WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric stability structure

  1. Atmospheric stability and atmospheric circulation in Athens, Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synodinou, B.M.; Petrakis, M.; Kassomenos, P.; Lykoudis, S.

    1996-01-01

    In the evaluation and study of atmospheric pollution reference is always made to the stability criteria. These criteria, usually represented as functions of different meteorological data such as wind speed and direction, temperature, solar radiation, etc., play a very important role in the investigation of different parameters that affect the build up of pollution episodes mainly in urban areas. In this paper an attempt is made to evaluate the atmospheric stability criteria based on measurements obtained from two locations in and nearby Athens. The atmospheric stability is then examined along with the other meteorological parameters

  2. On atmospheric stability in the dynamic wake meandering model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; de Mare, Martin Tobias; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates a new approach for capturing the effects of atmospheric stability on wind turbine wake evolution and wake meandering by using the dynamic wake meandering model. The most notable impact of atmospheric stability on the wind is the changes in length and velocity scales...... spectra and applied to the dynamic wake meandering model to capture the correct wake meandering behaviour. The ambient turbulence in all stability classes is generated using the Mann turbulence model, where the effects of non-neutral atmospheric stability are approximated by the selection of input...... in the computational domain. The changes in the turbulent length scales due to the various atmospheric stability states impact the wake meandering characteristics and thus the power generation by the individual turbines. The proposed method is compared with results from both large-eddy simulation coupled...

  3. Higher stability in forest-atmosphere exchange observed in a structurally diverse forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrakar, R.; Rayment, M.; Moyano, F.; Herbst, M.; Mund, M.; Knohl, A.

    2016-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that structurally diverse forests have greater stability on exchange processes with the atmosphere compared to forests with less diverse structure. In a case study, we assessed how net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and normalized maximum assimilation (Amax) varied over time in two forests in Germany based on 11 years of continuous eddy flux measurements. The two sites differ in structure as well as in species composition: one (Hainich) is an unmanaged, uneven-aged and heterogeneous mixed beech forest (65% beech), the other (Leinefelde) is a managed, even-aged and homogeneous pure beech stand. The two selected forests are of similar mean ages (about 130 years old) and exposed to similar air temperatures and vapour pressure deficits. Even though Hainich (the unmanaged forest) received higher rainfall (720 ± 134 mm vs 599±166 mm), the soil water availability showed no significant difference between both sites. Based on detailed biomass inventory, trees in Hainich are well distributed in all diameter at breast height (dbh) classes (10 to 90cm dbh) whereas in Leinefelde (the managed forest) trees are mostly confined to dbh classes of 40 to 55 cm. Our results showed a strong difference in inter-annual variability of NEE, which was lower in the unmanaged than in the managed site (coefficient of variation (CV) of 0.13 and 0.27, respectively). The lowest NEE was observed in both sites in 2004, a mast year and a year after the strong summer drought of 2003. The variation in the inter-annual normalized maximum assimilation (Amax) was lower in Hainich (standard deviation of 2.5 compared to 3.9 µmol m-2 s-1). Also, the seasonal course of Amax differed between the two forests which could explain why the mixed forest was more affected by the late summer drought of 2003, despite showing a more conservative carbon budget than the pure stand in the long term. The interannual anomaly in Amax was correlated with fruit production, the latter being larger in

  4. Determination of equivalent mixing height and atmospheric stability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, J.; Bulko, M.; Holy, K.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric stability is an indicator that reflects the intensity of boundary layer mixing processes. This feature of the atmosphere is especially important since it defines dispersive atmospheric conditions and provides information on how effectively the anthropogenic pollution will be transferred to the higher levels of the atmosphere. The assessment of atmospheric dispersiveness plays a crucial role in the protection of air quality and public health in big cities. The presented paper deals with determination of atmospheric stability via so called Equivalent Mixing Height (EMH) quantity using a radioactive noble gas 222 Rn. A method of deriving a link between 222 Rn activity concentration, eddy diffusion coefficient and EMH using fluid mechanics is also outlined in this work. (authors)

  5. The annual averaged atmospheric dispersion factor and deposition factor according to methods of atmospheric stability classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hae Sun; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Kim, Eun Han; Han, Moon Hee; Hwang, Won Tae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study analyzes the differences in the annual averaged atmospheric dispersion factor and ground deposition factor produced using two classification methods of atmospheric stability, which are based on a vertical temperature difference and the standard deviation of horizontal wind direction fluctuation. Daedeok and Wolsong nuclear sites were chosen for an assessment, and the meteorological data at 10 m were applied to the evaluation of atmospheric stability. The XOQDOQ software program was used to calculate atmospheric dispersion factors and ground deposition factors. The calculated distances were chosen at 400 m, 800 m, 1,200 m, 1,600 m, 2,400 m, and 3,200 m away from the radioactive material release points. All of the atmospheric dispersion factors generated using the atmospheric stability based on the vertical temperature difference were shown to be higher than those from the standard deviation of horizontal wind direction fluctuation. On the other hand, the ground deposition factors were shown to be same regardless of the classification method, as they were based on the graph obtained from empirical data presented in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.111, which is unrelated to the atmospheric stability for the ground level release. These results are based on the meteorological data collected over the course of one year at the specified sites; however, the classification method of atmospheric stability using the vertical temperature difference is expected to be more conservative.

  6. Plume spread and atmospheric stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R O [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The horizontal spread of a plume in atmospheric dispersion can be described by the standard deviation of horizontal direction. The widely used Pasquill-Gifford classes of atmospheric stability have assigned typical values of the standard deviation of horizontal wind direction and of the lapse rate. A measured lapse rate can thus be used to estimate the standard deviation of wind direction. It is examined by means of a large dataset of fast wind measurements how good these estimates are. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  7. Influence of atmospheric stability on wind-turbine wakes: A large-eddy simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation is combined with a turbine model to investigate the influence of atmospheric stability on wind-turbine wakes. In the simulations, subgrid-scale turbulent fluxes are parameterized using tuning-free Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic models. These models optimize the local value of the model coefficients based on the dynamics of the resolved scales. The turbine-induced forces are parameterized with an actuator-disk model with rotation. In this technique, blade-element theory is used to calculate the lift and drag forces acting on the blades. Emphasis is placed on the structure and characteristics of wind-turbine wakes in the cases where the incident flows to the turbine have the same mean velocity at the hub height but different stability conditions. The simulation results show that atmospheric stability has a significant effect on the spatial distribution of the mean velocity deficit and turbulent fluxes in the wake region. In particular, the magnitude of the velocity deficit increases with increasing stability in the atmosphere. In addition, the locations of the maximum turbulence intensity and turbulent stresses are closer to the turbine in convective boundary layer compared with neutral and stable ones. Detailed analysis of the resolved turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget inside the wake reveals also that the thermal stratification of the incoming wind considerably affects the magnitude and spatial distribution of the turbulent production, transport term and dissipation rate (transfer of energy to the subgrid scales). It is also shown that the near-wake region can be extended to a farther distance downstream in stable condition compared with neutral and unstable counterparts. In order to isolate the effect of atmospheric stability, additional simulations of neutrally-stratified atmospheric boundary layers are performed with the same turbulence intensity at hub height as convective and stable ones. The results show that the

  8. Atmospheric stability analysis and its relationship with the atmospheric pollution in Salamanca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidalgo, M.R.; Garmendia, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we have studied the relationship between the sulphur dioxide and suspended particulate matter concentrations and the atmospheric stability in Salamanca over 4 year (1978-1982). Of the various indices cited in the bibliography for estimating stratification stability, two were used. First, the Pasquill categories and later a method based on Montgomery's potential, which was the one that gave the best results. (Author)

  9. A discussion for stabilization time of carbon steel in atmospheric corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zong-kai; Ma, Xiao-bing; Cai, Yi-kun

    2017-09-01

    Stabilization time is an important parameter in long-term prediction of carbon steel corrosion in atmosphere. The range of the stabilization time of carbon steel in atmospheric corrosion has been published in many scientific literatures. However, the results may not precise because engineering experiences is dominant. This paper deals with the recalculation of stabilization time based on ISO CORRAG program, and analyzes the results and makes a comparison to the data mentioned above. In addition, a new thinking to obtain stabilization time will be proposed.

  10. The relationship between perceived family atmosphere and emotional stability of adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    KRÁČMAROVÁ, Martina

    2015-01-01

    The bachelor thesis called "The relationship between perceived family atmosphere and emotional stability of adolescents" deals with adolescence especially in relation to the perceived family and emotional stability of adolescent. The main goal of my work is to describe how the perceived family atmosphere and events in the family influences the emotion of Adolescents. Firstly I was clarifying the specifics of adolescent period, the importance of relationships, family atmosphere and emotional a...

  11. 222Rn concentration in the outdoor atmosphere and its relation to the atmospheric stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holy, K.; Boehm, R.; Bosa, I.; Polaskova, A.; Hola, O.

    1998-01-01

    The radon in the outdoor atmosphere has been monitored continuously since 1991. On the basis of the measured data mainly the average daily and the average annual courses of the 222 Rn concentrations have been studied. The annual courses of 222 Rn concentration are similar for all years. They present the annual variations. The average course of the 222 Rn concentration calculated on the basis of all continual measurements in the years 1991-1997 reaches the maximum value in October and the minimum value in April. The average daily courses of the 222 Rn concentration for the individual months of the year. The average daily courses have a form of waves with a maximum in the morning hours and with a minimum in the afternoon. The maximal amplitudes of daily waves have been reached in the summer months, from June till August. The amplitudes of daily waves are very small at the end of an autumn and during the winter months. The analysis of the daily waves and annual courses of 222 Rn showed that the amplitudes of the daily waves are in proportion to the global solar radiation irradiating the Earth's surface. The day duration influence on the phase of the daily wave and the wind velocity influence mainly on the level of the radon concentration. For the study of the relation of the radon concentration in the outdoor atmosphere to the stability the data of the atmosphere were obtained and they were correlated with the radon concentration. The results indicate that the 222 Rn concentrations int he outdoor atmosphere could be used for determination of the vertical atmospheric stability and these ones could reflect the atmospheric stability more completely than the different classifications based on the knowledge pertinent to the meteorological parameters. (authors)

  12. Investigation of the influence of atmospheric stability and turbulence on land-atmosphere exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osibanjo, O.; Holmes, H.

    2015-12-01

    Surface energy fluxes are exchanged between the surface of the earth and the atmosphere and impact weather, climate, and air quality. The radiation from the sun triggers the surface-atmosphere interaction during the day as heat is transmitted to the surface and the surface heats the air directly above generating wind (i.e., thermal turbulence) that transports heat, moisture, and momentum in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This process is impacted by greenhouse gasses (i.e., water vapor, carbon dioxide and other trace gases) that absorb heat emitted by the earth's surface. The concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gasses are increasing leading to changes in ABL dynamics as a result of the changing surface energy balance. The ABL processes are important to characterize because they are difficult to parameterize in global and regional scale atmospheric models. Empirical data can be collected using eddy covariance micrometeorological methods to measure turbulent fluxes (e.g., sensible heat, moisture, and CO2) and quantify the exchange between the surface and the atmosphere. The objective of this work is to calculate surface fluxes using observational data collected during one week in September 2014 from a monitoring site in Echo, Oregon. The site is located in the Columbia Basin with rolling terrain, irrigated farmland, and over 100 wind turbines. The 10m tower was placed in a small valley depression to isolate nighttime cold air pools. This work will present observations of momentum, sensible heat, moisture, and carbon dioxide fluxes from data collected at a sampling frequency of 10Hz at four heights. Atmospheric stability is determined using Monin-Obukov length and flux Richardson number, and the impact of stability on surface-atmosphere exchange is investigated. This work will provide a better understanding of surface fluxes and mixing, particularly during stable ABL periods, and the results can be used to compare with numerical models.

  13. Atmospheric stability index using radio occultation refractivity profiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new stability index based on atmospheric refractivity at ∼500 hPa level and surface measurements of temperature ... able at different heights rather than pressure levels. However ..... the radio occultation technique being a limb sound-.

  14. Atmospheric stability modelling for nuclear emergency response systems using fuzzy set theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walle, B. van de; Ruan, D.; Govaerts, P.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach to Pasquill stability classification is developed using fuzzy set theory, taking into account the natural continuity of the atmospheric stability and providing means to analyse the obtained stability classes. (2 figs.)

  15. Wind turbine power and sound in relation to atmospheric stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, G. P.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric stability cannot, with respect to modem, toll wind turbines, be viewed as a 'small perturbation to a basic neutral state' This can be demonstrated by comparison of measured wind velocity at the height of the rotor with the wind velocity expected in a neutral or 'standard' atmosphere.

  16. Atmospheric stability and topography effects on wind turbine performance and wake properties in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Xingxing; Liu, Deyou; Xu, Chang

    2018-01-01

    This paper evaluates the influence of atmospheric stability and topography on wind turbine performance and wake properties in complex terrain. To assess atmospheric stability effects on wind turbine performance, an equivalent wind speed calculated with the power output and the manufacture power...... and topography have significant influences on wind turbine performance and wake properties. Considering effects of atmospheric stability and topography will benefit the wind resource assessment in complex terrain....

  17. On the impact of atmospheric thermal stability on the characteristics of nocturnal downslope flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Z. J.; Garratt, J. R.; Segal, M.; Pielke, R. A.

    1990-04-01

    The impacts of background (or ambient) and local atmospheric thermal stabilities, and slope steepness, on nighttime thermally induced downslope flow in meso-β domains (i.e., 20 200 km horizontal extent) have been investigated using analytical and numerical model approaches. Good agreement between the analytical and numerical evaluations was found. It was concluded that: (i) as anticipated, the intensity of the downslope flow increases with increased slope steepness, although the depth of the downslope flow was found to be insensitive to slope steepness in the studied situations; (ii) the intensity of the downslope flow is generally independent of background atmospheric thermal stability; (iii) for given integrated nighttime cooling across the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), Q s the local atmospheric thermal stability exerts a strong influence on downslope flow behavior: the downslope flow intensity increases when local atmospheric thermal stability increases; and (iv) the downslope flow intensity is proportional to Q s 1/2.

  18. Energy implications of future stabilization of atmospheric CO2 content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffert, M.I.; Jain, A.K.

    1998-01-01

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change calls for ''stabilization of greenhouse-gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system...''. A standard baseline scenario that assumes no policy intervention to limit greenhouse-gas emissions has 10 TW (10 x 10 12 watts) of carbon-emission-free power being produced by the year 2050, equivalent to the power provided by all today's energy sources combined. Here we employ a carbon-cycle/energy model to estimate the carbon-emission-free power needed for various atmospheric CO 2 stabilization scenarios. We find that CO 2 stabilization with continued economic growth will require innovative, cost-effective and carbon-emission-free technologies that can provide additional tens of terawatts of primary power in the coming decades, and certainly by the middle of the twenty-first century, even with sustained improvement in the economic productivity of primary energy. (author)

  19. Wake meandering under non-neutral atmospheric stability conditions – theory and facts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Machefaux, Ewan; Chougule, Abhijit S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with modelling of wake dynamics under influence of atmospheric stability conditions different from neutral. In particular, it is investigated how the basic split in turbulent scales, on which the Dynamic Wake Meandering model is based, can be utilized to include atmospheric...... stability effects in this model. This is done partly by analyzing a large number of turbulence spectra obtained from sonic measurements, partly by analyzing dedicated full-scale LiDAR measurements from which wake dynamics can be directly resolved. The theory behind generalizing the Dynamic Wake Meandering...

  20. Calculating the wind energy input to a system using a spatially explicit method that considers atmospheric stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmospheric stability has a major effect in determining the wind energy doing work in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL); however, it is seldom considered in determining this value in emergy analyses. One reason that atmospheric stability is not usually considered is that a sui...

  1. Atmospheric stability-dependent infinite wind-farm models and the wake-decay coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo; Rathmann, Ole

    2014-01-01

    We extend the infinite wind-farm boundary-layer (IWFBL) model of Frandsen to take into account atmospheric static stability effects. This extended model is compared with the IWFBL model of Emeis and to the Park wake model used inWind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP), which is computed......) larger than the adjusted values for a wide range of neutral to stable atmospheric stability conditions, a number of roughness lengths and turbine separations lower than _ 10 rotor diameters and (ii) too large compared with those obtained by a semiempirical formulation (relating the ratio of the friction...

  2. Analysis of smoke trailers at individual classes of atmosphere stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carach, V.; Macala, J.

    2007-01-01

    At the present most endangered element of the environment is currently atmosphere and its pollution that rapidly accrue. Pollutants are emitted from air pollution sources. The output of pollutant from air pollution source is creating so-called smoke screen. Smoke screens can be observed from point sources of air pollution - smokestacks, up-cast. The purpose of this article was to build theoretical models of smoke screens rise from point source at different meteorological conditions characterized with fifth classes of atmosphere stability. (authors)

  3. Atmospheric stability inside containments with a heated layer of liquid on the floor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vate, J.F. van de [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands)

    1977-01-01

    The study of atmospheric stability inside containments with a heated layer of liquid comprised derivation of the boundary condition for stable atmospheric stratifications and the experimental validation of the boundary condition for stable atmospheric stratification. This report includes description of the model for stirred aerosol deposition and the calculation results for maximum aerodynamic diameter of a confined aerosol remaining just well-stirred.

  4. The atmospheric temperature structure of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Pollack, J. B.; Courtin, Regis; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of various factors to the thermal structure of Titan's past and present atmosphere are discussed. A one dimensional model of Titan's thermal structure is summarized. The greenhouse effect of Titan's atmosphere, caused primarily by pressure induced opacity of N2, CH4, and H2, is discussed together with the antigreenhouse effect dominated by the haze which absorbs incident sunlight. The implications for the atmosphere of the presence of an ocean on Titan are also discussed.

  5. Implications of Stably Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence on the Near-Wake Structure of Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Bhaganagar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence structure in the wake behind a full-scale horizontal-axis wind turbine under the influence of real-time atmospheric inflow conditions has been investigated using actuator-line-model based large-eddy-simulations. Precursor atmospheric boundary layer (ABL simulations have been performed to obtain mean and turbulence states of the atmosphere under stable stratification subjected to two different cooling rates. Wind turbine simulations have revealed that, in addition to wind shear and ABL turbulence, height-varying wind angle and low-level jets are ABL metrics that influence the structure of the turbine wake. Increasing stability results in shallower boundary layers with stronger wind shear, steeper vertical wind angle gradients, lower turbulence, and suppressed vertical motions. A turbulent mixing layer forms downstream of the wind turbines, the strength and size of which decreases with increasing stability. Height dependent wind angle and turbulence are the ABL metrics influencing the lateral wake expansion. Further, ABL metrics strongly impact the evolution of tip and root vortices formed behind the rotor. Two factors play an important role in wake meandering: tip vortex merging due to the mutual inductance form of instability and the corresponding instability of the turbulent mixing layer.

  6. The sound of high winds. The effect of atmospheric stability on wind turbine sound and microphone noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Berg, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis issues are raised concerning wind turbine noise and its relationship to altitude dependent wind velocity. The following issues are investigated: what is the influence of atmospheric stability on the speed and sound power of a wind turbine?; what is the influence of atmospheric stability on the character of wind turbine sound?; how widespread is the impact of atmospheric stability on wind turbine performance: is it relevant for new wind turbine projects; how can noise prediction take this stability into account?; what can be done to deal with the resultant higher impact of wind turbine sound? Apart from these directly wind turbine related issues, a final aim was to address a measurement problem: how does wind on a microphone affect the measurement of the ambient sound level?

  7. Research of chemical structure of atmospheric precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenyak, D.

    2001-01-01

    The structure of atmospheric precipitation changes in its passing through the air medium. Thus, the atmospheric precipitation is one of the ecological factors, acting regularly. The research of chemical structure of atmospheric precipitation is closely connected with the problems of turnover of elements, with sanitary - ecological conditions of regions, with the matters of agricultural equipment and of salt balance of the soils. In paper the author for the first time represents the data on chemical structure of precipitation in the town. The data of chemical analysis of 18 samples are given. Obtained results permitted, to a certain extent, to determine the mechanisms of formation of atmospheric precipitation in the region investigated and its genesis. (authors)

  8. On the permanent hip-stabilizing effect of atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prietzel, Torsten; Hammer, Niels; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Kaßebaum, Eric; Farag, Mohamed; von Salis-Soglio, Georg

    2014-08-22

    Hip joint dislocations related to total hip arthroplasty (THA) are a common complication especially in the early postoperative course. The surgical approach, the alignment of the prosthetic components, the range of motion and the muscle tone are known factors influencing the risk of dislocation. A further factor that is discussed until today is atmospheric pressure which is not taken into account in the present THA concepts. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of atmospheric pressure on hip joint stability. Five joint models (Ø 28-44 mm), consisting of THA components were hermetically sealed with a rubber capsule, filled with a defined amount of fluid and exposed to varying ambient pressure. Displacement and pressure sensors were used to record the extent of dislocation related to intraarticular and ambient pressure. In 200 experiments spontaneous dislocations of the different sized joint models were reliably observed once the ambient pressure was lower than 6.0 kPa. Increasing the ambient pressure above 6.0 kPa immediately and persistently reduced the joint models until the ambient pressure was lowered again. Displacement always exceeded half the diameter of the joint model and was independent of gravity effects. This experimental study gives strong evidence that the hip joint is permanently stabilized by atmospheric pressure, confirming the theories of Weber and Weber (1836). On basis of these findings the use of larger prosthetic heads, capsular repair and the deployment of an intracapsular Redon drain are proposed to substantially decrease the risk of dislocation after THA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tensegrity structures form, stability, and symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jing Yao

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate a deeper understanding of tensegrity structures, this book focuses on their two key design problems: self-equilibrium analysis and stability investigation. In particular, high symmetry properties of the structures are extensively utilized. Conditions for self-equilibrium as well as super-stability of tensegrity structures are presented in detail. An analytical method and an efficient numerical method are given for self-equilibrium analysis of tensegrity structures: the analytical method deals with symmetric structures and the numerical method guarantees super-stability. Utilizing group representation theory, the text further provides analytical super-stability conditions for the structures that are of dihedral as well as tetrahedral symmetry. This book not only serves as a reference for engineers and scientists but is also a useful source for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students. Keeping this objective in mind, the presentation of the book is self-contained and detailed, with an abund...

  10. The effect of surface treatment and gaseous rust protection paper on the atmospheric corrosion stability of aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Guizhong

    1992-03-01

    The experimental results of atmospheric corrosion of 166 aluminium alloy of Al-Mg-Si-Cu system and 167 aluminium alloy of Al-Mg-Si-Cu-Fe-Ni system for different surface treatment and different wrapping papers used are introduced. The results show: 1. The composition of aluminium alloy has some effect on the performance of atmospheric corrosion stability and the local corrosion depth for 167 aluminium alloy specimen is considerable. 2. After 8 years storage, the 167 aluminium alloy tubular specimen, which was treated with surface treatment in deionized water at 100 ∼ 230 C degree, has no spot of atmospheric corrosion found. 3. Within the test period, the performance of atmospheric corrosion stability by sulphuric-acid anodization film is remarkable. 4. The No. 19 gaseous rust protection paper has no effect of atmospheric corrosion stability on the 166 and 167 aluminium alloys which were treated with quenching and natural ageing method

  11. An experimental and numerical study of the atmospheric stability impact on wind turbine wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machefaux, Ewan; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Koblitz, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    campus test site. Wake measurements are averaged within a mean wind speed bin of 1 m s1 and classified according to atmospheric stability using three different metrics: the Obukhov length, the Bulk–Richardson number and the Froude number. Three test cases are subsequently defined covering various...... atmospheric conditions. Simulations are carried out using large eddy simulation and actuator disk rotor modeling. The turbulence properties of the incoming wind are adapted to the thermal stratification using a newly developed spectral tensor model that includes buoyancy effects. Discrepancies are discussed......In this paper, the impact of atmospheric stability on a wind turbine wake is studied experimentally and numerically. The experimental approach is based on full-scale (nacelle based) pulsed lidar measurements of the wake flow field of a stall-regulated 500 kW turbine at the DTU Wind Energy, Risø...

  12. Estimation of seasonal atmospheric stability and mixing height by using different schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essa, K.S.M.; Embaby, M.; Mubarak, F.; Kamel, I.

    2007-01-01

    Different atmospheric stability schemes were used to characterize the plume growth (dispersion coefficients σ) in the lateral and vertical directions to determine the concentration distribution of pollutants through the PBL. The PBL is the region in which surface friction has a large effect on the mixing of pollutants. It is also suffer large fluctuation in temperature and wind and its depth (mixing depth) changes over a diurnal cycle. In this study, four months of surface meteorological parameters were used (to represent different seasons) to determine seasonal stability, classification. Five different stability schemes were estimated based on temperature gradient, standard deviation of the horizontal wind direction fluctuation, gradient and Bulk Richardson numbers and Monin-Obukhov length. Friction velocity, (u * ) for each stability scheme was estimated for characterizing the hourly, mixing height for each stability class. Also, plume rise was estimated for each stability class depending on the availability of meteorological parameters

  13. Stability of bulk metallic glass structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, H.; Williams, D.B.

    2003-06-18

    The fundamental origins of the stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a prototype for a whole class of BMG formers, were explored. While much of the properties of their BMGs have been characterized, their glass-stability have not been explained in terms of the atomic and electronic structure. The local structure around all three constituent atoms was obtained, in a complementary way, using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), to probe the nearest neighbor environment of the metals, and extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS), to investigate the environment around P. The occupied electronic structure was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs receive their stability from cumulative, and interrelated, effects of both atomic and electronic origin. The stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs can be explained in terms of the stability of Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20}, glasses at the end of BMG formation. The atomic structure in these alloys is very similar to those of the binary phosphide crystals near x=0 and x=80, which are trigonal prisms of Pd or Ni atoms surrounding P atoms. Such structures are known to exist in dense, randomly-packed systems. The structure of the best glass former in this series, Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} is further described by a weighted average of those of Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20}. Bonding states present only in the ternary alloys were found and point to a further stabilization of the system through a negative heat of mixing between Pd and Ni atoms. The Nagel and Tauc criterion, correlating a decrease in the density of states at the Fermi level with an increase in the glass stability, was consistent with greater stability of the Pd{sub x}Ni{sub (80-x)}P{sub 20} glasses with respect to the binary alloys of P. A valence electron concentration of 1.8 e/a, which

  14. Observations and Modeling of Atmospheric Radiance Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wintersteiner, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The overall purpose of the work that we have undertaken is to provide new capabilities for observing and modeling structured radiance in the atmosphere, particularly the non-LTE regions of the atmosphere...

  15. Structural stability analysis considerations in fusion reactor plasma chamber design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, M.J.; Cramer, B.A.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing a toroidal plasma chamber for the prevention of both static and dynamic buckling. Results of stability analyses performed for the doublet shaped plasma chamber of the General Atomic 3.8 meter radius TNS ignition test reactor are presented. Load conditions are the static external atmospheric pressure load and the dynamic plasma disruption pulse load. Methods for analysis of plasma chamber structures are presented for both types of load. Analysis for static buckling is based on idealizing the plasma chamber into standard structural shapes and applying classical cylinder and circular torus buckling equations. Results are verified using the Buckling of Shells of Revolution (BOSOR4) finite difference computer code. Analysis for the dynamic loading is based on a pulse buckling analysis method for circular cylinders

  16. Atmospheric stability effects on potential radiological releases at a nuclear research facility in Romania: Characterising the atmospheric mixing state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, Scott D.; Galeriu, Dan; Williams, Alastair G.; Melintescu, Anca; Griffiths, Alan D.; Crawford, Jagoda; Dyer, Leisa; Duma, Marin; Zorila, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    A radon-based nocturnal stability classification scheme is developed for a flat inland site near Bucharest, Romania, characterised by significant local surface roughness heterogeneity, and compared with traditional meteorologically-based techniques. Eight months of hourly meteorological and atmospheric radon observations from a 60 m tower at the IFIN-HH nuclear research facility are analysed. Heterogeneous surface roughness conditions in the 1 km radius exclusion zone around the site hinder accurate characterisation of nocturnal atmospheric mixing conditions using conventional meteorological techniques, so a radon-based scheme is trialled. When the nocturnal boundary layer is very stable, the Pasquill–Gifford “radiation” scheme overestimates the atmosphere's capacity to dilute pollutants with near-surface sources (such as tritiated water vapour) by 20% compared to the radon-based scheme. Under these conditions, near-surface wind speeds drop well below 1 m s"−"1 and nocturnal mixing depths vary from ∼25 m to less than 10 m above ground level (a.g.l.). Combining nocturnal radon with daytime ceilometer data, we were able to reconstruct the full diurnal cycle of mixing depths. Average daytime mixing depths at this flat inland site range from 1200 to 1800 m a.g.l. in summer, and 500–900 m a.g.l. in winter. Using tower observations to constrain the nocturnal radon-derived effective mixing depth, we were able to estimate the seasonal range in the Bucharest regional radon flux as: 12 mBq m"−"2 s"−"1 in winter to 14 mBq m"−"2 s"−"1 in summer. - Highlights: • Site climatology accurately characterised by season and atmospheric stability class. • Comparison of "2"2"2Rn-based, Pasquill–Gifford and Richardson number stability indices. • Seasonal mixing depth estimates over the whole diurnal cycle by ceilometer and radon. • Seasonal variability in the regional radon source function well constrained.

  17. Stability Analysis and Stabilization of Miduk Heap Leaching Structure, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Amini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available To construct copper heap leaching structures, a stepped heap of ore is placed over an isolated sloping surface and then washed with sulphuric acid. The isolated bed of such a heap consists of some natural and geosynthetic layers. Shear strength parameters between these layers are low, so they form the possible sliding surfaces of the heaps. Economic and environmental considerations call for studying such slides. In this study, firstly, results of the laboratory tests carried on the materials of the heap leaching structures bed are presented. Then, the instability mechanisms of such structures are investigated and proper approaches are summarized for their stabilization. Finally, stability of the Miduk copper heap is evaluated as a case history, and appropriate approaches and their effects are discussed for its stabilization.

  18. Thermal stability of pulsed laser deposited iridium oxide thin films at low oxygen atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yansheng; Wang, Chuanbin; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Lianmeng

    2013-11-01

    Iridium oxide (IrO2) thin films have been regarded as a leading candidate for bottom electrode and diffusion barrier of ferroelectric capacitors, some process related issues need to be considered before integrating ferroelectric capacitors into memory cells. This paper presents the thermal stability of pulsed laser deposited IrO2 thin films at low oxygen atmosphere. Emphasis was given on the effect of post-deposition annealing temperature at different oxygen pressure (PO2) on the crystal structure, surface morphology, electrical resistivity, carrier concentration and mobility of IrO2 thin films. The results showed that the thermal stability of IrO2 thin films was strongly dependent on the oxygen pressure and annealing temperature. IrO2 thin films can stably exist below 923 K at PO2 = 1 Pa, which had a higher stability than the previous reported results. The surface morphology of IrO2 thin films depended on PO2 and annealing temperature, showing a flat and uniform surface for the annealed films. Electrical properties were found to be sensitive to both the annealing temperature and oxygen pressure. The room-temperature resistivity of IrO2 thin films with a value of 49-58 μΩ cm increased with annealing temperature at PO2 = 1 Pa. The thermal stability of IrO2 thin films as a function of oxygen pressure and annealing temperature was almost consistent with thermodynamic calculation.

  19. Sensitivity of system stability to model structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosack, G.R.; Li, H.W.; Rossignol, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    A community is stable, and resilient, if the levels of all community variables can return to the original steady state following a perturbation. The stability properties of a community depend on its structure, which is the network of direct effects (interactions) among the variables within the community. These direct effects form feedback cycles (loops) that determine community stability. Although feedback cycles have an intuitive interpretation, identifying how they form the feedback properties of a particular community can be intractable. Furthermore, determining the role that any specific direct effect plays in the stability of a system is even more daunting. Such information, however, would identify important direct effects for targeted experimental and management manipulation even in complex communities for which quantitative information is lacking. We therefore provide a method that determines the sensitivity of community stability to model structure, and identifies the relative role of particular direct effects, indirect effects, and feedback cycles in determining stability. Structural sensitivities summarize the degree to which each direct effect contributes to stabilizing feedback or destabilizing feedback or both. Structural sensitivities prove useful in identifying ecologically important feedback cycles within the community structure and for detecting direct effects that have strong, or weak, influences on community stability. The approach may guide the development of management intervention and research design. We demonstrate its value with two theoretical models and two empirical examples of different levels of complexity. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural stability of nonlinear population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, Simone; Saavedra, Serguei

    2018-01-01

    In population dynamics, the concept of structural stability has been used to quantify the tolerance of a system to environmental perturbations. Yet, measuring the structural stability of nonlinear dynamical systems remains a challenging task. Focusing on the classic Lotka-Volterra dynamics, because of the linearity of the functional response, it has been possible to measure the conditions compatible with a structurally stable system. However, the functional response of biological communities is not always well approximated by deterministic linear functions. Thus, it is unclear the extent to which this linear approach can be generalized to other population dynamics models. Here, we show that the same approach used to investigate the classic Lotka-Volterra dynamics, which is called the structural approach, can be applied to a much larger class of nonlinear models. This class covers a large number of nonlinear functional responses that have been intensively investigated both theoretically and experimentally. We also investigate the applicability of the structural approach to stochastic dynamical systems and we provide a measure of structural stability for finite populations. Overall, we show that the structural approach can provide reliable and tractable information about the qualitative behavior of many nonlinear dynamical systems.

  1. Structural stability of nonlinear population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, Simone; Saavedra, Serguei

    2018-01-01

    In population dynamics, the concept of structural stability has been used to quantify the tolerance of a system to environmental perturbations. Yet, measuring the structural stability of nonlinear dynamical systems remains a challenging task. Focusing on the classic Lotka-Volterra dynamics, because of the linearity of the functional response, it has been possible to measure the conditions compatible with a structurally stable system. However, the functional response of biological communities is not always well approximated by deterministic linear functions. Thus, it is unclear the extent to which this linear approach can be generalized to other population dynamics models. Here, we show that the same approach used to investigate the classic Lotka-Volterra dynamics, which is called the structural approach, can be applied to a much larger class of nonlinear models. This class covers a large number of nonlinear functional responses that have been intensively investigated both theoretically and experimentally. We also investigate the applicability of the structural approach to stochastic dynamical systems and we provide a measure of structural stability for finite populations. Overall, we show that the structural approach can provide reliable and tractable information about the qualitative behavior of many nonlinear dynamical systems.

  2. STABILITY OF CO2 ATMOSPHERES ON DESICCATED M DWARF EXOPLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Peter; Hu, Renyu; Li, Cheng; Yung, Yuk L.; Robinson, Tyler D.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the chemical stability of CO 2 -dominated atmospheres of desiccated M dwarf terrestrial exoplanets using a one-dimensional photochemical model. Around Sun-like stars, CO 2 photolysis by Far-UV (FUV) radiation is balanced by recombination reactions that depend on water abundance. Planets orbiting M dwarf stars experience more FUV radiation, and could be depleted in water due to M dwarfs’ prolonged, high-luminosity pre-main sequences. We show that, for water-depleted M dwarf terrestrial planets, a catalytic cycle relying on H 2 O 2 photolysis can maintain a CO 2 atmosphere. However, this cycle breaks down for atmospheric hydrogen mixing ratios <1 ppm, resulting in ∼40% of the atmospheric CO 2 being converted to CO and O 2 on a timescale of 1 Myr. The increased O 2 abundance leads to high O 3 concentrations, the photolysis of which forms another CO 2 -regenerating catalytic cycle. For atmospheres with <0.1 ppm hydrogen, CO 2 is produced directly from the recombination of CO and O. These catalytic cycles place an upper limit of ∼50% on the amount of CO 2 that can be destroyed via photolysis, which is enough to generate Earth-like abundances of (abiotic) O 2 and O 3 . The conditions that lead to such high oxygen levels could be widespread on planets in the habitable zones of M dwarfs. Discrimination between biological and abiotic O 2 and O 3 in this case can perhaps be accomplished by noting the lack of water features in the reflectance and emission spectra of these planets, which necessitates observations at wavelengths longer than 0.95 μm

  3. The thermal structure of Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Pollack, James B.; Courtin, Regis

    1989-01-01

    The present radiative-convective model of the Titan atmosphere thermal structure obtains the solar and IR radiation in a series of spectral intervals with vertical resolution. Haze properties have been determined with a microphysics model encompassing a minimum of free parameters. It is determined that gas and haze opacity alone, using temperatures established by Voyager observations, yields a model that is within a few percent of the radiative convective balance throughout the Titan atmosphere. Model calculations of the surface temperature are generally colder than the observed value by 5-10 K; better agreement is obtained through adjustment of the model parameters. Sunlight absorption by stratospheric haze and pressure-induced gas opacity in the IR are the most important thermal structure-controlling factors.

  4. Stability patterns for a size-structured population model and its stage-structured counterpart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lai; Pedersen, Michael; Lin, Zhigui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we compare a general size-structured population model, where a size-structured consumer feeds upon an unstructured resource, to its simplified stage-structured counterpart in terms of equilibrium stability. Stability of the size-structured model is understood in terms of an equivale...... to the population level....

  5. Atmospheric stability analysis over statically and dynamically rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Emina; Metzger, Meredith; Singha, Arindam; Sadr, Reza

    2011-11-01

    The ratio of buoyancy flux to turbulent kinetic energy production in the atmospheric surface layer is investigated experimentally for air flow over two types of surfaces characterized by static and dynamic roughness. In this study, ``static'' refers to the time-invariant nature of naturally-occurring roughness over a mud/salt playa; while, ``dynamic'' refers to the behavior of water waves along an air-water interface. In both cases, time-resolved measurements of the momentum and heat fluxes were acquired from synchronized 3D sonic anemometers mounted on a vertical tower. Field campaigns were conducted at two sites, representing the ``statically'' and ``dynamically'' rough surfaces, respectively: (1) the SLTEST facility in Utah's western desert, and (2) the new Doha airport in Qatar under construction along the coast of the Persian Gulf. Note, at site 2, anemometers were located directly above the water by extension from a tower secured to the end of a 1 km-long pier. Comparisons of the Monin-Obukhov length, flux Richardson number, and gradient Richardson number are presented, and discussed in the context of the observed evolution of the turbulent spectra in response to diurnal variations of atmospheric stability. Supported by the Qatar National Research Fund.

  6. The Mars Pathfinder atmospheric structure investigation/meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schofield, J.T.; Barnes, J.R.; Crisp, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder atmospheric structure investigation/meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment measured the vertical density, pressure, and temperature structure of the martian atmosphere from the surface to 160 km, and monitored surface meteorology and climate for 83 sols (1 sol = 1 martian day = 24...

  7. Stability of Bulk Metallic Glass Structure. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, H.; Williams, D. B.

    2003-06-01

    The fundamental origins of the stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a prototype for a whole class of BMG formers, were explored. While much of the properties of their BMGs have been characterized, their glass-stability have not been explained in terms of the atomic and electronic structure. The local structure around all three constituent atoms was obtained, in a complementary way, using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), to probe the nearest neighbor environment of the metals, and extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS), to investigate the environment around P. The occupied electronic structure was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs receive their stability from cumulative, and interrelated, effects of both atomic and electronic origin. The stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs can be explained in terms of the stability of Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20}, glasses at the end of BMG formation. The atomic structure in these alloys is very similar to those of the binary phosphide crystals near x=0 and x=80, which are trigonal prisms of Pd or Ni atoms surrounding P atoms. Such structures are known to exist in dense, randomly-packed systems. The structure of the best glass former in this series, Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} is further described by a weighted average of those of Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20}. Bonding states present only in the ternary alloys were found and point to a further stabilization of the system through a negative heat of mixing between Pd and Ni atoms. The Nagel and Tauc criterion, correlating a decrease in the density of states at the Fermi level with an increase in the glass stability, was consistent with greater stability of the Pd{sub x}Ni{sub 80-x}P{sub 20} glasses with respect to the binary alloys of P. A valence electron concentration of 1.8 e/a, which

  8. Studies on electronic structure of interfaces between Ag and gelatin for stabilization of Ag nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Tadaaki; Uchida, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Extremely high stability of Ag nanoparticles in photographic materials has forced us to study the electronic structures of the interfaces between thin layers of Ag, Au, and Pt and their surface membranes in ambient atmosphere by photoelectron yield spectroscopy in air and Kelvin probe method. Owing to the Fermi level equalization between a metal layer and a membrane coming from air, the electron transfer took place from the membrane to Pt and Au layers and from an Ag layer to the membrane, giving the reason for poor stability of Ag nanoparticles in air. The control of the Fermi level of an Ag layer with respect to that of a gelatin membrane in air could be widely made according to Nernst's equation by changing the pH and pAg values of an aqueous gelatin solution used to form the membrane, and thus available to stabilize Ag nanoparticles in a gelatin matrix. (author)

  9. Effect of high-oxygen atmosphere packaging on oxidative stability and sensory quality of two chicken muscles during chill storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongberg, Sisse; Wen, Jinzhu; Tørngren, Mari Ann

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative stability and sensory quality of chicken breast (m. pectoralis) and thigh (m. peroneus longus) stored in high-oxygen modified atmosphere (MAP-O), non-oxygen modified atmosphere (MAP-N), or vacuum for up to 9 days at 5°C were investigated. Protein thiol concentration in breasts and t...

  10. Comparative evaluation of thermal decomposition behavior and thermal stability of powdered ammonium nitrate under different atmosphere conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Man; Chen, Xianfeng; Wang, Yujie; Yuan, Bihe; Niu, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Liao, Ruoyu; Zhang, Zumin

    2017-09-05

    In order to analyze the thermal decomposition characteristics of ammonium nitrate (AN), its thermal behavior and stability under different conditions are studied, including different atmospheres, heating rates and gas flow rates. The evolved decomposition gases of AN in air and nitrogen are analyzed with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Thermal stability of AN at different heating rates and gas flow rates are studied by differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, paired comparison method and safety parameter evaluation. Experimental results show that the major evolved decomposition gases in air are H 2 O, NH 3 , N 2 O, NO, NO 2 and HNO 3 , while in nitrogen, H 2 O, NH 3 , NO and HNO 3 are major components. Compared with nitrogen atmosphere, lower initial and end temperatures, higher heat flux and broader reaction temperature range are obtained in air. Meanwhile, higher air gas flow rate tends to achieve lower reaction temperature and to reduce thermal stability of AN. Self-accelerating decomposition temperature of AN in air is much lower than that in nitrogen. It is considered that thermostability of AN is influenced by atmosphere, heating rate and gas flow rate, thus changes of boundary conditions will influence its thermostability, which is helpful to its safe production, storage, transportation and utilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Atmospheric stability-dependent infinite wind-farm models and the wake-decay coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Peña, Alfredo; Rathmann, Ole

    2014-01-01

    We extend the infinite wind-farm boundary-layer (IWFBL) model of Frandsen to take into account atmospheric static stability effects. This extended model is compared with the IWFBL model of Emeis and to the Park wake model used inWind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP), which is computed for an infinite wind farm. The models show similar behavior for the wind-speed reduction when accounting for a number of surface roughness lengths, turbine to turbine separations and wind speeds und...

  12. Volumetric scans of wind turbine wakes performed with three simultaneous wind LiDARs under different atmospheric stability regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Aerodynamic optimization of wind farm layout is a crucial task to reduce wake effects on downstream wind turbines, thus to maximize wind power harvesting. However, downstream evolution and recovery of wind turbine wakes are strongly affected by the characteristics of the incoming atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow, such as wind shear and turbulence intensity, which are in turn affected by the ABL thermal stability. In order to characterize the downstream evolution of wakes produced by full-scale wind turbines under different atmospheric conditions, wind velocity measurements were performed with three wind LiDARs. The volumetric scans are performed by continuously sweeping azimuthal and elevation angles of the LiDARs in order to cover a 3D volume that includes the wind turbine wake. The minimum wake velocity deficit is then evaluated as a function of the downstream location for different atmospheric conditions. It is observed that the ABL thermal stability has a significant effect on the wake evolution, and the wake recovers faster under convective conditions

  13. Influence of stability classification on atmospheric diffusion calculations for elevated releases over a terrain of major roughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Erbang

    1988-01-01

    A series (22) of atmospheric tracer experiments with 100m release height have been performed at the kernforschungszentrum karlsruhe (KfK) of West Germany over a terrain of major roughness (Z 0 = 1.5 m). The concentration data of the tracers are statistically analysed in which 5 methods of stability classification are used. The results show that the normalized diffusion factors predicted by Gaussian plume dispersion model is in good agreement with the observed ones for elevated releases over a terrain of major roughness. Differnent sets of dispersion parameters could be obtained for the same series of atmospheric tracer experiments if different methods of classification are applied. The same method of stability classification should be used for the application of these dispersion parameters to evaluate the environment impact

  14. Stability and the structure of continuous-time economic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, H.J.; Schoonbeek, L.

    In this paper we investigate the relationship between the stability of macroeconomic, or macroeconometric, continuous-time models and the structure of the matrices appearing in these models. In particular, we concentrate on dominant-diagonal structures. We derive general stability results for models

  15. Structure of Dynamic, Taxol-Stabilized, and GMPPCP-Stabilized Microtubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Avi; Shemesh, Asaf; Millgram, Abigail; Dharan, Raviv; Levi-Kalisman, Yael; Ringel, Israel; Raviv, Uri

    2017-09-14

    Microtubule (MT) is made of αβ-tubulin heterodimers that dynamically assemble into a hollow nanotube composed of straight protofilaments. MT dynamics is facilitated by hydrolysis of guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP) and can be inhibited by either anticancer agents like taxol or the nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues like GMPPCP. Using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray scattering, we have measured and analyzed the scattering curves from solutions of dynamic MT (in other words, in the presence of excess GTP and free of dynamic-inhibiting agents) and examined the effect of two MT stabilizers: taxol and GMPPCP. Previously, we have analyzed the structure of dynamic MT by docking the atomic model of tubulin dimer onto a 3-start left handed helical lattice, derived from the PDB ID 3J6F . 3J6F corresponds to a MT with 14 protofilaments. In this paper, we took into account the possibility of having MT structures containing between 12 and 15 protofilaments. MTs with 12 protofilaments were never observed. We determined the radii, the pitch, and the distribution of protofilament number that best fit the scattering data from dynamic MT or stabilized MT by taxol or GMPPCP. We found that the protofilament number distribution shifted when the MT was stabilized. Taxol increased the mass fraction of MT with 13 protofilaments and decreased the mass fraction of MT with 14 protofilaments. GMPPCP reduced the mass fraction of MT with 15 protofilaments and increased the mass fraction of MT with 14 protofilaments. The pitch, however, remained unchanged regardless of whether the MT was dynamic or stabilized. Higher tubulin concentrations increased the fraction of dynamic MT with 14 protofilaments.

  16. Insulin structure and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange, J; Langkjoer, L

    1993-01-01

    Insulin is composed of 51 amino acids in two peptide chains (A and B) linked by two disulfide bonds. The three-dimensional structure of the insulin molecule (insulin monomer), essentially the same in solution and in solid phase, exists in two main conformations. These differ in the extent of helix in the B chain which is governed by the presence of phenol or its derivatives. In acid and neutral solutions, in concentrations relevant for pharmaceutical formulation, the insulin monomer assembles to dimers and at neutral pH, in the presence of zinc ions, further to hexamers. Many crystalline modifications of insulin have been identified but only those with the hexamer as the basic unit are utilized in preparations for therapy. The insulin hexamer forms a relatively stable unit but some flexibility remains within the individual molecules. The intrinsic flexibility at the ends of the B chain plays an important role in governing the physical and chemical stability of insulin. A variety of chemical changes of the primary structure (yielding insulin derivatives), and physical modifications of the secondary to quaternary structures (resulting in "denaturation," aggregation, and precipitation) are known to affect insulin and insulin preparations during storage and use (Fig. 8). The tendency of insulin to undergo structural transformation resulting in aggregation and formation of insoluble insulin fibrils has been one of the most intriguing and widely studied phenomena in relation to insulin stability. Although the exact mechanism of fibril formation is still obscure, it is now clear that the initial step is an exposure of certain hydrophobic residues, normally buried in the three-dimensional structure, to the surface of the insulin monomer. This requires displacement of the COOH-terminal B-chain residues from their normal position which can only be accomplished via monomerization of the insulin. Therefore, most methods stabilizing insulin against fibrillation share the

  17. Phase stability and electronic structure of transition-metal aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will describe the interplay between die electronic structure and structural energetics in simple, complex, and quasicrystalline Al-transition metal (T) intermetallics. The first example is the Ll 2 -DO 22 competition in Al 3 T compounds. Ab-initio electronic total-energy calculations reveal surprisingly large structural-energy differences, and show that the phase stability of both stoichiometric and ternary-substituted compounds correlates closely with a quasigap in the electronic density of states (DOS). Secondly, ab-initio calculations for the structural stability of the icosahedrally based Al 12 W structure reveal similar quasigap effects, and provide a simple physical explanation for the stability of the complex aluminide structures. Finally, parametrized tight-binding model calculations for the Al-Mn quasicrystal reveal a large spread in the local Mn DOS behavior, and support a two-site model for the quasicrystal's magnetic behavior

  18. Modeling large offshore wind farms under different atmospheric stability regimes with the Park wake model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Rathmann, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Here, we evaluate a modified version of the Park wake model against power data from a west-east row in the middle of the Horns Rev I offshore wind farm. The evaluation is performed on data classified in four different atmospheric stability conditions, for a narrow wind speed range, and a wide ran...

  19. The Structure and Composition of Io's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, W. H.; Marconi, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Io's atmosphere is thought to be generated principally by sublimation on the dayside and by multiple volcanoes scattered throughout its surface and more concentrated near the equator. While SO2 seems to be the principle product of these sources, many other chemical species are placed into the atmosphere by these sources, including substantial amounts of SO and S2 as well as smaller but observationally significant amounts of Na bearing molecules. These species in turn interact strongly with the torus plasma generating additional species such as O2, S, O, and Na. The strong interaction of the torus plasma with the neutral atmosphere not only exerts a profound effect on the composition of Io's atmosphere but also strongly affects the dynamics and thermodynamics of Io's atmosphere, particularly at higher altitudes. In addition, as Io orbits Jupiter, the change in location of the sublimation region and the eclipse of Io as it passes through Jupiter's shadow result in substantial variation in the atmosphere. A complex time-dependent three-dimensional atmosphere with strong spatial compositional variation is created. Here we extend the two-dimensional multispecies Navier-Stokes model of Smyth and Wong (2004) to three-dimensions, include two volcanic sources similar to Pele and Loki, and include the effect of Io's movement around Jupiter on sublimation. The effects of the torus plasma are also included as in Smyth and Wong. We will present the overall composition and structure of the atmosphere, O to S ratios in the upper atmosphere, and discuss a potential issue with the O2 abundance. Smyth, W.H. and M.C. Wong, Icarus 171, 171-182, 2004.

  20. Atmospheric reaction systems as null-models to identify structural traces of evolution in metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petter Holme

    Full Text Available The metabolism is the motor behind the biological complexity of an organism. One problem of characterizing its large-scale structure is that it is hard to know what to compare it to. All chemical reaction systems are shaped by the same physics that gives molecules their stability and affinity to react. These fundamental factors cannot be captured by standard null-models based on randomization. The unique property of organismal metabolism is that it is controlled, to some extent, by an enzymatic machinery that is subject to evolution. In this paper, we explore the possibility that reaction systems of planetary atmospheres can serve as a null-model against which we can define metabolic structure and trace the influence of evolution. We find that the two types of data can be distinguished by their respective degree distributions. This is especially clear when looking at the degree distribution of the reaction network (of reaction connected to each other if they involve the same molecular species. For the Earth's atmospheric network and the human metabolic network, we look into more detail for an underlying explanation of this deviation. However, we cannot pinpoint a single cause of the difference, rather there are several concurrent factors. By examining quantities relating to the modular-functional organization of the metabolism, we confirm that metabolic networks have a more complex modular organization than the atmospheric networks, but not much more. We interpret the more variegated modular arrangement of metabolism as a trace of evolved functionality. On the other hand, it is quite remarkable how similar the structures of these two types of networks are, which emphasizes that the constraints from the chemical properties of the molecules has a larger influence in shaping the reaction system than does natural selection.

  1. Variation of vertical atmospheric stability by means of radon measurements and of sodar monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedalia, D.; Druilhet, A.; Fontan, J.; N'tsila, A.

    1980-01-01

    Continuous measurements of radon at ground level are used to infer variations in equivalent mixing height and atmospheric vertical stability. Simultaneous determinations of the height of the inversion layer, when present, permit, with the use of sodar techniques, the estimation of radon flux from the ground and of the vertical diffusion coefficient. The two sets of data often indicate similar variations in mixing height

  2. Improvement of stability of sinusoidally driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet using auxiliary bias voltage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jin Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have proposed the auxiliary bias pulse scheme to improve the stability of atmospheric pressure plasma jets driven by an AC sinusoidal waveform excitation source. The stability of discharges can be significantly improved by the compensation of irregular variation in memory voltage due to the effect of auxiliary bias pulse. From the parametric study, such as the width, voltage, and onset time of auxiliary bias pulse, it has been demonstrated that the auxiliary bias pulse plays a significant role in suppressing the irregular discharges caused by the irregular variation in memory voltage and stable discharge can be initiated with the termination of the auxiliary bias pulse. As a result of further investigating the effects of the auxiliary pulse scheme on the jet stability under various process conditions such as the distance between the jet head and the counter electrode, and carrier gas flow, the jet stability can be improved by adjusting the amplitude and number of the bias pulse depending on the variations in the process conditions.

  3. Unifying dynamical and structural stability of equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldi, Jean-François; Haegeman, Bart

    2016-09-01

    We exhibit a fundamental relationship between measures of dynamical and structural stability of linear dynamical systems-e.g. linearized models in the vicinity of equilibria. We show that dynamical stability, quantified via the response to external perturbations (i.e. perturbation of dynamical variables), coincides with the minimal internal perturbation (i.e. perturbations of interactions between variables) able to render the system unstable. First, by reformulating a result of control theory, we explain that harmonic external perturbations reflect the spectral sensitivity of the Jacobian matrix at the equilibrium, with respect to constant changes of its coefficients. However, for this equivalence to hold, imaginary changes of the Jacobian's coefficients have to be allowed. The connection with dynamical stability is thus lost for real dynamical systems. We show that this issue can be avoided, thus recovering the fundamental link between dynamical and structural stability, by considering stochastic noise as external and internal perturbations. More precisely, we demonstrate that a linear system's response to white-noise perturbations directly reflects the intensity of internal white-noise disturbance that it can accommodate before becoming stochastically unstable.

  4. Micropore Structure of Cement-Stabilized Gold Mine Tailings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Kyu Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mine tailings have often to be stabilized by mixing them with cementing agents. In this study, the pore structure of gold tailings stabilized with Portland cement was evaluated by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry. The investigation was conducted on samples prepared with different fractions of tailings and cement as well as on samples activated with elevated temperature curing and chemical (CaCl2 addition. It was observed that all mixed samples exhibit a mono-modal pore size distribution, indicating that the cement-stabilized tailings are characterized by a single-porosity structure. The results also showed that the higher fraction of tailings and cement leads to a dense and finer pore structure. The total porosity of mixture samples decreases with increasing curing temperature and CaCl2 concentration due to the acceleration of hydration reaction.

  5. Sea surface stability parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, A.H.; Suich, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    A number of studies dealing with climatology of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean have been published in the last ten years. These published studies have dealt with directly measured meteorological parameters, e.g., wind speed, temperature, etc. This information has been useful because of the increased focus on the near coastal zone where man's activities are increasing in magnitude and scope, e.g., offshore power plants, petroleum production, and the subsequent environmental impacts of these activities. Atmospheric transport of passive or nonpassive material is significantly influenced by the turbulence structure of the atmosphere in the region of the atmosphere-ocean interface. This research entails identification of the suitability of standard atmospheric stability parameters which can be used to determine turbulence structure; the calculation of these parameters for the near-shore and continental shelf regions of the U.S. east coast from Cape Hatteras to Miami, Florida; and the preparation of a climatology of these parameters. In addition, a climatology for average surface stress for the same geographical region is being prepared

  6. Climatic effects of nuclear war: The role of atmospheric stability and ground heat fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.F.B.; Slingo, A.

    1988-01-01

    Most studies of the climatic effects of nuclear war have used atmospheric models with simple representations of important physical processes. In this work, a model is used which treats the diurnal cycle of insolation, and includes surface and boundary layer parameterizations which take into account static stability and a four-layer soil model. Three idealized experiments are described in which a band of smoke is prescribed over northern mid-latitudes in In the experiment, the standard model is used, in the second the effect of deep soil layers is ignored and in the third the stability dependence in the surface and boundary layer processes is removed. It is found that the inclusion of deep soil layers decreases the surface cooling by about 20%, whereas the inclusion of stability effects increases the cooling by about the same amount, though conclusions will depend to some extent on the model used. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  7. Atomistic mechanisms governing structural stability change of zinc antimony thermoelectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaolong [Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710054 (China); Lin, Jianping, E-mail: jaredlin@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen 361024 (China); Qiao, Guanjun [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, Zhao, E-mail: zwangzhao@gmail.com [Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710054 (China); State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2015-01-05

    The structural stability of thermoelectric materials is a subject of growing importance for their energy harvesting applications. Here, we study the microscopic mechanisms governing the structural stability change of zinc antimony at its working temperature, using molecular dynamics combined with experimental measurements of the electrical and thermal conductivity. Our results show that the temperature-dependence of the thermal and electrical transport coefficients is strongly correlated with a structural transition. This is found to be associated with a relaxation process, in which a group of Zn atoms migrates between interstitial sites. This atom migration gradually leads to a stabilizing structural transition of the entire crystal framework, and then results in a more stable crystal structure of β–Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} at high temperature.

  8. Atmospheric pollution. From processes to modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sportisse, B.

    2008-01-01

    Air quality, greenhouse effect, ozone hole, chemical or nuclear accidents.. All these phenomena are tightly linked to the chemical composition of atmosphere and to the atmospheric dispersion of pollutants. This book aims at supplying the main elements of understanding of 'atmospheric pollutions': stakes, physical processes involved, role of scientific expertise in decision making. Content: 1 - classifications and scales: chemical composition of the atmosphere, vertical structure, time scales (transport, residence); 2 - matter/light interaction: notions of radiative transfer, application to the Earth's atmosphere; 3 - some elements about the atmospheric boundary layer: notion of scales in meteorology, atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), thermal stratification and stability, description of ABL turbulence, elements of atmospheric dynamics, some elements about the urban climate; 4 - notions of atmospheric chemistry: characteristics, ozone stratospheric chemistry, ozone tropospheric chemistry, brief introduction to indoor air quality; 5 - aerosols, clouds and rains: aerosols and particulates, aerosols and clouds, acid rains and leaching; 6 - towards numerical simulation: equation of reactive dispersion, numerical methods for chemistry-transport models, numerical resolution of the general equation of aerosols dynamics (GDE), modern simulation chains, perspectives. (J.S.)

  9. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-01-01

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  10. Structures and energetics of hydrated deprotonated cis-pinonic acid anion clusters and their atmospheric relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Zhang, Jun; Valiev, Marat; Wang, Xue-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Pinonic acid, a C10-monocarboxylic acid with a hydrophilic –CO2H group and a hydrophobic hydrocarbon backbone, is a key intermediate oxidation product of α-pinene – an important monoterpene compound in biogenic emission processes that influences the atmosphere. Molecular interaction between cis-pinonic acid and water is essential for understanding its role in the formation and growth of pinene-derived secondary organic aerosols. In this work, we studied the structures, energetics, and optical properties of hydrated clusters of cis-pinonate anion (cPA–), the deprotonated form of cis-pinonic acid, by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio theoretical calculations. Our results show that cPA– can adopt two different structural configurations – open and folded. In the absence of waters, the open configuration has the lowest energy and provides the best agreement with the experiment. The addition waters, which mainly interact with the negatively charged -CO2– group, gradually stabilize the folded configuration and lower its energy difference relative to the most stable open-configured structure. Thermochemical and equilibrium hydrate distribution analysis suggests that the mono- and di- hydrates are likely to exist in humid atmospheric environment with high populations. The detailed molecular description of cPA– hydrated clusters unraveled in this study provides a valuable reference for understanding the initial nucleation process and aerosol formation involving organics containing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, as well as for analyzing the optical properties of those organic aerosols.

  11. Effects of Ecohydraulic Bank Stabilization Structures on Bank Stability and Macroinvertebrate Community in Surabaya River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daru Setyo Rini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There were 18 accelerated erosion sites identified along 7 km of Surabaya River Fishery Sanctuary Area. A model of ecohydraulic bank stabilization was applied to reduce bank erosion in Surabaya River at Gresik Regency Indonesia. The model is combination of reprofiled and revegetated bank with rock toe reinforcement and  addition of log groynes. Various native plant species were planted and naturally grown to establish multi-strata littoral vegetation structure. This study assessed effects of ecohydraulic bank stabilization on bank morphology, near bank velocity and littoral macroinvertebrate community during September 2014 to August 2016. The study found that rock toe enforcement, log groynes and reprofiled bank slope could stabilized the eroded bank, and littoral vegetation formation reduced near bank velocity at restored sites. There were 31 families of macroinvertebrate found in Surabaya River with high abundance of moderately pollution sensitive taxa Atyidae and pollution tolerant taxa Corixidae, Chironomidae and Tubificidae. The taxa richness, diversity index and abundance of sensitive and moderately sensitive macroinvertebrate group were increased after application of ecohydraulic bank stabilization at restored area. The results shown that ecohydraulic bank stabilization structure provides multi-benefits in improving bank stabilization against erosion and providing new micro-habitats for biotic community. Keywords:  ecohydraulic bank stabilization, macroinvertebrates, riparian restoration

  12. Structure stability index allocation theory and measurement of laser prototype facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Junwei; China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang; Zhou Hai; Feng Bin; Lin Donghui; Jing Feng; Zhou Yi; Wang Shilong

    2008-01-01

    Structure stability is an important design index of ICF driver. Based on laser prototype facility(TIL) design characteristic of multi-pass amplifier and frame structure, the optical matrix is used to analyze the single optical element influence on the beam drift and get the mathematic model. Considering all the optical elements influence on the beam drift, the mathematic model of the optical element stability index allocation is built, the parameter relation of the mathematic model is defined according to the structure characteristic of TIL, the stability index of each optical element is got as the support structure design index. Charge-coupled device(CCD) detect technology is used to measure the general beam stability of TIL. The root mean square beam drift in x and y direction are 2.78 μm, the difference between peak and valley values are 14.4 μm and 15.60 μm, respectively. The result indicates that the stability drift of the prototype facility can satisfy the design requirement, the way of the stability allocation is reasonable. (authors)

  13. Stabilization and structural adjustment in Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Finn; Arndt, Channing; Jensen, Henning Tarp

    2000-01-01

    This paper outlines the complex historical legacy and structural adjustment efforts in Mozambique in addition to reviewing recent economic developments. An in-depth analysis of new and more reliable national accounts data show that macroeconomic stabilization has occurred through recovery from...

