WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric reaction products

  1. Analysis of reaction products formed in the gas phase reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with atmospheric oxidants: Reaction mechanisms and atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenar, I.; Martin, P.; Cabañas, B.; Salgado, S.; Martinez, E.

    2018-03-01

    An analysis of reaction products for the reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with chlorine atoms (Cl) and OH and NO3 radicals has been carried out at the first time with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the tropospheric reactivity of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with a Time of Flight detector (GC-TOFMS) were used to carry out the qualitative and/or quantitative analyses. Reaction products in gas and particulate phase were observed from the reactions of E,E-2,4- hexadienal with all oxidants. E/Z-Butenedial and maleic anhydride were the main products identified in gas phase. E-butenedial calculated molar yield ranging from 4 to 10%. A significant amount of multifunctional compounds (chloro and hydroxy carbonyls) was identified. These compounds could be formed in particulate phase explaining the ∼90% of unaccounted carbon in gas phase. The reaction with Cl atoms in the presence of NOx with a long reaction time gave Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate (PAN) as an additional product, which is known for being an important specie in the generation of the photochemical smog. Nitrated compounds were the major organic products from the reaction with the NO3 radical. Based on the identified products, the reaction mechanisms have been proposed. In these mechanisms a double bond addition of the atmospheric oxidant at C4/C5 of E,E-2,4-hexadienal is the first step for tropospheric degradation.

  2. Studies of the Atmospheric Chemsitry of Energy-Related Volatile Organic Compounds and of their Atmospheric Reaction Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger Atkinson; Janet Arey

    2007-04-14

    The focus of this contract was to investigate selected aspects of the atmospheric chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted into the atmosphere from energy-related sources as well as from biogenic sources. The classes of VOCs studied were polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitro-PAHs, the biogenic VOCs isoprene, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol and cis-3-hexen-1-ol, alkenes (including alkenes emitted from vegetation) and their oxygenated atmospheric reaction products, and a series of oxygenated carbonyl and hydroxycarbonyl compounds formed as atmospheric reaction products of aromatic hydrocarbons and other VOCs. Large volume reaction chambers were used to investigate the kinetics and/or products of photolysis and of the gas-phase reactions of these organic compounds with hydroxyl (OH) radicals, nitrate (NO3) radicals, and ozone (O3), using an array of analytical instrumentation to analyze the reactants and products (including gas chromatography, in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and direct air sampling atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry). The following studies were carried out. The photolysis rates of 1- and 2-nitronaphthalene and of eleven isomeric methylnitronaphthalenes were measured indoors using blacklamp irradiation and outdoors using natural sunlight. Rate constants were measured for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals, Cl atoms and NO3 radicals with naphthalene, 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene, 1- and 2-ethylnaphthalene and the ten dimethylnaphthalene isomers. Rate constants were measured for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with four unsaturated carbonyls and with a series of hydroxyaldehydes formed as atmospheric reaction products of other VOCs, and for the gas-phase reactions of O3 with a series of cycloalkenes. Products of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and O3 with a series of biogenically emitted VOCs were identified and quantified. Ambient atmospheric measurements of the concentrations of a

  3. Productions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Surface Waters from Reactions with Atmospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Frances; Bell, Thomas; Yang, Mingxi

    2017-04-01

    Ozone (O3) is a key atmospheric oxidant, greenhouse gas and air pollutant. In marine environments, some atmospheric ozone is lost by reactions with aqueous compounds (e.g. dissolved organic material, DOM, dimethyl sulfide, DMS, and iodide) near the sea surface. These reactions also lead to formations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Removal of O3 by the ocean remains a large uncertainty in global and regional chemical transport models, hampering coastal air quality forecasts. To better understand the role of the ocean in controlling O3 concentrations in the coastal marine atmosphere, we designed and implemented a series of laboratory experiments whereby ambient surface seawater was bubbled with O3-enriched, VOC-free air in a custom-made glass bubble equilibration system. Gas phase concentrations of a range of VOCs were monitored continuously over the mass range m/z 33 - 137 at the outflow of the bubble equilibrator by a proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Gas phase O3 was also measured at the input and output of the equilibrator to monitor the uptake due to reactions with dissolved compounds in seawater. We observed consistent productions of a variety of VOCs upon reaction with O3, notably isoprene, aldehydes, and ketones. Aqueous DMS is rapidly removed from the reactions with O3. To test the importance of dissolved organic matter precursors, we added increasing (milliliter) volumes of Emiliania huxleyi culture to the equilibrator filled with aged seawater, and observed significant linear increases in gas phase concentrations of a number of VOCs. Reactions between DOM and O3 at the sea-air interface represent a potentially significant source of VOCs in marine air and a sink of atmospheric O3.

  4. Atmospheric gas phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Ulrich

    This chapter introduces the underlying physicochemical principles and the relevance of atmospheric gas phase reactions. In particular, reaction orders, the concept of elementary reactions, definition of and factors determining reaction rates (kinetic theory of chemical reactions), and photochemical reactions are discussed. Sample applications of the pertinent reaction pathways in tropospheric chemistry are presented, particularly reactions involving free radicals (OH, NO3, halogen oxides) and their roles in the self-cleaning of the troposphere. The cycles of nitrogen and sulfur species as well as the principles of tropospheric ozone formation are introduced. Finally, the processes governing the stratospheric ozone layer (Chapman Cycle and extensions) are discussed.

  5. Atmospheric reactions of methylcyclohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals: determination of rate coefficients and degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Bernabé; Ceacero-Vega, Antonio A; Jiménez, Elena; Albaladejo, José

    2015-04-01

    As the result of biogenic and anthropogenic activities, large quantities of chemical compounds are emitted into the troposphere. Alkanes, in general, and cycloalkanes are an important chemical class of hydrocarbons found in diesel, jet and gasoline, vehicle exhaust emissions, and ambient air in urban areas. In general, the primary atmospheric fate of organic compounds in the gas phase is the reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH). The oxidation by Cl atoms has gained importance in the study of atmospheric reactions because they may exert some influence in the boundary layer, particularly in marine and coastal environments, and in the Arctic troposphere. The aim of this paper is to study of the atmospheric reactivity of methylcylohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals under atmospheric conditions (in air at room temperature and pressure). Relative kinetic techniques have been used to determine the rate coefficients for the reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with methylcyclohexane, cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, and 1,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane at 298 ± 2 K and 720 ± 5 Torr of air by Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in two atmospheric simulation chambers. The products formed in the reaction under atmospheric conditions were investigated using a 200-L Teflon bag and employing the technique of solid-phase microextraction coupled to a GC-MS. The rate coefficients obtained for the reaction of Cl atoms with the studied compounds are the following ones (in units of 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (3.11 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.26), and (2.61 ± 0.42), respectively. For the reactions with OH radicals the determined rate coefficients are (in units of 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (1.18 ± 0.12), (1.49 ± 0.16), (1.41 ± 0.15), and (1.77 ± 0.23), respectively. The reported error is twice the standard deviation. A detailed

  6. Quantifying VOC-Reaction Tracers, Ozone Production, and Continuing Aerosol Production Rates in Urban and Far-Downwind Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, Robert; Ren, X.; Brune, W.; Fried, A.; Schwab, J.

    2008-01-01

    reaction products) and aerosol production, looking for VOC's that might be most implicated. All three variables j(sub rads), [HCHO], and [NO] are relatively easily measured in widespread air pollution monitoring networks, and all are deducible form space-borne observations, though estimation of [NO] from [NO2] (the species observable from space) may require care. We report also on airborne and surface observations of HCHO, suggesting that concentrated (urban) and more diffuse (forest) sources may be distinguishable from space. The use of the 3.58 micron microwindow for HCHO remote sensing should allow much sharper resolution of HCHO than the UV. UV sensing requires large and expensive instruments, but even these seem justified since formaldehyde is so informative.

  7. Atmospheric Chemistry of 1-Methoxy 2-Propyl Acetate: UV Absorption Cross Sections, Rate Coefficients, and Products of Its Reactions with OH Radicals and Cl Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogka, Antonia G; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Romanias, Manolis N; Bedjanian, Yuri; Idir, Mahmoud; Grosselin, Benoit; Daële, Véronique

    2016-11-17

    The rate coefficients for the reactions of OH and Cl with 1-methoxy 2-propyl acetate (MPA) in the gas phase were measured using absolute and relative methods. The kinetic study on the OH reaction was conducted in the temperature (263-373) K and pressure (1-760) Torr ranges using the pulsed laser photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence technique, a low pressure fast flow tube reactor-quadrupole mass spectrometer, and an atmospheric simulation chamber/GC-FID. The derived Arrhenius expression is k MPA+OH (T) = (2.01 ± 0.02) × 10 -12 exp[(588 ± 123/T)] cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . The absolute and relative rate coefficients for the reaction of Cl with MPA were measured at room temperature in the flow reactor and the atmospheric simulation chamber, which led to k (Cl+MPA) = (1.98 ± 0.31) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . GC-FID, GC-MS, and FT-IR techniques were used to investigate the reaction mechanism in the presence of NO. The products formed from the reaction of MPA with OH and their yields were methyl formate (80 ± 7.3%), acetic acid (50 ± 4.8%), and acetic anhydride (22 ± 2.4%), while for Cl reaction, the obtained yields were 60 ± 5.4, 41 ± 3.8, and 11 ± 1.2%, respectively, for the same products. The UV absorption cross section spectrum of MPA was determined in the wavelength range 210-370 nm. The study has shown no photolysis of MPA under atmospheric conditions. The obtained results are used to derive the atmospheric implication.

  8. The oleic acid-ozone heterogeneous reaction system: products, kinetics, secondary chemistry, and atmospheric implications of a model system – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zahardis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous processing of organic aerosols by trace oxidants has many implications to atmospheric chemistry and climate regulation. This review covers a model heterogeneous reaction system (HRS: the oleic acid-ozone HRS and other reaction systems featuring fatty acids, and their derivatives. The analysis of the commonly observed aldehyde and organic acid products of ozonolysis (azelaic acid, nonanoic acid, 9-oxononanoic acid, nonanal is described. The relative product yields are noted and explained by the observation of secondary chemical reactions. The secondary reaction products arising from reactive Criegee intermediates are mainly peroxidic, notably secondary ozonides and α-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxide oligomers and polymers, and their formation is in accord with solution and liquid-phase ozonolysis. These highly oxygenated products are of low volatility and hydrophilic which may enhance the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. The kinetic description of this HRS is critically reviewed. Most kinetic studies suggest this oxidative processing is either a near surface reaction that is limited by the diffusion of ozone or a surface based reaction. Internally mixed particles and coatings represent the next stage in the progression towards more realistic proxies of tropospheric organic aerosols and a description of the products and the kinetics resulting from the ozonolysis of these proxies, which are based on fatty acids or their derivatives, is presented. Finally, the main atmospheric implications of oxidative processing of particulate containing fatty acids are presented. These implications include the extended lifetime of unsaturated species in the troposphere facilitated by the presence of solids, semi-solids or viscous phases, and an enhanced rate of ozone uptake by particulate unsaturates compared to corresponding gas-phase organics. Ozonolysis of oleic acid enhances its CCN activity, which implies that

  9. LSM-YSZ Reactions in Different Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Liu, Yi-Lin; Hagen, Anke

    2009-01-01

    The influences of the oxygen partial pressure and the LSM/YSZ ratio on the LSM-YSZ interface reactions at 1,000 °C were investigated. Both pellets and diffusion couples were employed in the study. The equilibrium thermodynamics of the LSM-YSZ reactions was clarified based on the pellet study......-powder reaction. LSM reacts differently with YSZ in different atmospheres. In air, m-ZrO2 (monoclinic) is formed; while in N2, SrZrO3 and/or La2Zr2O7 are formed depending on the initial LSM/YSZ ratio. The reactions are reversible with varying P(O2) i.e. treating the sample in air after the heat treatment in N2...

  10. Atmospheric science and power production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randerson, D. (ed.)

    1984-07-01

    This is the third in a series of scientific publications sponsored by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the two later organizations, the US Energy Research and Development Adminstration, and the US Department of Energy. The first book, Meteorology and Atomic Energy, was published in 1955; the second, in 1968. The present volume is designed to update and to expand upon many of the important concepts presented previously. However, the present edition draws heavily on recent contributions made by atmospheric science to the analysis of air quality and on results originating from research conducted and completed in the 1970s. Special emphasis is placed on how atmospheric science can contribute to solving problems relating to the fate of combustion products released into the atmosphere. The framework of this book is built around the concept of air-quality modeling. Fundamentals are addressed first to equip the reader with basic background information and to focus on available meteorological instrumentation and to emphasize the importance of data management procedures. Atmospheric physics and field experiments are described in detail to provide an overview of atmospheric boundary layer processes, of how air flows around obstacles, and of the mechanism of plume rise. Atmospheric chemistry and removal processes are also detailed to provide fundamental knowledge on how gases and particulate matter can be transformed while in the atmosphere and how they can be removed from the atmosphere. The book closes with a review of how air-quality models are being applied to solve a wide variety of problems. Separate analytics have been prepared for each chapter.

  11. Reaction product imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, D.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  12. A laboratory flow reactor with gas particle separation and on-line MS/MS for product identification in atmospherically important reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Bennett

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A system to study the gas and particle phase products from gas phase hydrocarbon oxidation is described. It consists of a gas phase photochemical flow reactor followed by a diffusion membrane denuder to remove gases from the reacted products, or a filter to remove the particles. Chemical analysis is performed by an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. A diffusion membrane denuder is shown to remove trace gases to below detectable limits so the particle phase can be studied. The system was tested by examining the products of the oxidation of m-xylene initiated by HO radicals. Dimethylphenol was observed in both the gas and particle phases although individual isomers could not be identified. Two furanone isomers, 5-methyl-2(3Hfuranone and 3-methyl-2(5Hfuranone were identified in the particulate phase, but the isobaric product 2,5 furandione was not observed. One isomer of dimethyl-nitrophenol was identified in the particle phase but not in the gas phase.

  13. Effect of temperature oscillation on chemical reaction rates in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberstein, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of temperature fluctuations on atmospheric ozone chemistry is examined by considering the Chapman photochemical theory of ozone transport to calculate globally averaged ozone production rates from mean reaction rates, activation energies, and recombination processes.

  14. Atmospheric oxidation of halogenated aromatics: comparative analysis of reaction mechanisms and reaction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Goran; Sabljic, Aleksandar

    2017-03-22

    Atmospheric transport is the major route for global distribution of semi-volatile compounds such as halogenated aromatics as well as their major exposure route for humans. Their major atmospheric removal process is oxidation by hydroxyl radicals. There is very little information on the reaction mechanism or reaction-path dynamics of atmospheric degradation of halogenated benzenes. Furthermore, the measured reaction rate constants are missing for the range of environmentally relevant temperatures, i.e. 230-330 K. A series of recent theoretical studies have provided those valuable missing information for fluorobenzene, chlorobenzene, hexafluorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene. Their comparative analysis has provided additional and more general insight into the mechanism of those important tropospheric degradation processes as well as into the mobility, transport and atmospheric fate of halogenated aromatic systems. It was demonstrated for the first time that the addition of hydroxyl radicals to monohalogenated as well as to perhalogenated benzenes proceeds indirectly, via a prereaction complex and its formation and dynamics have been characterized including the respective transition-state. However, in fluorobenzene and chlorobenzene reactions hydroxyl radical hydrogen is pointing approximately to the center of the aromatic ring while in the case of hexafluorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene, unexpectedly, the oxygen is directed towards the center of the aromatic ring. The reliable rate constants are now available for all environmentally relevant temperatures for the tropospheric oxidation of fluorobenzene, chlorobenzene, hexafluorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene while pentachlorophenol, a well-known organic micropollutant, seems to be a major stable product of tropospheric oxidation of hexachlorobenzene. Their calculated tropospheric lifetimes show that fluorobenzene and chlorobenzene are easily removed from the atmosphere and do not have long-range transport potential while

  15. Kinetics and product identification of the reactions of (E)-2-hexenyl acetate and 4-methyl-3-penten-2-one with OH radicals and Cl atoms at 298 K and atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaona-Colmán, Elizabeth; Blanco, María B.; Teruel, Mariano A.

    2017-07-01

    Rate coefficients for the reactions of hydroxyl radicals and chlorine atoms with two biogenic volatile organic compounds as (E)-2-hexenyl acetate and 4-methyl-3-penten-2-one have been determined at 298 K and atmospheric pressure. The decay of the organics was followed using a chromatograph with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and the rate constants were determined using a relative rate method. Rate coefficients are found to be (in cm3 molecule-1 s-1): k1(OH + (E)-2-hexenyl acetate) = (6.88 ± 1.41) × 10-11, k2(Cl + (E)-2-hexenyl acetate) = (3.10 ± 1.13) × 10-10, k3(OH + 4-methyl-3-penten-2-one) = (1.02 ± 0.20) × 10-10 and k4(Cl + 4-methyl-3-penten-2-one) = (2.66 ± 0.90) × 10-10 at 298 K. This is the first kinetic experimental study for these reactions studied under atmospheric pressure. The rate coefficients are compared with previous determinations for other unsaturated and oxygenated compounds and reactivity trends are presented. Products identification studies were performed using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method employing on-fiber products derivatization with o-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine hydrochloride using gas chromatograph with a mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS) for the reactions studied. In addition, atmospheric lifetimes of the unsaturated compounds studied are estimated and compared with other tropospheric sinks for these compounds.

  16. Heterogeneous reactions important in atmospheric ozone depletion: a theoretical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Roberto; Hynes, James T

    2006-02-01

    Theoretical studies of the mechanisms of several heterogeneous reactions involving ClONO(2), H(2)O, HCl, HBr, and H(2)SO(4) important in atmospheric ozone depletion are described, focused primarily on reactions on aqueous aerosol surfaces. Among the insights obtained is the active chemical participation of the surface water molecules in several of these reactions. The general methodology adopted allows reduction of these complex chemical problems to meaningful model systems amenable to quantum chemical calculations.

  17. Heterogeneous reactions of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoli; Zhao, Yue; Chen, Zhongming; Huang, Dao

    2013-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are of central importance in the atmosphere because of their close relation to air quality and climate change. As a significant sink for VOCs, the fate of VOCs via heterogeneous reactions may explain the big gap between field and model studies. These reactions play as yet unclear but potentially crucial role in atmospheric processes. In order to better evaluate this reaction pathway, we present the first specific review for the progress of heterogeneous reaction studies on VOCs, including carbonyl compounds, organic acids, alcohols, and so on. Our review focuses on the processes for heterogeneous reactions of VOCs under varying experimental conditions, as well as their implications for trace gas and HOx budget, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, physicochemical properties of aerosols, and human health. Finally, we propose the future direction for laboratory studies of heterogeneous chemistry of VOCs that should be carried out under more atmospherically relevant conditions, with a special emphasis on the effects of relative humidity and illumination, the multicomponent reaction systems, and reactivity of aged and authentic particles. In particular, more reliable uptake coefficients, based on the abundant elaborate laboratory studies, appropriate calibration, and logical choice criterion, are urgently required in atmospheric models.

  18. Atmospheric chemistry of CF3CF═CH2 and (Z)-CF3CF═CHF: Cl and NO3 rate coefficients, Cl reaction product yields, and thermochemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Lazarou, Yannis G; Talukdar, Ranajit K; Burkholder, James B

    2011-01-20

    Rate coefficients, k, for the gas-phase reactions of Cl atoms and NO(3) radicals with 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene, CF(3)CF═CH(2) (HFO-1234yf), and 1,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropene, (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF (HFO-1225ye), are reported. Cl-atom rate coefficients were measured in the fall-off region as a function of temperature (220-380 K) and pressure (50-630 Torr; N(2), O(2), and synthetic air) using a relative rate method. The measured rate coefficients are well represented by the fall-off parameters k(0)(T) = 6.5 × 10(-28) (T/300)(-6.9) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1) and k(∞)(T) = 7.7 × 10(-11) (T/300)(-0.65) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for CF(3)CF═CH(2) and k(0)(T) = 3 × 10(-27) (T/300)(-6.5) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1) and k(∞)(T) = 4.15 × 10(-11) (T/300)(-0.5) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for (Z)-CF(3)C═CHF with F(c) = 0.6. Reaction product yields were measured in the presence of O(2) to be (98 ± 7)% for CF(3)C(O)F and (61 ± 4)% for HC(O)Cl in the CF(3)CF═CH(2) reaction and (108 ± 8)% for CF(3)C(O)F and (112 ± 8)% for HC(O)F in the (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF reaction, where the quoted uncertainties are 2σ (95% confidence level) and include estimated systematic errors. NO(3) reaction rate coefficients were determined using absolute and relative rate methods. Absolute measurements yielded upper limits for both reactions between 233 and 353 K, while the relative rate measurements yielded k(3)(295 K) = (2.6 ± 0.25) × 10(-17) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and k(4)(295 K) = (4.2 ± 0.5) × 10(-18) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for CF(3)CF═CH(2) and (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF, respectively. The Cl-atom reaction with CF(3)CF═CH(2) and (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF leads to decreases in their atmospheric lifetimes and global warming potentials and formation of a chlorine-containing product, HC(O)Cl, for CF(3)CF═CH(2). The NO(3) reaction has been shown to have a negligible impact on the atmospheric lifetimes of CF(3)CF═CH(2) and (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF. The energetics for the reaction of Cl, NO(3), and OH with CF

  19. Reaction Profiles and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Cyanide Radical Reactions Relevant to Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinidad Pérez-Rivera, Danilo; Romani, Paul N.; Lopez-Encarnacion, Juan Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Titan's atmosphere is arguably the atmosphere of greatest interest that we have an abundance of data for from both ground based and spacecraft observations. As we have learned more about Titan's atmospheric composition, the presence of pre-biotic molecules in its atmosphere has generated more and more fascination about the photochemical process and pathways it its atmosphere. Our computational laboratory has been extensively working throughout the past year characterizing nitrile synthesis reactions, making significant progress on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions of .CN with the hydrocarbons acetylene (C2H2), propylene (CH3CCH), and benzene (C6H6), developing a clear picture of the mechanistic aspects through which these three reactions proceed. Specifically, first principles calculations of the reaction profiles and molecular dynamics studies for gas-phase reactions of .CN and C2H2, .CN and CH3CCH, and .CN and C6H6 have been carried out. A very accurate determination of potential energy surfaces of these reactions will allow us to compute the reaction rates which are indispensable for photochemical modeling of Titan's atmosphere.The work at University of Puerto Rico at Cayey was supported by Puerto Rico NASA EPSCoR IDEAS-ER program (2015-2016) and DTPR was sponsored by the Puerto Rico NASA Space Grant Consortium Fellowship. *E-mail: juan.lopez15@upr.edu

  20. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxide treatment of organic materials are oxidized species, some of which also contain chlorine. The relative amounts of species types may depend on the amount of chlorine dioxide residual maintained and the concentration and nature of the organic material present in the source water. The trend toward lower concentrations of chlorinated by-products with increasing ClO2 concentration, which was observed with phenols, has not been observed with natural humic materials as measured by the organic halogen parameter. Organic halogen concentrations have been shown to increase with increasing chlorine dioxide dose, but are much lower than those observed when chlorine is applied. Aldehydes have been detected as apparent by-products of chlorine dioxide oxidation reactions in a surface water that is a drinking water source. Some other nonchlorinated products of chlorine dioxide treatment may be quinones and epoxides. The extent of formation of these moieties within the macromolecular humic structure is also still unknown. PMID:7151750

  1. A theoretical study of the atmospherically important radical-radical reaction BrO + HO2; the product channel O2(a1Δg) + HOBr is formed with the highest rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ronald; Mok, Daniel K W; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M

    2016-11-09

    A theoretical study has been made of the BrO + HO 2 reaction, a radical-radical reaction which contributes to ozone depletion in the atmosphere via production of HOBr. Reaction enthalpies, activation energies and mechanisms have been determined for five reaction channels. Also rate coefficients have been calculated, in the atmospherically important temperature range 200-400 K, for the two channels with the lowest activation energies, both of which produce HOBr: (R1a) HOBr(X 1 A') + O 2 (X 3 Σ) and (R1b) HOBr(X 1 A') + O 2 (a 1 Δ g ). The other channels considered are: (R2) BrO + HO 2 → HBr + O 3 , (R3) BrO + HO 2 → OBrO + OH and (R4) BrO + HO 2 → BrOO + OH. For all channels, geometry optimization and frequency calculations were carried out at the M06-2X/AVDZ level, while relative energies of the stationary points on the reaction surface were improved at a higher level (BD(TQ)/CBS or CCSD(T)/CBS). The computed standard reaction enthalpies (ΔH) for channels (R1a), (R1b), (R2), (R3) and (R4) are -47.5, -25.0, -4.3, 14.9 and 5.9 kcal mol -1 , and the corresponding computed activation energies (ΔE) are 2.53, -3.07, 11.83, 35.0 and 37.81 kcal mol -1 . These values differ significantly from those obtained in earlier work by Kaltsoyannis and Rowley (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2002, 4, 419-427), particularly for channel (R1b), and reasons for this are discussed. In particular, the importance of obtaining an open-shell singlet wavefunction, rather than a closed-shell singlet wavefunction, for the transition state of this channel is emphasized. Rate coefficient calculations from computed potential energy surfaces were made for BrO + HO 2 for the first time. Although channel (R1a) is the most exothermic, channel (R1b) has the lowest barrier height, which is negative (at -3.07 kcal mol -1 ). Most rate coefficient calculations were therefore made for (R1b). A two transition state model has been used, involving an outer and an inner transition state. The inner transition

  2. Evaluation of the Atmospheric Chemical Entropy Production of Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Delgado-Bonal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic disequilibrium is a necessary situation in a system in which complex emergent structures are created and maintained. It is known that most of the chemical disequilibrium, a particular type of thermodynamic disequilibrium, in Earth’s atmosphere is a consequence of life. We have developed a thermochemical model for the Martian atmosphere to analyze the disequilibrium by chemical reactions calculating the entropy production. It follows from the comparison with the Earth atmosphere that the magnitude of the entropy produced by the recombination reaction forming O3 (O + O2 + CO2 ⥦ O3 + CO2 in the atmosphere of the Earth is larger than the entropy produced by the dominant set of chemical reactions considered for Mars, as a consequence of the low density and the poor variety of species of the Martian atmosphere. If disequilibrium is needed to create and maintain self-organizing structures in a system, we conclude that the current Martian atmosphere is unable to support large physico-chemical structures, such as those created on Earth.