  14. Early structure of LPG partially premixed conically stabilized flames

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental investigation of LPG partially premixed turbulent flames stabilized within a conical nozzle burner under constant degree of partial premixing. The stability limits and mean flame structure are presented based

  15. Stability parameters and their inter-relationships at the naviface

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anto, A.F.; Hasse, L.; Murty, C.S.

    Different forms of stability parameters used for the estimation of fluxes and studies on the structure of surface boundary layer of the marine atmosphere and their inter-relationships under the varying conditions of thermal stratifications...

  16. Interface stability of granular filter structures under currents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, H.J.; Hoffmans, G.; Dorst, K.; Van de Sande, S.

    2012-01-01

    Granular filters are used for protection of structures against scour and erosion. For a proper functioning it is necessary that the interfaces between the filter structure, the subsoil and the water flowing above the filter structure are stable. Stability means that there is no transport of subsoil

  17. Simulation of convection-stabilized low-current glow and arc discharges in atmospheric-pressure air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidis, G V

    2007-01-01

    A two-dimensional model of stationary convection-stabilized low-current glow and arc discharge columns in atmospheric-pressure air is developed which accounts for deviation of the plasma state from the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). In addition to equations of energy, continuity and momentum (analogous to those used in LTE arc models), the non-LTE model includes balance equations for plasma species and for the vibrational energy of nitrogen molecules. The kinetic scheme is used which was developed recently for the simulation of low-current wall-stabilized discharges in air. Results of calculation of discharge parameters over a wide current range are presented. It is shown that the non-equilibrium effects are substantial at currents lower than ∼ 100 mA. The calculated plasma parameters agree with available experimental data

  18. The Turbopause experiment: atmospheric stability and turbulent structure spanning the turbopause altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Lehmacher

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Very few sequences of high resolution wind and temperature measurements in the lower thermosphere are available in the literature, which makes it difficult to verify the simulation results of models that would provide better understanding of the complex dynamics of the region. To address this problem the Turbopause experiment used four rockets launched over a period of approximately two hours from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska (64° N, 147° W on the night of 17–18 February 2009. All four rocket payloads released trimethyl aluminum trails for neutral wind and turbulence measurements, and two of the rockets carried ionization gauges and fixed-bias Langmuir probes measuring neutral and electron densities, small-scale fluctuations and neutral temperatures. Two lidars monitored temperature structure and sodium densities. The observations were made under quiet geomagnetic conditions and show persistence in the wind magnitudes and shears throughout the observing period while being modulated by inertia-gravity waves. High resolution temperature profiles show the winter polar mesosphere and lower thermosphere in a state of relatively low stability with several quasi-adiabatic layers between 74 and 103 km. Temperature and wind data were combined to calculate Richardson number profiles. Evidence for turbulence comes from simultaneous observations of density fluctuations and downward transport of sodium in a mixed layer near 75 km; the observation of turbulent fluctuations and energy dissipation from 87–90 km; and fast and irregular trail expansion at 90–93 km, and especially between 95 to 103 km. The regions of turbulent trails agree well with regions of quasi-adiabatic temperature gradients. Above 103 km, trail diffusion was mainly laminar; however, unusual features and vortices in the trail diffusion were observed up to 118 km that have not been as prevalent or as clearly evident in earlier trail releases.

  19. Structural Stability of Low-Crested Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten

    equations. New improved design formulae for calculation of static stability of LCS's are developed on the basis of new 2D and 3D laboratory experiments with scale models. The formulae are specially designed for breakwaters subject to shallow water waves and/or depth limited waves, as the majority...... of existing LCS’s are exposed to such conditions. The formulae are validated against prototype experience. Ecological aspects in relation to structural stability are important, and design guidance on how to consider ecology in the design is therefore given. The new design guidance adds practical and helpful...

  20. The impact of atmospheric stability and wind shear on vertical cloud overlap over the Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that changes in cloud cover are responsible for the rapid climate warming over the Tibetan Plateau (TP in the past 3 decades. To simulate the total cloud cover, atmospheric models have to reasonably represent the characteristics of vertical overlap between cloud layers. Until now, however, this subject has received little attention due to the limited availability of observations, especially over the TP. Based on the above information, the main aim of this study is to examine the properties of cloud overlaps over the TP region and to build an empirical relationship between cloud overlap properties and large-scale atmospheric dynamics using 4 years (2007–2010 of data from the CloudSat cloud product and collocated ERA-Interim reanalysis data. To do this, the cloud overlap parameter α, which is an inverse exponential function of the cloud layer separation D and decorrelation length scale L, is calculated using CloudSat and is discussed. The parameters α and L are both widely used to characterize the transition from the maximum to random overlap assumption with increasing layer separations. For those non-adjacent layers without clear sky between them (that is, contiguous cloud layers, it is found that the overlap parameter α is sensitive to the unique thermodynamic and dynamic environment over the TP, i.e., the unstable atmospheric stratification and corresponding weak wind shear, which leads to maximum overlap (that is, greater α values. This finding agrees well with the previous studies. Finally, we parameterize the decorrelation length scale L as a function of the wind shear and atmospheric stability based on a multiple linear regression. Compared with previous parameterizations, this new scheme can improve the simulation of total cloud cover over the TP when the separations between cloud layers are greater than 1 km. This study thus suggests that the effects of both wind shear and atmospheric stability on cloud overlap

  1. The impact of atmospheric stability and wind shear on vertical cloud overlap over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiming; Lv, Qiaoyi; Jian, Bida; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Fu, Qiang; Kawamoto, Kazuaki; Zhang, Hua

    2018-05-01

    Studies have shown that changes in cloud cover are responsible for the rapid climate warming over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) in the past 3 decades. To simulate the total cloud cover, atmospheric models have to reasonably represent the characteristics of vertical overlap between cloud layers. Until now, however, this subject has received little attention due to the limited availability of observations, especially over the TP. Based on the above information, the main aim of this study is to examine the properties of cloud overlaps over the TP region and to build an empirical relationship between cloud overlap properties and large-scale atmospheric dynamics using 4 years (2007-2010) of data from the CloudSat cloud product and collocated ERA-Interim reanalysis data. To do this, the cloud overlap parameter α, which is an inverse exponential function of the cloud layer separation D and decorrelation length scale L, is calculated using CloudSat and is discussed. The parameters α and L are both widely used to characterize the transition from the maximum to random overlap assumption with increasing layer separations. For those non-adjacent layers without clear sky between them (that is, contiguous cloud layers), it is found that the overlap parameter α is sensitive to the unique thermodynamic and dynamic environment over the TP, i.e., the unstable atmospheric stratification and corresponding weak wind shear, which leads to maximum overlap (that is, greater α values). This finding agrees well with the previous studies. Finally, we parameterize the decorrelation length scale L as a function of the wind shear and atmospheric stability based on a multiple linear regression. Compared with previous parameterizations, this new scheme can improve the simulation of total cloud cover over the TP when the separations between cloud layers are greater than 1 km. This study thus suggests that the effects of both wind shear and atmospheric stability on cloud overlap should be taken into

  2. DNA secondary structures: stability and function of G-quadruplex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochman, Matthew L.; Paeschke, Katrin; Zakian, Virginia A.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the canonical double helix, DNA can fold into various other inter- and intramolecular secondary structures. Although many such structures were long thought to be in vitro artefacts, bioinformatics demonstrates that DNA sequences capable of forming these structures are conserved throughout evolution, suggesting the existence of non-B-form DNA in vivo. In addition, genes whose products promote formation or resolution of these structures are found in diverse organisms, and a growing body of work suggests that the resolution of DNA secondary structures is critical for genome integrity. This Review focuses on emerging evidence relating to the characteristics of G-quadruplex structures and the possible influence of such structures on genomic stability and cellular processes, such as transcription. PMID:23032257

  3. Early structure of LPG partially premixed conically stabilized flames

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental investigation of LPG partially premixed turbulent flames stabilized within a conical nozzle burner under constant degree of partial premixing. The stability limits and mean flame structure are presented based on the mean gas temperature and the concentration of CO, O 2, NO, and HC at the flame early region of reaction. The investigation covered the influence of the nozzle cone angle, the jet exit velocity and the jet equivalence ratio. The stability results show that the flames with cone are more stable than those without cone. For conical stabilized flames, the stability results exhibit three different sensitivity regions between the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The inflame measurements prove that the flame stability could be attributed to the triple flame structure at the flame leading edge. The data show that the triple flame structure is influenced by cone angle, the jet velocity and the equivalence ratio. The flame is believed to be controlled by the recirculation flow inside the cone. Increasing the cone angle induced higher air entrainment to the reaction zone as depicted by a higher O 2 concentration within the flame leading edge. Increasing the jet velocity to a certain limit enhances the intensity of combustion at the flame leading edge, while excessive increase in jet velocity reduces this intensity. At a fixed jet velocity the higher the equivalence ratio, the higher the amount of fuel diffused and engulfed to the reaction zone, the more delay of the combustion completion and the higher the emission concentrations of the flame. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  4. First Integrals of Evolution Systems and Nonlinear Stability of Stationary Solutions for the Ideal Atmospheric, Oceanic Hydrodynamical and Plasma Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordin, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    First integral of the systems of nonlinear equations governing the behaviour of atmospheric, oceanic and MHD plasma models are determined. The Lyapunov stability conditions for the solutions under small initial disturbances are analyzed. (author)

  5. Structural Stability Of Detached Low Crested Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Kramer, Morten; Lamberti, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to describe hydraulic stability of rock-armoured low-crested structures on the basis of new experimental tests and prototype observations. Rock armour stability results from earlier model tests under non-depth-limited long-crested head-on waves are reviewed. Results from new...... determining armour stone size in shallow water conditions is given together with a rule of thumb for the required stone size in depth-limited design waves. Rock toe stability is discussed on the basis of prototype experience, hard bottom 2-D tests in depth-limited waves and an existing hydraulic stability...... formula. Toe damage predicted by the formula is in agreement with experimental results. In field sites, damage at the toe induced by scour or by sinking is observed and the volume of the berm is often insufficient to avoid regressive erosion of the armour layer. Stone sinking and settlement in selected...

  6. Structure and stability of spiro-cyclic water clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The structure and stability of spiro-cyclic water clusters containing up to 32 water molecules have been ... due to its importance in various real life systems. 1–8. High level ... It is well-known from the crystal structure data- base that the ...

  7. TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE AND ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF DRY TIDALLY LOCKED ROCKY EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koll, Daniel D. B.; Abbot, Dorian S., E-mail: dkoll@uchicago.edu [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2016-07-10

    Next-generation space telescopes will observe the atmospheres of rocky planets orbiting nearby M-dwarfs. Understanding these observations will require well-developed theory in addition to numerical simulations. Here we present theoretical models for the temperature structure and atmospheric circulation of dry, tidally locked rocky exoplanets with gray radiative transfer and test them using a general circulation model (GCM). First, we develop a radiative-convective (RC) model that captures surface temperatures of slowly rotating and cool atmospheres. Second, we show that the atmospheric circulation acts as a global heat engine, which places strong constraints on large-scale wind speeds. Third, we develop an RC-subsiding model which extends our RC model to hot and thin atmospheres. We find that rocky planets develop large day–night temperature gradients at a ratio of wave-to-radiative timescales up to two orders of magnitude smaller than the value suggested by work on hot Jupiters. The small ratio is due to the heat engine inefficiency and asymmetry between updrafts and subsidence in convecting atmospheres. Fourth, we show, using GCM simulations, that rotation only has a strong effect on temperature structure if the atmosphere is hot or thin. Our models let us map out atmospheric scenarios for planets such as GJ 1132b, and show how thermal phase curves could constrain them. Measuring phase curves of short-period planets will require similar amounts of time on the James Webb Space Telescope as detecting molecules via transit spectroscopy, so future observations should pursue both techniques.

  8. Structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures in the presence of chaotropic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Krainer, Georg; Grundmeier, Guido; Schlierf, Michael; Keller, Adrian

    2016-05-21

    DNA origami represent powerful platforms for single-molecule investigations of biomolecular processes. The required structural integrity of the DNA origami may, however, pose significant limitations regarding their applicability, for instance in protein folding studies that require strongly denaturing conditions. Here, we therefore report a detailed study on the stability of 2D DNA origami triangles in the presence of the strong chaotropic denaturing agents urea and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) and its dependence on concentration and temperature. At room temperature, the DNA origami triangles are stable up to at least 24 h in both denaturants at concentrations as high as 6 M. At elevated temperatures, however, structural stability is governed by variations in the melting temperature of the individual staple strands. Therefore, the global melting temperature of the DNA origami does not represent an accurate measure of their structural stability. Although GdmCl has a stronger effect on the global melting temperature, its attack results in less structural damage than observed for urea under equivalent conditions. This enhanced structural stability most likely originates from the ionic nature of GdmCl. By rational design of the arrangement and lengths of the individual staple strands used for the folding of a particular shape, however, the structural stability of DNA origami may be enhanced even further to meet individual experimental requirements. Overall, their high stability renders DNA origami promising platforms for biomolecular studies in the presence of chaotropic agents, including single-molecule protein folding or structural switching.

  9. Stability of low-temperature Li{sub 7}La{sub 3}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 12} cubic phase: The role of temperature and atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinzeni, Irene; Capsoni, Doretta; Berbenni, Vittorio; Mustarelli, Piercarlo [Chemistry Department, Physical-Chemistry Section, University of Pavia, Viale Taramelli 16, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Sturini, Michela [Chemistry Department, Analytical Section, University of Pavia, Viale Taramelli 12, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bini, Marcella, E-mail: bini@unipv.it [Chemistry Department, Physical-Chemistry Section, University of Pavia, Viale Taramelli 16, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2017-01-01

    Rechargeable all solid-state lithium batteries are a promising technology for the next generation of safer batteries. In this context, strict requirements are placed on the electrolytes, among which is emerging the Li{sub 7}La{sub 3}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 12} garnet, chiefly for the relationships among synthesis conditions and phase stability. Here, the structural modifications of the low temperature (LT) Li{sub 7}La{sub 3}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 12} cubic form were investigated by using in situ X-Rays diffraction analysis. In particular, we studied the role of both temperature and atmosphere (air or argon) on phase stabilization. In argon flow, the LT phase is stable under 750 °C, and it transforms into the tetragonal one at lower temperature. In air, it partially decomposes to La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} due to Li loss above 250 °C. ICP-OES analysis confirmed that garnet stoichiometry was maintained in argon, whereas in air lithium loss occurred. The structural transformations are driven by the CO{sub 2} absorbed in the LT structure that can form Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and/or La{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} so causing stoichiometry changes responsible of the structural evolution. - Highlights: • Li{sub 7}La{sub 3}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 12} is a promising electrolyte for rechargeable all solid state batteries. • The stability of low temperature cubic phase of garnet in argon and air was determined. • The garnet stoichiometry was maintained in argon while in air lithium loss occurred. • The influence of CO{sub 2} adsorption on the structural modifications of garnet was proved.

  10. Structure of the atmosphere of late-type stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, Ya.I.

    1976-01-01

    A method of calculation of model atmospheres of late-type stars is described. The model atmospheres have been constructed for effective temperature Tsub(e)=2500, 3000, 3500, 4000, 4500 and 5785 K at solar chemical composition and surface gravities log g = 0.0, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0 based on LTE and a plane-parallel horizontally homogeneous structure. Opacity due to H, H - and H 2 - was taken into account. The equation of state includes 10 metals and H 2 , H 2 - and H 2 + molecules. The results are compared with those published elsewhere. A satisfactory agreement is obtained for Tsub(e) > 3000 K

  11. Statistical prediction of far-field wind-turbine noise, with probabilistic characterization of atmospheric stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Mark C.; Barlas, Emre; Sogachev, Andrey

    2018-01-01

    Here we provide statistical low-order characterization of noise propagation from a single wind turbine, as affected by mutually interacting turbine wake and environmental conditions. This is accomplished via a probabilistic model, applied to an ensemble of atmospheric conditions based upon......; the latter solves Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations of momentum and temperature, including the effects of stability and the ABL depth, along with the drag due to the wind turbine. Sound levels are found to be highest downwind for modestly stable conditions not atypical of mid-latitude climates...

  12. SPICAM: studying the global structure and composition of the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaux, J.-L.; Fonteyn, D.; Korablev, O.; Chassefre, E.; Dimarellis, E.; Dubois, J. P.; Hauchecorne, A.; Lefèvre, F.; Cabane, M.; Rannou, P.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Cernogora, G.; Quemerais, E.; Hermans, C.; Kockarts, G.; Lippens, C.; de Maziere, M.; Moreau, D.; Muller, C.; Neefs, E.; Simon, P. C.; Forget, F.; Hourdin, F.; Talagrand, O.; Moroz, V. I.; Rodin, A.; Sandel, B.; Stern, A.

    2004-08-01

    The SPICAM (SPectroscopy for the Investigation of the Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars) instrument consists of two spectrometers. The UV spectrometer addresses key issues about ozone and its H2O coupling, aerosols, the atmospheric vertical temperature structure and the ionosphere. The IR spectrometer is aimed primarily at H2O and abundances and vertical profiling of H2O and aerosols. SPICAM's density/temperature profiles will aid the development of meteorological and dynamical atmospheric models from the surface up to 160 km altitude. UV observations of the upper atmosphere will study the ionosphere and its direct interaction with the solar wind. They will also allow a better understanding of escape mechanisms, crucial for insight into the long-term evolution of the atmosphere.

  13. On Robust Stability of Differential-Algebraic Equations with Structured Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kononov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider a linear time-invariant system of differential-algebraic equations (DAE, which can be written as a system of ordinary differential equations with non-invertible coefficients matrices. An important characteristic of DAE is the unsolvability index, which reflects the complexity of the internal structure of the system. The question of the asymptotic stability of DAE containing the uncertainty given by the matrix norm is investigated. We consider a perturbation in the structured uncertainty case. It is assumed that the initial nominal system is asymptotically stable. For the analysis, the original equation is reduced to the structural form, in which the differential and algebraic subsystems are separated. This structural form is equivalent to the input system in the sense of coincidence of sets of solutions, and the operator transforming the DAE into the structural form possesses the inverse operator. The conversion to structural form does not use a change of variables. Regularity of matrix pencil of the source equation is the necessary and sufficient condition of structural form existence. Sufficient conditions have been obtained that perturbations do not break the internal structure of the nominal system. Under these conditions robust stability of the DAE with structured uncertainty is investigated. Estimates for the stability radius of the perturbed DAE system are obtained. The text of the article is from the simpler case, in which the perturbation is present only for an unknown function, to a more complex one, under which the perturbation is also present in the derivative of the unknown function. We used values of the real and the complex stability radii of explicit ordinary differential equations for obtaining the results. We consider the example illustrating the obtained results.

  14. The crystal structure and stability of molybdenum at ultrahigh pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jona, F; Marcus, P M

    2005-01-01

    Crystal structures and their stabilities for molybdenum under increasing hydrostatic pressures are investigated by first-principles calculations of the Gibbs free energy. Three structures are considered: body-centred cubic (bcc, the ground state at zero pressure), hexagonal close-packed (hcp) and face-centred cubic (fcc). For each structure and each pressure (up to 8 Mbar) the equilibrium states are found from minima of the Gibbs free energy at zero temperature. The stability is tested by calculating the elastic constants and checking whether they satisfy the appropriate stability conditions. The bcc structure is confirmed to be stable at zero pressure and at 6 Mbar. At and above 6.2 M-bar the ground-state structure changes to hcp, which is found to be stable at 7 M-bar. At 7.7 Mbar another transition occurs, and the ground-state structure changes from hcp to fcc. The fcc structure, which is unstable at zero pressure, becomes metastable over the range from 3 to 7.7 M-bar and becomes the ground state at higher pressures (at least up to 8 Mbar). Direct confirmation of these calculated transition pressures with experiment is not now possible, as the maximum static pressure currently reached experimentally is 5.6 Mbar, where Mo is found to be still in the bcc phase

  15. The influence of fuel-air swirl intensity on flame structures of syngas swirl-stabilized diffusion flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Weiwei; Xiong, Yan; Mu, Kejin; Zhang, Zhedian; Wang, Yue; Xiao, Yunhan

    2010-06-01

    Flame structures of a syngas swirl-stabilized diffusion flame in a model combustor were measured using the OH-PLIF method under different fuel and air swirl intensity. The flame operated under atmospheric pressure with air and a typical low heating-value syngas with a composition of 28.5% CO, 22.5% H2 and 49% N2 at a thermal power of 34 kW. Results indicate that increasing the air swirl intensity with the same fuel, swirl intensity flame structures showed little difference except a small reduction of flame length; but also, with the same air swirl intensity, fuel swirl intensity showed great influence on flame shape, length and reaction zone distribution. Therefore, compared with air swirl intensity, fuel swirl intensity appeared a key effect on the flame structure for the model combustor. Instantaneous OH-PLIF images showed that three distinct typical structures with an obvious difference of reaction zone distribution were found at low swirl intensity, while a much compacter flame structure with a single, stable and uniform reaction zone distribution was found at large fuel-air swirl intensity. It means that larger swirl intensity leads to efficient, stable combustion of the syngas diffusion flame.

  16. Temperature dependent evolution of the local electronic structure of atmospheric plasma treated carbon nanotubes: Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S. S.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Okpalugo, T. I. T.; Murphy, H.

    2006-01-01

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has been employed to obtain the temperature dependent evolution of the electronic structure of acid treated carbon nanotubes, which were further modified by dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing in an ammonia atmosphere. The NEXAFS studies were performed from room temperature up to 900 deg. C. The presence of oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups was observed in C K edge, N K edge, and O K edge NEXAFS spectra of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The N K edge spectra revealed three types of π* features, the source of which was decisively identified by their temperature dependent evolution. It was established that these features are attributed to pyridinelike, NO, and graphitelike structures, respectively. The O K edge indicated that both carbonyl (C=O), π*(CO), and ether C-O-C, σ*(CO), functionalities were present. Upon heating in a vacuum to 900 deg. C the π*(CO) resonances disappeared while the σ*(CO) resonances were still present confirming their higher thermal stability. Heating did not produce a significant change in the π* feature of the C K edge spectrum indicating that the tabular structure of the nanotubes is essentially preserved following the thermal decomposition of the functional groups on the nanotube surface

  17. A comparison of short-term dispersion estimates resulting from various atmospheric stability classification methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, A.E. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Four methods of classifying atmospheric stability class are applied at four sites to make short-term (1-h) dispersion estimates from a ground-level source based on a model consistent with U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission practice. The classification methods include vertical temperature gradient, standard deviation of horizontal wind direction fluctuations (sigma theta), Pasquill-Turner, and modified sigma theta which accounts for meander. Results indicate that modified sigma theta yields reasonable dispersion estimates compared to those produced using methods of vertical temperature gradient and Pasquill-Turner, and can be considered as a potential economic alternative in establishing onsite monitoring programs. (author)

  18. The properties and Roles of Resonance-Stabilized Radicals in Photochemical Pathways in Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebree, Joshua A.; Kidwell, Nathan; Zwier, Timothy

    2010-11-01

    In recent years, the Cassini satellite has been providing details about the composition of Titan's atmosphere. Recent data has shown the existence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at higher altitudes than previously expected including masses tentatively ascribed to naphthalene and anthracene. The formation of indene (C9H9) and naphthalene (C10H8), the simplest PAHs, and their derivatives are of great interest as similar mechanisms may lead to the formation of larger fused-ring systems. In recent years it has been proposed that resonance-stabilized radicals (RSRs) may play an important role as intermediates along these pathways. RSRs gain extra stability by delocalizing the unpaired electron through a neighboring conjugated π-system. Because of this extra stability, RSRs are able to build up in concentration, allowing for the creation of larger, more complex systems through their recombination with other RSRs. Mass-selective UV-visible spectra of two RSRs, phenylallyl and benzylallenyl radicals, have been recorded under jet-cooled conditions. These two radicals, while sharing the same radical conjugation, have unique properties. The roles these radicals may play in the formation of fused ring systems will be discussed along with recent photochemical results on reaction pathways starting from benzylallene through the benzylallenyl radical.

  19. The stability of the thermohaline circulation in a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiller, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Mikolajewicz, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Voss, R. [Deutsches Klimarechenzentrum (DKRZ), Hamburg (Germany)

    1996-02-01

    The stability of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation against meltwater input is investigated in a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model. The meltwater input to the Labrador Sea is increased linearly for 250 years to a maximum input of 0.625 Sv and then reduced again to 0 (both instantaneously and slowly decreasing over 250 years). The resulting freshening forces a shutdown of the formation of North Atlantic deepwater and a subsequent reversal of the thermohaline circulation of the Atlantic, filling the deep Atlantic with Antarctic bottom water. The change in the overturning pattern causes a drastic reduction of the Atlantic northward heat transport, resulting in a strong cooling with maximum amplitude over the northern North Atlantic and a southward shift of the sea-ice margin in the Atlantic. Due to the increased meridional temperature gradient, the Atlantic intertropical convergence zone is displaced southward and the westerlies in the northern hemisphere gain strength. We identify four main feedbacks affecting the stability of the thermohaline circulation: the change in the overturning circulation of the Atlantic leads to longer residence times of the surface waters in high northern latitudes, which allows them to accumulate more precipitation and runoff from the continents, which results in an increased stability in the North Atlantic.

  20. Structural stability of interaction networks against negative external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2018-04-01

    We explore structural stability of weighted and unweighted networks of positively interacting agents against a negative external field. We study how the agents support the activity of each other to confront the negative field, which suppresses the activity of agents and can lead to collapse of the whole network. The competition between the interactions and the field shape the structure of stable states of the system. In unweighted networks (uniform interactions) the stable states have the structure of k -cores of the interaction network. The interplay between the topology and the distribution of weights (heterogeneous interactions) impacts strongly the structural stability against a negative field, especially in the case of fat-tailed distributions of weights. We show that apart from critical slowing down there is also a critical change in the system structure that precedes the network collapse. The change can serve as an early warning of the critical transition. To characterize changes of network structure we develop a method based on statistical analysis of the k -core organization and so-called "corona" clusters belonging to the k -cores.

  1. Towards a "Golden Standard" for computing globin stability: Stability and structure sensitivity of myoglobin mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2015-10-01

    Fast and accurate computation of protein stability is increasingly important for e.g. protein engineering and protein misfolding diseases, but no consensus methods exist for important proteins such as globins, and performance may depend on the type of structural input given. This paper reports benchmarking of six protein stability calculators (POPMUSIC 2.1, I-Mutant 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0, CUPSAT, SDM, and mCSM) against 134 experimental stability changes for mutations of sperm-whale myoglobin. Six different high-resolution structures were used to test structure sensitivity that may impair protein calculations. The trend accuracy of the methods decreased as I-Mutant 2.0 (R=0.64-0.65), SDM (R=0.57-0.60), POPMUSIC2.1 (R=0.54-0.57), I-Mutant 3.0 (R=0.53-0.55), mCSM (R=0.35-0.47), and CUPSAT (R=0.25-0.48). The mean signed errors increased as SDMMean absolute errors increased as I-Mutant 2.0Structural sensitivity increased as I-Mutant 3.0 (0.05)structures and reveal structure-dependent effects even in the near-atomic resolution limit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Implications of 3D Thermal Structure on 1D Atmospheric Retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian [NYU Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Greene, Thomas, E-mail: jasmina@nyu.edu [NASA Ames Research Center, Space Sciece and Astrobiology Division, M.S. 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2017-10-20

    Using the atmospheric structure from a 3D global radiation-hydrodynamic simulation of HD 189733b and the open-source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code, we investigate the difference between the secondary-eclipse temperature structure produced with a 3D simulation and the best-fit 1D retrieved model. Synthetic data are generated by integrating the 3D models over the Spitzer , the Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ), and the James Web Space Telescope ( JWST ) bandpasses, covering the wavelength range between 1 and 11 μ m where most spectroscopically active species have pronounced features. Using the data from different observing instruments, we present detailed comparisons between the temperature–pressure profiles recovered by BART and those from the 3D simulations. We calculate several averages of the 3D thermal structure and explore which particular thermal profile matches the retrieved temperature structure. We implement two temperature parameterizations that are commonly used in retrieval to investigate different thermal profile shapes. To assess which part of the thermal structure is best constrained by the data, we generate contribution functions for our theoretical model and each of our retrieved models. Our conclusions are strongly affected by the spectral resolution of the instruments included, their wavelength coverage, and the number of data points combined. We also see some limitations in each of the temperature parametrizations, as they are not able to fully match the complex curvatures that are usually produced in hydrodynamic simulations. The results show that our 1D retrieval is recovering a temperature and pressure profile that most closely matches the arithmetic average of the 3D thermal structure. When we use a higher resolution, more data points, and a parametrized temperature profile that allows more flexibility in the middle part of the atmosphere, we find a better match between the retrieved temperature and pressure profile and

  3. The Implications of 3D Thermal Structure on 1D Atmospheric Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Greene, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Using the atmospheric structure from a 3D global radiation-hydrodynamic simulation of HD 189733b and the open-source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code, we investigate the difference between the secondary-eclipse temperature structure produced with a 3D simulation and the best-fit 1D retrieved model. Synthetic data are generated by integrating the 3D models over the Spitzer, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the James Web Space Telescope (JWST) bandpasses, covering the wavelength range between 1 and 11 μm where most spectroscopically active species have pronounced features. Using the data from different observing instruments, we present detailed comparisons between the temperature-pressure profiles recovered by BART and those from the 3D simulations. We calculate several averages of the 3D thermal structure and explore which particular thermal profile matches the retrieved temperature structure. We implement two temperature parameterizations that are commonly used in retrieval to investigate different thermal profile shapes. To assess which part of the thermal structure is best constrained by the data, we generate contribution functions for our theoretical model and each of our retrieved models. Our conclusions are strongly affected by the spectral resolution of the instruments included, their wavelength coverage, and the number of data points combined. We also see some limitations in each of the temperature parametrizations, as they are not able to fully match the complex curvatures that are usually produced in hydrodynamic simulations. The results show that our 1D retrieval is recovering a temperature and pressure profile that most closely matches the arithmetic average of the 3D thermal structure. When we use a higher resolution, more data points, and a parametrized temperature profile that allows more flexibility in the middle part of the atmosphere, we find a better match between the retrieved temperature and pressure profile and the

  4. Jovian atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, M.; Travis, L.D.

    1986-10-01

    A conference on the atmosphere of Jupiter produced papers in the areas of thermal and ortho-para hydrogen structure, clouds and chemistry, atmospheric structure, global dynamics, synoptic features and processes, atmospheric dynamics, and future spaceflight opportunities. A session on the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune was included, and the atmosphere of Saturn was discussed in several papers

  5. The photochemical stability of the Venus atmosphere against UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, F.P.; Slanger, T.G.; Allen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: One unresolved question regarding the Venus atmosphere is what chemical mechanism(s) stabilize its primary constituent (CO 2 ) against UV radiation. CO 2 photolyzes on the day side into CO and O after absorbing photons at 2 rather than recombining with CO to form CO 2 , and the intense night side O 2 airglow observed quantitatively supports this. CO and O 2 are photochemically stable in an otherwise pure CO 2 atmosphere so significant abundances of CO and O 2 could accumulate on Venus if no catalytic mechanism existed to speed the reformation of CO 2 . However, the observational upper limit on ground state O 2 is equivalent to 2 from CO and O 2 . Recent laboratory work verified the existence of the ClC(O)OO catalytic mechanism that has been used in photochemical models since the early 1980s. However, there are significant uncertainties in the rates for the component steps of this catalytic mechanism. An alternative mechanism for production of CO 2 that has not previously been modeled but which could be competitive with the ClCO(O)O mechanism is the reaction CO + O 2 (c 1 Σ - u ) → CO 2 + O( 1 D) or O( 1 S), Reaction (1). A range of values for Reaction (1) will be examined in model calculations to compare with observational (UV to IR) constraints and to assess under what conditions this mechanism is competitive with the ClC(O)OO catalytic mechanism. The sensitivity of the results to uncertainties in the CO 2 UV absorption cross section also will be examined

  6. Structure, stability and behaviour of nucleic acids in ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids have become a powerful tool in nanotechnology because of their conformational polymorphism. However, lack of a medium in which nucleic acid structures exhibit long-term stability has been a bottleneck. Ionic liquids (ILs) are potential solvents in the nanotechnology field. Hydrated ILs, such as choline dihydrogen phosphate (choline dhp) and deep eutectic solvent (DES) prepared from choline chloride and urea, are ‘green’ solvents that ensure long-term stability of biomolecules. An understanding of the behaviour of nucleic acids in hydrated ILs is necessary for developing DNA materials. We here review current knowledge about the structures and stabilities of nucleic acids in choline dhp and DES. Interestingly, in choline dhp, A–T base pairs are more stable than G–C base pairs, the reverse of the situation in buffered NaCl solution. Moreover, DNA triplex formation is markedly stabilized in hydrated ILs compared with aqueous solution. In choline dhp, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs is comparable to that of Watson–Crick base pairs. Moreover, the parallel form of the G-quadruplex is stabilized in DES compared with aqueous solution. The behaviours of various DNA molecules in ILs detailed here should be useful for designing oligonucleotides for the development of nanomaterials and nanodevices. PMID:25013178

  7. Electrochemical stability of ionic clathrate hydrates and their structural consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Wonhee; Lim, Dongwook; Lee, Huen

    2013-01-01

    Although electrochemical stability is an essential factor in relation to the potential applications of ionic clathrate hydrates to solid electrolytes, most studies regarding the proton conductors have focused on their ionic conductivity and thermal stability. Solid electrolytes in various electrochemical devices have to endure the applied potentials; thus, we examined the linear sweep voltammograms of various tetraalkylammonium hydroxide hydrates in order to shed light on the trend of electrochemical stability depending on the hydrate structure. We revealed that the electrochemical stability of Me 4 NOH hydrates is mainly affected by both their ionic concentration and cage occupancy. In particular, the true clathrate structures of β-Me 4 NOH hydrates are more electrochemically stable than their α-forms that possess partially broken hydrogen bonds. We also observed that the binary THF–Pr 4 NOH and pure Bu 4 NOH clathrate hydrates exhibit greater electrochemical stability than those of pure Me 4 NOH hydrates having lower or similar ionic concentrations. These results are considered to arise from the fact that each of the Pr 4 N + and Bu 4 N + ions occupies an extended space comprising four cages, which leads to stabilization of the larger unit, whereas a Me 4 N + ion is completely included only in one cage

  8. An Analysis of Cassini Observations Regarding the Structure of Jupiter's Equatorial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David S.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of intriguing atmospheric phenomena reside on both sides of Jupiter's equator. 5-micron bright hot spots and opaque plumes prominently exhibit dynamic behavior to the north, whereas compact, dark chevron-shaped features and isolated anticyclonic disturbances periodically occupy the southern equatorial latitudes. All of these phenomena are associated with the vertical and meridional perturbations of Rossby waves disturbing the mean atmospheric state. As previous observational analysis and numerical simulations have investigated the dynamics of the region, an examination of the atmosphere's vertical structure though radiative transfer analysis is necessary for improved understanding of this unique environment. Here we present preliminary analysis of a multispectral Cassini imaging data set acquired during the spacecraft's flyby of Jupiter in 2000. We evaluated multiple methane and continuum spectral channels at available viewing angles to improve constraints on the vertical structure of the haze and cloud layers comprising these interesting features. Our preliminary results indicate distinct differences in the structure for both hemispheres. Upper troposphere hazes and cloud layers are prevalent in the northern equatorial latitudes, but are not present in corresponding southern latitudes. Continued analysis will further constrain the precise structure present in these phenomena and the differences between them.

  9. Structure and stabilization of hydrogen-rich transverse.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyra, Sgouria [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilde, B [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kolla, Hemanth [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Seitzman, J. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lieuwen, T. C. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Chen, Jacqueline H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports the results of a joint experimental and numerical study of the ow characteristics and flame stabilization of a hydrogen rich jet injected normal to a turbulent, vitiated cross ow of lean methane combustion products. Simultaneous high-speed stereoscopic PIV and OH PLIF measurements were obtained and analyzed alongside three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of inert and reacting JICF with detailed H2/CO chemistry. Both the experiment and the simulation reveal that, contrary to most previous studies of reacting JICF stabilized in low-to-moderate temperature air cross ow, the present conditions lead to an autoigniting, burner-attached flame that initiates uniformly around the burner edge. Significant asymmetry is observed, however, between the reaction zones located on the windward and leeward sides of the jet, due to the substantially different scalar dissipation rates. The windward reaction zone is much thinner in the near field, while also exhibiting significantly higher local and global heat release than the much broader reaction zone found on the leeward side of the jet. The unsteady dynamics of the windward shear layer, which largely control the important jet/cross flow mixing processes in that region, are explored in order to elucidate the important flow stability implications arising in the reacting JICF. Vorticity spectra extracted from the windward shear layer reveal that the reacting jet is globally unstable and features two high frequency peaks, including a fundamental mode whose Strouhal number of ~0.7 agrees well with previous non-reacting JICF stability studies. The paper concludes with an analysis of the ignition, ame stabilization, and global structure of the burner-attached flame. Chemical explosive mode analysis (CEMA) shows that the entire windward shear layer, and a large region on the leeward side of the jet, are highly explosive prior to ignition and are dominated by non-premixed flame structures after

  10. Estimating the wake deflection downstream of a wind turbine in different atmospheric stabilities: an LES study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Vollmer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An intentional yaw misalignment of wind turbines is currently discussed as one possibility to increase the overall energy yield of wind farms. The idea behind this control is to decrease wake losses of downstream turbines by altering the wake trajectory of the controlled upwind turbines. For an application of such an operational control, precise knowledge about the inflow wind conditions, the magnitude of wake deflection by a yawed turbine and the propagation of the wake is crucial. The dependency of the wake deflection on the ambient wind conditions as well as the uncertainty of its trajectory are not sufficiently covered in current wind farm control models. In this study we analyze multiple sources that contribute to the uncertainty of the estimation of the wake deflection downstream of yawed wind turbines in different ambient wind conditions. We find that the wake shapes and the magnitude of deflection differ in the three evaluated atmospheric boundary layers of neutral, stable and unstable thermal stability. Uncertainty in the wake deflection estimation increases for smaller temporal averaging intervals. We also consider the choice of the method to define the wake center as a source of uncertainty as it modifies the result. The variance of the wake deflection estimation increases with decreasing atmospheric stability. Control of the wake position in a highly convective environment is therefore not recommended.

  11. Structuring of poly ether ether ketone by ArF excimer laser radiation in different atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Y.; Gottmann, J.; Kreutz, E.W.

    2003-01-01

    Structuring of poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) by 193 nm ArF excimer laser radiation has been investigated. Experiments were carried out in different atmospheres (air, vacuum, Ar, O 2 ) in order to study its influence on the quality of the structures and the formation of the debris. Repetition rate makes little effect on the ablation rate and roughness of the structure in presence of any kind of atmosphere, indicating for the structuring of PEEK by ArF laser radiation a large window of processing. The roughness at the bottom of the structures and the morphology of the side walls are strongly affected by the properties of the atmosphere. The smallest roughness is achieved at 0.6 J/cm 2 for all kinds of processing gases. Debris around the structures can be diminished by structuring in vacuum. Plasma expansion speed has been measured by using high speed photography

  12. Ab initio study on structural stability of uranium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, B.D.; Joshi, K.D.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2013-01-01

    First principles calculations have been performed using plane wave pseudopotential and full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) methods to analyze structural, elastic and dynamic stability of UC under hydrostatic compression. Our calculations within pseudopotential method suggest that the rocksalt (B1) structure will transform to body centered orthorhombic (bco) structure at ∼21.5 GPa. The FP-LAPW calculations put this transition at 23 GPa. The transition pressures determined from our calculations though agree reasonably with the experimental value of 27 GPa, the high pressure bco structure suggested by theory differs slightly from the experimentally reported pseudo bco phase. The elastic stability analysis of B1 phase suggests that the B1 to bco transition is driven by the failure of C 44 modulus. This finding is further substantiated by the lattice dynamic calculations which demonstrate that the B1 phase becomes dynamically unstable around the transition pressure and the instability is of long wavelength nature

  13. Structural bifurcation of microwave helium jet discharge at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, Shuichi; Kitoh, Masakazu; Soga, Tadasuke

    2008-01-01

    Structural bifurcation of microwave-sustained jet discharge at atmospheric gas pressure was found to produce a stable helium plasma jet, which may open the possibility of a new type of high-flux test plasma beam for plasma-wall interactions in fusion devices. The fundamental discharge properties are presented including hysteresis characteristics, imaging of discharge emissive structure, and stable ignition parameter area. (author)

  14. Design criteria development for the structural stability of nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, C H [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yu, T S [Daewoo Engineering Company, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Ko, H M [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-11-15

    The objective of the present project is to develop design criteria for the structural stability of rock cavity for the underground repository are defined, according to which detailed descriptions for design methodologies, design stages and stability analysis of the cavity are made. The proposed criteria can be used as a guide for the preparation of design codes which are to be established as the site condition and technical emplacement procedure are fixed. The present report first reviews basic safety requirements and criteria of the underground disposal of nuclear wastes for the establishment of design concepts and stability analysis of the rock cavity. Important factors for the design are also described by considering characteristics of the wastes and underground facilities. The present project has investigated technical aspects on the design of underground structures based on the currently established underground construction technologies, and presented a proposal for design criteria for the structural stability of the nuclear waste repository. The proposed criteria consist of general provisions, geological exploration, rock classification, design process and methods, supporting system, analyses and instrumentation.

  15. High temperature corrosion in chloridizing atmospheres: development of material quasi-stability diagrams and coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doublet, S.; Schuetze, M. [Karl-Winnacker-Institut der DECHEMA e.V., Theodor-Heuss-Allee 25, D-60486 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Chlorine gas is widely encountered in chemical industries, e. g. in waste incinerators and plastic/polymer decomposition mills. The presence of chlorine may significantly reduce the life-time of the components. Although metallic materials have been widely used under such conditions there is still a need for data on the role of the different alloying elements in commercial alloys. The purpose of this work is to produce a clear picture of which alloying elements play a detrimental role and which elements are beneficial. These results can be used as a tool for general assessment of metallic alloys with regard to their performance in chloridizing high temperature environments. A previous study has already been performed in oxidizing-chloridizing atmospheres and led to the elaboration of material quasi-stability diagrams. As a follow-up the present work has been performed in reducing-chloridizing atmospheres in order to validate these diagrams at low partial pressures of oxygen. The behaviour of 9 commercial materials where the content of the major alloying elements was varied in a systematic manner was investigated in reducing-chloridizing atmospheres (in Ar containing up to 2 vol.% Cl{sub 2} and down to 1 ppm O{sub 2}) at 800 deg. C. As the thermodynamical approach to corrosion in such atmospheres could not explain all the phenomena which occur, kinetics calculations i.e. diffusion calculations were carried out. Pack cementation and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) coatings were also developed from the best alloying elements previously found by the calculations and the corrosion experiments. Corrosion tests on the coated materials were then performed in the same conditions as the commercial alloys. (authors)

  16. Effect of oxygen level on the oxidative stability of two different retail pork products stored using modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanos, Dimitrios; Ann Tørngren, Mari; Christensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics and the oxidative stability of pork steaks and of pork mince were investigated during 2, 5 and 7 days of refrigerated storage using oxygen (O2) levels of 0%, 20%, 50% and 80% in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). Steaks stored during 7 days were not affected by an increase i......%) O2 MAP. The results show that fresh pork products are affected differently by the MAP O2 concentration and strongly indicate that optimisation of MAP based on the retail product type would be of considerable benefit to their oxidative stability....

  17. Calcium Stabilized And Geogrid Reinforced Soil Structures In Seismic Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimoldi, Pietro; Intra, Edoardo

    2008-01-01

    In many areas of Italy, and particularly in high seismic areas, there is no or very little availability of granular soils: hence embankments and retaining structures are often built using the locally available fine soil. For improving the geotechnical characteristics of such soils and/or for building steep faced structures, there are three possible techniques: calcium stabilization, geogrid reinforcement, and the combination of both ones, that is calcium stabilized and reinforced soil. The present paper aims to evaluate these three techniques in terms of performance, design and construction, by carrying out FEM modeling and stability analyses of the same reference embankments, made up of soil improved with each one of the three techniques, both in static and dynamic conditions. Finally two case histories are illustrated, showing the practical application of the above outlined techniques

  18. A new method for evaluating structural stability of bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lei; Jia, Haoling [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Xie, Shenghui; Zeng, Xierong [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen University and Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, ShenZhen 518060 (China); Zhang, Tao [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Ma, Chaoli, E-mail: machaoli@buaa.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2010-08-15

    This paper proposed a new method for evaluating the structural stability of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) based on dilatometric measurements. During heating in the dilatometric experiments, the BMGs expanded continuously with increasing temperature. When the temperature reached the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), viscous shrinkage occurred due to the viscosity of material becoming lower. Since the inhomogeneous nature of the metallic glasses at atomic level, the processes of rigid expansion and the viscous shrinkage co-exist in a certain temperature region. The expansion stopped completely at a temperature (named T{sub p} here) beyond T{sub g}. The values of the temperature region, {Delta}T{sub gp} = T{sub p} - T{sub g}, and the corresponding time interval ({Delta}t{sub gp}) and the activation energy (E{sub p}) corresponding to the expansion processes, are the reflection of the structural stability of BMGs. Investigating the co-existing processes kinetically and thermodynamically, we can make an insight into the structural stability of metallic glasses. Based on this idea, the thermal expansion behaviors of Mg-, Pd-, Zr-, Ti- and Fe-based BMG were studied, and their structural stability was evaluated by the parameters of {Delta}T{sub gp}, {Delta}t{sub gp} and E{sub p}.

  19. Structure and stability of charged colloid-nanoparticle mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight, Braden M.; Denton, Alan R.

    2018-03-01

    Physical properties of colloidal materials can be modified by addition of nanoparticles. Within a model of like-charged mixtures of particles governed by effective electrostatic interactions, we explore the influence of charged nanoparticles on the structure and thermodynamic phase stability of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. Focusing on salt-free mixtures of particles of high size and charge asymmetry, interacting via repulsive Yukawa effective pair potentials, we perform molecular dynamics simulations and compute radial distribution functions and static structure factors. Analysis of these structural properties indicates that increasing the charge and concentration of nanoparticles progressively weakens correlations between charged colloids. We show that addition of charged nanoparticles to a suspension of like-charged colloids can induce a colloidal crystal to melt and can facilitate aggregation of a fluid suspension due to attractive van der Waals interactions. We attribute the destabilizing influence of charged nanoparticles to enhanced screening of electrostatic interactions, which weakens repulsion between charged colloids. This interpretation is consistent with recent predictions of an effective interaction theory of charged colloid-nanoparticle mixtures.

  20. A reliable method for the stability analysis of structures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The detection of structural configurations with singular tangent stiffness matrix is essential because they can be unstable. The secondary paths, especially in unstable buckling, can play the most important role in the loss of stability and collapse of the structure. A new method for reliable detection and accurate computation of ...

  1. Old-field Community, Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimee Classen

    2009-11-01

    We are in the process of finishing a number of laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse projects, analyzing data, and writing papers. The projects reported addressed these subjects: How do climate and atmospheric changes alter aboveground plant biomass and community structure; Effects of multiple climate changes factors on plant community composition and diversity: what did we learn from a 5-year open-top chamber experiment using constructed old-field communities; Do atmospheric and climatic change factors interact to alter woody seedling emergence, establishment and productivity; Soil moisture surpasses elevated CO{sub 2} and temperature in importance as a control on soil carbon dynamics; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter belowground root and fungal biomass; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter soil microarthropod and microbial communities; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter belowground microbial function; Linking root litter diversity and microbial functioning at a micro scale under current and projected CO{sub 2} concentrations; Multifactor climate change effects on soil ecosystem functioning depend on concurrent changes in plant community composition; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter aboveground insect populations; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter festuca endophyte infection; How do climate and atmospheric changes soil carbon stabilization.

  2. Mathematical models for atmospheric pollutants. Appendix A. Elements of meteorology. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, R.L.; Laulainen, N.S.

    1979-08-01

    The meteorological elements that are important in the transport and fate of airborne pollutants are summarized. The summary consists of descriptions of the thermal, water, kinematic and dynamic structures of the atmosphere, the time and space scale classifications of atmospheric motions, and modifications of pollutant plumes as they pass over nonhomogeneous surface conditions and complex terrain. The discussions consider the atmospheric thermal layers and their stability, formation of clouds and the production of rain and snow, the movement of air masses and weather fronts, the horizontal winds in the planetary boundary layer, and wind profiles over transition zones and complex terrain

  3. Stability of lamb loin stored under refrigeration and packed in different modified atmosphere packaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Rafaella de Paula Paseto; Freire, Maria Teresa de Alvarenga; de Paula, Elisa Silva Maluf; Kanashiro, Ana Livea Sayuri; Catunda, Fernanda Antunes Pinto; Rosa, Alessandra Fernandes; Balieiro, Júlio Cesar de Carvalho; Trindade, Marco Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) systems (vacuum, 75% O2+25% CO2 and 100% CO2) on the stability of lamb loins stored at 1±1°C for 28 days. Microbiological (counts of aerobic and anaerobic psychrotrophic microorganisms, coliform at 45°C, coagulase-positive staphylococci and lactic acid bacteria and presence of Salmonella), physical and chemical (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances [TBARS], objective color, pH, water loss from cooking [WLC] and shear force), sensory (acceptance testing using a 9-point hedonic scale) and gas composition analyses were performed. Lamb meat remained stable with respect to the majority of the evaluated physical and chemical indexes and within the standards established by Brazilian legislation for pathogenic microorganisms throughout the storage period in all three packaging systems. However, with respect to psychrotrophic microorganisms, 100% CO2 packaging system provided increased stability despite presenting lower appearance preference. © 2013.

  4. On the stability of atmospheric waves with low waves numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiin-Nielsen, A [The Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    The stability of atmospheric waves with low wave numbers is investigated using a quasi-geostrophic model of the second kind. Such a model is base on the thermodynamic equation, the continuity equation and a rigorous use of the geostrophic relations. The boundary conditions at the surface of the earth is formulated in two ways. The effects of a boundary condition at 1000 hpa, where the vertical p-velocity is zero, is compared with the effects of a second condition, where w is zero. The two boundary conditions are used to determine the stability of the low wave number waves. The second condition introduces waves with large positive and negative phase velocities, especially in the low latitudes, but has also an influence on the stability of these waves. The main result of the comparative investigation is that the more correct boundary condition in general will produce stronger instabilities than the simpler boundary condition. The e-folding times obtained with the more general model is in closer agreement with the results obtained by observational studies. [Spanish] Se investiga la estabilidad de las ondas atmosfericas con numero bajo de ondas, mediante un modelo quasi-geostrofico de segunda clase. Tal modelo esta basado en la ecuacion termodinamica, la de continuidad y un empleo riguroso de las relaciones geostroficas. La condicion de frontera en la superficie terrestre se formula de dos maneras. Los efectos de una condicion fronteriza a los 1000 hPa, donde la velocidad vertical P es nula, se comparan con los efectos de una segunda condicion, donde W es cero. Las dos condiciones fronterizas se usan para determinar la estabilidad de las ondas de numero bajo. La segunda condicion introduce ondas grandes, tanto con velocidades de fase positivas como negativas, especialmente en las bajas latitudes, pero tiene tambien una influencia sobre la estabilidad de estas ondas. El resultado principal de la investigacion comparativa es que entre mas realista es la condicion de

  5. Oxidative stability of structured lipids produced from sunflower oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2003-01-01

    Traditional sunflower oil (SO), randomized lipid (RL) and specific structured lipid (SL), both produced from SO and tricaprylin/caprylic acid, respectively, were stored for up to 12 wk to compare their oxidative stabilities by chemical and sensory analyses. Furthermore, the effect of adding...... a commercial antioxidant blend Grindox 117 (propyl gallate/citric acid/ascorbyl palmitate) or gallic acid to the SL was investigated. The lipid type affected the oxidative stability: SL was less stable than SO and RL. The reduced stability was most likely caused by both the structure of the lipid...

  6. First-principles calculation of the structural stability of 6d transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oestlin, A.; Vitos, L.

    2011-01-01

    The phase stability of the 6d transition metals (elements 103-111) is investigated using first-principles electronic-structure calculations. Comparison with the lighter transition metals reveals that the structural sequence trend is broken at the end of the 6d series. To account for this anomalous behavior, the effect of relativity on the lattice stability is scrutinized, taking different approximations into consideration. It is found that the mass-velocity and Darwin terms give important contributions to the electronic structure, leading to changes in the interstitial charge density and, thus, in the structural energy difference.

  7. Influence of the soil-atmosphere exchange on the hydric profile induced in soil-structure system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Al Qadad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil-atmosphere exchange leads to a moisture change in the soil. This can cause major damage to engineering structures due to the soil expansion and shrinkage. The soil-atmosphere exchange is related to several parameters, in particular the soil characteristics and climate conditions. The presence of an engineering structure causes a variation of the hydraulic profile in the soil, which can lead to heterogeneous soil movement and consequently to structural damage. This paper presents a coupled numerical model based on the consideration of both water flow in unsaturated soils and soil-atmosphere exchange. After the validation of the model, the paper presents its use for the analysis of the influence of the presence of structures on moisture change induced under climatic conditions recorded in a semi-arid region. Analysis shows that the presence of the structure leads to important change in the moisture distribution, in particular in the vicinity of the structure.

  8. Effects of sintering atmosphere and temperature on structural and magnetic properties of Ni-Cu-Zn ferrite nano-particles: Magnetic enhancement by a reducing atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholizadeh, Ahmad, E-mail: gholizadeh@du.ac.ir; Jafari, Elahe, E-mail: ah_gh1359@yahoo.com

    2017-01-15

    In this work, effects of sintering atmosphere and temperature on structural and magnetic properties of Ni{sub 0.3}Cu{sub 0.2}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles prepared by citrate precursor method have been studied. The structural characterization of the samples by X-ray powder diffraction and FT-IR spectroscopy is evidence for formation of a cubic structure with no presence of impurity phase. Calculated values of crystallite size and unit cell parameter show an increase with sintering temperature under different atmospheres. Variation of saturation magnetization with sintering temperature and atmosphere can be attributed to change of three factors: magnetic core size, inversion parameter and the change of Fe{sup 3+}-ion concentration due to the presence of Fe{sup 4+} and Fe{sup 2+} ions. The saturation magnetization gradually grows with sintering temperature due to increase of magnetic core size and a maximum 63 emu/g was achieved at 600 °C under carbon monoxide-ambient atmosphere. - Highlights: • Different sintering atmosphere and temperature cause substantial differences in Ni{sub 0.3}Cu{sub 0.2}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. • The saturation magnetization gradually grows. • A maximum 63 emu/g was achieved at 600 °C under a reducing atmosphere.

  9. Recent Advances in Heliogyro Solar Sail Structural Dynamics, Stability, and Control Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Warren, Jerry E.; Horta, Lucas G.; Lyle, Karen H.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Gibbs, S. Chad; Dowell, Earl H.; Guerrant, Daniel V.; Lawrence, Dale

    2015-01-01

    Results from recent NASA sponsored research on the structural dynamics, stability, and control characteristics of heliogyro solar sails are summarized. Specific areas under investigation include coupled nonlinear finite element analysis of heliogyro membrane blade with solar radiation pressure effects, system identification of spinning membrane structures, and solarelastic stability analysis of heliogyro solar sails, including stability during blade deployment. Recent results from terrestrial 1-g blade dynamics and control experiments on "rope ladder" membrane blade analogs, and small-scale in vacuo system identification experiments with hanging and spinning high-aspect ratio membranes will also be presented. A low-cost, rideshare payload heliogyro technology demonstration mission concept is used as a mission context for these heliogyro structural dynamics and solarelasticity investigations, and is also described. Blade torsional dynamic response and control are also shown to be significantly improved through the use of edge stiffening structural features or inclusion of modest tip masses to increase centrifugal stiffening of the blade structure. An output-only system identification procedure suitable for on-orbit blade dynamics investigations is also developed and validated using ground tests of spinning sub-scale heliogyro blade models. Overall, analytical and experimental investigations to date indicate no intractable stability or control issues for the heliogyro solar sail concept.

  10. Range and stability of structural colors generated by Morpho-inspired color reflectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyungjae; Shin, Jung H

    2013-05-01

    The range and stability of structural colors generated by Morpho-inspired color reflectors are investigated. We find that despite the internal randomness of such structures that gives rise to their Morpho-like angle-independent iridescence, their colors under ambient lighting condition can be predicted by simple transfer-matrix calculations of corresponding planar multilayer structures. By calculating the possible range of colors generated by multilayers of different structures and material combinations using such transfer-matrix methods, we find that low-refractive index multilayers with intrastructure absorption, such as the melanin-containing chitin/air multilayer structure from the Morpho butterflies, can provide not only the most pure structural colors with the largest color gamut, but also the highest stability of color against variations in multilayer structure.

  11. Formation, structure, and stability of MHD intermediate shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    Contrary to the usual belief that MHD intermediate shocks are extraneous, the author has recently shown by numerical solutions of dissipative MHD equations that intermediate shocks are admissible and can be formed through nonlinear wave steepening from continuous waves. In this paper, the formation, structure and stability of intermediate shocks in dissipative MHD are considered in detail. The differences between the conventional theory and his are pointed out and clarified. He shows that all four types of intermediate shocks can be formed from smooth waves. He also shows that there are free parameters in the structure of the intermediate shocks, and that these parameters are related to the shock stability. In addition, he shows that a rotational discontinuity can not exist with finite width, indicate how this is related to the existence of time-dependent intermediate shocks, and show why the conventional theory is not a good approximation to dissipative MHD solutions whenever there is rotation in magnetic field

  12. Structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of actinide carbides AnC (An = U, Np)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manikandan, M.; Santhosh, M.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.

    2016-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of actinide carbides AnC (An=U, Np) for three different crystal structures, namely NaCl, CsCl and ZnS. Among the considered structures, NaCl structure is found to be the most stable structure for these carbides at normal pressure. A pressure induced structural phase transition from NaCl to ZnS is observed. The electronic structure reveals that these carbides are metals. The calculated elastic constants indicate that these carbides are mechanically stable at normal pressure.

  13. Structure-activity relationships between sterols and their thermal stability in oil matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yinzhou; Xu, Junli; Huang, Weisu; Zhao, Yajing; Li, Maiquan; Wang, Mengmeng; Zheng, Lufei; Lu, Baiyi

    2018-08-30

    Structure-activity relationships between 20 sterols and their thermal stabilities were studied in a model oil system. All sterol degradations were found to be consistent with a first-order kinetic model with determination of coefficient (R 2 ) higher than 0.9444. The number of double bonds in the sterol structure was negatively correlated with the thermal stability of sterol, whereas the length of the branch chain was positively correlated with the thermal stability of sterol. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model to predict thermal stability of sterol was developed by using partial least squares regression (PLSR) combined with genetic algorithm (GA). A regression model was built with R 2 of 0.806. Almost all sterol degradation constants can be predicted accurately with R 2 of cross-validation equals to 0.680. Four important variables were selected in optimal QSAR model and the selected variables were observed to be related with information indices, RDF descriptors, and 3D-MoRSE descriptors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural Stability and Hydraulic Conductivity Of Nkpologu Sandy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were conducted in the runoff plots at the University of Nigeria Nsukka Teaching and Resesarch Farm in 2010 and 2011 to monitor the changes in structural stability and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) of Nkpologu sandy loam soil under different cover management practices. The management practices were ...

  15. Network structure and thermal stability study of high temperature seal glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, K.; Mahapatra, M. K.

    2008-10-01

    High temperature seal glass has stringent requirement on glass thermal stability, which is dictated by glass network structures. In this study, a SrO-La2O3-Al2O3-B2O3-SiO2 based glass system was studied using nuclear magnetic resonance, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction for solid oxide cell application purpose. Glass structural unit neighboring environment and local ordering were evaluated. Glass network connectivity as well as silicon and boron glass former coordination were calculated for different B2O3:SiO2 ratios. Thermal stability of the borosilicate glasses was studied after thermal treatment at 850 °C. The study shows that high B2O3 content induces BO4 and SiO4 structural unit ordering, increases glass localized inhomogeneity, decreases glass network connectivity, and causes devitrification. Glass modifiers interact with either silicon- or boron-containing structural units and form different devitrified phases at different B2O3:SiO2 ratios. B2O3-free glass shows the best thermal stability among the studied compositions, remaining stable after thermal treatment for 200 h at 850 °C.

  16. Structural Stability of Tokamak Equilibrium: Transport Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solano, E. R.

    2001-07-01

    A generalised theory of structural stability of differential equations is introduced and applied to the Grad-Shafranov equation. It is discussed how the formation and loss of transport barrier could be associated with the appearance/disappearance of equilibria. The equilibrium conjecture is presented: transport barriers are associated with locally diamagnetic regions in the plasma, and affected by the paramagnetism of the bootstrap current. (Author) 18 refs.

  17. Differentiable dynamical systems an introduction to structural stability and hyperbolicity

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Lan

    2016-01-01

    This is a graduate text in differentiable dynamical systems. It focuses on structural stability and hyperbolicity, a topic that is central to the field. Starting with the basic concepts of dynamical systems, analyzing the historic systems of the Smale horseshoe, Anosov toral automorphisms, and the solenoid attractor, the book develops the hyperbolic theory first for hyperbolic fixed points and then for general hyperbolic sets. The problems of stable manifolds, structural stability, and shadowing property are investigated, which lead to a highlight of the book, the \\Omega-stability theorem of Smale. While the content is rather standard, a key objective of the book is to present a thorough treatment for some tough material that has remained an obstacle to teaching and learning the subject matter. The treatment is straightforward and hence could be particularly suitable for self-study. Selected solutions are available electronically for instructors only. Please send email to textbooks@ams.org for more informatio...

  18. Structures and Stability of Metal Amidoboranes (MAB): Density Functional Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Cailin; Wu Chaoling; Chen Yungui; Zhou Jingjing; Zheng Xin; Pang Lijuan; Deng Gang

    2010-01-01

    Molecule geometry structures, frequencies, and energetic stabilities of ammonia borane (AB, NH 3 BH 3 ) and metal amidoboranes (MAB, MNH 2 BH 3 ), formed by substituting H atom in AB with one of main group metal atoms, have been investigated by density-functional theory and optimized at the B3LYP levels with 6-311G++ (3df, 3pd) basic set. Their structural parameters and infrared spectrum characteristic peaks have been predicted, which should be the criterion of a successfully synthesized material. Several parameters such as binding energies, vibrational frequencies, and the energy gaps between the HOMO and the LUMO have been adopted to characterize and evaluate their structure stabilities. It is also found that the binding energies and HOMO-LUMO energy gaps of the MAB obviously change with the substitution of the atoms. MgAB has the lowest binding energy and is easier to decompose than any other substitutional structures under same conditions, while CaAB has the highest chemical activity. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  19. The structure and stability of common mental disorders - The NEMESIS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollebergh, W.A.M.; Iedema, J; Bijl, R.V.; de Graaf, R.; Smit, F.; Ormel, J.

    Background: We analyzed the underlying latent structure of 12-month DSM-III-R diagnoses of 9 common disorders for the general population in the Netherlands. In addition, we sought to establish (1) the stability of the latent structure underlying mental disorders across a 1-year period (structural

  20. Aging effects on vertical graphene nanosheets and their thermal stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S.; Polaki, S. R.; Ajikumar, P. K.; Krishna, N. G.; Kamruddin, M.

    2018-03-01

    The present study investigates environmental aging effects and thermal stability of vertical graphene nanosheets (VGN). Self-organized VGN is synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and exposed to ambient conditions over 6-month period to examine its aging behavior. A systematic inspection is carried out on morphology, chemical structure, wettability and electrical property by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, water contact angle and four-probe resistivity measurements at regular intervals, respectively. Detailed microscopic and spectroscopic analysis substantiated the retention of graphitic quality and surface chemistry of VGN over the test period. An unchanged sheet resistance and hydrophobicity reveals its electrical and wetting stability over the time, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis ensures an excellent thermal stability of VGN up to 575 °C in ambient atmosphere. These findings of long-term morphological, structural, wetting, electrical and thermal stability of VGN validate their potential utilization for the next-generation device applications.

  1. Structure and Mechanical Properties of Al-Cu-Fe-X Alloys with Excellent Thermal Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Školáková, Andrea; Novák, Pavel; Mejzlíková, Lucie; Průša, Filip; Salvetr, Pavel; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2017-11-05

    In this work, the structure and mechanical properties of innovative Al-Cu-Fe based alloys were studied. We focused on preparation and characterization of rapidly solidified and hot extruded Al-Cu-Fe, Al-Cu-Fe-Ni and Al-Cu-Fe-Cr alloys. The content of transition metals affects mechanical properties and structure. For this reason, microstructure, phase composition, hardness and thermal stability have been investigated in this study. The results showed exceptional thermal stability of these alloys and very good values of mechanical properties. Alloying by chromium ensured the highest thermal stability, while nickel addition refined the structure of the consolidated alloy. High thermal stability of all tested alloys was described in context with the transformation of the quasicrystalline phases to other types of intermetallics.

  2. Rock stream stability structures in the vicinity of bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This report was sponsored by the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) to determine if rock stream stability structures could be used as : scour countermeasures and to protect streambanks. Traditional scour countermeasures, such as rock riprap, ar...

  3. Simplification and Validation of a Spectral-Tensor Model for Turbulence Including Atmospheric Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chougule, Abhijit; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark; Larsen, Gunner C.

    2018-02-01

    A spectral-tensor model of non-neutral, atmospheric-boundary-layer turbulence is evaluated using Eulerian statistics from single-point measurements of the wind speed and temperature at heights up to 100 m, assuming constant vertical gradients of mean wind speed and temperature. The model has been previously described in terms of the dissipation rate ɛ , the length scale of energy-containing eddies L , a turbulence anisotropy parameter Γ, the Richardson number Ri, and the normalized rate of destruction of temperature variance η _θ ≡ ɛ _θ /ɛ . Here, the latter two parameters are collapsed into a single atmospheric stability parameter z / L using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, where z is the height above the Earth's surface, and L is the Obukhov length corresponding to Ri,η _θ. Model outputs of the one-dimensional velocity spectra, as well as cospectra of the streamwise and/or vertical velocity components, and/or temperature, and cross-spectra for the spatial separation of all three velocity components and temperature, are compared with measurements. As a function of the four model parameters, spectra and cospectra are reproduced quite well, but horizontal temperature fluxes are slightly underestimated in stable conditions. In moderately unstable stratification, our model reproduces spectra only up to a scale ˜ 1 km. The model also overestimates coherences for vertical separations, but is less severe in unstable than in stable cases.

  4. Convective transport in ATM simulations and its relation to the atmospheric stability conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta

    2017-04-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 80 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases, in particular xenon isotopes, supported by the atmospheric transport modeling (ATM). One of the important noble gases, monitored on a daily basis, is radioxenon. It can be produced either during a nuclear explosion with a high fission yield, and thus be considered as an important tracer to prove the nuclear character of an explosion, or be emitted from nuclear power plants (NPPs) or from isotope production facilities (IPFs). To investigate the transport of xenon emissions, the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) operates an Atmospheric Transport Modelling (ATM) system based on the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. To address the question whether including the convective transport in ATM simulations will change the results significantly, the differences between the outputs with the convective transport turned off and turned on, were computed and further investigated taking into account the atmospheric stability conditions. For that purpose series of 14 days forward simulations, with convective transport and without it, released daily in the period January 2011 to February 2012, were analysed. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. The unique opportunity of having access to both daily emission values for ANSTO as well as measured Xe-133 activity concentration (AC) values at the IMS stations, gave a chance to validate the simulations.

  5. Towards a "Golden Standard" for computing globin stability: Stability and structure sensitivity of myoglobin mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2015-01-01

    Fast and accurate computation of protein stability is increasingly important for e.g. protein engineering and protein misfolding diseases, but no consensus methods exist for important proteins such as globins, and performance may depend on the type of structural input given. This paper reports be...

  6. Structure and Mechanical Properties of Al-Cu-Fe-X Alloys with Excellent Thermal Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Školáková

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the structure and mechanical properties of innovative Al-Cu-Fe based alloys were studied. We focused on preparation and characterization of rapidly solidified and hot extruded Al-Cu-Fe, Al-Cu-Fe-Ni and Al-Cu-Fe-Cr alloys. The content of transition metals affects mechanical properties and structure. For this reason, microstructure, phase composition, hardness and thermal stability have been investigated in this study. The results showed exceptional thermal stability of these alloys and very good values of mechanical properties. Alloying by chromium ensured the highest thermal stability, while nickel addition refined the structure of the consolidated alloy. High thermal stability of all tested alloys was described in context with the transformation of the quasicrystalline phases to other types of intermetallics.

  7. Correlation between local structure and stability of supercooled liquid state in Zr-based metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Junji; Imafuku, Muneyuki; Sato, Shigeo; Sanada, Takashi; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Inoue, Akihisa

    2007-01-01

    The correlation between the local structure and stability of supercooled liquid state is investigated in the Zr 70 (Ni, Cu) 30 binary and Zr 70 Al 10 (Ni, Cu) 20 (numbers indicate at.%) ternary metallic glasses. The Zr 70 Ni 30 binary amorphous alloy with a low stability of supercooled liquid state has a tetragonal Zr 2 Ni-like local structure around Ni atom. Meanwhile, the Zr 70 Cu 30 binary metallic glass has a different local structure of tetragonal Zr 2 Cu, where we suggest the icosahedral local structure by the quasicrystallization behavior in addition of a very small amount of noble metals. The effect of Al addition on the local structure in the Zr-Ni alloy is also examined. We have investigated that the dominant local structure changes in the icosahedral-like structure from the tetragonal Zr 2 Ni-like local structure by the Al substitution with Ni accompanying with the significant stabilization of supercooled liquid state. It is concluded that the formation of icosahedral local structure contributes to the enhancement of stability of supercooled liquid state in the Zr-based alloys

  8. Photochemical stability of π-conjugated polymers for polymer solar cells: a rule of thumb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manceau, Matthieu; Bundgaard, Eva; Carlé, Jon Eggert

    2011-01-01

    A comparative photochemical stability study of a wide range of π-conjugated polymers relevant to polymer solar cells is presented. The behavior of each material has been investigated under simulated sunlight (1 sun, 1000 W m−2, AM 1.5G) and ambient atmosphere. Degradation was monitored during age...... ageing combining UV-visible and infrared spectroscopies. From the comparison of the collected data, the influence of the polymer chemical structure on its stability has been discussed. General rules relative to the polymer structure–stability relationship are proposed....

  9. Effect of annealing atmosphere on optic-electric properties of Zn O thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, C.; Pacio, M.; Juarez, H.; Osorio, E.; Perez, R.

    2017-01-01

    In this work the study of structural, morphologic characteristics, optical and electrical properties of the thin films of Zn O in temperatures and annealing atmospheres different was realized. The films were obtained by the sol-gel method, utilizing zinc acetate dihydrate as the precursor, monoethanolamine (Mea) as a stabilizing agent and 2-methoxyethanol as a solvent and deposited by spin-coating. The films were crystallized at 600, 800 and 1000 degrees Celsius in oxygen and nitrogen atmospheres. The results obtained by XRD, Sem, photoluminescence and Hall effects of the Zn O films were related and depend strongly on the temperature and atmosphere annealing. (Author)

  10. Effect of annealing atmosphere on optic-electric properties of Zn O thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, C. [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ingenieria, Blvd. Valsequillo y Av. San Claudio s/n, 72570 Puebla (Mexico); Pacio, M.; Juarez, H. [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Posgrado en Dispositivos Semiconductores, Av. San Claudio y 14 Sur, 72450 Puebla (Mexico); Osorio, E. [Universidad de Quinta Roo, Blvd. Bahia s/n, esquina Ignacio Comonfort, El Bosque, 77019 Chetumal, Quintana Roo (Mexico); Perez, R., E-mail: cba3009@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, 72570 Puebla (Mexico)

    2017-11-01

    In this work the study of structural, morphologic characteristics, optical and electrical properties of the thin films of Zn O in temperatures and annealing atmospheres different was realized. The films were obtained by the sol-gel method, utilizing zinc acetate dihydrate as the precursor, monoethanolamine (Mea) as a stabilizing agent and 2-methoxyethanol as a solvent and deposited by spin-coating. The films were crystallized at 600, 800 and 1000 degrees Celsius in oxygen and nitrogen atmospheres. The results obtained by XRD, Sem, photoluminescence and Hall effects of the Zn O films were related and depend strongly on the temperature and atmosphere annealing. (Author)

  11. Structure and stability of warm cores in neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez Cabanell, J M [Departamento de Mecanica y Astronomia, Facultad de Matematicas, Burjasot-Valencia (Spain)

    1981-12-01

    Relativistic equations of structure are solved using Lamb's equations of state for warm neutron degenerate matter. The stability of isothermal cores in neutron stars is discussed and also the possible compatibility of the results obtained with experimental evidence is shown.

  12. The structure of nuclei far from beta stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zganjar, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses: shape coexistence and intruder states; the electric monopole transition in nuclei; gold isotopes; platinum isotopes; iridium isotopes; search for superdeformation in 192 Hg; search for population of superformed states in 194 Pb using 194 Bi β + -decay; detailed nuclear structure studies far from stability; prototype internal pair spectrometer; and picosecond lifetime spectrometer

  13. Momentum and scalar transport within a vegetation canopy following atmospheric stability and seasonal canopy changes: the CHATS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dupont

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Momentum and scalar (heat and water vapor transfer between a walnut canopy and the overlying atmosphere are investigated for two seasonal periods (before and after leaf-out, and for five thermal stability regimes (free and forced convection, near-neutral condition, transition to stable, and stable. Quadrant and octant analyses of momentum and scalar fluxes followed by space-time autocorrelations of observations from the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study's (CHATS thirty meter tower help characterize the motions exchanging momentum, heat, and moisture between the canopy layers and aloft.

    During sufficiently windy conditions, i.e. in forced convection, near-neutral and transition to stable regimes, momentum and scalars are generally transported by sweep and ejection motions associated with the well-known canopy-top "shear-driven" coherent eddy structures. During extreme stability conditions (both unstable and stable, the role of these "shear-driven" structures in transporting scalars decreases, inducing notable dissimilarity between momentum and scalar transport.

    In unstable conditions, "shear-driven" coherent structures are progressively replaced by "buo-yantly-driven" structures, known as thermal plumes; which appear very efficient at transporting scalars, especially upward thermal plumes above the canopy. Within the canopy, downward thermal plumes become more efficient at transporting scalars than upward thermal plumes if scalar sources are located in the upper canopy. We explain these features by suggesting that: (i downward plumes within the canopy correspond to large downward plumes coming from above, and (ii upward plumes within the canopy are local small plumes induced by canopy heat sources where passive scalars are first injected if there sources are at the same location as heat sources. Above the canopy, these small upward thermal plumes aggregate to form larger scale upward thermal plumes. Furthermore, scalar

  14. Design Formulae for Hydraulic Stability and Structural Integrity of Dolos Breakwater Round-Heads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Jensen, Jacob Birk; Liu, Z.

    1995-01-01

    A rational design of Dolos armour unit should incorporate both the hydraulic stability and the structural integrity. The previous tests performed by Aalborg University (AU) resulted in design formulae for the trunk of a 1:1.5 slope Dolos breakwater without superstructure including both...... the hydraulic stability and the structural integrity. The objective of the round-head tests is to produce similar design formulae for Dolos armour in around-head. The tests will also include examinations of the hydraulic stability and run-up for a trunk section adjacent to the round-head. A run-up formula...

  15. Giant Planets of Our Solar System Atmospheres, Composition, and Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Patrick G. J

    2009-01-01

    This book reviews the current state of knowledge of the atmospheres of the giant gaseous planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The current theories of their formation are reviewed and their recently observed temperature, composition and cloud structures are contrasted and compared with simple thermodynamic, radiative transfer and dynamical models. The instruments and techniques that have been used to remotely measure their atmospheric properties are also reviewed, and the likely development of outer planet observations over the next two decades is outlined. This second edition has been extensively updated following the Cassini mission results for Jupiter/Saturn and the newest ground-based measurements for Uranus/Neptune as well as on the latest development in the theories on planet formation.

  16. Origin of atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, Gy [Eotvos Lorand Tudomanyegyetem, Budapest (Hungary). Atomfizikai Tanszek

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of the atmosphere of the Earth is described. Starting from the hot Universe the main steps of the ''cooling-down'' process as the different states of the condensation of the matter are discussed. After this nuclear evolution the chemical evolution could start on the solid Earth's crust. In the reductive primordial atmosphere mainly due to ultraviolet rays the basic molecules for life as sugars and amino acids were formed. The photosynthesis of the plants has later produced the oxygen being present in the recent atmosphere. The question whether pollution could affect the auto-stabilization loop of the atmosphere is also discussed. Finally the possibility of life on the Mars is studied.

  17. Investigation of temperature stability of ITO films characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troyan Pavel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents research of thermal stability of optical and electro-physical parameters of ITO films deposited using various techniques. Variation of optical and electro-physical parameters was recorded using spectroscopy, and Hall’s and four-probe measurements. The best thermal stability was demonstrated by ITO films deposited by metal target sputtering In(90%/Sn(10% in mixture of gases O2 (25% + Ar (75% with further annealing in air atmosphere. This enables to apply this technique for production of thin film transparent resistive elements capable to heat the translucent structures up to 100°C without deterioration of their parameters.

  18. Structures, stabilities, and electronic properties for rare-earth lanthanum doped gold clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Ya-Ru

    2015-01-01

    The structures, stabilities, and electronic properties of rare-earth lanthanum doped gold La 2 Au n (n = 1-9) and pure gold Au n (n ≤ 11) clusters have been investigated by using density functional theory. The optimized geometries show that the lowest energy structures of La 2 Au n clusters favour the 3D structure at n ≥ 3. The lanthanum atoms can strongly enhance the stabilities of gold clusters and tend to occupy the most highly coordinated position. By analysing the gap, vertical ionization potential, and chemical hardness, it is found that the La 2 Au 6 isomer possesses higher stability for small-sized La 2 Au n clusters (n = 1-9). The charges in the La 2 Au n clusters transfer from La atoms to the Au n host. In addition, Wiberg bond indices analysis reveals that the intensity of different bonds of La 2 Au n clusters exhibits a sequence of La-La bond > La-Au bond > Au-Au bond.

  19. Robust stability analysis of large power systems using the structured singular value theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos, R.; Sarmiento, H. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Messina, A.R. [Cinvestav, Graduate Program in Electrical Engineering, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    This paper examines the application of structured singular value (SSV) theory to analyse robust stability of complex power systems with respect to a set of structured uncertainties. Based on SSV theory and the frequency sweep method, techniques for robust analysis of large-scale power systems are developed. The main interest is focused on determining robust stability for varying operating conditions and uncertainties in the structure of the power system. The applicability of the proposed techniques is verified through simulation studies on a large-scale power system. In particular, results for the system are considered for a wide range of uncertainties of operating conditions. Specifically, the developed technique is used to estimate the effect of variations in the parameters of a major system inter-tie on the nominal stability of a critical inter-area mode. (Author)

  20. New insights into structural determinants of prion protein folding and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Prions are the etiological agent of fatal neurodegenerative diseases called prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious disorders. Prions are due to post-translational modifications of the cellular prion protein leading to the formation of a β-sheet enriched conformer with altered biochemical properties. The molecular events causing prion formation in sporadic prion diseases are still elusive. Recently, we published a research elucidating the contribution of major structural determinants and environmental factors in prion protein folding and stability. Our study highlighted the crucial role of octarepeats in stabilizing prion protein; the presence of a highly enthalpically stable intermediate state in prion-susceptible species; and the role of disulfide bridge in preserving native fold thus avoiding the misfolding to a β-sheet enriched isoform. Taking advantage from these findings, in this work we present new insights into structural determinants of prion protein folding and stability.

  1. Structural Stability of Light-harvesting Protein LH2 Adsorbed on Mesoporous Silica Supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Yuuta; Itoh, Tetsuji; Matsuura, Shun-ichi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the reversible thermal deformation of the membrane protein light-harvesting complex LH2 adsorbed on mesoporous silica (MPS) supports. The LH2 complex from Thermochromatium tepidum cells was conjugated to MPS supports with a series of pore diameter (2.4 to 10.6 nm), and absorption spectra of the resulting LH2/MPS conjugates were observed over a temperature range of 273 - 313 K in order to examine the structure of the LH2 adsorbed on the MPS support. The experimental results confirmed that a slight ellipsoidal deformation of LH2 was induced by adsorption on the MPS supports. On the other hand, the structural stability of LH2 was not perturbed by the adsorption. Since the pore diameter of MPS support did not influence the structural stability of LH2, it could be considered that the spatial confinement of LH2 in size-matches pore did not improve the structural stability of LH2.

  2. Thermo-cleavable polymers: Materials with enhanced photochemical stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manceau, Matthieu; Petersen, Martin Helgesen; Krebs, Frederik C

    2010-01-01

    Photochemical stability of three thermo-cleavable polymers was investigated as thin films under atmospheric conditions. A significant increase in lifetime was observed once the side-chain was cleaved emphasizing the detrimental effect of solubilizing groups on the photochemical stability of conju......Photochemical stability of three thermo-cleavable polymers was investigated as thin films under atmospheric conditions. A significant increase in lifetime was observed once the side-chain was cleaved emphasizing the detrimental effect of solubilizing groups on the photochemical stability...... of conjugated polymers. In addition to their ease of processing, thermo-cleavable polymers thus also offer a greater intrinsic stability under illumination....

  3. Magnetic Doppler imaging considering atmospheric structure modifications due to local abundances: a luxury or a necessity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochukhov, O.; Wade, G. A.; Shulyak, D.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic Doppler imaging is currently the most powerful method of interpreting high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of stars. This technique has provided the very first maps of stellar magnetic field topologies reconstructed from time series of full Stokes vector spectra, revealing the presence of small-scale magnetic fields on the surfaces of Ap stars. These studies were recently criticised by Stift et al., who claimed that magnetic inversions are not robust and are seriously undermined by neglecting a feedback on the Stokes line profiles from the local atmospheric structure in the regions of enhanced metal abundance. We show that Stift et al. misinterpreted published magnetic Doppler imaging results and consistently neglected some of the most fundamental principles behind magnetic mapping. Using state-of-the-art opacity sampling model atmosphere and polarized radiative transfer codes, we demonstrate that the variation of atmospheric structure across the surface of a star with chemical spots affects the local continuum intensity but is negligible for the normalized local Stokes profiles except for the rare situation of a very strong line in an extremely Fe-rich atmosphere. For the disc-integrated spectra of an Ap star with extreme abundance variations, we find that the assumption of a mean model atmosphere leads to moderate errors in Stokes I but is negligible for the circular and linear polarization spectra. Employing a new magnetic inversion code, which incorporates the horizontal variation of atmospheric structure induced by chemical spots, we reconstructed new maps of magnetic field and Fe abundance for the bright Ap star α2 CVn. The resulting distribution of chemical spots changes insignificantly compared to the previous modelling based on a single model atmosphere, while the magnetic field geometry does not change at all. This shows that the assertions by Stift et al. are exaggerated as a consequence of unreasonable assumptions and

  4. Improving structural stability of water-dispersed MCM-41 silica nanoparticles through post-synthesis pH aging process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varache, Mathieu; Bezverkhyy, Igor [UMR 6303 CNRS-Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (France); Bouyer, Florence [Inserm U866, Equipe Chimiothérapie, métabolisme des lipides et réponse immunitaire anti-tumorale (France); Chassagnon, Rémi; Baras, Florence; Bouyer, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.bouyer@u-bourgogne.fr [UMR 6303 CNRS-Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (France)

    2015-09-15

    The colloidal and structural stabilities of MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are of great importance in order to prepare optimal nanovectors. In this paper, MSNs (approximatively 160 nm in diameter) were synthesized using n-cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a template and tetraethyl orthosilicate as a silica source under high N{sub 2} flow (MSN/N{sub 2}) to obtain stable dispersions in water. The degradation of the porous nanoparticles was investigated by immersion in water. The morphology and the porous structure were studied by TEM, XRD, N{sub 2} sorption, and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR and were compared to that of MSNs prepared in ambient air (MSN/air). The volumetric properties of the MSN/N{sub 2} after 1 day in water were drastically more decreased than MSN/air (a pore volume decrease of 85 % for MSN/N{sub 2} and 59 % for MSN/air) and the 2D-hexagonal porous structure was totally lost. Furthermore, synthesizing MSNs under a high N{sub 2} flow leads to a decrease in the synthesis yield (45 % MSN/N{sub 2} and 75 % for MSN/air). The lower structural stability of the MSN/N{sub 2} is explained by the lower polycondensation degree of the MSN/N{sub 2} observed by {sup 29}Si MAS NMR (Q{sup 4}/Q{sup 3} = 0.86 for MSN/N{sub 2} and 1.61 for MSN/air) and the lower silica molar ratio in the nanomaterials (SiO{sub 2}/CTA = 3.9 for MSN/N{sub 2} 7.1 for MSN/air). This allows for enhanced solubilization of silica in water. Four strategies were hence evaluated in order to reinforce the porous structure of the MSNs. Among them, the most efficient route was based on a pH adjustment of the colloidal suspension (pH 7.5) after 2 h of synthesis without any purification and while keeping a N{sub 2} static atmosphere (called MSN/N{sub 2}/7.5). After 1 day in water, the volumetric and structural properties of MSN/N{sub 2}/7.5 were similar to that obtained for MSN/air. The improvement of the stability arose as a result of the increase in the silica condensation (Q{sup 4

  5. The structure of nuclei far from beta stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zganjar, E.F.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the structural of nuclei for from beta stability of the following isotopes: thallium isotopes; mercury isotopes; gold isotopes; platinum isotopes; iridium isotopes; the neutron deficient rare-earth, Z = 57-72 region, and the neutron deficient Z = 50-56 region; also discussed are in-beam spectroscopy in the A = 70 region and shape coexistence, intruder states, and EO transitions

  6. The stability of gabion walls for earth retaining structures

    OpenAIRE

    Mahyuddin Ramli; T.J.r. Karasu; Eethar Thanon Dawood

    2013-01-01

    The stability of earth retaining structures in flood prone areas has become a serious problem in many countries. The two most basic causes of failure arising from flooding are scouring and erosion of the foundation of the superstructure. Hence, a number of structures like bridges employ scour-arresting devices, e.g., gabions to acting on the piers and abutments during flooding. Research was therefore undertaken to improve gabion resistance against lateral movement by means of an interlocking ...

  7. Atmospheric structure and helium abundance on Saturn from Cassini/UVIS and CIRS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, T. T.; Guerlet, S.

    2018-06-01

    We combine measurements from stellar occultations observed by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and limb scans observed by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) to create empirical atmospheric structure models for Saturn corresponding to the locations probed by the occultations. The results cover multiple locations at low to mid-latitudes between the spring of 2005 and the fall of 2015. We connect the temperature-pressure (T-P) profiles retrieved from the CIRS limb scans in the stratosphere to the T-P profiles in the thermosphere retrieved from the UVIS occultations. We calculate the altitudes corresponding to the pressure levels in each case based on our best fit composition model that includes H2, He, CH4 and upper limits on H. We match the altitude structure to the density profile in the thermosphere that is retrieved from the occultations. Our models depend on the abundance of helium and we derive a volume mixing ratio of 11 ± 2% for helium in the lower atmosphere based on a statistical analysis of the values derived for 32 different occultation locations. We also derive the mean temperature and methane profiles in the upper atmosphere and constrain their variability. Our results are consistent with enhanced heating at the polar auroral region and a dynamically active upper atmosphere.

  8. Local time dependence of the thermal structure in the Venusian equatorial region revealed by Akatsuki radio occultation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, H.; Fukuhara, T.; Takagi, M.; Imamura, T.; Sugimoto, N.; Sagawa, H.

    2017-12-01

    The radio occultation technique is one of the most useful methods to retrieve vertical temperature profiles in planetary atmospheres. Ultra-Stable Oscillator (USO) onboard Venus Climate Orbiter, Akatsuki, enables us to investigate the thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere between about 40-90 km levels. It is expected that 35 temperature profiles will be obtained by the radio occultation measurements of Akatsuki until August 2017. Static stability derived from the temperature profiles shows its local time dependence above the cloud top level at low-latitudes equatorward of 25˚. The vertical profiles of the static stability in the dawn and dusk regions have maxima at 77 km and 82 km levels, respectively. A general circulation model (GCM) for the Venus atmosphere (AFES-Venus) reproduced the thermal structures above the cloud top qualitatively consistent with the radio occultation measurements; the maxima of the static stability are seen both in the dawn and dusk regions, and the local maximum of the static stability in the dusk region is located at a highler level than in the dawn region. Comparing the thermal structures between the radio occultation measurements and the GCM results, it is suggested that the distribution of the static stability above the cloud top could be strongly affected by the diurnal tide. The thermal tide influences on the thermal structure as well as atmospheric motions above the cloud level. In addition, it is shown that zonally averaged zonal wind at about 80 km altitude could be roughly estimated from the radio occultation measurements using the dispersion relation of the internal gravity wave.

  9. Temperature structure of the Uranian upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, J. L.; Dunham, E.

    1979-01-01

    The temperature structure of the upper atmosphere of Uranus at two locations on the planet was determined from observations of the occultation of the star SAO158687 by Uranus on 10 March 1977, carried out at the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The temperature-pressure relationships obtained from the immersion and emersion data for 7280 A channel show peak-to-peak variations of 45 K for immersion and 35 K for emersion. The mean temperature for both immersion and emersion profiles is about 100 K, which shows that Uranus has a temperature inversion between 0.001 mbar and the 100 mbar level probed by IR measurements. Both profiles show wavelike temperature variations, which may be due to dynamical or photochemical processes.

  10. Composition and structure of the martian upper atmosphere: analysis of results from viking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, M B; Kong, T Y; Yung, Y L; Nier, A O

    1976-12-11

    Densities for carbon dioxide measured by the upper atmospheric mass spectrometers on Viking 1 and Viking 2 are analyzed to yield height profiles for the temperature of the martian atmosphere between 120 and 200 kilometers. Densities for nitrogen and argon are used to derive vertical profiles for the eddy diffusion coefficient over the same height range. The upper atmosphere of Mars is surprisingly cold with average temperatures for both Viking 1 and Viking 2 of less than 200 degrees K, and there is significant vertical structure. Model calculations are presented and shown to be in good agreement with measured concentrations of carbon monoxide, oxygen, and nitric oxide.

  11. Frame Stability of Tunnel‐Structured Cryptomelane Nanofibers: The Role of Tunnel Cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Tao; Norby, Poul

    2013-01-01

    precursor to the tunnel‐structured cryptomelane, in which the K+ ions play important roles in templating and stabilizing the tunneled framework. The presence of tunnel K+ ions also enhances the frame stability of the cryptomelane nanofibers at elevated temperatures. The formation of a layered KxMn2O4 (x ≈ 0...

  12. Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Black CarbonReference Materials and Individual Carbonaceous AtmosphericAerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Marten, Bryan D.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2007-04-25

    The carbon-to-oxygen ratios and graphitic nature of a rangeof black carbon standard reference materials (BC SRMs), high molecularmass humic-like substances (HULIS) and atmospheric particles are examinedusing scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) coupled with nearedge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. UsingSTXM/NEXAFS, individual particles with diameter>100 nm are studied,thus the diversity of atmospheric particles collected during a variety offield missions is assessed. Applying a semi-quantitative peak fittingmethod to the NEXAFS spectra enables a comparison of BC SRMs and HULIS toparticles originating from anthropogenic combustion and biomass burns,thus allowing determination of the suitability of these materials forrepresenting atmospheric particles. Anthropogenic combustion and biomassburn particles can be distinguished from one another using both chemicalbonding and structural ordering information. While anthropogeniccombustion particles are characterized by a high proportion ofaromatic-C, the presence of benzoquinone and are highly structurallyordered, biomass burn particles exhibit lower structural ordering, asmaller proportion of aromatic-C and contain a much higher proportion ofoxygenated functional groups.

  13. Elastic stability of biaxially loaded longitudinally stiffened composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, A. V.; Tamekuni, M.; Tripp, L. L.

    1973-01-01

    A linear analysis method is presented for the elastic stability of structures of uniform cross section, that may be idealized as an assemblage of laminated plate-strips, flat and curved, and beams. Each plate-strip and beam covers the entire length of the structure and is simply supported on the edges normal to the longitudinal axis. Arbitrary boundary conditions may be specified on any external longitudinal side of plate-strips. The structure or selected plate-strips may be loaded in any desired combination of inplane biaxial loads. The analysis simultaneously considers all modes of instability and is applicable for the buckling of laminated composite structures. Some numerical results are presented to indicate possible applications.

  14. Influences of the Structure of Lipids on Thermal Stability of Lipid Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai Nan-Nan; Zhou Xin; Li Ming

    2015-01-01

    The binding free energy (BFE) of lipid to lipid bilayer is a critical factor to determine the thermal or mechanical stability of the bilayer. Although the molecular structure of lipids has significant impacts on BFE of the lipid, there lacks a systematic study on this issue. In this paper we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation to investigate this problem for several typical phospholipids. We find that both the tail length and tail unsaturation can significantly affect the BFE of lipids but in opposite way, namely, BFE decreases linearly with increasing length, but increases linearly with addition of unsaturated bonds. Inspired by the specific structure of cholesterol which is a crucial component of biomembrane, we also find that introduction of carbo-ring-like structures to the lipid tail or to the bilayer may greatly enhance the stability of the bilayer. Our simulation also shows that temperature can influence the bilayer stability and this effect can be significant when the bilayer undergoes phase transition. These results may be helpful to the design of liposome or other self-assembled lipid systems. (paper)

  15. Stability of Ruddlesden-Popper-structured oxides in humid conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtimäki, M.; Yamauchi, H.; Karppinen, M.

    2013-08-01

    Some of layered transition-metal oxides are known to react with atmospheric humidity to form through topotactic intercalation reactions new water-containing layered structures. Here we investigate the influence of oxygen content (7-δ) of the Ruddlesden-Popper-structured Sr3FeMO7-δ (M=Ni, Mn, Ti) oxides on the water-intercalation reaction. It is found that their oxygen contents influence greatly the reactivity of the phases with water. Other factors possibly affecting the reactivity are discussed on the basis of the present data in combination with a comprehensive review of previous works on Ruddlesden-Popper and related layered oxide phases.

  16. Double-Layer Structured CO2 Adsorbent Functionalized with Modified Polyethyleneimine for High Physical and Chemical Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sunbin; Jung, Hyunchul; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, Ki Bong

    2018-06-18

    CO 2 capture using polyethyleneimine (PEI)-impregnated silica adsorbents has been receiving a lot of attention. However, the absence of physical stability (evaporation and leaching of amine) and chemical stability (urea formation) of the PEI-impregnated silica adsorbent has been generally established. Therefore, in this study, a double-layer impregnated structure, developed using modified PEI, is newly proposed to enhance the physical and chemical stabilities of the adsorbent. Epoxy-modified PEI and diepoxide-cross-linked PEI were impregnated via a dry impregnation method in the first and second layers, respectively. The physical stability of the double-layer structured adsorbent was noticeably enhanced when compared to the conventional adsorbents with a single layer. In addition to the enhanced physical stability, the result of simulated temperature swing adsorption cycles revealed that the double-layer structured adsorbent presented a high potential working capacity (3.5 mmol/g) and less urea formation under CO 2 -rich regeneration conditions. The enhanced physical and chemical stabilities as well as the high CO 2 working capacity of the double-layer structured adsorbent were mainly attributed to the second layer consisting of diepoxide-cross-linked PEI.

  17. Understanding structure-stability relationships of Candida antartica lipase B in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Diego, Teresa; Lozano, Pedro; Gmouh, Said; Vaultier, Michel; Iborra, José L

    2005-01-01

    Two different water-immiscible ionic liquids (ILs), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidizolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide and butyltrimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, were used for butyl butyrate synthesis from vinyl butyrate catalyzed by Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) at 2% (v/v) water content and 50 degrees C. Both the synthetic activity and stability of the enzyme in these ILs were enhanced as compared to those in hexane. Circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopic techniques have been used over a period of 4 days to determine structural changes in the enzyme associated with differences in its stability for each assayed medium. CALB showed a loss in residual activity higher than 75% after 4 days of incubation in both water and hexane media at 50 degrees C, being related to great changes in both alpha-helix and beta-strand secondary structures. The stabilization of CALB, which was observed in the two ILs studied, was associated with both the maintenance of the 50% of initial alpha-helix content and the enhancement of beta-strands. Furthermore, intrinsic fluorescence studies clearly showed how a classical enzyme unfolding was occurring with time in both water and hexane media. However, the structural changes associated with the incubation of the enzyme in both ILs might be attributed to a compact and active enzyme conformation, resulting in an enhancement of the stability in these nonaqueous environments.

  18. Risk of development of solid cancer and its relation with the classes of Pasquill-Gifford atmospheric stability in RDD scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulhosa, Valquiria Miranda

    2018-01-01

    The release of radioactive material into the environment can lead to serious consequences that include the risk of cancer induction in the affected population. This work intends to study the influence of the Pasquill-Gilfford atmospheric stability classes on the consequences of a simulated RDD event with respect to the risk of developing solid cancer in the exposed population. The HotSpot health Physics Code software was used for the simulation of the radiological scenario that allows to estimate the doses received by exposed individuals and the environmental contamination at the event site. The HotSpot code uses the Gaussian model to simulate the dispersion of radiological material in the atmosphere. Conservatively, it generates data to evaluate the contamination of an area of interest. These data allow to know the Total Effective Equivalent Dose (TEDE), which corresponds to the combined dose of all exposure routes (external and internal). The estimated dose was used as input data for the biostatistical model developed by the Research Foundation on Radiation Effects (RERF) to estimate the risk of the related morbidity development. The model equation estimate the risk of developing solid cancer. The data from HotSpot enabled the calculation of the affected areas, doses in each area, as well as relative risk (RR) of solid cancer estimation for the affected population, taking into account age and sex and its possible relation with the classes of atmospheric stability. These estimates can be a good resource for a first evaluation of such a scenario, accounting for the recommended dose limits for shelter and evacuation and, consequently, a valuable decision support for the ongoing radiological event. (author)

  19. Stability analysis and structural rules of titanium dioxide clusters (TiO2)n with n = 1-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weiwei; Han Ye; Yao Shuyu; Sun Haiqing

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: · We investigated the structure and stability of (TiO 2 ) n clusters with n = 1-9. · Some initial structures are introduced and proved to be the real global minimum. · We summarized the structural rules for small (TiO 2 ) n clusters. · The bonding features for the energy increment or decrement of the clusters are investigated. · A general shift of stability and reactivity with size for (TiO 2 ) n clusters. - Abstract: Atomic clusters have been considered as models for fundamental mechanistic insight into complex surfaces and catalysts. The structure and stability of (TiO 2 ) n clusters with n = 1-9 are investigated using the b3lyp hybrid density functional method in this paper. Some of the clusters are proposed initially and proved to be the real global minima. The stability and band gap of the clusters as a function of size are also investigated. The structural rules of the clusters are first summarized. The lowest-lying (TiO 2 ) n isomers tend to form some compact rather than quasi-linear or circular structures. The oxygen atom in 4-fold coordination and the titanium atom in 4-fold coordination favor the cluster stability. The 5-fold coordinated Ti-atom, the Ti-Ti bond and the terminal Ti-O bond lead to stability penalty for the clusters. No evidence for a regular variation in stability or reactivity with size of the clusters has shown. The structural rules can serve as guiding factors for formation research and structure design of (TiO 2 ) n and other transition metal oxide clusters.

  20. Structural Stability and Vibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiggers, Sine Leergaard; Pedersen, Pauli

    This book offers an integrated introduction to the topic of stability and vibration. Strikingly, it describes stability as a function of boundary conditions and eigenfrequency as a function of both boundary conditions and column force. Based on a post graduate course held by the author at the Uni...... and their derivation, thus stimulating them to write interactive and dynamic programs to analyze instability and vibrational modes....

  1. The effect of relativity on stability of Copernicium phases, their electronic structure and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čenčariková, Hana; Legut, Dominik

    2018-05-01

    The phase stability of the various crystalline structures of the super-heavy element Copernicium was determined based on the first-principles calculations with different levels of the relativistic effects. We utilized the Darwin term, mass-velocity, and spin-orbit interaction with the single electron framework of the density functional theory while treating the exchange and correlation effects using local density approximations. It is found that the spin-orbit coupling is the key component to stabilize the body-centered cubic (bcc) structure over the hexagonal closed packed (hcp) structure, which is in accord with Sol. Stat. Comm. 152 (2012) 530, but in contrast to Atta-Fynn and Ray (2015) [11], Gaston et al. (2007) [10], Papaconstantopoulos (2015) [9]. It seems that the main role here is the correct description of the semi-core relativistic 6p1/2 orbitals. The all other investigated structures, i.e. face-centered cubic (fcc) , simple cubic (sc) as well as rhombohedral (rh) structures are higher in energy. The criteria of mechanical stability were investigated based on the calculated elastic constants, identifying the phase instability of fcc and rh structures, but surprisingly confirm the stability of the energetically higher sc structure. In addition, the pressure-induced structural transition between two stable sc and bcc phases has been detected. The ground-state bcc structure exhibits the highest elastic anisotropy from single elements of the Periodic table. At last, we support the experimental findings that Copernicium is a metal.

  2. Evaluating the atmospheric dispersion characteristics of Suez Canal area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, A.I.M.; Sabek, G.; Abd El-Aal, M.; El-Ghamry, M.

    1988-01-01

    The atmospheric dispersion characteristics of Suez Canal area were determined for subsequent estimation of the environmental impacts of transporting radioactive or hazardous material through the Suez Canal and for the study of environmental pollution resulting from fossil power plants. The atmospheric stability classes were determined at three stations: Port Said, Ismailia and Port Tawfiek (Suez). For achieving this purpose, a computer program was developed through which the atmospheric stability classes A - F and insolation were determined by combining the measured meteorological parameters and the sun elevation which was calculated by another developed computer program with the help of astronomical tables. The results show that the most frequent stability class at Port-Said and Suez is stability class D (neutral condition), whereas at Ismailia area the moderately stable class F, which is the inversion condition with unfavourable dispersion characteristics, is prevailing. The determination of the frequency of stability classes will make it possible to calculate the concentration of a pollutant at a given distance from the source and therefore will be used in dose assessment

  3. The origin of atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, Gy.

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of the atmosphere of the Earth is described. Starting from the hot Universe the main steps of the ''cooling-down'' process as the different states of the condensation of the matter are discussed. After this nuclear evolution the chemical evolution could start on the solid Earth's crust. In the reductive primordial atmosphere mainly due to ultraviolet rays the basic molecules for life as sugars and amino acids were formed. The photosynthesis of the plants has later produced the oxygen being present in the recent atmosphere. The question whether the pollution could affect the auto-stabilization loop of the atmosphere is also discussed. Finally the possibility of life on the Mars is studied. (Sz.Z.)

  4. Monte Carlo analysis of critical phenomenon of the Ising model on memory stabilizer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viteri, C. Ricardo; Tomita, Yu; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the critical temperature of the Ising model on a set of graphs representing a concatenated three-bit error-correction code. The graphs are derived from the stabilizer formalism used in quantum error correction. The stabilizer for a subspace is defined as the group of Pauli operators whose eigenvalues are +1 on the subspace. The group can be generated by a subset of operators in the stabilizer, and the choice of generators determines the structure of the graph. The Wolff algorithm, together with the histogram method and finite-size scaling, is used to calculate both the critical temperature and the critical exponents of each structure. The simulations show that the choice of stabilizer generators, both the number and the geometry, has a large effect on the critical temperature.

  5. Structural properties and out-of-plane stability of roller bent steel arches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    In contemporary architecture the use of steel arches has seen a significant increase. They are applied in buildings and large span bridges, combining structural design with architectural merits. For arches lacking lateral support (or freestanding arches) the out-of-plane structural stability

  6. Structural homeostasis in the nervous system: A balancing act for wiring plasticity and stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eYin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experience-dependent modifications of neural circuits provide the cellular basis for functional adaptation and learning, while presenting significant challenges to the stability of neural networks. The nervous system copes with these perturbations through a variety of compensatory mechanisms with distinct spatial and temporal profiles. Mounting evidence suggests that structural plasticity, through modifications of the number and structure of synapses, or changes in local and long-range connectivity, might contribute to the stabilization of network activity and serve as an important component of the homeostatic regulation of the nervous system. Conceptually similar to the homeostatic regulation of synaptic strength and efficacy, homeostatic structural plasticity has a profound and lasting impact on the intrinsic excitability of the neuron and circuit properties, yet remains largely unexplored. In this review, we examine recent reports describing structural modifications associated with functional compensation in both developing and adult nervous systems, and discuss the potential role for structural homeostasis in maintaining network stability and its implications in physiological and pathological conditions of the nervous systems.

  7. Oxidative stability during storage of structured lipids produced from fish oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nina Skall; Xu, Xuebing; Timm Heinrich, Maike

    2004-01-01

    Structured lipids produced by enzymatic or chemical methods for different applications have been receiving considerable attention. The oxidative stability of a randomized structured lipid (RFO), produced by chemical interesterification from fish oil (FO) and tricaprylin, and a specific structured...... lipid (SFO), produced by enzymatic interesterification from the same oil and caprylic acid, was compared with the stability of FO. Oils were stored at 2degreesC for 11 wk followed by storage at 20degreesC for 6 wk. In addition, the antioxidative effect of adding the metal chelators EDTA or citric acid...

  8. Atmospheric stabilization of CO2 emissions: Near-term reductions and absolute versus intensity-based targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timilsina, Govinda R.

    2008-01-01

    This study analyzes CO 2 emissions reduction targets for various countries and geopolitical regions by the year 2030 to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO 2 at 450 ppm (550 ppm including non-CO 2 greenhouse gases) level. It also determines CO 2 intensity cuts that would be required in those countries and regions if the emission reductions were to be achieved through intensity-based targets without curtailing their expected economic growth. Considering that the stabilization of CO 2 concentrations at 450 ppm requires the global trend of CO 2 emissions to be reversed before 2030, this study develops two scenarios: reversing the global CO 2 trend in (i) 2020 and (ii) 2025. The study shows that global CO 2 emissions would be limited at 42 percent above 1990 level in 2030 if the increasing trend of global CO 2 emissions were to be reversed by 2020. If reversing the trend is delayed by 5 years, global CO 2 emissions in 2030 would be 52 percent higher than the 1990 level. The study also finds that to achieve these targets while maintaining expected economic growth, the global average CO 2 intensity would require a 68 percent drop from the 1990 level or a 60 percent drop from the 2004 level by 2030

  9. Density effects on turbulent boundary layer structure: From the atmosphere to hypersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Owen J. H.

    This dissertation examines the effects of density gradients on turbulent boundary layer statistics and structure using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Two distinct cases were examined: the thermally stable atmospheric surface layer characteristic of nocturnal or polar conditions, and the hypersonic bounder layer characteristic of high speed aircraft and reentering spacecraft. Previous experimental studies examining the effects of stability on turbulent boundary layers identified two regimes, weak and strong stability, separated by a critical bulk stratification with a collapse of near-wall turbulence thought to be intrinsic to the strongly stable regime. To examine the characteristics of these two regimes, PIV measurements were obtained in conjunction with the mean temperature profile in a low Reynolds number facility over smooth and rough surfaces. The turbulent stresses were found to scale with the wall shear stress in the weakly stable regime prior relaminarization at a critical stratification. Changes in profile shape were shown to correlate with the local stratification profile, and as a result, the collapse of near-wall turbulence is not intrinsic to the strongly stable regime. The critical bulk stratification was found to be sensitive to surface roughness and potentially Reynolds number, and not constant as previously thought. Further investigations examined turbulent boundary layer structure and changes to the motions that contribute to turbulent production. To study the characteristics of a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer at Mach 8, significant improvements were required to the implementation and error characterization of PIV. Limited resolution or dynamic range effects were minimized and the effects of high shear on cross-correlation routines were examined. Significantly, an examination of particle dynamics, subject to fluid inertia, compressibility and non-continuum effects, revealed that particle frequency responses to turbulence can be up to an

  10. Microflora and structural stability of soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckert, A.; Chone, Therese; Jacquin, F.; Institut National Polytechnique, 54 - Nancy; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy

    1975-01-01

    Water stable aggregates produced during the incubation of a loamy soil amended with glucose 14 C show a quite differing evolution of their physical properties and their organic matter according to the time of incubation after which they have been isolated from the soil by water sieving. The aggregates, built up during the first week of incubation, therefore during the maximal activity stage of the microflora of the soil, present the highest stability against biodegradation induced by a second incubation process, even if this one has reached six weeks. This evolution of the physical properties of the aggregates, is essentially in relationship with the microbially synthetized organic matter and especially the polysaccharides preferentially incorporated into the humine fraction. This relatively labile microbial humine has a high aggregating effect, the polysaccharide chains forming several bonds between the neighbouring clay surfaces and building up stable structural units. The mechanical strength of these aggregates is related to the stabilization of the humine produced previously and whose evolution towards a relatively stable form seems to be the result of two mechanisms: a secundary biodegradation parallel to a higher humification process of the organic matter and a increase of the bonds between polysaccharides and clay surfaces favoured by the alternation of wetting and drying [fr

  11. Electronic structure and phase stability during martensitic transformation in Al-doped ZrCu intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Feng; Shen Ping; Liu Tao; Lin Qiaoli; Jiang Qichuan

    2010-01-01

    Martensitic transformation, phase stability and electronic structure of Al-doped ZrCu intermetallics were investigated by experiments and first-principles calculations using the pseudopotentials plane wave method. The formation energy calculations indicate that the stability of the ZrCu phase increases with the increasing Al content. Al plays a decisive role in controlling the formation and microstructures of the martensite phases in Zr-Cu-Al alloys. The total energy difference between ZrCu (B2) austenite and ZrCu martensite plays an important role in the martensitic transformation. The phase stability is dependent on its electronic structure. The densities of states (DOS) of the intermetallics were discussed in detail.

  12. Balancing atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goreau, T.J. (Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory, Univ. of the West Indies (JM))

    1990-01-01

    Rising carbon dioxide and global temperatures are causing increasing worldwide concern, and pressure towards an international law of the atmosphere is rapidly escalating, yet widespread misconceptions about the greenhouse effect's inevitability, time scale, and causes have inhibited effective consensus and action. Observations from Antarctic ice cores, Amazonian rain forests, and Carribean coral reefs suggest that the biological effects of climate change may be more severe than climate models predict. Efforts to limit emissions from fossil-fuel combustion alone are incapable of stabilizing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide requires coupled measures to balance sources and sinks of the gas, and will only be viable with large-scale investments in increased sustainable productivity on degraded tropical soils, and in long-term research on renewable energy and biomass product development in the developing countries. A mechanism is outlined which directly links fossil-fuel combustion sources of carbon dioxide to removal via increasing biotic productivity and storage. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis suggests that such measures are very affordable, costing far less than inaction. (With 88 refs.).

  13. Balancing atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goreau, T J [Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory, Univ. of the West Indies (JM)

    1990-01-01

    Rising carbon dioxide and global temperatures are causing increasing worldwide concern, and pressure towards an international law of the atmosphere is rapidly escalating, yet widespread misconceptions about the greenhouse effect's inevitability, time scale, and causes have inhibited effective consensus and action. Observations from Antarctic ice cores, Amazonian rain forests, and Carribean coral reefs suggest that the biological effects of climate change may be more severe than climate models predict. Efforts to limit emissions from fossil-fuel combustion alone are incapable of stabilizing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide requires coupled measures to balance sources and sinks of the gas, and will only be viable with large-scale investments in increased sustainable productivity on degraded tropical soils, and in long-term research on renewable energy and biomass product development in the developing countries. A mechanism is outlined which directly links fossil-fuel combustion sources of carbon dioxide to removal via increasing biotic productivity and storage. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis suggests that such measures are very affordable, costing far less than inaction. (With 88 refs.).

  14. Effects of PEG size on structure, function and stability of PEGylated BSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Bitten; Fee, Conan J.; Westh, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The effects of PEGylation on the structural, thermal and functional stability of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated using BSA and 6 linear mono-PEGylated BSA compounds. The secondary and tertiary structure of BSA measured by circular dichroism (CD) was independent of PEGylation. In cont...

  15. Turbulence and dispersion flow of radioisotopes in the atmospheric Boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Said, S.I.M.

    2013-01-01

    There is an increase in the study of atmospheric pollution and harmful impact on environment, in this work attention was forward to atmospheric diffusion equation to evaluate the concentration pollution with different methods under different stability conditions. The material in the present thesis is organized in six chapters in the following way: Chapter (1), it describe as. In section 1.1, General Introduction, In section 1.2, Turbulence, In section 1.3, Turbulence of the atmosphere. In section 1.4, Atmospheric stability. In section 1.5, Atmospheric pollution. In section 1.6, Behavior of effluent released to the atmosphere. In section 1.7, Source Types. In section 1.8, Atmospheric Dispersion Theories (Modeling). In section 1.9 Comparison between Some Models. In section 1.10, The Planetary Boundary Layer. Chapter (2), it describe as: In section 2.1 , Introduction. In section 2.2, Analytical Method. In section 2.3, Numerical Method. In section 2.4, Statistical method. In chapter (3), it describe as: In section 3.1, Introduction. In section 3.2, Analytical solution. In section 3.3, statically methods.Chapter (4), it contain following: In section 4.1, Introduction. In section 4.2, Proposed model structure. In section 4.3, the effective height. In section 4.4, Mathematical technique In section 4. 5, Case study. In section 4.6, Verification. Chapter (5), one can find as: In section 5.1, Introduction. In section 5.2, Gaussian distributions. In section 5.3, Dispersion parameters schemes. In section 5.4, Result and discussion. In section 5.5 Statistical methods. Chapter (6), it can be arranged in the following: In section 6.1, Introduction. In section 6.2, Model formulation. In section 6.3, Results and Discussion. In section 6.4, Statistical method.

  16. A steep road to climate stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedlingstein, P [CEA Saclay, Inst Pierre Simon Laplace, Lab Climate and Environm Sci, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2008-07-01

    The only way to stabilize Earth's climate is to stabilize the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, but future changes in the carbon cycle might make this more difficult than has been thought. (author)

  17. A steep road to climate stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedlingstein, P.

    2008-01-01

    The only way to stabilize Earth's climate is to stabilize the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, but future changes in the carbon cycle might make this more difficult than has been thought. (author)

  18. Solidified structure and leaching properties of metallurgical wastewater treatment sludge after solidification/stabilization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanović, Dragana Đ; Kamberović, Željko J; Korać, Marija S; Rogan, Jelena R

    2016-01-01

    The presented study investigates solidification/stabilization process of hazardous heavy metals/arsenic sludge, generated after the treatment of the wastewater from a primary copper smelter. Fly ash and fly ash with addition of hydrated lime and Portland composite cement were studied as potential binders. The effectiveness of the process was evaluated by unconfined compressive strength (UCS) testing, leaching tests (EN 12457-4 and TCLP) and acid neutralization capacity (ANC) test. It was found that introduction of cement into the systems increased the UCS, led to reduced leaching of Cu, Ni and Zn, but had a negative effect on the ANC. Gradual addition of lime resulted in decreased UCS, significant reduction of metals leaching and high ANC, due to the excess of lime that remained unreacted in pozzolanic reaction. Stabilization of more than 99% of heavy metals and 90% of arsenic has been achieved. All the samples had UCS above required value for safe disposal. In addition to standard leaching tests, solidificates were exposed to atmospheric conditions during one year in order to determine the actual leaching level of metals in real environment. It can be concluded that the EN 12457-4 test is more similar to the real environmental conditions, while the TCLP test highly exaggerates the leaching of metals. The paper also presents results of differential acid neutralization (d-AN) analysis compared with mineralogical study done by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The d-AN coupled with Eh-pH (Pourbaix) diagrams were proven to be a new effective method for analysis of amorphous solidified structure.

  19. Magnetospheric structure and atmospheric Joule heating of habitable planets orbiting M-dwarf stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.; Garraffo, C.; Poppenhaeger, K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Glocer, A. [NASA/GSFC, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bell, J. M. [Center for Planetary Atmospheres and Flight Sciences, National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton, VA 23666 (United States); Ridley, A. J.; Gombosi, T. I. [Center for Space Environment Modeling, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    We study the magnetospheric structure and the ionospheric Joule Heating of planets orbiting M-dwarf stars in the habitable zone using a set of magnetohydrodynamic models. The stellar wind solution is used to drive a model for the planetary magnetosphere, which is coupled with a model for the planetary ionosphere. Our simulations reveal that the space environment around close-in habitable planets is extreme, and the stellar wind plasma conditions change from sub- to super-Alfvénic along the planetary orbit. As a result, the magnetospheric structure changes dramatically with a bow shock forming in the super-Alfvénic sectors, while no bow shock forms in the sub-Alfvénic sectors. The planets reside most of the time in the sub-Alfvénic sectors with poor atmospheric protection. A significant amount of Joule Heating is provided at the top of the atmosphere as a result of the intense stellar wind. For the steady-state solution, the heating is about 0.1%-3% of the total incoming stellar irradiation, and it is enhanced by 50% for the time-dependent case. The significant Joule Heating obtained here should be considered in models for the atmospheres of habitable planets in terms of the thickness of the atmosphere, the top-side temperature and density, the boundary conditions for the atmospheric pressure, and particle radiation and transport. Here we assume constant ionospheric Pedersen conductance similar to that of the Earth. The conductance could be greater due to the intense EUV radiation leading to smaller heating rates. We plan to quantify the ionospheric conductance in future study.

  20. Structure and stability of accretion-disk around a black-hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibazaki, N; Hoshi, R [Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1975-09-01

    Structure and stability of a stationary thin-disk formed around a black-hole are studied using the conventional formula for the viscous stress. The disk is classified into an optically thick case, an optically thin case and an intermediate case in which the comptonization plays an important role. Thermal and secular stabilities are examined in each of the above three cases. High temperatures in excess of 10sup(9 0)K are expected in the optically thin case and in the comptonization dominant case. However, it is shown that in these cases the disk is unstable for the thermal perturbation.

  1. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  2. Decentralized stabilization of semi-active vibrating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarski, Dominik

    2018-02-01

    A novel method of decentralized structural vibration control is presented. The control is assumed to be realized by a semi-active device. The objective is to stabilize a vibrating system with the optimal rates of decrease of the energy. The controller relies on an easily implemented decentralized switched state-feedback control law. It uses a set of communication channels to exchange the state information between the neighboring subcontrollers. The performance of the designed method is validated by means of numerical experiments performed for a double cantilever system equipped with a set of elastomers with controlled viscoelastic properties. In terms of the assumed objectives, the proposed control strategy significantly outperforms the passive damping cases and is competitive with a standard centralized control. The presented methodology can be applied to a class of bilinear control systems concerned with smart structural elements.

  3. Strength Analysis of Coconut Fiber Stabilized Earth for Farm Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enokela, O. S.; P. O, Alada

    2012-07-01

    Investigation of the strength characteristic of soil from alluvial deposit of River Benue in makurdi stabilized with coconut fiber as a stabilizer was carried as local building material for farm structure. Processed coconut fibers were mixed with the soil at four different mix ratios of 1% fiber, 2% fiber, 3% fiber and 4% fiber by percentage weight with 0% fiber as control. Compaction test and compressive strength were carried out on the various stabilizing ratio. From the compaction test, the correlation between the maximum dry density and optimum moisture content is a second order polynomial with a coefficient of 63% obtained at1.91kg/m3and 20.0% respectively while the compressive strength test shows an optimum failure load of 8.62N/mm2 at 2%fibre:100% soil mix ratio at 2.16 maximum dry density.

  4. Stabilization of structure in near-infrared fluorescent proteins by binding of biliverdin chromophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Stepanenko, Olga V.; Bublikov, G. S.; Kuznetsova, I. M.; Verkhusha, V. V.; Turoverov, K. K.

    2017-07-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins (NIR FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes and their mutants with different location of Cys residues, which able to bind a biliverdin chromophore, or without these Cys residues were studied using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, NIR fluorescence and circular dichroism. It was shown that a covalent binding of the biliverdin chromophore to a Cys residue via thioether group substantially stabilizes the spatial structure of NIR FPs. The stability of the protein structure and the chromophore association strength strongly depends on the location of Cys residues and decreases in the following order: a protein with Cys residues in both domains, a protein with Cys in PAS domains, and a protein with Cys in GAF domains. NIR FPs without Cys residues capable to covalently attach biliverdin have the lowest stability, comparable to NIR FP apoforms.

  5. Infrared spectroscopy, vibrational predissociation dynamics and stability of the hydrogen trioxy (HOOO) radical and estimation of its abundance in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derro, Erika L.

    The hydrogen trioxy (HOOO) radical has been implicated as an important intermediate in key processes in the atmosphere. In the present studies, HOOO is produced by the combination of O2 and photolytically generated OH radicals in the collisional region of a pulsed supersonic expansion. Rotationally cooled HOOO is probed in the effectively collision-free region of the expansion using infrared action spectroscopy, an infrared-pump, ultraviolet-probe technique, in which HOOO is vibrationally excited and the nascent OH products of vibrational predissociation are probed via laser-induced fluorescence. High resolution infrared spectra of HOOO and DOOO were observed in the fundamental and overtone OH/D stretching regions (nui and 2nu 1), which comprise a rotationally structured band attributed to the trans conformer, and an unstructured component assigned to the cis conformer. Infrared spectra of HOOO and DOOO combination bands composed of the OH stretch and a low frequency mode (nu1 + nun) were also observed. This allowed identification of vibrational frequencies for five of the six modes for trans-H/DOOO and four of the six modes for cis-HOOO and DOOO. Identification of low frequency modes provides critical information on the vibrational dynamics and thermochemical properties of the HOOO radical, and furthermore, provides a potential means for detecting HOOO in situ in the atmosphere. In addition, the nascent OH X2pi products following vibrational predissociation of HOOO have been investigated. The product state distributions reveal a distinct preference for population of pi(A ') Λ-doublets in OH that is indicative of a planar dissociation of trans-HOOO in which the symmetry of the bonding orbital is maintained. The highest observed OH quantum state allows determination of the stability of HOOO relative to the OH + O 2 asymptote using a conservation of energy approach. In conjunction with a similar investigation of DOOO, the binding energy is determined to be ≤ 5

  6. Importance of structural stability to success of mourning dove nests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, R.A.; Nichols, J.D.; Percival, H.F.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of nest-site selection and nesting habitats often involve a "characterization" of nests and of habitats in which nests are found. Our objective in the present work is to identify nest-site characteristics that are associated with variation in components of Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) fitness (e.g. the probability of a nest succeeding), as opposed to simply "characterizing" dove nest sites. If certain nest- site characteristics affect the probability that a nest will succeed, then we suspect that these characteristics will be associated with either concealment (the probability of detection by certain predators) or structural stability (the probability of eggs or entire nests falling to the ground as a result of wind, rain storms, parental activity, etc.). Although other workers agree that structural stability is an important determinant of Mourning Dove nesting success (e.g. McClure 1944: 384; Woolfenden and Rohwer 1969: 59), we are aware of no actual tests of this hypothesis.