  3. Spectroscopic Studies of Atmospheric Radical-Radical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Mitchio

    2004-03-01

    The reactions of trace free radicals largely determine the chemical composition of gas phase species in the atmosphere. Reactions between pairs of radicals are very important, but exhibit a high degree of complexity; fundamental studies have revealed the importance of multiple wells, adduct formation, chaperone effects, and nonadiabatic coupling among potential energy surfaces. We have investigated the spectra, kinetics, and dynamics of a number of radical-radical reactions using infrared cavity ringdown, FM diode laser, and action spectroscopic methods. New results will be presented on peroxynitrous acid, HOONO, a minor but significant channel in the OH + NO2 + M reaction, a major sink for HOx and NOx radicals in polluted tropospheric air. These experiments lead to a detailed understanding of HOONO formation and kinetics under thermal conditions. Additional work on peroxyl radical spectroscopy and chemistry, including the role of hydrogen-bonded adducts, will also be discussed.

  4. Predicting Complex Organic Mixture Atmospheric Chemistry Using Computer-Generated Reaction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M. T.; Broadbelt, L. J.; Mazurek, M. A.

    2001-12-01

    matrix transforms the reactants to products. The computer-generated reaction models provide mechanistic details and to predict the product spectrum of atmospheric organic reaction families. Precursor compounds for discrete reaction families will have predicted product spectrums. This capability is useful, for example, in modeling the atmospheric chemistry of certain classes of chemical emissions from specific source categories. One other possible benefit of the computer-assisted model building, although more challenging, would be the enhanced ability for attributing plausible emission source chemistry to observed atmospheric organic chemistry ("reverse" interpretation) using the same reaction matrix and rules.

  5. Interception of excited vibrational quantum states by O2 in atmospheric association reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, David R; Lockhart, James; Blitz, Mark A; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Pilling, Michael J; Robertson, Struan H; Seakins, Paul W

    2012-08-31

    Bimolecular reactions in Earth's atmosphere are generally assumed to proceed between reactants whose internal quantum states are fully thermally relaxed. Here, we highlight a dramatic role for vibrationally excited bimolecular reactants in the oxidation of acetylene. The reaction proceeds by preliminary adduct formation between the alkyne and OH radical, with subsequent O(2) addition. Using a detailed theoretical model, we show that the product-branching ratio is determined by the excited vibrational quantum-state distribution of the adduct at the moment it reacts with O(2). Experimentally, we found that under the simulated atmospheric conditions O(2) intercepts ~25% of the excited adducts before their vibrational quantum states have fully relaxed. Analogous interception of excited-state radicals by O(2) is likely common to a range of atmospheric reactions that proceed through peroxy complexes.

  6. Atmospheric production rate of {sup 36}Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrat, Y.; Hajdas, W.; Baltensperger, U.; Synal, H.A.; Kubik, P.W.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Using experimental cross sections, a new calculation of the atmospheric production rate of {sup 36}Cl was carried out. A mean production rate of 20 atoms m{sup -2}s{sup -1} was obtained, which is lower than mean {sup 36}Cl deposition rates. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs.

  7. Electrochemical studies on the cathodic reaction of marine atmospheric corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia

    1996-12-01

    Electrochemical studies on the cathodic reaction of marine atmospheric corrosion using Kelvin probe as reference electrode showed that the rate of cathodic reaction-oxygen reduction first increases then decreases, with the reaction maximizing at a certain thickness as the electrolyte film decreases during evaporation. It was indicated that with decreasing electrolyte thickness by drying, the oxygen reduction rate was accelerated by the faster oxygen diffusion due to the thinner electrolyte layer on the metal surface. The results also revealed that although the oxygen salting out effect has great influence on the rate of oxygen reduction, it is not the main causative factor for the decrease in cathodic limiting current in the case of a very thin electrolyte layer.

  8. Atmospheric Production of Perchlorate on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claire, M.; Catling, D. C.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2009-12-01

    Natural production and preservation of perchlorate on Earth occurs only in arid environments. Isotopic evidence suggests a strong role for atmospheric oxidation of chlorine species via pathways including ozone or its photochemical derivatives. As the Martian atmosphere is both oxidizing and drier than the driest places on Earth, we propose an atmospheric origin for the Martian perchlorates measured by NASA's Phoenix Lander. A variety of hypothetical formation pathways can be proposed including atmospheric photochemical reactions, electrostatic discharge, and gas-solid reactions. Here, we investigate gas phase formation pathways using a 1-D photochemical model (Catling et al. 2009, accepted by JGR). Because perchlorate-rich deposits in the Atacama desert are closest in abundance to perchlorate measured at NASA's Phoenix Lander site, we start with a study of the means to produce Atacama perchlorate. We found that perchlorate can be produced in sufficient quantities to explain the abundance of perchlorate in the Atacama from a proposed gas phase oxidation of chlorine volatiles to perchloric acid. These results are sensitive to estimated reaction rates for ClO3 species. The feasibility of gas phase production for the Atacama provides justification for further investigations of gas phase photochemistry as a possible source for Martian perchlorate. In addition to the Atacama results, we will present a preliminary study incorporating chlorine chemistry into an existing Martian photochemical model (Zahnle et al. JGR 2008).

  9. Secondary aerosol formation from atmospheric reactions of aliphatic amines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Murphy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Although aliphatic amines have been detected in both urban and rural atmospheric aerosols, little is known about the chemistry leading to particle formation or the potential aerosol yields from reactions of gas-phase amines. We present here the first systematic study of aerosol formation from the atmospheric reactions of amines. Based on laboratory chamber experiments and theoretical calculations, we evaluate aerosol formation from reaction of OH, ozone, and nitric acid with trimethylamine, methylamine, triethylamine, diethylamine, ethylamine, and ethanolamine. Entropies of formation for alkylammonium nitrate salts are estimated by molecular dynamics calculations enabling us to estimate equilibrium constants for the reactions of amines with nitric acid. Though subject to significant uncertainty, the calculated dissociation equilibrium constant for diethylammonium nitrate is found to be sufficiently small to allow for its atmospheric formation, even in the presence of ammonia which competes for available nitric acid. Experimental chamber studies indicate that the dissociation equilibrium constant for triethylammonium nitrate is of the same order of magnitude as that for ammonium nitrate. All amines studied form aerosol when photooxidized in the presence of NOx with the majority of the aerosol mass present at the peak of aerosol growth consisting of aminium (R3NH+ nitrate salts, which repartition back to the gas phase as the parent amine is consumed. Only the two tertiary amines studied, trimethylamine and triethylamine, are found to form significant non-salt organic aerosol when oxidized by OH or ozone; calculated organic mass yields for the experiments conducted are similar for ozonolysis (15% and 5% respectively and photooxidation (23% and 8% respectively. The non-salt organic aerosol formed appears to be more stable than the nitrate salts and does not quickly repartition back to the gas phase.

  10. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxi...

  11. Snake antivenoms: adverse reactions and production technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VM Morais

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Antivenoms have been widely used for more than a century for treating snakebites and other accidents with poisonous animals. Despite their efficacy, the use of heterologous antivenoms involves the possibility of adverse reactions due to activation of the immune system. In this paper, alternatives for antivenom production already in use were evaluated in light of their ability to minimize the occurrence of adverse reactions. These effects were classified according to their molecular mechanism as: anaphylactic reactions mediated by IgE, anaphylactoid reactions caused by complement system activation, and pyrogenic reactions produced mainly by the presence of endotoxins in the final product. In the future, antivenoms may be replaced by humanized antibodies, specific neutralizing compounds or vaccination. Meanwhile, improvements in antivenom quality will be focused on the obtainment of a more purified and specific product in compliance with good manufacturing practices and at an affordable cost.

  12. Meson production in Ф· reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Angular distribution for the two reactions Ф. Ш+ (right axis) and. Ф. 3. He. 0. (left axis) and for beam momenta of 750 MeV/c and 800 MeV/c. The data for Ф. Ш+ reaction are corrected for Coulomb effects. mixing [33]. This mixing affects π. ¼ production in contrast to π. · production. One may expect a deviation of the ratio. R( ) =.

  13. Atmospheric chemistry of perfluorinated carboxylic acids: Reaction with OH radicals and atmospheric lifetimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, MD; Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Wallington, TJ

    2004-01-01

    Relative rate techniques were used to study the kinetics of the reactions of OH radicals with a homologous series of perfluorinated acids, F(CF2)(n)COOH (n = 1, 2, 3, 4), in 700 Torr of air at 296 +/- 2 K. For n > 1, the length of the F(CF2)(n) group had no discernible impact on the reactivity.......03 Torr(-1), 0.41 +/- 0.04 Torr(-1), and 0.46 +/- 0.05 Torr(-1) for n = 1, 2, 3. 4, respectively. Atmospheric lifetimes of F(CF2)(n)COOH with respect to reaction with OH radicals are estimated to be approximately 230 days for n = 1 and 130 days for n > 1. Reaction with OH radicals is a minor atmospheric...... of the molecule. For n = 1, k(OH + F(CF2)(n)COOH) = (9.35 +/- 2.08) x 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). For n = 2-4, k(OH + F(CF2)(n)COOH) = (1.69 +/- 0.22) x 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). Dimerization constants for 2F(CF2)(n)COOH = (F(CF2)(n)COOH)(2) were determined to be 0.32 +/- 0.03 Torr(-1), 0.30 +/- 0...

  14. Atmospheric trident production for probing new physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Feng Ge

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose to use atmospheric neutrinos as a powerful probe of new physics beyond the Standard Model via neutrino trident production. The final state with double muon tracks simultaneously produced from the same vertex is a distinctive signal at large Cherenkov detectors. We calculate the expected event numbers of trident production in the Standard Model. To illustrate the potential of this process to probe new physics we obtain the sensitivity on new vector/scalar bosons with coupling to muon and tau neutrinos.

  15. Chemical Characterization of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed from Atmospheric Aqueous-phase Reactions of Phenolic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, L.; Smith, J.; Anastasio, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Phenolic compounds, which are released in significant amounts from biomass burning, may undergo fast aqueous-phase reactions to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. Understanding the aqueous-phase reaction mechanisms of these compounds and the composition of their reaction products is thus important for constraining SOA sources and predicting organic aerosol properties in models. In this study, we investigate the aqueous-phase reactions of three phenols (phenol, guaiacol and syringol) with two oxidants - excited triplet states (3C*) of non-phenolic aromatic carbonyls and hydroxyl radical (OH). By employing four analytical methods including high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry, total organic carbon analysis, ion chromatography, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we thoroughly characterize the chemical compositions of the low volatility reaction products of phenols and propose formation mechanisms based on this information. Our results indicate that phenolic SOA is highly oxygenated, with O/C ratios in the range of 0.83-1.03, and that the SOA of phenol is usually more oxidized than those of guaiacol and syringol. Among the three precursors, syringol generates the largest fraction of higher molecular weight (MW) products. For the same precursor, the SOA formed via reaction with 3C* is less oxidized than that formed via reaction with OH. In addition, oxidation by 3C* enhances the formation of higher MW species, including phenolic dimers, higher oligomers and hydroxylated products, compared to reactions initiated by OH, which appear to favor the formation of organic acids. However, our results indicate that the yields of small organic acids (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate) are low for both reaction pathways, together accounting for less than 5% of total SOA mass.

  16. Fractionation of Stable Isotopes in Atmospheric Aerosol Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meusinger, Carl

    Aerosols - particles suspended in air - are the single largest uncertainty in our current understanding of Earth's climate. They also affect human health, infrastructure and ecosystems. Aerosols are emitted either directly into the atmosphere or are formed there for instance in response to chemical...... reactions and undergo complex chemical and physical changes during their lifetimes. In order to assess processes that form and alter aerosols, information provided by stable isotopes can be used to help constrain estimates on the strength of aerosol sources and sinks. This thesis studies (mass......-independent) fractionation processes of stable isotopes of C, N, O and S in order to investigate three different systems related to aerosols: 1. Post-depositional processes of nitrate in snow that obscure nitrate ice core records 2. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol generated by ozonolysis of X...

  17. Laboratory studies on N(2D) reactions of relevance to the chemistry of planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balucani, N.; Casavecchia, P.

    Molecular nitrogen is a very stable molecule, practically inert from a chemical point of view. For a nitrogen chemistry to occur in the planetary atmospheres which contain N2 , it is necessary to transform it into an active form, such as atoms or ions. As far as the production of atomic nitrogen in the upper atmospheres of planets (like Mars) or moons (like Titan) is concerned, several processes - as N2 dissociation induced by electron impact, EUV photolysis (λ fact, because N(4 S) atoms exhibit very low reactivity with closed-shell molecules and the probability of collision with an open-shell radical is small. Unfortunately laboratory experiments on the gas-phase reactions of N(2 D) have been lacking until recently, because of serious experimental difficulties in studying these reactive systems. Accurate kinetic data on the reactions of N(2 D) with the some molecules of relevance to the chemistry of planetary atmospheres have finally become available in the late 90's, but a better knowledge of the reactive behavior requires a dynamical investigation of N(2 D) reactions. The capability of generating intense continuous beams of N(2 D) achieved in our laboratory some years ago has opened up the possibility of studying the reactive scattering of this species under single collision conditions by means of the "crossed molecular beam" technique with mass spectrometric detection. Some examples of our experimental results will be illustrated, with particular attention to the reactions of N(2 D) with hydrocarbons (CH4 , C2 H2 and C2 H4 ) of relevance to the atmosphere of Titan, but also with other molecules of relevance to the atmospheres of Mars, Triton and Pluto.

  18. Heterogeneous Reactions of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons on Atmospheric and Terrestrial Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonich, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of five higher molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzo[a]pyrene-d12 (BaP-d12), benzo(k)fluoranthene-d12 (BkF-d12), benzo[g,h,i]perylene-d12 (BghiP-d12), dibenzo(a,i)pyrene-d14 (DBaiP-d14), and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DalP), with NO2, NO3/N2O5, O3, and OH radicals were investigated in a 7000 L indoor Teflon chamber. Quartz fiber filters (QFF) were used as the reaction surface and substrate and the analyses of parent PAHs and Nitro-PAH (NPAH) products was conducted using electron impact gas chromatographic mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and negative chemical ionization GC/MS. In parallel to the laboratory experiments, a theoretical study was conducted to assist in determining the formation of NPAH isomers based on the OH-radical initiated reaction. The thermodynamic stability of OH-PAH intermediates was used to indicate the position of highest electron density and the most stable NPAH products were synthesized to confirm their identity. NO2 and NO3/N2O5 were the most effective oxidizing agents in transforming PAHs deposited on filters to NPAHs, under the experimental conditions. Reaction of BaP-d12, BkF-d12 and BghiP-d12 resulted in the formation of several mono-nitro PAH isomer product, while the reaction of DalP and DaiP-d14 resulted in the formation of only one mono-nitro PAH isomer product. The direct-acting mutagenicity of the products increased the most after NO3/N2O5 exposure, particularly for BkF-d12 in which the formation of dinitro- PAHs was observed. In addition, the degradation of particulate matter (PM)-bound PAHs by heterogeneous reaction with OH radicals, O3, NO3/N2O5 was also studied. Ambient PM samples collected from Beijing, China and Riverside, California were exposed in an indoor chamber under simulated trans-Pacific atmospheric transport conditions and the formation of NPAHs was studied. NPAHs were most effectively formed during the NO3/N2O5 exposure and, for all exposures, there was no significant

  19. Dominant Overall Chemical Reaction in a Chlorine Trifluoride Silicon Nitrogen System at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habuka, Hitoshi; Otsuka, Toru; Qu, Wei-Feng

    1999-11-01

    This study evaluates the overall chemical reaction in a chlorine trifluoride silicon nitrogen system at atmospheric pressure, based on the observation of the dominant chemical species in the gas phase using a quadrupole mass spectra analyzer coupled with a horizontal cold-wall single-wafer epitaxial reactor. Chlorine trifluoride gas etches the silicon surface, producing two major products, silicon tetrafluoride gas and chlorine gas, at room temperature and 530 K. The production of chlorosilanes was not observed in this study. The results obtained in this study indicate that the dominant overall chemical reaction in a chlorine trifluoride silicon nitrogen system is 3Si + 4ClF3 →3SiF4 ↑+ 2Cl2 ↑.

  20. Production of hydrogen from solar zinc in steam atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnevetsky, Irina; Epstein, Michael [Solar Research Facilities Unit, Weizmann Institute of Science, P.O. Box 26, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2007-09-15

    Production of hydrogen via hydrolysis of zinc with steam is an essential step in the Zn/ZnO thermochemical cycle for splitting of water. Recent studies on reducing ZnO to Zn metal with the aid of concentrated solar energy stimulated the interest in the hydrolysis of the zinc for hydrogen production. One of these studies was focusing on solar carbothermal reduction of ZnO to produce zinc powder (EC/FP5-SOLZINC project). The current paper deals with the hydrolysis process of this material which will be referred to, hereafter, as SOLZINC. Test results obtained during the hydrolysis of SOLZINC powder in batch experiments at atmospheric pressure demonstrate possibilities of fast and high conversion of SOLZINC powder with steam to ZnO powder and hydrogen without intermediate melting or evaporation of zinc and indicate that the reaction occurs in two different rates, depending on the preheating temperature. A slow reaction starts at about 250 {sup circle} C and the hydrogen output increases with reactor temperature. The fast stage starts as the reactor temperature approaches 400 {sup circle} C. Above this temperature, the reaction develops vigorously due to fast increase of the reaction rate with temperature resulting in releasing additional exothermic heat by the reacted powder. Increasing the preheating temperature (when the steam flow starts) from 200 to 550 {sup circle} C can improve the SOLZINC conversion during the fast stage from 24% to 81% and increase the hydrogen yield. When the fast stage decays, slow reaction can be continued on for a long time until the hydrogen production is fully achieved. (author)

  1. Prediction of Mechanism and Thermochemical Properties of O3 + H2S Atmospheric Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Vahedpour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone and hydrogen sulfide reaction mechanism including a complex was studied at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd and CCSD/6-311++G(3df,3pd//B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd levels of computation. The interaction between sulfur atom of hydrogen sulfide and terminal oxygen atom of ozone produces a stable H2S-O3 complex with no barrier. With the decomposition of this complex, four possible product channels have been found. Intrinsic reaction coordinate, topological analyses of atom in molecule, and vibrational frequency calculation have been used to confirm the suggested mechanism. Thermodynamic data at T = 298.15 K and the atmospheric pressure have been calculated. The results show that the production of H2O + SO2 is the main reaction channel with ΔG° = −645.84 kJ/mol. Rate constants of H2S + O3 reaction show two product channels, SO2 + H2O and HSO + HOO, which compete with each other based on the temperature.

  2. Atmospheric Processing Module for Mars Propellant Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, A.; Devor, R.; Captain, J.

    2014-01-01

    The multi-NASA center Mars Atmosphere and Regolith COllector/PrOcessor for Lander Operations (MARCO POLO) project was established to build and demonstrate a methaneoxygen propellant production system in a Mars analog environment. Work at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Applied Chemistry Laboratory is focused on the Atmospheric Processing Module (APM). The purpose of the APM is to freeze carbon dioxide from a simulated Martian atmosphere containing the minor components nitrogen, argon, carbon monoxide, and water vapor at Martian pressures (approx. 8 torr) by using dual cryocoolers with alternating cycles of freezing and sublimation. The resulting pressurized CO(sub 2) is fed to a methanation subsystem where it is catalytically combined with hydrogen in a Sabatier reactor supplied by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to make methane and water vapor. We first used a simplified once-through setup and later employed a H(sub 2)CO(sub 2) recycling system to improve process efficiency. This presentation and paper will cover (1) the design and selection of major hardware items, such as the cryocoolers, pumps, tanks, chillers, and membrane separators, (2) the determination of the optimal cold head design and flow rates needed to meet the collection requirement of 88 g CO(sub 2) hr for 14 hr, (3) the testing of the CO(sub 2) freezer subsystem, and (4) the integration and testing of the two subsystems to verify the desired production rate of 31.7 g CH(sub 4) hr and 71.3 g H(sub 2)O hr along with verification of their purity. The resulting 2.22 kg of CH(sub 2)O(sub 2) propellant per 14 hr day (including O(sub 2) from electrolysis of water recovered from regolith, which also supplies the H(sub 2) for methanation) is of the scale needed for a Mars Sample Return mission. In addition, the significance of the project to NASAs new Mars exploration plans will be discussed.

  3. Atmospheric chemistry of benzyl alcohol: kinetics and mechanism of reaction with OH radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, François; Magneron, Isabelle; Eyglunent, Grégory; Daële, Véronique; Wallington, Timothy J; Hurley, Michael D; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2013-04-02

    The atmospheric oxidation of benzyl alcohol has been investigated using smog chambers at ICARE, FORD, and EUPHORE. The rate coefficient for reaction with OH radicals was measured and an upper limit for the reaction with ozone was established; kOH = (2.8 ± 0.4) × 10(-11) at 297 ± 3 K (averaged value including results from Harrison and Wells) and kO(3) < 2 × 10(-19) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 299 K. The products of the OH radical initiated oxidation of benzyl alcohol in the presence of NOX were studied. Benzaldehyde, originating from H-abstraction from the -CH(2)OH group, was identified using in situ FTIR spectroscopy, HPLC-UV/FID, and GC-PID and quantified in a yield of (24 ± 5) %. Ring retaining products originating from OH-addition to the aromatic ring such as o-hydroxybenzylalcohol and o-dihydroxybenzene as well as ring-cleavage products such as glyoxal were also identified and quantified with molar yields of (22 ± 2)%, (10 ± 3)%, and (2.7 ± 0.7)%, respectively. Formaldehyde was observed with a molar yield of (27 ± 10)%. The results are discussed with respect to previous studies and the atmospheric oxidation mechanism of benzyl alcohol.

  4. Atmospheric deuterium fractionation: HCHO and HCDO yields in the CH2DO + O2 reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Hurley

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of formaldehyde via hydrogen atom transfer from the methoxy radical to molecular oxygen is a key step in the atmospheric photochemical oxidation of methane, and in the propagation of deuterium from methane to molecular hydrogen. We report the results of the first investigation of the branching ratio for HCHO and HCDO formation in the CH2DO + O2 reaction. Labeled methoxy radicals (CH2DO were generated in a photochemical reactor by photolysis of CH2DONO. HCHO and HCDO concentrations were measured using FTIR spectroscopy. Significant deuterium enrichment was seen in the formaldehyde product, from which we derive a branching ratio of 88.2±1.1% for HCDO and 11.8±1.1% for HCHO. The implications of this fractionation on the propagation of deuterium in the atmosphere are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of the atmospheric significance of multiphase reactions in atmospheric secondary organic aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelencsér

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In a simple conceptual cloud-aerosol model the mass of secondary organic aerosol (SOA that may be formed in multiphase reaction in an idealized scenario involving two cloud cycles separated with a cloud-free period is evaluated. The conditions are set to those typical of continental clouds, and each parameter used in the model calculations is selected as a mean of available observational data of individual species for which the multiphase SOA formation route has been established. In the idealized setting gas and aqueous-phase reactions are both considered, but only the latter is expected to yield products of sufficiently low volatility to be retained by aerosol particles after the cloud dissipates. The key variable of the model is the Henry-constant which primarily determines how important multiphase reactions are relative to gas-phase photooxidation processes. The precursor considered in the model is assumed to already have some affinity to water, i.e. it is a compound having oxygen-containing functional group(s. As a principal model output an aerosol yield parameter is calculated for the multiphase SOA formation route as a function of the Henry-constant, and has been found to be significant already above H~103 M atm-1. Among the potential precursors that may be eligible for this mechanism based on their Henry constants, there are a suite of oxygenated compounds such as primary oxidation products of biogenic and anthropogenic hydrocarbons, including, for example, pinonaldehyde. Finally, the analogy of multiphase SOA formation to in-cloud sulfate production is exploited.

  6. Atmospheric Gas-Phase Reactions of Fluorinated Compounds and Alkenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerstrøm, Freja From

    for Atmospheric Research, Denmark. All setups consist of a chamber and uses UV light to initiate the experiments and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for the analysis of the data. The atmospheric chemistry of new chlorofluorocarbon replacements is discussed. Experimental studies have been performed on: (CF......Experimental studies have been performed using three different smog chamber setups to investigate the atmospheric chemistry of fluorinated compounds as well as alkenes. The three instruments were at Ford Motor Company, USA, National Center for Atmospheric Research, USA, and Copenhagen Center...

  7. Heterogeneous Reactions between Toluene and NO2on Mineral Particles under Simulated Atmospheric Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hejingying; Li, Kezhi; Chu, Biwu; Su, Wenkang; Li, Junhua

    2017-09-05

    Heterogeneous reactions between organic and inorganic gases with aerosols are important for the study of smog occurrence and development. In this study, heterogeneous reactions between toluene and NO 2 with three atmospheric mineral particles in the presence or absence of UV light were investigated. The three mineral particles were SiO 2 , α-Fe 2 O 3 , and BS (butlerite and szmolnokite). In a dark environment, benzaldehyde was produced on α-Fe 2 O 3 . For BS, nitrotoluene and benzaldehyde were obtained. No aromatic products were produced in the absence of NO 2 in the system. In the presence of UV irradiation, benzaldehyde was detected on the SiO 2 surface. Identical products were produced in the presence and absence of UV light over α-Fe 2 O 3 and BS. UV light promoted nitrite to nitrate on mineral particles surface. On the basisi of the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results, a portion of BS was reduced from Fe 3+ to Fe 2+ with the adsorption of toluene or the reaction with toluene and NO 2 . Sulfate may play a key role in the generation of nitrotoluene on BS particles. From this research, the heterogeneous reactions between organic and inorganic gases with aerosols that occur during smog events will be better understood.

  8. Feasibility Study of Venus Surfuce Cooling Using Chemical Reactions with the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    A literature search and theoretical analysis were conducted to investigate the feasibility of cooling a craft on Venus through chemical reformation of materials from the atmosphere. The core concept was to take carbon dioxide (CO2) from the Venus atmosphere and chemically reform it into simpler compounds such as carbon, oxygen, and carbon monoxide. This process is endothermic, taking energy from the surroundings to produce a cooling effect. A literature search was performed to document possible routes for achieving the desired reactions. Analyses indicated that on Venus, this concept could theoretically be used to produce cooling, but would not perform as well as a conventional heat pump. For environments other than Venus, the low theoretical performance limits general applicability of this concept, however this approach to cooling may be useful in niche applications. Analysis indicated that environments with particular atmospheric compositions and temperatures could allow a similar cooling system to operate with very good performance. This approach to cooling may also be useful where the products of reaction are also desirable, or for missions where design simplicity is valued. Conceptual designs for Venus cooling systems were developed using a modified concept, in which an expendable reactant supply would be used to promote more energetically favorable reactions with the ambient CO2, providing cooling for a more limited duration. This approach does not have the same performance issues, but the use of expendable supplies increases the mass requirements and limits the operating lifetime. This paper summarizes the findings of the literature search and corresponding analyses of the various cooling options

  9. Feasibility Study of Venus Surface Cooling Using Chemical Reactions with the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    A literature search and theoretical analysis were conducted to investigate the feasibility of cooling a craft on Venus through chemical reformation of materials from the atmosphere. The core concept was to take carbon dioxide (CO2) from the Venus atmosphere and chemically reform it into simpler compounds such as carbon, oxygen, and carbon monoxide. This process is endothermic, taking energy from the surroundings to produce a cooling effect. A literature search was performed to document possible routes for achieving the desired reactions. Analyses indicated that on Venus, this concept could theoretically be used to produce cooling, but would not perform as well as a conventional heat pump. For environments other than Venus, the low theoretical performance limits general applicability of this concept, however this approach to cooling may be useful in niche applications. Analysis indicated that environments with particular atmospheric compositions and temperatures could allow a similar cooling system to operate with very good performance. This approach to cooling may also be useful where the products of reaction are also desirable, or for missions where design simplicity is valued. Conceptual designs for Venus cooling systems were developed using a modified concept, in which an expendable reactant supply would be used to promote more energetically favorable reactions with the ambient CO2, providing cooling for a more limited duration. This approach does not have the same performance issues, but the use of expendable supplies increases the mass requirements and limits the operating lifetime. This paper summarizes the findings of the literature search and corresponding analyses of the various cooling options.

  10. Atmospheric reaction of Cl + methacrolein: a theoretical study on the mechanism, and pressure- and temperature-dependent rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cuihong; Xu, Baoen; Zhang, Shaowen

    2014-05-22

    Methacrolein is a major degradation product of isoprene, the reaction of methacrolein with Cl atoms may play some roles in the degradation of isoprene where these species are relatively abundant. However, the energetics and kinetics of this reaction, which govern the reaction branching, are still not well understood so far. In the present study, two-dimensional potential energy surfaces were constructed to analyze the minimum energy path of the barrierless addition process between Cl and the C═C double bond of methacrolein, which reveals that the terminal addition intermediate is directly formed from the addition reaction. The terminal addition intermediate can further yield different products among which the reaction paths abstracting the aldehyde hydrogen atom and the methyl hydrogen atom are dominant reaction exits. The minimum reaction path for the direct aldehydic hydrogen atom abstraction is also obtained. The reaction kinetics was calculated by the variational transition state theory in conjunction with the master equation method. From the theoretical model we predicted that the overall rate constant of the Cl + methacrolein reaction at 297 K and atmospheric pressure is koverall = 2.3× 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and the branching ratio of the aldehydic hydrogen abstraction is about 12%. The reaction is pressure dependent at P < 10 Torr with the high pressure limit at about 100 Torr. The calculated results could well account for the experimental observations.

  11. Theoretical study on the reaction of ground state cyano radical with propylene in Titan's atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C H; Kaiser, R I; Chang, A H H

    2009-11-12

    The bimolecular reaction of ground state cyano radical with propylene under the condition of single collision is investigated by combining ab initio electronic structure calculations for predicting reaction paths and RRKM theory to yield rate constant for each path. The isomerization and dissociation channels for each of the seven collision complexes are characterized by utilizing the unrestricted B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory and the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ calculations. Sifting with the facilitation of RRKM rate constants through web of ab initio paths composed of 8 collision complexes, 37 intermediates, and 12 H-, 23 H(2)-, 3 HCN-, and 4 CH(3)-dissociated products, we identify the most probable paths down to 7-9 species at collisions energies of 0 and 5 kcal/mol as the reaction mechanisms. The rate equations of the reaction mechanisms are solved numerically such that the concentration evolutions for all species involved are obtained. This study predicts that CN + C(2)H(3)CH(3) reaction via any of the seven collision complex, c1-c5, c7, and c8, would produce p1(CH(3)CHCHCN) + H, p2(CH(2)CHCH(2)CN) + H, and mostly p43(vinyl cyanide) + CH(3) for collision energy within 0-5 kcal/mol. In addition to the insertion mechanism through collision complex, the direct H-abstraction of propylene by CN radical might occur. Our investigation indicates that the barrierless and exoergic CN(X(2)Sigma(+)) + C(2)H(3)CH(3)(X(1)A') reaction would be an efficient route for the p1, p2, and p43, and likely HCN formation in cold molecular clouds and in the atmosphere of Saturn's satellite Titan.

  12. Kinetics of Thermochemical Reactions Important in the Venus Atmospheric Sulfur Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to experimentally measure the rates of several thermochemical gas-solid reactions between sulfur gases in the Venus atmosphere and reactive minerals on the hot Venus surface. Despite the great importance of these reactions for the maintenance of significant amounts of sulfur gases (and thus for the maintenance of the global cloud cover) in the atmosphere of Venus, essentially no kinetic data are currently available for them.

  13. A study of aqueous phase reactions relevant for atmospheric chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loegager, T.

    1993-12-31

    The subject of this thesis being aqueous phase atmospheric chemistry, species of atmospheric relevance such ad ozone (O{sub 3}) ferrous ion (Fe{sup 2+}), the ferryl ion (FeO{sup 2+}), hydrogen perioxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), the nitrite and nitrate ion and their acids, peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH), peroxynitric acid (O{sub 2}NOOH), and the radicals {sub a}{sup -}{sub q}, H, OH, HO{sub 2}/O{sub 2}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}, NO{sub 3}{sup =}, and SO{sub 4}{sup -}, have all been studied. The ai has been to study spectra, extinction coefficients, specific rate constants, kinetic mechanisms, and pK`s using the stopped-flow and pulse radiolysis techniques, combined with an indispensable chemical kinetics simulations program. (au).

  14. Flame Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Coupled with Negative Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Ion Molecule Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Bhat, Suhail Muzaffar; Shiea, Jentaie

    2017-07-01

    Flame atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (FAPCI) combined with negative electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry was developed to detect the ion/molecule reactions (IMRs) products between nitric acid (HNO3) and negatively charged amino acid, angiotensin I (AI) and angiotensin II (AII), and insulin ions. Nitrate and HNO3-nitrate ions were detected in the oxyacetylene flame, suggesting that a large quantity of nitric acid (HNO3) was produced in the flame. The HNO3 and negatively charged analyte ions produced by a negative ESI source were delivered into each arm of a Y-shaped stainless steel tube where they merged and reacted. The products were subsequently characterized with an ion trap mass analyzer attached to the exit of the Y-tube. HNO3 showed the strongest affinity to histidine and formed (Mhistidine-H+HNO3)- complex ions, whereas some amino acids did not react with HNO3 at all. Reactions between HNO3 and histidine residues in AI and AII resulted in the formation of dominant [MAI-H+(HNO3)]- and [MAII-H+(HNO3)]- ions. Results from analyses of AAs and insulin indicated that HNO3 could not only react with basic amino acid residues, but also with disulfide bonds to form [M-3H+(HNO3)n]3- complex ions. This approach is useful for obtaining information about the number of basic amino acid residues and disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins.

  15. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  16. Middle atmosphere heating by exothermic chemical reactions involving odd-hydrogen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Solomon, Susan

    1991-01-01

    The rate of heating which occurs in the middle atmosphere due to four exothermic reactions involving members of the odd-hydrogen family is calculated. The following reactions are considered: O + OH yields O2 + H; H + O2 + M yields HO2 + M; H + O3 yields OH + O2; and O + HO2 yields OH + O2. It is shown that the heating rates due to these reactions rival the oxygen-related heating rates conventionally considered in middle-atmosphere models. The conversion of chemical potential energy into molecular translational energy (heat) by these odd-hydrogen reactions is shown to be a significant energy source in the middle atmosphere that has not been previously considered.

  17. Atmospheric chemistry of CF3C(O)O2 radicals. Kinetics of their reaction with NO2 and kinetics of the thermal decomposition of the product CF3C(O)O2NO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallington, T.J.; Sehested, J.; Nielsen, O.J.

    1994-01-01

    decomposition CF3C(O)O2NO2. The rate of decomposition of CF3C(O)O2NO2 was independent of the total pressure of N2 diluent over the range 100-700 Torr and was fit by the expression k-1 = (1.9(-1.5)+7.6) x 10(16) exp[(-14000 +/- 480)/T] s-1. Implications for the atmospheric chemistry of CFC replacements...

  18. Reactions of Azine Anions with Nitrogen and Oxygen Atoms: Implications for Titan's Upper Atmosphere and Interstellar Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Cole, Callie A; Demarais, Nicholas J; Snow, Theodore P; Bierbaum, Veronica M

    2015-08-26

    Azines are important in many extraterrestrial environments, from the atmosphere of Titan to the interstellar medium. They have been implicated as possible carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands in astronomy, indicating their persistence in interstellar space. Most importantly, they constitute the basic building blocks of DNA and RNA, so their chemical reactivity in these environments has significant astrobiological implications. In addition, N and O atoms are widely observed in the ISM and in the ionospheres of planets and moons. However, the chemical reactions of molecular anions with abundant interstellar and atmospheric atomic species are largely unexplored. In this paper, gas-phase reactions of deprotonated anions of benzene, pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, pyrazine, and s-triazine with N and O atoms are studied both experimentally and computationally. In all cases, the major reaction channel is associative electron detachment; these reactions are particularly important since they control the balance between negative ions and free electron densities. The reactions of the azine anions with N atoms exhibit larger rate constants than reactions of corresponding chain anions. The reactions of azine anions with O atoms are even more rapid, with complex product patterns for different reactants. The mechanisms are studied theoretically by employing density functional theory; spin conversion is found to be important in determining some product distributions. The rich gas-phase chemistry observed in this work provides a better understanding of ion-atom reactions and their contributions to ionospheric chemistry as well as the chemical processing that occurs in the boundary layers between diffuse and dense interstellar clouds.

  19. The Atmospheric Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds Through Hydrogen Shift Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Hasse Christian

    In this thesis the unimolecular hydrogen transfer reactions (H-shift) in peroxy and acyl peroxy radicals derived from the atmospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) have been investigated. A unimolecular isomerization reaction where a hydrogen atom is moved internally within...... the reaction rate constants of the H-shift reactions. The autoxidation of volatile organic compounds is an important oxidation mechanism that produces secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and recycles hydroxyl (OH) radicals. The autoxidation cycle produces a second generation peroxy radical (OOQOOH) through...

  20. The Atmospherically Important Reaction of Hydroxyl Radicals with Methyl Nitrate: A Theoretical Study Involving the Calculation of Reaction Mechanisms, Enthalpies, Activation Energies, and Rate Coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Maggie; Mok, Daniel K W; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M

    2017-09-07

    A theoretical study, involving the calculation of reaction enthalpies, activation energies, mechanisms, and rate coefficients, was made of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with methyl nitrate, an important process for methyl nitrate removal in the earth's atmosphere. Four reaction channels were considered: formation of H 2 O + CH 2 ONO 2 , CH 3 OOH + NO 2 , CH 3 OH + NO 3 , and CH 3 O + HNO 3 . For all channels, geometry optimization and frequency calculations were performed at the M06-2X/6-31+G** level, while relative energies were improved at the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS level. The major channel is found to be the H abstraction channel, to give the products H 2 O + CH 2 ONO 2 . The reaction enthalpy (ΔH 298 K RX ) of this channel is computed as -17.90 kcal mol -1 . Although the other reaction channels are also exothermic, their reaction barriers are high (>24 kcal mol -1 ), and therefore these reactions do not contribute to the overall rate coefficient in the temperature range considered (200-400 K). Pathways via three transition states were identified for the H abstraction channel. Rate coefficients were calculated for these pathways at various levels of variational transition state theory including tunneling. The results obtained are used to distinguish between two sets of experimental rate coefficients, measured in the temperature range of 200-400 K, one of which is approximately an order of magnitude greater than the other. This comparison, as well as the temperature dependence of the computed rate coefficients, shows that the lower experimental values are favored. The implications of the results to atmospheric chemistry are discussed.

  1. Reactions of CF3O radicals with selected alkenes and aromatics under atmospheric conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, C.; Sidebottom, H.W.; Treacy, J.

    1994-01-01

    Rate data for the reactions of CF3O radicals with alkenes and aromatic compounds have been determined at 298 K using a relative rate method. The data are analyzed in terms of structure-reactivity relationships, and their importance to the atmospheric chemistry of CF3O discussed.......Rate data for the reactions of CF3O radicals with alkenes and aromatic compounds have been determined at 298 K using a relative rate method. The data are analyzed in terms of structure-reactivity relationships, and their importance to the atmospheric chemistry of CF3O discussed....

  2. Reactions of isoprene and sulphoxy radical-anions - a possible source of atmospheric organosulphites and organosulphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudziński, K. J.; Gmachowski, L.; Kuznietsova, I.

    2009-03-01

    Transformation of isoprene coupled with auto-oxidation of SIV in aqueous solutions was studied experimentally and by chemical-kinetic modelling over a broad range of solution acidities (pH=3-9) to complement the research on aqueous-phase and heterogeneous transformation of isoprene reported recently by many laboratories. Isoprene significantly slowed down the auto-oxidation in acidic and basic solutions, and accelerated it slightly in neutral solutions. Simultaneously, production of sulphate ions and formation of solution acidity were significantly reduced. Formation of sulphite and sulphate derivatives of isoprene - sulphurous acid mono-(2-methyl-4-oxo-but-2-enyl) ester (m/z=163), sulphurous acid mono-(4-hydroxy-2-methyl-but-2-enyl) ester (m/z=165), sulphuric acid mono-(2-methyl-4-oxo-but-2-enyl) ester (m/z=179), sulphuric acid mono-(4-hydroxy-2-methyl-but-2-enyl) ester (m/z=181), and possible structural isomers of these species - was indicated by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometric analysis of post-reaction mixtures. The experimental results were explained by changes in a subtle quantitative balance of three superimposed processes whose rates depended in different manner on the acidity of reacting solutions - the scavenging of sulphoxy radical-anions by isoprene, the formation of sulphoxy radical-anions during further reactions of isoprene radicals, and the auto-oxidation of SIV itself. A chemical mechanism based on this idea was explored numerically to show good agreement with experimental data. In basic and neutral solutions, the model overestimated the consumption of isoprene, probably because reactions of primary sulphite and sulphate derivatives of isoprene with sulphoxy radical-anions were not included. Interaction of isoprene with sulphur(IV) species and oxygen can possibly result in formation of new organosulphate and organosulphite components of atmospheric aerosols and waters, and influence the distribution of reactive sulphur and oxygen species

  3. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, David L

    2017-05-05

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low-temperature combustion and in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in Earth's atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization makes characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, and master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  4. Kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry reactions of the nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, R. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Data sheets for thermal and photochemical reactions of importance in the atmospheric chemistry of the nitrogen oxides are presented. For each reaction the available experimental data are summarized and critically evaluated, and a preferred value of the rate coefficient is given. The selection of the preferred value is discussed and an estimate of its accuracy is given. For the photochemical process, the data are summarized, and preferred for the photoabsorption cross section and primary quantum yields are given.

  5. Comparison of the Reaction Behavior of Hexagonal Silicon Carbide Powder in Different Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Enhui; Hou, Xinmei; Chen, Junhong; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2017-10-01

    The reaction behavior of hexagonal silicon carbide (h-SiC) powder under different atmospheres including dry air, air containing 20 vol pct water vapor, and Ar containing 20 vol pct water vapor at 1373 K to 1773 K (1100 °C to 1500 °C) for 10 hours has been investigated and compared. The SiC powder exhibits good oxidation resistance up to 1373 K (1100 °C) and its reaction behavior depends on both the temperature and atmosphere. Below 1773 K (1500 °C), water vapor can promote the formation of pores and enhance the oxidation of SiC powder. However, it tends to aggravate the surface sintering and intensify the volatilization reaction at 1773 K (1500 °C). This phenomenon is further verified with the increasing water vapor content. Based on this, a gas-solid model is adopted to deal with the corresponding reaction kinetics, and especially both oxidation and volatilization reactions are considered when dealing with the reaction kinetics of SiC powder in water-containing atmospheres.

  6. Strangeness production in Pontecorvo reactions on deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Regenfus, C

    1999-01-01

    From a K sup 0 sub S and LAMBDA enriched data sample the rare Pontecorvo reactions pbard -> LAMBDA K sup 0 and pbard -> SIGMA sup 0 K sup 0 were clearly observed for the first time. Analyses for missing K sup 0 sub L or charged decaying K sup 0 sub S in the final state show surprisingly similar branching ratios (approx 2 centre dot 10 sup - sup 6) for both reactions. This rules out a description of these reaction by a two step mechanism and favours strongly a model of a statistically decaying fireball, formed in the annihilation process. From comparison to the channel pbard -> p pi sup - open strangeness is found to be produced at a level of 10 %. Additional reactions of the Pontecorvo type were identified where the recoiling baryon is a neutron and the meson decays to K sup 0 sub S K sup 0 sub S.

  7. Aqueous-Phase Reactions of Isoprene with Sulfoxy Radical Anions as a way of Wet Aerosol Formation in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznietsova, I.; Rudzinski, K. J.; Szmigielski, R.; Laboratory of the Environmental Chemistry

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols exhibit an important role in the environment. They have implications on human health and life, and - in the larger scale - on climate, the Earth's radiative balance and the cloud's formation. Organic matter makes up a significant fraction of atmospheric aerosols (~35% to ~90%) and may originate from direct emissions (primary organic aerosol, POA) or result from complex physico-chemical processes of volatile organic compounds (secondary organic aerosol, SOA). Isoprene (2-methyl-buta-1,3-diene) is one of the relevant volatile precursor of ambient SOA in the atmosphere. It is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted to the atmosphere as a result of living vegetation. According to the recent data, the isoprene emission rate is estimated to be at the level of 500 TgC per year. While heterogeneous transformations of isoprene have been well documented, aqueous-phase reactions of this hydrocarbon with radical species that lead to the production of new class of wet SOA components such as polyols and their sulfate esters (organosulfates), are still poorly recognized. The chain reactions of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions (SRA) are one of the recently researched route leading to the formation of organosulfates in the aqueous phase. The letter radical species originate from the auto-oxidation of sulfur dioxide in the aqueous phase and are behind the phenomenon of atmospheric acid rain formation. This is a complicated chain reaction that is catalyzed by transition metal ions, such as manganese(II), iron(III) and propagated by sulfoxy radical anions . The presented work addresses the chemical interaction of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions in the water solution in the presence of nitrite ions and nitrous acid, which are important trace components of the atmosphere. We showed that nitrite ions and nitrous acid significantly altered the kinetics of the auto-oxidation of SO2 in the presence of isoprene at different solution acidity from 2 to 8

  8. Mutagenicity in Salmonella of a Simulated Urban-Smog Atmosphere Generated Using a Mobile Reaction Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA Mobile Reaction Chamber (MRC) is a 24-foot trailer containing a 14.3-m3 Teflon lined photochemical chamber used to generate simulated urban atmospheres. Photochemistry in the MRC is catalyzed by 120 fluorescent bulbs evenly mixed with black light bulbs and UV bulbs (300 &...