  7. Non-Equilibrium Radiative Transfer in Structured Atmospheres

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Picard, R. H; Winick, J. R; Wintersteiner, P. P

    2002-01-01

    ... passage of both atmospheric gravity waves and transient frontal disturbances or bores. The infrared emissions from this part of the atmosphere are already typically not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE...

  8. Structure and Mechanical Properties of Al-Cu-Fe-X Alloys with Excellent Thermal Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Školáková, Andrea; Novák, Pavel; Mejzlíková, Lucie; Průša, Filip; Salvetr, Pavel; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the structure and mechanical properties of innovative Al-Cu-Fe based alloys were studied. We focused on preparation and characterization of rapidly solidified and hot extruded Al-Cu-Fe, Al-Cu-Fe-Ni and Al-Cu-Fe-Cr alloys. The content of transition metals affects mechanical properties and structure. For this reason, microstructure, phase composition, hardness and thermal stability have been investigated in this study. The results showed exceptional thermal stability of these allo...

  9. Influence of structured sidewalls on the wetting states and superhydrophobic stability of surfaces with dual-scale roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huaping, E-mail: wuhuaping@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of E& M (Zhejiang University of Technology), Ministry of Education & Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou 310014 (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhu, Kai; Wu, Bingbing [Key Laboratory of E& M (Zhejiang University of Technology), Ministry of Education & Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Lou, Jia [Piezoelectric Device Laboratory, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Zhang, Zheng [Key Laboratory of E& M (Zhejiang University of Technology), Ministry of Education & Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Chai, Guozhong, E-mail: chaigz@zjut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of E& M (Zhejiang University of Technology), Ministry of Education & Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou 310014 (China)

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Apparent contact angle equation of all wetting states on dual-scale rough surfaces is derived. • Structured sidewalls can improve superhydrophobicity than smooth sidewalls. • Structured sidewalls can enlarge ACA than smooth sidewalls. • Structured sidewalls present an advantage over smooth sidewalls in terms of enhancing superhydrophobic stability. - Abstract: The superhydrophobicity of biological surfaces with dual-scale roughness has recently received considerable attention because of the unique wettability of such surfaces. Based on this, artificial micro/nano hierarchical structures with structured sidewalls and smooth sidewalls were designed and the influences of sidewall configurations (i.e., structured and smooth) on the wetting state of micro/nano hierarchical structures were systematically investigated based on thermodynamics and the principle of minimum free energy. Wetting transition and superhydrophobic stability were then analyzed for a droplet on dual-scale rough surfaces with structured and smooth sidewalls. Theoretical analysis results show that dual-scale rough surfaces with structured sidewalls have a larger “stable superhydrophobic region” than those with smooth sidewalls. The dual-scale rough surfaces with smooth sidewalls can enlarge the apparent contact angle (ACA) without improvement in the superhydrophobic stability. By contrast, dual-scale rough surfaces with structured sidewalls present an advantage over those with smooth sidewalls in terms of enlarging ACA and enhancing superhydrophobic stability. The proposed thermodynamic model is valid when compared with previous experimental data and numerical analysis results, which is helpful for designing and understanding the wetting states and superhydrophobic stability of surfaces with dual-scale roughness.

  10. The Effects of Molecular Crowding on the Structure and Stability of G-Quadruplexes with an Abasic Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Takeshi; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Both cellular environmental factors and chemical modifications critically affect the properties of nucleic acids. However, the structure and stability of DNA containing abasic sites under cell-mimicking molecular crowding conditions remain unclear. Here, we investigated the molecular crowding effects on the structure and stability of the G-quadruplexes including a single abasic site. Structural analysis by circular dichroism showed that molecular crowding by PEG200 did not affect the topology of the G-quadruplex structure with or without an abasic site. Thermodynamic analysis further demonstrated that the degree of stabilization of the G-quadruplex by molecular crowding decreased with substitution of an abasic site for a single guanine. Notably, we found that the molecular crowding effects on the enthalpy change for G-quadruplex formation had a linear relationship with the abasic site effects depending on its position. These results are useful for predicting the structure and stability of G-quadruplexes with abasic sites in the cell-mimicking conditions. PMID:21949901

  11. Atmospheric Energy Deposition Modeling and Inference for Varied Meteoroid Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lorien; Mathias, Donovan; Stokan, Edward; Brown, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Asteroids populations are highly diverse, ranging from coherent monoliths to loosely-bound rubble piles with a broad range of material and compositional properties. These different structures and properties could significantly affect how an asteroid breaks up and deposits energy in the atmosphere, and how much ground damage may occur from resulting blast waves. We have previously developed a fragment-cloud model (FCM) for assessing the atmospheric breakup and energy deposition of asteroids striking Earth. The approach represents ranges of breakup characteristics by combining progressive fragmentation with releases of variable fractions of debris and larger discrete fragments. In this work, we have extended the FCM to also represent asteroids with varied initial structures, such as rubble piles or fractured bodies. We have used the extended FCM to model the Chelyabinsk, Benesov, Kosice, and Tagish Lake meteors, and have obtained excellent matches to energy deposition profiles derived from their light curves. These matches provide validation for the FCM approach, help guide further model refinements, and enable inferences about pre-entry structure and breakup behavior. Results highlight differences in the amount of small debris vs. discrete fragments in matching the various flare characteristics of each meteor. The Chelyabinsk flares were best represented using relatively high debris fractions, while Kosice and Benesov cases were more notably driven by their discrete fragmentation characteristics, perhaps indicating more cohesive initial structures. Tagish Lake exhibited a combination of these characteristics, with lower-debris fragmentation at high altitudes followed by sudden disintegration into small debris in the lower flares. Results from all cases also suggest that lower ablation coefficients and debris spread rates may be more appropriate for the way in which debris clouds are represented in FCM, offering an avenue for future model refinement.

  12. Experiment and Simulation of Autoignition in Jet Flames and its Relevance to Flame Stabilization and Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Noman, Saeed M.

    2016-06-01

    Autoignition characteristics of pre-vaporized iso-octane, primary reference fuels, gasolines, and dimethyl ether (DME) have been investigated experimentally in a coflow with elevated temperature of air. With the coflow air at relatively low initial temperatures below autoignition temperature Tauto, an external ignition source was required to stabilize the flame. Non-autoignited lifted flames had tribrachial edge structures and their liftoff heights correlated well with the jet velocity scaled by the stoichiometric laminar burning velocity, indicating the importance of the edge propagation speed on flame stabilization balanced with local flow velocity. At high initial temperatures over Tauto, the autoignited flames were stabilized without requiring an external ignition source. The autoignited lifted flames exhibited either tribrachial edge structures or Mild combustion behaviors depending on the level of fuel dilution. For the iso-octane and n-heptane fuels, two distinct transition behaviors were observed in the autoignition regime from a nozzle-attached flame to a lifted tribrachial-edge flame and then a sudden transition to lifted Mild combustion as the jet velocity increased at a certain fuel dilution level. The liftoff data of the autoignited flames with tribrachial edges were analyzed based on calculated ignition delay times for the pre-vaporized fuels. Analysis of the experimental data suggested that ignition delay time may be much less sensitive to initial temperature under atmospheric pressure conditions as compared with predictions. For the gasoline fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACEs), and primary reference fuels (PRFs), autoignited liftoff data were correlated with Research Octane Number and Cetane Number. For the DME fuel, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of formaldehyde (CH2O) and CH* chemiluminescence were visualized qualitatively. In the autoignition regime for both tribrachial structure and mild combustion, formaldehyde were found

  13. Critical Role of Crystalline Anisotropy in the Stability of Cellular Array Structures in Directional Solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopczynski, P.; Rappel, W.; Karma, A.

    1996-01-01

    We calculate numerically the full Floquet-Bloch stability spectrum of cellular array structures in a symmetric model of directional solidification. Our results demonstrate that crystalline anisotropy critically influences the stability of these structures. Without anisotropy, the stability balloon of cells in the plane of wave number and velocity closes near the onset of morphological instability. With a finite, but even small, amount of anisotropy this balloon remains open and a band of stable solutions persists for higher velocities into a deep cell regime. The width of the balloon depends critically on the anisotropy strength. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  14. Two-Dimensional Simulation of Spatial-Temporal Behaviors About Period Doubling Bifurcation in an Atmospheric-Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiao; Wang Yanhui; Wang Dezhen; Zhuang Juan

    2014-01-01

    As a spatially extended dissipated system, atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) could in principle possess complex nonlinear behaviors. In order to improve the stability and uniformity of atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharges, studies on temporal behaviors and radial structure of discharges with strong nonlinear behaviors under different controlling parameters are much desirable. In this paper, a two-dimensional fluid model is developed to simulate the radial discharge structure of period-doubling bifurcation, chaos, and inverse period-doubling bifurcation in an atmospheric-pressure DBD. The results show that the period-2n (n = 1, 2…) and chaotic discharges exhibit nonuniform discharge structure. In period-2n or chaos, not only the shape of current pulses doesn't remains exactly the same from one cycle to another, but also the radial structures, such as discharge spatial evolution process and the strongest breakdown region, are different in each neighboring discharge event. Current-voltage characteristics of the discharge system are studied for further understanding of the radial structure. (low temperature plasma)

  15. Human and natural influences on the changing thermal structure of the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santer, Benjamin D; Painter, Jeffrey F; Bonfils, Céline; Mears, Carl A; Solomon, Susan; Wigley, Tom M L; Gleckler, Peter J; Schmidt, Gavin A; Doutriaux, Charles; Gillett, Nathan P; Taylor, Karl E; Thorne, Peter W; Wentz, Frank J

    2013-10-22

    Since the late 1970s, satellite-based instruments have monitored global changes in atmospheric temperature. These measurements reveal multidecadal tropospheric warming and stratospheric cooling, punctuated by short-term volcanic signals of reverse sign. Similar long- and short-term temperature signals occur in model simulations driven by human-caused changes in atmospheric composition and natural variations in volcanic aerosols. Most previous comparisons of modeled and observed atmospheric temperature changes have used results from individual models and individual observational records. In contrast, we rely on a large multimodel archive and multiple observational datasets. We show that a human-caused latitude/altitude pattern of atmospheric temperature change can be identified with high statistical confidence in satellite data. Results are robust to current uncertainties in models and observations. Virtually all previous research in this area has attempted to discriminate an anthropogenic signal from internal variability. Here, we present evidence that a human-caused signal can also be identified relative to the larger "total" natural variability arising from sources internal to the climate system, solar irradiance changes, and volcanic forcing. Consistent signal identification occurs because both internal and total natural variability (as simulated by state-of-the-art models) cannot produce sustained global-scale tropospheric warming and stratospheric cooling. Our results provide clear evidence for a discernible human influence on the thermal structure of the atmosphere.

  16. Structure and Stability of Pt-Y Alloy Particles for Oxygen Reduction Studied by Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deiana, Davide; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-yttrium alloy nanoparticles show both a high activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction. The catalysts were prepared by magnetron sputter aggregation and mass filtration providing a model catalyst system with a narrow size distribution. The structure and stability of nanost...... the catalyst after reaction and after aging tests shows the development of a core-shell type structure after being exposed to reaction conditions....

  17. Polyhedral Lyapunov functions structurally ensure global asymptotic stability of dynamical networks iff the Jacobian is non-singular

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanchini, Franco; Giordano, G.

    2017-01-01

    For a vast class of dynamical networks, including chemical reaction networks (CRNs) with monotonic reaction rates, the existence of a polyhedral Lyapunov function (PLF) implies structural (i.e., parameter-free) local stability. Global structural stability is ensured under the additional

  18. The stability of arsenic and selenium compounds that were retained in limestone in a coal gasification atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Somoano, M.; Lopez-Anton, M.A.; Huggins, F.E.; Martinez-Tarazona, M.R. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the stability of arsenic and selenium species retained in a lime/limestone mixture obtained by using limestone as a sorbent for gas cleaning in a coal gasification atmosphere. It was found that the stability of arsenic and selenium species produced by the gas-solid reactions with lime/limestone may be affected by their exposure to air and by their contact with water. The results confirm the conclusions of a previous work in which Ca(AsO{sub 2}){sub 2} and CaSe was postulated as the products of the reaction between the arsenic and selenium species present in a coal gasification atmosphere with lime/limestone. Moreover it was proved that the compounds (Ca(AsO{sub 2}){sub 2} and CaSe) may undergo transformations when the sorbents post-retention are stored or disposed of in air. From the results obtained by XAFS it was possible to identify the Ca{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} produced by the oxidation of the Ca(ASO{sub 2}){sub 2} on the sorbent surface. The XAFS results for selenium showed that the CaSe formed on the sorbent was transformed to form several species, but mainly elemental Se. These changes in the speciation of arsenic and selenium may explain the behavior of the sorbent post-retention during the water solubility test. Although the selenium compounds and the products that may originate from their decomposition in water are not toxic, in the case of arsenic, species like Ca(AsO{sub 2}){sub 2} and Ca{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} may lixiviate, and generate toxic arsenic compounds in solution that could pose a risk when the sorbent is finally disposed of.

  19. Nonlinear Stability and Structure of Compressible Reacting Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, M. J.; Mansour, N. N.; Reynolds, W. C.

    2000-01-01

    The parabolized stability equations (PSE) are used to investigate issues of nonlinear flow development and mixing in compressible reacting shear layers. Particular interest is placed on investigating the change in flow structure that occurs when compressibility and heat release are added to the flow. These conditions allow the 'outer' instability modes- one associated with each of the fast and slow streams-to dominate over the 'central', Kelvin-Helmholtz mode that unaccompanied in incompressible nonreacting mixing layers. Analysis of scalar probability density functions in flows with dominant outer modes demonstrates the ineffective, one-sided nature of mixing that accompany these flow structures. Colayer conditions, where two modes have equal growth rate and the mixing layer is formed by two sets of vortices, offer some opportunity for mixing enhancement. Their extent, however, is found to be limited in the mixing layer's parameter space. Extensive validation of the PSE technique also provides a unique perspective on central- mode vortex pairing, further supporting the view that pairing is primarily governed perspective sheds insight on how linear stability theory is able to provide such an accurate prediction of experimentally-observed, fully nonlinear flow phenomenon.

  20. Uncertainty considerations for interferometric stability testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, J.D.; Joo, K.N.; Verlaan, A.L.; Spronck, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Material stability is an important parameter for EUV lithography, space instrumentation, and metrology in general. In both EUV lithography and space, more information is needed about material stability during an atmospheric to vacuum transition. For metrology instruments in general, determining the

  1. Two-phase flow stability structure in a natural circulation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhiwei [Nuclear Engineering Laboratory Zurich (Switzerland)

    1995-09-01

    The present study reports a numerical analysis of two-phase flow stability structures in a natural circulation system with two parallel, heated channels. The numerical model is derived, based on the Galerkin moving nodal method. This analysis is related to some design options applicable to integral heating reactors with a slightly-boiling operation mode, and is also of general interest to similar facilities. The options include: (1) Symmetric heating and throttling; (2) Asymmetric heating and symmetric throttling; (3) Asymmetric heating and throttling. The oscillation modes for these variants are discussed. Comparisons with the data from the INET two-phase flow stability experiment have qualitatively validated the present analysis.

  2. Interactive effects of body-size structure and adaptive foraging on food-web stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckmann, Lotta; Drossel, Barbara; Brose, Ulrich; Guill, Christian

    2012-03-01

    Body-size structure of food webs and adaptive foraging of consumers are two of the dominant concepts of our understanding how natural ecosystems maintain their stability and diversity. The interplay of these two processes, however, is a critically important yet unresolved issue. To fill this gap in our knowledge of ecosystem stability, we investigate dynamic random and niche model food webs to evaluate the proportion of persistent species. We show that stronger body-size structures and faster adaptation stabilise these food webs. Body-size structures yield stabilising configurations of interaction strength distributions across food webs, and adaptive foraging emphasises links to resources closer to the base. Moreover, both mechanisms combined have a cumulative effect. Most importantly, unstructured random webs evolve via adaptive foraging into stable size-structured food webs. This offers a mechanistic explanation of how size structure adaptively emerges in complex food webs, thus building a novel bridge between these two important stabilising mechanisms. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  3. Global structure and composition of the martian atmosphere with SPICAM on Mars express

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Korablev, O.; Fonteyn, D.; Guibert, S.; Chassefière, E.; Lefèvre, F.; Dimarellis, E.; Dubois, J. P.; Hauchecorne, A.; Cabane, M.; Rannou, P.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Cernogora, G.; Quémerais, E.; Hermans, C.; Kockarts, G.; Lippens, C.; de Maziere, M.; Moreau, D.; Muller, C.; Neefs, E.; Simon, P. C.; Forget, F.; Hourdin, F.; Talagrand, O.; Moroz, V. I.; Rodin, A.; Sandel, B.; Stern, A.

    SPectroscopy for the Investigation of the Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars (SPICAM) Light, a light-weight (4.7 kg) UV-IR instrument to be flown on Mars Express orbiter, is dedicated to the study of the atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. A UV spectrometer (118-320 nm, resolution 0.8 nm) is dedicated to nadir viewing, limb viewing and vertical profiling by stellar and solar occultation (3.8 kg). It addresses key issues about ozone, its coupling with H2O, aerosols, atmospheric vertical temperature structure and ionospheric studies. UV observations of the upper atmosphere will allow studies of the ionosphere through the emissions of CO, CO+, and CO2+, and its direct interaction with the solar wind. An IR spectrometer (1.0-1.7 μm, resolution 0.5-1.2 nm) is dedicated primarily to nadir measurements of H2O abundances simultaneously with ozone measured in the UV, and to vertical profiling during solar occultation of H2O, CO2, and aerosols. The SPICAM Light near-IR sensor employs a pioneering technology acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF), leading to a compact and light design. Overall, SPICAM Light is an ideal candidate for future orbiter studies of Mars, after Mars Express, in order to study the interannual variability of martian atmospheric processes. The potential contribution to a Mars International Reference Atmosphere is clear.

  4. Effects of iron content on the structural evolution, electrical properties and thermochemical stability of BaCo{sub 0.9-x}Fe{sub x}Nb{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{delta}} ceramic membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ji; Li, Yuan; Xu, Nansheng [Department of Inorganic Nonmetallic Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao, Hailei; Li, Fushen [Department of Inorganic Nonmetallic Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Lab. of New Energy Material and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Ding, Weizhong; Lu, Xionggang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Cubic perovskite oxygen permeation materials BaCo{sub 0.9-x}Fe{sub x}Nb{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BCFN, x = 0.1-0.7) are prepared by the conventional solid state reaction process. The crystal structure development, structural stability, electrical conductivity and oxygen permeation flux are investigated. The introduction of iron makes the formation of cubic perovskite structure for BCFN materials much easier. BCFN exhibits a p-type semiconductor and obeys the thermally activated small polarons hopping mechanism. The electrical conductivity of BCFN increases with increasing temperature and decreases with the Fe-doping concentration. The incorporation of Fe decreases slightly the oxygen permeability of BCFN membranes, but enhances significantly the structure stability of the oxygen permeation membrane in reducing atmosphere. A high oxygen permeation flux of 1.7 ml cm{sup -2} min{sup -1} at 900 C through 1 mm densified membrane under air/helium condition is obtained for the composition of BaCo{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.3}Nb{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{delta}}. (author)

  5. Soil-atmosphere interaction in unsaturated cut slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsiampousi Aikaterini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between atmosphere and soil has only recently attracted significant interest. Soil-atmosphere interaction takes place under dynamic climatic conditions, which vary throughout the year and are expected to suffer considerable alterations due to climate change. However, Geotechnical Analysis has traditionally been limited to simplistic approaches, where winter and summer pore water pressure profiles are prescribed. Geotechnical Structures, such as cut slopes, are known to be prone to large irreversible displacements under the combined effect of water uptake by a complex vegetation root system and precipitation. If such processes take place in an unsaturated material the complexity of the problem renders the use of numerical analysis essential. In this paper soil-atmosphere interaction in cut slopes is studied using advanced, fully coupled partially saturated finite element analyses. The effect of rainfall and evapotranspiration is modelled through sophisticated boundary conditions, applying actual meteorological data on a monthly basis. Stages of low and high water demand vegetation are considered for a period of several years, before simulating the effect of vegetation removal. The analysis results are presented with regard to the serviceability and stability of the cut slope.

  6. The atmospheric structure and dynamical properties of Neptune derived from ground-based and IUE spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Smith, Wm. Hayden

    1990-01-01

    A wide range of recent full-disk spectral observations is used to constrain the atmospheric structure and dynamical properties of Neptune; analytical determinations are made of the abundances of such spectrally active gas species as the deep-atmosphere CH4 molar fraction and the mean ortho/para hydrogen ratio in the visible atmosphere, as well as stratospheric and tropospheric aerosol properties. Compared to Uranus, the greater abundance and shorter lifetimes of Neptunian particulates in the stratospheric region irradiated by the solar UV flux indicate that such radiation is the darkening agent of stratospheric aerosols on both planets.

  7. Phase stabilities at a glance: Stability diagrams of nickel dipnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachhuber, F.; Rothballer, J.; Weihrich, R.; Söhnel, T.

    2013-01-01

    In the course of the recent advances in chemical structure prediction, a straightforward type of diagram to evaluate phase stabilities is presented based on an expedient example. Crystal structures and energetic stabilities of dipnictides NiPn 2 (Pn = N, P, As, Sb, Bi) are systematically investigated by first principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory using the generalized gradient approximation to treat exchange and correlation. These dipnictides show remarkable polymorphism that is not yet understood systematically and offers room for the discovery of new phases. Relationships between the concerned structures including the marcasite, the pyrite, the arsenopyrite/CoSb 2 , and the NiAs 2 types are highlighted by means of common structural fragments. Electronic stabilities of experimentally known and related AB 2 structure types are presented graphically in so-called stability diagrams. Additionally, competing binary phases are taken into consideration in the diagrams to evaluate the stabilities of the title compounds with respect to decomposition. The main purpose of the stability diagrams is the introduction of an image that enables the estimation of phase stabilities at a single glance. Beyond that, some of the energetically favored structure types can be identified as potential new phases

  8. Vane coupling rings: a simple technique for stabilizing a four-vane radiofrequency quadrupole structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.; Lancaster, H.

    1982-11-01

    The benefits of stabilized accelerating structures, with regard to the manufacture and operation, have been well documented. The four-vane radiofrequency quadrupoles (RFQ) presently being designed and constructed in many laboratories are not stabilized because of the weak electromagnetic coupling between the quadrant resonators. This paper presents a simple technique developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory using vane coupling rings (VCR's) which azimuthally stabilize the RFQ structure and greatly enhance its use as a practical accelerator. In particular, the VCR's: completely eliminate the dipole modes in the frequency range of interest; provide adequate quadrant balance with an initial precision mechanical alignment of the vanes; and enhance axial balance and simplify end tuners. Experimental verification tests on a scale model are discussed

  9. Vane coupling rings: a simple technique for stabilizing a four-vane radiofrequency quadrupole structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.; Lancaster, H.

    1983-01-01

    The benefits of stabilized accelerating structures, with regard to the manufacture and operation, have been well documented. The four-vane radiofrequency quadrupoles (RFQ) presently being designed and constructed in many laboratories are not stabilized because of the weak electromagnetic coupling between the quadrant resonators. This paper presents a simple technique developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory using vane coupling rings (VCR's) which azimuthally stabilize the RFQ structure and greatly enhance its use as a practical accelerator. In particular, the VCR's: Completely eliminate the dipole modes in the frequency range of interest; Provide adequate quadrant balance with an initial precision mechanical alignment of the vanes; Enhance axial balance and simplify end tuners. Experimental verification tests on a scale model will be discussed

  10. The nano-fractal structured tungsten oxides films with high thermal stability prepared by the deposition of size-selected W clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eun Ji; Kim, Young Dok [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Chemistry, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Dollinger, Andreas; Huether, Lukas; Blankenhorn, Moritz; Koehler, Kerstine; Gantefoer, Gerd [Konstanz University, Department of Physics, Constance (Germany); Seo, Hyun Ook [Sangmyung University, Department of Chemistry and Energy Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Size-selected W{sub n}{sup -} clusters (n = 1650) were deposited on the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite surface at room temperature under high vacuum conditions by utilizing a magnetron sputtering source and a magnet sector field. Moreover, geometrical structure and surface chemical states of deposited clusters were analyzed by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The formation of 2-D islands (lateral size ∝150 nm) with multiple dendritic arms was observed by STM, and the structure of the individual W{sub 1650} clusters survived within the dendritic arms. To study the thermal stability of the nano-fractal structure under the atmospheric conditions, the sample was brought to the ambient air conditions and sequentially post-annealed at 200, 300, and 500 C in the air. The nano-fractal structure was maintained after the 1st post-annealing process at 200 C for 1 h in the air, and the subsequent 2nd post-annealing at 300 C (for 1 h, in the air) also did not induce any noticeable change in the topological structure of the sample. The topological changes were observed only after the further post-annealing at a higher temperature (at 500 C, 1 h) in the air. We show high potential use of these nano-structured films of tungsten oxides in ambient conditions. (orig.)

  11. Theoretical study of stability geometrical and electronic structure of (BeHsub(2))sub(n) oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanov, L P; Boldyrev, A I; Charkin, O P [AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Novykh Khimicheskikh Problem

    1983-01-01

    The Hartree-Fock-Ruthane method with the Roos-Siegbahn two-exponent basis is used to calculate stability, geometrical and electronic structures of (BeHsub(2))sub(n) oligomers, where n=1, 2, 3, 4 and 6. It is shown that with the growth of oligomerization degree n stability of linear band structure is increased as compared with other configurations including high-coordination volumetric ones. Tendencies in formation with n growth of geometrical, energetic characteristics, electronic structure of (BeHsub(2))sub(n) oligomers of band type are analysed.

  12. Influence of annealing atmosphere on structural and superconducting properties of MgB{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregor, M., E-mail: gregor@fmph.uniba.sk; Plecenik, T.; Sobota, R.; Brndiarova, J.; Roch, T.; Satrapinskyy, L.; Kus, P.; Plecenik, A.

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • Superconducting MgB{sub 2} thin film were deposited by co-deposition using the thermal and e-beam evaporation. • Ex situ annealing process was done using various atmospheres. • Influence of annealing atmosphere and temperature on superconducting and structural properties were studied. • Possible mechanisms of the formation and crystallization of MgB{sub 2} thin film are discussed. - Abstract: Influence of an ex situ annealing temperature and atmosphere on chemical composition and structural and superconducting properties of MgB{sub 2} thin films deposited by vacuum evaporation has been investigated. The annealing has been done in Ar, N{sub 2} and Ar + 5%H{sub 2} atmospheres at pressure of 700 Pa and temperature varying from 700 to 800 °C. It has been shown that annealing in Ar and N{sub 2} atmosphere at 700–800 °C produces relatively thick MgO layer on the surface of the films, while creation of such layer is highly reduced if the annealing is done in reducing Ar + 5%H{sub 2} atmosphere. The XPS and XRD results suggest that the MgO layer prevents out-diffusion of Mg from the film during the annealing, what assures better stoichiometry of the films as well as creation of larger MgB{sub 2} grains. The films with the highest amount of MgO on the surface, annealed in nitrogen atmosphere, thus paradoxically exhibited the highest critical temperature of T{sub c0} = 34.8 K with very sharp transition width of 0.1 K.

  13. New insights into transcription fidelity: thermal stability of non-canonical structures in template DNA regulates transcriptional arrest, pause, and slippage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Isono, Noburu; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The thermal stability and topology of non-canonical structures of G-quadruplexes and hairpins in template DNA were investigated, and the effect of non-canonical structures on transcription fidelity was evaluated quantitatively. We designed ten template DNAs: A linear sequence that does not have significant higher-order structure, three sequences that form hairpin structures, and six sequences that form G-quadruplex structures with different stabilities. Templates with non-canonical structures induced the production of an arrested, a slipped, and a full-length transcript, whereas the linear sequence produced only a full-length transcript. The efficiency of production for run-off transcripts (full-length and slipped transcripts) from templates that formed the non-canonical structures was lower than that from the linear. G-quadruplex structures were more effective inhibitors of full-length product formation than were hairpin structure even when the stability of the G-quadruplex in an aqueous solution was the same as that of the hairpin. We considered that intra-polymerase conditions may differentially affect the stability of non-canonical structures. The values of transcription efficiencies of run-off or arrest transcripts were correlated with stabilities of non-canonical structures in the intra-polymerase condition mimicked by 20 wt% polyethylene glycol (PEG). Transcriptional arrest was induced when the stability of the G-quadruplex structure (-ΔG°37) in the presence of 20 wt% PEG was more than 8.2 kcal mol(-1). Thus, values of stability in the presence of 20 wt% PEG are an important indicator of transcription perturbation. Our results further our understanding of the impact of template structure on the transcription process and may guide logical design of transcription-regulating drugs.

  14. Bounds of thermal stability of infinite cylindrical structures with non-uniform internal heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadalla, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an overview analyses of the thermal instability or thermal viability of infinite cylindrical structures with non-linear and non-uniform internal heat generation. The structure may be subjected to different and combined boundary conditions. An analytical solution is obtained for the generalized problem in spite of the non-linearity and the non-homogeneity of the source term. Four case studies with different boundary conditions are presented. The analyses show that the critical parameter for thermal stability may be though of as an altitude of surface below which the cylindrical structure will be thermally stable and performance worthy. The results also show that the bounds of thermal stability of a cylindrical structure system (solid or hollow) is eminently determined by the boundary conditions to which the system is subjected and can significantly alter the life-span of the structure

  15. Stability of the octameric structure affects plasminogen-binding capacity of streptococcal enolase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Cork

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen. Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen binding and activation.

  16. Structure and stability insights into tumour suppressor p53 evolutionary related proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pagano

    Full Text Available The p53 family of genes and their protein products, namely, p53, p63 and p73, have over one billion years of evolutionary history. Advances in computational biology and genomics are enabling studies of the complexities of the molecular evolution of p53 protein family to decipher the underpinnings of key biological conditions spanning from cancer through to various metabolic and developmental disorders and facilitate the design of personalised medicines. However, a complete understanding of the inherent nature of the thermodynamic and structural stability of the p53 protein family is still lacking. This is due, to a degree, to the lack of comprehensive structural information for a large number of homologous proteins and to an incomplete knowledge of the intrinsic factors responsible for their stability and how these might influence function. Here we investigate the thermal stability, secondary structure and folding properties of the DNA-binding domains (DBDs of a range of proteins from the p53 family using biophysical methods. While the N- and the C-terminal domains of the p53 family show sequence diversity and are normally targets for post-translational modifications and alternative splicing, the central DBD is highly conserved. Together with data obtained from Molecular Dynamics simulations in solution and with structure based homology modelling, our results provide further insights into the molecular properties of evolutionary related p53 proteins. We identify some marked structural differences within the p53 family, which could account for the divergence in biological functions as well as the subtleties manifested in the oligomerization properties of this family.

  17. Depletion of atmospheric muon-neutrino fluxes and structure of Majorana mass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Morimitsu; Matsuda, Masahisa

    1993-01-01

    We study the structures of the Dirac and Majorana mass matrices which give rise to the large lepton mixing expected from the depleted atmospheric muonneutrino flux. In the case that the Majorana mass matrix has a hierarchy for generations, a certain kind of the neutrino Dirac mass matrix with the hierarchical structure leads to the large lepton mixing between the second generation and the third one. Our model-independent analyses serve the model-building of the mass matrices based on the quark-lepton unified theory. (orig.)

  18. The stability of gabion walls for earth retaining structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahyuddin Ramli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The stability of earth retaining structures in flood prone areas has become a serious problem in many countries. The two most basic causes of failure arising from flooding are scouring and erosion of the foundation of the superstructure. Hence, a number of structures like bridges employ scour-arresting devices, e.g., gabions to acting on the piers and abutments during flooding. Research was therefore undertaken to improve gabion resistance against lateral movement by means of an interlocking configuration instead of the conventional stack-and-pair system. This involved simulating lateral thrusts against two dimensionally identical retaining wall systems configured according to the rectangular and hexagonal gabion type. The evolution of deformation observed suggested that the interlocking design exhibits better structural integrity than the conventional box gabion-based wall in resisting lateral movement and therefore warrants consideration for use as an appropriate scour-arresting device for earth retaining structures.

  19. Aerodynamic modeling of the lower part of the atmospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, K.S.

    1992-01-01

    In this thesis , we present a study dealing with the basic meteorology concepts commonly used in air pollution. The pollutant motion in the atmosphere together with its basic mathematical concepts have been reviewed. This review includes; atmospheric forces acting on a particle, atmospheric turbulence, atmospheric stability and the most widely used atmospheric diffusion models. The resistance for pollutant transfer for different atmospheric stability classes has been derived in terms of both wind velocity profile parameters and diffusion coefficients. Therefrom, the residence time of a pollutant in the atmosphere is obtained. The dust particle trajectory and deposition in case of neutral atmosphere is formulated mathematically adopting particle Gaussian distribution. An analytical treatment for the diffusion equation with extension of the boundary conditions to include the ground surface absorption of pollutants and presence of elevated inversion layer, has been presented . The concept of decay distance is introduced and applied in a sample calculation for the dispersion of pollutants over growing wheat field

  20. High order quaternary arrangement confers increased structural stability to Brucella Spp. lumazine synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylberman, V.; Craig, P.O.; Klinke, S.; Cauerhff, A.; Goldbaum, F.A. [Instituto Leloir, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Braden, B.C. [Bowie State Univ., Maryland (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The penultimate step in the pathway of riboflavin biosynthesis is catalyzed by the enzyme lumazine synthase (LS). One of the most distinctive characteristics of this enzyme is the structural quaternary divergence found in different species. The protein exists as pentameric and icosahedral forms, built from practically the same structural monomeric unit. The pentameric structure is formed by five 18 kDa monomers, each extensively contacting neighboring monomers. The icosahedral structure consists of 60 LS monomers arranged as twelve pentamers giving rise to a capsid exhibiting icosahedral 532 symmetry. In all lumazine synthases studied, the topologically equivalent active sites are located at the interfaces between adjacent subunits in the pentameric modules. The Brucella spp. lumazine synthase (BLS) sequence clearly diverges from pentameric and icosahedral enzymes. This unusual divergence prompted to further investigate on its quaternary arrangement. In the present work, we demonstrate by means of solution Light Scattering and X-ray structural analyses that BLS assembles as a very stable dimer of pentamers representing a third category of quaternary assembly for lumazine synthases. We also describe by spectroscopic studies the thermodynamic stability of this oligomeric protein, and postulate a mechanism for dissociation/unfolding of this macromolecular assembly. The higher molecular order of BLS increases its stability 20 deg C compared to pentameric lumazine synthases. The decameric arrangement described in this work highlights the importance of quaternary interactions in the stabilization of proteins. (author)

  1. High order quaternary arrangement confers increased structural stability to Brucella Spp. lumazine synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylberman, V.; Craig, P.O.; Klinke, S.; Cauerhff, A.; Goldbaum, F.A.; Braden, B.C.

    2004-01-01

    The penultimate step in the pathway of riboflavin biosynthesis is catalyzed by the enzyme lumazine synthase (LS). One of the most distinctive characteristics of this enzyme is the structural quaternary divergence found in different species. The protein exists as pentameric and icosahedral forms, built from practically the same structural monomeric unit. The pentameric structure is formed by five 18 kDa monomers, each extensively contacting neighboring monomers. The icosahedral structure consists of 60 LS monomers arranged as twelve pentamers giving rise to a capsid exhibiting icosahedral 532 symmetry. In all lumazine synthases studied, the topologically equivalent active sites are located at the interfaces between adjacent subunits in the pentameric modules. The Brucella spp. lumazine synthase (BLS) sequence clearly diverges from pentameric and icosahedral enzymes. This unusual divergence prompted to further investigate on its quaternary arrangement. In the present work, we demonstrate by means of solution Light Scattering and X-ray structural analyses that BLS assembles as a very stable dimer of pentamers representing a third category of quaternary assembly for lumazine synthases. We also describe by spectroscopic studies the thermodynamic stability of this oligomeric protein, and postulate a mechanism for dissociation/unfolding of this macromolecular assembly. The higher molecular order of BLS increases its stability 20 deg C compared to pentameric lumazine synthases. The decameric arrangement described in this work highlights the importance of quaternary interactions in the stabilization of proteins. (author)

  2. Physical modeling of river spanning rock structures: Evaluating interstitial flow, local hydraulics, downstream scour development, and structure stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, K.L.; Thornton, C.I.; Mefford, B.; Holmquist-Johnson, C. L.

    2009-01-01

    Rock weir and ramp structures uniquely serve a necessary role in river management: to meet water deliveries in an ecologically sound manner. Uses include functioning as low head diversion dams, permitting fish passage, creating habitat diversity, and stabilizing stream banks and profiles. Existing information on design and performance of in-stream rock structures does not provide the guidance necessary to implement repeatable and sustainable construction and retrofit techniques. As widespread use of rock structures increases, the need for reliable design methods with a broad range of applicability at individual sites grows as well. Rigorous laboratory testing programs were implemented at the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and at Colorado State University (CSU) as part of a multifaceted research project focused on expanding the current knowledge base and developing design methods to improve the success rate of river spanning rock structures in meeting project goals. Physical modeling at Reclamation is being used to measure, predict, and reduce interstitial flow through rock ramps. CSU is using physical testing to quantify and predict scour development downstream of rock weirs and its impact on the stability of rock structures. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  3. Enhancement of cell growth on honeycomb-structured polylactide surface using atmospheric-pressure plasma jet modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Kuang-Yao; Chang, Chia-Hsing; Yang, Yi-Wei; Liao, Guo-Chun; Liu, Chih-Tung; Wu, Jong-Shinn, E-mail: chongsin@faculty.nctu.edu.tw

    2017-02-01

    Graphical abstract: Atmospheric-pressure plasma enhances cell growth on two different pore sizes of honeycomb pattern on polylactide surface. - Highlights: • Different pore sizes of honeycomb pattern on PLA film are created. • The two-step plasma treatment provided the oxygen- and nitrogen-containing functional groups that had a major impact on cell cultivation. • The plasma treatment had a significant effect for cell proliferation. • The surface structures are the main influence on cell cultivation, while plasma treatment can indeed improve the growth environment. - Abstract: In this paper, we compare the cell growth results of NIH-3T3 and Neuro-2A cells over 72 h on flat and honeycomb structured PLA films without and with a two-step atmospheric-pressure nitrogen-based plasma jet treatment. We developed a fabrication system used for forming of a uniform honeycomb structure on PLA surface, which can produce two different pore sizes, 3–4 μm and 7–8 μm, of honeycomb pattern. We applied a previously developed nitrogen-based atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet system to treat the PLA film without and with honeycomb structure. NIH-3T3 and a much smaller Neuro-2A cells were cultivated on the films under various surface conditions. The results show that the two-step plasma treatment in combination with a honeycomb structure can enhance cell growth on PLA film, should the cell size be not too smaller than the pore size of honeycomb structure, e.g., NIH-3T3. Otherwise, cell growth would be better on flat PLA film, e.g., Neuro-2A.

  4. Structure and stability of triglyceride monolayers on water and mica surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zdravkova, A.N.; van der Eerden, J.P.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The structure and the stability of tripalmitin (PPP), tristearin (SSS), and triarachidin (AAA) monolayers at the air-water interface are investigated with the Langmuir method. The Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) layers obtained by deposition on mica were investigated with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our

  5. Relative Stabilities of Conserved and Non-Conserved Structures in the OB-Fold Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei T. Alexandrescu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The OB-fold is a diverse structure superfamily based on a β-barrel motif that is often supplemented with additional non-conserved secondary structures. Previous deletion mutagenesis and NMR hydrogen exchange studies of three OB-fold proteins showed that the structural stabilities of sites within the conserved β-barrels were larger than sites in non-conserved segments. In this work we examined a database of 80 representative domain structures currently classified as OB-folds, to establish the basis of this effect. Residue-specific values were obtained for the number of Cα-Cα distance contacts, sequence hydrophobicities, crystallographic B-factors, and theoretical B-factors calculated from a Gaussian Network Model. All four parameters point to a larger average flexibility for the non-conserved structures compared to the conserved β-barrels. The theoretical B-factors and contact densities show the highest sensitivity.Our results suggest a model of protein structure evolution in which novel structural features develop at the periphery of conserved motifs. Core residues are more resistant to structural changes during evolution since their substitution would disrupt a larger number of interactions. Similar factors are likely to account for the differences in stability to unfolding between conserved and non-conserved structures.

  6. Growth and micro structural studies on Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Strontium Titanate (STO) buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivas, S.; Bhatnagar, A.K. [Univ. of Hyderabad (India); Pinto, R. [Solid State Electronics Group, Bombay (India)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Microstructure of Yittria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Strontium Titanate (STO) of radio frequency magnetron sputtered buffer layers was studied at various sputtering conditions on Si<100>, Sapphire and LaAlO{sub 3} <100> substrates. The effect of substrate temperatures upto 800 C and sputtering gas pressures in the range of 50 mTorr. of growth conditions was studied. The buffer layers of YSZ and STO showed a strong tendency for columnar structure with variation growth conditions. The buffer layers of YSZ and STO showed orientation. The tendency for columnar growth was observed above 15 mTorr sputtering gas pressure and at high substrate temperatures. Post annealing of these films in oxygen atmosphere reduced the oxygen deficiency and strain generated during growth of the films. Strong c-axis oriented superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 9}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) thin films were obtained on these buffer layers using pulsed laser ablation technique. YBCO films deposited on multilayers of YSZ and STO were shown to have better superconducting properties.

  7. Some Clarifications Regarding Literature on Atmospheric Corrosion of Weathering Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Díaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research work has thrown light on the requisites for a protective rust layer to form on weathering steels (WSs in the atmosphere, one of the most important is the existence of wet/dry cycling. However, the abundant literature on WS behaviour in different atmospheres can sometimes be confusing and lacks clear criteria regarding certain aspects that are addressed in the present paper. What corrosion models best fit the obtained data? How long does it take for the rust layer to stabilize? What is the morphology and structure of the protective rust layer? What is an acceptable corrosion rate for unpainted WS? What are the guideline environmental conditions, time of wetness (TOW, SO2, and Cl−, for unpainted WS? The paper makes a review of the bibliography on this issue.

  8. A Subset of Autism-Associated Genes Regulate the Structural Stability of Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Chih; Frei, Jeannine A.; Kilander, Michaela B. C.; Shen, Wenjuan; Blatt, Gene J.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) comprises a range of neurological conditions that affect individuals’ ability to communicate and interact with others. People with ASD often exhibit marked qualitative difficulties in social interaction, communication, and behavior. Alterations in neurite arborization and dendritic spine morphology, including size, shape, and number, are hallmarks of almost all neurological conditions, including ASD. As experimental evidence emerges in recent years, it becomes clear that although there is broad heterogeneity of identified autism risk genes, many of them converge into similar cellular pathways, including those regulating neurite outgrowth, synapse formation and spine stability, and synaptic plasticity. These mechanisms together regulate the structural stability of neurons and are vulnerable targets in ASD. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of those autism risk genes that affect the structural connectivity of neurons. We sub-categorize them into (1) cytoskeletal regulators, e.g., motors and small RhoGTPase regulators; (2) adhesion molecules, e.g., cadherins, NCAM, and neurexin superfamily; (3) cell surface receptors, e.g., glutamatergic receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases; (4) signaling molecules, e.g., protein kinases and phosphatases; and (5) synaptic proteins, e.g., vesicle and scaffolding proteins. Although the roles of some of these genes in maintaining neuronal structural stability are well studied, how mutations contribute to the autism phenotype is still largely unknown. Investigating whether and how the neuronal structure and function are affected when these genes are mutated will provide insights toward developing effective interventions aimed at improving the lives of people with autism and their families. PMID:27909399

  9. Mao-Gilles Stabilization Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Jérôme Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Originally, the Mao-Gilles stabilization algorithm was designed to compensate the non-rigid deformations due to atmospheric turbulence. Given a sequence of frames affected by atmospheric turbulence, the algorithm uses a variational model combining optical flow and regularization to characterize the static observed scene. The optimization problem is solved by Bregman Iteration and the operator splitting method. The algorithm is simple, efficient, and can be easily generalized for different sce...

  10. Colloidal stability of suspended and agglomerate structures of settled carbon nanotubes in different aqueous matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwyzer, Irène; Kaegi, Ralf; Sigg, Laura; Nowack, Bernd

    2013-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are often processed in suspended form and therefore a release of CNT-suspensions into the aquatic environment is plausible. In this study, the behaviour of two physico-chemically very different CNT types in the presence of varying, environmentally relevant calcium-containing media was investigated, including the long-term colloidal stability and the sedimentary structures of settled CNTs. Calcium induced CNT flocculation, however, the stability of the CNTs in the medium did not monotonously decrease with increasing calcium concentration. At intermediate calcium concentrations (0.5-1.5 mM Ca) pre-dispersed CNTs were stabilized in humic acid medium to similar, temporarily even to higher degree than in the absence of calcium. Between pH 5 and 8 only at the highest pH an influence on CNT stability was observed by either promoting flocculation or stabilisation depending on the CNT type. Humic acid stabilized CNTs much better than fulvic acid. Generally, the colloidal stability of the long, thick CNTs with higher surface oxygen content was less affected by the media composition. An investigation of the settled CNT material using analytical electron microscopy revealed the presence of spheroidal, bundle-like and net like CNT-agglomerate structures. Calcium possibly acted as bridging agent linking CNTs in a network like manner, temporarily increasing the CNT concentrations stabilized in the supernatants due to the low density of these structures. With increasing settling time the CNTs formed a fluffy sediment layer at the bottom of the reaction vessels. Bundle-like CNT agglomerates were also observed within that layer of settled CNTs, possibly caused by calcium neutralizing the surface charges. Furthermore, the CNT suspensions contained spheroidal CNT agglomerates, most likely residues from the original dry powder that were not disaggregated. The analysis of settled CNT material is a novelty and illustrates CNT agglomerate structures possibly

  11. Structural stability and elastic properties of L12 Co3(Ga,W) precipitate from first-principle calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Qiang; Zhu Yuhong; Wang Yan

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasoft pseudopotential within a generalized gradient approximation was employed to study the structural stability, electronic structure, and elastic properties of ternary Co 3 (Ga,W) precipitate. The Young's and shear moduli of the polycrystals containing the Co 3 (Ga,W) precipitate were calculated using the Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging scheme. Results show that the stable ternary Co 3 (Ga,W) compound has the L1 2 structure, and is ductile in nature. The structural stability of the Co 3 (Ga,W) compound is discussed together with the calculated electronic structure.

  12. Evaluation of the atmospheric stability and it influence in the radiological environmental impact of the treatment plant and radioactive waste storage (PTDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos V, E.O.; Cornejo D, N.

    2006-01-01

    It is well-known that the meteorological variables as the atmospheric stability, influence in the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive pollutants, for that as regards radiological safety, it constitutes a demand the evaluation of their impact in the process before mentioned. The present work exposes the results of the study of the radiological impact of our PTDR that it allowed to know the influence of this meteorological parameter in the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive pollutants in its location. To such effects they were processed by means of the methodology of Pasquill - Gifford, data of time zone observations of this meteorological variable obtained in the proximities of the installation, being modeled the worst conditions in atmospheric liberation of their radionuclides inventory, valuing stops the 2 critical considered population groups the doses received by inhalation of polluted air and ingestion of water and polluted products, as well as, for external irradiation from the radioactive cloud and the floor. The obtained annual effective doses due to the modeling situation reach until a mSv, except for the Ra-226 that are lightly superior, implying a risk radiological acceptable chord to the international standard. To the above-mentioned a reduced probability of occurrence of events initiators of the evaluated accidental sequence is added. (Author)

  13. Spatial Atmospheric Pressure Atomic Layer Deposition of Tin Oxide as an Impermeable Electron Extraction Layer for Perovskite Solar Cells with Enhanced Thermal Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Lukas; Brinkmann, Kai O; Malerczyk, Jessica; Rogalla, Detlef; Becker, Tim; Theirich, Detlef; Shutsko, Ivan; Görrn, Patrick; Riedl, Thomas

    2018-02-14

    Despite the notable success of hybrid halide perovskite-based solar cells, their long-term stability is still a key-issue. Aside from optimizing the photoactive perovskite, the cell design states a powerful lever to improve stability under various stress conditions. Dedicated electrically conductive diffusion barriers inside the cell stack, that counteract the ingress of moisture and prevent the migration of corrosive halogen species, can substantially improve ambient and thermal stability. Although atomic layer deposition (ALD) is excellently suited to prepare such functional layers, ALD suffers from the requirement of vacuum and only allows for a very limited throughput. Here, we demonstrate for the first time spatial ALD-grown SnO x at atmospheric pressure as impermeable electron extraction layers for perovskite solar cells. We achieve optical transmittance and electrical conductivity similar to those in SnO x grown by conventional vacuum-based ALD. A low deposition temperature of 80 °C and a high substrate speed of 2.4 m min -1 yield SnO x layers with a low water vapor transmission rate of ∼10 -4 gm -2 day -1 (at 60 °C/60% RH). Thereby, in perovskite solar cells, dense hybrid Al:ZnO/SnO x electron extraction layers are created that are the key for stable cell characteristics beyond 1000 h in ambient air and over 3000 h at 60 °C. Most notably, our work of introducing spatial ALD at atmospheric pressure paves the way to the future roll-to-roll manufacturing of stable perovskite solar cells.

  14. Chemical structures and theoretical models of lean premixed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To better understand the chemistry involved in the lean-fuel combustion, the chemical structure of lean premixed propene-oxygen-nitrogen flames stabilized on a flat-flame burner at atmospheric pressure was determined experimentally. The species mole fraction profiles were also computed by the Premix code and three ...

  15. The role of a topologically conserved isoleucine in glutathione transferase structure, stability and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achilonu, Ikechukwu; Gildenhuys, Samantha; Fisher, Loren; Burke, Jonathan; Fanucchi, Sylvia; Sewell, B. Trevor; Fernandes, Manuel; Dirr, Heini W.

    2010-01-01

    The role of a topologically conserved isoleucine in the structure of glutathione transferase was investigated by replacing the Ile71 residue in human GSTA1-1 by alanine or valine. The common fold shared by members of the glutathione-transferase (GST) family has a topologically conserved isoleucine residue at the N-terminus of helix 3 which is involved in the packing of helix 3 against two β-strands in domain 1. The role of the isoleucine residue in the structure, function and stability of GST was investigated by replacing the Ile71 residue in human GSTA1-1 by alanine or valine. The X-ray structures of the I71A and I71V mutants resolved at 1.75 and 2.51 Å, respectively, revealed that the mutations do not alter the overall structure of the protein compared with the wild type. Urea-induced equilibrium unfolding studies using circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence suggest that the mutation of Ile71 to alanine or valine reduces the stability of the protein. A functional assay with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene shows that the mutation does not significantly alter the function of the protein relative to the wild type. Overall, the results suggest that conservation of the topologically conserved Ile71 maintains the structural stability of the protein but does not play a significant role in catalysis and substrate binding

  16. Stabilization of Si_60 Cage Structure: The Agony and the Ecstasy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazoe, Y.; Sun, Q.; Wang, Q.; Rao, B. K.; Jena, P.

    2003-03-01

    The unique role of silicon in the micro-electronics industry has motivated many researchers to find ways to stabilize Si_60 with fullerene structure. In spite of numerous experimental attempts, synthesis of a theoretically predicted C_60-supported Si_60 cluster (C_60@Si_60) has not been possible. Using a state-of-the-art theoretical method, we provide the first answer for this long-standing contradiction between the experimental observation and the theoretical prediction. The flaws in earlier theoretical works are pointed out, and Si_60 is shown to be unstable in the fullerene structure either on its own or when supported on a C_60 fullerene (C_60@Si_60). On the other hand, we show that Si_60 cage can be stabilized by using magic clusters such as Al_12X (X = Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) as endohedral units, which have been identified in recent experiment as stable clusters and as suitable building blocks for cluster-assembled materials.

  17. Preparation, structure and thermal stability of Cu/LDPE nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Xianping; Cai Shuizhou; Xie Changsheng

    2006-01-01

    Copper/low-density-polyethylene (Cu/LDPE) nanocomposites have been prepared using a melt-blending technique in a single-screw extruder. Their structure and thermal characteristics are characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results of XRD, SEM and SEM-EDS Cu-mapping show that the nanocomposites are a hybrid of the polymer and the copper nanoparticles, and the copper nanoparticles aggregates were distributed uniformly in general. The results also show that the nanocomposites and the base resin, the pure LDPE, have a different crystalline structure and the same oriented characteristics owing to the presence of copper nanoparticles and the same cooling condition. The results of DSC show that the incorporation of copper nanoparticles can decrease the melting temperatures but increase the crystallization temperatures, and can lower the crystallinity degree of the matrix of the composites. The results of TGA show that the presence of copper nanoparticles can improve the thermal stability of the nanocomposites, a maximum increment of 18 deg. C is obtained comparing with the pure LDPE in this experiment. The results of TGA also show that the influence of the incorporation of the copper nanoparticles on the thermal stability of the Cu/LDPE nanocomposites is different from that of the non-metal nanoparticles on the polymer/non-metal nanocomposites and the copper microparticles on the Cu/LDPE microcomposites. The increase of the thermal stability of the Cu/LDPE nanocomposites will decrease when the content of the copper nanoparticles is more than 2 wt.%. The difference might be caused by the fact that the activity of the metal nanoparticles is much more higher than that of the non-metal nanoparticles, and the different size effect the different copper particles has

  18. Axial ratio dependence of the stability of self-interstitials in HCP structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Qing; Ji, Wei; Huang, Hanchen; De, Suvranu

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effect of the axial ratio (c/a) on the stability of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) in hexagonal close-packed crystal structures, using hcp-zirconium as a prototype, through density functional theory based ab initio calculations. The axial ratio is found to dominate the relative stability of SIAs over volumetric strains. We observe that below the ideal value of 1.633, the basal octahedral configuration is the most stable. Above the ideal value, the off-plane SIAs are more stable than in-plane ones

  19. Structure and phase stability of a Pu-0.32 wt% Ga alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, D.W., E-mail: David.Wheeler@awe.co.uk; Ennaceur, S.M.; Matthews, M.B.; Roussel, P.; Bayer, P.D.

    2016-08-01

    In plutonium-gallium (Pu-Ga) alloys that have a Ga content of 0.3–0.4 wt%, their readiness to transform to α′ renders them of particular interest in efforts to understand the tenuous nature of δ phase stability. The present study is a comprehensive examination of the structure and phase stability of a cast Pu-0.32 wt% Ga alloy, the Ga content being close to the minimum amount needed to retain the δ phase to ambient temperature. The alloy was characterised in both the as-cast condition as well as following a homogenising heat treatment. The 250-h heat treatment at 450 °C was shown to achieve an apparently stable δ-Pu phase. However, the stability of the δ-Pu phase was shown to be marginal: partial transformation to α′-Pu was observed when the alloy was subjected to hydrostatic compression. Similar transformation was also apparent during metallographic preparation as well as during hardness indentation. The results provide new understanding of the nature of δ phase stability. - Highlights: • New insights into the delta phase stability of a Pu-0.32 wt% Ga alloy. • Density and DSC of as-cast alloy both show α-Pu contents of approximately 30%. • The heat-treated alloy has a largely δ-Pu structure at ambient temperature. • Heat-treated alloy susceptible to δ → α transformation during hardness indentation.

  20. The stability of CaS in circulating fluidized bed boiler residue and the possible release of H2S gas to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattisson, T.; Lyngfelt, A.

    1995-01-01

    During the combustion of coal, SO 2 is released to the atmosphere. Because of environmental concerns with acid rain, the capture of SO 2 is an important issue. In fluidized bed combustion SO 2 is captured in-situ by limestone or dolomite to form CaSO 4 . This product is stable and can be disposed of or reused as gypsum. In order to capture the sulphur as CaSO 4 oxidizing conditions are necessary. In a fluidized bed boiler (FBB) CaS may form in regions with reducing conditions, and FBB ashes sampled under irregular operating conditions may contain as much as 50 % of the captured sulphur as CaS. The stability of CaS in a landfill environment is thus very important. It is possible that the sulphide decomposes in the presence of moisture or runoff leachate with the subsequent release of H 2 S gas. This re-release of captured sulphur could have a substantial effect on the overall sulphur capture efficiency, with more sulphur released to the atmosphere than previously thought. In this study the stability of CaS in bed ashes from a 12 MW circulating FBB combusting coal has been investigated, with focus on the release of H 2 S gas. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of the Structure Stability of a Plate Girder Bridge Using MIDAS Structure Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eui Soo; Kim, Jong Hyuk [National Forensic Service, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Recently, as a means of resolving the issue of legal liability in the event of an accident or a disaster, a wide variety of simulation techniques, such as structural and structure-fluid interaction analysis, have been used in the field of forensic engineering. The plate girder bridge discussed in this paper was being constructed between a pier and an abutment to expand an existing bridge, but an accident whereby the bridge overturned occurred at the end of the concrete laying process for a protective wall. This accident was caused by additional loads not being considered at the time of the design as well as the actual construction being different from the design. The additional loads ultimately generated a negative support force. In this study, we determined the cause of the accident by comparing the structural stability of the original design with that of the additional, non-conforming construction using MIDAS structural analysis.

  2. Evaluation of the Structure Stability of a Plate Girder Bridge Using MIDAS Structure Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Soo; Kim, Jong Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Recently, as a means of resolving the issue of legal liability in the event of an accident or a disaster, a wide variety of simulation techniques, such as structural and structure-fluid interaction analysis, have been used in the field of forensic engineering. The plate girder bridge discussed in this paper was being constructed between a pier and an abutment to expand an existing bridge, but an accident whereby the bridge overturned occurred at the end of the concrete laying process for a protective wall. This accident was caused by additional loads not being considered at the time of the design as well as the actual construction being different from the design. The additional loads ultimately generated a negative support force. In this study, we determined the cause of the accident by comparing the structural stability of the original design with that of the additional, non-conforming construction using MIDAS structural analysis

  3. Lattice stability of metastable AlN and wurtzite-to-rock-salt structural transformation by CALPHAD modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanhui, E-mail: yanhui.z@hotmail.com [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials-Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); High-performance Ceramics Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 110016, Shenyang (China); Franke, Peter; Li, Dajian; Seifert, Hans Jürgen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials-Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    Reliable lattice stability of cubic AlN with rock-salt structure (rs-AlN) is the prerequisite of accurate thermodynamic modeling of cubic (M, Al)N solid solutions (M = Ti, Zr, Cr etc.). In order to derive the Gibbs energy of metastable rs-AlN, and then its lattice stability, we did the pressure-temperature (P-T) assessment of AlN phases by equations-of-state modeling. Meanwhile, the molar volumes and the heat capacities of wurtzite and rock-salt AlN, as well as the wurtzite-to-rock-salt structural transition at high P&T were successfully incorporated in CALPHAD-type database by integrating thermodynamic data from experiments and ab-initio calculations. These results promise subsequent investigations on phase stabilities and transitions of solid solutions with AlN component and the development of novel multicomponent coatings. - Highlights: • Phase stability investigation for novel multi-component metastable coatings. • Structural transition at high temperature and high pressure. • Integrating thermodynamic data from ab-initio calculations and experiments. • Thermal expansion, isothermal compressibility and heat capacity of w-AlN and rs-AlN.

  4. The relationship between dental implant stability and trabecular bone structure using cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between primary implant stability as measured by impact response frequency and the structural parameters of trabecular bone using cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT), excluding the effect of cortical bone thickness. Methods We measured the impact response of a dental implant placed into swine bone specimens composed of only trabecular bone without the cortical bone layer using an inductive sensor. The peak frequency of the impact response spectrum was determined as an implant stability criterion (SPF). The 3D microstructural parameters were calculated from CT images of the bone specimens obtained using both micro-CT and CBCT. Results SPF had significant positive correlations with trabecular bone structural parameters (BV/TV, BV, BS, BSD, Tb.Th, Tb.N, FD, and BS/BV) (Pmicro-CT and CBCT (Pimplant stability prediction by combining BV/TV and SMI in the stepwise forward regression analysis. Bone with high volume density and low surface density shows high implant stability. Well-connected thick bone with small marrow spaces also shows high implant stability. The combination of bone density and architectural parameters measured using CBCT can predict the implant stability more accurately than the density alone in clinical diagnoses. PMID:27127692

  5. Loads in wind farms under non-neutral ABL stability conditions: A full-scale validation study of the DWM model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The purpose of this study is twofold: To validate a generalized version of the DWM approach for load prediction under non-neural atmospheric stability conditions, and to demonstrate the importance of atmospheric stability for wind turbines operating in wind farm conditions.......The purpose of this study is twofold: To validate a generalized version of the DWM approach for load prediction under non-neural atmospheric stability conditions, and to demonstrate the importance of atmospheric stability for wind turbines operating in wind farm conditions....