  9. Carbon Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Reactions of Atmospheric NMHC with OH, Cl and O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. S.; Iannone, R.; Thompson, A. E.; Huang, L.; Ernst, D.; Rudolph, J.

    2003-12-01

    It has recently been shown that stable carbon isotope measurements are extremely useful for better understanding of processes involving NMHC in the atmosphere. Knowledge of the isotopic fractionation associated with the chemical removal of NMHC is vital for the interpretation of these measurements. Oxidation by OH-radicals is by far the most important atmospheric removal process of NMHC. Contributions to isotopic fractionation due to removal by reactions with Cl and O3 should also be understood to better interpret stable carbon isotope measurements. From our measurements, in normal urban and background air, reactions with O3 account for 15-25% of the isotopic fractionation in light C2-C4 alkenes. In polar sunrise conditions, reactions with Cl atoms may have a significant impact on the isotopic fractionation in light alkanes. An overview of the measured KIEs for the reactions of C2-C9 NMHC with atmospheric oxidants OH, Cl and O3 will be presented. Possibilities for using specific structural and thermal dependencies of measured KIEs for estimations of unmeasured KIEs of atmospheric interest will be discussed.

  10. Dynamical Studies of Chemical Reactions Relevant to the Local Atmosphere of the Orbiting Space Shuttle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    1998-01-01

    ...: The contractor will measure differential cross sections for reactions of O(3P), 0(1D) and OH(2P) with various radial and molecules present in the local atmosphere of the space shuttle in low earth orbit as described in the original proposal for this work.

  11. The Heck reaction in the production of fine chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, Johannes G. de

    2001-01-01

    An overview is given of the use of the Heck reaction for the production of fine chemicals. Five commercial products have been identified that are produced on a scale in excess of 1 ton/year. The herbicide Prosulfuron™ is produced via a Matsuda reaction of 2-sulfonatobenzenediazonium on

  12. Reactions between Criegee Intermediates and the Inorganic Acids HCl and HNO3 : Kinetics and Atmospheric Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Elizabeth S; Kapnas, Kara M; Murray, Craig

    2016-08-22

    Criegee intermediates (CIs) are a class of reactive radicals that are thought to play a key role in atmospheric chemistry through reactions with trace species that can lead to aerosol particle formation. Recent work has suggested that water vapor is likely to be the dominant sink for some CIs, although reactions with trace species that are sufficiently rapid can be locally competitive. Herein, we use broadband transient absorption spectroscopy to measure rate constants for the reactions of the simplest CI, CH2 OO, with two inorganic acids, HCl and HNO3 , both of which are present in polluted urban atmospheres. Both reactions are fast; at 295 K, the reactions of CH2 OO with HCl and HNO3 have rate constants of 4.6×10(-11)  cm(3)  s(-1) and 5.4×10(-10)  cm(3)  s(-1) , respectively. Complementary quantum-chemical calculations show that these reactions form substituted hydroperoxides with no energy barrier. The results suggest that reactions of CIs with HNO3 in particular are likely to be competitive with those with water vapor in polluted urban areas under conditions of modest relative humidity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Conjugate products of pyocyanin-glutathione reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheluvappa, Rajkumar; Eri, Rajaraman

    2015-08-05

    This "Letter to the Editor" is a "gentle but purposeful rejoinder" to specific comments made in pages 36-37 of your Muller and Merrett (2015) publication regarding the data presented in our Cheluvappa et al. (2008) paper. Our rebuttal topics include the effect of oxygen on the pyocyanin-glutathione reaction, relevance of reaction-duration to pathophysiology, rationale of experiments, veracity of statements germane to molecular-structure construction, and correction of hyperbole. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Influence of CO2 Admixtures on the Product Composition in a Nitrogen-Methane Atmospheric Glow Discharge Used as a Prebiotic Atmosphere Mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazankova, V; Torokova, L; Krcma, F; Mason, N J; Matejcik, S

    2016-11-01

    This work extends our previous experimental studies of the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere by atmospheric glow discharge. The Titan's atmosphere seems to be similarly to early Earth atmospheric composition. The exploration of Titan atmosphere was initiated by the exciting results of the Cassini-Huygens mission and obtained results increased the interest about prebiotic atmospheres. Present work is devoted to the role of CO2 in the prebiotic atmosphere chemistry. Most of the laboratory studies of such atmosphere were focused on the chemistry of N2 + CH4 mixtures. The present work is devoted to the study of the oxygenated volatile species in prebiotic atmosphere, specifically CO2 reactivity. CO2 was introduced to the standard N2 + CH4 mixture at different mixing ratio up to 5 % CH4 and 3 % CO2. The reaction products were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. This work shows that CO2 modifies the composition of the gas phase with the detection of oxygenated compounds: CO and others oxides. There is a strong influence of CO2 on increasing concentration other products as cyanide (HCN) and ammonia (NH3).

  15. Maillard reaction products in pet foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van C.

    2015-01-01

    Pet dogs and cats around the world are commonly fed processed commercial foods throughout their lives. Often heat treatments are used during the processing of these foods to improve nutrient digestibility, shelf life, and food safety. Processing is known to induce the Maillard reaction, in which a

  16. Pontecorvo reactions on deuterium with strangeness production

    CERN Document Server

    Regenfus, C

    2000-01-01

    From a K sup 0 sub S and LAMBDA enriched data sample first clear evidence for the rare Pontecorvo reactions reactions p-bard-> LAMBDA K sup 0 and p-bard-> SIGMA sup 0 K sup 0 (SIGMA sup 0-> LAMBDA gamma, LAMBDA->p pi sup -) were found. The data taken with the Crystal-Barrel detector at LEAR, triggered on secondary vertices by means of a Si-micro-strip detector. Detailed analyses for K sup 0 sub L (missing) or K sup 0 sub S (-> pi sup +pi sup -) in the final state show surprisingly similar branching ratios for d-bar-> LAMBDA K sup 0 and d-bar-> SIGMA sup 0 K sup 0. This rules out a description of a Pontecorvo reaction by a two step process and favours strongly a model of a statistically decaying fireball, formed in the annihilation process. >From comparison to the channel d-bar->p pi sup - open strangeness is found to be produced at a level of 10 %. Additional reactions of the Pontecorvo type were identified where the recoiling baryon is a neutron and the meson decays to K sup 0 sub S K sup 0 sub S.

  17. MODIS Atmospheric L2 Browse Cloud Optical Thickness Product (TERRA Browse Product)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is browse product: "MODIS Atmospheric L2 Browse Cloud Optical Thickness Product" Data set information: http://modis-atmos.gsfc.nasa.gov/ [placeholder metadata

  18. Quality Assessment of Collection 6 MODIS Atmospheric Science Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, V. S.; Ridgway, B.; Platnick, S. E.; Devadiga, S.; Mauoka, E.

    2015-12-01

    Since the launch of the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively, atmosphere and land data acquired by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor on-board these satellites have been reprocessed five times at the MODAPS (MODIS Adaptive Processing System) located at NASA GSFC. The global land and atmosphere products use science algorithms developed by the NASA MODIS science team investigators. MODAPS completed Collection 6 reprocessing of MODIS Atmosphere science data products in April 2015 and is currently generating the Collection 6 products using the latest version of the science algorithms. This reprocessing has generated one of the longest time series of consistent data records for understanding cloud, aerosol, and other constituents in the earth's atmosphere. It is important to carefully evaluate and assess the quality of this data and remove any artifacts to maintain a useful climate data record. Quality Assessment (QA) is an integral part of the processing chain at MODAPS. This presentation will describe the QA approaches and tools adopted by the MODIS Land/Atmosphere Operational Product Evaluation (LDOPE) team to assess the quality of MODIS operational Atmospheric products produced at MODAPS. Some of the tools include global high resolution images, time series analysis and statistical QA metrics. The new high resolution global browse images with pan and zoom have provided the ability to perform QA of products in real time through synoptic QA on the web. This global browse generation has been useful in identifying production error, data loss, and data quality issues from calibration error, geolocation error and algorithm performance. A time series analysis for various science datasets in the Level-3 monthly product was recently developed for assessing any long term drifts in the data arising from instrument errors or other artifacts. This presentation will describe and discuss some test cases from the

  19. Prompt atmospheric neutrino production of W-bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Berezinsky, Veniamin Sergeevich; Schramm, D N

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the recent CERN beam dump experiment implying direct neutrino production provides a straightforward way to detect W-bosons via ultrahigh energy cosmic rays hitting the atmosphere. This occurs because (1) at high energies, direct neutrinos will dominate over the standard pi , K produced flux due to time dilation effects and (2) direct pi -production produces a large fraction of nu /sub e/. (13 refs).

  20. Positive feedback between increasing atmospheric CO2 and ecosystem productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, I.; Hamilton, S. K.; Robertson, G. P.

    2009-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 will likely affect both the hydrologic cycle and ecosystem productivity. Current assumptions that increasing CO2 will lead to increased ecosystem productivity and plant water use efficiency (WUE) are driving optimistic predictions of higher crop yields as well as greater availability of freshwater resources due to a decrease in evapotranspiration. The plant physiological response that drives these effects is believed to be an increase in carbon uptake either by (a) stronger CO2 gradient between the stomata and the atmosphere, or by (b) reduced CO2 limitation of enzymatic carboxylation within the leaf. The (a) scenario will lead to increased water use efficiency (WUE) in plants. However, evidence for increased WUE is mostly based on modeling studies, and experiments producing a short duration or step-wise increase in CO2 concentration (e.g. free-air CO2 enrichment). We hypothesize that the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration is having a positive effect on ecosystem productivity and WUE. To investigate this hypothesis, we analyzed meteorological, ANPP, and soil CO2 flux datasets together with carbon isotopic ratio (13C/12C) of archived plant samples from the long term ecological research (LTER) program at Kellogg Biological Station. The datasets were collected between 1989 and 2007 (corresponding to an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration of ~33 ppmv at Mauna Loa). Wheat (Triticum aestivum) samples taken from 1989 and 2007 show a significant decrease in the C isotope discrimination factor (Δ) over time. Stomatal conductance is directly related to Δ, and thus Δ is inversely related to plant intrinsic WUE (iWUE). Historical changes in the 13C/12C ratio (δ13C) in samples of a perennial forb, Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), taken from adjacent successional fields, indicate changes in Δ upon uptake of CO2 as well. These temporal trends in Δ suggest a positive feedback between the increasing CO2 concentration in the

  1. Reaction of benzene with atomic carbon: pathways to fulvenallene and the fulvenallenyl radical in extraterrestrial atmospheres and the interstellar medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gabriel

    2014-06-05

    The reaction of benzene with ground-state atomic carbon, C((3)P), has been investigated using the G3X-K composite quantum chemical method. A suite of novel energetically favorable pathways that lead to previously unconsidered products are identified. Reaction is initiated by barrierless C atom cycloaddition to benzene on the triplet surface, producing a vibrationally excited [C7H6]* adduct that can dissociate to the cycloheptatrienyl radical (+ H) via a relatively loose transition state 4.4 kcal mol(-1) below the reactant energies. This study also identifies that this reaction adduct can isomerize to generate five-membered ring intermediates that can further dissociate to the global C7H5 minima, the fulvenallenyl radical (+ H), or to c-C5H4 and acetylene, with limiting barriers around 20 and 10 kcal mol(-1) below the reactants, respectively. If intersystem crossing to the singlet surface occurs, isomerization pathways that are lower-yet in energy are available leading to the C7H6 minima fulvenallene, with all barriers over 40 kcal mol(-1) below the reactants. From here further barrierless fragmentation to fulvenallenyl + H can proceed at ca. 25 kcal mol(-1) below the reactants. In the reducing atmospheres of planets like Jupiter and satellites like Titan, where benzene and C((3)P) are both expected, it is proposed that fulvenallene and the fulvenallenyl radical would be the dominant products of the C6H6 + C((3)P) reaction. Fulvenallenyl may also be a significant reaction product under collision-free conditions representative of the interstellar medium, although further work is required here to confirm the identity of the C7H5 radical product.

  2. Application of an atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer to chlorination reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure mass spectrometric sampling system, based on a free jet expansion was used to study certain M-Cl-O reactions at high temperatures. The apparatus enables the volatile species from a 1-atm chemical process to be directly identified with a mass spectrometer which operates at approx. 10 to the minus 8th power torr. Studies for both pure metals and alloys are discussed. It is shown that this mass spectrometer system aids in identifying the volatile species, and provides fundamental information on the reaction mechanism.

  3. A product study of the isoprene+NO3 reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Cohen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of isoprene through reaction with NO3 radicals is a significant sink for isoprene that persists after dark. The main products of the reaction are multifunctional nitrates. These nitrates constitute a significant NOx sink in the nocturnal boundary layer and they likely play an important role in formation of secondary organic aerosol. Products of the isoprene+NO3 reaction will, in many locations, be abundant enough to affect nighttime radical chemistry and to persist into daytime where they may represent a source of NOx. Product formation in the isoprene + NO3 reaction was studied in a smog chamber at Purdue University. Isoprene nitrates and other hydrocarbon products were observed using Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS and reactive nitrogen products were observed using Thermal Dissociation–Laser Induced Fluorescence (TD-LIF. The organic nitrate yield is found to be 65±12% of which the majority was nitrooxy carbonyls and the combined yield of methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone (MACR+MVK is found to be ∼10%. PTR-MS measurements of nitrooxy carbonyls and TD-LIF measurements of total organic nitrates agreed well. The PTR-MS also observed a series of minor oxidation products which were tentatively identified and their yields quantified These other oxidation products are used as additional constraints on the reaction mechanism.

  4. Quantitation of Maillard reaction products in commercially available pet foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van C.; Bosch, G.; Poel, van der A.F.B.; Wierenga, P.A.; Alexander, L.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    During processing of pet food, the Maillard reaction occurs, which reduces the bioavailability of essential amino acids such as lysine and results in the formation of advanced Maillard reaction products (MRPs). The aim of this study was to quantitate MRPs (fructoselysine (FL), carboxymethyllysine

  5. Products of the Benzene + O(3P) Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Meloni, Giovanni; Trevitt, Adam J.; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Krylov, Anna I.; Sirjean, Baptiste; Dames, Enoch; Wang, Hai

    2009-12-21

    The gas-phase reaction of benzene with O(3P) is of considerable interest for modeling of aromatic oxidation, and also because there exist fundamental questions concerning the prominence of intersystem crossing in the reaction. While its overall rate constant has been studied extensively, there are still significant uncertainties in the product distribution. The reaction proceeds mainly through the addition of the O atom to benzene, forming an initial triplet diradical adduct, which can either dissociate to form the phenoxy radical and H atom, or undergo intersystem crossing onto a singlet surface, followed by a multiplicity of internal isomerizations, leading to several possible reaction products. In this work, we examined the product branching ratios of the reaction between benzene and O(3P) over the temperature range of 300 to 1000 K and pressure range of 1 to 10 Torr. The reactions were initiated by pulsed-laser photolysis of NO2 in the presence of benzene and helium buffer in a slow-flow reactor, and reaction products were identified by using the multiplexed chemical kinetics photoionization mass spectrometer operating at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Phenol and phenoxy radical were detected and quantified. Cyclopentadiene and cyclopentadienyl radical were directly identified for the first time. Finally, ab initio calculations and master equation/RRKM modeling were used to reproduce the experimental branching ratios, yielding pressure-dependent rate expressions for the reaction channels, including phenoxy + H, phenol, cyclopentadiene + CO, which are proposed for kinetic modeling of benzene oxidation.

  6. Antioxidant activity of maillard reaction products from lysine-glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maillard reaction (MR) was carried out in L-lysine-D-glucose (Lys-Glu) model system heated at 120°C for 0 to 10 h without pH control. Optical property (UV-Vis absorbance and fluorescence) development of MR was monitored. Antioxidant activity of maillard reaction products (MRPs) was investigated by a series of in vitro ...

  7. Influence of reaction products on the selective oxidation of ethene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, E.P.S.; Schouten, E.P.S.; Borman, P.C.; Borman, P.C.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1996-01-01

    The kinetics of the selective oxidation of ethene in air over an industrial silver on ¿-alumina catalyst were studied. Special attention was paid to the influence of the reaction products on the reaction rates of epoxidation and complete combustion. Kinetic data were obtained in two different types

  8. Cyclometalation reactions five-membered ring products as universal reagents

    CERN Document Server

    Omae, Iwao

    2014-01-01

    Offering unrivalled breadth of coverage on the topic, this review of cyclometalation reactions and organometallic intramolecular-coordination five-membered ring products includes discussion of vital commercial aspects such as synthetic applications.

  9. Charmonium production in p̄-induced reactions on nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larionov Alexei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of charmonia in the antiproton-nucleus reactions at plab = 3 − 10 GeV/c is studied within the Glauber model and the generalized eikonal approximation. The main reaction channel is charmonium formation in an antiproton-proton collision. The target mass dependence of the charmonium transparency ratio allows to determine the charmonium-nucleon cross section. The polarization effects in the production of χc2 states are evaluated.

  10. Atmospheric reaction systems as null-models to identify structural traces of evolution in metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Petter; Huss, Mikael; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2011-05-06

    The metabolism is the motor behind the biological complexity of an organism. One problem of characterizing its large-scale structure is that it is hard to know what to compare it to. All chemical reaction systems are shaped by the same physics that gives molecules their stability and affinity to react. These fundamental factors cannot be captured by standard null-models based on randomization. The unique property of organismal metabolism is that it is controlled, to some extent, by an enzymatic machinery that is subject to evolution. In this paper, we explore the possibility that reaction systems of planetary atmospheres can serve as a null-model against which we can define metabolic structure and trace the influence of evolution. We find that the two types of data can be distinguished by their respective degree distributions. This is especially clear when looking at the degree distribution of the reaction network (of reaction connected to each other if they involve the same molecular species). For the Earth's atmospheric network and the human metabolic network, we look into more detail for an underlying explanation of this deviation. However, we cannot pinpoint a single cause of the difference, rather there are several concurrent factors. By examining quantities relating to the modular-functional organization of the metabolism, we confirm that metabolic networks have a more complex modular organization than the atmospheric networks, but not much more. We interpret the more variegated modular arrangement of metabolism as a trace of evolved functionality. On the other hand, it is quite remarkable how similar the structures of these two types of networks are, which emphasizes that the constraints from the chemical properties of the molecules has a larger influence in shaping the reaction system than does natural selection.

  11. Reactions of SIV species with organic compounds: formation mechanisms of organo-sulfur derivatives in atmospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passananti, Monica; Shang, Jing; Dupart, Yoan; Perrier, Sébastien; George, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have an important impact on climate, air quality and human health. However the chemical reactions involved in their formation and growth are not fully understood or well-constrained in climate models. It is well known that inorganic sulfur (mainly in oxidation states (+IV) and (+VI)) plays a key role in aerosol formation, for instance sulfuric acid is known to be a good nucleating gas. In addition, acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions of organic compounds has shown to produce new particles, with a clear enhancement in the presence of ozone (Iinuma 2013). Organosulfates have been detected in tropospheric particles and aqueous phases, which suggests they are products of secondary organic aerosol formation process (Tolocka 2012). Originally, the production of organosulfates was explained by the esterification reaction of alcohols, but this reaction in atmosphere is kinetically negligible. Other formation pathways have been suggested such as hydrolysis of peroxides and reaction of organic matter with sulfite and sulfate radical anions (SO3-, SO4-) (Nozière 2010), but it remains unclear if these can completely explain atmospheric organo-sulfur aerosol loading. To better understand the formation of organo-sulfur compounds, we started to investigate the reactivity of SIV species (SO2 and SO32-) with respect to specific functional groups (organic acids and double bonds) on atmospherically relevant carboxylic acids and alkenes. The experiments were carried out in the homogeneous aqueous phase and at the solid-gas interface. A custom built coated-wall flow tube reactor was developed to control relativity humidity, SO2 concentration, temperature and gas flow rate. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction kinetics were measured and resulting products were identified using liquid chromatography coupled with an orbitrap mass spectrometer (LC-HR-MS). The experiments were performed with and without the presence of ozone in order to evaluate any

  12. Energy conservation and maximal entropy production in enzyme reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobovišek, Andrej; Vitas, Marko; Brumen, Milan; Fajmut, Aleš

    2017-08-01

    A procedure for maximization of the density of entropy production in a single stationary two-step enzyme reaction is developed. Under the constraints of mass conservation, fixed equilibrium constant of a reaction and fixed products of forward and backward enzyme rate constants the existence of maximum in the density of entropy production is demonstrated. In the state with maximal density of entropy production the optimal enzyme rate constants, the stationary concentrations of the substrate and the product, the stationary product yield as well as the stationary reaction flux are calculated. The test, whether these calculated values of the reaction parameters are consistent with their corresponding measured values, is performed for the enzyme Glucose Isomerase. It is found that calculated and measured rate constants agree within an order of magnitude, whereas the calculated reaction flux and the product yield differ from their corresponding measured values for less than 20 % and 5 %, respectively. This indicates that the enzyme Glucose Isomerase, considered in a non-equilibrium stationary state, as found in experiments using the continuous stirred tank reactors, possibly operates close to the state with the maximum in the density of entropy production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Adsorption and reactions of atmospheric constituents and pollutants on ice particles: an FTIR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudakova, A. V.; Marinov, I. L.; Poretskiy, M. S.; Tsyganenko, A. A.

    2009-04-01

    , which act as adsorption sites either as a proton-donor or as a donor of the lone pair of electrons. Such adsorption-induced relaxation explains the dependence of physico-chemical properties of icy particles on the presence of atmospheric gases. Spectra HCN/D2O and ND3/D2O mixed icy films with low (1:10) dopant/water ratios do not manifest any changes in the acidic or basic properties of dangling hydroxyl groups or surface oxygen atoms, but reveal a difference in the proportion between the concentrations of these sites as compared with that for pure water ice. For high dopant concentrations (1:1), the dangling hydroxyls were not observed; the dominant adsorption sites for CO are likely to be the unsaturated oxygen atoms, while serious structural changes occur in the bulk of ices. Ecologically important reactions of atmospheric pollutants such as ozonolysis of ethene, chlorinated ethenes, hydrogen cyanide, and methyl bromide adsorbed on water ice film as well as the influence of UV radiation on this process have been studied in 77 - 200 K temperature range by FTIR spectroscopy. Ozone co-adsorption with ethene or C2H3Cl readily leads to ozonolysis reaction, which also starts for C2H2Cl2 isomers but only at temperatures elevated up to 120 - 150 K. Co-adsorption of O3 with HCN or CH3Br molecules in the dark does not lead to any noticeable spectral changes. Irradiation of HCN or CH3Br deposited on ice films in the presence of ozone leads to appearance of new bands revealing the formation of ozonolysis products. The same "synergetic effect" of simultaneous action of ozone and UV radiation at 77 K, was found for C2H2Cl2 isomers and C2Cl4, which are resistant against O3 even at higher temperatures. The obtained spectral dependence of photo-ozonolysis of C2Cl4 and HCN at 77 K shows that photoexcitation or photodissociation of ozone, evidently, accounts for the observed processes. The surface of ice particles, thus, plays the role of a condenser of atmospheric pollutants and acts

  14. Molecular weight growth in Titan's atmosphere: branching pathways for the reaction of 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙) with small alkenes and alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Benjamin B; Savee, John D; Trevitt, Adam J; Osborn, David L; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-08-28

    The reaction of small hydrocarbon radicals (i.e.˙CN, ˙C2H) with trace alkenes and alkynes is believed to play an important role in molecular weight growth and ultimately the formation of Titan's characteristic haze. Current photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere largely assume hydrogen atom abstraction or unimolecular hydrogen elimination reactions dominate the mechanism, in contrast to recent experiments that reveal significant alkyl radical loss pathways during reaction of ethynyl radical (˙C2H) with alkenes and alkynes. In this study, the trend is explored for the case of a larger ethynyl radical analogue, the 1-propynyl radical (H3CC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C˙), a likely product from the high-energy photolysis of propyne in Titan's atmosphere. Using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry, product branching ratios are measured for the reactions of 1-propynyl radical with a suite of small alkenes (ethylene and propene) and alkynes (acetylene and d4-propyne) at 4 Torr and 300 K. Reactions of 1-propynyl radical with acetylene and ethylene form single products, identified as penta-1,3-diyne and pent-1-en-3-yne, respectively. These products form by hydrogen atom loss from the radical-adduct intermediates. The reactions of 1-propynyl radical with d4-propyne and propene form products from both hydrogen atom and methyl loss, (-H = 27%, -CH3 = 73%) and (-H = 14%, -CH3 = 86%), respectively. Together, these results indicate that reactions of ethynyl radical analogues with alkenes and alkynes form significant quantities of products by alkyl loss channels, suggesting that current photochemical models of Titan over predict both hydrogen atom production as well as the efficiency of molecular weight growth in these reactions.

  15. Capacity-coupled multidischarge for atmospheric plasma production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Tamiya; Sato, Noriyoshi

    2003-12-01

    We propose a method of plasma production by capacity-coupled multidischarge (CCMD) at atmospheric pressure. The discharge gaps in the CCMD consist of a common electrode and a number of compact electrodes (CCE) which are directly coupled with small capacitors for quenching the discharge. A simple CCE structure is provided by a cylindrical capacitor, the inner conductor of which is used as a gap electrode. A short pulse discharge is observed to appear homogeneously at each CCE. A charge transfer for the single-pulsed discharge is 10-100 times as large as that of the conventional dielectric barrier discharge. A high efficiency of ozone production has been confirmed in the CCMD using O2 gas. A device configuration of the CCMD is quite flexible with respect to its geometrical shape and size. The CCMD could be used to produce plasmas for various kinds of industrial applications at atmospheric pressure.

  16. Production of radioactive nuclides in inverse reaction kinematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Traykov, E.; Rogachevskiy, A.; Bosswell, M.; Dammalapati, U.; Dendooven, P.G.; Dermois, O.C.; Jungmann, K.P.; Onderwater, C.J.G.; Sohani, M.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H.W.E.M.; Young, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Efficient production of short-lived radioactive isotopes in inverse reaction kinematics is an important technique for various applications. It is particularly relevant when the isotope of interest is only a few nucleons away from a stable isotope. In this article production via charge exchange and

  17. Duff reaction on phenols: Characterization of non steam volatile products

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S.; DeSouza, L.; Bhattacharya, J.

    New products having structures 1 and 2 have been characterized in the Duff reaction thymol arid carvacrol. These products have been identified as 2.6'-dithymylmethane 1 and 5.5' -dicarvacryl methane 2 respectively on the basis of spectral data...

  18. Reevaluation of the O(+)(2P) reaction rate coefficients derived from Atmosphere Explorer C observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T.; Torr, D. G.; Richards, P. G.; Solomon, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    O(+)(2P) is an important species for studies of the ionosphere and thermosphere: its emission at 7320 A can be used as a diagnostic of the thermospheric atomic oxygen density. Unfortunately, there are no laboratory measurements of the O and N2 reaction rates which are needed to determine the major sinks of (O+)(2p). We have recalculated the O and N2 reaction rates for O(+) (2P) using recent improvements in the solar EUV flux, cross sections, and photoelectron fluxes. For the standard solar EUV flux, the new N2 reaction rate of 3.4 +/- 1.5 x 10 exp -10 cu cm/s is close to the value obtained by Rusch et al. (1977), but the new O reaction rate of 4.0 +/- 1.9 x 10 exp -10 cu cm/sec is about 8 times larger. These new reaction rates are derived using neutral densities, electron density, and solar EUV fluxes measured by Atmosphere Explorer C in 1974 during solar minimum. The new theoretical emission rates are in good agreement with the data for the two orbits studied by Rusch et al.

  19. Reentry blackout prediction for atmospheric reentry demonstrator mission considering uncertainty in chemical reaction rate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minseok; Kihara, Hisashi; Abe, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Yusuke

    2018-01-01

    A numerical simulation model of plasma flows and electromagnetic waves around a vehicle was developed to predict a radio frequency blackout. Plasma flows in the shock layer and the wake region were calculated using a computational fluid dynamics technique with a three-dimensional model. A finite-catalytic wall condition known to affect plasma properties, such as the number density of electrons, was considered for accurate prediction. A parametric study was performed to investigate the effect of uncertainty in the chemical reaction rate model on evaluating a radio frequency blackout. The behavior of electromagnetic waves in plasma was investigated using a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method. Numerical simulations of reentry blackout were performed for the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator mission at various altitudes. The plasma flows and the complex movement of electromagnetic waves around the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator vehicle were clarified. The predicted signal loss profile was then directly compared with the experimental flight data to validate the present models. The numerical results generally reproduced the trends over altitudes of the measured data. It is suggested that the present simulation model can be used to investigate the radio frequency blackout and signal loss of electromagnetic waves in the communication of a reentry vehicle. It was confirmed that high associative ionization reaction rates contribute to reducing the electron density in the wake region and radio frequency blackout. It is suggested that the accuracy of predicting the signal loss improved when considering the uncertainty in the chemical reaction model for associative ionizations.

  20. Role of lipid reactions in quality of oat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. LEHTINEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In traditional oat processing practice the control of lipid reactions relies largely on empirical experiences and dogmatic principles rather than on profound understanding of the underlying mechanisms. However, in today’s global food markets, the industry faces strict challenges in the development of new processes and applications where the prior experience is unsatisfactory or insufficient. The storage stability of novel oat products can be greatly enhanced by taking the mechanisms of lipid deterioration into account, and by adjusting the processing conditions accordingly so that these reactions can be minimized. The lipid reactions in oat products result in two different unwanted properties: bitter, astringent, taste or a rancid flavor. Chemically, these properties are associated to enzymatic hydrolysis of ester bonds and non-enzymatic oxidation of unsaturated fatty acyl chains respectively. The processing history oat product has a huge impact on which of these reactions predominates in oat products. The review focuses on the reactions of lipids in processed oat products, and identifies factors that are critical for enhanced shelf-life.;

  1. Numerical study of the influence of surface reaction probabilities on reactive species in an rf atmospheric pressure plasma containing humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Sandra; Gibson, Andrew R.; Kushner, Mark J.; Gans, Timo; O’Connell, Deborah

    2018-01-01

    The quantification and control of reactive species (RS) in atmospheric pressure plasmas (APPs) is of great interest for their technological applications, in particular in biomedicine. Of key importance in simulating the densities of these species are fundamental data on their production and destruction. In particular, data concerning particle-surface reaction probabilities in APPs are scarce, with most of these probabilities measured in low-pressure systems. In this work, the role of surface reaction probabilities, γ, of reactive neutral species (H, O and OH) on neutral particle densities in a He–H2O radio-frequency micro APP jet (COST-μ APPJ) are investigated using a global model. It is found that the choice of γ, particularly for low-mass species having large diffusivities, such as H, can change computed species densities significantly. The importance of γ even at elevated pressures offers potential for tailoring the RS composition of atmospheric pressure microplasmas by choosing different wall materials or plasma geometries.

  2. Implicit coupling of turbulent diffusion with chemical reaction mechanisms for prognostic atmospheric dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlowitz, D.R.

    1996-11-01

    In the last few decades the negative impact by humans on the thin atmospheric layer enveloping the earth, the basis for life on this planet, has increased steadily. In order to halt, or at least slow down this development, the knowledge and study of these anthropogenic influence has to be increased and possible remedies have to be suggested. An important tool for these studies are computer models. With their help the atmospheric system can be approximated and the various processes, which have led to the current situation can be quantified. They also serve as an instrument to assess short or medium term strategies to reduce this human impact. However, to assure efficiency as well as accuracy, a careful analysis of the numerous processes involved in the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere is called for. This should help to concentrate on the essentials and also prevent excessive usage of sometimes scarce computing resources. The basis of the presented work is the EUMAC Zooming Model (ETM), and particularly the component calculating the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, the model MARS. The model has two main parts: an explicit solver, where the advection and the horizontal diffusion of pollutants are calculated, and an implicit solution mechanism, allowing the joint computation of the change of concentration due to chemical reactions, coupled with the respective influence of the vertical diffusion of the species. The aim of this thesis is to determine particularly the influence of the horizontal components of the turbulent diffusion on the existing implicit solver of the model. Suggestions for a more comprehensive inclusion of the full three dimensional diffusion operator in the implicit solver are made. This is achieved by an appropriate operator splitting. A selection of numerical approaches to tighten the coupling of the diffusion processes with the calculation of the applied chemical reaction mechanisms are examined. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  3. Development of hydroxyapatite crystallization utilizing the contact reaction of a minute droplet with atmospheric plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y.; Kudoh, K.; Matsumoto, M.; Onoe, K.

    2017-05-01

    For the creation of a new crystallization method of hydroxyapatite ((Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2); HAp) fine particles through a simplified operation, a combined system of atmospheric plasma with minute droplets was developed. An atmospheric pressure plasma-jet was generated by an inductively coupled plasma method that is contacted to minute droplets including HAp liquid sources as Ca, PO4 and OH elements. In this paper, the effects of the organic compound chemical properties and plasma irradiation power on production of HAp fine particles were examined. Consequently, the fine spherical particles of HAp are generated by the introduction of minute droplets including Ca, PO4 and OH elements into an atmospheric plasma field. Moreover, when citric acid is added to a HAp liquid source for minute droplets, HAp yield is increased 2-times compared to other operations. In conclusion, crystalline HAp is obtained without calcination under conditions of RF irradiation power at 1500 W.

  4. Heterogeneous chemistry and reaction dynamics of the atmospheric oxidants, O3, NO3, and OH, on organic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Chapleski, Robert C.; Zhang, Yafen; Troya, Diego; Morris, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of the most important atmospheric oxidants, O3, NO3, and OH, plays a central role in regulating atmospheric gas concentrations, processing aerosols, and aging materials. Recent experimental and computational studies have begun to reveal the detailed reaction mechanisms and kinetics for gas-phase O3, NO3, and OH when they impinge on organic surfaces. Through new research approaches that merge the fields of traditional surface science with atmospheric chemistry, research...

  5. Atmospheric Oxidation Mechanism and Kinetic Studies for OH and NO3 Radical-Initiated Reaction of Methyl Methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Gao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism for OH and NO3 radical-initiated oxidation reactions of methyl methacrylate (MMA was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT molecular orbital theory. Geometrical parameters of the reactants, intermediates, transition states, and products were fully optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level. Detailed oxidation pathways were presented and discussed. The rate constants were deduced by the canonical variational transition-state (CVT theory with the small-curvature tunneling (SCT correction and the multichannel Rice-Ramspergere-Kassele-Marcus (RRKM theory, based on the potential energy surface profiles over the general atmospheric temperature range of 180–370 K. The calculated results were in reasonable agreement with experimental measurement.

  6. [Adverse drug reactions of a slimming product contaminated with sibutramine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hunsel, Florence; van Grootheest, Kees

    2011-01-01

    On the internet numerous diet pills and weight loss courses are advertised. These products may contain active ingredients or contaminants that are not mentioned on the pack or in the patient information leaflet. The Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb received two reports of undesirable effects associated with the unregistered slimming product 'Green Coffee 800'. A 33-year-old woman reported hypomania and a 44-year-old woman reported abnormal hepatic enzyme levels after the use of this product. Research by the Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority revealed that samples of the slimming coffee Green Coffee 800 contained sibutramine. The Dutch Healthcare Inspectorate issued a warning about this product in August 2010. It is plausible that the Green Coffee 800 in the reports sent to Lareb also contained sibutramine. The slimming product Green Coffee 800 may contain sibutramine and may cause severe adverse reactions. This product is still advertised on the Internet.

  7. Fragment production in 16 O· 80 Br reaction within dynamical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 59; Issue 1. Fragment production in 16O + 80Br reaction within dynamical microscopic theory. Rajeev K Puri Jaivir Singh Suneel Kumar. Research Articles Volume 59 Issue 1 July 2002 pp 19-31 ...

  8. Two-pion production in photon-induced reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A deeper understanding of the situation is anticipated from a detailed experimental study of meson photoproduction from nuclei in exclusive reactions. In the energy regime above the (1232) resonance, the dominant double pion production channels are of particular interest. Double pion photoproduction from nuclei is ...

  9. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sircar, S.; Anand, M.; Carvill, B. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction (SER) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process, the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The consequences of SER are: (1) reformation reaction at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than conventional SMR (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (2) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 99+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (3) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The early focus of the program will be on the identification of an adsorbent/chemisorbent for CO{sub 2} and on the demonstration of the SER concept for SMR in our state-of-the-art bench scale process. In the latter stages, a pilot plant will be built to scale-up the technology and to develop engineering data. The program has just been initiated and no significant results for SMR will be reported. However, results demonstrating the basic principles and process schemes of SER technology will be presented for reverse water gas shift reaction as the model reaction. If successful, this technology will be commercialized by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) and used in its existing hydrogen business. APCI is the world leader in merchant hydrogen production for a wide range of industrial applications.

  10. Studies in Photochemical Smog Chemistry: I. Atmospheric Chemistry of Toluene. I. Analysis of Chemical Reaction Mechanisms for Photochemical Smog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Joseph Anthony

    This study focuses on two related topics in the gas phase organic chemistry of importance in urban air pollution. Part I describes an experimental and modeling effort aimed at developing a new explicit reaction mechanism for the atmospheric photooxidation of toluene. This mechanism is tested using experimental data from both indoor and outdoor smog chamber facilities. The predictions of the new reaction mechanism are found to be in good agreement with both sets of experimental data. Additional simulations performed with the new mechanism are used to investigate various mechanistic paths, and to gain insight into areas where our understanding is not complete. The outdoor experimental facility, which was built to provide the second set of experimental data, consists of a 65 cubic meter teflon smog chamber together with full instrumentation capable of measuring ozone, nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), carbon monoxide, relative humidity, temperature, aerosol size distributions, and of course toluene and its photooxidation products. In Part II, we present a theoretical analysis of lumped chemical reaction mechanisms for photochemical smog. Included is a description of a new counter species analysis technique which can be used to analyze any complex chemical reaction mechanism. When applied to mechanisms for photochemical smog, this analysis is shown capable of providing answers to previously inaccessible questions such as the relative contributions of individual organics to photochemical ozone formation. The counter species analysis is applied to six existing mechanisms for photochemical smog to determine why they predict substantially different degrees of emission controls to achieve the same desired air quality under identical conditions. For each mechanism critical areas are identified that when altered bring the predictions of the various mechanisms into much closer agreement. Finally, a new lumped mechanism for photochemical smog is

  11. Atmospheric Chemistry of Six Methyl-perfluoroheptene-ethers Used as Heat Transfer Fluid Replacement Compounds: Measured OH Radical Reaction Rate Coefficients, Atmospheric Lifetimes, and Global Warming Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubb, A. M.; Gierczak, T.; Baasandorj, M.; Waterland, R. L.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Mixtures of methyl-perfluoroheptene-ethers (C7F13OCH3, MPHEs) are currently in use as a replacement for perfluorinated alkane (PFC) and polyether mixtures (both persistent greenhouse gases with atmospheric lifetimes >1000 years) used as heat transfer fluids. Currently, the atmospheric fate of the MPHE isomers are not well characterized, however, reaction with the OH radical is expected to be a dominant tropospheric loss process for these compounds. In order to assess the atmospheric lifetimes and environmental implications of MPHE use, rate coefficients for MPHE isomers' reaction with OH radicals are desired. In the work presented here, rate coefficients, k, for the gas-phase reaction of the OH radical with six MPHEs commonly used in commercial mixtures (isomers and stereoisomers) and their deuterated analogs (d3-MPHE) were determined at 296 K using a relative rate method with combined gas-chromatography/IR spectroscopy detection. A range of OH rate coefficient values was observed, up to a factor of 20× different, between the MPHE isomers with the (E)-stereoisomers exhibiting the greatest reactivity. The measured OH reaction rate coefficients for the d3-MPHE isomers were lower than the observed MPHE values although a large range of k values between isomers was still observed. The reduction in reactivity with deuteration signifies that the MPHE + OH reaction proceeds via both addition to the olefinic C=C bond and H-abstraction from the methyl ester group. OH addition to the C=C bond was determined to be the primary reaction channel. Atmospheric lifetimes with respect to the OH reaction for the six MPHE isomers were found to be in the range of days to months. The short lifetimes indicate that MPHE use will primarily impact tropospheric local and regional air quality. A MPHE atmospheric degradation mechanism will be presented. As part of this work, radiative efficiencies and global warming potentials (GWPs) for the MPHE isomers were estimated based on measured

  12. Atmospheric fate of hydrofluoroethanes and hydrofluorochloroethanes: 1. Rate coefficients for reactions with OH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierczak, T.; Talukdar, R.; Lovejoy, E.R.; Ravishankara, A.R. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (USA) Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (USA)); Vaghjiani, G.L. (Univ. of Dayton Research Inst., Edwards AFB, CA (USA))

    1991-03-20

    The rate coefficients for the reactions of OH with five halocarbons (CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2} (HFC 134a), CF{sub 3}CHClF (HCFC 124), CF{sub 3}CHCl{sub 2} (HCFC 123), CH{sub 3}CHF{sub 2} (HFC 152a), and CH{sub 3}CF{sub 2}Cl (HCFC 142b)), which are proposed as alternatives to chlorofluoromethanes, have been measured. A pulsed pholtolysis system and a discharge flow apparatus were used to measure the rate coefficients between approximately 210 and 425 K. Use of the complementary techniques enabled identification of systematic errors and minimization of these errors. The obtained values are compared with values previously measured by other groups. This data base is used in the subsequent paper to calculate the atmospheric lifetimes of the five compounds.

  13. Acid-base chemical reaction model for nucleation rates in the polluted atmospheric boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Modi; Titcombe, Mari; Jiang, Jingkun; Jen, Coty; Kuang, Chongai; Fischer, Marc L; Eisele, Fred L; Siepmann, J Ilja; Hanson, David R; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H

    2012-11-13

    Climate models show that particles formed by nucleation can affect cloud cover and, therefore, the earth's radiation budget. Measurements worldwide show that nucleation rates in the atmospheric boundary layer are positively correlated with concentrations of sulfuric acid vapor. However, current nucleation theories do not correctly predict either the observed nucleation rates or their functional dependence on sulfuric acid concentrations. This paper develops an alternative approach for modeling nucleation rates, based on a sequence of acid-base reactions. The model uses empirical estimates of sulfuric acid evaporation rates obtained from new measurements of neutral molecular clusters. The model predicts that nucleation rates equal the sulfuric acid vapor collision rate times a prefactor that is less than unity and that depends on the concentrations of basic gaseous compounds and preexisting particles. Predicted nucleation rates and their dependence on sulfuric acid vapor concentrations are in reasonable agreement with measurements from Mexico City and Atlanta.

  14. Pressure Dependent Product Formation in the Photochemically Initiated Allyl + Allyl Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Zeuch

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Photochemically driven reactions involving unsaturated radicals produce a thick global layer of organic haze on Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. The allyl radical self-reaction is an example for this type of chemistry and was examined at room temperature from an experimental and kinetic modelling perspective. The experiments were performed in a static reactor with a volume of 5 L under wall free conditions. The allyl radicals were produced from laser flash photolysis of three different precursors allyl bromide (C3H5Br, allyl chloride (C3H5Cl, and 1,5-hexadiene (CH2CH(CH22CHCH2 at 193 nm. Stable products were identified by their characteristic vibrational modes and quantified using FTIR spectroscopy. In addition to the (re- combination pathway C3H5+C3H5 → C6H10 we found at low pressures around 1 mbar the highest final product yields for allene and propene for the precursor C3H5Br. A kinetic analysis indicates that the end product formation is influenced by specific reaction kinetics of photochemically activated allyl radicals. Above 10 mbar the (re- combination pathway becomes dominant. These findings exemplify the specificities of reaction kinetics involving chemically activated species, which for certain conditions cannot be simply deduced from combustion kinetics or atmospheric chemistry on Earth.

  15. Maillard reaction products from chitosan-xylan ionic liquid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuqiong; Ling, Yunzhi; Wang, Xiaoying; Han, Yang; Zeng, Xianjie; Sun, Runcang

    2013-10-15

    A facile method is reported to prepare Maillard reaction products (MRPs) from chitosan and xylan in co-solvent ionic liquid. UV absorbance and fluorescence changes were regarded as indicators of the occurrence of Maillard reaction. FT-IR, NMR, XRD and TG were used to investigate the structure of chitosan-xylan conjugate. The results revealed that when chitosan reacted with xylan in ionic liquid, the hydrogen bonds in chitosan were destroyed, the facts resulted in the formation of chitosan-xylan MRPs. Moreover, when the mass ratio of chitosan to xylan was 1:1, the Maillard reaction proceeded easily. In addition, relatively high antioxidant property was also noted for the chitosan-xylan conjugate with mass ratio 1:1. So the obtained chitosan-xylan MRP is a promising antioxidant agent for food industry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modifications of hemoglobin and myoglobin by Maillard reaction products (MRPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristos Ioannou

    Full Text Available High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC coupled with a Fraction Collector was employed to isolate Maillard reaction products (MRPs formed in model systems comprising of asparagine and monosaccharides in the 60-180°C range. The primary MRP which is detected at 60°C is important for Acrylamide content and color/aroma development in foods and also in the field of food biotechnology for controlling the extent of the Maillard reaction with temperature. The discrete fractions of the reaction products were reacted with Hemoglobin (Hb and Myoglobin (Mb at physiological conditions and the reaction adducts were monitored by UV-vis and Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrophotometry. The UV-vis kinetic profiles revealed the formation of a Soret transition characteristic of a low-spin six-coordinated species and the ATR-FTIR spectrum of the Hb-MRP and Mb-MRP fractions showed modifications in the protein Amide I and II vibrations. The UV-vis and the FTIR spectra of the Hb-MRPs indicate that the six-coordinated species is a hemichrome in which the distal E7 Histidine is coordinated to the heme Fe and blocks irreversibly the ligand binding site. Although the Mb-MRPs complex is a six-coordinated species, the 1608 cm-1 FTIR band characteristic of a hemichrome was not observed.

  17. Chemical kinetic studies of atmospheric reactions using tunable diode laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsnop, Douglas R.; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    IR absorption using tunable diode laser spectroscopy provides a sensitive and quantitative detection method for laboratory kinetic studies of atmospheric trace gases. Improvements in multipass cell design, real time signal processing, and computer controlled data acquisition and analysis have extended the applicability of the technique. We have developed several optical systems using off-axis resonator mirror designs which maximize path length while minimizing both the sample volume and the interference fringes inherent in conventional 'White' cells. Computerized signal processing using rapid scan (300 kHz), sweep integration with 100 percent duty cycle allows substantial noise reduction while retaining the advantages of using direct absorption for absolute absorbance measurements and simultaneous detection of multiple species. Peak heights and areas are determined by curve fitting using nonlinear least square methods. We have applied these techniques to measurements of: (1) heterogeneous uptake chemistry of atmospheric trace gases (HCl, H2O2, and N2O5) on aqueous and sulfuric acid droplets; (2) vapor pressure measurements of nitric acid and water over prototypical stratospheric aerosol (nitric acid trihydrate) surfaces; and (3) discharge flow tube kinetic studies of the HO2 radical using isotopic labeling for product channel and mechanistic analysis. Results from each of these areas demonstrate the versatility of TDL absorption spectroscopy for atmospheric chemistry applications.