  6. Radiative instabilities of atmospheric jets and boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candelier, J.

    2010-01-01

    Complex flows occur in the atmosphere and they can be source of internal gravity waves. We focus here on the sources associated with radiative and shear (or Kelvin-Helmholtz) instabilities. Stability studies of shear layers in a stably stratified fluid concern mainly cases where shear and stratification are aligned along the same direction. In these cases, Miles (1961) and Howard (1961) found a necessary condition for stability based on the Richardson number: Ri ≥ 1/4. In this thesis, we show that this condition is not necessary when shear and stratification are not aligned: we demonstrate that a two-dimensional planar Bickley jet can be unstable for all Richardson numbers. Although the most unstable mode remains 2D, we show there exists an infinite family of 3D unstable modes exhibiting a radiative structure. A WKBJ theory is found to provide the main characteristics of these modes. We also study an inviscid and stratified boundary layer over an inclined wall with non-Boussinesq and compressible effects. We show that this flow is unstable as soon as the wall is not horizontal for all Froude numbers and that strongly stratified 3D perturbations behave exactly like compressible 2D perturbations. Applications of the results to the jet stream and the atmospheric boundary layer are proposed. (author) [fr

  7. Hydrodynamic stability theory of double ablation front structures in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanez Vico, C.

    2012-11-01

    For moderate-Z materials, the hydrodynamic structure of the ablation region formed by the irradiation of high intensity laser beams differs from that of low-Z materials (hydrogenic ablators). In particular, the role played by the radiative energy flux becomes non-negligible for increasing atomic number material and ended up forming a second ablation front. This structure of two separated ablation fronts, called double ablation (DA) front, was confirmed in the simulations carried out by Fujioka et al. In this work a linear stability theory of DA fronts is developed for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Two models are proposed. First, a sharp boundary model where the thin front approximation is assumed for both ablation fronts. The information about the corona region that permits to close the sharp boundary model is obtained from a prior self-consistent analysis of the electronic-radiative ablation (ERA) front. Numerical results are presented as well as an analytical approach for the radiation dominated regime of very steep double ablation front structure. Second, a self-consistent numerical method where the finite length of the ablation fronts is considered. Accurate hydrodynamic profiles are taken into account in the theoretical model by means of a fitting parameters method using one-dimensional simulation results. Numerical dispersion relation is compared to the analytical sharp boundary model showing an excellent agreement for the radiation dominated regime, and the stabilization due to smooth profiles. 2D simulations are presented to validate the linear stability theory

  8. The Stability of Hydrogen-Rich Atmospheres of Earth-Like Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding hydrogen escape is essential to understanding the limits to habitability, both for liquid water where the Sun is bright, but also to assess the true potential of H2 as a greenhouse gas where the Sun is faint. Hydrogen-rich primary atmospheres of Earth-like planets can result either from gravitational capture of solar nebular gases (with helium), or from impact shock processing of a wide variety of volatile-rich planetesimals (typically accompanied by H2O, CO2, and under the right circumstances, CH4). Most studies of hydrogen escape from planets focus on determining how fast the hydrogen escapes. In general this requires solving hydro- dynamic equations that take into account the acceleration of hydrogen through a critical transonic point and an energy budget that should include radiative heating and cooling, thermal conduction, the work done in lifting the hydrogen against gravity, and the residual heat carried by the hydrogen as it leaves. But for planets from which hydrogen escape is modest or insignificant, the atmosphere can be approximated as hydrostatic, which is much simpler, and for which a relatively full-featured treatment of radiative cooling by embedded molecules, atoms, and ions such as CO2 and H3+ is straightforward. Previous work has overlooked the fact that the H2 molecule is extremely efficient at exciting non-LTE CO2 15 micron emission, and thus that radiative cooling can be markedly more efficient when H2 is abundant. We map out the region of phase space in which terrestrial planets keep hydrogen-rich atmospheres, which is what we actually want to know for habitability. We will use this framework to reassess Tian et al's hypothesis that H2-rich atmospheres may have been rather long-lived on Earth itself. Finally, we will address the empirical observation that rocky planets with thin or negligible atmospheres are rarely or never bigger than 1.6 Earth radii.

  9. Epothilones as lead structures for the synthesis-based discovery of new chemotypes for microtubule stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyen, Fabian; Cachoux, Frédéric; Gertsch, Jürg; Wartmann, Markus; Altmann, Karl-Heinz

    2008-01-01

    Epothilones are macrocyclic bacterial natural products with potent microtubule-stabilizing and antiproliferative activity. They have served as successful lead structures for the development of several clinical candidates for anticancer therapy. However, the structural diversity of this group of clinical compounds is rather limited, as their structures show little divergence from the original natural product leads. Our own research has explored the question of whether epothilones can serve as a basis for the development of new structural scaffolds, or chemotypes, for microtubule stabilization that might serve as a basis for the discovery of new generations of anticancer drugs. We have elaborated a series of epothilone-derived macrolactones whose overall structural features significantly deviate from those of the natural epothilone scaffold and thus define new structural families of microtubule-stabilizing agents. Key elements of our hypermodification strategy are the change of the natural epoxide geometry from cis to trans, the incorporation of a conformationally constrained side chain, the removal of the C3-hydroxyl group, and the replacement of C12 with nitrogen. So far, this approach has yielded analogs 30 and 40 that are the most advanced, the most rigorously modified, structures, both of which are potent antiproliferative agents with low nanomolar activity against several human cancer cell lines in vitro. The synthesis was achieved through a macrolactone-based strategy or a high-yielding RCM reaction. The 12-aza-epothilone ("azathilone" 40) may be considered a "non-natural" natural product that still retains most of the overall structural characteristics of a true natural product but is structurally unique, because it lies outside of the general scope of Nature's biosynthetic machinery for polyketide synthesis. Like natural epothilones, both 30 and 40 promote tubulin polymerization in vitro and at the cellular level induce cell cycle arrest in mitosis. These

  10. On dependence of stability of lanthanum complexes with aminopolycarboxylic acids on the complex structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poluehktov, N.S.; Meshkova, S.B.; Danilkovich, M.M.; Topilova, Z.M.

    1985-01-01

    Regularities in changes of stability constants of lanthanum complexes with aminopolycarboxylic acids (APA) versus their structure are studied, The stability of lathanum-APA complexes depends mainly on the number of carboxyl groups in a ligand molecule. At that, the highest stability constant is characteristic of a complex with a ligand, containing 3 nitrogen atoms and 5 carboxyl groups, in the presenoe of which the lanthanum ion coordination sphere gets satupated. The oxyethy group introduction into a ligand molecule also improves the lanthanum complex stability but to a lesser degree than during the introduction of a carboxyl group. The number of nitrogen atoms in a ligand polecule affects insignificantly the complex stability constant value, and the elongation of a chain of CH 2 groups, separating nitrogen atoms, reduces the constant to a -0.6 power

  11. Dynamics and stability of radiation-driven double ablation front structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drean, V.; Olazabal-Loume, M.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Sanz, J.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of double ablation front (DAF) structures is studied for planar targets with moderate atomic number ablators. These structures are obtained in hydrodynamic simulations for various materials and laser intensities and are qualitatively characterized during the acceleration stage of the target. The importance of the radiative transport for the DAF dynamics is then demonstrated. Simulated hydrodynamic profiles are compared with a theoretical model, showing the consistency of the model and the relevant parameters for the dynamics description. The stability of DAF structures with respect to two-dimensional perturbations is studied using two different approaches: one considers the assumptions of the theoretical model and the other one a more complete physics. The numerical simulations performed with both approaches demonstrate good agreement of dispersion curves.

  12. Assessment of structural stability of a degraded sandy clay loam soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of bare, two legumes and four grasses cover treatments on the structural stability of a sandy clay loam Ultisol were studied within a two year period. The experiment was of a randomised complete block design with seven treatments. The legume treatments were Centrosema pubescens (Ce) and Pueraria ...

  13. The atmosphere and ocean: A physical introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, N.

    1986-01-01

    The book's contents are: The Earth within the solar system. Composition and physical properties of the ocean and atmosphere. Radiation, temperature and stability. Water in the atmosphere. Global budgets of heat, water and salt. Observations of winds and currents. The influence of the Earth's rotation on fluid motion. Waves and tides. Energy transfer in the ocean-atmosphere system. Climate variability and predictability. The atmosphere and ocean are two different environmental systems, yet both are interdependent, interacting and exchanging energy, heat and matter. This book attempts to bring the study of the atmosphere and ocean together. It is a descriptive account of physical properties, exploring their common bases, similarities, interactions and fundamental differences

  14. Pluto's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, J.L.; Dunham, E.W.; Bosh, A.S.; Slivan, S.M.; Young, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    Airborne CCD photometer observations of Pluto's June 9, 1988 stellar occultation have yielded an occultation lightcurve, probing two regions on the sunrise limb 2000 km apart, which reveals an upper atmosphere overlying an extinction layer with an abrupt upper boundary. The extinction layer may surround the entire planet. Attention is given to a model atmosphere whose occultation lightcurve closely duplicates observations; fits of the model to the immersion and emersion lightcurves exhibit no significant derived atmosphere-structure differences. Assuming a pure methane atmosphere, surface pressures of the order of 3 microbars are consistent with the occultation data. 43 references

  15. The stabilities and electron structures of Al-Mg clusters with 18 and 20 valence electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huihui; Chen, Hongshan

    2017-07-01

    The spherical jellium model predicts that metal clusters having 18 and 20 valence electrons correspond to the magic numbers and will show specific stabilities. We explore in detail the geometric structures, stabilities and electronic structures of Al-Mg clusters containing 18 and 20 valence electrons by using genetic algorithm combined with density functional theories. The stabilities of the clusters are governed by the electronic configurations and Mg/Al ratios. The clusters with lower Mg/Al ratios are more stable. The molecular orbitals accord with the shell structures predicted by the jellium model but the 2S level interweaves with the 1D levels and the 2S and 1D orbitals form a subgroup. The clusters having 20 valence electrons form closed 1S21P61D102S2 shells and show enhanced stability. The Al-Mg clusters with a valence electron count of 18 do not form closed shells because one 1D orbital is unoccupied. The ionization potential and electron affinity are closely related to the electronic configurations; their values are determined by the subgroups the HOMO or LUMO belong to. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2017-80042-9

  16. Mao-Gilles Stabilization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Gilles

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Originally, the Mao-Gilles stabilization algorithm was designed to compensate the non-rigid deformations due to atmospheric turbulence. Given a sequence of frames affected by atmospheric turbulence, the algorithm uses a variational model combining optical flow and regularization to characterize the static observed scene. The optimization problem is solved by Bregman Iteration and the operator splitting method. The algorithm is simple, efficient, and can be easily generalized for different scenarios involving non-rigid deformations.

  17. Enhancing the crumb rubber modified asphalt’s storage stability through the control of its internal network structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohyeldin Ragab

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The current research investigated the effect of the internal network structure developed in the crumb rubber modified asphalt (CRMA on its storage stability. The authors investigated the influence of asphalt-crumb rubber modifier (CRM interaction parameters (interaction time, interaction speed, and interaction temperature on the development of the internal network structure in CRMA. The authors found that the existence of three dimensional (3D network structures in the CRMA enhanced its storage stability. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR Spectroscopy was utilized to determine the nature of CRM components responsible for the development of 3D network structure in the liquid phase of CRMA. This was achieved by monitoring the changes of the IR distinctive peaks in the CRMA liquid phase. Dissolution tests and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA were carried out on the extracted CRM after interaction with asphalt to determine the role of CRM dissolved amounts and released components on the development of 3D network structure in CRMA. The asphalt-CRM interaction parameters were found to be essential to induce the formation of the 3D network structure within the liquid phase of the CRMA through controlling the swelling, dissolution and release of CRM components into the asphalt liquid phase. The existence of 3D network structure in the CRMA had determinant impact on the enhancement of its storage stability. Keywords: Storage stability, Three dimensional (3D network, Crumb rubber modified asphalt

  18. Structural Design Optimization of a Tiltrotor Aircraft Composite Wing to Enhance Whirl Flutter Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Taeseong; Kim, Jaehoon; Shin, Sang Joon

    2013-01-01

    In order to enhance the aeroelastic stability of a tiltrotor aircraft, a structural optimization framework is developed by applying a multi-level optimization approach. Each optimization level is designed to achieve a different purpose; therefore, relevant optimization schemes are selected for each...... level. Enhancement of the aeroelastic stability is selected as an objective in the upper-level optimization. This is achieved by seeking the optimal structural properties of a composite wing, including its mass, vertical, chordwise, and torsional stiffness. In the upper-level optimization, the response...... surface method (RSM), is selected. On the other hand, lower-level optimization seeks to determine the local detailed cross-sectional parameters, such as the ply orientation angles and ply thickness, which are relevant to the wing structural properties obtained at the upper-level. To avoid manufacturing...

  19. Accuracy Enhanced Stability and Structure Preserving Model Reduction Technique for Dynamical Systems with Second Order Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahavori, Maryamsadat; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    A method for model reduction of dynamical systems with the second order structure is proposed in this paper. The proposed technique preserves the second order structure of the system, and also preserves the stability of the original systems. The method uses the controllability and observability...... gramians within the time interval to build the appropriate Petrov-Galerkin projection for dynamical systems within the time interval of interest. The bound on approximation error is also derived. The numerical results are compared with the counterparts from other techniques. The results confirm...

  20. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/diamond double-layered structure for improved field electron emission stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L., E-mail: qiaoqin.yang@mail.usask.ca; Yang, Q.; Zhang, C.; Li, Y.S.

    2013-12-31

    A double-layered nanostructure consisting of a layer of vertically aligned Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and a layer of diamond beneath has been synthesized on silicon substrate by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition. The synthesis was achieved by first depositing a layer of diamond on silicon and then depositing a top layer of vertically aligned CNTs by applying a negative bias on the substrate holder. The growth of CNTs was catalyzed by a thin layer of spin-coated iron nitride. The surface morphology and structure of the CNTs/diamond double-layered structure were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope, Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrum, and Raman Spectroscopy. Their field electron emission (FEE) properties were measured by KEITHLEY 237 high voltage measurement unit, showing much higher FEE current stability than single layered CNTs. - Highlights: • A new double-layered nanostructure consisting of a layer of vertically aligned CNTs and a layer of diamond beneath has been synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. • This double-layered structure exhibits superior field electron emission stability. • The improvement of emission stability is due to the combination of the unique properties of diamond and CNTs.

  1. Effects of sorbitol and glycerol on the structure, dynamics, and stability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrazinamidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnoosh Khajehzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: It can be concluded that the native conformation of the enzyme was stabilized in the sorbitol and glycerol and tend to exclude from the PZase surface, forcing the enzyme to keep it in the compactly folded conformation. The glycerol molecules stabilized PZase by decreasing the loops flexibility and then compacting the enzyme structure. It appears that more stability of PZase in glycerol solution correlates with its amphiphilic orientation, which decreases the unfavorable interactions of hydrophobic regions.

  2. Structure and stability of the spinach aquaporin SoPIP2;1 in detergent micelles and lipid membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Plasencia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SoPIP2;1 constitutes one of the major integral proteins in spinach leaf plasma membranes and belongs to the aquaporin family. SoPIP2;1 is a highly permeable and selective water channel that has been successfully overexpressed and purified with high yields. In order to optimize reconstitution of the purified protein into biomimetic systems, we have here for the first time characterized the structural stability of SoPIP2;1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We have characterized the protein structural stability after purification and after reconstitution into detergent micelles and proteoliposomes using circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The structure of SoPIP2;1 was analyzed either with the protein solubilized with octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (OG or reconstituted into lipid membranes formed by E. coli lipids, diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine (DPhPC, or reconstituted into lipid membranes formed from mixtures of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPE, 1-palmitoyl-2oleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylserine (POPS, and ergosterol. Generally, SoPIP2;1 secondary structure was found to be predominantly α-helical in accordance with crystallographic data. The protein has a high thermal structural stability in detergent solutions, with an irreversible thermal unfolding occurring at a melting temperature of 58°C. Incorporation of the protein into lipid membranes increases the structural stability as evidenced by an increased melting temperature of up to 70°C. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study provide insights into SoPIP2;1 stability in various host membranes and suggest suitable choices of detergent and lipid composition for reconstitution of SoPIP2;1 into biomimetic membranes for biotechnological applications.

  3. Dynamics of Massive Atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemke, Rei; Kaspi, Yohai, E-mail: rei.chemke@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, 234 Herzl st., 76100, Rehovot (Israel)

    2017-08-10

    The many recently discovered terrestrial exoplanets are expected to hold a wide range of atmospheric masses. Here the dynamic-thermodynamic effects of atmospheric mass on atmospheric circulation are studied using an idealized global circulation model by systematically varying the atmospheric surface pressure. On an Earth analog planet, an increase in atmospheric mass weakens the Hadley circulation and decreases its latitudinal extent. These changes are found to be related to the reduction of the convective fluxes and net radiative cooling (due to the higher atmospheric heat capacity), which, respectively, cool the upper troposphere at mid-low latitudes and warm the troposphere at high latitudes. These together decrease the meridional temperature gradient, tropopause height and static stability. The reduction of these parameters, which play a key role in affecting the flow properties of the tropical circulation, weakens and contracts the Hadley circulation. The reduction of the meridional temperature gradient also decreases the extraction of mean potential energy to the eddy fields and the mean kinetic energy, which weakens the extratropical circulation. The decrease of the eddy kinetic energy decreases the Rhines wavelength, which is found to follow the meridional jet scale. The contraction of the jet scale in the extratropics results in multiple jets and meridional circulation cells as the atmospheric mass increases.

  4. The effect of structured triglycerides on the kinetic stability of total nutrient admixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Judit; Bubenik, Júlia; Dredán, Judit; Csempesz, Ferenc; Kiss, Dorottya; Zelkó, Romána

    2005-10-05

    The physical stability of two types of total parenteral nutrient (TPN) admixtures was studied as a function of storage time and temperature. One of them contained only structured triglycerides and the other exclusively long-chain triglycerides as lipid components. Droplet size of the mixtures was followed by photon correlation spectroscopy for 10 days. Zeta potential and dynamic surface tension measurements were carried out to evaluate the possible changes in the charge and interfacial surface tension of the emulsion droplets during the storage. pH values were monitored in order to follow the possible decomposition processes in the course of storage. Droplet size of emulsions prepared with lipids containing exclusively long-chain triglycerides showed remarkable increase after 4 days of storage in contrast with that of the mixtures containing structured lipids. The obtained results indicate that besides the advantageous metabolic effects of structured triglycerides, their application is recommended to improve the physical stability of TPN admixtures.

  5. The effect of exchange-correlation on change and stability of crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazdani, A.; Niazi, M.; Alimardan, V.

    2007-01-01

    Since exchange interaction energy has effect on band structure via polarization of spin of free electron, then can directly effects formation crystal structure. Therefore exchange-correlation is able to have an effect on determination of crystal structure or its change and stability. This energy is subject to fluctuation range of electrons between conduction band and valance band or density of electrons which due to increase the entropy of system, via Gibss Energy .We investigated these factors: 1) Size of ions 2) Density of States 3) Range of inter atomic and pair-potential.

  6. Structure of Mars' Atmosphere up to 100 Kilometers from the Entry Measurements of Viking 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiff, A; Kirk, D B

    1976-12-11

    The Viking 2 entry science data on the structure of Mars' atmosphere up to 100 kilometers define a morning atmosphere with an isothermal region near the surface; a surface pressure 10 percent greater than that recorded simultaneously at the Viking 1 site, which implies a landing site elevation lower by 2.7 kilometers than the reference ellipsoid; and a thermal structure to 100 kilometers at least qualitatively consistent with pre-Viking modeling of thermal tides. The temperature profile exhibits waves whose amplitude grows with altitude, to approximately 25 degrees K at 90 kilometers. These waves are believed to be a consequence of layered vertical oscillations and associated heating and cooling by compression and expansion, excited by the daily thermal cycling of the planet surface. As is necessary for gravity wave propagation, the atmosphere is stable against convection, except possibly in some very local regions. Temperature is everywhere appreciably above the carbon dioxide condensation boundary at both landing sites, precluding the occurrence of carbon dioxide hazes in northern summer at latitudes to at least 50 degrees N. Thus, ground level mists seen in these latitudes would appear to be condensed water vapor.

  7. Atmospheric stability in CFD &NDASH; Representation of the diurnal cycle in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman; Bechmann, Andreas; Sogachev, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models that focus primarily on modeling the airflow in a neutrally stratified surface layer. So far, physical processes that are specific to the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), for exam......For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models that focus primarily on modeling the airflow in a neutrally stratified surface layer. So far, physical processes that are specific to the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL......), for example the Coriolis force, buoyancy forces and heat transport, are mostly ignored in state-of-the-art CFD models. In order to decrease the uncertainty of wind resource assessment, especially in complex terrain, the effect of thermal stratification on the ABL should be included in such models. The present...

  8. Long wave dispersion relations for surface waves in a magnetically structured atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, I.C.; Roberts, B.

    1983-01-01

    A means of obtaining approximate dispersion relations for long wavelength magnetoacoustic surface waves propagating in a magnetically structured atmosphere is presented. A general dispersion relation applying to a wide range of magnetic profiles is obtained, and illustrated for the special cases of a single interface and a magnetic slab. In the slab geometry, for example, the dispersion relation contains both the even (sausage) and odd (kink) modes in one formalism

  9. Using high thermal stability flexible thin film thermoelectric generator at moderate temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhuang-Hao; Luo, Jing-Ting; Chen, Tian-Bao; Zhang, Xiang-Hua; Liang, Guang-Xing; Fan, Ping

    2018-04-01

    Flexible thin film thermoelectric devices are extensively used in the microscale industry for powering wearable electronics. In this study, comprehensive optimization was conducted in materials and connection design for fabricating a high thermal stability flexible thin film thermoelectric generator. First, the thin films in the generator, including the electrodes, were prepared by magnetron sputtering deposition. The "NiCu-Cu-NiCu" multilayer electrode structure was applied to ensure the thermal stability of the device used at moderate temperature in an air atmosphere. A design with metal layer bonding and series accordant connection was then employed. The maximum efficiency of a single PN thermocouple generator is >11%, and the output power loss of the generator is <10% after integration.

  10. Atmospheric stability and complex terrain: comparing measurements and CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman; Bechmann, Andreas; Berg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on Computational Fluid Dynamics models that focus on modeling the airflow in a neutrally stratified surface layer. So far, physical processes that are specific to the atmospheric boundary layer, for example the Coriolis force...

  11. Impact of aerosol particles on the structure of an atmospheric pressure microwave plasma afterglow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Chunku [Ceramic and Composite Materials Centre, 209 Farris Engineering Centre, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS C930, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2002-05-21

    Several novel ceramic processing technologies (e.g. oxide ceramic melting and spheroidization) using an atmospheric pressure microwave plasma torch were recently developed in our lab. Understanding the processes and optimization requires complete characterization of the plasma as a function of operating condition. As a first step, a non-intrusive spectroscopic method was employed to map rotational (gas), electron and excitation temperatures and electron densities of the afterglow region of microwave generated atmospheric plasmas with and without alumina particle aerosol. Two-dimensional spatially resolved mapping of rotational (gas), excitation and electron temperatures and electron densities as a function of operating conditions during material processing were developed. It was shown that the passage of an aerosol dramatically changes the structure of the afterglow. Also the non-equilibrium nature of microwave generated atmospheric argon plasma was confirmed, suggesting that only multi-temperature models are capable of modelling this region of the plasma. (author)

  12. Simple microwave plasma source at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong H.; Hong, Yong C.; Kim, Hyoung S.; Uhm, Han S.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a thermal plasma source operating without electrodes. One electrodeless torch is the microwave plasma-torch, which can produce plasmas in large quantities. We can generate plasma at an atmospheric pressure by marking use of the same magnetrons used as commercial microwave ovens. Most of the magnetrons are operated at the frequency of 2.45 GHz; the magnetron power microwave is about 1kW. Electromagnetic waves from the magnetrons propagate through a shorted waveguide. Plasma was generated under a resonant condition, by an auxiliary ignition system. The plasma is stabilized by vortex stabilization. Also, a high-power and high-efficiency microwave plasma-torch has been operated in air by combining two microwave plasma sources with 1kW, 2.45 GHz. They are arranged in series to generate a high-power plasma flame. The second torch adds all its power to the plasma flame of the first torch. Basically, electromagnetic waves in the waveguide were studied by a High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) code and preliminary experiments were conducted

  13. Valence electron structure and properties of stabilized ZrO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI JinPing; HAN JieOai; MENG SongHe; ZHANG XingHong

    2008-01-01

    To reveal the properties of stabilizers in ZrO2 on nanoscopic levels,the valence elec-tron structures of four stable ZrO2 phases and c-ZrO2 were analyzed on the basis of the empirical electron theory of solids and molecules.The results showed that the hybridization levels of Zr atoms in c-ZrO2 doped with Ca and Mg dropped from B17 to B13,the hybridization levels of Zr atoms in c-ZrO2 doped with Y and Ce dropped from B17 to B15,and that the four stabilizing atoms all made the hybridization levels of O atoms drop from level 4 to level 2.The numbers of covalent electrons in the strongest covalent bond in the descending order are c-ZrO2>ZrCeO2>ZrYOZrMgO>ZrCaO.The bond energies of the strongest covalent bond and the melting points of the solid solutions in the descending order are ZrCeO2>c-ZrO2>ZrYO>ZrMgO>ZrCaO.The percent-ages of the total number of covalent electrons in the descending order arec-ZrO2>ZrYO> ZrCeO2>ZrMgO> ZrCaO.From the above analysis,it can be concluded that the stabilizing degrees of the four stabilizers in the descending order are CaO> MgO>Y2O3>CeO2.

  14. Flexible Structure Control Scheme of a UAVs Formation to Improve the Formation Stability During Maneuvers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kownacki Cezary

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the issues related to formation flights, which requires to be still discussed, is the stability of formation flight in turns, where the aerodynamic conditions can be substantially different for outer vehicles due to varying bank angles. Therefore, this paper proposes a decentralized control algorithm based on a leader as the reference point for followers, i.e. other UAVs and two flocking behaviors responsible for local position control, i.e. cohesion and repulsion. But opposite to other research in this area, the structure of the formation becomes flexible (structure is being reshaped and bent according to actual turn radius of the leader. During turns the structure is bent basing on concentred circles with different radiuses corresponding to relative locations of vehicles in the structure. Simultaneously, UAVs' air-speeds must be modified according to the length of turn radius to achieve the stability of the structure. The effectiveness of the algorithm is verified by the results of simulated flights of five UAVs.

  15. Phase structures of the black Dp-D(p+4)-brane system in various ensembles II: electrical and thermodynamic stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Zhiguang; Zhou, Da

    2015-01-01

    By incorporating the electrical stability condition into the discussion, we continue the study on the thermodynamic phase structures of the Dp-D(p+4) black brane in GG, GC, CG, CC ensembles defined in our previous paper http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP07(2015)134. We find that including the electrical stability conditions in addition to the thermal stability conditions does not modify the phase structure of the GG ensemble but puts more constraints on the parameter space where black branes can stably exist in GC, CG, CC ensembles. In particular, the van der Waals-like phase structure which was supposed to be present in these ensembles when only thermal stability condition is considered would no longer be visible, since the phase of the small black brane is unstable under electrical fluctuations. However, the symmetry of the phase structure by interchanging the two kinds of brane charges and potentials is still preserved, which is argued to be the result of T-duality.

  16. Relationship between the structural stability with the types and land uses in southeastern Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin Sanleandro, P.; Sanchez Navarro, A.; Delgado Iniesta, M. J.; Fernandez-Delgado Juarez, M.

    2009-01-01

    Structural stability is one of the most important physical properties and is proposed as an indicator of quality. The aim of this study is to see the possible relationship between this property with soil types and uses of them. In this paper we have selected the Mazarron area based on their environmental characteristics and has taken forty-one topsoil samples, after analysis and study of the relationship between its structural stability with soil types and uses of same, we find a closer relationship in the case of uses that type, so that the natural soil as the percentage of stable aggregates close to 75%, while in soils anthropized this value reaches 44 %. (Author) 6 refs

  17. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure investigation of nitrogen stabilized expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    As-delivered austenitic stainless steel and nitrogen stabilized expanded austenite, both fully nitrided and denitrided (in H2), were investigated with Cr, Fe and Ni extended X-ray absorption fine structure. The data shows pronounced short-range ordering of Cr and N. For the denitrided specimen...

  18. The flow field structure of highly stabilized partially premixed flames in a concentric flow conical nozzle burner with coflow

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.; Zayed, M.F.; Samy, M.; Roberts, William L.; Mansour, Mohy S.

    2015-01-01

    The stability limits, the stabilization mechanism, and the flow field structure of highly stabilized partially premixed methane flames in a concentric flow conical nozzle burner with air co-flow have been investigated and presented in this work

  19. First-principle study of structure and stability of nickel carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, Josh S; Uddin, Jamal; Cundari, Thomas R; Bodiford, Nelli K; Wilson, Angela K [Center for Advanced Scientific Computing and Modeling, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle 305070, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2010-10-10

    Computational studies of nickel carbides, particularly Ni{sub 2}C, are scarce. A systematic density functional theory study is reported for Ni{sub 2}C, along with NiC and Ni{sub 3}C, to understand the stability and electronic structure of nickel carbides of varying stoichiometry. A comprehensive study was executed that involved 28 trial structures of varying space group symmetry for Ni{sub 2}C. An analysis of the electronic structure, geometry and thermodynamics of Ni{sub 2}C is performed, and compared with that for Ni{sub 3}C and NiC as well as several defect structures of varying composition. It is found that the most stable ground state arrangement of Ni{sub 2}C exists within a simple orthorhombic lattice and that it has metallic character. The calculated formation energies (kcal mol{sup -1}) of NiC, Ni{sub 2}C, and Ni{sub 3}C are 48.6, 7.9 and 6.4, respectively.

  20. Contribution of simple saccharides to the stabilization of amyloid structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, Justin; Darabie, Audrey A.; McLaurin, JoAnne

    2005-01-01

    The use of osmolytes or chaperones to stabilize proteins/peptides that misfold in neurodegenerative diseases is an attractive concept for drug development. We have investigated the role of a series of small carbohydrates for protection of the natively structured Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptides (Aβ). Using circular dichroism spectroscopy to follow the β-structural transitions and electron microscopy to examine tertiary structural characteristics, we demonstrate that the hydrogen bonding capacity of the carbohydrate determines the inhibition or promotion of fibrillogenesis. Three sugar molecules that vary only in their distribution of potential H-bonding partners promote various structural changes in Aβ. Two of these sugar molecules are excluded from Aβ during aggregation and promote mature fibre growth, while the other binds Aβ promoting nucleation and the accumulation of protofibrils. Our studies suggest that utilization of a combinatorial strategy to alter H-bonding capacity across a simple carbohydrate molecule may represent a novel drug design strategy

  1. Seismic stability of a standalone glove box structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saraswat, A., E-mail: anupams@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Reddy, G.R. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Ghosh, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India); Ghosh, A.K.; Kumar, Arun [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Glove box is a leak tight, safety related structure used for handling radiotoxic materials. • To study the seismic performance of a freestanding glove box, extensive shake table testing has been carried out. • Glove box maintained structural integrity and leak tightness up to design basis earthquake loading. • Detailed three-dimensional finite element model of the structure is developed and analyzed by using direct time integration methods. • Simplified numerical method is proposed and successfully applied, to quickly estimate sliding displacement and determine upper bounds for it. - Abstract: In a nuclear fuel cycle facility, radiotoxic materials are being handled in freestanding leak tight enclosures called glove boxes (GBs). These glove boxes act as a primary confinement for the radiotoxic materials. Glove boxes are designed as per codal requirements for class I component. They are designed to withstand extreme level of earthquake loading with a return period of 10,000 years. To evaluate seismic performance of the glove box, there is a need to check the stability (sliding and overturning), structural integrity (stresses and strains) and leak tightness under earthquake loading. Extensive shake table experiments were conducted on a single standalone glove box. Actual laboratory conditions were simulated during testing to check the response. After extensive shake table testing, glove box structure was also analyzed using finite element (FE) software. Detailed three-dimensional model of glove box structure was developed and analyzed using nonlinear time history method. It was observed that finite element methods could be utilized to accurately predict dynamic response of glove box structure. This paper discusses the details and results of shake table testing and methodology used for modelling and analysing freestanding glove box structure under seismic loading. In addition, simplified numerical procedure, developed using energy conservation

  2. Seismic stability of a standalone glove box structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraswat, A.; Reddy, G.R.; Ghosh, S.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kumar, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Glove box is a leak tight, safety related structure used for handling radiotoxic materials. • To study the seismic performance of a freestanding glove box, extensive shake table testing has been carried out. • Glove box maintained structural integrity and leak tightness up to design basis earthquake loading. • Detailed three-dimensional finite element model of the structure is developed and analyzed by using direct time integration methods. • Simplified numerical method is proposed and successfully applied, to quickly estimate sliding displacement and determine upper bounds for it. - Abstract: In a nuclear fuel cycle facility, radiotoxic materials are being handled in freestanding leak tight enclosures called glove boxes (GBs). These glove boxes act as a primary confinement for the radiotoxic materials. Glove boxes are designed as per codal requirements for class I component. They are designed to withstand extreme level of earthquake loading with a return period of 10,000 years. To evaluate seismic performance of the glove box, there is a need to check the stability (sliding and overturning), structural integrity (stresses and strains) and leak tightness under earthquake loading. Extensive shake table experiments were conducted on a single standalone glove box. Actual laboratory conditions were simulated during testing to check the response. After extensive shake table testing, glove box structure was also analyzed using finite element (FE) software. Detailed three-dimensional model of glove box structure was developed and analyzed using nonlinear time history method. It was observed that finite element methods could be utilized to accurately predict dynamic response of glove box structure. This paper discusses the details and results of shake table testing and methodology used for modelling and analysing freestanding glove box structure under seismic loading. In addition, simplified numerical procedure, developed using energy conservation

  3. Designing of new structure PID controller of boost converter for solar photovoltaic stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabrina, Hanifati Nur; Setiawan, Eko Adhi; Sabirin, Chip Rinaldi

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, the utilization of renewable energy as the source on distributed generation system is increasing. It aims to reduce reliance and power losses from utility grid and improve power stability in near loads. One example of renewable energy technology that have been highly proven on the market is solar photovoltaic (PV). This technology converts photon from sunlight into electricity. However, the fluctuation of solar radiation that often occurs become the main problem for this system. Due to this condition, the power conversion is needed to convert the change frequently in photovoltaic panel into a stable voltage to the system. Developing control of boost converter has important role to keep ability of system stabilization. A conventional PID (Proportional, Integral, Derivative) control is mostly used to achieve this goal. In this research, a design of new structure PID controller of boost converter is offered to better optimize system stability comparing to the conventional PID. Parameters obtained from this PID structure have been successfully yield a stable boost converter output at 200 V with 10% overshoot, 1.5 seconds of settling time, and 1.5% of steady-state error.

  4. Prediction and analysis of structure, stability and unfolding of thermolysin-like proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Gert; Eijsink, Vincent

    1993-08-01

    Bacillus neutral proteases (NPs) form a group of well-characterized homologous enzymes, that exhibit large differences in thermostability. The three-dimensional (3D) structures of several of these enzymes have been modelled on the basis of the crystal structures of the NPs of B. thermoproteolyticus (thermolysin) and B. cercus. Several new techniques have been developed to improve the model-building procedures. Also a model-building by mutagenesis' strategy was used, in which mutants were designed just to shed light on parts of the structures that were particularly hard to model. The NP models have been used for the prediction of site-directed mutations aimed at improving the thermostability of the enzymes. Predictions were made using several novel computational techniques, such as position-specific rotamer searching, packing quality analysis and property-profile database searches. Many stabilizing mutations were predicted and produced: improvement of hydrogen bonding, exclusion of buried water molecules, capping helices, improvement of hydrophobic interactions and entropic stabilization have been applied successfully. At elevated temperatures NPs are irreversibly inactivated as a result of autolysis. It has been shown that this denaturation process is independent of the protease activity and concentration and that the inactivation follows first-order kinetics. From this it has been conjectured that local unfolding of (surface) loops, which renders the protein susceptible to autolysis, is the rate-limiting step. Despite the particular nature of the thermal denaturation process, normal rules for protein stability can be applied to NPs. However, rather than stabilizing the whole protein against global unfolding, only a small region has to be protected against local unfolding. In contrast to proteins in general, mutational effects in proteases are not additive and their magnitude is strongly dependent on the location of the mutation. Mutations that alter the stability

  5. Oxidative stability of milk drinks containing structured lipids produced from sunflower oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2003-01-01

    Milk drinks containing 5% traditional sunflower oil (SO), randomized lipid (RL) or specific structured lipid (SL) (both produced from SO and tricaprylin/caprylic acid) were compared with respect to their particle size, viscosity and oxidative stability during storage. Furthermore, the effect...... drink could not be ascribed was most likely influenced by the structure of the lipid and to a single factor, differences in the process applied to produce and purify the lipids. EDTA was a strong antioxidant, while gallic acid did not exert a distinct antioxidative effect in the milk drink based on SL....... of adding potential antioxidants EDTA or gallic acid to the milk drink based on SL was investigated. The lipid type significantly affected the oxidative stability of the milk drinks: Milk drink based on SL oxidized faster than milk drink based on RL or SO. The reduced oxidative stability in the SL milk...

  6. Straightforward and accurate technique for post-coupler stabilization in drift tube linac structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Khalvati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The axial electric field of Alvarez drift tube linacs (DTLs is known to be susceptible to variations due to static and dynamic effects like manufacturing tolerances and beam loading. Post-couplers are used to stabilize the accelerating fields of DTLs against tuning errors. Tilt sensitivity and its slope have been introduced as measures for the stability right from the invention of post-couplers but since then the actual stabilization has mostly been done by tedious iteration. In the present article, the local tilt-sensitivity slope TS_{n}^{′} is established as the principal measure for stabilization instead of tilt sensitivity or some visual slope, and its significance is developed on the basis of an equivalent-circuit diagram of the DTL. Experimental and 3D simulation results are used to analyze its behavior and to define a technique for stabilization that allows finding the best post-coupler settings with just four tilt-sensitivity measurements. CERN’s Linac4 DTL Tank 2 and Tank 3 have been stabilized successfully using this technique. The final tilt-sensitivity error has been reduced from ±100%/MHz down to ±3%/MHz for Tank 2 and down to ±1%/MHz for Tank 3. Finally, an accurate procedure for tuning the structure using slug tuners is discussed.

  7. Straightforward and accurate technique for post-coupler stabilization in drift tube linac structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalvati, Mohammad Reza; Ramberger, Suitbert

    2016-04-01

    The axial electric field of Alvarez drift tube linacs (DTLs) is known to be susceptible to variations due to static and dynamic effects like manufacturing tolerances and beam loading. Post-couplers are used to stabilize the accelerating fields of DTLs against tuning errors. Tilt sensitivity and its slope have been introduced as measures for the stability right from the invention of post-couplers but since then the actual stabilization has mostly been done by tedious iteration. In the present article, the local tilt-sensitivity slope TSn' is established as the principal measure for stabilization instead of tilt sensitivity or some visual slope, and its significance is developed on the basis of an equivalent-circuit diagram of the DTL. Experimental and 3D simulation results are used to analyze its behavior and to define a technique for stabilization that allows finding the best post-coupler settings with just four tilt-sensitivity measurements. CERN's Linac4 DTL Tank 2 and Tank 3 have been stabilized successfully using this technique. The final tilt-sensitivity error has been reduced from ±100 %/MHz down to ±3 %/MHz for Tank 2 and down to ±1 %/MHz for Tank 3. Finally, an accurate procedure for tuning the structure using slug tuners is discussed.

  8. Impact of sea ice cover changes on the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric winter circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Handorf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of the Arctic atmosphere to low and high sea ice concentration phases based on European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF Re-Analysis Interim (ERA-Interim atmospheric data and Hadley Centre's sea ice dataset (HadISST1 from 1989 until 2010 has been studied. Time slices of winter atmospheric circulation with high (1990–2000 and low (2001–2010 sea ice concentration in the preceding August/September have been analysed with respect to tropospheric interactions between planetary and baroclinic waves. It is shown that a changed sea ice concentration over the Arctic Ocean impacts differently the development of synoptic and planetary atmospheric circulation systems. During the low ice phase, stronger heat release to the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean reduces the atmospheric vertical static stability. This leads to an earlier onset of baroclinic instability that further modulates the non-linear interactions between baroclinic wave energy fluxes on time scales of 2.5–6 d and planetary scales of 10–90 d. Our analysis suggests that Arctic sea ice concentration changes exert a remote impact on the large-scale atmospheric circulation during winter, exhibiting a barotropic structure with similar patterns of pressure anomalies at the surface and in the mid-troposphere. These are connected to pronounced planetary wave train changes notably over the North Pacific.

  9. Effect of ionic liquid on activity, stability, and structure of enzymes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naushad, Mu; Alothman, Zied Abdullah; Khan, Abbul Bashar; Ali, Maroof

    2012-11-01

    Ionic liquids have shown their potential as a solvent media for many enzymatic reactions as well as protein preservation, because of their unusual characteristics. It is also observed that change in cation or anion alters the physiochemical properties of the ionic liquids, which in turn influence the enzymatic reactions by altering the structure, activity, enatioselectivity, and stability of the enzymes. Thus, it is utmost need of the researchers to have full understanding of these influences created by ionic liquids before choosing or developing an ionic liquid to serve as solvent media for enzymatic reaction or protein preservation. So, in the present review, we try to shed light on effects of ionic liquids chemistry on structure, stability, and activity of enzymes, which will be helpful for the researchers in various biocatalytic applications. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Infrasonic ray tracing applied to mesoscale atmospheric structures: refraction by hurricanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Alfred J; Jones, R Michael

    2013-11-01

    A ray-tracing program is used to estimate the refraction of infrasound by the temperature structure of the atmosphere and by hurricanes represented by a Rankine-combined vortex wind plus a temperature perturbation. Refraction by the hurricane winds is significant, giving rise to regions of focusing, defocusing, and virtual sources. The refraction of infrasound by the temperature anomaly associated with a hurricane is small, probably no larger than that from uncertainties in the wind field. The results are pertinent to interpreting ocean wave generated infrasound in the vicinities of tropical cyclones.

  11. Structure, elastic properties and phase stability of Cr1-xAlxN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayrhofer, P.H.; Music, D.; Reeswinkel, Th.; Fuss, H.-G.; Schneider, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of composition and metal sublattice population on the phase stability, structure and elastic properties of cubic (c), hexagonal (h) and orthorhombic spin-polarized Cr 1-x Al x N was studied using ab initio calculations. Excellent correlation between ab initio and experimentally obtained lattice parameters and elastic constants was obtained. The energy of formation suggests that the cubic phase can be stabilized for x in the range 0.48-0.75, depending on the metal sublattice population. The broad range of x, which is also observed in experiments, can be understood by considering the Al distribution induced changes in the configurational contribution to the total energy

  12. Effects of building structures on radiation doses from routine releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    Realistic assessments of radiation doses to the population from routine releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere require consideration of man's largely indoor environment. The effect of a building structure on radiation doses is described quantitatively by a dose reduction factor, which is the ratio of the dose to a reference individual inside a structure to the corresponding dose with no structure present. We have implemented models to estimate dose reduction factors for internal dose from inhaled radionuclides and for external photon dose from airborne and surface-deposited radionuclides. The models are particularly useful in radiological assessment applications, since dose reduction factors may readily be estimated for arbitrary mixtures and concentrations of radionuclides in the atmosphere and on the ground. The model for inhalation dose reduction factors accounts for radioactive decay, air ventilation into and out of the structure, and deposition of radionuclides on inside surfaces of the structure. External dose reduction factors are estimated using the point-kernel integration method including consideration of buildup in air and the walls of the building. The potential importance of deposition of radionuclides on inside surfaces of a structure on both inhalation and external dose reduction factors has been demonstrated. Model formulation and the assumptions used in the calculations are discussed. Results of model-parameter sensitivity studies and estimates of dose reduction factors for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from an LWR fuel reprocessing plant are presented. (author)

  13. Breaking Dense Structures: Proving Stability of Densely Structured Hybrid Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike Möhlmann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstraction and refinement is widely used in software development. Such techniques are valuable since they allow to handle even more complex systems. One key point is the ability to decompose a large system into subsystems, analyze those subsystems and deduce properties of the larger system. As cyber-physical systems tend to become more and more complex, such techniques become more appealing. In 2009, Oehlerking and Theel presented a (de-composition technique for hybrid systems. This technique is graph-based and constructs a Lyapunov function for hybrid systems having a complex discrete state space. The technique consists of (1 decomposing the underlying graph of the hybrid system into subgraphs, (2 computing multiple local Lyapunov functions for the subgraphs, and finally (3 composing the local Lyapunov functions into a piecewise Lyapunov function. A Lyapunov function can serve multiple purposes, e.g., it certifies stability or termination of a system or allows to construct invariant sets, which in turn may be used to certify safety and security. In this paper, we propose an improvement to the decomposing technique, which relaxes the graph structure before applying the decomposition technique. Our relaxation significantly reduces the connectivity of the graph by exploiting super-dense switching. The relaxation makes the decomposition technique more efficient on one hand and on the other allows to decompose a wider range of graph structures.

  14. Energy intensity decline implications for stabilization of atmospheric CO2 content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lightfoot, H.D.; Green, C.

    2002-01-01

    By calculating the amount of carbon-free energy required to stabilize the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere at some level, such as 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 2100, the authors estimate the appropriate rate of world average annual energy intensity decline. The roles played by energy efficiency and long term sectoral changes like shifts in economic activity from high energy intensity sectors or industries to low energy intensity sectors or industries are distinguished. Advances in technology and better and improved procedures, as well as a broader adoption of more efficient technologies currently available are included in the improvements made in energy efficiency. The objective was, for the period 1990 to 2100 (110 years), to estimate the potential energy efficiency increase for world electricity generation. It is noted that electricity generation represents 38 per cent of world energy consumption in 1995, while transportation accounts for 19 per cent and residential, industrial and commercial uses account for 43 per cent. In 2100, it is expected that the overall average decline in energy intensity will be 40.1 per cent of that of 1990, according to the results obtained. Looked at from another perspective, it represents an average annual rate of energy intensity decline of 0.83 per cent for 110 years. Between 0.16 and 0.30 per cent could be added to the impact of sectoral changes on the average annual rate of decline in energy intensity, while 0.83 per cent would be attributable to improvements in energy efficiency, as shown by sensitivity analysis. 33 refs., 9 tabs., 1 fig

  15. Molecular Dications in Planetary Atmospheric Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Falcinelli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental properties of multiply charged molecular ions, such as energetics, structure, stability, lifetime and fragmentation dynamics, are relevant to understand and model the behavior of gaseous plasmas as well as ionosphere and astrophysical environments. Experimental determinations of the Kinetic Energy Released (KER for ions originating from dissociations reactions, induced by Coulomb explosion of doubly charged molecular ions (molecular dications produced by double photoionization of CO2, N2O and C2H2 molecules of interest in planetary atmospheres, are reported. The KER measurement as a function of the ultraviolet (UV photon energy in the range of 28–65 eV was extracted from the electron-ion-ion coincidence spectra obtained by using tunable synchrotron radiation coupled with ion imaging techniques at the ELETTRA Synchrotron Light Laboratory Trieste, Italy. These experiments, coupled with a computational analysis based on a Monte Carlo trajectory simulation, allow assessing the probability of escape for simple ionic species in the upper atmosphere of Mars, Venus and Titan. The measured KER in the case of H+, C+, CH+, CH2+, N+, O+, CO+, N2+ and NO+ fragment ions range between 1.0 and 5.5 eV, being large enough to allow these ionic species to participate in the atmospheric escape from such planets into space. In the case of Mars, we suggest a possible explanation for the observed behavior of the O+ and CO22+ ion density profiles.

  16. First Principles Prediction of Structure, Structure Selectivity, and Thermodynamic Stability under Realistic Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceder, Gerbrand [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials and Engineering

    2018-01-28

    Novel materials are often the enabler for new energy technologies. In ab-initio computational materials science, method are developed to predict the behavior of materials starting from the laws of physics, so that properties can be predicted before compounds have to be synthesized and tested. As such, a virtual materials laboratory can be constructed, saving time and money. The objectives of this program were to develop first-principles theory to predict the structure and thermodynamic stability of materials. Since its inception the program focused on the development of the cluster expansion to deal with the increased complexity of complex oxides. This research led to the incorporation of vibrational degrees of freedom in ab-initio thermodynamics, developed methods for multi-component cluster expansions, included the explicit configurational degrees of freedom of localized electrons, developed the formalism for stability in aqueous environments, and culminated in the first ever approach to produce exact ground state predictions of the cluster expansion. Many of these methods have been disseminated to the larger theory community through the Materials Project, pymatgen software, or individual codes. We summarize three of the main accomplishments.

  17. Emissions Control in Swirl-Stabilized Combustors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Ronald K

    2006-01-01

    ...) fabricate a swirl-stabilized gas and liquid fuel burner with optical access to enable diagnostic development that mimics the atmospheric pressure performance of the University of Cincinnati facility, and 4...

  18. Synthesis, Structure and Reactivity of a Borylene Cation [(NHSi)2B(CO)]+ Stabilized by Three Neutral Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Wu, Linlin; Lin, Zhenyang; Xie, Zuowei

    2017-10-04

    A borylene cation stabilized by bis(silylene) and carbon monoxide was prepared and structurally characterized via the reaction of bis(silylene)-stabilized bromoborylene with W(CO) 6 . This is the first example of a borylene cation coordinated by three neutral ligands, which can be viewed as a cationic form of a long-sought Lewis base-stabilized zerovalent boron compound. This cation can cleave dihydrogen.

  19. PWL approximation of nonlinear dynamical systems, part I: structural stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storace, M; De Feo, O

    2005-01-01

    This paper and its companion address the problem of the approximation/identification of nonlinear dynamical systems depending on parameters, with a view to their circuit implementation. The proposed method is based on a piecewise-linear approximation technique. In particular, this paper describes the approximation method and applies it to some particularly significant dynamical systems (topological normal forms). The structural stability of the PWL approximations of such systems is investigated through a bifurcation analysis (via continuation methods)

  20. Stability study of MMC tubes and advanced assemblies for telescope structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivet-Lutz, Martine; Pommatau, Gilles

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents new advances concerning the development of an Aluminum Matrix Composite for dimensionally stable satellite structures. Feasibility of thermally stable thin-walled tubes have been acquired through microstructure observation and Coefficient of Thermal Expansion measurement. In order to fit the thermo-mechanical stability domain of tubes on specifications, 3 thermal cycles have been tested, regarding to relaxation of internal stress and changes in macroscopic thermo-mechanical properties. Experimental expansion curves and microstructure observation show that thermal treatments permitts such a good fitting. For a better understanding of physical internal phenomena, internal stress has been measured by neutron diffraction on tube samples after each thermal treatment. Results show a significant decrease of stress due to cycling in cold temperature. In order to decrease the absolute value of CTE of assemblies, a new concept of thermo-mechanical stable linkage has been developped, which consists in a common alumlinum infiltration of superposed carbon preforms. Structural bonding, which usually affects stability properties and impose surface treatments and polymerization, can so be avoided. The study has been achieved through CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and French Ministry of Defense (DGA) supports.

  1. STRAT: an automated algorithm to retrieve the vertical structure of the atmosphere from single channel lidar data

    OpenAIRE

    Morille, Yohann; Haeffelin, Martial; Drobinski, Philippe; Pelon, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Today several lidar networks around the world provide large data sets that are extremely valuable for aerosol and cloud research. Retrieval of atmospheric constituent properties from lidar profiles requires detailed analysis of spatial and temporal variations of the signal. This paper presents an algorithm called STRAT (STRucture of the ATmosphere) designed to retrieve the vertical distribution of cloud and aerosol layers in the boundary layer and through the free trop...

  2. STRUCTURAL STABILITY OF HIGH NITROGEN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Bakajová

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the structural stability of an austenitic stainless steel with high nitrogen content. The investigated steel was heat treated at 800°C using different annealing times. Investigation was carried out using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and thermodynamic calculations. Three phases were identified by electron diffraction: Cr2N, sigma – phase and M23C6. The thermodynamic prediction is in good agreement with the experimental result. The only is the M23C6 carbide phase which is not thermodynamically predicted. Cr2N is the majority secondary phase and occurs in the form of discrete particles or cells (lamellas of Cr2N and austenite.

  3. Hydrolytic catalysis and structural stabilization in a designed metalloprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrow, Melissa L.; Peacock, Anna F. A.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Pecoraro, Vincent L.

    2011-01-01

    Metal ions are an important part of many natural proteins, providing structural, catalytic and electron transfer functions. Reproducing these functions in a designed protein is the ultimate challenge to our understanding of them. Here, we present an artificial metallohydrolase, which has been shown by X-ray crystallography to contain two different metal ions – a Zn(II) ion which is important for catalytic activity and a Hg(II) ion which provides structural stability. This metallohydrolase displays catalytic activity that compares well with several characteristic reactions of natural enzymes. It catalyses p-nitrophenyl acetate hydrolysis (pNPA) to within ~100-fold of the efficiency of human carbonic anhydrase (CA)II and is at least 550-fold better than comparable synthetic complexes. Similarly, CO2 hydration occurs with an efficiency within ~500-fold of CAII. While histidine residues in the absence of Zn(II) exhibit pNPA hydrolysis, miniscule apopeptide activity is observed for CO2 hydration. The kinetic and structural analysis of this first de novo designed hydrolytic metalloenzyme uncovers necessary design features for future metalloenzymes containing one or more metals. PMID:22270627

  4. Long-term atmospheric corrosion of mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuente, D. de la; Diaz, I.; Simancas, J.; Chico, B.; Morcillo, M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Atmospheric corrosion rate stabilises after the first 4-6 years of exposure. → Great compaction of the rust layers in rural and urban atmospheres. → Corrosion (in rural and urban) deviates from common behaviour of bilogarithmic law. → Typical structures of lepidocrocite, goethite and akaganeite are identified. → Formation of hematite (industrial atmosphere) and ferrihydrite (marine atmosphere). - Abstract: A great deal of information is available on the atmospheric corrosion of mild steel in the short, mid and even long term, but studies of the structure and morphology of corrosion layers are less abundant and generally deal with those formed in just a few years. The present study assesses the structure and morphology of corrosion product layers formed on mild steel after 13 years of exposure in five Spanish atmospheres of different types: rural, urban, industrial and marine (mild and severe). The corrosion layers have been characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Long-term corrosion is seen to be more severe in the industrial and marine atmospheres, and less so in the rural and urban atmospheres. In all cases the corrosion rate is seen to decrease with exposure time, stabilising after the first 4-6 years of exposure. The most relevant aspects to be noted are (a) the great compaction of the rust layers formed in the rural and urban atmospheres, (b) the formation of hematite and ferrihydrite phases (not commonly found) in the industrial and marine atmospheres, respectively and (c) identification of the typical morphological structures of lepidocrocite (sandy crystals and flowery plates), goethite (cotton balls structures) and akaganeite (cotton balls structures and cigar-shaped crystals).

  5. Leaching of concrete : the leaching process : extrapolation of deterioration : effect on the structural stability

    OpenAIRE

    Fagerlund, Göran

    2000-01-01

    The leaching process when water attacks concrete, and the effect of leaching on the strength and durability of a concrete structure, is analysed theoretically. Technique for prediction of the future leaching and structural stability is outlined. The analysis is to a certain extent supported by data from literature. The leaching process is divided in five different types: 1: Pure surface leaching 2: Surface leaching involving erosion 3: Homogeneous leaching over the entire structure 4...

  6. A first principles study of structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of beryllium alanate BeAlH{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, M.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R., E-mail: rajeswarapalanichamy@gmail.com; Priyanga, G. Sudha; Cinthia, A. Jemmy [Department of physics, N.M.S.S.V.N college, Madurai, Tamilnadu-625019 (India); Kanagaprabha, S. [Department of Physics, Kamaraj College, Tuticorin, Tamil Nadu 628003 (India); Iyakutti, K. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Chennai, Tamilnadu-603203 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of BeAlH{sub 5} for monoclinic crystal structures with two different types of space group namely P2{sub 1} and C{sub 2}/c. Among the considered structures monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) phase is found to be the most stable at ambient condition. The structural phase transition from monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) to monoclinic (C{sub 2}/c) phase is observed in BeAlH{sub 5}. The electronic structure reveals that this compound is insulator. The calculated elastic constants indicate that this material is mechanically stable at ambient condition.

  7. Formation and thermodynamic stability of (polymer + porphyrin) supramolecular structures in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Viviana C.P. da; Hwang, Barrington J.; Eggen, Spencer E.; Wallace, Megan J.; Annunziata, Onofrio

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamic stability of a (polymer + porphyrin) supramolecular structure was characterized. • Isothermal titration calorimetry provided two ways to determine reaction enthalpies. • Exothermic (polymer + porphyrin) binding competes with porphyrin self-association. • (Polymer + porphyrin) binding is entropically favored with respect to porphyrin self-association. • Spectral shifts show importance of porphyrin central hydrogens in polymer binding. - Abstract: Optical properties of porphyrins can be tuned through (polymer + porphyrin) (host + guest) binding in solution. This gives rise to the formation of supramolecular structures. In this paper, the formation, thermodynamic stability and spectroscopic properties of (polymer + porphyrin) supramolecular structures and their competition with porphyrin self-association were investigated by both isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and absorption spectroscopy. Specifically, reaction enthalpies and equilibrium constants were measured for meso-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin (TPPS) self-association and TPPS binding to the polymer poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP, 40 kg/mol) in aqueous solutions at pH 7 and three different temperatures (12, 25 and 37 °C). ITC, compared to spectroscopic techniques, provides two independent means to determine reaction enthalpies: direct measurements and Van’t Hoff plot. This was used as a criterion to assess that (1) self-association of TPPS is limited to the formation of dimers and (2) TPPS binds to PVP in its monomeric state only. The formation of TPPS dimers and (PVP + TPPS) supramolecular structures are both enthalpically driven. However, (polymer + porphyrin) binding was found to be entropically favored compared to dimerization. Furthermore, the reaction enthalpies of these two processes significantly depend on temperature. This behavior was attributed to hydrophobic interactions. Finally, the limiting absorption spectra of monomeric, dimeric and polymer

  8. Fabrication of Porous ZnO/Co₃O₄ Composites for Improving Cycling Stability of Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongqing; Zhang, Longmei; Tang, Zehua; Yu, Tingting; Liu, Huili; Zhang, Junhao; Liu, Yuanjun; Yuan, Aihua; Kong, Qinghong

    2018-07-01

    To tackle the issue of poor cycling stability for metal oxide nanoparticles as supercapacitor electrode, porous ZnO/Co3O4 composites were fabricated via solid-state thermolysis of [CoZn(BTC)(NO3)](2H2O)(0.5DMF) under air atmosphere. The results demonstrate that the products are mesoporous polyhedron structure with the diameter of about 10 μm, which are constructed by many interconnected nanocrystals with the sizes of around 20 nm. ZnO/Co3O4 composites as supercapacitor electrode exhibited excellent cyclic stability capacity, showing a maximum specific capacitance of 106.7 F g-1 and a capacity retention of 102.7 F · g-1 after 1000 cycles at 0.5 A · g-1. The superior electrochemical performance was contributed to ZnO/Co3O4 composites with porous structures and small size, which shortened the route of electronic transmission as well as ions insertion and desertion processes. Additionally, the synergetic effect of bimetallic oxides improved the electrochemical stability.

  9. Structure of the Nanobody-Stabilized Active State of the Kappa Opioid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Tao; Majumdar, Susruta; Zaidi, Saheem A; Ondachi, Pauline; McCorvy, John D; Wang, Sheng; Mosier, Philip D; Uprety, Rajendra; Vardy, Eyal; Krumm, Brian E; Han, Gye Won; Lee, Ming-Yue; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Huang, Xi-Ping; Strachan, Ryan T; Tribo, Alexandra R; Pasternak, Gavril W; Carroll, F Ivy; Stevens, Raymond C; Cherezov, Vadim; Katritch, Vsevolod; Wacker, Daniel; Roth, Bryan L

    2018-01-11

    The κ-opioid receptor (KOP) mediates the actions of opioids with hallucinogenic, dysphoric, and analgesic activities. The design of KOP analgesics devoid of hallucinatory and dysphoric effects has been hindered by an incomplete structural and mechanistic understanding of KOP agonist actions. Here, we provide a crystal structure of human KOP in complex with the potent epoxymorphinan opioid agonist MP1104 and an active-state-stabilizing nanobody. Comparisons between inactive- and active-state opioid receptor structures reveal substantial conformational changes in the binding pocket and intracellular and extracellular regions. Extensive structural analysis and experimental validation illuminate key residues that propagate larger-scale structural rearrangements and transducer binding that, collectively, elucidate the structural determinants of KOP pharmacology, function, and biased signaling. These molecular insights promise to accelerate the structure-guided design of safer and more effective κ-opioid receptor therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Simulating the 3-D Structure of Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. M.; Waite, H.; Westlake, J.; Magee, B.

    2009-05-01

    We present results from the 3-D Titan Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (Bell et al [2009], PSS, in review). We show comparisons between simulated N2, CH4, and H2 density fields and the in-situ data from the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS). We describe the temperature and wind fields consistent with these density calculations. Variations with local time, longitude, and latitude will be addressed. Potential plasma heating sources can be estimated using the 1-D model of De La Haye et al [2007, 2008] and the impacts on the thermosphere of Titan can be assessed in a global sense in Titan-GITM. Lastly, we will place these findings within the context of recent work in modeling the 2-D structure of Titan's upper atmosphere (Mueller-Wodarg et al [2008]).

  11. Optical properties and thermal stability of germanium oxide (GeO2) nanocrystals with α-quartz structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramana, C.V.; Carbajal-Franco, G.; Vemuri, R.S.; Troitskaia, I.B.; Gromilov, S.A.; Atuchin, V.V.

    2010-01-01

    Germanium dioxide (GeO 2 ) crystals were prepared by a chemical precipitation method at a relatively low-temperature (100 o C). The grown crystals were characterized by studying their microstructure, optical properties and thermal stability. The results indicate that the grown GeO 2 crystals exhibit α-quartz type crystal structure. The lattice parameters obtained from XRD were a = 4.987(4) A and c = 5.652(5) A. Electron microscopy analysis indicates a high structural quality of GeO 2 crystals grown using the present approach. Optical absorption measurements indicate a direct bandgap of 5.72 eV without any additional bands arising from localized or defect states. Thermogravimetric measurements indicate the temperature stability of the grown GeO 2 nanocrystals. Microscopic analysis coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy of the GeO 2 crystals with α-quartz type crystal structure indicates their stability in chemical composition up to a temperature of 400 deg. C. The surface morphology of GeO 2 crystals, however, found to be changing with the increase in temperature.