  18. Dual Position Sensitive MWPC for tracking reaction products at VAMOS++

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Lemasson, A.; Rejmund, M.; Fremont, G.; Pancin, J.; Navin, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Goupil, J.; Spitaels, C.; Jacquot, B.

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics and performance of a Dual Position Sensitive Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (DPS-MWPC) used to measure the scattering angle, the interaction position on the target and the velocity of reaction products detected in the VAMOS++ magnetic spectrometer, are reported. The detector consists of a pair of position sensitive low pressure MWPCs and provides both fast timing signals, along with the two-dimensional position coordinates required to define the trajectory of the reaction products. A time-of-flight resolution of 305(11) ps (FWHM) was measured. The measured resolutions (FWHM) were 2.5(3) mrad and 560(70) μm for the scattering angle and the interaction point at the target respectively. The subsequent improvement of the Doppler correction of the energy of the γ-rays, detected in the γ-ray tracking array AGATA in coincidence with isotopically identified ions in VAMOS++, is also discussed.

  19. Role of lipid reactions in quality of oat products

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtinen, P; Laakso, S

    2008-01-01

    In traditional oat processing practice the control of lipid reactions relies largely on empirical experiences and dogmatic principles rather than on profound understanding of the underlying mechanisms. However, in todays global food markets, the industry faces strict challenges in the development of new processes and applications where the prior experience is unsatisfactory or insufficient. The storage stability of novel oat products can be greatly enhanced by taking the mechanisms of lipid d...

  20. Influence of transesterification reaction temperature on biodiesel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pighinelli, Anna Leticia Montenegro Turtelli; Zorzeto, Thais Queiroz; Park, Kil Jin [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola], E-mail: annalets@agr.unicamp.br; Bevilaqua, Gabriela [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    Brazilian government policy has authorized the introduction of biodiesel into the national energy matrix, law no.11.097 of January 13th, 2005. It is necessary, like any new product, to invest in research which is able to cover its entire production chain (planting of oilseeds, vegetable oils extraction and chemical reactions), providing data and relevant information in order to optimize the process and solve critical issues. The objective of this work was to study the effects of temperature on crude sunflower transesterification reaction with ethanol. A central composite experimental design with five variation levels (25 deg, 32 deg, 47.5 deg, 64 deg and 70 deg C) was used and response surface methodology applied for the data analysis. The statistical analysis of the results showed that the production suffered the influence of temperature (linear and quadratic effects) and reaction time (linear and quadratic). The generated models did not show significant regression. The model generated was not well suited to the experimental data and the value of the coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}=0.52) was low. Consequently it was not possible to build the response surface. (author)

  1. Reaction of atomic bromine with acetylene and loss rate of atmospheric acetylene due to reaction with OH, Cl, O, and Br

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.; Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The first-order, diffusion, and bimolecular rate constants for the reaction Br + C2H2 yields C2H3Br are evaluated. The rate constants are measured at 210, 248, 298, and 393 K and at pressures between 15-100 torr Ar using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of atomic bromine via Br resonance radiation. It is observed that the reaction is not affected by pressure or temperature and the bimolecular constant = (4.0 + or - 0.8) x 10 to the -15th cu cm/sec with an error of two standard deviations. The C2H2 + Br reaction rates are compared with reactions of C2H2 with Cl, OH, NH2, and H. The loss rates for atmospheric C2H2 for reactions with OH, Cl, O, and Br are calculated as a function of altitude.

  2. Kinetics of the unimolecular reaction of CH2OO and the bimolecular reactions with the water monomer, acetaldehyde and acetone under atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Torsten; Kaethner, Ralf; Voigtländer, Jens; Stratmann, Frank; Pfeifle, Mark; Reichle, Patrick; Sipilä, Mikko; Kulmala, Markku; Olzmann, Matthias

    2015-08-14

    Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (sCIs) have been identified as oxidants of atmospheric trace gases such as SO2, NO2, carboxylic acids or carbonyls. The atmospheric sCI concentrations, and accordingly their importance for trace gas oxidation, are controlled by the rate of the most important loss processes, very likely the unimolecular reactions and the reaction with water vapour (monomer and dimer) ubiquitously present at high concentrations in the troposphere. In this study, the rate coefficients of the unimolecular reaction of the simplest sCI, formaldehyde oxide, CH2OO, and its bimolecular reaction with the water monomer have been experimentally determined at T = (297 ± 1) K and at atmospheric pressure by using a free-jet flow system. CH2OO was produced by the reaction of ozone with C2H4, and CH2OO concentrations were probed indirectly by detecting H2SO4 after titration with SO2. Time-resolved experiments yield a rate coefficient of the unimolecular reaction of k(uni) = (0.19 ± 0.07) s(-1), a value that is supported by quantum-chemical and statistical rate theory calculations as well as by additional measurements performed under CH2OO steady-state conditions. A rate coefficient of k(CH2OO+H2O) = (3.2 ± 1.2) × 10(-16) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) has been determined for sufficiently low H2O concentrations (reaction with the water dimer. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the experimental approach, the rate coefficients of the reactions with acetaldehyde and acetone were reinvestigated. The obtained rate coefficients k(CH2OO+acetald) = (1.7 ± 0.5) × 10(-12) and k(CH2OO+acetone) = (3.4 ± 0.9) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) are in good agreement with literature data.

  3. The Reaction between Sodium Hydroxide and Atomic Hydrogen in Atmospheric and Flame Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Martín, J C; Seaton, C; de Miranda, M P; Plane, J M C

    2017-10-12

    We report the first direct kinetic study of the gas-phase reaction NaOH + H → Na + H2O, which is central to the chemistry of sodium in the upper atmosphere and in flames. The reaction was studied in a fast flow tube, where NaOH was observed by multiphoton ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry, yielding k(NaOH + H, 230-298 K) = (3.8 ± 0.8) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule (-1) s(-1) (at 2σ confidence level), showing no significant temperature dependence over the indicated temperature range and essentially in agreement with previous estimates of the rate constant in hydrogen-rich flames. We show, using theoretical trajectory calculations, that the unexpectedly slow, yet T-independent, rate coefficient for NaOH + H is explained by severe constraints in the angle of attack that H can make on NaOH to produce H2O. This reaction is also central to explaining Na-catalyzed flame inhibition, which has been proposed to occur via the sequence Na + OH (+ M) → NaOH followed by NaOH + H → Na + H2O, thereby effectively recombinating H and OH to H2O. RRKM calculations for the recombination of Na and OH yield k(Na + OH + N2, 300-2400 K) = 2.7 × 10(-29) (300/T)(1.2) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1), in agreement with a previous flash photolysis measurement at 653 K and Na-seeded flame studies in the 1800-2200 K range. These results therefore provide strong evidence to support the mechanism of flame inhibition by Na.

  4. The effects of heterogeneous reactions on atmospheric chemistry and aerosol properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Carmichael, Gregory; Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang

    2017-04-01

    A new aerosol module is developed for the STEM model (the Sulfur Transport and dEposition Model) to better understand the chemical aging of dust during long range transport and assess the impact of heterogeneous reactions on tropospheric chemistry. The new aerosol module is verified and first applied in a box model, and then coupled into the 3-Dimentional STEM model. In the new aerosol model, a nonequilibrium (dynamic or kinetic) approach to treat gas-to-particle conversion is employed to replace the equilibrium method in STEM model. Meanwhile, a new numerical method solving the aerosol dynamics equation is introduced into the dynamic aerosol model for its improved computational efficiency and high accuracy. Compared with the equilibrium method, the new dynamic approach is found to provide better results on predicating the different hygroscopicity and chemical aging patterns as a function of size. The current modeling study also takes advantage of new findings from laboratory experiments about heterogeneous reactions on mineral oxides and dust particles, in order to consider the complexity of surface chemistry (such as surface saturation, coating and relative humidity). Modeling results show that the impacts of mineralogy and relative humidity on heterogeneous reactions are significant and should be considered in atmospheric chemistry modeling with first priority. The new dynamic approach for gas-to-particle conversion and RH-dependent heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 improve the model performance in term of aerosol predictions under different conditions. It is shown that these improvements change the modeled nitrate and sulfate concentrations, but also modify their size distributions significantly.

  5. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate, abundance, and oxidation products in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Bouvier-Brown

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol was detected simultaneously by three in-situ instruments – a gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS, a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, and a thermal desorption aerosol GC-MS (TAG – and found to be abundant within and above Blodgett Forest. Methyl chavicol atmospheric mixing ratios are strongly correlated with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO, a light- and temperature-dependent biogenic emission from the ponderosa pine trees at Blodgett Forest. Scaling from this correlation, methyl chavicol emissions account for 4–68% of the carbon mass emitted as MBO in the daytime, depending on the season. From this relationship, we estimate a daytime basal emission rate of 0.72–10.2 μgCg−1 h−1, depending on needle age and seasonality. We also present the first observations of its oxidation products (4-methoxybenzaldehyde and 4-methyoxy benzene acetaldehyde in the ambient atmosphere. Methyl chavicol is a major essential oil component of many plant species. This work suggests that methyl chavicol plays a significant role in the atmospheric chemistry of Blodgett Forest, and potentially other sites, and should be included explicitly in both biogenic volatile organic carbon emission and atmospheric chemistry models.

  6. Wind turbine power production and annual energy production depend on atmospheric stability and turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. St. Martin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Using detailed upwind and nacelle-based measurements from a General Electric (GE 1.5sle model with a 77 m rotor diameter, we calculate power curves and annual energy production (AEP and explore their sensitivity to different atmospheric parameters to provide guidelines for the use of stability and turbulence filters in segregating power curves. The wind measurements upwind of the turbine include anemometers mounted on a 135 m meteorological tower as well as profiles from a lidar. We calculate power curves for different regimes based on turbulence parameters such as turbulence intensity (TI as well as atmospheric stability parameters such as the bulk Richardson number (RB. We also calculate AEP with and without these atmospheric filters and highlight differences between the results of these calculations. The power curves for different TI regimes reveal that increased TI undermines power production at wind speeds near rated, but TI increases power production at lower wind speeds at this site, the US Department of Energy (DOE National Wind Technology Center (NWTC. Similarly, power curves for different RB regimes reveal that periods of stable conditions produce more power at wind speeds near rated and periods of unstable conditions produce more power at lower wind speeds. AEP results suggest that calculations without filtering for these atmospheric regimes may overestimate the AEP. Because of statistically significant differences between power curves and AEP calculated with these turbulence and stability filters for this turbine at this site, we suggest implementing an additional step in analyzing power performance data to incorporate effects of atmospheric stability and turbulence across the rotor disk.

  7. Reaction engineering strategies for the production of inorganic nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Victor; Arruebo, Manuel; Santamaria, Jesus

    2014-03-12

    The rapid expansion of nanotechnology requires scaled-up production rates to cope with increased nanomaterials demand. However, in many cases, the final uses of nanomaterials impose strict requisites on their physical and chemical characteristics including size, shape, chemical composition and type of functional groups on their surface. Frequently, additional features such as a limited degree of agglomeration are also demanded. These requisites represent a serious challenge to present-day synthesis methods when nanomaterials must be produced in large amounts. Some of the possible solutions from the reaction engineering perspective are discussed in this work for both gas and liquid phase production processes. Special attention will be devoted to enabling technologies, which allow the production of engineered nanoparticles with limited aggregation and with a good control on their nano-scale characteristics. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Production of medical 99 m Tc isotope via photonuclear reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, M.; Nakai, K.; Takahashi, N.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Miyamoto, S.; Fan, G. T.; Takemoto, A.; Yamaguchi, M.; Nishimura, M.

    2017-01-01

    99 m Tc with a 6 hour half-life is one of the most important medical isotopes used for the Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) inspection in hospitals of US, Canada, Europe and Japan. 99 m Tc isotopes are extracted by the milking method from parent 99Mo isotopes with a 66 hour half-life. The supply of 99Mo isotopes now encounters a serious crisis. Hospitals may not suitably receive 99Mo medical isotopes in near future, due to difficulties in production by research nuclear reactors. Many countries are now looking for alternative ways to generate 99Mo isotopes other than those with research reactors. We discuss a sustained availability of 99 m Tc isotopes via the nat Mo(γ, n) photonuclear reaction, and discuss to solve technical problems for extracting pure 99 m Tc isotopes from other output materials of photonuclear reactions.

  9. Atmospheric CO2 uptake throughout bio-enhanced brucite-water reaction at Montecastelli serpentinites (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedini, Federica; Boschi, Chiara; Ménez, Benedicte; Perchiazzi, Natale; Zanchetta, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    In the last several years, interactions between microorganisms and minerals have intrigued and catched the interest of the scientific community. Montecastelli serpentinites (Tuscany, Italy) are characterized by CO2-mineral carbonation, an important process which leads to spontaneous formation of carbonate phases uptaking atmospheric CO2. In the studied areas carbonate precipitates, mainly hydrated Mg-carbonates, are present in form of crusts, coating and spherules on exposed rock surfaces, and filling rock fractures. Petrographic and mineralogical observations revealed that Tuscan brucite-rich serpentinites hosts preserve their original chemical compositions with typical mesh-textured serpentine (± brucite) after olivine, magnetite-rich mesh rims and relicts of primary spinel. Representative hydrated carbonate samples have been collected in three different areas and analyzed to investigate the role of biological activity and its influence in the serpentine-hydrated Mg-carbonates reaction. The different types of whitish precipitates have been selected under binocular microscope for XRD analyses performed at the Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra (University of Pisa, Italy): their mineralogical composition consists of mainly hydromagnesite and variable amount of other metastable carbonate phases (i.e. nesquehonite, manasseite, pyroaurite, brugnatellite and aragonite). Moreover, the crystallinity analysis of whitish crust and spherules have been carried out by detailed and quantitative XRD analyses to testify a possible biologically controlled growth, inasmuch as the crystal structure of biominerals could be affected by many lattice defects (i.e. dislocations, twinning, etc.) and this observation cause low crystallinity of the mineral. The presence of microbial cells and relicts of organic matter has already been detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) combined with Raman spectromicroscopy in a previous study (Bedini et al., 2013). The presence of

  10. Agroecosystem productivity in a warmer and CO2 enriched atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacchi, Carl; Köhler, Iris; Ort, Donald; Long, Steven; Clemente, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    A number of in-field manipulative experiments have been conducted that address the response of key ecosystem services of major agronomic species to rising CO2. Global warming, however, is inextricably linked to rising greenhouse gases in general, of which CO2 is the most dominant. Therefore, agroecosystem functioning in future conditions requires an understanding of plant responses to both rising CO2 and increased temperatures. Few in-field manipulative experiments have been conducted that supplement both heating and CO2 above background concentrations. Here, the results of six years of experimentation using a coupled Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) technology with variable output infrared heating arrays are reported. The manipulative experiment increased temperatures (+ 3.5˚ C) and CO2 (+ 200 μmol mol-1) above background levels for on two major agronomic crop species grown throughout the world, Zea mays (maize) and Glycine max (soybean). The first phase of this research addresses the response of plant physiological parameters to growth in elevated CO2 and warmer temperatures for maize and soybean grown in an open-air manipulative experiment. The results show that any increase in ecosystem productivity associated with rising CO2 is either similar or is offset by growth at higher temperatures, inconsistent with the perceived benefits of higher CO2 plus warmer temperatures on agroecosystem productivity. The second phase of this research addresses the opportunity to genetically modify soybean to allow for improved productivity under high CO2 and warmer temperatures by increasing a key photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle enzyme, SPBase. The results from this research demonstrates that manipulation of the photosynthetic pathway can lead to higher productivity in high CO2 and temperature relative to the wild-type control soybean. Overall, this research advances the understanding of the physiological responses of two major crops, and the impact on ecosystem services

  11. Isomer ratios for products of photonuclear reactions on 121Sb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezshyyko, Oleg; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Golinka-Bezshyyko, Larisa; Kadenko, Igor; Vodin, Oleksandr; Olejnik, Stanislav; Tuller, Gleb; Kushnir, Volodymyr; Mitrochenko, Viktor

    2017-09-01

    Over the past several years various preequilibrium model approaches for nuclear reactions were developed. Diversified detailed experimental data in the medium excitation energy region for nucleus are needed for reasonable selection among these theoretical models. Lack of experimental data in this energy region does essentially limit the possibilities for analysis and comparison of different preequilibrium theoretical models. For photonuclear reactions this energy region extends between bremsstrahlung energies nearly 30-100 MeV. Experimental measurements and estimations of isomer ratios for products of photonuclear reactions with multiple particle escape on antimony have been performed using bremsstrahlung with end-point energies 38, 43 and 53 MeV. Method of induced activity measurement was applied. For acquisition of gamma spectra we used HPGe spectrometer with 20% efficiency and energy resolution 1.9 keV for 1332 keV gamma line of 60Co. Linear accelerator of electrons LU-40 was a source of bremsstrahlung. Energy resolution of electron beam was about 1% and mean current was within (3.8-5.3) μA.

  12. Production of Energetic Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashnik Stepan G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Different reaction mechanisms contribute to the production of light fragments (LF from nuclear reactions. Available models cannot accurately predict emission of LF from arbitrary reactions. However, the emission of LF is important formany applications, such as cosmic-ray-induced single event upsets, radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and heavy-ion beams, to name just a few. The cascade-exciton model (CEM and the Los Alamos version of the quark-gluon string model (LAQGSM, as implemented in the CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators used in the Los Alamos Monte Carlo transport code MCNP6, describe quite well the spectra of fragments with sizes up to 4He across a broad range of target masses and incident energies. However, they do not predict high-energy tails for LF heavier than 4He. The standard versions of CEM and LAQGSM do not account for preequilibrium emission of LF larger than 4He. The aim of our work is to extend the preequilibrium model to include such processes. We do this by including the emission of fragments heavier than 4He at the preequilibrium stage, and using an improved version of the Fermi Break-up model, providing improved agreement with various experimental data.

  13. A kinetic-theory approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallis, Michael A; Bond, Ryan B; Torczynski, John R

    2009-09-28

    Recently proposed molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction-rate information) are investigated for chemical reactions occurring in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows. The new models are in good agreement with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions and with both measured rates and other theoretical models for far-from-equilibrium conditions. Additionally, the new models are applied to representative combustion and ionization reactions and are in good agreement with available measurements and theoretical models. Thus, molecular-level chemistry modeling provides an accurate method for predicting equilibrium and nonequilibrium chemical-reaction rates in gases.

  14. NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE THE GELLED PRODUCT OF CANNIZZARO REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Fernández-Sánchez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR of proton 1H, carbon 13C and two dimensional spectrums, product of a green organic synthesis of redox on the Cannizzaro reaction. The product was reported as a tribochemical gel (heterogeneous mixture and confirmed by Infrared Spectroscopy IR, X-ray and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results in this paper confirm its structure through various techniques of NMR and evaluate the content of sodium benzoate and benzyl alcohol in the spectroscopy sample, examining the values of the integrals on 1H NMR signals. The result of analysis indicates that benzyl alcohol (dispersed phase is in 33.44% mol in comparison with sodium benzoate content (continuous phase. These results confirm that the gel structure over time loses the dispersed phase of the benzyl alcohol producing a xerogel.

  15. Methylidyne radical reactions with hydrocarbons: kinetics at low temperature and product branching ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeat, Astrid; Caubert, Philippe; Costes, Michel; Daugey, Nicolas; Loison, Jean-Christophe

    CH radical reactions with hydrocarbons could play a role in the atmospheres of Titan, Pluto or Triton as well as in interstellar clouds (ISCs), where the hydrocarbon compounds were detected and the temperatures are very low, i.e. ~ 95 K down to ~ 38 K at the surface of these satellites and planet and from 50 K down to 10 K in ISCs. In fact, in modelling the processes occurring in these low-temperature environments, researchers generally still have to extrapolate the high-temperature kinetic data mainly obtained in the temperature range above 300 K. However, for many neutral-neutral reactions studied, the rate constants exhibit essentially non-Arrhenius behaviour at low temperatures. The temperature dependences of the methylidyne radical reactions with methane, allene, methylacetylene and propene were studied in our new supersonic flow reactor coupled with pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques. Three Laval nozzles were designed to provide uniform supersonic expansions down to 77 K. The rate constants for the CH + CH4 reaction are in good agreement with the temperature dependence proposed by A. Canosa et al., i.e. 3.96 × 10-8 ×(T/K)-1.04 exp(-36.1K/T) in the range 23-298 K. The rate constants of the CH + C3H4 (allene), CH + C3H4 (methylacetylene) and CH + C3H6 (propene) reactions exhibit a small temperature dependence between 77 and 170 K, are close to the gas kinetic limit and could thus contribute to the chemistry in the dense molecular clouds or outer planets atmospheres (Titan, Pluto and Triton for example) rich in hydrocarbons. The reactions of CH radical with several saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons were studied, at room temperature, in a low-pressure fast-flow reactor. The absolute atomic hydrogen productions were determined at 300 K by V.U.V. resonance fluorescence, the reference used being the H production from the CH + CH4 and H2S reactions. Ab initio studies of the different stationary points relevant to some

  16. Heterogeneous chemistry and reaction dynamics of the atmospheric oxidants, O3, NO3, and OH, on organic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapleski, Robert C; Zhang, Yafen; Troya, Diego; Morris, John R

    2016-07-07

    Heterogeneous chemistry of the most important atmospheric oxidants, O3, NO3, and OH, plays a central role in regulating atmospheric gas concentrations, processing aerosols, and aging materials. Recent experimental and computational studies have begun to reveal the detailed reaction mechanisms and kinetics for gas-phase O3, NO3, and OH when they impinge on organic surfaces. Through new research approaches that merge the fields of traditional surface science with atmospheric chemistry, researchers are developing an understanding for how surface structure and functionality affect interfacial chemistry with this class of highly oxidizing pollutants. Together with future research initiatives, these studies will provide a more complete description of atmospheric chemistry and help others more accurately predict the properties of aerosols, the environmental impact of interfacial oxidation, and the concentrations of tropospheric gases.

  17. Comprehensive atmospheric modeling of reactive cyclic siloxanes and their oxidation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janechek, Nathan J.; Hansen, Kaj M.; Stanier, Charles O.

    2017-07-01

    Cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMSs) are important components in personal care products that transport and react in the atmosphere. Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6), and their gas-phase oxidation products have been incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. Gas-phase oxidation products, as the precursor to secondary organic aerosol from this compound class, were included to quantify the maximum potential for aerosol formation from gas-phase reactions with OH. Four 1-month periods were modeled to quantify typical concentrations, seasonal variability, spatial patterns, and vertical profiles. Typical model concentrations showed parent compounds were highly dependent on population density as cities had monthly averaged peak D5 concentrations up to 432 ng m-3. Peak oxidized D5 concentrations were significantly less, up to 9 ng m-3, and were located downwind of major urban areas. Model results were compared to available measurements and previous simulation results. Seasonal variation was analyzed and differences in seasonal influences were observed between urban and rural locations. Parent compound concentrations in urban and peri-urban locations were sensitive to transport factors, while parent compounds in rural areas and oxidized product concentrations were influenced by large-scale seasonal variability in OH.

  18. Comprehensive atmospheric modeling of reactive cyclic siloxanes and their oxidation products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Janechek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMSs are important components in personal care products that transport and react in the atmosphere. Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5, dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6, and their gas-phase oxidation products have been incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model. Gas-phase oxidation products, as the precursor to secondary organic aerosol from this compound class, were included to quantify the maximum potential for aerosol formation from gas-phase reactions with OH. Four 1-month periods were modeled to quantify typical concentrations, seasonal variability, spatial patterns, and vertical profiles. Typical model concentrations showed parent compounds were highly dependent on population density as cities had monthly averaged peak D5 concentrations up to 432 ng m−3. Peak oxidized D5 concentrations were significantly less, up to 9 ng m−3, and were located downwind of major urban areas. Model results were compared to available measurements and previous simulation results. Seasonal variation was analyzed and differences in seasonal influences were observed between urban and rural locations. Parent compound concentrations in urban and peri-urban locations were sensitive to transport factors, while parent compounds in rural areas and oxidized product concentrations were influenced by large-scale seasonal variability in OH.

  19. Temperature dependence of carbon kinetic isotope effect for the oxidation reaction of ethane by OH radicals under atmospherically relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piansawan, Tammarat; Saccon, Marina; Laumer, Werner; Gensch, Iulia; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    Modeling of the global distribution of atmospheric ethane sources and sinks by using the 13C isotopic composition requires accurate knowledge of the carbon kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of its atmospheric removal reactions. The quantum mechanical prediction implies the necessity to elucidate the temperature dependence of KIE within atmospherically relevant temperature range by experiment. In this study, the KIE and its temperature dependence for ethane oxidation by OH radicals was investigated at ambient pressure in a temperature range of 243 K to 303 K. The chemical reactions were carried out in a 15 L PFE reaction chamber, suspended in a thermally controlled oven. The isotope ratios of the gas phase components during the course of the reactions were measured by Thermal Desorption -- Gas Chromatography -- Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC-IRMS). For each temperature, the KIE was derived from the temporal evolution of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of ethane using a method adapted from the relative reaction rate concept. The room temperature KIE of the ethane reaction with OH radicals was found to be 6.85 ± 0.32 ‰. This value is in agreement with the previously reported value of 8.57 ± 1.95 ‰ [Anderson et al. 2004] but has a substantially lower uncertainty. The experimental results will be discussed with the KIE temperature dependence predicted by quantum mechanical calculations. Reference: Rebecca S. Anderson, Lin Huang, Richard Iannone, Alexandra E. Thompson, and Jochen Rudolph (2004), Carbon Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Gas Phase Reactions of Light Alkanes and Ethene with the OH Radical at 296 ± 4 K, J. Phys. Chem. A, 108, 11537--11544

  20. 40 CFR 721.3805 - Formaldehyde, reaction products with 1,3-benzenedimethanamine and bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Formaldehyde, reaction products with 1... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3805 Formaldehyde, reaction products... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as formaldehyde, reaction products with 1,3...

  1. Evaluation of Neutron Induced Reactions for 32 Fission Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeong Il

    2007-02-15

    Neutron cross sections for 32 fission products were evaluated in the neutron-incident energy range from 10{sup -5} eV to 20 MeV. The list of fission products consists of the priority materials for several applications, extended to cover complete isotopic chains for three elements. The full list includes 8 individual isotopes, {sup 95}Mo, {sup 101}Ru, {sup 103}Rh, {sup 105}Pd, {sup 109}Ag, {sup 131}Xe, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 141}Pr, and 24 isotopes in complete isotopic chains for Nd (8), Sm (9) and Dy (7). Our evaluation methodology covers both the low energy region and the fast neutron region.In the low energy region, our evaluations are based on the latest data published in the Atlas of Neutron Resonances. This resource was used to infer both the thermal values and the resolved resonance parameters that were validated against the capture resonance integrals. In the unresolved resonance region we performed the additional evaluation by using the averages of the resolved resonances and adjusting them to the experimental data.In the fast neutron region our evaluations are based on the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE-2.19 validated against the experimental data. EMPIRE is the modular system of codes consisting of many nuclear reaction models, including the spherical and deformed Optical Model, Hauser-Feshbach theory with the width fluctuation correction and complete gamma-ray emission cascade, DWBA, Multi-step Direct and Multi-step Compound models, and several versions of the phenomenological preequilibrium models. The code is equipped with a power full GUI, allowing an easy access to support libraries such as RIPL and CSISRS, the graphical package, as well the utility codes for formatting and checking. In general, in our calculations we used the Reference Input Parameter Library, RIPL, for the initial set model parameters. These parameters were properly adjusted to reproduce the available experimental data taken from the CSISRS library. Our evaluations cover cross

  2. Atmospheric oxidation chemistry and ozone production: Results from SHARP 2009 in Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xinrong; van Duin, Diana; Cazorla, Maria; Chen, Shuang; Mao, Jingqiu; Zhang, Li; Brune, William H.; Flynn, James H.; Grossberg, Nicole; Lefer, Barry L.; Rappenglück, Bernhard; Wong, Kam W.; Tsai, Catalina; Stutz, Jochen; Dibb, Jack E.; Thomas Jobson, B.; Luke, Winston T.; Kelley, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Ozone (O3) and secondary fine particles come from the atmospheric oxidation chemistry that involves the hydroxyl radical (OH) and hydroperoxyl radical (HO2), which are together called HOx. Radical precursors such as nitrous acid (HONO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) significantly affect the HOx budget in urban environments. These chemical processes connect surface anthropogenic and natural emissions to local and regional air pollution. Using the data collected during the Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors (SHARP) in spring 2009, we examine atmospheric oxidation chemistry and O3 production in this polluted urban environment. A numerical box model with five different chemical mechanisms was used to simulate the oxidation processes and thus OH and HO2 in this study. In general, the model reproduced the measured OH and HO2 with all five chemical mechanisms producing similar levels of OH and HO2, although midday OH was overpredicted and nighttime OH and HO2 were underpredicted. The calculated HOx production was dominated by HONO photolysis in the early morning and by the photolysis of O3 and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) in the midday. On average, the daily HOx production rate was 24.6 ppbv d-1, of which 30% was from O3 photolysis, 22% from HONO photolysis, 15% from the photolysis of OVOCs (other than HCHO), 14% from HCHO photolysis, and 13% from O3 reactions with alkenes. The O3 production was sensitive to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the early morning but was sensitive to NOx for most of afternoon. This is similar to the behavior observed in two previous summertime studies in Houston: the Texas Air Quality Study in 2000 (TexAQS 2000) and the TexAQS II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project in 2006 (TRAMP 2006). Ozone production in SHARP exhibits a longer NOx-sensitive period than TexAQS 2000 and TRAMP 2006, indicating that NOx control may be an efficient approach for the O3 control in springtime for Houston. Results from this study

  3. Removal of the potent greenhouse gas NF3 by reactions with the atmospheric oxidants O(1D), OH and O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Terry J; Vereecken, Luc; Horowitz, Abraham; Khamaganov, Victor; Crowley, John N; Lelieveld, Jos

    2011-11-07

    Nitrogen trifluoride, NF(3), a trace gas of purely anthropogenic origin with a large global warming potential is accumulating in the Earth's atmosphere. Large uncertainties are however associated with its atmospheric removal rate. In this work, experimental and theoretical kinetic tools were used to study the reactions of NF(3) with three of the principal gas-phase atmospheric oxidants: O((1)D), OH and O(3). For reaction (R2) with O((1)D), rate coefficients of k(2)(212-356 K) = (2.0 ± 0.3) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) were obtained in direct competitive kinetics experiments, and experimental and theoretical evidence was obtained for F-atom product formation. These results indicate that whilst photolysis in the stratosphere remains the principal fate of NF(3), reaction with O((1)D) is significant and was previously underestimated in atmospheric lifetime calculations. Experimental evidence of F-atom production from 248 nm photolysis of NF(3) was also obtained, indicating that quantum yields for NF(3) destruction remain significant throughout the UV. No evidence was found for reaction (R3) of NF(3) with OH indicating that this process makes little or no contribution to NF(3) removal from the atmosphere. An upper-limit of k(3)(298 K) true rate coefficient is more than ten orders of magnitude smaller. An upper-limit of k(4)(296 K) < 3 × 10(-25) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained in experiments to investigate O(3) + NF(3) (R4). Altogether these results underpin calculations of a long (several hundred year) lifetime for NF(3). In the course of this work rate coefficients (in units of 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) for removal of O((1)D) by n-C(5)H(12), k(6) = (50 ± 5) and by N(2), k(7) = (3.1 ± 0.2) were obtained. Uncertainties quoted throughout are 2σ precision only. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  4. A theoretical study of the mechanism of the atmospherically relevant reaction of chlorine atoms with methyl nitrate, and calculation of the reaction rate coefficients at temperatures relevant to the troposphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Maggie; Mok, Daniel K W; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M

    2015-03-21

    The reaction between atomic chlorine (Cl) and methyl nitrate (CH3ONO2) is significant in the atmosphere, as Cl is a key oxidant, especially in the marine boundary layer, and alkyl nitrates are important nitrogen-containing organic compounds, which are temporary reservoirs of the reactive nitrogen oxides NO, NO2 and NO3 (NOx). Four reaction channels HCl + CH2ONO2, CH3OCl + NO2, CH3Cl + NO3 and CH3O + ClNO2 were considered. The major channel is found to be the H abstraction channel, to give the products HCl + CH2ONO2. For all channels, geometry optimization and frequency calculations were carried out at the M06-2X/6-31+G** level, while relative electronic energies were improved to the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS level. The reaction barrier (ΔE(‡)0K) and reaction enthalpy (ΔH(RX)298K) of the H abstraction channel were computed to be 0.61 and -2.30 kcal mol(-1), respectively, at the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS//M06-2X/6-31+G** level. Reaction barriers (ΔE(‡)0K) for the other channels are more positive and these pathways do not contribute to the overall reaction rate coefficient in the temperature range considered (200-400 K). Rate coefficients were calculated for the H-abstraction channel at various levels of variational transition state theory (VTST) including tunnelling. Recommended ICVT/SCT rate coefficients in the temperature range 200-400 K are presented for the first time for this reaction. The values obtained in the 200-300 K region are particularly important as they will be valuable for atmospheric modelling calculations involving reactions with methyl nitrate. The implications of the results to atmospheric chemistry are discussed. Also, the enthalpies of formation, ΔHf,298K, of CH3ONO2 and CH2ONO2 were computed to be -29.7 and 19.3 kcal mol(-1), respectively, at the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS level.

  5. Chlorination of parabens: reaction kinetics and transformation product identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qianhui; Ji, Feng; Wang, Wei; Wang, Qiquan; Hu, Zhenhu; Yuan, Shoujun

    2016-11-01

    The reactivity and fate of parabens during chlorination were investigated in this work. Chlorination kinetics of methylparaben (MeP), ethylparaben (EtP), propylparaben (PrP), and butylparaben (BuP) were studied in the pH range of 4.0 to 11.0 at 25 ± 1 °C. Apparent rate constants (k app) of 9.65 × 10-3 M-0.614·s-1, 1.77 × 10-2 M-1.019·s-1, 2.98 × 10-2 M-0.851·s-1, and 1.76 × 10-2 M-0.860·s-1 for MeP, EtP, PrP, and BuP, respectively, were obtained at pH 7.0. The rate constants depended on the solution pH, temperature, and NH4+ concentration. The maximum k app was obtained at pH 8.0, and the minimum value was obtained at pH 11.0. The reaction rate constants increased with increasing temperature. When NH4+ was added to the solution, the reaction of parabens was inhibited due to the rapid formation of chloramines. Two main transformation products, 3-chloro-parabens and 3,5-dichloro-parabens, were identified by GC-MS and LCMS-IT-TOF, and a reaction pathway was proposed. Dichlorinated parabens accumulated in solution, which is a threat to human health and the aqueous environment.

  6. Production cross sections of proton-induced reactions on yttrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Sung-Chul; Song, Tae-Yung; Lee, Young-Ouk [Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guinyun, E-mail: gnkim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-01

    The production cross sections of residual radionuclides such as {sup 86,88,89g}Zr, {sup 86g,87m,87g,88}Y, {sup 83g,85g}Sr, and {sup 83,84g}Rb in the {sup 89}Y(p,x) reaction were measured using a stacked-foil activation and offline γ-ray spectrometric technique with proton energies of 57 MeV and 69 MeV at the 100 MeV proton linac in the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC), Gyeongju, Korea. The induced activities of the activated samples were measured using a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and the proton flux was determined using the {sup nat}Cu(p,x){sup 62}Zn reaction. The measured data was compared with other experimental data and the data from the TENLD-2015 library based on the TALYS code. The present results are generally lower than those in literature, but are found to be in agreement with the shape of the excitation functions. The integral yields for the thick target using the measured cross sections are given.

  7. Production cross sections of proton-induced reactions on yttrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sung-Chul; Song, Tae-Yung; Lee, Young-Ouk; Kim, Guinyun

    2017-05-01

    The production cross sections of residual radionuclides such as 86,88,89gZr, 86g,87m,87g,88Y, 83g,85gSr, and 83,84gRb in the 89Y(p,x) reaction were measured using a stacked-foil activation and offline γ-ray spectrometric technique with proton energies of 57 MeV and 69 MeV at the 100 MeV proton linac in the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC), Gyeongju, Korea. The induced activities of the activated samples were measured using a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and the proton flux was determined using the natCu(p,x)62Zn reaction. The measured data was compared with other experimental data and the data from the TENLD-2015 library based on the TALYS code. The present results are generally lower than those in literature, but are found to be in agreement with the shape of the excitation functions. The integral yields for the thick target using the measured cross sections are given.

  8. Production of gamma rays with energies greater than 30 MeV in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D.; Fichtel, C.; Kniffen, D.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional study of atmospheric gamma rays with energy greater than 30 MeV has been carried out. Experimental results were obtained from four balloon flights from Palestine, Texas, with a 15 cm by 15 cm digitized wire grid spark chamber. The energy spectrum for downward-moving gamma rays steepens with increasing atmospheric depth. Near the top of the atmosphere, the spectrum steepens with increasing zenith angle. Experimental results compare reasonably well with a three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation of atmospheric gamma ray production. Inclusion of upward-moving gamma rays makes possible the use of atmospheric secondaries for in-flight calibration of satellite gamma ray detectors.

  9. Rapid electrochemiluminescence assays of polymerase chain reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenten, J H; Casadei, J; Link, J; Lupold, S; Willey, J; Powell, M; Rees, A; Massey, R

    1991-09-01

    We demonstrate the first use of an electrochemiluminescent (ECL) label, [4-(N-succimidyloxycarbonylpropyl)-4'-methyl-2,2'- bipyridine]ruthenium(II) dihexafluorophosphate (Origen label; IGEN Inc.), in DNA probe assays. This label allows rapid (less than 25 min) quantification and detection of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified products from oncogenes, viruses, and cloned genes. For the PCR, we used labeled oligonucleotide primers complementary to human papiloma virus and the Ha-ras oncogene. These samples were followed by ECL analysis or hybridization with specific, Origen-labeled oligonucleotide probes. These studies demonstrate the speed, specificity, and effectiveness of the new ECL labels, compared with 32P, for nucleic acid probe applications. We describe formats involving conventional methodologies and a new format that requires no wash step, allowing simple and rapid sample analysis. These rapid assays also reduce PCR contamination, by requiring less sample handling. Improvements in ECL detectability are currently under investigation for use in DNA probe assays without amplification.

  10. Reactions of isoprene and sulphoxy radical-anions – a possible source of atmospheric organosulphites and organosulphates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Rudziński

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Transformation of isoprene coupled with auto-oxidation of SIV in aqueous solutions was studied experimentally and by chemical-kinetic modelling over a broad range of solution acidities (pH=3–9 to complement the research on aqueous-phase and heterogeneous transformation of isoprene reported recently by many laboratories. Isoprene significantly slowed down the auto-oxidation in acidic and basic solutions, and accelerated it slightly in neutral solutions. Simultaneously, production of sulphate ions and formation of solution acidity were significantly reduced. Formation of sulphite and sulphate derivatives of isoprene - sulphurous acid mono-(2-methyl-4-oxo-but-2-enyl ester (m/z=163, sulphurous acid mono-(4-hydroxy-2-methyl-but-2-enyl ester (m/z=165, sulphuric acid mono-(2-methyl-4-oxo-but-2-enyl ester (m/z=179, sulphuric acid mono-(4-hydroxy-2-methyl-but-2-enyl ester (m/z=181, and possible structural isomers of these species – was indicated by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometric analysis of post-reaction mixtures. The experimental results were explained by changes in a subtle quantitative balance of three superimposed processes whose rates depended in different manner on the acidity of reacting solutions – the scavenging of sulphoxy radical-anions by isoprene, the formation of sulphoxy radical-anions during further reactions of isoprene radicals, and the auto-oxidation of SIV itself. A chemical mechanism based on this idea was explored numerically to show good agreement with experimental data. In basic and neutral solutions, the model overestimated the consumption of isoprene, probably because reactions of primary sulphite and sulphate derivatives of isoprene with sulphoxy radical-anions were not included. Interaction of isoprene with sulphur(IV species and oxygen can possibly result in formation of new organosulphate and organosulphite components of atmospheric aerosols and waters, and

  11. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhang, Ya [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People’s Republic of China, Nanjing 210042 (China); Ji, Yuefei [College of Resources and Environmental Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Gao, Shixiang, E-mail: ecsxg@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-06-05

    Highlights: • Enzymatic treatment of triclosan in water by soybean and horseradish peroxidases. • pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and enzyme dosage affected the removal efficiency of TCS. • The removal of TCS by SBP was more efficient than that of HRP. • K{sub CAT} and K{sub CAT}/K{sub M} values for SBP toward TCS were much higher than those for HRP. • Polymers formed via radical coupling mechanism were nontoxic to the growth of alga. - Abstract: This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, while the optimal pH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration were 7.0 and 8 μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1 U mL{sup −1} SBP in 30 min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3 U mL{sup −1} was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (K{sub CAT}) and catalytic efficiency (K{sub CAT}/K{sub M}) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via C−C and C−O coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water

  12. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for the production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S.; Gaffney, T.; Nataraj, S.; Rao, M.; Sircar, S. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The novel Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process has the potential to decrease the cost of hydrogen production by steam methane reforming. Current effort for development of this technology has focused on adsorbent development, experimental process concept testing, and process development and design. A preferred CO{sub 2} adsorbent, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted hydrotalcite, satisfies all of the performance targets and it has been scaled up for process testing. A separate class of adsorbents has been identified which could potentially improve the performance of the H{sub 2}-SER process. Although this material exhibits improved CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the HTC adsorbent, its hydrothermal stability must be improved. Single-step process experiments (not cyclic) indicate that the H{sub 2}-SER reactor performance during the reaction step improves with decreasing pressure and increasing temperature and steam to methane ratio in the feed. Methane conversion in the H{sub 2}-SER reactor is higher than for a conventional catalyst-only reactor operated at similar temperature and pressure. The reactor effluent gas consists of 90+% H{sub 2}, balance CH{sub 4}, with only trace levels (< 50 ppm) of carbon oxides. A best-case process design (2.5 MMSCFD of 99.9+% H{sub 2}) based on the HTC adsorbent properties and a revised SER process cycle has been generated. Economic analysis of this design indicates the process has the potential to reduce the H{sub 2} product cost by 25--31% compared to conventional steam methane reforming.

  13. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume IV – gas phase reactions of organic halogen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Atkinson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This article, the fourth in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data sheets evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of organic halogen species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in 2006/07. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and four appendices containing the data sheets, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  14. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume I - gas phase reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Atkinson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article, the first in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on GasKinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2001. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and five appendices containing the data sheets, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  15. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume II – gas phase reactions of organic species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Atkinson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article, the second in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Organic species, which were last published in 1999, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2002, and subsequently during the preparation of this article. The article consists of a summary table of the recommended rate coefficients, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and eight appendices containing the data sheets, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  16. Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, M.; Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The key consequences of SERP are: (i) reformation reaction is carried out at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than that in a conventional SMR reactor (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (ii) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 98+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (iii) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The first phase of the program has focused on the development of a sorbent for CO{sub 2} which has (a) reversible CO{sub 2} capacity >0.3 mmol/g at low partial pressures of CO{sub 2} (0.1 - 1.0 atm) in the presence of excess steam (pH{sub 2}O/pCO{sub 2}>20) at 400-500{degrees}C and (b) fast sorption-desorption kinetics for CO{sub 2}, at 400-500{degrees}C. Several families of supported sorbents have been identified that meet the target CO{sub 2} capacity. A few of these sorbents have been tested under repeated sorption/desorption cycles and extended exposure to high pressure steam at 400-500{degrees}C. One sorbent has been scaled up to larger quantities (2-3 kg) and tested in the laboratory process equipment for sorption and desorption kinetics of CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2}, sorption and desorption kinetics are desirably fast. This was a critical path item for the first phase of the program and now has been successfully demonstrated. A reactor has been designed that will allow nearly isothermal operation for SERP-SMR. This reactor was integrated into an overall process flow diagram for the SERP-SMR process.

  17. Products of the gas-phase reactions of 1,3-butadiene with OH and NO{sub 3} radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuazon, E.C.; Alvarado, A.; Aschmann, S.M.; Atkinson, R.; Arey, J.

    1999-10-15

    1,3-Butadiene is emitted into the atmosphere from a number of sources including combustion sources and is listed in the US as a hazardous air pollutant. In the atmosphere, 1,3-butadiene reacts with OH radicals, NO{sub 3} radicals, and O{sub 3} with the dominant tropospheric removal processes being daytime reaction with the OH radical and nighttime reaction with the NO{sub 3} radical. The authors have used gas chromatography, in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy, and in situ atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry (API-MS) to identify and quantify the products formed from the reactions of 1,3-butadiene with OH radicals (in the presence of NO) and NO{sub 3} radicals. Acrolein, formaldehyde, and furan were identified and quantified from the OH radical-initiated reaction, with formation yields of 0.58 {+-} 0.04, 0.62 {+-} 0.05, and 0.03--0.04, respectively. Organic nitrates were observed by FT-IR spectroscopy with an estimated yield of 0.07 {+-} 0.03, and the API-MS analyses indicated that these organic nitrates are mainly the hydroxynitrate HOCH{sub 2}CH=CHCH{sub 2}ONO{sub 2} and/or its isomers. API-MS analyses showed the formation of a hydroxycarbonyl with the formula C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 2}, attributed to HOCH{sub 2}CH=CHCHO and/or its isomers. The major products of the NO{sub 3} radical-initiated reaction were organic nitrates; the API-MS analyses indicated the formation of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene, and unsaturated C{sub 4}-hydroxycarbonyls, hydroxynitrates, carbonyl nitrates, and nitrooxyhydroperoxides. Acrolein, HCHO, and furan were again quantified by gas chromatographic and FT-IR analyses. The data is compared with previous literature studies, and detailed reaction mechanisms are presented and discussed.

  18. The nitrogen cycle: Atmosphere interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric interactions involving the nitrogen species are varied and complex. These interactions include photochemical reactions, initiated by the absorption of solar photons and chemical kinetic reactions, which involve both homogeneous (gas-to-gas reactions) and heterogeneous (gas-to-particle) reactions. Another important atmospheric interaction is the production of nitrogen oxides by atmospheric lightning. The nitrogen cycle strongly couples the biosphere and atmosphere. Many nitrogen species are produced by biogenic processes. Once in the atmosphere nitrogen oxides are photochemically and chemically transformed to nitrates, which are returned to the biosphere via precipitation, dry deposition and aerosols to close the biosphere-atmosphere nitrogen cycle. The sources, sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of the nitrogen species; atmospheric nitrogen species; souces and sinks of nitrous oxide; sources; sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of ammonia; seasonal variation of the vertical distribution of ammonia in the troposphere; surface and atmospheric sources of the nitrogen species, and seasonal variation of ground level ammonia are summarized.