  12. Electronic structure effects on stability and quantum conductance in 2D gold nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashid, Vikas; Shah, Vaishali; Salunke, H. G.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the stability and conductivity of unsupported, two-dimensional infinite gold nanowires using ab initio density functional theory (DFT). Two-dimensional ribbon-like nanowires with 1–5 rows of gold atoms in the non-periodic direction and with different possible structures have been considered. The nanowires with >2 rows of atoms exhibit dimerization, similar to finite wires, along the non-periodic direction. Our results show that in these zero thickness nanowires, the parallelogram motif is the most stable. A comparison between parallelogram- and rectangular-shaped nanowires of increasing width indicates that zero thickness (111) oriented wires have a higher stability over (100). A detailed analysis of the electronic structure, reveals that the (111) oriented structures show increased delocalization of s and p electrons in addition to a stronger delocalization of the d electrons and hence are the most stable. The density of states show that the nanowires are metallic and conducting except for the double zigzag structure, which is semiconducting. Conductance calculations show transmission for a wide range of energies in all the stable nanowires with more than two rows of atoms. The conductance channels are not purely s and have strong contributions from the d levels, and weak contributions from the p levels.

  13. Correlation of structural stability with functional remodeling of high-density lipoproteins: the importance of being disordered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Madhumita; Gao, Xuan; Jayaraman, Shobini; Gursky, Olga

    2008-11-04

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) are protein-lipid assemblies that remove excess cell cholesterol and prevent atherosclerosis. HDLs are stabilized by kinetic barriers that decelerate protein dissociation and lipoprotein fusion. We propose that similar barriers modulate metabolic remodeling of plasma HDLs; hence, changes in particle composition that destabilize HDLs and accelerate their denaturation may accelerate their metabolic remodeling. To test this notion, we correlate existing reports on HDL-mediated cell cholesterol efflux and esterification, which are obligatory early steps in cholesterol removal, with our kinetic studies of HDL stability. The results support our hypothesis and show that factors accelerating cholesterol efflux and esterification in model discoidal lipoproteins (including reduced protein size, reduced fatty acyl chain length, and/or increased level of cis unsaturation) destabilize lipoproteins and accelerate their fusion and apolipoprotein dissociation. Oxidation studies of plasma spherical HDLs show a similar trend: mild oxidation by Cu(2+) or OCl(-) accelerates cell cholesterol efflux, protein dissociation, and HDL fusion, while extensive oxidation inhibits these reactions. Consequently, moderate destabilization may be beneficial for HDL functions by facilitating insertion of cholesterol and lipophilic enzymes, promoting dissociation of lipid-poor apolipoproteins, which are primary acceptors of cell cholesterol, and thereby accelerating HDL metabolism. Therefore, HDL stability must be delicately balanced to maintain the structural integrity of the lipoprotein assembly and ensure structural specificity necessary for interactions of HDL with its metabolic partners, while facilitating rapid HDL remodeling and turnover at key junctures of cholesterol transport. The inverse correlation between HDL stability and remodeling illustrates the functional importance of structural disorder in macromolecular assemblies stabilized by kinetic barriers.

  14. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low temperature combustion and the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in earth’s atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization make characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, while master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  15. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, David L.

    2017-05-01

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low-temperature combustion and in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in Earth's atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization makes characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, and master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  16. The study of the structural stability of the spiral laser beams propagation through inhomogeneous phase medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchik, Alexander A.; Muzychenko, Yana B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper discusses theoretical and experimental results of the investigation of light beams that retain their intensity structure during propagation and focusing. Spiral laser beams are a family of laser beams that preserve the structural stability up to scale and rotation with the propagation. Properties of spiral beams are of practical interest for laser technology, medicine and biotechnology. Researchers use a spiral beams for movement and manipulation of microparticles. Functionality laser manipulators can be significantly enhanced by using spiral beams whose intensity remains invariable. It is well known, that these beams has non-zero orbital angular momentum. Spiral beams have a complicated phase distribution in cross section. In this paper we investigate the structural stability of the laser beams having a spiral phase structure by passing them through an inhomogeneous phase medium. Laser beam is passed through a medium is characterized by a random distribution of phase in the range 0..2π. The modeling was performed using VirtualLab 5.0 (manufacturer LightTrans GmbH). Compared the intensity distribution of the spiral and ordinary laser beam after the passage of the inhomogeneous medium. It is shown that the spiral beams exhibit a significantly better structural stability during the passage phase heterogeneous environments than conventional laser beams. The results obtained in the simulation are tested experimentally. Experimental results show good agreement with the theoretical results.

  17. A first-principles study on hydrogen in ZnS: Structure, stability and diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yu [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Xie, Sheng-Yi, E-mail: ayikongjian@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Meng, Xing, E-mail: mengxingjlu@163.com [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Based on first-principles calculations, the local structures and their energetic stability for impurity hydrogen (H) in semiconductor ZnS are investigated. H is most favorable to dwell in the bond center (BC) site in ZnS. The antibonding site of Zn (AB{sub Zn}) has close energy with BC. The antibonding site of S (AB{sub S}) and interstitial (I{sub H}) site have 0.19 eV and 0.44 eV energy cost, separately. The bond strength with S and Zn determines the stability of impurity H in ZnS. Meanwhile, H is highly moveable in ZnS. At the room temperature, H can overcome the barrier to diffuse through the neighboring BC site. - Highlights: • Local structures for hydrogen in ZnS are investigated. • Impurity level of hydrogen is modulated by bonding with S or Zn. • Hydrogen is highly moveable in ZnS.

  18. First-principles study of structural stability and elastic property of pre-perovskite PbTiO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yong; Ni Li-Hong; Ren Zhao-Hui; Xu Gang; Li Xiang; Song Chen-Lu; Han Gao-Rong

    2012-01-01

    The structural stability and the elastic properties of a novel structure of lead titanate, which is named pre- perovskite PbTiO 3 (PP-PTO) and is constructed with TiO 6 octahedral columns arranged in a one-dimensional manner, are investigated by using first-principles calculations. PP-PTO is energetically unstable compared with conventional perovskite phases, however it is mechanically stable. The equilibrium transition pressures for changing from pre- perovskite to cubic and tetragonal phases are −0.5 GPa and −1.4 GPa, respectively, with first-order characteristics. Further, the differences in elastic properties between pre-perovskite and conventional perovskite phases are discussed for the covalent bonding network, which shows a highly anisotropic character in PP-PTO. This study provides a crucial insight into the structural stabilities of PP-PTO and conventional perovskite. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  19. FINGERING CONVECTION AND CLOUDLESS MODELS FOR COOL BROWN DWARF ATMOSPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremblin, P.; Amundsen, D. S.; Mourier, P.; Baraffe, I.; Chabrier, G.; Drummond, B.; Homeier, D.; Venot, O.

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to improve the current understanding of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs, especially cold ones with spectral types T and Y, whose modeling is a current challenge. Silicate and iron clouds are believed to disappear at the photosphere at the L/T transition, but cloudless models fail to reproduce correctly the spectra of T dwarfs, advocating for the addition of more physics, e.g., other types of clouds or internal energy transport mechanisms. We use a one-dimensional radiative/convective equilibrium code ATMO to investigate this issue. This code includes both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium chemistry and solves consistently the PT structure. Included opacity sources are H 2 -H 2 , H 2 -He, H 2 O, CO, CO 2 , CH 4 , NH 3 , K, Na, and TiO, VO if they are present in the atmosphere. We show that the spectra of Y dwarfs can be accurately reproduced with a cloudless model if vertical mixing and NH 3 quenching are taken into account. T dwarf spectra still have some reddening in, e.g., J–H, compared to cloudless models. This reddening can be reproduced by slightly reducing the temperature gradient in the atmosphere. We propose that this reduction of the stabilizing temperature gradient in these layers, leading to cooler structures, is due to the onset of fingering convection, triggered by the destabilizing impact of condensation of very thin dust

  20. FINGERING CONVECTION AND CLOUDLESS MODELS FOR COOL BROWN DWARF ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremblin, P.; Amundsen, D. S.; Mourier, P.; Baraffe, I.; Chabrier, G.; Drummond, B. [Astrophysics Group, University of Exeter, EX4 4QL Exeter (United Kingdom); Homeier, D. [Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, CRAL, UMR CNRS 5574, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Venot, O., E-mail: tremblin@astro.ex.ac.uk, E-mail: pascal.tremblin@cea.fr [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-05-01

    This work aims to improve the current understanding of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs, especially cold ones with spectral types T and Y, whose modeling is a current challenge. Silicate and iron clouds are believed to disappear at the photosphere at the L/T transition, but cloudless models fail to reproduce correctly the spectra of T dwarfs, advocating for the addition of more physics, e.g., other types of clouds or internal energy transport mechanisms. We use a one-dimensional radiative/convective equilibrium code ATMO to investigate this issue. This code includes both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium chemistry and solves consistently the PT structure. Included opacity sources are H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}-He, H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, K, Na, and TiO, VO if they are present in the atmosphere. We show that the spectra of Y dwarfs can be accurately reproduced with a cloudless model if vertical mixing and NH{sub 3} quenching are taken into account. T dwarf spectra still have some reddening in, e.g., J–H, compared to cloudless models. This reddening can be reproduced by slightly reducing the temperature gradient in the atmosphere. We propose that this reduction of the stabilizing temperature gradient in these layers, leading to cooler structures, is due to the onset of fingering convection, triggered by the destabilizing impact of condensation of very thin dust.

  1. Magnet Cycles and Stability Periods of the CMS Structures from 2008 to 2013 as Observed by the Link Alignment System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this document Magnet Cycles and Stability Periods of the CMS Experiment are studied with the recorded Alignment Link System data along the 2008 to 2013 years of operation. The motions of the mechanical structures due to the magnetic field forces are studied including an in-depth analysis of the relative distance between the endcap structures and the central Tracker body during the Stability Periods to verify the mechanical stability of the detector during the physics data taking.

  2. Structure and dynamics of solar atmosphere: the reign of SOHO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocchialini, Karine

    2004-01-01

    In this report for Accreditation to Supervise Research (HDR), the author proposes an overview of his research works which particularly addressed the study of the solar atmosphere, notably based on observations made by the SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) satellite. After a recall of his curriculum, he presents and comments results obtained in various areas: Corona heating and origin of solar wind, heating by waves, heating by quasi-steady mechanisms, regions which are sources of fast solar wind, sources of Coronal matter ejections. He also presents the different adopted approaches and methods (multi-wavelength analysis, oscillation measurement, statistical analysis) and the various observed structures (chromospheric network, shiny points, Coronal holes, and protuberances)

  3. Higher order structural effects stabilizing the reverse watson-crick guanine-cytosine base pair in functional RNAs

    KAUST Repository

    Chawla, Mohit

    2013-10-10

    The G:C reverse Watson-Crick (W:W trans) base pair, also known as Levitt base pair in the context of tRNAs, is a structurally and functionally important base pair that contributes to tertiary interactions joining distant domains in functional RNA molecules and also participates in metabolite binding in riboswitches. We previously indicated that the isolated G:C W:W trans base pair is a rather unstable geometry, and that dicationic metal binding to the Guanine base or posttranscriptional modification of the Guanine can increase its stability. Herein, we extend our survey and report on other H-bonding interactions that can increase the stability of this base pair. To this aim, we performed a bioinformatics search of the PDB to locate all the occurencies of G:C trans base pairs. Interestingly, 66% of the G:C trans base pairs in the PDB are engaged in additional H-bonding interactions with other bases, the RNA backbone or structured water molecules. High level quantum mechanical calculations on a data set of representative crystal structures were performed to shed light on the structural stability and energetics of the various crystallographic motifs. This analysis was extended to the binding of the preQ1 metabolite to a preQ1-II riboswitch. 2013 The Author(s).

  4. Evaluation of the effect of non-B DNA structures on plasmid integrity via accelerated stability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, S C; Monteiro, G A; Prazeres, D M F

    2009-04-01

    Plasmid biopharmaceuticals are a new class of medicines with an enormous potential. Attempts to increase the physical stability of highly purified supercoiled (SC) plasmid DNA in pharmaceutical aqueous solutions have relied on: (i) changing the DNA sequence, (ii) improving manufacturing to reduce deleterious impurities and initial DNA damage, and (iii) controlling the storage medium characteristics. In this work we analyzed the role of secondary structures on the degradation of plasmid molecules. Accelerated stability experiments were performed with SC, open circular (OC) and linear (L) isoforms of three plasmids which differed only in the "single-strandlike" content of their polyadenylation (poly A) signals. We have proved that the presence of more altered or interrupted (non-B) DNA secondary structures did not directly translate into an easier strand scission of the SC isoforms. Rather, those unusual structures imposed a lower degree of SC in the plasmids, leading to an increase in their resistance to thermal degradation. However, this behavior was reversed when the relaxed or L isoforms were tested, in which case the absence of SC rendered the plasmids essentially double-stranded. Overall, this work suggests that plasmid DNA sequence and secondary structures should be taken into account in future investigations of plasmid stability during prolonged storage.

  5. Micromagnetic study of skyrmion stability in confined magnetic structures with perpendicular anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, R. L.; Garcia, F.; Novais, E. R. P.; Sinnecker, J. P.; Guimarães, A. P.

    2018-04-01

    Skyrmions are emerging topological spin structures that are potentially revolutionary for future data storage and spintronics applications. The existence and stability of skyrmions in magnetic materials is usually associated to the presence of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) in bulk magnets or in magnetic thin films lacking inversion symmetry. While some methods have already been proposed to generate isolated skyrmions in thin films with DMI, a thorough study of the conditions under which the skyrmions will remain stable in order to be manipulated in an integrated spintronic device are still an open problem. The stability of such structures is believed to be a result of ideal combinations of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), DMI and the interplay between geometry and magnetostatics. In the present work we show some micromagnetic results supporting previous experimental observations of magnetic skyrmions in spin-valve stacks with a wide range of DMI values. Using micromagnetic simulations of cobalt-based disks, we obtain the magnetic ground state configuration for several values of PMA, DMI and geometric parameters. Skyrmion numbers, corresponding to the topological charge, are calculated in all cases and confirm the occurrence of isolated, stable, axially symmetric skyrmions for several combinations of DMI and anisotropy constant. The stability of the skyrmions in disks is then investigated under magnetic field and spin-polarized current, in finite temperature, highlighting the limits of applicability of these spin textures in spintronic devices.

  6. First principles study of structural stability and site preference in Co3 (W,X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Sri Raghunath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery [1] of γ′ precipitate (L12 – Co3(Al, W in the Co-Al-W ternary system, there has been an increased interest in Co-based superalloys. Since these alloys have two phase microstructures (γ + γ′ similar to Ni-based superalloys [2], they are viable candidates in high temperature applications, particularly in land-based turbines. The role of alloying on stability of the γ′ phase has been an active area of research. In this study, electronic structure calculations were done to probe the effect of alloying in Co3W with L12 structure. Compositions of type Co3(W,X, (where X/Y = Mn, Fe, Ni, Pt, Cr , Al, Si, V, W, Ta, Ti, Nb, Hf, Zr and Mo were studied. Effect of alloying on equilibrium lattice parameters and ground state energies was used to calculate Vegard's coefficients and site preference related data. The effect of alloying on the stability of the L12 structure vis a vis other geometrically close packed ordered structures was also studied for a range of Co3X compounds. Results suggest that the penchant of element for the W sublattice can be predicted by comparing heats of formation of Co3X in different structures.

  7. Covariance Between Arctic Sea Ice and Clouds Within Atmospheric State Regimes at the Satellite Footprint Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patrick C.; Kato, Seiji; Xu, Kuan-Man; Cai, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the cloud response to sea ice change is necessary for modeling Arctic climate. Previous work has primarily addressed this problem from the interannual variability perspective. This paper provides a refined perspective of sea ice-cloud relationship in the Arctic using a satellite footprint-level quantification of the covariance between sea ice and Arctic low cloud properties from NASA A-Train active remote sensing data. The covariances between Arctic low cloud properties and sea ice concentration are quantified by first partitioning each footprint into four atmospheric regimes defined using thresholds of lower tropospheric stability and mid-tropospheric vertical velocity. Significant regional variability in the cloud properties is found within the atmospheric regimes indicating that the regimes do not completely account for the influence of meteorology. Regional anomalies are used to account for the remaining meteorological influence on clouds. After accounting for meteorological regime and regional influences, a statistically significant but weak covariance between cloud properties and sea ice is found in each season for at least one atmospheric regime. Smaller average cloud fraction and liquid water are found within footprints with more sea ice. The largest-magnitude cloud-sea ice covariance occurs between 500m and 1.2 km when the lower tropospheric stability is between 16 and 24 K. The covariance between low cloud properties and sea ice is found to be largest in fall and is accompanied by significant changes in boundary layer temperature structure where larger average near-surface static stability is found at larger sea ice concentrations.

  8. Covariance between Arctic sea ice and clouds within atmospheric state regimes at the satellite footprint level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patrick C; Kato, Seiji; Xu, Kuan-Man; Cai, Ming

    2015-12-27

    Understanding the cloud response to sea ice change is necessary for modeling Arctic climate. Previous work has primarily addressed this problem from the interannual variability perspective. This paper provides a refined perspective of sea ice-cloud relationship in the Arctic using a satellite footprint-level quantification of the covariance between sea ice and Arctic low cloud properties from NASA A-Train active remote sensing data. The covariances between Arctic low cloud properties and sea ice concentration are quantified by first partitioning each footprint into four atmospheric regimes defined using thresholds of lower tropospheric stability and midtropospheric vertical velocity. Significant regional variability in the cloud properties is found within the atmospheric regimes indicating that the regimes do not completely account for the influence of meteorology. Regional anomalies are used to account for the remaining meteorological influence on clouds. After accounting for meteorological regime and regional influences, a statistically significant but weak covariance between cloud properties and sea ice is found in each season for at least one atmospheric regime. Smaller average cloud fraction and liquid water are found within footprints with more sea ice. The largest-magnitude cloud-sea ice covariance occurs between 500 m and 1.2 km when the lower tropospheric stability is between 16 and 24 K. The covariance between low cloud properties and sea ice is found to be largest in fall and is accompanied by significant changes in boundary layer temperature structure where larger average near-surface static stability is found at larger sea ice concentrations.

  9. Thermal stability and degradation behavior of novel wholly aromatic azo polyamide-hydrazides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ghamdia, R.F.; Fahmib, M.M.; Mohamed, N.A.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal stability and degradation behavior of a series of novel wholly aromatic azo polyamide-hydrazides have been investigated in nitrogen and in air atmospheres using differential scanning ealorimetry, thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The influences of controlled structural variations and molecular weight on the thermal stability and degradation behavior of this series of polymers have also been studied. The structural differences were achieved by varying the content of para- and meta substituted phenylene rings incorporated within this series. The polymers were prepared by a low temperature solution polycondensation reaction of p aminosalicylic acid hydrazide and an equimolar amount of 4,4-azo dibenzoyl chloride [4,4 ADBC] or 3,3-azo dibenzoyl chloride [3,3ADBC] or mixtures of various molar ratios of 4,4ADBC and 3,3ADBC in anhydrous N,N- dimethyl acetamide [DMAc] containing lithium chloride as a solvent at -10 degree C. The results clearly reveal that these polymers are characterized by high thermal stability. Their weight loss occurred in three distinctive steps. The first was small and assigned to the evaporation of absorbed moisture. The second was appreciable and was attributed to the cyclo dehydration reaction of the hydrazide groups into 1,3,4-oxadiazole rings by losing water, combined with elimination of azo groups by losing molecular nitrogen. This is not a true degradation but rather a thermo-chemical transformation reaction of the azo polyamide-hydrasdes into the corresponding polyamide-l,3,4-oxadiazoles. The third was relatively severe and sharp, particularly in air, and corresponded to the decomposition of the resulting polyamide-l, 3,4-oxadiazoles. In both degradation atmospheres, the improved resistance to high temperatures was always associated with increased content of para- phenylene moieties of the investigated polymer. Further, with exception of 160-200 degree C temperature range, where the lower molecular weight

  10. Spectroscopy of Exoplanet Atmospheres with the FINESSE Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroo, Pieter; Swain, Mark R.; Green, Robert O.

    2012-01-01

    FINESSE (Fast INfrared Exoplanet Spectroscopic Survey Explorer) will provide uniquely detailed information on the growing number of newly discovered planets by characterizing their atmospheric composition and temperature structure. This NASA Explorer mission, selected for a competitive Phase A study, is unique in its breath and scope thanks to broad instantaneous spectroscopy from the optical to the mid-IR (0.7 - 5 micron), with a survey of exoplanets measured in a consistent, uniform way. For 200 transiting exoplanets ranging from Terrestrial to Jovians, FINESSE will measure the chemical composition and temperature structure of their atmospheres and trace changes over time with exoplanet longitude. The mission will do so by measuring the spectroscopic time series for a primary and secondary eclipse over the exoplanet orbital phase curve. With spectrophotometric precision being a key enabling aspect for combined light exoplanet characterization, FINESSE is designed to produce spectrophotometric precision of better than 100 parts-per-million per spectral channel without the need for decorrelation. The exceptional stability of FINESSE will even allow the mission to characterize non-transiting planets, potentially as part of FINESSE's Participating Scientist Program. In this paper, we discuss the flow down from the target availability to observations and scheduling to the analysis and calibration of the data and how it enables FINESSE to be the mission that will truly expand the new field of comparative exoplanetology.

  11. Oxidative stability of mayonnaise and milk drink produced with structured lipids based on fish oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2004-01-01

    The oxidative stabilities of traditional fish oil (FO), randomized lipids (RFO), or specific structured lipids (SFO) produced from fish oil were compared when incorporated into either milk drink or mayonnaise. Furthermore, the effect of adding the potential antioxidants EDTA (240 mg...... not be ascribed to a single factor, but was most likely influenced by the structure of the lipids and differences in the processes used to produce and purify the lipids. In milk drinks based on SFO, EDTA slightly reduced oxidation, while lactoferrin did not exert a distinct antioxidative effect....../kg) or lactoferrin (1000 mg/kg) to the milk drink based on SFO was investigated. The lipid type significantly affected the oxidative stability of both mayonnaises and milk drinks: The oxidative stability decreased in the order RFO>FO>SFO. The reduced oxidative stability in the SFO food emulsions could...

  12. Short and long periodic atmospheric variations between 25 and 200 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, C. G.; Woodrum, A.

    1973-01-01

    Previously collected data on atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and winds between 25 and 200 km from sources including Meteorological Rocket Network data, ROBIN falling sphere data, grenade release and pitot tube data, meteor winds, chemical release winds, satellite data, and others were analyzed by a daily difference method and results on the distribution statistics, magnitude, and spatial structure of gravity wave and planetary wave atmospheric variations are presented. Time structure of the gravity wave variations were determined by the analysis of residuals from harmonic analysis of time series data. Planetary wave contributions in the 25-85 km range were discovered and found to have significant height and latitudinal variation. Long period planetary waves, and seasonal variations were also computed by harmonic analysis. Revised height variations of the gravity wave contributions in the 25 to 85 km height range were computed. An engineering method and design values for gravity wave magnitudes and wave lengths are given to be used for such tasks as evaluating the effects on the dynamical heating, stability and control of spacecraft such as the space shuttle vehicle in launch or reentry trajectories.

  13. Structure and Stability of Deflagrations in Porous Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    stephen B. Margolis; Forman A. Williams

    1999-03-01

    Theoretical two-phase-flow analyses have recently been developed to describe the structure and stability of multi-phase deflagrations in porous energetic materials, in both confined and unconfined geometries. The results of these studies are reviewed, with an emphasis on the fundamental differences that emerge with respect to the two types of geometries. In particular, pressure gradients are usually negligible in unconfined systems, whereas the confined problem is generally characterized by a significant gas-phase pressure difference, or overpressure, between the burned and unburned regions. The latter leads to a strong convective influence on the burning rate arising from the pressure-driven permeation of hot gases into the solid/gas region and the consequent preheating of the unburned material. It is also shown how asymptotic models that are suitable for analyzing stability may be derived based on the largeness of an overall activation-energy parameter. From an analysis of such models, it is shown that the effects of porosity and two-phase flow are generally destabilizing, suggesting that degraded propellants, which exhibit greater porosity than their pristine counterparts, may be more readily subject to combustion instability and nonsteady deflagration.

  14. Stability of cosmic structures in scalar-tensor theories of gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panotopoulos, Grigoris [Universidade de Lisboa, Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Rincon, Angel [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Instituto de Fisica, Santiago (Chile)

    2018-01-15

    In the present work we study a concrete model of scalar-tensor theory of gravity characterized by two free parameters, and we compare its predictions to observational data and constraints coming from supernovae, solar system tests and the stability of cosmic structures. First an exact analytical solution at the background level is obtained. Using that solution the expression for the turnaround radius is computed. Finally we show graphically how current data and limits put bounds on the parameters of the model at hand. (orig.)

  15. Covalent-bond stabilization of the Si(111)-(3 1 -1 1)-Pb structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumpf, C.; Nielsen, M.; Feidenhans'l, R.

    2001-01-01

    by codeposition of Pb and Sn. Our surface X-ray diffraction measurements prove that the alloy structure is closely related to the low-temperature reconstruction. The interatomic distances reveal the nature of the chemical bonding in the surface layer and provide insight into the mechanism stabilizing...

  16. High-resolution studies of the structure of the solar atmosphere using a new imaging algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karovska, Margarita; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    1991-01-01

    The results of the application of a new image restoration algorithm developed by Ayers and Dainty (1988) to the multiwavelength EUV/Skylab observations of the solar atmosphere are presented. The application of the algorithm makes it possible to reach a resolution better than 5 arcsec, and thus study the structure of the quiet sun on that spatial scale. The results show evidence for discrete looplike structures in the network boundary, 5-10 arcsec in size, at temperatures of 100,000 K.

  17. Changes in the chemical structure of polytetrafluoroethylene induced by electron beam irradiation in the molten state

    CERN Document Server

    Lappan, U; Lunkwitz, K

    2000-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was exposed to electron beam radiation at elevated temperature above the melting point under nitrogen atmosphere and in vacuum for comparison. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to study the changes in the chemical structure. The irradiation under nitrogen atmosphere leads to the same structures as described recently for PTFE irradiated in vacuum. Trifluoromethyl branches and double bond structures were detected. The concentrations of terminal and internal double bonds are higher after irradiation under nitrogen than in vacuum. Annealing experiments have shown that the thermal oxidative stability of the radiation-modified PTFE is reduced compared to unirradiated PTFE. The reason are the formation of unstable structures such as double bonds.

  18. Atmospheric stability and turbulence fluxes at Horns Rev—an intercomparison of sonic, bulk and WRF model data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.

    2012-01-01

    anemometer at 15 m height and potential temperature differences between the water and the air above. Surface flux estimations from the advanced weather research and forecast (WRF) model are also validated against the sonic and bulk data. The correlation between the sonic and bulk estimates of friction...... to the surface, not only from a systematic bulk and WRF under‐prediction of the friction velocity when compared with the sonic value but also because of the lower magnitude of the sonic heat flux compared with that from the WRF simulations. Although they are not measured but parameterized or estimated, the bulk......–WRF comparisons of friction velocity and 10 m wind speed show good agreement. It is also shown that on a long‐term basis, the WRF and bulk estimates of stability are nearly equal and that a correction towards a slightly stable atmospheric condition has to be applied to the long‐term wind profile at Horns Rev...

  19. Structure and stability of solid Xe(H2)n

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somayazulu, Maddury; Hemley, Russell J.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Smith, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Mixtures of xenon and molecular hydrogen form a series of hexagonal, van der Waals compounds at high pressures and at 300 K. Synchrotron, x-ray, single crystal diffraction studies reveal that below 7.5 GPa, Xe(H 2 ) 8 crystallizes in a P3 - m1 structure that displays pressure-induced occupancy changes of two pairs of xenon atoms located on the 2c and 2d sites (while the third pair on yet another 2c site remains fully occupied). The occupancy becomes 1 at the P3 - m1 to R3 transition and all the xenon atoms occupy the 3d sites in the high-pressure structure. These pressure-induced changes in occupancy coincide with volume changes that maintain the average Xe:H 2 stoichiometry fixed at 1:8. The synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman measurements show that this unique hydrogen-bearing compound that can be synthesized at 4.2 GPa and 300 K, quenched at low temperatures to atmospheric pressure, and retained up to 90 K on subsequent warming

  20. Structure of the middle atmosphere of Venus and future observation with PFS on Venus Express.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasova, L. V.; Formisano, V.; Moroz, V. I.; Ignatiev, N. I.; Khatountsev, I. A.

    Investigation of the middle atmosphere of Venus (55 -- 100 km) will allow to advance our knowledge about the most puzzling phenomena of the Venus dynamics -- its superrotation. More than 70% of all absorbed by Venus Solar energy is deposited there, results in the thermal tides generation and giving energy to support the superrotation. The importance of the tides in the middle atmosphere is manifested by the tidal character of the local time variation of the structure of the thermal field, zonal wind field (especially, behavior of the wind speed in the mid latitude jet), upper clouds, with amplitudes depending on the altitude and latitude. Investigation of the middle atmosphere is a scientific goal of the long wavelength channel of PFS on Venus Express, as well as of its short wavelength channel (the latter on the day side). The 3D temperature, aerosol, thermal wind and SO2 abundance fields, spatial distribution of abundance of H2O (possibly vertical profile), CO, HCl, HF will be obtained.

  1. Dissecting the structure of surface stabilizer on the dispersion of inorganic nanoparticles in aqueous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yong; Yu, Zongzhi; Zheng, Junping, E-mail: jpzheng@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin University, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2017-03-15

    Dispersing inorganic nanoparticles in aqueous solutions is a key requirement for a great variety of products and processes, including carriers in drug delivery or fillers in polymers. To be highly functional in the final product, inorganic particles are required to be finely dispersed in nanoscale. In this study, silica was selected as a representative inorganic particle. Surface stabilizers with different chain length and charged group were designed to reveal the influence of electrostatic and van der Waals forces between silica and stabilizer on the dispersion of silica particles in aqueous medium. Results showed surface stabilizer with longer alkyl chain and charged group exerted best ability to deaggregate silica, leading to a hydrodynamic size of 51.1 nm. Surface stabilizer designing with rational structure is a promising solution for deagglomerating and reducing process time and energy. Giving the designability and adaptability of surface stabilizer, this method is of potential for dispersion of other inorganic nanoparticles.

  2. Dissecting the structure of surface stabilizer on the dispersion of inorganic nanoparticles in aqueous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong; Yu, Zongzhi; Zheng, Junping

    2017-03-01

    Dispersing inorganic nanoparticles in aqueous solutions is a key requirement for a great variety of products and processes, including carriers in drug delivery or fillers in polymers. To be highly functional in the final product, inorganic particles are required to be finely dispersed in nanoscale. In this study, silica was selected as a representative inorganic particle. Surface stabilizers with different chain length and charged group were designed to reveal the influence of electrostatic and van der Waals forces between silica and stabilizer on the dispersion of silica particles in aqueous medium. Results showed surface stabilizer with longer alkyl chain and charged group exerted best ability to deaggregate silica, leading to a hydrodynamic size of 51.1 nm. Surface stabilizer designing with rational structure is a promising solution for deagglomerating and reducing process time and energy. Giving the designability and adaptability of surface stabilizer, this method is of potential for dispersion of other inorganic nanoparticles.

  3. Energy implications of CO{sub 2} stabilization. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffert, M.I.; Caldeira, K.; Jain, A.K. [and others

    1997-12-01

    Analysis of carbon emissions paths stabilizing atmospheric CO{sub 2} in the 350--750 ppmv range reveals that implementing the UN Climate Convention will become increasingly difficult as the stabilization target decreases because of increasing dependence on carbon-free energy sources. Even the central Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change scenario (IS92a) requires carbon-free primary power by 2050 equal to the humankind`s present fossil-fuel-based primary power consumption {approximately}10 TW (1 TW = 10{sup 12} W). The authors describe and critique the assumptions on which this projection is based, and extend the analysis to scenarios in which atmospheric CO{sub 2} stabilizes. For continued economic growth with CO{sub 2} stabilization, new, cost-effective, carbon-free technologies that can provide primary power of order 10 TW will be needed in the coming decades, and certainly by mid-century, in addition to improved economic productivity of primary energy.

  4. Carbonation of lime and cement stabilized layers in road construction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Netterberg, F

    1984-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of deterioration of lime, lime-slag and cement stabilized pavement layers during curing, before sealing and in service is partly ascribed to carbonation of the stabilizer during curing and subsequent exposure to the atmosphere before...

  5. Structural stabilities and electronic properties of Mg28-nAln clusters: A first-principles study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Juan Lu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have constructed the alloy configurations of Mg28-nAln by replacing atoms at various possible positions, starting from the stable structures of Mg28 and Al28 clusters. According to the symmetry of the cluster structure, the isomers of these initial structures have been screened with the congruence check, which would reduce computational hours and improve efficiency. Using the first-principles method, the structural evolution, mixing behavior and electronic properties of Mg28-nAln clusters are investigated for all compositions. We conclude that Al atoms prefer to reside in the central positions of Mg−Al clusters and Mg atoms tend to occupy the peripheral location. The negative mixing enthalpies imply the stabilities of these Mg-Al clusters and thus possible applications in catalysis and hydrogen storage materials. Among Mg28-nAln clusters, Mg24Al4, Mg21Al7, Mg14Al14, Mg26Al2 and Mg27Al1 present relatively high thermodynamic stabilities, and the electronic properties of these stable structures are discussed with the charge distributions around the Fermi level.

  6. Analysis on complex structure stability under different bar angle with BIM technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiongjue

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sun Valley, the landmark building of World Expo in Shanghai, which has free surface with single-layer reticulated shell structure, is a typical complex structure. CAD/CAM integrated information system to design is used for the complex structure; however, it is a very rigorous process to be used widely. The relevant technology of the Sun Valley is not open to the public at present, so we try to use BIM technology to model the Sun Valley, including architecture modelling and structure analysis. By analysis of the Sun Valley structure using this method, it is proved that the problems in modelling may be solved by writing some script codes in Rhino software and the stability of the model can also be analyzed. The new approach is viable and effective in combination with different softwares such as Rhino, Revit, and Midas in solution of the complex shaped surfaces’ structure for modelling and calculation.

  7. Structural modifications under reactive atmosphere of cobalt catalysts; Modifications structurales sous atmospheres reactionnelles de catalyseurs a base de cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducreux, O.

    1999-11-23

    The purpose of this work was to develop in situ methods under reactive dynamic conditions (XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) to describe the active phase structure in order to understand Fischer-Tropsch catalyst behaviour and improve the natural gas conversion process performance. Experiments were designed to correlate structural modifications with catalytic results. The effect of ruthenium used as a promoter has also been studied. The impregnation process increases cobalt-support interaction. The presence of ruthenium promoter reduces this effect. Interactions between Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} oxide and support play an important role in the reducibility of cobalt and in the resulting metal structure. This in turn strongly influences the catalytic behaviour. Our results show a close correlation between structure modification and reactivity in the systems studied. Cobalt metal and CO can react to form a carbide Co{sub 2}C under conditions close to those of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. This carbide formation seems to be related to a deactivation process. The presence of interstitial carbon formed by dissociation of CO is proposed as a key to understanding the mechanism of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. A specific catalyst activation treatment was developed to increase the catalytic activity. This work permits correlation of materials structure with their chemical properties and demonstrates the contribution of in situ physico-chemical characterisation methods to describe solids under reactive atmosphere. (author)

  8. Assessment of Slope Stability and Interference of Structures Considering Seismity in Complex Engineering-Geological Conditions Using the Method of Finite Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menabdishvili, Papuna; Eremadze, Nelly

    2008-01-01

    There is elaborated the calculation model of slope deformation mode stability and the methodic of calculation considering the interference of structures to be built on it using the method of finite elements. There is examined the task of slope stability using the soil physically nonlinear finite element considering the seismicity 8. The deformation mode and field of coefficients of stability are obtained and slope supposed sliding curve is determined. The elaborated calculation methodic allows to determine the slope deformation mode, stability and select the optimum version of structure foundation at any slant and composition of slope layers

  9. mathematical modelling of atmospheric dispersion of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    the main objectives of this thesis are dealing with environmental problems adopting mathematical techniques. in this respect, atmospheric dispersion processes have been investigated by improving the analytical models to realize the realistic physical phenomena. to achieve these aims, the skeleton of this work contained both mathematical and environmental topics,performed in six chapters. in chapter one we presented a comprehensive review study of most important informations related to our work such as thermal stability , plume rise, inversion, advection , dispersion of pollutants, gaussian plume models dealing with both radioactive and industrial contaminants. chapter two deals with estimating the decay distance as well as the decay time of either industrial or radioactive airborne pollutant. further, highly turbulent atmosphere has been investigated as a special case in the three main thermal stability classes namely, neutral, stable, and unstable atmosphere. chapter three is concerned with obtaining maximum ground level concentration of air pollutant. the variable effective height of pollutants has been considered throughout the mathematical treatment. as a special case the constancy of effective height has been derived mathematically and the maximum ground level concentration as well as its location have been established

  10. Protein secondary structure and stability determined by combining exoproteolysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Josep; Villegas, Virtudes; Querol, Enrique; Avilés, Francesc X; Serrano, Luis

    2002-09-01

    In the post-genomic era, several projects focused on the massive experimental resolution of the three-dimensional structures of all the proteins of different organisms have been initiated. Simultaneously, significant progress has been made in the ab initio prediction of protein three-dimensional structure. One of the keys to the success of such a prediction is the use of local information (i.e. secondary structure). Here we describe a new limited proteolysis methodology, based on the use of unspecific exoproteases coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), to map quickly secondary structure elements of a protein from both ends, the N- and C-termini. We show that the proteolytic patterns (mass spectra series) obtained can be interpreted in the light of the conformation and local stability of the analyzed proteins, a direct correlation being observed between the predicted and the experimentally derived protein secondary structure. Further, this methodology can be easily applied to check rapidly the folding state of a protein and characterize mutational effects on protein conformation and stability. Moreover, given global stability information, this methodology allows one to locate the protein regions of increased or decreased conformational stability. All of this can be done with a small fraction of the amount of protein required by most of the other methods for conformational analysis. Thus limited exoproteolysis, together with MALDI-TOF MS, can be a useful tool to achieve quickly the elucidation of protein structure and stability. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Correlating the Impact of Well-Defined Oligosaccharide Structures on Physical Stability Profiles of IgG1-Fc Glycoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Apurva S; Toprani, Vishal M; Okbazghi, Solomon Z; Kim, Jae H; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell; Tolbert, Thomas J; Volkin, David B

    2016-02-01

    As part of a series of articles in this special issue describing 4 well-defined IgG1-Fc glycoforms as a model system for biosimilarity analysis (high mannose-Fc, Man5-Fc, GlcNAc-Fc and N297Q-Fc aglycosylated), the focus of this work is comparisons of their physical properties. A trend of decreasing apparent solubility (thermodynamic activity) by polyethylene glycol precipitation (pH 4.5, 6.0) and lower conformational stability by differential scanning calorimetry (pH 4.5) was observed with reducing size of the N297-linked oligosaccharide structures. Using multiple high-throughput biophysical techniques, the physical stability of the Fc glycoproteins was then measured in 2 formulations (NaCl and sucrose) across a wide range of temperatures (10°C-90°C) and pH (4.0-7.5) conditions. The data sets were used to construct 3-index empirical phase diagrams and radar charts to visualize the regions of protein structural stability. Each glycoform showed improved stability in the sucrose (vs. salt) formulation. The HM-Fc and Man5-Fc displayed the highest relative stability, followed by GlcNAc-Fc, with N297Q-Fc being the least stable. Thus, the overall physical stability profiles of the 4 IgG1-Fc glycoforms also show a correlation with oligosaccharide structure. These data sets are used to develop a mathematical model for biosimilarity analysis (as described in a companion article by Kim et al. in this issue). Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Coherent structures in the Es layer and neutral middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mošna, Zbyšek; Knížová, Petra Koucká; Potužníková, Kateřina

    2015-12-01

    The present paper shows results from the summer campaign performed during geomagnetically quiet period from June 1 to August 31, 2009. Within time-series of stratospheric and mesospheric temperatures at pressure levels 10-0.1 hPa, mesospheric winds measured in Collm, Germany, and the sporadic E-layer parameters foEs and hEs measured at the Pruhonice station we detected specific coherent wave-bursts in planetary wave domain. Permanent wave-like activity is observed in all analyzed data sets. However, the number of wave-like structures persistent in large range of height from the stratosphere to lower ionosphere is limited. The only coherent modes that are detected on consequent levels of the atmosphere are those corresponding to eigenmodes of planetary waves.

  13. Thermodynamic Stability of Structure H Hydrates Based on the Molecular Properties of Large Guest Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Tezuka, Kyoichi; Taguchi, Tatsuhiko; Alavi, Saman; Sum, Amadeu K.; Ohmura, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    This paper report analyses of thermodynamic stability of structure-H clathrate hydrates formed with methane and large guest molecules in terms of their gas phase molecular sizes and molar masses for the selection of a large guest molecule providing better hydrate stability. We investigated the correlation among the gas phase molecular sizes, the molar masses of large molecule guest substances, and the equilibrium pressures. The results suggest that there exists a molecular-size value for the ...

  14. Pool boiling of water on nano-structured micro wires at sub-atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Mahendra; Khandekar, Sameer; Pratap, Dheeraj; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2016-09-01

    Past decades have seen active research in enhancement of boiling heat transfer by surface modifications. Favorable surface modifications are expected to enhance boiling efficiency. Several interrelated mechanisms such as capillarity, surface energy alteration, wettability, cavity geometry, wetting transitions, geometrical features of surface morphology, etc., are responsible for change in the boiling behavior of modified surfaces. Not much work is available on pool boiling at low pressures on microscale/nanoscale geometries; low pressure boiling is attractive in many applications wherein low operating temperatures are desired for a particular working fluid. In this background, an experimental setup was designed and developed to investigate the pool boiling performance of water on (a) plain aluminum micro wire (99.999 % pure) and, (b) nano-porous alumina structured aluminum micro wire, both having diameter of 250 µm, under sub-atmospheric pressure. Nano-structuring on the plain wire surface was achieved via anodization. Two samples, A and B of anodized wires, differing by the degree of anodization were tested. The heater length scale (wire diameter) was much smaller than the capillary length scale. Pool boiling characteristics of water were investigated at three different sub-atmospheric pressures of 73, 123 and 199 mbar (corresponding to T sat = 40, 50 and 60 °C). First, the boiling characteristics of plain wire were measured. It was noticed that at sub-atmospheric pressures, boiling heat transfer performance for plain wire was quite low due to the increased bubble sizes and low nucleation site density. Subsequently, boiling performance of nano-structured wires (both Sample A and Sample B) was compared with plain wire and it was noted that boiling heat transfer for the former was considerably enhanced as compared to the plain wire. This enhancement is attributed to increased nucleation site density, change in wettability and possibly due to enhanced pore scale

  15. The role of computational chemistry in the science and measurements of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    The role of computational chemistry in determining the stability, photochemistry, spectroscopic parameters, and parameters for estimating reaction rates of atmospheric constituents is discussed. Examples dealing with the photolysis cross sections of HOCl and (1 Delta g) O2 and with the stability of gaseous NH4Cl and asymmetric ClO3 are presented. It is concluded that computational chemistry can play an important role in the study of atmospheric constituents, particularly reactive and short-lived species which are difficult to investigate experimentally.

  16. Structure of the marine atmospheric boundary layer over an oceanic thermal front: SEMAPHORE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, B. H.; BéNech, B.; Lambert, D.; Durand, P.; Druilhet, A.; Giordani, H.; Planton, S.

    1998-10-01

    The Structure des Echanges Mer-Atmosphere, Proprietes des Heterogeneites Oceaniques: Recherche Experimentale (SEMAPHORE) experiment, the third phase of which took place between October 4 and November 17, 1993, was conducted over the oceanic Azores Current located in the Azores basin and mainly marked at the surface by a thermal front due to the gradient of the sea surface temperature (SST) of about 1° to 2°C per 100 km. The evolution of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) over the SST front was studied with two aircraft and a ship in different meteorological conditions. For each case, the influence of the incoming air direction with respect to the orientation of the oceanic front was taken into account. During the campaign, advanced very high resolution radiometer pictures did not show any relation between the SST field and the cloud cover. The MABL was systematically thicker on the warm side than on the cold side. The mean MABL structure described from aircraft data collected in a vertical plane crossing the oceanic front was characterized by (1) an atmospheric horizontal gradient of 1° to 2°C per 100 km in the whole depth of the mixed layer and (2) an increase of the wind intensity from the cold to the warm side when the synoptic wind blew from the cold side. The surface sensible heat (latent heat) flux always increased from the cold to the warm sector owing to the increase of the wind and of the temperature (specific humidity) difference between the surface and the air. Turbulence increased from the cold to the warm side in conjunction with the MABL thickening, but the normalized profiles presented the same structure, regardless of the position over the SST front. In agreement with the Action de Recherche Programme te Petite Echelle and Grande Echelle model, the mean temperature and momentum budgets were highly influenced by the horizontal temperature gradient. In particular, the strong ageostrophic influence in the MABL above the SST front seems

  17. Dynamical stability in fluid-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planchard, J.; Thomas, B.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to investigate the dynamical stability of a group of elastic tubes placed in a cross-flow which obeys to the Navier-Stokes equations. The stability of this coupled system is deduced from the study of a quadratic eigenvalue problem arising in the linearized equations. The instability occurs when the real part of one of the eigenvalues becomes positive; the steady state is then replaced by a time-periodic state which is stable (Hopf bifurcation phenomenon). Some numerical methods for solving the quadratic eigenvalue problem are described [fr

  18. The Grading Entropy-based Criteria for Structural Stability of Granular Materials and Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janos Lőrincz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with three grading entropy-based rules that describe different soil structure stability phenomena: an internal stability rule, a filtering rule and a segregation rule. These rules are elaborated on the basis of a large amount of laboratory testing and from existing knowledge in the field. Use is made of the theory of grading entropy to derive parameters which incorporate all of the information of the grading curve into a pair of entropy-based parameters that allow soils with common behaviours to be grouped into domains on an entropy diagram. Applications of the derived entropy-based rules are presented by examining the reason of a dam failure, by testing against the existing filter rules from the literature, and by giving some examples for the design of non-segregating grading curves (discrete particle size distributions by dry weight. A physical basis for the internal stability rule is established, wherein the higher values of base entropy required for granular stability are shown to reflect the closeness between the mean and maximum grain diameters, which explains how there are sufficient coarser grains to achieve a stable grain skeleton.

  19. Metal Hydride Nanoparticles with Ultrahigh Structural Stability and Hydrogen Storage Activity Derived from Microencapsulated Nanoconfinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiguang; Zhu, Yunfeng; Lin, Huaijun; Liu, Yana; Zhang, Yao; Li, Shenyang; Ma, Zhongliang; Li, Liquan

    2017-06-01

    Metal hydrides (MHs) have recently been designed for hydrogen sensors, switchable mirrors, rechargeable batteries, and other energy-storage and conversion-related applications. The demands of MHs, particular fast hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics, have brought their sizes to nanoscale. However, the nanostructured MHs generally suffer from surface passivation and low aggregation-resisting structural stability upon absorption/desorption. This study reports a novel strategy named microencapsulated nanoconfinement to realize local synthesis of nano-MHs, which possess ultrahigh structural stability and superior desorption kinetics. Monodispersed Mg 2 NiH 4 single crystal nanoparticles (NPs) are in situ encapsulated on the surface of graphene sheets (GS) through facile gas-solid reactions. This well-defined MgO coating layer with a thickness of ≈3 nm efficiently separates the NPs from each other to prevent aggregation during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles, leading to excellent thermal and mechanical stability. More interestingly, the MgO layer shows superior gas-selective permeability to prevent further oxidation of Mg 2 NiH 4 meanwhile accessible for hydrogen absorption/desorption. As a result, an extremely low activation energy (31.2 kJ mol -1 ) for the dehydrogenation reaction is achieved. This study provides alternative insights into designing nanosized MHs with both excellent hydrogen storage activity and thermal/mechanical stability exempting surface modification by agents. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Enzyme stability, thermodynamics and secondary structures of α-amylase as probed by the CD spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikani, B A; Singh, S P

    2015-11-01

    An amylase of a thermophilic bacterium, Bacillus sp. TSSC-3 (GenBank Number, EU710557) isolated from the Tulsi Shyam hot spring reservoir (Gujarat, India) was purified to the homogeneity in a single step on phenyl sepharose 6FF. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 25kD, while the temperature and pH optima for the enzyme catalysis were 80°C and 7, respectively. The purified enzyme was highly thermostable with broad pH stability and displayed remarkable resistance against surfactants, chelators, urea, guanidine HCl and various solvents as well. The stability and changes in the secondary structure of the enzyme under various extreme conditions were determined by the circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The stability trends and the changes in the α-helices and β-sheets were analyzed by Mean Residual Ellipticity (MRE) and K2D3. The CD data confirmed the structural stability of the enzyme under various harsh conditions, yet it indicated reduced α-helix content and increased β-sheets upon denaturation. The thermodynamic parameters; deactivation rate constant, half-life, changes in entropy, enthalpy, activation energy and Gibb's free energy indicated that the enzyme-substrate reactions were highly stable. The overall profile of the enzyme: high thermostability, alkalitolerance, calcium independent nature, dextrose equivalent values and resistance against chemical denaturants, solvents and surfactants suggest its commercial applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Stability, electrochemical behaviors and electronic structures of iron hydroxyl-phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongli; Sun Shaorui; Li Fan; Chen Ge; Xia Dingguo; Zhao Ting; Chu Wangsheng; Wu Ziyu

    2010-01-01

    Iron hydroxyl-phosphate with a uniform spherical particle size of around 1 μm, a compound of the type Fe 2-y □ y (PO 4 )(OH) 3-3y (H 2 O) 3y-2 (where □ represents a vacancy), has been synthesized by hydrothermal methods. The particles are composed of spheres of diameter -1 and 120 mAh g -1 at current densities of 170 mA g -1 and 680 mA g -1 , respectively. The stability of crystal structure of this material was studied by TGA and XRD which show that the material remains stable at least up to the temperature 200 deg. C. Investigation of the electronic structure of the iron hydroxyl-phosphate by GGA + U calculation has indicated that it has a better electronic conductivity than LiFePO 4 .

  2. Atomistic structural ensemble refinement reveals non-native structure stabilizes a sub-millisecond folding intermediate of CheY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Jade; Schwantes, Christian; Bilsel, Osman

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of globular proteins can be described in terms of transitions between a folded native state and less-populated intermediates, or excited states, which can play critical roles in both protein folding and function. Excited states are by definition transient species, and therefore are difficult to characterize using current experimental techniques. We report an atomistic model of the excited state ensemble of a stabilized mutant of an extensively studied flavodoxin fold protein CheY. We employed a hybrid simulation and experimental approach in which an aggregate 42 milliseconds of all-atom molecular dynamics were used as an informative prior for the structure of the excited state ensemble. The resulting prior was then refined against small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data employing an established method (EROS). The most striking feature of the resulting excited state ensemble was an unstructured N-terminus stabilized by non-native contacts in a conformation that is topologically simpler than the native state. We then predict incisive single molecule FRET experiments, using these results, as a means of model validation. Our study demonstrates the paradigm of uniting simulation and experiment in a statistical model to study the structure of protein excited states and rationally design validating experiments.

  3. Development of a Cloud Computing-Based Pier Type Port Structure Stability Evaluation Platform Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Byung Wan; Jo, Jun Ho; Khan, Rana Muhammad Asad; Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Yun Sung

    2018-05-23

    Structure Health Monitoring is a topic of great interest in port structures due to the ageing of structures and the limitations of evaluating structures. This paper presents a cloud computing-based stability evaluation platform for a pier type port structure using Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors in a system consisting of a FBG strain sensor, FBG displacement gauge, FBG angle meter, gateway, and cloud computing-based web server. The sensors were installed on core components of the structure and measurements were taken to evaluate the structures. The measurement values were transmitted to the web server via the gateway to analyze and visualize them. All data were analyzed and visualized in the web server to evaluate the structure based on the safety evaluation index (SEI). The stability evaluation platform for pier type port structures involves the efficient monitoring of the structures which can be carried out easily anytime and anywhere by converging new technologies such as cloud computing and FBG sensors. In addition, the platform has been successfully implemented at “Maryang Harbor” situated in Maryang-Meyon of Korea to test its durability.

  4. Amines in the Earth’s Atmosphere: A Density Functional Theory Study of the Thermochemistry of Pre-Nucleation Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Herb

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The impact of organic species which are present in the Earth’s atmosphere on the burst of new particles is critically important for the understanding of the molecular nature of atmospheric nucleation phenomena. Amines have recently been proposed as possible stabilizers of binary pre-nucleation clusters. In order to advance the understanding of atmospheric nucleation phenomena, a quantum-chemical study of hydrogen-bonded complexes of binary sulfuric acid-water clusters with methyl-, dimethyl- and trimethylamines representing common atmospheric organic species, vegetation products and laboratory impurities has been carried out. The thermochemical stability of the sulfuric acid-amines-water complexes was found to be higher than that of the sulfuric acid-ammonia-water complexes, in qualitative agreement with the previous studies. However, the enhancement in stability due to amines appears to not be large enough to overcome the difference in typical atmospheric concentrations of ammonia and amines. Further research is needed in order to address the existing uncertainties and to reach a final conclusion about the importance of amines for the atmospheric nucleation.

  5. Protonation and structural/chemical stability of Ln{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} ceramics vs. H{sub 2}O/CO{sub 2}: High temperature/water pressure ageing tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upasen, S. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 8233, MONARIS, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS-IP2CT, UMR 8233, MONARIS, F-75005 Paris (France); Batocchi, P.; Mauvy, F. [ICMCB, ICMCB-CNRS-IUT-Université de Bordeaux, 33608 Pessac Cedex (France); Slodczyk, A. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 8233, MONARIS, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS-IP2CT, UMR 8233, MONARIS, F-75005 Paris (France); Colomban, Ph., E-mail: philippe.colomban@upmc.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 8233, MONARIS, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS-IP2CT, UMR 8233, MONARIS, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • High temperature/water pressure autoclave is used to study the reaction/corrosion at SOFC/HTSE electrode. • High stability of Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} (PNO) and Nd{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} (NNO) dense ceramics vs. water pressure is demonstrated. • Protonated rare-earth nickelates retain the perovskite-type structure and their H-content is determined. • Very low laser illumination power is required to avoid RE nickelate phase transition. • Nickelates show increasing stability from La to Pr/Nd vs. CO{sub 2}-rich high temperature water vapor. - Abstract: Mixed ionic-electronic conductors (MIEC) such as rare-earth nickelates with a general formula Ln{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} (Ln = La, Pr, Nd) appear as potential for energy production and storage systems: fuel cells, electrolysers and CO{sub 2} converters. Since a good electrode material should exhibit important stability in operating conditions, the structural and chemical stability of different nickelate-based, well-densified ceramics have been studied using various techniques: TGA, dilatometry, XRD, Raman scattering and IR spectroscopy. Consequently, La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} (LNO), Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} (PNO) and Nd{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} (NNO) have been exposed during 5 days to high water vapor pressure (40 bar) at intermediate temperature (550 °C) in an autoclave device, the used water being almost free or saturated with CO{sub 2}. Such protonation process offers an accelerating stability test and allows the choice of the most pertinent composition for industrial applications requiring a selected material with important life-time. In order to understand any eventual change of crystal structure, the ceramics were investigated in as-prepared, pristine state as well as after protonation and deprotonation (due to thermal treatment till 1000 °C under dry atmosphere). The results show the presence of traces or second phases originating from undesirable hydroxylation and carbonation, detected in the near

  6. Stabilizing effect of epoxidized sunflower oil as a secondary stabilizer for Ca/Hg stabilized PVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsaturated triglyceride oil sunflower was epoxidized and characterized by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Epoxidized sunflower oil (ESO was used as an organic thermal co-stabilizer for rigid poly(vinyl chloride (PVC in the presence of tricalcium dicitrate (Ca3(C6H5O72 and mercury (II acetate (Hg(CH3COO2. The thermo-oxidative degradation of PVC was studied in the presence of these ternary stabilizer systems at 170, 180, 190 and 200°C in N2 atmosphere. The effects of metal carboxylate combination Ca/Hg in the absence and in the presence of epoxidized sunflower oil on static heat treatment of PVC have been studied. The formation of polyene sequences was investigated by UV-visible and FT-IR spectroscopy and by comparing viscosity data obtained in the presence and in the absence of the additives. It was found that the additives retard the rate of degradation and reduce the extent of polymer chain scission associated with the thermal degradation of poly(vinyl chloride. Synergistic effects were found when stabilizer was blended in 50:50 weight ratios with either. It was found that ESO exerted a stabilizing effect on the degradation of PVC. The activation energy for degraded PVC in absence of stabilizers was 38.6 kJ•mol–1 and in the presence of Ca/Hg and Ca/Hg/ESO were 53.3 and 64.7 kJ•mol–1 respectively. In order of compare the efficiency of the epoxidized sunflower oil with these metal soap stabilizers, thermal stabilities were evaluated on the basis of evolved hydrogen chloride determined by conductometry technique and degree of discoloration are discussed.

  7. Theoretical Kinetic Study of the Formic Acid Catalyzed Criegee Intermediate Isomerization: Multistructural Anharmonicity and Atmospheric Implications

    KAUST Repository

    Monge Palacios, Manuel

    2018-01-29

    We performed a theoretical study on the double hydrogen shift isomerization reaction of a six carbon atom Criegee intermediate (C6-CI), catalyzed by formic acid (HCOOH), to produce vinylhydroperoxide (VHP), C6-CI+HCOOH→VHP+HCOOH. This Criegee intermediate can serve as a surrogate for larger CIs derived from important volatile organic compounds like monoterpenes, whose reactivity is not well understood and are difficult to handle computationally. The reactant HCOOH exerts a pronounced catalytic effect on the studied reaction by lowering the barrier height, but the kinetic enhancement is hindered by the multistructural anharmonicity. First, the rigid ring-structure adopted by the saddle point to facilitate simultaneous transfer of two atoms does not allow formation of as many conformers as those formed by the reactant C6-CI. And second, the flexible carbon chain of C6-CI facilitates the formation of stabilizing intramolecular C–H···O hydrogen bonds; this stabilizing effect is less pronounced in the saddle point structure due to its tightness and steric effects. Thus, the contribution of the reactant C6-CI conformers to the multistructural partition function is larger than that of the saddle point conformers. The resulting low multistructural anharmonicity factor partially cancels out the catalytic effect of the carboxylic acid, yielding in a moderately large rate coefficient, k(298 K) = 4.9·10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. We show that carboxylic acids may promote the conversion of stabilized Criegee intermediates into vinylhydroperoxides in the atmosphere, which generates OH radicals and leads to secondary organic aerosol, thereby affecting the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and ultimately the climate.

  8. Dispersion and transport of atmospheric pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieslik, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the physical mechanisms that govern the dispersion and transport of air pollutant; the influence of the state of the 'carrying fluid', i.e. the role of meteorology; and finally, outlines the different techniques of assessing the process. Aspects of physical mechanisms and meteorology covered include: fate of an air pollutant; turbulence and dispersion; transport; wind speed and direction; atmospheric stability; and the role of atmospheric water. Assessment techniques covered are: concentrations measurements; modelling meteorological observations; and tracer releases. It is concluded that the only way to reduce air pollution is to pollute less. 10 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Analyses on the formation of atmospheric particles and stabilized sulphuric acid clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paasonen, P.

    2012-11-01

    Aerosol particles have various effects on our life. They affect the visibility and have diverse health effects, but are also applied in various applications, from drug inhalators to pesticides. Additionally, aerosol particles have manifold effects on the Earths' radiation budget and thus on the climate. The strength of the aerosol climate effect is one of the factors causing major uncertainties in the global climate models predicting the future climate change. Aerosol particles are emitted to atmosphere from various anthropogenic and biogenic sources, but they are also formed from precursor vapours in many parts of the world in a process called atmospheric new particle formation (NPF). The uncertainties in aerosol climate effect are partly due to the current lack of knowledge of the mechanisms governing the atmospheric NPF. It is known that gas phase sulphuric acid most certainly plays an important role in atmospheric NPF. However, also other vapours are needed in NPF, but the exact roles or even identities of these vapours are currently not exactly known. In this thesis I present some of the recent advancements in understanding of the atmospheric NPF in terms of the roles of the participating vapours and the meteorological conditions. Since direct measurements of new particle formation rate in the initial size scale of the formed particles (below 2 nm) are so far infrequent in both spatial and temporal scales, indirect methods are needed. The work presented on the following pages approaches the NPF from two directions: by analysing the observed formation rates of particles after they have grown to sizes measurable with widely applied instruments (2 nm or larger), and by measuring and modelling the initial sulphuric acid cluster formation. The obtained results can be summarized as follows. (1) The observed atmospheric new particle formation rates are typically connected with sulphuric acid concentration to the power close to two. (2) Also other compounds, most

  10. Evaluation of liquid fragility and thermal stability of Al-based metallic glasses by equivalent structure parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xuelian; Bian Xiufang; Hu Lina

    2010-01-01

    Based on extended Ideal-Atomic-Packing model, we propose an equivalent structure parameter '6x+11y' to evaluate fragility and thermal stability of Al-TM-RE metallic glasses, where x and y are composition concentrations of transition metal (TM) and rare earth (RE), respectively. Experimental results show that glass forming compositions with '6x+11y' near 100 have the smallest fragility parameter and best structure stability. In addition, '6x+11y' parameter has a positive relationship with onset-crystallization temperature, T x . Al-TM-RE glassy alloys with (6x+11y)≤100 undergo primary crystallization of fcc-Al nanocrystals, while alloys with (6x+11y)>100 exhibit nanoglassy or glassy crystallization behavior.

  11. Polyhydroxy surfactants for the formulation of lipid nanoparticles (SLN and NLC): effects on size, physical stability and particle matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, A; Savic, S; Vuleta, G; Müller, R H; Keck, C M

    2011-03-15

    The two polyhydroxy surfactants polyglycerol 6-distearate (Plurol(®)Stearique WL1009 - (PS)) and caprylyl/capryl glucoside (Plantacare(®) 810 - (PL)) are a class of PEG-free stabilizers, made from renewable resources. They were investigated for stabilization of aqueous solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) and nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) dispersions. Production was performed by high pressure homogenization, analysis by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), laser diffraction (LD), zeta potential measurements and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Particles were made from Cutina CP as solid lipid only (SLN) and its blends with Miglyol 812 (NLC, the blends containing increasing amounts of oil from 20% to 60%). The obtained particle sizes were identical for both surfactants, about 200 nm with polydispersity indices below 0.20 (PCS), and unimodal size distribution (LD). All dispersions with both surfactants were physically stable for 3 months at room temperature, but Plantacare (PL) showing a superior stability. The melting behaviour and crystallinity of bulk lipids/lipid blends were compared to the nanoparticles. Both were lower for the nanoparticles. The crystallinity of dispersions stabilized with PS was higher, the zeta potential decreased with storage time associated with this higher crystallinity, and leading to a few, but negligible larger particles. The lower crystallinity particles stabilized with PL remained unchanged in zeta potential (about -50 mV) and in size. These data show that surfactants have a distinct influence on the particle matrix structure (and related stability and drug loading), to which too little attention was given by now. Despite being from the same surfactant class, the differences on the structure are pronounced. They are attributed to the hydrophobic-lipophilic tail structure with one-point anchoring in the interface (PL), and the loop conformation of PS with two hydrophobic anchor points, i.e. their molecular structure and its

  12. BOMB STABILIZING STRUCTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, J.L.; Runyan, C.E.

    1963-12-10

    A stabilizinig structure capable of minimizing deviations of a falling body such as a bomb from desired trajectory is described. The structure comprises a fin or shroud arrangement of double-wedge configuration, the feeding portion being of narrow wedge shape and the after portion being of a wider wedge shape. The structure provides a force component for keeping the body on essentially desired trajectory throughout its fall. (AEC)

  13. Chlorophyll stability in yerba maté leaves in controlled atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén O. Morawicki

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to investigate the stability of chlorophyll in yerba maté leaves in controlled atmospheres of CO2/air mixtures and different water activities at 25°C.Two levels of water activity were selected corresponding to saturated salt solutions of LiCl (a w=0.113 and MgCl2(a w=0.330 and three levels of CO2/air mixtures (0/100,20/80 and 40/60. The chlorophyll content was evaluated using a liquid chromatography HPLC technique. Experimental values varied between 2.16 and 0.61 mg/g of dry matter. For each sample, 5 determination were made during 58 days. Experimental values were fitted to an equation describing a first order reaction. In all cases, the agreement was good with PO objetivo deste trabalho foi pesquisar a estabilidade da clorofila em folhas de erva mate em misturas atmosféricas controladas de CO2/ar e diferentes atividades de vapor de água a 25ºC. Dois níveis de atividade de vapor de água foram selecionadas, correspondendo a soluçoes saturadas de LiCl (a w=0.113 e MgCl2 (a w=0.330 e três níveis de misturas CO2/ar (0/100,20/80 e 40/60. O conteúdo de clorofila foi avaliado usando a técnica de cromatografia líqüida HPLC. Os valores experimentais variaram entre 2.16 e 0.61 mg/g de matéria seca. Para cada amostra foram realizadas 5 determinaçoes durante 58 dias. Os valores experimentais foram ajustados para uma eqüação descrevendo uma reação de primeiro ordem. Em todos os casos houve boa concordância P < 3 10-3. A concentração inicial de clorofila ficou reduzida em média um 30.5% depois de 58 dias. Porém, depois da comparação das constantes de velocidade, não foram achadas diferenças entre elas.

  14. The structure and spectrum of the accretion shock in the atmospheres of young stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodin, Alexandr

    2018-04-01

    The structure and spectrum of the accretion shock have been self-consistently simulated for a wide range of parameters typical for Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTS). Radiative cooling of the shocked gas was calculated, taking into account the self-absorption and non-equilibrium (time-dependent) effects in the level populations. These effects modify the standard cooling curve for an optically thin plasma in coronal equilibrium, however the shape of high-temperature (T > 3 × 105 K) part of the curve remains unchanged. The applied methods allow us to smoothly describe the transition from the cooling flow to the hydrostatic stellar atmosphere. Thanks to this approach, it has been found that the narrow component of He II lines is formed predominantly in the irradiated stationary atmosphere (hotspot), i.e. at velocities of the settling gas law via the full energy flux.

  15. Structure, stability, and thermodynamics of a short intermolecular purine-purine-pyrimidine triple helix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilch, D.S.; Shafer, R.H.; Levenson, C.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have investigated the structure and physical chemistry of the d(C 3 T 4 C 3 )·2[d(G 3 A 4 G 3 )] triple helix by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), 1 H NMR, and ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy. The triplex was stabilized with MgCl 2 at neutral pH. PAGE studies verify the stoichiometry of the strands comprising the triplex and indicate that the orientation of the third strand in purine-purine-pyrimidine (pur-pur-pyr) triplexes is antiparallel with respect to the purine strand of the underlying duplex. Imino proton NMR spectra provide evidence for the existence of new purine-purine (pur·pur) hydrogen bonds, in addition to those of the Watson-Crick (W-C) base pairs, in the triplex structure. These new hydrogen bonds are likely to correspond to the interaction between third-strand guanine NH1 imino protons and the N7 atoms of guanine residues on the puring strand of the underlying duplex. Thermal denaturation of the triplex proceeds to single strands in one step, under the conditions used in this study. Binding of the third strand appears to enhance the thermal stability of the duplex by 1-3 C, depending on the DNA concentration. This marked enhancement in stability, coupled with the lack of an acidic pH requirement, suggests that pur-pur-pyr triplexes are appealing choices for use in applications involving oligonucleotide targeting of duplex DNA in vitro and in vivo

  16. Structurally stabilized organosilane-templated thermostable mesoporous titania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoli, Vipin; Tiwari, Rashmi; Dutta, Arghya; Bhaumik, Asim; Sinha, Anil Kumar

    2014-01-13

    Structurally thermostable mesoporous anatase TiO2 (m-TiO2) nanoparticles, uniquely decorated with atomically dispersed SiO2, is reported for the first time. The inorganic Si portion of the novel organosilane template, used as a mesopores-directing agent, is found to be incorporated in the pore walls of the titania aggregates, mainly as isolated sites. This is evident by transmission electron microscopy and high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy, combined with electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. This type of unique structure provides exceptional stability to this new material against thermal collapse of the mesoporous structure, which is reflected in its high surface area (the highest known for anatase titania), even after high-temperature (550 °C) calcination. Control of crystallite size, pore diameter, and surface area is achieved by varying the molar ratios of the titanium precursor and the template during synthesis. These mesoporous materials retain their porosity and high surface area after template removal and further NaOH/HCl treatment to remove silica. We investigate their performance for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with bilayer TiO2 electrodes, which are prepared by applying a coating of m-TiO2 onto a commercial titania (P25) film. The high surface area of the upper mesoporous layer in the P25-m-TiO2 DSSC significantly increases the dye loading ability of the photoanode. The photocurrent and fill factor for the DSSC with the bilayer TiO2 electrode are greatly improved. The large increase in photocurrent current (ca. 56%) in the P25-m-TiO2 DSSC is believed to play a significant role in achieving a remarkable increase in the photovoltaic efficiency (60%) of the device, compared to DSSCs with a monolayer of P25 as the electrode. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The global stability of a delayed predator-prey system with two stage-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fengyan; Pang Guoping

    2009-01-01

    Based on the classical delayed stage-structured model and Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model, we introduce and study a delayed predator-prey system, where prey and predator have two stages, an immature stage and a mature stage. The time delays are the time lengths between the immature's birth and maturity of prey and predator species. Results on global asymptotic stability of nonnegative equilibria of the delay system are given, which generalize and suggest that good continuity exists between the predator-prey system and its corresponding stage-structured system.

  18. Study on thermal stability and chemical structure of polyamide blended with small amount of Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Tsuyoshi; Ueno, Tomonaga; Kajiya, Takafumi; Ishikawa, Tomoyuki; Takeda, Kunihiko

    2007-01-01

    The thermal stability and the chemical structure of Polyamide 66 (PA66) blended with a small amount of copper have been studied. The thermal degradation of the blend with 35 ppm or more of copper was restrained and no strong influence of the concentration of copper was observed. The molecular weight of PA66 decreased by the thermal aging process but the amount of decrease of the blend was smaller than that of the non-blend. The water uptake of the blend increased. The chemical structure, which was observed by IR and NMR, changed slightly by blending with copper after aging at higher temperatures. Multiple items influenced the thermal stability of PA66 blended with a small amount of copper instead of just one. Namely, the main chain of PA66 is cut by heat and the degree of the cut is restrained by the copper. The diffusion time of copper atoms that disperse uniformly in the PA66 matrix is short enough to cover the individual amide groups and the effect enlarges the entire configuration of the PA66 chain to enhance the thermal stability. (author)

  19. Effectiveness of the Vertical Gas Ventilation Pipes for Promoting Waste Stabilization in Post-Closure Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumasa Tojo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To make inside of the municipal solid waste (MSW landfill aerobic as much as possible is thought to be preferable for promoting waste stabilization, reducing pollutant's load in leachate, minimizing greenhouse gas emission and shortening post-closure-care period. In Japan, installation of semi-aerobic landfill structure has widely spread in order to promote waste stabilization in MSW landfill from 1980s. In semi-aerobic landfill structure, outlet of main leachate collection pipe is opened to atmosphere. Heat generated by aerobic degradation of waste causes natural convection and natural aeration arises from the outlet of leachate collection pipe to the gas vents. It is so-called stack effect. This air flow is thought to be effective for purifying leachate flowing through drainage layer and leachate collection pipes. And it is also thought to be contributing to expanding aerobic region in waste layer in landfill. Recently, measures attempting the promotion of waste stabilization are taken at several landfills at where stabilization of waste delays, in which many vertical gas vents are newly installed and close structure to semi-aerobic landfill is created. However, in many cases, these gas vents are not connected to leachate collection pipes. Many vertical gas vents are just installed without scientific proof regarding whether they can contribute for waste stabilization. In this study, how such installation of gas vents is effective for waste stabilization and aerobization of waste layer was discussed by numerical analysis. In numerical analysis, heat transfer, gas movement by pressure, gas diffusion, biological degradation of organic matter, and heat generation by biodegradation were taken into account. Simulations were carried out by using the general purpose simulator of finite element method. Three types of landfill structure were assumed. As the results, the following information were obtained. In dig-down type landfill, installation of gas

  20. A Mechanism for Land-Atmosphere Feedback Involving Planetary Wave Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D.; Chang, Yehui; Schubert, Siegfried D.

    2014-01-01

    While the ability of land surface conditions to influence the atmosphere has been demonstrated in various modeling and observational studies, the precise mechanisms by which land-atmosphere feedback occurs are still largely unknown particularly the mechanisms that allow land moisture state in one region to affect atmospheric conditions in another. Such remote impacts are examined here in the context of atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations, leading to the identification of one potential mechanism: the phase-locking and amplification of a planetary wave through the imposition of a spatial pattern of soil moisture at the land surface. This mechanism, shown here to be relevant in the AGCM, apparently also operates in nature, as suggested by supporting evidence found in reanalysis data.

  1. Nb-TiO{sub 2}/polymer hybrid solar cells with photovoltaic response under inert atmosphere conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lira-Cantu, Monica; Khoda Siddiki, Mahbube; Munoz-Rojas, David; Amade, Roger [Centre d' Investigacio en Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (CIN2, CSIC), Laboratory of Nanostructured Materials for Photovoltaic Energy, Campus UAB, Barcelona (Spain); Gonzalez-Pech, Natalia I. [Centre d' Investigacio en Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (CIN2, CSIC), Laboratory of Nanostructured Materials for Photovoltaic Energy, Campus UAB, Barcelona (Spain); Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM), Ave. Eugenio Garza Sada, 64640 Monterrey, N.L. (Mexico)

    2010-07-15

    Hybrid Solar Cells (HSC) applying Nb-TiO{sub 2} in direct contact with a conducting organic polymer, MEH-PPV, show higher stability than the bare TiO{sub 2}-based HSC when analyzed under inert atmosphere conditions. IPCE analyses revealed that inert atmospheres affect directly the semiconductor oxide in the first stages of the analyses but photovoltaic performance stabilizes after several hours. A 20 wt% Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} presented the highest stability and photovoltaic properties. The behavior has been attributed to the solubility limit of Nb within the TiO{sub 2} beyond 20 wt% doping level where the co-existence of NbO{sub 2} is observed. The HSCs were analyzed under controlled N{sub 2} atmosphere and 1000 W/m{sup 2} (AM 1.5) irradiation. (author)

  2. Internet Addiction: Stability and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined five indices of stability and change in Internet addiction: structural stability, mean-level stability, differential stability, individual-level stability, and ipsative stability. The study sample was 351 undergraduate students from end of freshman year to end of junior year. Convergent findings revealed stability…

  3. Structure and Stability of the Spinach Aquaporin SoPIP2;1 in Detergent Micelles and Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, Ines; Survery, Sabeen; Ibragimova, Sania

    2011-01-01

    Background: SoPIP2;1 constitutes one of the major integral proteins in spinach leaf plasma membranes and belongs to the aquaporin family. SoPIP2;1 is a highly permeable and selective water channel that has been successfully overexpressed and purified with high yields. In order to optimize...... reconstitution of the purified protein into biomimetic systems, we have here for the first time characterized the structural stability of SoPIP2;1. Methodology/Principal Finding: We have characterized the protein structural stability after purification and after reconstitution into detergent micelles...... and proteoliposomes using circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The structure of SoPIP2;1 was analyzed either with the protein solubilized with octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OG) or reconstituted into lipid membranes formed by E. coli lipids, diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine (DPh...

  4. Vertical variations in the turbulent structure of the surface boundary layer over vineyards under unstable atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to their highly-structured canopy, turbulent characteristics within and above vineyards, may not conform to those typically exhibited by other agricultural and natural ecosystems. Using data collected as a part of the Grape Remote sensing and Atmospheric Profiling and Evapotranspiration Experime...

  5. Silicon/Wolfram Carbide@Graphene composite: enhancing conductivity and structure stability in amorphous-silicon for high lithium storage performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Wei; Hu, Renzong; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Hanying; Liu, Jiangwen; Yang, Lichun; Wang, Haihui; Zhu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Two-step ball milling was used to produce an amorphous-Si/WC@Graphene(SW@G) composite. • Concrete-like core-shell structure with high stability was designed. • Multiscale WC particle strengthen the inside structure. • Graphene coating outside much enhanced the cycling stability and conductivity. • The SW@G anode exhibited long cycle life and superior volumetric capacity. - Abstract: Improving the electron conductivity and lithiated structure stability for Si anodes can result in high stable capacity in cells. A Silicon/Wolfram Carbide@Graphene (SW@G) composite anode is designed and produced by a simple two-step ball milling the mixture of coarse-grained Si with good conductive wolfram carbide (WC) and graphite. The SW@G composite consists of multiple-scale WC particles, which are uniformly distributed in amorphous Si matrices, and wrapped by graphene nanosheets (GNs) on the outside. Owing to the unique concrete-like core-shell structure, the wrapping of GNs on the Si improves the conductivity and structural stability of the composite. The inner WC particles which tightly connect the Si and graphene act as the cornerstone to resist large volumetric expansion of Si during charge/discharge, and in particular serve as the high-speed channels of electrons as well as provide more interface paths for Li + to accelerate their transfer inside the Si. These contribute to the excellent electrochemical properties of SW@G composite anode, including high volumetric capacity (three times higher than that of graphite), superior rate capability, and long-life stable cycleability. The synthetic method developed in this work paves the way for large-scale manufacturing of high performance Li storage anodes using commercially available materials and technologies.

  6. Study of surface atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma based on ultrathin laminated electrodes in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Luxiang; Liu, Wenzheng; Li, Zhiyi; Ma, Chuanlong

    2018-05-01

    A method to generate large-area surface plasma in air by micro-discharge is proposed. Two ultrathin laminated electrode structures of non-insulating and insulating types were formed by using the nanoscale ITO conductive layer. The surface glow discharge in atmospheric air is realized in low discharge voltage by constructing the special electric field of two-dimensional unidirectional attenuation. In particular, the insulating electrode structure can avoid the loss of ITO electrodes so that the discharge stability can be increased, and the treated objects can be prevented from metal ion pollution caused by the electrode in the discharge. It has broad application prospects in the fields of aerodynamics and material surface treatment.

  7. The thermal structure of Triton's atmosphere - Pre-Voyager models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Pollack, James B.; Zent, Aaron P.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Courtin, Regis

    1989-01-01

    Spectral data from earth observations have indicated the presence of N2 and CH4 on Triton. This paper outlines the use of the 1-D radiative-convective model developed for Titan to calculate the current pressure of N2 and CH4 on Triton. The production of haze material is obtained by scaling down from the Titan value. Results and predictions for the Voyager Triton encounter are as follows: A N2-CH4 atmosphere on Triton is thermodynamically self consistent and would have a surface pressure of approximately 50 millibar; due to the chemically produced haze, Triton has a hot atmosphere with a temperature of approximately 130 K; Triton's troposphere is a region of saturation of the major constituent of the atmosphere, N2.

  8. Accumulation of radiation defects and products of radiolysis in lithium orthosilicate pebbles with silicon dioxide additions under action of high absorbed doses and high temperature in air and inert atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarins, A.; Supe, A.; Kizane, G.; Knitter, R.; Baumane, L.

    2012-10-01

    One of the technological problems of a fusion reactor is the change in composition and structure of ceramic breeders (Li4SiO4 or Li2TiO3 pebbles) during long-term operation. In this study changes in the composition and microstructure of Li4SiO4 pebbles with 2.5 wt% silicon dioxide additions, fabricated by a melt-spraying process, were investigated after fast electron irradiation (E = 5 MeV, dose rate up to 88 MGy h-1) with high absorbed dose from 1.3 to 10.6 GGy at high temperature (543-573 K) in air and argon atmosphere. Three types of pebbles with different diameters and grain sizes were investigated. Products of radiolysis were studied by means of FTIR and XRD. TSL and ESR spectroscopy were used to detect radiation defects. SEM was used to investigate structure of pebbles. Experiments showed that Li4SiO4 pebbles with a diameter of 500 μm had similar radiation stability as pebbles with diameter <50 μm which were annealed at 1173 K for 128 h in argon and air atmosphere. As well as determined that lithium orthosilicate pebbles with size 500 (1243 K 168 h) and <50 μm (1173 K 128 h) have a higher radiation stability in air and argon atmosphere than pebbles with size <50 μm (1073 K 1 h). Degree of decomposition α10.56 of the lithium orthosilicate pebbles at an absorbed dose of 10.56 GGy in air atmosphere is 1.5% and 0.15% at irradiation in dry argon. It has been suggested that changes of radiation stability of lithium orthosilicate pebbles in air atmosphere comparing with irradiated pebbles in argon atmosphere is effect of chemical reaction of lithium orthosilicate surface with air containing - H2O and CO2 in irradiation process. As well as it has been suggested that silicon dioxide - lithium metasilicate admixtures do not affect formation mechanism of radiation defect and products of radiolysis in lithium orthosilicate pebbles.

  9. Atmospheric turbulence affects wind turbine nacelle transfer functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. St. Martin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite their potential as a valuable source of individual turbine power performance and turbine array energy production optimization information, nacelle-mounted anemometers have often been neglected because complex flows around the blades and nacelle interfere with their measurements. This work quantitatively explores the accuracy of and potential corrections to nacelle anemometer measurements to determine the degree to which they may be useful when corrected for these complex flows, particularly for calculating annual energy production (AEP in the absence of other meteorological data. Using upwind meteorological tower measurements along with nacelle-based measurements from a General Electric (GE 1.5sle model, we calculate empirical nacelle transfer functions (NTFs and explore how they are impacted by different atmospheric and turbulence parameters. This work provides guidelines for the use of NTFs for deriving useful wind measurements from nacelle-mounted anemometers. Corrections to the nacelle anemometer wind speed measurements can be made with NTFs and used to calculate an AEP that comes within 1 % of an AEP calculated with upwind measurements. We also calculate unique NTFs for different atmospheric conditions defined by temperature stratification as well as turbulence intensity, turbulence kinetic energy, and wind shear. During periods of low stability as defined by the Bulk Richardson number (RB, the nacelle-mounted anemometer underestimates the upwind wind speed more than during periods of high stability at some wind speed bins below rated speed, leading to a steeper NTF during periods of low stability. Similarly, during periods of high turbulence, the nacelle-mounted anemometer underestimates the upwind wind speed more than during periods of low turbulence at most wind bins between cut-in and rated wind speed. Based on these results, we suggest different NTFs be calculated for different regimes of atmospheric stability and turbulence

  10. Insights on the structure and stability of Licanantase: a trimeric acid-stable coiled-coil lipoprotein from Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Abarca

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Licanantase (Lic is the major component of the secretome of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans when grown in elemental sulphur. When used as an additive, Lic improves copper recovery from bioleaching processes. However, this recovery enhancement is not fully understood. In this context, our aim is to predict the 3D structure of Lic, to shed light on its structure-function relationships. Bioinformatics analyses on the amino acid sequence of Lic showed a great similarity with Lpp, an Escherichia coli Lipoprotein that can form stable trimers in solution. Lic and Lpp share the secretion motif, intracellular processing and alpha helix structure, as well as the distribution of hydrophobic residues in heptads forming a hydrophobic core, typical of coiled-coil structures. Cross-linking experiments showed the presence of Lic trimers, supporting our predictions. Taking the in vitro and in silico evidence as a whole, we propose that the most probable structure for Lic is a trimeric coiled-coil. According to this prediction, a suitable model for Lic was produced using the de novo algorithm “Rosetta Fold-and-Dock”. To assess the structural stability of our model, Molecular Dynamics (MD and Replica Exchange MD simulations were performed using the structure of Lpp and a 14-alanine Lpp mutant as controls, at both acidic and neutral pH. Our results suggest that Lic was the most stable structure among the studied proteins in both pH conditions. This increased stability can be explained by a higher number of both intermonomer hydrophobic contacts and hydrogen bonds, key elements for the stability of Lic’s secondary and tertiary structure.

  11. Geophysical and atmospheric evolution of habitable planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammer, Helmut; Selsis, Frank; Chassefière, Eric; Breuer, Doris; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Kulikov, Yuri N; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Biernat, Helfried K; Leblanc, Francois; Kallio, Esa; Lundin, Richard; Westall, Frances; Bauer, Siegfried J; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Eiroa, Carlos; Fridlund, Malcolm; Gröller, Hannes; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Hausleitner, Walter; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Léger, Alain; Leitzinger, Martin; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Liseau, René; Lunine, Jonathan; Motschmann, Uwe; Odert, Petra; Paresce, Francesco; Parnell, John; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Rauer, Heike; Röttgering, Huub; Schneider, Jean; Spohn, Tilman; Stadelmann, Anja; Stangl, Günter; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of Earth-like habitable planets is a complex process that depends on the geodynamical and geophysical environments. In particular, it is necessary that plate tectonics remain active over billions of years. These geophysically active environments are strongly coupled to a planet's host star parameters, such as mass, luminosity and activity, orbit location of the habitable zone, and the planet's initial water inventory. Depending on the host star's radiation and particle flux evolution, the composition in the thermosphere, and the availability of an active magnetic dynamo, the atmospheres of Earth-like planets within their habitable zones are differently affected due to thermal and nonthermal escape processes. For some planets, strong atmospheric escape could even effect the stability of the atmosphere.

  12. STABILITY AND DYNAMICS OF SPATIO-TEMPORAL STRUCTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann Riecke

    2005-10-21

    This document constitutes the final report for the grant. It provides a complete list of publications and presentations that arose from the project as well as a brief description of the highlights of the research results. The research funded by this grant has provided insights into the spontaneous formation of structures of increasing complexity in systems driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium. A classic example of such a system is thermally driven convection in a horizontal fluid layer. Highlights of the research are: (1) explanation of the localized traveling wave pulses observed in binary-mixture convection, (2) explanation of the localized waves in electroconvection, (3) introduction of a new diagnostics for spatially and temporally chaotic states, which is based on the statistics of defect trajectories, (4) prediction of complex states in thermally driven convection in rotating systems. Additional contributions provided insight into the localization mechanism for oscillons, the prediction of a new localization mechanism for traveling waves based on a resonant periodic forcing, and an analysis of the stability of quasi-periodic patterns.

  13. Virial theorem analysis of the structure and stability of magnetized clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweibel, E.G.

    1990-01-01

    The tensor virial theorem is used to analyze the structure and stability of self-gravitating, magnetized spheroids surrounded by a low-density medium with pressure and magnetic field. Analytical expressions are developed for the effect of a weak field and calculate critical states when the effect of the field is arbitrarily strong, comparing the results with full magnetohydrostatic calculations. This analysis suggests that a magnetic field may prevent gravitational collapse but may also be destabilizing, depending on its degree of concentration within the cloud. 34 refs

  14. An Enhanced Asymptotic Expansion for the Stability of Nonlinear Elastic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Dencker; Byskov, Esben

    2010-01-01

    A new, enhanced asymptotic expansion applicable to stability of structures made of nonlinear elastic materials is established. The method utilizes “hyperbolic” terms instead of the conventional polynomial terms, covers full kinematic nonlinearity and is applied to nonlinear elastic Euler columns...... with two different types of cross-section. Comparison with numerical results show that our expansion provides more accurate predictions of the behavior than usual expansions. The method is based on an extended version of the principle of virtual displacements that covers cases with auxiliary conditions...

  15. Effects of mannose, fructose, and fucose on the structure, stability, and hydration of lysozyme in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahim, Abdoul; Peters, Günther H.J.; Jalkanen, Karl J.

    2013-01-01

    The bio-protective properties of monosaccharaides, namely mannose, fructose and fucose, on the stability and dynamical properties of the NMR determined hen egg-white lysozyme structure have been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature in aqueous solution and in...... of the solvent and sugar distributions around lysozyme was used to investigate the interfacial solvent and sugar structure near the protein surface.......The bio-protective properties of monosaccharaides, namely mannose, fructose and fucose, on the stability and dynamical properties of the NMR determined hen egg-white lysozyme structure have been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature in aqueous solution and in 7...... and 13 wt % concentrations of the three sugars. Results are discussed in the framework of the bio-protective phenomena. The three sugars show similar bio-protective behaviours at room temperature (300 K) in the concentration range studied as shown by the small RMSDs of the resulting MD structures from...

  16. Analysis of the structural stability of the smectite submitted to high pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alabarse, Frederico Gil

    2009-10-01

    The thermal stability of bentonite is of particular interest for containment barrier in nuclear waste disposal facilities. However, very little is known about the stability of smectite (principal component of bentonite) under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions (HPHT). The objective of this work was to investigate the stability of the smectite structure under HP-HT conditions. The HP-HT experiments were performed on toroidal chambers (TC) with pressure up 7.7 GPa and temperatures of 1000 deg C. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction after the HP-HT processing. Furthermore, one sample from the original material was analyzed using Fourier transformed infra-red (FTIR) in situ measurements on a diamond anvil cell (DAC) in experiments up to 12 GPa. The original sample of bentonite, calcium dioctahedral montmorillonite with small fraction of quartz, was characterized by FTIR, XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). In the experiment performed using the DAC up to 12 GPa, the FTIR in situ measurements analysis showed that the smectite structure is stable with a reversible deformation in the Si-O bond and that the smectite did not loose water. Experiments performed in TC at 7.7 GPa of pressure and 250 deg C of temperature, during 3.5 h showed, after analysis by XRD and FTIR, that the smectite structure is stable and did not loose water. Experiments performed in TC at 7.7 GPa of pressure and 1000 deg C of temperature, during 3.5 h showed, after analysis by XRD and SEM, the transformation of bentonite to the mineral assemblage: Coesite, Quartz, Kyanite and Pyrope. (author)

  17. Functional and structural stability of the epidermal growth factor receptor in detergent micelles and phospholipid nanodiscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mi, Li-Zhi; Grey, Michael J; Nishida, Noritaka

    2008-01-01

    Cellular signaling mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or ErbB) family of receptor tyrosine kinases plays an important role in regulating normal and oncogenic cellular physiology. While structures of isolated EGFR extracellular domains and intracellular protein tyrosine kinase...... differential functional stability in Triton X-100 versus dodecyl maltoside. Furthermore, the kinase activity can be significantly stabilized by reconstituting purified EGF-bound EGFR dimers in phospholipid nanodiscs or vesicles, suggesting that the environment around the hydrophobic transmembrane...

  18. Climate-carbon cycle feedbacks under stabilization: uncertainty and observational constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Chris D.; Cox, Peter M.; Huntingford, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Avoiding 'dangerous climate change' by stabilization of atmospheric CO 2 concentrations at a desired level requires reducing the rate of anthropogenic carbon emissions so that they are balanced by uptake of carbon by the natural terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycles. Previous calculations of profiles of emissions which lead to stabilized CO 2 levels have assumed no impact of climate change on this natural carbon uptake. However, future climate change effects on the land carbon cycle are predicted to reduce its ability to act as a sink for anthropogenic carbon emissions and so quantification of this feedback is required to determine future permissible emissions. Here, we assess the impact of the climate-carbon cycle feedback and attempt to quantify its uncertainty due to both within-model parameter uncertainty and between-model structural uncertainty. We assess the use of observational constraints to reduce uncertainty in the future permissible emissions for climate stabilization and find that all realistic carbon cycle feedbacks consistent with the observational record give permissible emissions significantly less than previously assumed. However, the observational record proves to be insufficient to tightly constrain carbon cycle processes or future feedback strength with implications for climate-carbon cycle model evaluation

  19. Stability and electronic structure of superlattices (IIIV)n/(IV2)n

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casagrande, D.; Ferraz, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of atomic relaxation and electronic states have been made for ultrathin superlattices (GaP) n /(Ge 2 ) n , (GaP) n /(Si 2 ) n , (In P) n /(Ge 2 ) n and (In P) n /(Si 2 ) n with period n ≤ 3 in growth directions (001) and (110). The calculations were performed within the momentum-space formalism of the self-consistent ab-initio pseudopotential method and the molecular dynamics approach as proposed by Car and Parrinello. The structures were found to be unstable with respect to the phase separation into the constituent bulk materials. The results for the enthalpy show a metastability as increasing the superlattice period n. The density of nonoctet wrong-bonds play an important role to determine the stability of the structures. (author). 13 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Stabilization of crystal and magnetic structure of Gd2Al1-xInx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niazi, M.; Yazdani, A.

    2006-01-01

    A random mixture of two compounds with different type of crystal structure and magnetic characteristic which can lead to a new phase, is studied to find out the critical point at which both of them stabilized. such an interesting random system can be found by; 1) Gd 2 Al with two different magnetic phase transition on which T c is unstable 2) Gd 2 In which is also shows two magnetic phase transition, but completely different with Gd 2 Al on which T N is unstable. The stabilized point which is consider experimentally by X-Ray diffraction and theoretically by WIEN2K is suggested to be at x=0.3 where it is a good agreement between these two methods.

  1. ANALYTICAL MODELS OF EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES. I. ATMOSPHERIC DYNAMICS VIA THE SHALLOW WATER SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heng, Kevin [Center for Space and Habitability, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Workman, Jared, E-mail: kevin.heng@csh.unibe.ch, E-mail: jworkman@coloradomesa.edu [Colorado Mesa University, 1260 Kennedy Avenue, Grand Junction, CO 81501 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Within the context of exoplanetary atmospheres, we present a comprehensive linear analysis of forced, damped, magnetized shallow water systems, exploring the effects of dimensionality, geometry (Cartesian, pseudo-spherical, and spherical), rotation, magnetic tension, and hydrodynamic and magnetic sources of friction. Across a broad range of conditions, we find that the key governing equation for atmospheres and quantum harmonic oscillators are identical, even when forcing (stellar irradiation), sources of friction (molecular viscosity, Rayleigh drag, and magnetic drag), and magnetic tension are included. The global atmospheric structure is largely controlled by a single key parameter that involves the Rossby and Prandtl numbers. This near-universality breaks down when either molecular viscosity or magnetic drag acts non-uniformly across latitude or a poloidal magnetic field is present, suggesting that these effects will introduce qualitative changes to the familiar chevron-shaped feature witnessed in simulations of atmospheric circulation. We also find that hydrodynamic and magnetic sources of friction have dissimilar phase signatures and affect the flow in fundamentally different ways, implying that using Rayleigh drag to mimic magnetic drag is inaccurate. We exhaustively lay down the theoretical formalism (dispersion relations, governing equations, and time-dependent wave solutions) for a broad suite of models. In all situations, we derive the steady state of an atmosphere, which is relevant to interpreting infrared phase and eclipse maps of exoplanetary atmospheres. We elucidate a pinching effect that confines the atmospheric structure to be near the equator. Our suite of analytical models may be used to develop decisively physical intuition and as a reference point for three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of atmospheric circulation.

  2. Valence electron structure and properties of stabilized ZrO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To reveal the properties of stabilizers in ZrO2 on nanoscopic levels, the valence electron structures of four stable ZrO2 phases and c-ZrO2 were analyzed on the basis of the empirical electron theory of solids and molecules. The results showed that the hybridization levels of Zr atoms in c-ZrO2 doped with Ca and Mg dropped from B17 to B13, the hybridization levels of Zr atoms in c-ZrO2 doped with Y and Ce dropped from B17 to B15, and that the four stabilizing atoms all made the hybridization levels of O atoms drop from level 4 to level 2. The numbers of covalent electrons in the strongest covalent bond in the descending order are c-ZrO2>Zr0.82Ce0.18O2> Zr0.82Y0.18O1.91>Zr0.82Mg0.18O1.82>Zr0.82Ca0.18O1.82. The bond energies of the strongest covalent bond and the melting points of the solid solutions in the descending order are Zr0.82Ce0.18O2> c-ZrO2>Zr0.82Y0.18O1.91>Zr0.82Mg0.18O1.82>Zr0.82Ca0.18O1.82. The percent-ages of the total number of covalent electrons in the descending order are c-ZrO2>Zr0.82Y0.18O1.91> Zr0.82Ce0.18O2>Zr0.82Mg0.18O1.82> Zr0.82Ca0.18O1.82. From the above analysis, it can be concluded that the stabilizing degrees of the four stabilizers in the descending order are CaO> MgO>Y2O3>CeO2.

  3. Evaluation of the influence of fluoroquinolone chemical structure on stability: forced degradation and in silico studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Valle de Bairros

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Fluoroquinolones are a known antibacterial class commonly used around the world. These compounds present relative stability and they may show some adverse effects according their distinct chemical structures. The chemical hydrolysis of five fluoroquinolones was studied using alkaline and photolytic degradation aiming to observe the differences in molecular reactivity. DFT/B3LYP-6.31G* was used to assist with understanding the chemical structure degradation. Gemifloxacin underwent degradation in alkaline medium. Gemifloxacin and danofloxacin showed more degradation perceptual indices in comparison with ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and norfloxacin in photolytic conditions. Some structural features were observed which may influence degradation, such as the presence of five member rings attached to the quinolone ring and the electrostatic positive charges, showed in maps of potential electrostatic charges. These measurements may be used in the design of effective and more stable fluoroquinolones as well as the investigation of degradation products from stress stability assays.

  4. The influence of boundary conditions on domain structure stability in spin wave approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachinewski, A.

    1974-01-01

    Instead of the usually used Born-Karman cyclic conditions, boundary conditions which take into account the situation of the boundary lattice sites lying on the crystal's surface are assumed. It is shown that the particular choice of the boundary conditions secures the stability of domain structure in ferromagnet (positive spin wave energies), without including the Winter term in Hamiltonian. (author)

  5. Analysis of eddy current loss in high-Tc superconducting power cables with respect to various structure of stabilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S. J.; Song, M. K.; Lee, S. J.; Cho, J. W.; Sim, K. D.

    2005-01-01

    The High-Tc superconducting power cable consists of a multi-layer high-Tc superconducting cable core and a stabilizer which is used to bypass the current at fault time. Eddy current loss is generated in the stabilizer in normal operating condition and affects the whole system. In this paper, the eddy current losses are analyzed with respect to various structure of stabilizer by using opera-3d. Moreover, optimal conditions of the stabilizer are derived to minimize the eddy current losses from the analyzed results. The obtained results could be applied to the design and manufacture of the high-Tc superconducting power cable system.

  6. Aeroelastic impact of above-rated wave-induced structural motions on the near-wake stability of a floating offshore wind turbine rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Steven; Jaworski, Justin

    2017-11-01

    The impact of above-rated wave-induced motions on the stability of floating offshore wind turbine near-wakes is studied numerically. The rotor near-wake is generated using a lifting-line free vortex wake method, which is strongly coupled to a finite element solver for kinematically nonlinear blade deformations. A synthetic time series of relatively high-amplitude/high-frequency representative of above-rated conditions of the NREL 5MW referece wind turbine is imposed on the rotor structure. To evaluate the impact of these above-rated conditions, a linear stability analysis is first performed on the near wake generated by a fixed-tower wind turbine configuration at above-rated inflow conditions. The platform motion is then introduced via synthetic time series, and a stability analysis is performed on the wake generated by the floating offshore wind turbine at the same above-rated inflow conditions. The stability trends (disturbance modes versus the divergence rate of vortex structures) of the two analyses are compared to identify the impact that above-rated wave-induced structural motions have on the stability of the floating offshore wind turbine wake.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of poly (bisphenol A borate) with high thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shujuan [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Wang, Xiao [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Jia, Beibei [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Jing, Xinli, E-mail: xljing@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi’an, 710049 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • PBAB with excellent thermal resistance and high char yield was synthesized. • The chemical reaction of BPA with BA, and chemical structure of PBAB were studied. • PBAB show excellent thermal resistance in N{sub 2} and air atmospheres. • The thermal stability of PBAB is greatly influenced by boron content. • Boron oxide and boron carbide are formed during the pyrolysis of PBAB. - Abstract: In this work, poly (bisphenol A borate) (PBAB), which has excellent thermal resistance and a high char yield, was synthesized via a convenient A{sub 2} + B{sub 3} strategy by using bisphenol A (BPA) and boric acid (BA). The chemical reaction between BPA and BA and the chemical structure of PBAB were investigated. The results demonstrate that PBAB consists of aromatic, Ph–O–B and B–O–B structures, as well as a small number of boron hydroxyl groups and phenolic hydroxyl groups. The thermal properties of PBAB were studied by DMA and TGA. The results indicate that the glass transition temperature and char yield are gradually enhanced by increasing the boron content, where the char yield of PBAB at 800 °C in nitrogen (N{sub 2}) reaches up to 71.3%. It is of particular importance that PBAB show excellent thermal resistance in N{sub 2} and air atmospheres. By analysing the pyrolysis of PBAB, the high char yield of PBAB can be attributed to the formation of boron oxide and boron carbide at high temperatures, which reduced the release of volatile carbon dioxide and improved the thermal stability of the carbonization products. This study provides a new perspective on the design of novel boron-containing polymers and possesses significant potential for the improvement of the comprehensive performance of thermosetting resins to broaden their applicability in the field of advanced composites.

  8. Effect of the mixing fields on the stability and structure of turbulent partially premixed flames in a concentric flow conical nozzle burner

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Mohy S.

    2016-10-22

    The mixing field is known to be one of the key parameters that affect the stability and structure of partially premixed flames. Data in these flames are now available covering the effects of turbulence, combustion system geometry, level of partially premixing and fuel type. However, quantitative analyses of the flame structure based on the mixing field are not yet available. The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive study of the effects of the mixing fields on the structure and stability of partially premixed methane flames. The mixing field in a concentric flow conical nozzle (CFCN) burner with well-controlled mechanism of the mixing is investigated using Rayleigh scattering technique. The flame stability, structure and flow field of some selected cases are presented using LIF of OH and PIV. The experimental data of the mixing field cover wide ranges of Reynolds number, equivalence ratio and mixing length. The data show that the mixing field is significantly affected by the mixing length and the ratio of the air-to-fuel velocities. The Reynolds number has a minimum effect on the mixing field in high turbulent flow regime and the stability is significantly affected by the turbulence level. The temporal fluctuations of the range of mixture fraction within the mixing field correlate with the flame stability. The highest point of stability occurs at recess distances where fluid mixtures near the jet exit plane are mostly within the flammability limits. This paper provides some correlations between the stability range in mixture fraction space and the turbulence level for different equivalence ratios.

  9. Assessing the Impacts of Atmospheric Conditions under Climate Change on Air Quality Profile over Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei Tong, Cheuk

    2017-04-01

    Small particulates can cause long term impairment to human health as they can penetrate deep and deposit on the wall of the respiratory system. Under the projected climate change as reported by literature, atmospheric stability, which has strong effects on vertical mixing of air pollutants and thus air quality Hong Kong, is also varying from near to far future. In addition to domestic emission, Hong Kong receives also significant concentration of cross-boundary particulates that their natures and movements are correlated with atmospheric condition. This study aims to study the relation of atmospheric conditions with air quality over Hong Kong. Past meteorological data is based on Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis data. Radiosonde data provided from HKO are also adopted in testing and validating the data. Future meteorological data is simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF), which dynamically downscaled the past and future climate under the A1B scenario simulated by ECHAM5/MPIOM. Air quality data is collected on one hand from the ground station data provided by Environment Protection Department, with selected stations revealing local emission and trans-boundary emission respectively. On the other hand, an Atmospheric Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), which operates using the radar principle to detect Rayleigh and Mie scattering from atmospheric gas and aerosols, has also been adopted to measure vertical aerosol profile, which has been observed tightly related to the high level meteorology. Data from scattered signals are collected, averaged or some episode selected for characteristic comparison with the atmospheric stability indices and other meteorological factors. The relation between atmospheric conditions and air quality is observed by statistical analysis, and statistical models are built based on the stability indices to project the changes in sulphur dioxide, ozone and particulate

  10. Structure and stability of nickel/nickel oxide core-shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Addato, S; Grillo, V; Valeri, S; Frabboni, S; Altieri, S; Tondi, R

    2011-01-01

    The results of a combined x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) study of Ni nanoparticles (NP), before and after oxidation, are presented. An experimental set-up was realized for the preparation and study of pre-formed NP films, concentrating the attention on Ni NP in the diameter range between 4 and 8 nm. The XPS data were taken in situ from NPs after different stages of oxidation, including controlled dosing of O 2 gas in the experimental system and exposure to the atmosphere. The Ni 2p structure is a combination of spectra from metallic Ni in the NP core and from the oxide shell. The signal from the NP core was observed even for samples after exposure to air. From the comparison of HR-TEM experimental images with theoretical simulations, it was found that the Ni NP core has a regular multitwinned icosahedral structure, composed of single-crystal tetrahedra with (111) faces. The NiO phase is clearly observed forming islands on the NP surface.

  11. Structure and stability of nickel/nickel oxide core-shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Addato, S; Grillo, V; Valeri, S; Frabboni, S [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Altieri, S; Tondi, R, E-mail: sergio.daddato@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy)

    2011-05-04

    The results of a combined x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) study of Ni nanoparticles (NP), before and after oxidation, are presented. An experimental set-up was realized for the preparation and study of pre-formed NP films, concentrating the attention on Ni NP in the diameter range between 4 and 8 nm. The XPS data were taken in situ from NPs after different stages of oxidation, including controlled dosing of O{sub 2} gas in the experimental system and exposure to the atmosphere. The Ni 2p structure is a combination of spectra from metallic Ni in the NP core and from the oxide shell. The signal from the NP core was observed even for samples after exposure to air. From the comparison of HR-TEM experimental images with theoretical simulations, it was found that the Ni NP core has a regular multitwinned icosahedral structure, composed of single-crystal tetrahedra with (111) faces. The NiO phase is clearly observed forming islands on the NP surface.

  12. Role of tryptophan 95 in substrate specificity and structural stability of Sulfolobus solfataricus alcohol dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennacchio, Angela; Esposito, Luciana; Zagari, Adriana; Rossi, Mosè; Raia, Carlo A

    2009-09-01

    A mutant of the thermostable NAD(+)-dependent (S)-stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase from Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsADH) which has a single substitution, Trp95Leu, located at the substrate binding pocket, was fully characterized to ascertain the role of Trp95 in discriminating between chiral secondary alcohols suggested by the wild-type SsADH crystallographic structure. The Trp95Leu mutant displays no apparent activity with short-chain primary and secondary alcohols and poor activity with aromatic substrates and coenzyme. Moreover, the Trp --> Leu substitution affects the structural stability of the archaeal ADH, decreasing its thermal stability without relevant changes in secondary structure. The double mutant Trp95Leu/Asn249Tyr was also purified to assist in crystallographic analysis. This mutant exhibits higher activity but decreased affinity toward aliphatic alcohols, aldehydes as well as NAD(+) and NADH compared to the wild-type enzyme. The crystal structure of the Trp95Leu/Asn249Tyr mutant apo form, determined at 2.0 A resolution, reveals a large local rearrangement of the substrate site with dramatic consequences. The Leu95 side-chain conformation points away from the catalytic metal center and the widening of the substrate site is partially counteracted by a concomitant change of Trp117 side chain conformation. Structural changes at the active site are consistent with the reduced activity on substrates and decreased coenzyme binding.

  13. Global 3D radiation-hydrodynamics models of AGB stars. Effects of convection and radial pulsations on atmospheric structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytag, B.; Liljegren, S.; Höfner, S.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Observations of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with increasing spatial resolution reveal new layers of complexity of atmospheric processes on a variety of scales. Aims: To analyze the physical mechanisms that cause asymmetries and surface structures in observed images, we use detailed 3D dynamical simulations of AGB stars; these simulations self-consistently describe convection and pulsations. Methods: We used the CO5BOLD radiation-hydrodynamics code to produce an exploratory grid of global "star-in-a-box" models of the outer convective envelope and the inner atmosphere of AGB stars to study convection, pulsations, and shock waves and their dependence on stellar and numerical parameters. Results: The model dynamics are governed by the interaction of long-lasting giant convection cells, short-lived surface granules, and strong, radial, fundamental-mode pulsations. Radial pulsations and shorter wavelength, traveling, acoustic waves induce shocks on various scales in the atmosphere. Convection, waves, and shocks all contribute to the dynamical pressure and, thus, to an increase of the stellar radius and to a levitation of material into layers where dust can form. Consequently, the resulting relation of pulsation period and stellar radius is shifted toward larger radii compared to that of non-linear 1D models. The dependence of pulsation period on luminosity agrees well with observed relations. The interaction of the pulsation mode with the non-stationary convective flow causes occasional amplitude changes and phase shifts. The regularity of the pulsations decreases with decreasing gravity as the relative size of convection cells increases. The model stars do not have a well-defined surface. Instead, the light is emitted from a very extended inhomogeneous atmosphere with a complex dynamic pattern of high-contrast features. Conclusions: Our models self-consistently describe convection, convectively generated acoustic noise, fundamental-mode radial

  14. Atomistic Origins of High Capacity and High Structural Stability of Polymer-Derived SiOC Anode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Zhao, Kejie

    2017-10-11

    Capacity and structural stability are often mutually exclusive properties of electrodes in Li-ion batteries (LIBs): a gain in capacity is usually accompanied by the undesired large volumetric change of the host material upon lithiation. Polymer-derived ceramics, such as silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) of hybrid Si-O-C bonds, show an exceptional combination of high capacity and superior structural stability. We investigate the atomistic origins of the unique chemomechanical performance of carbon-rich SiOC using the first-principles theoretical approach. The atomic model of SiOC is composed of continuous Si-O-C units caged by a graphene-like cellular network and percolated nanovoids. The segregated sp 2 carbon network serves as the backbone to maintain the structural stability of the lattice. Li insertion is first absorbed at the nanovoid sites, and then it is accommodated by the SiOC tetrahedral units, excess C atoms, and topological defects at the edge of or within the segregated carbon network. SiOC expands up to 22% in volumetric strain at the fully lithiated capacity of 1230 mA h/g. We examine in great detail the evolution of the microscopic features of the SiOC molecule in the course of Li reactions. The first-principles modeling provides a fundamental understanding of the physicochemical properties of Si-based glass ceramics for their application in LIBs.

  15. Atlas of the Underworld : Paleo-subduction, -geography, -atmosphere and -sea level reconstructed from present-day mantle structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Douwe G.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, I aimed at searching for new ways of constraining paleo-geographic, -atmosphere and -sea level reconstructions, through an extensive investigation of mantle structure in seismic tomographic models. To this end, I explored evidence for paleo-subduction in these models and how this may

  16. Stability, electrochemical behaviors and electronic structures of iron hydroxyl-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhongli; Sun Shaorui; Li Fan; Chen Ge [College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Pingleyuan 100, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100022 (China); Xia Dingguo, E-mail: dgxia@bjut.edu.cn [College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Pingleyuan 100, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100022 (China); Zhao Ting; Chu Wangsheng [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wu Ziyu, E-mail: wuzy@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2010-09-01

    Iron hydroxyl-phosphate with a uniform spherical particle size of around 1 {mu}m, a compound of the type Fe{sub 2-y}{open_square}{sub y}(PO{sub 4})(OH){sub 3-3y}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3y-2} (where {open_square} represents a vacancy), has been synthesized by hydrothermal methods. The particles are composed of spheres of diameter <100 nm. The compound exhibits good electrochemical performance, with reversible capacities of around 150 mAh g{sup -1} and 120 mAh g{sup -1} at current densities of 170 mA g{sup -1} and 680 mA g{sup -1}, respectively. The stability of crystal structure of this material was studied by TGA and XRD which show that the material remains stable at least up to the temperature 200 deg. C. Investigation of the electronic structure of the iron hydroxyl-phosphate by GGA + U calculation has indicated that it has a better electronic conductivity than LiFePO{sub 4}.

  17. Integrated optimization on aerodynamics-structure coupling and flight stability of a large airplane in preliminary design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhe WANG

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The preliminary phase is significant during the whole design process of a large airplane because of its enormous potential in enhancing the overall performance. However, classical sequential designs can hardly adapt to modern airplanes, due to their repeated iterations, long periods, and massive computational burdens. Multidisciplinary analysis and optimization demonstrates the capability to tackle such complex design issues. In this paper, an integrated optimization method for the preliminary design of a large airplane is proposed, accounting for aerodynamics, structure, and stability. Aeroelastic responses are computed by a rapid three-dimensional flight load analysis method combining the high-order panel method and the structural elasticity correction. The flow field is determined by the viscous/inviscid iteration method, and the cruise stability is evaluated by the linear small-disturbance theory. Parametric optimization is carried out using genetic algorithm to seek the minimal weight of a simplified plate-beam wing structure in the cruise trim condition subject to aeroelastic, aerodynamic, and stability constraints, and the optimal wing geometry shape, front/rear spar positions, and structural sizes are obtained simultaneously. To reduce the computational burden of the static aeroelasticity analysis in the optimization process, the Kriging method is employed to predict aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices of different aerodynamic shapes. The multidisciplinary analyses guarantee computational accuracy and efficiency, and the integrated optimization considers the coupling effect sufficiently between different disciplines to improve the overall performance, avoiding the limitations of sequential approaches utilized currently. Keywords: Aeroelasticity, Integrated optimization, Multidisciplinary analysis, Large airplane, Preliminary design

  18. Computational analysis of histidine mutations on the structural stability of human tyrosinases leading to albinism insurgence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mubashir; Abbas, Qamar; Raza, Hussain; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Seo, Sung-Yum

    2017-07-25

    Misfolding and structural alteration in proteins lead to serious malfunctions and cause various diseases in humans. Mutations at the active binding site in tyrosinase impair structural stability and cause lethal albinism by abolishing copper binding. To evaluate the histidine mutational effect, all mutated structures were built using homology modelling. The protein sequence was retrieved from the UniProt database, and 3D models of original and mutated human tyrosinase sequences were predicted by changing the residual positions within the target sequence separately. Structural and mutational analyses were performed to interpret the significance of mutated residues (N 180 , R 202 , Q 202 , R 211 , Y 363 , R 367 , Y 367 and D 390 ) at the active binding site of tyrosinases. CSpritz analysis depicted that 23.25% residues actively participate in the instability of tyrosinase. The accuracy of predicted models was confirmed through online servers ProSA-web, ERRAT score and VERIFY 3D values. The theoretical pI and GRAVY generated results also showed the accuracy of the predicted models. The CCA negative correlation results depicted that the replacement of mutated residues at His within the active binding site disturbs the structural stability of tyrosinases. The predicted CCA scores of Tyr 367 (-0.079) and Q/R 202 (0.032) revealed that both mutations have more potential to disturb the structural stability. MD simulation analyses of all predicted models justified that Gln 202 , Arg 202 , Tyr 367 and D 390 replacement made the protein structures more susceptible to destabilization. Mutational results showed that the replacement of His with Q/R 202 and Y/R 363 has a lethal effect and may cause melanin associated diseases such as OCA1. Taken together, our computational analysis depicts that the mutated residues such as Q/R 202 and Y/R 363 actively participate in instability and misfolding of tyrosinases, which may govern OCA1 through disturbing the melanin biosynthetic pathway.

  19. Meteorological fluid dynamics asymptotic modelling, stability and chaotic atmospheric motion

    CERN Document Server

    Zeytounian, Radyadour K

    1991-01-01

    The author considers meteorology as a part of fluid dynamics. He tries to derive the properties of atmospheric flows from a rational analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations, at the same time analyzing various types of initial and boundary problems. This approach to simulate nature by models from fluid dynamics will be of interest to both scientists and students of physics and theoretical meteorology.

  20. Structural Health Monitoring of Transport Aircraft with Fuzzy Logic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray C. Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A structural health monitoring method based on the concept of static aeroelasticity is presented in this paper. This paper focuses on the estimation of these aeroelastic effects on older transport aircraft, in particular the structural components that are most affected, in severe atmospheric turbulence. Because the structural flexibility properties are mostly unknown to aircraft operators, only the trend, not the magnitude, of these effects is estimated. For this purpose, one useful concept in static aeroelastic effects for conventional aircraft structures is that under aeroelastic deformation the aerodynamic center should move aft. This concept is applied in the present paper by using the fuzzy-logic aerodynamic models. A twin-jet transport aircraft in severe atmospheric turbulence involving plunging motion is examined. It is found that the pitching moment derivatives in cruise with moderate to severe turbulence in transonic flight indicate some degree of abnormality in the stabilizer (i.e., the horizontal tail. Therefore, the horizontal tail is the most severely affected structural component of the aircraft probably caused by vibration under the dynamic loads induced by turbulence.

  1. Polymer stabilized Ni-Ag and Ni-Fe alloy nanoclusters: Structural and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabir, L.; Mandal, A.R. [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan-731 235 (India); Mandal, S.K., E-mail: sk_mandal@hotmail.co [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan-731 235 (India)

    2010-04-15

    We report here the structural and magnetic behaviors of nickel-silver (Ni-Ag) and nickel-iron (Ni-Fe) nanoclusters stabilized with polymer (polypyrrole). High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) indicates Ni-Ag nanoclusters to stabilize in core-shell configuration while that of Ni-Fe nanoclusters in a mixed type of geometry. Structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal the possibility of alloying in such bimetallic nanoclusters to some extent even at temperatures much lower than that of bulk alloying. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra clearly reveal two different absorption behaviors: one is ascribed to non-isolated Ni{sup 2+} clusters surrounded by either silver or iron giving rise to a broad signal, other (very narrow signal) being due to the isolated superparamagnetic Ni{sup 2+} clusters or bimetallic alloy nanoclusters. Results obtained for Ni-Ag and Ni-Fe nanoclusters have been further compared with the behavior exhibited by pure Ni nanoclusters in polypyrrole host. Temperature dependent studies (at 300 and 77 K) of EPR parameters, e.g. linewidth, g-value, line shape and signal intensity indicating the significant influence of surrounding paramagnetic silver or ferromagnetic iron within polymer host on the EPR spectra have been presented.

  2. Polymer stabilized Ni-Ag and Ni-Fe alloy nanoclusters: Structural and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, L.; Mandal, A. R.; Mandal, S. K.

    2010-04-01

    We report here the structural and magnetic behaviors of nickel-silver (Ni-Ag) and nickel-iron (Ni-Fe) nanoclusters stabilized with polymer (polypyrrole). High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) indicates Ni-Ag nanoclusters to stabilize in core-shell configuration while that of Ni-Fe nanoclusters in a mixed type of geometry. Structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal the possibility of alloying in such bimetallic nanoclusters to some extent even at temperatures much lower than that of bulk alloying. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra clearly reveal two different absorption behaviors: one is ascribed to non-isolated Ni 2+ clusters surrounded by either silver or iron giving rise to a broad signal, other (very narrow signal) being due to the isolated superparamagnetic Ni 2+ clusters or bimetallic alloy nanoclusters. Results obtained for Ni-Ag and Ni-Fe nanoclusters have been further compared with the behavior exhibited by pure Ni nanoclusters in polypyrrole host. Temperature dependent studies (at 300 and 77 K) of EPR parameters, e.g. linewidth, g-value, line shape and signal intensity indicating the significant influence of surrounding paramagnetic silver or ferromagnetic iron within polymer host on the EPR spectra have been presented.

  3. Polymer stabilized Ni-Ag and Ni-Fe alloy nanoclusters: Structural and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, L.; Mandal, A.R.; Mandal, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    We report here the structural and magnetic behaviors of nickel-silver (Ni-Ag) and nickel-iron (Ni-Fe) nanoclusters stabilized with polymer (polypyrrole). High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) indicates Ni-Ag nanoclusters to stabilize in core-shell configuration while that of Ni-Fe nanoclusters in a mixed type of geometry. Structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal the possibility of alloying in such bimetallic nanoclusters to some extent even at temperatures much lower than that of bulk alloying. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra clearly reveal two different absorption behaviors: one is ascribed to non-isolated Ni 2+ clusters surrounded by either silver or iron giving rise to a broad signal, other (very narrow signal) being due to the isolated superparamagnetic Ni 2+ clusters or bimetallic alloy nanoclusters. Results obtained for Ni-Ag and Ni-Fe nanoclusters have been further compared with the behavior exhibited by pure Ni nanoclusters in polypyrrole host. Temperature dependent studies (at 300 and 77 K) of EPR parameters, e.g. linewidth, g-value, line shape and signal intensity indicating the significant influence of surrounding paramagnetic silver or ferromagnetic iron within polymer host on the EPR spectra have been presented.

  4. Effect of triethanolamine on the stability of furfurol at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baiburskaya, E.L.; Kalenik, G.S.; Levchenko, E.S.; Martynenko, A.G.; Okhrimenko, N.V.; Shiryaeva, G.P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of triethanolamine (I) on the stability of furfurol under the conditions of oil purification was studied. It was shown that (I) shows a stabilizing effect at a temperature of 200/sup 0/, which is considerably weakened on heating the furfurol in the presence of air (at atmospheric pressure). At a temperature of 230/sup 0/ (I) is not a stabilizer for furfurol.

  5. Ab initio study on stacking sequences, free energy, dynamical stability and potential energy surfaces of graphite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anees, P; Valsakumar, M C; Chandra, Sharat; Panigrahi, B K

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio simulations have been performed to study the structure, energetics and stability of several plausible stacking sequences in graphite. These calculations suggest that in addition to the standard structures, graphite can also exist in AA-simple hexagonal, AB-orthorhombic and ABC-hexagonal type stacking. The free energy difference between these structures is very small (∼1 meV/atom), and hence all the structures can coexist from purely energetic considerations. Calculated x-ray diffraction patterns are similar to those of the standard structures for 2θ ⩽ 70°. Shear elastic constant C 44 is negative in AA-simple hexagonal, AB-orthorhombic and ABC-hexagonal structures, suggesting that these structures are mechanically unstable. Phonon dispersions show that the frequencies of some modes along the Γ–A direction in the Brillouin zone are imaginary in all of the new structures, implying that these structures are dynamically unstable. Incorporation of zero point vibrational energy via the quasi-harmonic approximation does not result in the restoration of dynamical stability. Potential energy surfaces for the unstable normal modes are seen to have the topography of a potential hill for all the new structures, confirming that all of the new structures are inherently unstable. The fact that the potential energy surface is not in the form of a double well implies that the structures are linearly as well as globally unstable. (paper)

  6. Large-eddy simulation of stable atmospheric boundary layers to develop better turbulence closures for climate and weather models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Zeid, Elie; Huang, Jing; Golaz, Jean-Christophe

    2011-11-01

    A disconnect remains between our improved physical understanding of boundary layers stabilized by buoyancy and how we parameterize them in coarse atmospheric models. Most operational climate models require excessive turbulence mixing in such conditions to prevent decoupling of the atmospheric component from the land component, but the performance of such a model is unlikely to be satisfactory under weakly and moderately stable conditions. Using Large-eddy simulation, we revisit some of the basic challenges in parameterizing stable atmospheric boundary layers: eddy-viscosity closure is found to be more reliable due to an improved alignment of vertical Reynolds stresses and mean strains under stable conditions, but the dependence of the magnitude of the eddy viscosity on stability is not well represented by several models tested here. Thus, we propose a new closure that reproduces the different stability regimes better. Subsequently, tests of this model in the GFDL's single-column model (SCM) are found to yield good agreement with LES results in idealized steady-stability cases, as well as in cases with gradual and sharp changes of stability with time.

  7. Self-amplified Amazon forest loss due to vegetation-atmosphere feedbacks

    OpenAIRE

    Zemp, Delphine Clara; Schleussner, Carl Friedrich; Barbosa, Henrique M J; Hirota, Marina; Montade, Vincent; Sampaio, Gilvan; Staal, Arie; Wang-Erlandsson, L.; Rammig, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Reduced rainfall increases the risk of forest dieback, while in return forest loss might intensify regional droughts. The consequences of this vegetation–atmosphere feedback for the stability of the Amazon forest are still unclear. Here we show that the risk of self-amplified Amazon forest loss increases nonlinearly with dry-season intensification. We apply a novel complexnetwork approach, in which Amazon forest patches are linked by observation-based atmospheric water fluxes. ...

  8. DFT investigations on mechanical stability, electronic structure and magnetism in Co2TaZ (Z = Al, Ga, In) heusler alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandy, Shakeel Ahmad; Gupta, Dinesh C.

    2017-12-01

    Ferromagnetic Heusler compounds have vast and imminent applications for novel devices, smart materials thanks to density functional theory (DFT) based simulations, which have scored out a new approach to study these materials. We forecast the structural stability of Co2TaZ alloys on the basis of total energy calculations and mechanical stability criteria. The elastic constants, robust spin-polarized ferromagnetism and electron densities in these half-metallic alloys are also discussed. The observed structural aspects calculated to predict the stability and equilibrium lattice parameters agree well with the experimental results. The elastic parameters like elastic constants, bulk, Young’s and shear moduli, poison’s and Pugh ratios, melting temperatures, etc have been put together to establish their mechanical properties. The elaborated electronic band structures along with indirect band gaps and spin polarization favour the application of these materials in spintronics and memory device technology.

  9. Structuring detergents for extracting and stabilizing functional membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima Matar-Merheb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Membrane proteins are privileged pharmaceutical targets for which the development of structure-based drug design is challenging. One underlying reason is the fact that detergents do not stabilize membrane domains as efficiently as natural lipids in membranes, often leading to a partial to complete loss of activity/stability during protein extraction and purification and preventing crystallization in an active conformation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Anionic calix[4]arene based detergents (C4Cn, n=1-12 were designed to structure the membrane domains through hydrophobic interactions and a network of salt bridges with the basic residues found at the cytosol-membrane interface of membrane proteins. These compounds behave as surfactants, forming micelles of 5-24 nm, with the critical micellar concentration (CMC being as expected sensitive to pH ranging from 0.05 to 1.5 mM. Both by 1H NMR titration and Surface Tension titration experiments, the interaction of these molecules with the basic amino acids was confirmed. They extract membrane proteins from different origins behaving as mild detergents, leading to partial extraction in some cases. They also retain protein functionality, as shown for BmrA (Bacillus multidrug resistance ATP protein, a membrane multidrug-transporting ATPase, which is particularly sensitive to detergent extraction. These new detergents allow BmrA to bind daunorubicin with a Kd of 12 µM, a value similar to that observed after purification using dodecyl maltoside (DDM. They preserve the ATPase activity of BmrA (which resets the protein to its initial state after drug efflux much more efficiently than SDS (sodium dodecyl sulphate, FC12 (Foscholine 12 or DDM. They also maintain in a functional state the C4Cn-extracted protein upon detergent exchange with FC12. Finally, they promote 3D-crystallization of the membrane protein. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These compounds seem promising to extract in a functional state

  10. Effect of homogenization and pasteurization on the structure and stability of whey protein in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Phoebe X; Ren, Daxi; Xiao, Yingping; Tomasula, Peggy M

    2015-05-01

    The effect of homogenization alone or in combination with high-temperature, short-time (HTST) pasteurization or UHT processing on the whey fraction of milk was investigated using highly sensitive spectroscopic techniques. In pilot plant trials, 1-L quantities of whole milk were homogenized in a 2-stage homogenizer at 35°C (6.9 MPa/10.3 MPa) and, along with skim milk, were subjected to HTST pasteurization (72°C for 15 s) or UHT processing (135°C for 2 s). Other whole milk samples were processed using homogenization followed by either HTST pasteurization or UHT processing. The processed skim and whole milk samples were centrifuged further to remove fat and then acidified to pH 4.6 to isolate the corresponding whey fractions, and centrifuged again. The whey fractions were then purified using dialysis and investigated using the circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared, and Trp intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Results demonstrated that homogenization combined with UHT processing of milk caused not only changes in protein composition but also significant secondary structural loss, particularly in the amounts of apparent antiparallel β-sheet and α-helix, as well as diminished tertiary structural contact. In both cases of homogenization alone and followed by HTST treatments, neither caused appreciable chemical changes, nor remarkable secondary structural reduction. But disruption was evident in the tertiary structural environment of the whey proteins due to homogenization of whole milk as shown by both the near-UV circular dichroism and Trp intrinsic fluorescence. In-depth structural stability analyses revealed that even though processing of milk imposed little impairment on the secondary structural stability, the tertiary structural stability of whey protein was altered significantly. The following order was derived based on these studies: raw whole>HTST, homogenized, homogenized and pasteurized>skimmed and pasteurized, and skimmed UHT

  11. Structural aspects of magnetic fluid stabilization in aqueous agarose solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagornyi, A.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv (Ukraine); Petrenko, V.I., E-mail: vip@nf.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv (Ukraine); Avdeev, M.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Yelenich, O.V.; Solopan, S.O.; Belous, A.G. [V.I.Vernadsky Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Ukrainian NAS, Kyiv (Ukraine); Gruzinov, A.Yu. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ivankov, O.I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute for Safety Problems of Nuclear Power Plants of the Ukrainian NAS, Kyiv (Ukraine); Bulavin, L.A. [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv (Ukraine); Institute for Safety Problems of Nuclear Power Plants of the Ukrainian NAS, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2017-06-01

    Structure characterization of magnetic fluids (MFs) synthesized by three different methods in aqueous solutions of agarose was done by means of small-angle neutron (SANS) and synchrotron X-ray scattering (SAXS). The differences in the complex aggregation observed in the studied magnetic fluids were related to different stabilizing procedures of the three kinds of MFs. The results of the analysis of the scattering (mean size of single polydisperse magnetic particles, fractal dimensions of the aggregates) are consistent with the data of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). - Highlights: • MFs synthesized by three different methods in agarose solution were studied. • all MFs are agglomerated colloidal systems whose structures are nevertheless stable in time. • differences in the complex aggregation were observed in the studied magnetic fluids. • results of the SAXS and SANS analysis are consistent with TEM data.

  12. Structure of anti-FLAG M2 Fab domain and its use in the stabilization of engineered membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roosild, Tarmo P.; Castronovo, Samantha; Choe, Senyon

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray crystallographic analysis of anti-FLAG M2 Fab is reported and the implications of the structure on FLAG epitope binding are described as a first step in the development of a tool for the structural and biophysical study of membrane proteins. The inherent difficulties of stabilizing detergent-solubilized integral membrane proteins for biophysical or structural analysis demand the development of new methodologies to improve success rates. One proven strategy is the use of antibody fragments to increase the ‘soluble’ portion of any membrane protein, but this approach is limited by the difficulties and expense associated with producing monoclonal antibodies to an appropriate exposed epitope on the target protein. Here, the stabilization of a detergent-solubilized K + channel protein, KvPae, by engineering a FLAG-binding epitope into a known loop region of the protein and creating a complex with Fab fragments from commercially available anti-FLAG M2 monoclonal antibodies is reported. Although well diffracting crystals of the complex have not yet been obtained, during the course of crystallization trials the structure of the anti-FLAG M2 Fab domain was solved to 1.86 Å resolution. This structure, which should aid future structure-determination efforts using this approach by facilitating molecular-replacement phasing, reveals that the binding pocket appears to be specific only for the first four amino acids of the traditional FLAG epitope, namely DYKD. Thus, the use of antibody fragments for improving the stability of target proteins can be rapidly applied to the study of membrane-protein structure by placing the short DKYD motif within a predicted peripheral loop of that protein and utilizing commercially available anti-FLAG M2 antibody fragments

  13. Functional activity of plasmid DNA after entry into the atmosphere of earth investigated by a new biomarker stability assay for ballistic spaceflight experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cora S Thiel

    Full Text Available Sounding rockets represent an excellent platform for testing the influence of space conditions during the passage of Earth's atmosphere and re-entry on biological, physical and chemical experiments for astrobiological purposes. We designed a robust functionality biomarker assay to analyze the biological effects of suborbital spaceflights prevailing during ballistic rocket flights. During the TEXUS-49 rocket mission in March 2011, artificial plasmid DNA carrying a fluorescent marker (enhanced green fluorescent protein: EGFP and an antibiotic resistance cassette (kanamycin/neomycin was attached on different positions of rocket exterior; (i circular every 90 degree on the outer surface concentrical of the payload, (ii in the grooves of screw heads located in between the surface application sites, and (iii on the surface of the bottom side of the payload. Temperature measurements showed two major peaks at 118 and 130 °C during the 780 seconds lasting flight on the inside of the recovery module, while outer gas temperatures of more than 1000 °C were estimated on the sample application locations. Directly after retrieval and return transport of the payload, the plasmid DNA samples were recovered. Subsequent analyses showed that DNA could be recovered from all application sites with a maximum of 53% in the grooves of the screw heads. We could further show that up to 35% of DNA retained its full biological function, i.e., mediating antibiotic resistance in bacteria and fluorescent marker expression in eukaryotic cells. These experiments show that our plasmid DNA biomarker assay is suitable to characterize the environmental conditions affecting DNA during an atmospheric transit and the re-entry and constitute the first report of the stability of DNA during hypervelocity atmospheric transit indicating that sounding rocket flights can be used to model the high-speed atmospheric entry of organics-laden artificial meteorites.

  14. Effects of stabilizer ratio on photoluminescence properties of sol-gel ZnO nano-structured thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudjouan, F.; Chelouche, A.; Touam, T.; Djouadi, D.; Khodja, S.; Tazerout, M.; Ouerdane, Y.; Hadjoub, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured ZnO thin films with different molar ratios of MEA to zinc acetate (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0) have been deposited on glass substrates by a sol–gel dip coating technique. X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, UV–visible spectrophotometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy have been employed to investigate the effect of MEA stabilizer ratio on structural, morphological, absorbance and emission properties of the ZnO thin films. Diffraction patterns have shown that all the films are polycrystalline and exhibit a wurtzite hexagonal structure. The c axis orientation has been enhanced with increasing stabilizer ratio. SEM micrographs have revealed that the morphology of the ZnO films depend on stabilizer ratio. The UV–visible absorption spectra have demonstrated that the optical absorption is affected by stabilizer ratio. The photoluminescence spectra have indicated one ultraviolet and two visible emission bands (green and red), while band intensities are found to be dependent on stabilizer ratio. ZnO thin films deposited at MEA ratio of 1.0 show the highest UV emission while the minimum UV emission intensity is observed in thin films deposited at ratio of 0.5 and the maximum green has been recorded for films deposited at MEA ratio of 2.0. - Highlight: • c axis orientation increases with increasing MEA ratio. • The increase of MEA ration from 0.5 to 1.0 enhances greatly the UV emission. • The larger I UV /I visible is obtained for the MEA to Zn ratio of 1:1. • The MEA ratio of 0.5 favors the formation of large density of V zn . • The MEA ratio of 2.0 increases the V o density

  15. Structure, stability, and thermomechanical properties of Ca-substituted Pr2NiO4 + δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikalova, E. Yu.; Medvedev, D. A.; Khasanov, A. F.

    2017-04-01

    Ca-substituted layered nickelates with a general Pr2- x Ca x NiO4 + δ composition ( x = 0-0.7, Δ x = 0.1) were prepared in the present work and their structural and physic-chemical properties were investigated in order to select the most optimal materials, which can be used as cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells. With an increase in Ca content in Pr2- x Ca x NiO4 + δ the following tendencies were observed: (i) a decrease in the concentration of nonstoichiometric oxygen (δ), (ii) a decrease in the unit cell parameters and volume, (iii) stabilization of the tetragonal structure, (iv) a decrease of the thermal expansion coefficients, and (v) enchancement of thermodynamic stability and compatibility with selected oxygen- and proton-conducting electrolytes. The Pr1.9Ca0.1NiO4 + δ material, having highest δ value, departs from the general "properties-composition" dependences ascertained. This indicates that oxygen non-stoichiometry has determining influence on the functional properties of layered nickelates.

  16. Optimization of structures undergoing harmonic or stochastic excitation. Ph.D. Thesis; [atmospheric turbulence and white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The optimal design was investigated of simple structures subjected to dynamic loads, with constraints on the structures' responses. Optimal designs were examined for one dimensional structures excited by harmonically oscillating loads, similar structures excited by white noise, and a wing in the presence of continuous atmospheric turbulence. The first has constraints on the maximum allowable stress while the last two place bounds on the probability of failure of the structure. Approximations were made to replace the time parameter with a frequency parameter. For the first problem, this involved the steady state response, and in the remaining cases, power spectral techniques were employed to find the root mean square values of the responses. Optimal solutions were found by using computer algorithms which combined finite elements methods with optimization techniques based on mathematical programming. It was found that the inertial loads for these dynamic problems result in optimal structures that are radically different from those obtained for structures loaded statically by forces of comparable magnitude.

  17. Stability, structure, and evolution of cool loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cally, P.S.; Robb, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    The criteria for the existence and stability of cool loops are reexamined. It is found that the stability of the loops strongly depends on the form of the heating and radiative loss functions and that if the Ly-alpha peak which appears in most calculations of the radiative loss function is real, cool loops are almost certainly unstable. Removing the hydrogen contribution from the recent loss function Q(T) by Cook et al. (1989) does not produce the much-used result, Q proportional to T-cubed, which is so favorable to cool loop stability. Even using the probably unrealistically favorable loss function Q1 of Cook et al. with the hydrogen contribution removed, the maximum temperature attainable in stable cool loops is a factor of 2-3 too small to account for the excess emission observed in lower transition region lines. Dynamical simulations of cool loop instabilities reveal that the final state of such a model is the hot loop equilibrium. 26 refs

  18. Influence of Surfactant Structure on the Stability of Water-in-Oil Emulsions under High-Temperature High-Salinity Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhalim I. A. Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emulsified water-in-oil (W/O systems are extensively used in the oil industry for water control and acid stimulation. Emulsifiers are commonly utilized to emulsify a water-soluble material to form W/O emulsion. The selection of a particular surfactant for such jobs is critical and certainly expensive. In this work, the impact of surfactant structure on the stability of W/O emulsions is investigated using the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB of the surfactant. Different commercial surfactants were evaluated for use as emulsifiers for W/O systems at high-temperature (up to 120°C high-salinity (221,673 ppm HTHS conditions. Diverse surfactants were examined including ethoxylates, polyethylene glycols, fluorinated surfactants, and amides. Both commercial Diesel and waste oil are used for the oleic phase to prepare the emulsified system. Waste oil has shown higher stability (less separation in comparison with Diesel. This work has successfully identified stable emulsified W/O systems that can tolerate HTHS environments using HLB approach. Amine Acetate family shows higher stability in comparison with Glycol Ether family and at even lower concentration. New insights into structure-surfactant stability relationship, beyond the HLB approach, are provided for surfactant selection.

  19. Oxidative stability of mayonnaise containing structured lipids produced from sunflower oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2003-01-01

    Mayonnaise based on enzymatically produced specific structured lipid (SL) from sunflower oil and caprylic acid was compared with mayonnaise based on traditional sunflower oil (SO) or chemically randomized lipid (RL) with respect to their oxidative stability, sensory and rheological properties......, but was most likely influenced by the structure of the lipid, the lower tocopherol content and the higher initial levels of lipid hydroperoxides and secondary volatile oxidation compounds in the SL itself compared with the RL and traditional sunflower oil employed. EDTA was a strong antioxidant, while propyl...

  20. Improving stability and strength characteristics of framed structures with nonlinear behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshk, Shahram

    1990-01-01

    In this paper an optimal design procedure is introduced to improve the overall performance of nonlinear framed structures. The design methodology presented here is a multiple-objective optimization procedure whose objective functions involve the buckling eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the structure. A constant volume with bounds on the design variables is used in conjunction with an optimality criterion approach. The method provides a general tool for solving complex design problems and generally leads to structures with better limit strength and stability. Many algorithms have been developed to improve the limit strength of structures. In most applications geometrically linear analysis is employed with the consequence that overall strength of the design is overestimated. Directly optimizing the limit load of the structure would require a full nonlinear analysis at each iteration which would be prohibitively expensive. The objective of this paper is to develop an algorithm that can improve the limit-load of geometrically nonlinear framed structures while avoiding the nonlinear analysis. One of the novelties of the new design methodology is its ability to efficiently model and design structures under multiple loading conditions. These loading conditions can be different factored loads or any kind of loads that can be applied to the structure simultaneously or independently. Attention is focused on optimal design of space framed structures. Three-dimensional design problems are more complicated to carry out, but they yield insight into real behavior of the structure and can help avoiding some of the problems that might appear in planar design procedure such as the need for out-of-plane buckling constraint. Although researchers in the field of structural engineering generally agree that optimum design of three-dimension building frames especially in the seismic regions would be beneficial, methods have been slow to emerge. Most of the research in this area has dealt

  1. Stability of Ruddlesden–Popper-structured oxides in humid conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtimäki, M.; Yamauchi, H.; Karppinen, M., E-mail: maarit.karppinen@aalto.fi

    2013-08-15

    Some of layered transition-metal oxides are known to react with atmospheric humidity to form through topotactic intercalation reactions new water-containing layered structures. Here we investigate the influence of oxygen content (7−δ) of the Ruddlesden–Popper-structured Sr{sub 3}FeMO{sub 7−δ} (M=Ni, Mn, Ti) oxides on the water-intercalation reaction. It is found that their oxygen contents influence greatly the reactivity of the phases with water. Other factors possibly affecting the reactivity are discussed on the basis of the present data in combination with a comprehensive review of previous works on Ruddlesden–Popper and related layered oxide phases. - Graphical abstract: Many of the Ruddlesden–Popper-structured A{sub 3}B{sub 2}O{sub 7−δ} oxides readily react with water via intercalation reactions. Three possible factors affecting the water intercalation are identified: oxygen content of the phase, ionic radius of cation A and valence state of cation B. The resultant layered water-derivative phases can be categorised into two groups, depending on the crystal symmetry of the phase. Highlights: • Ruddlesden–Popper oxides A{sub 3}B{sub 2}O{sub 7−δ} often accommodate water via intercalation reaction. • The lower the oxygen content 7−δ is the more readily the intercalation reaction occurs. • The second factor promoting the reaction is the large size of cation A. • The third possible factor is the high valence state of cation B. • Resultant water-derivatives can be categorised into two groups depending on symmetry.

  2. Stability of Ruddlesden–Popper-structured oxides in humid conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtimäki, M.; Yamauchi, H.; Karppinen, M.

    2013-01-01

    Some of layered transition-metal oxides are known to react with atmospheric humidity to form through topotactic intercalation reactions new water-containing layered structures. Here we investigate the influence of oxygen content (7−δ) of the Ruddlesden–Popper-structured Sr 3 FeMO 7−δ (M=Ni, Mn, Ti) oxides on the water-intercalation reaction. It is found that their oxygen contents influence greatly the reactivity of the phases with water. Other factors possibly affecting the reactivity are discussed on the basis of the present data in combination with a comprehensive review of previous works on Ruddlesden–Popper and related layered oxide phases. - Graphical abstract: Many of the Ruddlesden–Popper-structured A 3 B 2 O 7−δ oxides readily react with water via intercalation reactions. Three possible factors affecting the water intercalation are identified: oxygen content of the phase, ionic radius of cation A and valence state of cation B. The resultant layered water-derivative phases can be categorised into two groups, depending on the crystal symmetry of the phase. Highlights: • Ruddlesden–Popper oxides A 3 B 2 O 7−δ often accommodate water via intercalation reaction. • The lower the oxygen content 7−δ is the more readily the intercalation reaction occurs. • The second factor promoting the reaction is the large size of cation A. • The third possible factor is the high valence state of cation B. • Resultant water-derivatives can be categorised into two groups depending on symmetry

  3. Structure stability of HKUST-1 towards water and ethanol and their effect on its CO2 capture properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, J Raziel; Sánchez-González, Elí; Pérez, Eric; Schneider-Revueltas, Emilia; Martínez, Ana; Tejeda-Cruz, Adriana; Islas-Jácome, Alejandro; González-Zamora, Eduardo; Ibarra, Ilich A

    2017-07-18

    Water and ethanol stabilities of the crystal structure of the Cu-based metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 have been investigated. Vapour (water and ethanol) sorption isotherms and cyclability were measured by a dynamic strategy. The ethanol sorption capacity of HKUST-1 at 303 K remained unchanged contrasting water sorption (which decreased along with the sorption experiment time). Considering the binding energy of each sorbate with the open Cu(ii) sites, obtained by the use of diffusion coefficients, we showed the superior crystal stability of the HKUST-1 framework towards ethanol. Finally, a small quantity of ethanol (pre-adsorbed) slightly enhanced CO 2 capture without crystal structure degradation.

  4. Evidence for the long-term stability of uranium mill tailings: survivability of ancient man-made earthern structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, C.G.; Mishima, J.

    1982-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), as part of a study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is investigating long-term stabilization techniques for uranium mill tailings piles. Part of this invetigation involves the design of a rock armoring blanket to mitigate wind and water erosion of the underlying soil cover, which, in turn, prevents exposure of the tailings to the environment. However, the need for the armoring blanket, as well as this blanket's effectiveness, depends on the stability of the underlying soil cap (radon suppression cover) and on the tailings themselves. Compelling evidence in archaeological records suggests that large man-made earthen structures can remain sound and intact for time periods comparable to those required for the tailings piles. In this paper we present archaeological evidence of the existence and survivability of man-made earthen and rock structures through specific examples of such structures around the world. We also review factors contributing to the survival or destruction of these structures. Archaeological evidence suggests that whereas natural erosional forces have affected these structures, man's activities (e.g., agriculture, looting) have been the most damaging. The influence of climate, building materials, and construction techniques on survivability is addressed in this paper

  5. Possibilities for stabilization of fly ash from REK 'Bitola' dump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrushevska, Ljubica; Ivanovska, Pavlina; Ilievski, Zlatko; Peeva, Liljana

    2002-01-01

    The Coal Power Plants environmental problems, mainly, arise from deposited fly ash-solid particles which, under the influence of the wind, heavily pollute the atmospheric air. Prevention of the environmental problems, coming from spraying from the energetic dumps, is achieved with technical and biological stabilization of dumped fly ash. The choice of the stabilization means and methods depends on the physical-chemical properties of the ash. Therefore, the stabilization possibilities of REK 'Bitola' fly ash were investigated. (Original)

  6. Dromion-like structures and stability analysis in the variable coefficients complex Ginzburg–Landau equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Pring; Pang, Li-Hui; Huang, Long-Gang; Li, Yan-Qing; Lei, Ming; Liu, Wen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The study of the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation, which can describe the fiber laser system, is of significance for ultra-fast laser. In this paper, dromion-like structures for the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation are considered due to their abundant nonlinear dynamics. Via the modified Hirota method and simplified assumption, the analytic dromion-like solution is obtained. The partial asymmetry of structure is particularly discussed, which arises from asymmetry of nonlinear and dispersion terms. Furthermore, the stability of dromion-like structures is analyzed. Oscillation structure emerges to exhibit strong interference when the dispersion loss is perturbed. Through the appropriate modulation of modified exponent parameter, the oscillation structure is transformed into two dromion-like structures. It indicates that the dromion-like structure is unstable, and the coherence intensity is affected by the modified exponent parameter. Results in this paper may be useful in accounting for some nonlinear phenomena in fiber laser systems, and understanding the essential role of modified Hirota method

  7. The Hydromechanics of Vegetation for Slope Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyono, A.; Subardja, A.; Ekasari, I.; Lailati, M.; Sudirja, R.; Ningrum, W.

    2018-02-01

    Vegetation is one of the alternative technologies in the prevention of shallow landslide prevention that occurs mostly during the rainy season. The application of plant for slope stabilization is known as bioengineering. Knowledge of the vegetative contribution that can be considered in bioengineering was the hydrological and mechanical aspects (hydromechanical). Hydrological effect of the plant on slope stability is to reduce soil water content through transpiration, interception, and evapotranspiration. The mechanical impact of vegetation on slope stability is to stabilize the slope with mechanical reinforcement of soils through roots. Vegetation water consumption varies depending on the age and density, rainfall factors and soil types. Vegetation with high ability to absorb water from the soil and release into the atmosphere through a transpiration process will reduce the pore water stress and increase slope stability, and vegetation with deep root anchoring and strong root binding was potentially more significant to maintain the stability of the slope.

  8. The Use of Polymerized Genipin for the Stabilization of the Collagen Structure of Animal Hides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal hides are the major byproduct of meat industry and the collagen fibers is the main constituent. Crosslinkers play a key role in stabilizing the collagen structure for useful applications. Genipin is widely used as an ideal biological protein crosslinking agent due to its low toxicity compare...

  9. Chemical structure and radiation stability of solid crystalline antibiotics: thiamphenicol and chloramphenicol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshney, Lalit; Soe Nwe

    1997-01-01

    Antibiotics in solid state show significant radiation resistance and some of them are exposed to gamma or electron beam irradiation for sterilization. Even small radiation degradation in solid state antibiotics is not desirable. Two antibiotics namely thiamphenicol (TPL) and chloramphenicol (CPL) having similar chemical and solid state structure were irradiated at different graded radiation doses to study their stability. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to evaluate purity, entropy of radiation processing, heat of fusion and melting point. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab

  10. Analysis of stability parameters in relation to precipitation associated

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atmospheric instability; stability indices; Richardson number; vertical wind ... is used to compute some important dynamic/thermodynamic parameters and are ... (i*) well indicate the occurrence of thunderstorms about 2 hours in advance.

  11. Beam Stability in the Drive-Beam Decelerator of CLIC Using Structures of High-Order Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Millich, Antonio; Schulte, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The RF power necessary to accelerate the main beam of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is produced by decelerating a high-current drive beam in Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS). The reference structure is not cylindrically symmetric but has longitudinal waveguides carved into the inner surface. This gives rise to a transverse component of the main longitudinal mode which can not be damped, in contrast to the transverse dipole wake- field. The field is non-linear and couples the motion of the particles in the two planes. Limits of the stability of the decelerated beam are investigated for different structures.

  12. Strategies to curb structural changes of lithium/transition metal oxide cathode materials & the changes’ effects on thermal & cycling stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiqian, Yu; Enyuan, Hu; Seongmin, Bak; Yong-Ning, Zhou; Xiao-Qing, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Structural transformation behaviors of several typical oxide cathode materials during a heating process are reviewed in detail to provide in-depth understanding of the key factors governing the thermal stability of these materials. We also discuss applying the information about heat induced structural evolution in the study of electrochemically induced structural changes. All these discussions are expected to provide valuable insights for designing oxide cathode materials with significantly improved structural stability for safe, long-life lithium ion batteries, as the safety of lithium-ion batteries is a critical issue; it is widely accepted that the thermal instability of the cathodes is one of the most critical factors in thermal runaway and related safety problems. Project supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies (Grant No. DE-SC0012704).

  13. Innovative Ingredients and Emerging Technologies for Controlling Ice Recrystallization, Texture, and Structure Stability in Frozen Dairy Desserts: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukoulis, Christos; Fisk, Ian

    2016-11-17

    Over the past decade, ice cream manufacturers have developed a strong understanding of the functionality of key ingredients and processing, developing effective explanations for the link between structure forming agents, stability mechanisms, and perceived quality. Increasing demand for products perceived as healthier/more natural with minimal processing has identified a number of new tools to improve quality and storage stability of frozen dairy desserts. Ingredients such as dietary fiber, polysaccharides, prebiotics, alternate sweeteners, fat sources rich in unsaturated fatty acids and ice strucsturing proteins (ISP) have been successfully applied as cryoprotective, texturizing, and structuring agents. Emerging minimal processing technologies including hydrostatic pressure processing, ultrasonic or high pressure assisted freezing, low temperature extrusion and enzymatically induced biopolymers crosslinking have been evaluated for their ability to improve colloidal stability, texture and sensory quality. It is therefore timely for a comprehensive review.

  14. Stability and electronic structure of carbon capsules with superior gas storage properties: A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manna, Arun K.; Pati, Swapan K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Stability and electronic structure of various carbon capsules are studied. • Effects of capsule’s sizes on electronic and optical properties are explored. • Changes in cohesive and formation energy and electronic gap are discussed. • Capsule’s gas storage propensity is addressed using DFT and ab initio MD. • Capsule’s optical absorptions are discussed with and without stored gas molecules. - Abstract: Structures, electronic and optical properties of carbon nanocapsules of varying sizes (length and diameter) are studied using first-principles density functional theory. Based on calculated cohesive energy, formation energy, electronic gap and extent of orbital delocalization, we examine structural stability and changes in low-energy physics of these carbon capsules. We find that both cohesive and formation energy decrease with increase in capsule’s sizes, indicating their greater structural rigidity and favorable formation feasibility. The electronic gap also decreases with increase in capsule’s sizes due to the larger electronic delocalization. The simulated optical absorption spectra show lowering of low-energy peak positions with increase in the capsule’s dimensions, consistent with the reduction in electronic gap. Additionally, we also provide an estimate of gas storage capacity for the larger carbon capsule (C 460 ) considered. We find 7.69 wt.% and 28.08 wt.% storage propensity for hydrogen and carbon dioxide gases, respectively, which clearly suggests their potential use as light storage materials

  15. Structure-based stabilization of HIV-1 gp120 enhances humoral immune responses to the induced co-receptor binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barna Dey

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, possesses conserved binding sites for interaction with the primary virus receptor, CD4, and also for the co-receptor, generally CCR5. Although gp120 is a major target for virus-specific neutralizing antibodies, the gp120 variable elements and its malleable nature contribute to evasion of effective host-neutralizing antibodies. To understand the conformational character and immunogenicity of the gp120 receptor binding sites as potential vaccine targets, we introduced structure-based modifications to stabilize gp120 core proteins (deleted of the gp120 major variable regions into the conformation recognized by both receptors. Thermodynamic analysis of the re-engineered core with selected ligands revealed significant stabilization of the receptor-binding regions. Stabilization of the co-receptor-binding region was associated with a marked increase in on-rate of ligand binding to this site as determined by surface plasmon resonance. Rabbit immunization studies showed that the conformational stabilization of core proteins, along with increased ligand affinity, was associated with strikingly enhanced humoral immune responses against the co-receptor-binding site. These results demonstrate that structure-based approaches can be exploited to stabilize a conformational site in a large functional protein to enhance immunogenic responses specific for that region.

  16. Structure and stability of semiconductor tip apexes for atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pou, P; Perez, R; Ghasemi, S A; Goedecker, S; Jelinek, P; Lenosky, T

    2009-01-01

    The short range force between the tip and the surface atoms, that is responsible for atomic-scale contrast in atomic force microscopy (AFM), is mainly controlled by the tip apex. Thus, the ability to image, manipulate and chemically identify single atoms in semiconductor surfaces is ultimately determined by the apex structure and its composition. Here we present a detailed and systematic study of the most common structures that can be expected at the apex of the Si tips used in experiments. We tackle the determination of the structure and stability of Si tips with three different approaches: (i) first principles simulations of small tip apexes; (ii) simulated annealing of a Si cluster; and (iii) a minima hopping study of large Si tips. We have probed the tip apexes by making atomic contacts between the tips and then compared force-distance curves with the experimental short range forces obtained with dynamic force spectroscopy. The main conclusion is that although there are multiple stable solutions for the atomically sharp tip apexes, they can be grouped into a few types with characteristic atomic structures and properties. We also show that the structure of the last atomic layers in a tip apex can be both crystalline and amorphous. We corroborate that the atomically sharp tips are thermodynamically stable and that the tip-surface interaction helps to produce the atomic protrusion needed to get atomic resolution.

  17. Analysis of stability parameters in relation to precipitation associated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    erty and crops; human and animal fatalities, and also aviation hazards. ... Keywords. Atmospheric instability; stability indices; Richardson number; vertical wind shear; energy-helicity index; ... ing the genesis and development of severe weather.

  18. Thermal stability of detonation-produced micro and nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, V. P.; Zakatilova, E. I.; Maklashova, I. V.; Shevchenko, N. V.

    2018-01-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds are produced at utilization of high explosives. When an explosive blasts in a water environment, the detonation products contain microdiamonds, and in a gaseous medium, nanodiamonds. It is known that with decreasing size the influence of the surface energy of particles on their properties increases. Thus, it is interesting to compare the properties of detonation nano and microdiamonds. In this study, we have examined the thermal stability of diamond materials by synchronous thermal analysis. The experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure in argon flow for different heating rates in a range from room temperature to 1500 °C. Samples of initial and annealed micro and nanomaterials were studied using electron microscopy, x-ray and x-ray-fluorescence analysis. It was established that thermal and structural properties of micro and nanodiamonds differ substantially.

  19. Micro-ring structures stabilize microdroplets to enable long term spheroid culture in 384 hanging drop array plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Tung, Yi-Chung; Kuo, Chuan-Hsien; Mosadegh, Bobak; Bedenis, Rachel; Pienta, Kenneth J; Takayama, Shuichi

    2012-04-01

    Using stereolithography, 20 different structural variations comprised of millimeter diameter holes surrounded by trenches, plateaus, or micro-ring structures were prepared and tested for their ability to stably hold arrays of microliter sized droplets within the structures over an extended period of time. The micro-ring structures were the most effective in stabilizing droplets against mechanical and chemical perturbations. After confirming the importance of micro-ring structures using rapid prototyping, we developed an injection molding tool for mass production of polystyrene 3D cell culture plates with an array of 384 such micro-ring surrounded through-hole structures. These newly designed and injection molded polystyrene 384 hanging drop array plates with micro-rings were stable and robust against mechanical perturbations as well as surface fouling-facilitated droplet spreading making them capable of long term cell spheroid culture of up to 22 days within the droplet array. This is a significant improvement over previously reported 384 hanging drop array plates which are susceptible to small mechanical shocks and could not reliably maintain hanging drops for longer than a few days. With enhanced droplet stability, the hanging drop array plates with micro-ring structures provide better platforms and open up new opportunities for high-throughput preparation of microscale 3D cell constructs for drug screening and cell analysis.

  20. A Method to Predict the Structure and Stability of RNA/RNA Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojun; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2016-01-01

    RNA/RNA interactions are essential for genomic RNA dimerization and regulation of gene expression. Intermolecular loop-loop base pairing is a widespread and functionally important tertiary structure motif in RNA machinery. However, computational prediction of intermolecular loop-loop base pairing is challenged by the entropy and free energy calculation due to the conformational constraint and the intermolecular interactions. In this chapter, we describe a recently developed statistical mechanics-based method for the prediction of RNA/RNA complex structures and stabilities. The method is based on the virtual bond RNA folding model (Vfold). The main emphasis in the method is placed on the evaluation of the entropy and free energy for the loops, especially tertiary kissing loops. The method also uses recursive partition function calculations and two-step screening algorithm for large, complicated structures of RNA/RNA complexes. As case studies, we use the HIV-1 Mal dimer and the siRNA/HIV-1 mutant (T4) to illustrate the method.

  1. Probing the 3-D Structure, Dynamics, and Stability of Bacterial Collagenase Collagen Binding Domain (apo- versus holo-) by Limited Proteolysis MALDI-TOF MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sides, Cynthia R.; Liyanage, Rohana; Lay, Jackson O.; Philominathan, Sagaya Theresa Leena; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Pairing limited proteolysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to probe clostridial collagenase collagen binding domain (CBD) reveals the solution dynamics and stability of the protein, as these factors are crucial to CBD effectiveness as a drug-delivery vehicle. MS analysis of proteolytic digests indicates initial cleavage sites, thereby specifying the less stable and highly accessible regions of CBD. Modulation of protein structure and stability upon metal binding is shown through MS analysis of calcium-bound and cobalt-bound CBD proteolytic digests. Previously determined X-ray crystal structures illustrate that calcium binding induces secondary structure transformation in the highly mobile N-terminal arm and increases protein stability. MS-based detection of exposed residues confirms protein flexibility, accentuates N-terminal dynamics, and demonstrates increased global protein stability exported by calcium binding. Additionally, apo- and calcium-bound CBD proteolysis sites correlate well with crystallographic B-factors, accessibility, and enzyme specificity. MS-observed cleavage sites with no clear correlations are explained either by crystal contacts of the X-ray crystal structures or by observed differences between Molecules A and B in the X-ray crystal structures. The study newly reveals the absence of the βA strand and thus the very dynamic N-terminal linker, as corroborated by the solution X-ray scattering results. Cobalt binding has a regional effect on the solution phase stability of CBD, as limited proteolysis data implies the capture of an intermediate-CBD solution structure when cobalt is bound.

  2. On the determination of stability conditions over forested areas from velocity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, D.; Segalini, A.; Dellwik, Ebba

    2014-01-01

    Two proxies able to determine the sign of the atmospheric stability in the absence of temperature measurements were investigated using data from four forested sites in Sweden. The results indicate that the simple proxy based on the time of the day when the measurement was taken was sufficient....... The investigated data sets show large variation of shear and turbulence intensity with increasing stability, indicating the need for proxies that also can be used to characterize the degree of atmospheric stability....... approximately 90% of the overall stable data. When selecting data with mean wind speeds over 5 m/s at 80 m height, the presented data sets include mostly data where temperature effects are small (near-neutral), followed by stable data. Only few occurrences of unstable conditions were anyway observed...

  3. Influence of flocculating agents and structural vehicles on the physical stability and rheological behavior of nitrofurantoin suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimipour, Eskandar; Salimi, Anayatollah; Rezaee, Saeed; Balack, Maryam; Handali, Somayeh

    2014-05-01

    Nitrofurantoin is a nitrofuran antibiotic that has been used for treatment of urinary tract against positive and negative bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of structural vehicles and flocculating agents on physical stability and rheological behavior of nitrofurantoin suspension. To formulate the suspensions, the effect of glycerin and polysorbate 80 as wetting agents was evaluated and their particle sizes were determined using the sieve method. Then to achieve controlled flocculation, sodium citrate and aluminum chloride were added. After choosing the suitable wetting and flocculating agents, structural vehicles such as sodium carboxyl methyl cellulose and Veegum were evaluated individually and in combination. In addition, the effect of sorbitol on density of continuous phase and some physical stability parameters such as sedimentation volume, degree of flocculation and ease of redispersion of the suspensions were evaluated. After incorporation of structural vehicles, the rheological properties of formulations were also determined to find their flow behavior. According to the results, glycerin (0.2%) and sodium citrate (0.3%) had the best effect on the suspension stability as wetting and flocculating agents, respectively. Rheological properties of formulations showed pseudoplastic behavior with some degree of thixotropy. In conclusion, the suspension containing Veegum 1%, sodium carboxy methyl cellulose 1%, glycerine 0.2%, sodium citrate 0.3% and sorbitol 20 % was chosen as the most physically stable formulation.

  4. Interactions of methylamine and ammonia with atmospheric nucleation precursor H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and common organic acids: Thermodynamics and atmospheric implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.; Jiang, L.; Bai, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Nadykto, A. B., E-mail: anadykto@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Applied Mathematics, Moscow State University of Technology “STANKIN”, Vadkovsky per. 1, Moscow 127055 (Russian Federation); Atmospheric Science Research Center, State University of New York at Albany, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

    2016-06-08

    Interactions of the two common atmospheric bases, ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and methylamine MA (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}), which are considered to be important stabilizers of binary clusters in the Earth’s atmosphere, with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the key atmospheric precursor, and 14 common atmospheric organic acids (COA) (formic (CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}), acetic (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}), oxalic (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}O{sub 4}), malonic (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}), succinic (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 4}), glutaric acid (C{sub 5}H{sub 8}O{sub 4}), adipic (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}O{sub 4}), benzoic (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}COOH), phenylacetic (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}COOH), pyruvic (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O{sub 3}), maleic acid (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}), malic (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 5}), tartaric (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}) and pinonic acid (C{sub 10}H{sub 16}O{sub 3})) have been studied using the composite high-accuracy G3MP2 method. The thermodynamic stability of mixed (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), (COA)(B1) and (COA)(B2) dimers and (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (B1) and (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (B1) trimers, where B1 and B2 represent methylamine (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), respectively, have been investigated and their impacts on the thermodynamic stability of clusters containing H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} have been analyzed. It has been shown that in many cases the interactions of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} with COA, ammonia and methylamine lead to the formation of heteromolecular dimers and trimers, which are certainly more stable than (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 2} and (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 3}. It has also been found that free energies of (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})+ CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}⇔(COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})(CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) reactions exceed 10-15 kcal mol{sup −1}. This is a clear indication that mixed trimers composed of COA, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and methylamine are very stable and can thus serve as possible nucleation sites. The present study leads us to conclude that the interactions of COA coexisting with H

  5. Modeling and simulation of adaptive Neuro-fuzzy based intelligent system for predictive stabilization in structured overlay networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanpreet Kaur

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent prediction of neighboring node (k well defined neighbors as specified by the dht protocol dynamism is helpful to improve the resilience and can reduce the overhead associated with topology maintenance of structured overlay networks. The dynamic behavior of overlay nodes depends on many factors such as underlying user’s online behavior, geographical position, time of the day, day of the week etc. as reported in many applications. We can exploit these characteristics for efficient maintenance of structured overlay networks by implementing an intelligent predictive framework for setting stabilization parameters appropriately. Considering the fact that human driven behavior usually goes beyond intermittent availability patterns, we use a hybrid Neuro-fuzzy based predictor to enhance the accuracy of the predictions. In this paper, we discuss our predictive stabilization approach, implement Neuro-fuzzy based prediction in MATLAB simulation and apply this predictive stabilization model in a chord based overlay network using OverSim as a simulation tool. The MATLAB simulation results present that the behavior of neighboring nodes is predictable to a large extent as indicated by the very small RMSE. The OverSim based simulation results also observe significant improvements in the performance of chord based overlay network in terms of lookup success ratio, lookup hop count and maintenance overhead as compared to periodic stabilization approach.

  6. Thermal stability of inorganic and organic compounds in atmospheric particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrino, Cinzia; Marconi, Elisabetta; Tofful, Luca; Farao, Carmela; Materazzi, Stefano; Canepari, Silvia

    2012-07-01

    The thermal behaviour of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) has been investigated by using different analytical approaches to explore the added value offered by these technique in environmental studies. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), carried out on both certified material and real PM samples, has shown that several mass losses can be detected starting from 80 °C up to above 500 °C, when pyrolysis occur. Thermo-optical analysis of PM and ion chromatographic analysis of the residual have shown that the mass losses in the temperature range 80-180 °C are not justified by the release of either organic or inorganic compounds; it can be thus attributed to the release of weakly and strongly bound water. Release of water has also been evidenced in the temperature range 225-275 °C. The release of ammonium chloride and nitrate has been detected only above 80 °C. This indicates that the release of nitric acid, hydrochloric acid and ammonia, which is observed downstream of the filters during the sampling of atmospheric PM at ambient temperature, cannot be reproduced off-line, after the end of the sampling. We successfully explored one of the possible explanations, that is the desorption of HNO3, HCl and NH3 adsorbed on collected particles. NH4NO3 and NH4Cl, which can be thermally released by the filter, exhibit a different thermal behaviour from NaNO3 and NaCl, which are thermally stable up to 370 °C. This different behaviour can be used to discriminate between natural and secondary sources of atmospheric inorganic salts, as the interconversion that is observed when heating mixtures of pure salts resulted to be not relevant when heating real PM samples.

  7. Strategies to curb structural changes of lithium/transition metal oxide cathode materials and the changes’ effects on thermal and cycling stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xiqian; Hu Enyuan; Bak, Seongmin; Zhou Yong-Ning; Yang Xiao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Structural transformation behaviors of several typical oxide cathode materials during a heating process are reviewed in detail to provide in-depth understanding of the key factors governing the thermal stability of these materials. We also discuss applying the information about heat induced structural evolution in the study of electrochemically induced structural changes. All these discussions are expected to provide valuable insights for designing oxide cathode materials with significantly improved structural stability for safe, long-life lithium ion batteries, as the safety of lithium-ion batteries is a critical issue; it is widely accepted that the thermal instability of the cathodes is one of the most critical factors in thermal runaway and related safety problems. (topical review)

  8. The study of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide near nuclear power plant using CFD approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagrale, Dhanesh B.; Bera, Subrata; Deo, Anuj K.; Gaikwad, Avinash J.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the studies on atmospheric dispersion of radioactive material released from nuclear power plants are based on Gaussian plume models which fail to take account turbulence generated. The Fire Dynamic Simulator (FDS) code is one such flow model that uses a form of Navier-Stokes equation for low mach number applications. In the 0-2 km range near nuclear power plant, mainly near the source of emission of radionuclides, obstructions like natural draft cooling towers, plant building and structures are located. The stability class 'F' conditions and temperature of surrounding atmosphere, 15°C are considered in analysis. Main constituents of radionuclides released from stack mainly xenon, krypton. Two cases are carried out a) dispersion of gases without obstruction of cooling tower and b) dispersion of gases with obstruction of cooling tower. It is observed that mass fraction of radionuclides near the cooling tower ground increased to certain extent due to obstruction and wake effect. (author)

  9. Constraint Network Analysis (CNA): a Python software package for efficiently linking biomacromolecular structure, flexibility, (thermo-)stability, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Christopher; Rathi, Prakash Chandra; Klein, Doris L; Radestock, Sebastian; Gohlke, Holger

    2013-04-22

    For deriving maximal advantage from information on biomacromolecular flexibility and rigidity, results from rigidity analyses must be linked to biologically relevant characteristics of a structure. Here, we describe the Python-based software package Constraint Network Analysis (CNA) developed for this task. CNA functions as a front- and backend to the graph-based rigidity analysis software FIRST. CNA goes beyond the mere identification of flexible and rigid regions in a biomacromolecule in that it (I) provides a refined modeling of thermal unfolding simulations that also considers the temperature-dependence of hydrophobic tethers, (II) allows performing rigidity analyses on ensembles of network topologies, either generated from structural ensembles or by using the concept of fuzzy noncovalent constraints, and (III) computes a set of global and local indices for quantifying biomacromolecular stability. This leads to more robust results from rigidity analyses and extends the application domain of rigidity analyses in that phase transition points ("melting points") and unfolding nuclei ("structural weak spots") are determined automatically. Furthermore, CNA robustly handles small-molecule ligands in general. Such advancements are important for applying rigidity analysis to data-driven protein engineering and for estimating the influence of ligand molecules on biomacromolecular stability. CNA maintains the efficiency of FIRST such that the analysis of a single protein structure takes a few seconds for systems of several hundred residues on a single core. These features make CNA an interesting tool for linking biomacromolecular structure, flexibility, (thermo-)stability, and function. CNA is available from http://cpclab.uni-duesseldorf.de/software for nonprofit organizations.

  10. Vesper - Venus Chemistry and Dynamics Orbiter - A NASA Discovery Mission Proposal: Submillimeter Investigation of Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Vesper conducts a focused investigation of the chemistry and dynamics of the middle atmosphere of our sister planet- from the base of the global cloud cover to the lower thermosphere. The middle atmosphere controls the stability of the Venus climate system. Vesper determines what processes maintain the atmospheric chemical stability, cause observed variability of chemical composition, control the escape of water, and drive the extreme super-rotation. The Vesper science investigation provides a unique perspective on the Earth environment due to the similarities in the middle atmosphere processes of both Venus and the Earth. Understanding key distinctions and similarities between Venus and Earth will increase our knowledge of how terrestrial planets evolve along different paths from nearly identical initial conditions.

  11. Theoretical Investigation of the Structural Stabilities of Ceria Surfaces and Supported Metal Nanocluster in Vapor and Aqueous Phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhibo [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China; Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Liu, Ning [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China; Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Chen, Biaohua [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China; Li, Jianwei [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China; Mei, Donghai [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States

    2018-01-25

    Understanding the structural stability and dynamics at the interface between the solid metal oxide and aqueous phase is significant in a variety of industrial applications including heterogeneous catalysis and environmental remediation. In the present work, the stabilities of three low-index ceria (CeO2) surfaces, i.e., (111), (110) and (100) in vapor and aqueous phases were studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Gibbs surface free energies as a function of temperature, water partial pressure, and water coverages were calculated using DFT based atomistic thermodynamic approach. On the basis of surface free energies, the morphology and exposed surface structures of the CeO2 nanoparticle were predicted using Wulff construction principle. It is found that the partially hydroxylated (111) and (100) are two major surface structures of CeO2 nanoparticles in vapor phase at ambient temperature (300 K). As the temperature increases, the fully dehydrated (111) surface gradually becomes the most dominant surface structure. While in aqueous phase, the exposed surface of the CeO2 nanoparticle is dominated by the hydroxylated (110) structure at 393 K. Finally, the morphology and stability of a cuboctahedron Pt13 nanocluster supported on CeO2 surfaces in both gas and aqueous phases were investigated. In gas phase, the supported Pt13 nanocluster has the tendency to wetting the CeO2 surface due to the strong metal-support interaction. The calculated interaction energies suggest the CeO2(110) surface provides the best stability for the Pt13 nanocluster. The CeO2 supported Pt13 nanoclusters are oxidized. Compared to the gas phase, the morphology of the CeO2 supported Pt13 nanocluster is less distorted due to the solvation effect provided by surrounding water molecules in aqueous phase. More electrons are transferred from the Pt13 nanocluster to the CeO2 support, implying the supported Pt13 nanocluster is further

  12. Synchronisation and stability in river metapopulation networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeakel, J D; Moore, J W; Guimarães, P R; de Aguiar, M A M

    2014-03-01

    Spatial structure in landscapes impacts population stability. Two linked components of stability have large consequences for persistence: first, statistical stability as the lack of temporal fluctuations; second, synchronisation as an aspect of dynamic stability, which erodes metapopulation rescue effects. Here, we determine the influence of river network structure on the stability of riverine metapopulations. We introduce an approach that converts river networks to metapopulation networks, and analytically show how fluctuation magnitude is influenced by interaction structure. We show that river metapopulation complexity (in terms of branching prevalence) has nonlinear dampening effects on population fluctuations, and can also buffer against synchronisation. We conclude by showing that river transects generally increase synchronisation, while the spatial scale of interaction has nonlinear effects on synchronised dynamics. Our results indicate that this dual stability - conferred by fluctuation and synchronisation dampening - emerges from interaction structure in rivers, and this may strongly influence the persistence of river metapopulations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  13. Thermal stability of radiation vulcanized EPDM rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aziz, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) have been used to study the thermal stability of gamma- ray vulcanized ethylene-propylene diene rubber (EPDM) stabilized with various types of antioxidants. The antioxidants used were penta erythrityl tetrakis(3,5- di-tert-butyl(-4-hydroxyphenyl)propionate (Irganox 1010), Irganox 1035, Irganox 1520 D, as primary antioxidants; Irganox B 561 and Irganox B 900, as synergistic blends; hindered amine light stabilizer (HALS), i.e. Tinuvin 622 LD; N-isopropyl-N-phenyl-p-phenylene diamine (IPPD) and Trimethyl quinoline (TMQ) and their mixtures. The measurements were carried out under atmospheric conditions. The effect of antioxidant type, selected concentration and mechanism of reaction were determined

  14. Thermal structure of the Martian atmosphere retrieved from the IR spectrometry in the 15 μm CO2 band: input to MIRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasova, L. V.; Formisano, V.; Grassi, D.; Igantiev, N. I.; Moroz, V. I.

    This paper describes one of the sources of the data concerning the thermal structure of the Martian atmosphere, based on the thermal IR spectrometry method. It allows to investigate the Martian atmosphere below 55 km by retrieving the temperature profiles from the 15 μm CO2 band. This approach enables to reach the vertical resolution of several kilometers and the temperature accuracy of several Kelvins. An aerosol abundance, which influences the temperature profile, is obtained from the continuum of the same spectrum parallel with the temperature profile and is taken into account in the temperature retrieval procedure in a self consistent way. Although this method has the limited vertical resolution, it possesses a significant advantage: the thermal IR spectrometry allows to monitor the temperature profiles with a good coverage both in space and local time. The Planetary Fourier spectrometer on board of Mars Express has the spectral range from 250 to 8000 cm-1 and a high spectral resolution of about 2 cm-1. Vertical temperature profiles retrieval is one of the main scientific goals of the experiment. The important data are expected to be obtained on the vertical thermal structure of the atmosphere, and its dependence on latitude, longitude, season, local time, clouds and dust loadings. These results should give a significant input in the future MIRA, being included in the Chapter “Structure of the atmosphere from the surface to 100 km”.

  15. Accumulation of radiation defects and products of radiolysis in lithium orthosilicate pebbles with silicon dioxide additions under action of high absorbed doses and high temperature in air and inert atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarins, A.; Supe, A. [Laboratory of Radiation Chemistry of Solids, Institute of Chemical Physics, University of Latvia, Kronvalda Bulvaris 4, LV-1010 Riga (Latvia); Kizane, G., E-mail: gunta.kizane@lu.lv [Laboratory of Radiation Chemistry of Solids, Institute of Chemical Physics, University of Latvia, Kronvalda Bulvaris 4, LV-1010 Riga (Latvia); Knitter, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-WPT), POB 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Baumane, L. [Laboratory of Radiation Chemistry of Solids, Institute of Chemical Physics, University of Latvia, Kronvalda Bulvaris 4, LV-1010 Riga (Latvia)

    2012-10-15

    One of the technological problems of a fusion reactor is the change in composition and structure of ceramic breeders (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} or Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles) during long-term operation. In this study changes in the composition and microstructure of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with 2.5 wt% silicon dioxide additions, fabricated by a melt-spraying process, were investigated after fast electron irradiation (E = 5 MeV, dose rate up to 88 MGy h{sup -1}) with high absorbed dose from 1.3 to 10.6 GGy at high temperature (543-573 K) in air and argon atmosphere. Three types of pebbles with different diameters and grain sizes were investigated. Products of radiolysis were studied by means of FTIR and XRD. TSL and ESR spectroscopy were used to detect radiation defects. SEM was used to investigate structure of pebbles. Experiments showed that Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with a diameter of 500 {mu}m had similar radiation stability as pebbles with diameter <50 {mu}m which were annealed at 1173 K for 128 h in argon and air atmosphere. As well as determined that lithium orthosilicate pebbles with size 500 (1243 K 168 h) and <50 {mu}m (1173 K 128 h) have a higher radiation stability in air and argon atmosphere than pebbles with size <50 {mu}m (1073 K 1 h). Degree of decomposition {alpha}{sub 10.56} of the lithium orthosilicate pebbles at an absorbed dose of 10.56 GGy in air atmosphere is 1.5% and 0.15% at irradiation in dry argon. It has been suggested that changes of radiation stability of lithium orthosilicate pebbles in air atmosphere comparing with irradiated pebbles in argon atmosphere is effect of chemical reaction of lithium orthosilicate surface with air containing - H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} in irradiation process. As well as it has been suggested that silicon dioxide - lithium metasilicate admixtures do not affect formation mechanism of radiation defect and products of radiolysis in lithium orthosilicate pebbles.

  16. Photocatalytic property and structural stability of CuAl-based layered double hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Ming; Liu, Haiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Three types of CuMAl layered double hydroxides (LDHs, M=Mg, Zn, Ni) were successfully synthesized by coprecipitation. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (UV–vis) were used to confirm the formation of as-synthesized solids with good crystal structure. The photocatalytic activity of those LDH materials for CO 2 reduction under visible light was investigated. The experimental results show that CuNiAl-LDHs with narrowest band gap and largest surface areas behave highest efficiency for methanol generation under visible light compared with CuMgAl-LDHs and CuZnAl-LDHs. The CuNiAL-LDH showed high yield for methanol production i.e. 0.210 mmol/g h, which was high efficient. In addition, the influence of the different M 2+ on the structures and stability of the CuMAl-LDHs was also investigated by analyzing the geometric parameters, electronic arrangement, charge populations, hydrogen-bonding, and binding energies by density functional theory (DFT) analysis. The theoretical calculation results show that the chemical stability of LDH materials followed the order of CuMgAl-LDHs>CuZnAl-LDHs>CuNiAl-LDHs, which is just opposite with the photocatalytic activity and band gaps of three materials. - Graphical abstract: The host–guest calculation models and XRD patterns of CuMAl-LDHs: CuMgAl-LDHs (a), CuZnAl-LDHs (b) and CuNiAl-LDHs (c). - Highlights: • Three types of CuMAl layered double hydroxides (LDHs, M=Mg, Zn, Ni) has been synthesized. • CuMgNi shows narrower band gap and more excellent textural properties than other LDHs. • The band gap: CuMgAlstability and lowest photocatalytic activity, while CuNiAl just opposite

  17. Multivariate stability of force-reflecting teleoperation: Structures of finite and infinite zeros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, R.W.; McAree, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a stability analysis of force-position teleoperation under general end-effector contact. The analysis is based on the finite and infinite zero structure of the multivariable root-locus resulting from modulation of the environment stiffness. The starting point is an analysis of the stability of robot force control, motivated by the observation that the human-operator in a force reflection loop acts as a force servo, generating position commands in response to reflected force. Asymptotic root loci properties are used to establish passivity conditions on force feedback to give root locus interpretations of the well-known results that (1) feedback via the inverse joint Jacobian can lead to (kinematic) instability and that (2) passivity is preserved by kinematically proper force feedback through the transpose of the joint angle Jacobian. It is demonstrated that a fully constrained force-position teleoperation loop has an identical infinite zero structure to that of a slave manipulation under kinematically proper force control and that the dominant vibration modes of a force-position loop are fully described by a multivariable analogue of the single-input single-output pseudo-system investigated in a study by Daniel and McAree. Extension of the analysis to cover partial end-effector constraint provides a design tool for teleoperation control and serves to aid selection of teleoperation slate-arms. The paper concludes by giving a passivity condition for multiple-input multiple-output force-position teleoperation for stable contact against all environments

  18. Establishment of a structural scale for evaluating sports team’s ethical atmospheres%运动队伦理气氛测评结构量表的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马德森; 孙庆祝

    2012-01-01

      在梳理国外相关研究文献、开放式调查和结构访谈的基础上,编制了运动队伦理气氛测评结构初始量表,通过对初始量表的试测和修改,形成了正式的“运动队伦理气氛测评结构量表”。运用此量表对600名被试者进行了调查,通过探索性因素和验证性因素分析,得出我国运动队伦理气氛测评结构,包括道德准则型伦理气氛、关怀型伦理气氛、法律制度型伦理气氛、团队精神型伦理气氛和利己主义型伦理气氛。我国运动队伦理气氛测评结构量表与西方的有所差异。%  On the basis of sorting out related domestic and foreign research literature, open surveys and structural interviews, the authors established an initial structural scale for evaluating sports team’s ethic atmospheres, formed a“Structural Scale for Evaluating Sports Team’s Ethical Atmospheres” by testing and revising the initial scale, used this scale to survey 600 testees, and by means of exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis, worked out a structure for evaluating Chinese sports team’s ethical atmospheres, which include moral standard type ethical atmosphere, caring type ethical atmosphere, legal system type ethical atmosphere, team spirit type ethical atmosphere and egoism type ethical atmosphere. The structural scale for evaluating Chinese sports team’s ethical atmospheres is somewhat different from the ones used by western countries.

  19. Indoor atmospheric corrosion of historical ferrous alloys. System characterisation, mechanisms and modelling discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, J.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of indoor atmospheric corrosion in iron alloys is of primary importance in several fields, including for the conservation of Middle Ages monuments or the long term storage of nuclear waste. In this research, a double approach was developed, combining fine characterisation of corrosion systems and design of experiments to answers specific questions related to mechanisms understanding. Iron indoor atmospheric corrosion was investigated on samples coming from the reinforcing chain of the Amiens cathedral (15. century). In the first stage, the corrosion system has been extensively characterised from the macroscopic to the nano-metric scale. In particular, structural micro-analysis (μ-Raman, μ-XRD, μ-XAS) has been used to locate, identify and quantify the oxidised phases. Rust layers are composed of a matrix of nano-metric goethite, with low quantities of lepidocrocite and akaganeite mostly located in the extern part of the corrosion system. In addition, clear marblings are dispersed in the matrix, which are sometimes connected with the metal core. Although these may contain maghemite, these marblings are generally made of ferri-hydrite/feroxyhite phases. In the second stage, specific experiments have been carried out in an unsaturated marked medium to locate oxygen reduction sites in the rust layers. Several cases were evidenced, depending on the rust layer morphology. In addition, reduction processes of model phases have been studied in situ, using an electrochemical cell coupled with structural characterisation techniques. This combination highlighted the influence of reduction mode and pH on the type of reduced phase formed. From the obtained results, several mechanisms are proposed to explain the long term indoor atmospheric corrosion of iron, including rust layers morphology and phases properties. The different hypotheses have been integrated in a proposed method to diagnosis ancient ferrous systems stability. These hypotheses also

  20. Superhydrophobicity of biological and technical surfaces under moisture condensation: stability in relation to surface structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockenhaupt, Bernd; Ensikat, Hans-Jürgen; Spaeth, Manuel; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2008-12-02

    The stability of superhydrophobic properties of eight plants and four technical surfaces in respect to water condensation has been compared. Contact and sliding angles were measured after application of water drops of ambient temperature (20 degrees C) onto cooled surfaces. Water evaporating from the drops condensed, due to the temperature difference between the drops and the surface, on the cooled samples, forming "satellite droplets" in the vicinity of the drops. Surface cooling to 15, 10, and 5 degrees C showed a gradual decrease of superhydrophobicity. The decrease was dependent on the specific surface architecture of the sample. The least decrease was found on hierarchically structured surfaces with a combination of a coarse microstructure and submicrometer-sized structures, similar to that of the Lotus leaf. Control experiments with glycerol droplets, which show no evaporation, and thus no condensation, were carried out to verify that the effects with water were caused by condensation from the drop (secondary condensation). Furthermore, the superhydrophobic properties after condensation on cooled surfaces from a humid environment