  19. Transfusion reactions in pediatric compared with adult patients: a look at rate, reaction type, and associated products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Fredrick D; Woods, Marcella; Arnold, Shanna; Young, Pampee P

    2015-03-01

    The majority of reports on transfusion reactions address adult patients. Less is known about the types, incidence, and other clinical details of transfusion reactions in pediatric populations. Furthermore, to our knowledge, there have been no previous reports directly comparing these aspects between adults and pediatric patient populations to assess if there are differences. Between the period of January 1, 2011, and February 1, 2013, all reported adult and pediatric transfusion reactions at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) were evaluated by transfusion medicine clinical service. The information was subsequently shared with the hemovigilance database. Data provided to hemovigilance included age, sex, blood product associated with the reaction, severity of the reaction, and the type of transfusion reactions. These were collated with hospital and blood bank information system-acquired data on overall admission and product transfusion. A total of 133,671 transfusions were performed at VUMC during the study period including 20,179 platelet (PLT) transfusions, 31,605 plasma transfusions, 79,933 red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, and 2154 cryoprecipitate transfusions. Over the same period, 108 pediatric and 277 adult transfusion reactions were recorded. This corresponds to an incidence of 6.2 reactions per 1000 transfusions within the pediatric (age reactions per 1000 transfusions within the adult population. In both adult and pediatric populations, transfusion reactions were most commonly associated with PLT, followed by RBC, and then plasma transfusions. Within the pediatric population, subset analysis identified multiple differences when compared to the adult population, including an increased incidence of allergic transfusion reactions (2.7/1000 vs. 1.1/1000, p reactions (1.9/1000 vs. 0.47/1000, p reactions (0.29/1000 vs. 0.078/1000, p reaction incidence was the same between sexes in adults, in pediatric patients, reactions were more common in male

  20. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production via Terbium Oxide Based Redox Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bhosale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The computational thermodynamic modeling of the terbium oxide based two-step solar thermochemical water splitting (Tb-WS cycle is reported. The 1st step of the Tb-WS cycle involves thermal reduction of TbO2 into Tb and O2, whereas the 2nd step corresponds to the production of H2 through Tb oxidation by water splitting reaction. Equilibrium compositions associated with the thermal reduction and water splitting steps were determined via HSC simulations. Influence of oxygen partial pressure in the inert gas on thermal reduction of TbO2 and effect of water splitting temperature (TL on Gibbs free energy related to the H2 production step were examined in detail. The cycle (ηcycle and solar-to-fuel energy conversion (ηsolar-to-fuel efficiency of the Tb-WS cycle were determined by performing the second-law thermodynamic analysis. Results obtained indicate that ηcycle and ηsolar-to-fuel increase with the decrease in oxygen partial pressure in the inert flushing gas and thermal reduction temperature (TH. It was also realized that the recuperation of the heat released by the water splitting reactor and quench unit further enhances the solar reactor efficiency. At TH=2280 K, by applying 60% heat recuperation, maximum ηcycle of 39.0% and ηsolar-to-fuel of 47.1% for the Tb-WS cycle can be attained.

  1. Measurement of charmed particle production in hadronic reactions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to measure the production cross-section for charmed particles in hadronic reactions, study their production mechanism, and search for excited charmed hadrons.\\\\ \\\\ Charmed Mesons and Baryons will be measured in $\\pi$ and $p$ interactions on Beryllium between 100 and 200 GeV/c. The trigger will be on an electron from the leptonic decay of one charmed particle by signals from the Cerenkov counter (Ce), the electron trigger calorimeter (eCal), scintillation counters, and proportional wire chambers. The accompanying charmed particle will be measured via its hadronic decay in a two-stage magnetic spectrometer with drift chambers (arms 2, 3a, 3b, 3c), two large-area multicell Cerenkov counters (C2, C3) and a large-area shower counter ($\\gamma$-CAL). The particles which can be measured and identified include $\\gamma, e, \\pi^{\\pm}, \\pi^{0}, K^{\\pm}, p, \\bar{p}$ so that a large number of hadronic decay modes of charmed particles can be studied. \\\\ \\\\ A silicon counter telescope with 5 $\\m...

  2. A Review of Microwave-Assisted Reactions for Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifuddin Nomanbhay

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of biomass into chemicals and biofuels is an active research area as trends move to replace fossil fuels with renewable resources due to society’s increased concern towards sustainability. In this context, microwave processing has emerged as a tool in organic synthesis and plays an important role in developing a more sustainable world. Integration of processing methods with microwave irradiation has resulted in a great reduction in the time required for many processes, while the reaction efficiencies have been increased markedly. Microwave processing produces a higher yield with a cleaner profile in comparison to other methods. The microwave processing is reported to be a better heating method than the conventional methods due to its unique thermal and non-thermal effects. This paper provides an insight into the theoretical aspects of microwave irradiation practices and highlights the importance of microwave processing. The potential of the microwave technology to accomplish superior outcomes over the conventional methods in biodiesel production is presented. A green process for biodiesel production using a non-catalytic method is still new and very costly because of the supercritical condition requirement. Hence, non-catalytic biodiesel conversion under ambient pressure using microwave technology must be developed, as the energy utilization for microwave-based biodiesel synthesis is reported to be lower and cost-effective.

  3. Reactions of substituted benzene anions with N and O atoms: Chemistry in Titan’s upper atmosphere and the interstellar medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Bierbaum, Veronica M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2016-06-07

    The likely existence of aromatic anions in many important extraterrestrial environments, from the atmosphere of Titan to the interstellar medium (ISM), is attracting increasing attention. Nitrogen and oxygen atoms are also widely observed in the ISM and in the ionospheres of planets and moons. In the current work, we extend previous studies to explore the reactivity of prototypical aromatic anions (deprotonated toluene, aniline, and phenol) with N and O atoms both experimentally and computationally. The benzyl and anilinide anions both exhibit slow associative electron detachment (AED) processes with N atom, and moderate reactivity with O atom in which AED dominates but ionic products are also formed. The reactivity of phenoxide is dramatically different; there is no measurable reaction with N atom, and the moderate reactivity with O atom produces almost exclusively ionic products. The reaction mechanisms are studied theoretically by employing density functional theory calculations, and spin conversion is found to be critical for understanding some product distributions. This work provides insight into the rich gas-phase chemistry of aromatic ion-atom reactions and their relevance to ionospheric and interstellar chemistry.

  4. Gas production after reaction of sodium bicarbonate and hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordtran, J S; Morawski, S G; Santa Ana, C A; Rector, F C

    1984-11-01

    Ingestion of sodium bicarbonate has been implicated as one of the proximate causes of spontaneous gastric rupture. However, the volume and rate of gas released from the reaction of ingested sodium bicarbonate and gastric acid has not been previously studied in detail. We, therefore, developed an in vitro method for measuring gas release after addition of sodium bicarbonate to a solution containing hydrochloric acid. From the results of our studies, we conclude that even though hydrochloric acid and sodium bicarbonate react instantaneously, the resulting gas production is slow, mainly because CO2 produced from the dehydration of carbonic acid dissolves in water and is only slowly released into the gas phase. The major exogenous factors that determine the rate of gas release are the volume of the solution, the quantity of reactants, the air volume over the reaction mixture, the partial pressure of CO2 of the acid solution before the addition of bicarbonate, and the stirring rate. The presence of food, alcohol, and carbonic anhydrase had relatively little if any effect. Based on our results, we believe that ingestion of the recommended dose of sodium bicarbonate (one-half teaspoon) would result in only small amounts of sudden gas release, probably not enough to be an important factor in causing spontaneous gastric rupture. On the other hand, we measured the amount of sodium bicarbonate that people actually select to take for indigestion, and all exceeded the recommended dose. Some people selected doses of bicarbonate that would result in several hundred milliliters of gas release within 3 min; it seems likely that such injudicious ingestion of sodium bicarbonate, if taken when the stomach was distended with air, food, and liquid, could be an important factor in spontaneous gastric rupture.

  5. Critical Evaluation of Chemical Reaction Rates and Collision Cross Sections of Importance in the Earth's Upper Atmosphere and the Atmospheres of Other Planets, Moons, and Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, David L.

    2006-01-01

    We propose to establish a long-term program of critical evaluation by domain experts of the rates and cross sections for atomic and molecular processes that are needed for understanding and modeling the atmospheres in the solar system. We envision data products resembling those of the JPL/NASA Panel for Data Evaluation and the similar efforts of the international combustion modeling community funded by US DoE and its European counterpart.

  6. Atmospheric Neutrino Predictions and the Influence of Hadron Production

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, S

    2004-01-01

    The observation of neutrino flavour transformations of atmospheric neutrinos measured in Super-Kamiokande demands a theoretical explanation. The favoured candidate -- neutrino oscillations -- makes detailed predictions for the energy and path length dependence of the flavour transformations. For this reason, neutrino oscillations is a testable theory, which so far is in excellent agreement with the observations. The detailed comparison between the measured neutrino fluxes at Super-Kamiokande and the expected neutrino flux demands accurate predictions. Such predictions are performed with Monte-Carlo based simulations; the simulation of the Bartol group is used for the analyses in this thesis. Most recently the development of fully three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric neutrino calculations has been a significant theoretical improvement to the predicted neutrino fluxes. Older calculations employed the one-dimensional (1D) approximation; a comparison of these techniques is contained herewith. It is shown that above...

  7. Product inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose: are we running the reactions all wrong?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    include high substrate conversion (maximal yields), maximal enzyme efficiency, maximal volumetric reactor productivity, minimal equipment investment, minimal size, and short reaction time. The classic batch type STR reactions used for enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis prevent these goals to be fulfilled...

  8. Maillard reaction products modulate gut microbiota composition in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiquer, Isabel; Rubio, Luis A; Peinado, M Jesús; Delgado-Andrade, Cristina; Navarro, María Pilar

    2014-07-01

    Scarce data are available concerning effects of certain bioactive substances such as Maillard reaction products (MRP) on the gut microbiota composition, and the question of how a diet rich in MRP affects gut microbiota in humans is still open. Two experiments were conducted. In expt. 1, adolescents consumed diets either high or low in MRP in a two-period crossover trial; in expt. 2, rats were fed diets supplemented or not with MRP model-systems. Intestinal microbiota composition in fecal (adolescents) or cecal (rat) samples was assessed by qPCR analysis. Negative correlations were found in the human assay between lactobacilli numbers and dietary advanced MRP (r = -0.418 and -0.387, for hydroxymethylfurfural and carboxymethyl-lysine respectively, p microbiota composition both in humans and in rats, and the specific effects are likely to be linked to the chemical structure and dietary amounts of the different browning compounds. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Plant Glutathione Biosynthesis: Diversity in Biochemical Regulation and Reaction Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley eGalant

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In plants, exposure to temperature extremes, heavy metal-contaminated soils, drought, air pollutants, and pathogens results in the generation of reactive oxygen species that alter the intracellular redox environment, which in turn influences signaling pathways and cell fate. As part of their response to these stresses, plants produce glutathione. Glutathione acts as an antioxidant by quenching reactive oxygen species, and is involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle that eliminates damaging peroxides. Plants also use glutathione for the detoxification of xenobiotics, herbicides, air pollutants (sulfur dioxide and ozone, and toxic heavy metals. Two enzymes catalyze glutathione synthesis: glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL, and glutathione synthetase (GS. Glutathione is a ubiquitous protective compound in plants, but the structural and functional details of the proteins that synthesize it, as well as the potential biochemical mechanisms of their regulation, have only begun to be explored. As discussed here, the core reactions of glutathione synthesis are conserved across various organisms, but plants have diversified both the regulatory mechanisms that control its synthesis and the range of products derived from this pathway. Understanding the molecular basis of glutathione biosynthesis and its regulation will expand our knowledge of this component in the plant stress response network.

  10. Electrochemical device for converting carbon dioxide to a reaction product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Richard I.; Chen, Qingmei; Liu, Zengcai; Kutz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    An electrochemical device converts carbon dioxide to a reaction product. The device includes an anode and a cathode, each comprising a quantity of catalyst. The anode and cathode each has reactant introduced thereto. A polymer electrolyte membrane is interposed between the anode and the cathode. At least a portion of the cathode catalyst is directly exposed to gaseous carbon dioxide during electrolysis. The average current density at the membrane is at least 20 mA/cm.sup.2, measured as the area of the cathode gas diffusion layer that is covered by catalyst, and CO selectivity is at least 50% at a cell potential of 3.0 V. In some embodiments, the polymer electrolyte membrane comprises a polymer in which a constituent monomer is (p-vinylbenzyl)-R, where R is selected from the group consisting of imidazoliums, pyridiniums and phosphoniums. In some embodiments, the polymer electrolyte membrane is a Helper Membrane comprising a polymer containing an imidazolium ligand, a pyridinium ligand, or a phosphonium ligand.

  11. NUCAPS: NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System Environmental Data Record (EDR) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of numerous retrieved estimates of hydrological variables and trace gases as Environmental Data Record (EDR) products from the NOAA Unique...

  12. Atmospheric hydroxyl radical production from electronically excited NO2 and H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuping; Matthews, Jamie; Sinha, Amitabha

    2008-03-21

    Hydroxyl radicals are often called the "detergent" of the atmosphere because they control the atmosphere's capacity to cleanse itself of pollutants. Here, we show that the reaction of electronically excited nitrogen dioxide with water can be an important source of tropospheric hydroxyl radicals. Using measured rate data, along with available solar flux and atmospheric mixing ratios, we demonstrate that the tropospheric hydroxyl contribution from this source can be a substantial fraction (50%) of that from the traditional O(1D) + H2O reaction in the boundary-layer region for high solar zenith angles. Inclusion of this chemistry is expected to affect modeling of urban air quality, where the interactions of sunlight with emitted NOx species, volatile organic compounds, and hydroxyl radicals are central in determining the rate of ozone formation.

  13. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume V – heterogeneous reactions on solid substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Crowley

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article, the fifth in the ACP journal series, presents data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the heterogeneous processes on surfaces of solid particles present in the atmosphere, for which uptake coefficients and adsorption parameters have been presented on the IUPAC website in 2010. The article consists of an introduction and guide to the evaluation, giving a unifying framework for parameterisation of atmospheric heterogeneous processes. We provide summary sheets containing the recommended uptake parameters for the evaluated processes. Four substantial appendices contain detailed data sheets for each process considered for ice, mineral dust, sulfuric acid hydrate and nitric acid hydrate surfaces, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  14. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume VI – heterogeneous reactions with liquid substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ammann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This article, the sixth in the ACP journal series, presents data evaluated by the IUPAC Task Group on Atmospheric Chemical Kinetic Data Evaluation. It covers the heterogeneous processes involving liquid particles present in the atmosphere with an emphasis on those relevant for the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere and the marine boundary layer, for which uptake coefficients and adsorption parameters have been presented on the IUPAC website since 2009. The article consists of an introduction and guide to the evaluation, giving a unifying framework for parameterisation of atmospheric heterogeneous processes. We provide summary sheets containing the recommended uptake parameters for the evaluated processes. The experimental data on which the recommendations are based are provided in data sheets in separate appendices for the four surfaces considered: liquid water, deliquesced halide salts, other aqueous electrolytes and sulfuric acid.

  15. A COMBINED REACTION/PRODUCT RECOVERY PROCESS FOR THE CONTINUOUS PRODUCTION OF BIODIESEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdwell, J.F., Jr.; McFarlane, J.; Schuh, D.L.; Tsouris, C; Day, J.N. (Nu-Energie, LLC); Hullette, J.N. (Nu-Energie, LLC)

    2009-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Nu-Energie, LLC entered into a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) for the purpose of demonstrating and deploying a novel technology for the continuous synthesis and recovery of biodiesel from the transesterification of triglycerides. The focus of the work was the demonstration of a combination Couette reactor and centrifugal separator - an invention of ORNL researchers - that facilitates both product synthesis and recovery from reaction byproducts in the same apparatus. At present, transesterification of triglycerides to produce biodiesel is performed in batch-type reactors with an excess of a chemical catalyst, which is required to achieve high reactant conversions in reasonable reaction times (e.g., 1 hour). The need for long reactor residence times requires use of large reactors and ancillary equipment (e.g., feed and product tankage), and correspondingly large facilities, in order to obtain the economy of scale required to make the process economically viable. Hence, the goal of this CRADA was to demonstrate successful, extended operation of a laboratory-scale reactor/separator prototype to process typical industrial reactant materials, and to design, fabricate, and test a production-scale unit for deployment at the biodiesel production site. Because of its ease of operation, rapid attainment of steady state, high mass transfer and phase separation efficiencies, and compact size, a centrifugal contactor was chosen for intensification of the biodiesel production process. The unit was modified to increase the residence time from a few seconds to minutes*. For this application, liquid phases were introduced into the reactor as separate streams. One was composed of the methanol and base catalyst and the other was the soy oil used in the experiments. Following reaction in the mixing zone, the immiscible glycerine and methyl ester products were separated in the high speed rotor and collected from separate

  16. Propellant and Terrestrial Fuel Production from Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Build and test in a relevant environment a Mars propellant production plant of an appropriate scale for an initial demonstration on Mars. It will produce sufficient...

  17. An upper limit for the rate coefficient of the reaction of NH2 radicals with O2 using FTIR product analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, G. S.; Orlando, J. J.; Nickerson, Karen E.; Cantrell, C. A.; Calvert, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectrometry has been used to study the products of the photooxidation of ammonia in the presence of oxygen at 296 K. The data have been used to derive an upper limit of 6 x 10 exp -21/cu cm molecule s for the reaction of NH2 radicals with O2 to produce NO(x) at 296 K. This upper limit, which is three orders of magnitude lower than previous estimates based on the kinetics of NH2 loss, rules out the importance of this reaction in the atmosphere and suggests that NH2 will be oxidized by O3 or NO2. The effect on the NO(x) and N2O budgets depends critically on the products of the NH2 + O3 reaction. Simulations of the experimental product yields also allow an evaluation of possible product channels for the reaction of NH2 with HO2.

  18. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  19. Light-induced nitrous acid (HONO) production from NO2 heterogeneous reactions on household chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Alvarez, Elena; Sörgel, Matthias; Gligorovski, Sasho; Bassil, Sabina; Bartolomei, Vincent; Coulomb, Bruno; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Wortham, Henri

    2014-10-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) can be generated in various indoor environments directly during combustion processes or indirectly via heterogeneous NO2 reactions with water adsorbed layers on diverse surfaces. Indoors not only the concentrations of NO2 are higher but the surface to volume (S/V) ratios are larger and therefore the potential of HONO production is significantly elevated compared to outdoors. It has been claimed that the UV solar light is largely attenuated indoors. Here, we show that solar light (λ > 340 nm) penetrates indoors and can influence the heterogeneous reactions of gas-phase NO2 with various household surfaces. The NO2 to HONO conversion mediated by light on surfaces covered with domestic chemicals has been determined at atmospherically relevant conditions i.e. 50 ppb NO2 and 50% RH. The formation rates of HONO were enhanced in presence of light for all the studied surfaces and are determined in the following order: 1.3·109 molecules cm-2 s-1 for borosilicate glass, 1.7·109 molecules cm-2 s-1 for bathroom cleaner, 1.0·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 on alkaline detergent (floor cleaner), 1.3·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 for white wall paint and 2.7·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 for lacquer. These results highlight the potential of household chemicals, used for cleaning purposes to generate HONO indoors through light-enhanced NO2 heterogeneous reactions. The results obtained have been applied to predict the timely evolution of HONO in a real indoor environment using a dynamic mass balance model. A steady state mixing ratio of HONO has been estimated at 1.6 ppb assuming a contribution from glass, paint and lacquer and considering the photolysis of HONO as the most important loss process.

  20. Atmospheric chemistry of CF3COOH. Kinetics of the reaction with OH radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelberg, T.E.; Nielsen, O.J.; Sehested, J.

    1994-01-01

    Two different experimental techniques were used to study the kinetics of the reaction of OH radicals with trifluoroacetic acid, CF3COOH. Using a pulse radiolysis absolute rate technique, rate constants at 315 and 348 K were determined to be (1.6 +/- 0.4) x 10(-13) and (1.5 +/- 0.2) x 10(-13) cm3...

  1. Productivity and community structure of ectomycorrhizal fungal sporocarps under increased atmospheric CO2 and O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrie Andrew; Erik A. Lilleskov

    2009-01-01

    Sporocarp production is essential for ectomycorrhizal fungal recombination and dispersal, which influences fungal community dynamics. Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and ozone (O3) affect host plant carbon gain and allocation, which may in turn influence ectomycorrhizal sporocarp production if the carbon...

  2. Long-term leaf production response to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and tropospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan F. Talhelm; Kurt S. Pregitzer; Christian P. Giardina

    2011-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3 will profoundly influence future forest productivity, but our understanding of these influences over the long-term is poor. Leaves are key indicators of productivity and we measured the mass, area, and nitrogen concentration of leaves collected in litter traps...

  3. Atmospheric oxidants. [ozone concentration and combustion product aspects in spacecraft design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The ingredients which cause the air pollution are a mixture of oxides of organic matter (mostly nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons) and ozone. Ozone, although considered one of the rare atmospheric gases, needs consideration in spacecraft design because of its chemical reaction (oxidation) with organic materials, especially rubber, which becomes hard and brittle under tension in a few minutes time. At the earth surface, a maximum of 60 parts per hundred million of oxidants composed of nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, sulphur dioxide, sulphur trioxides, peroxides, and ozone can be expected for 72 hours when smog occurs. A table representing distribution of ozone concentration with atmospheric altitude is included.

  4. Western Pacific atmospheric nutrient deposition fluxes, their impact on surface ocean productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, M.; Hamilton, D.; Baker, A. R.; Jickells, T. D.; Bromley, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Quack, B.; Boyd, P. W.

    2014-07-01

    The atmospheric deposition of both macronutrients and micronutrients plays an important role in driving primary productivity, particularly in the low-latitude ocean. We report aerosol major ion measurements for five ship-based sampling campaigns in the western Pacific from ~25°N to 20°S and compare the results with those from Atlantic meridional transects (~50°N to 50°S) with aerosols collected and analyzed in the same laboratory, allowing full incomparability. We discuss sources of the main nutrient species (nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and iron (Fe)) in the aerosols and their stoichiometry. Striking north-south gradients are evident over both basins with the Northern Hemisphere more impacted by terrestrial dust sources and anthropogenic emissions and the North Atlantic apparently more impacted than the North Pacific. We estimate the atmospheric supply rates of these nutrients and the potential impact of the atmospheric deposition on the tropical western Pacific. Our results suggest that the atmospheric deposition is P deficient relative to the needs of the resident phytoplankton. These findings suggest that atmospheric supply of N, Fe, and P increases primary productivity utilizing some of the residual excess phosphorus (P*) in the surface waters to compensate for aerosol P deficiency. Regional primary productivity is further enhanced via the stimulation of nitrogen fixation fuelled by the residual atmospheric iron and P*. Our stoichiometric calculations reveal that a P* of 0.1 µmol L-1 can offset the P deficiency in atmospheric supply for many months. This study suggests that atmospheric deposition may sustain ~10% of primary production in both the western tropical Pacific.

  5. Spallation Reactions: A Tool for RNB Production and a Neutron Source for Nuclear Waste Transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benlliure, J.; Armbruster, P.; Bernas, M.; Boudard, A.; Casarejos, E.; Czajkowski, S.; Enqvist, T.; Farget, F.; Legrain, R.; Leray, S.; Pravikoff, M.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Stephan, C.; Taieb, J.; Tassan-Got, L.; Volant, C.

    1999-12-31

    A large experimental program was initiated at GSI to study in detail the spallation reactions. The use of the inverse kinematics allows to determine the production cross section and recoil momentum of the spallation residues with high accuracy. The comparison of the experimental data with model calculation gives valuable information about the reaction mechanism and the application of these reactions to RNB production and to the problematic of nuclear waste transmutation.

  6. Production of nanocrystalline metal powders via combustion reaction synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frye, John G.; Weil, Kenneth Scott; Lavender, Curt A.; Kim, Jin Yong

    2017-10-31

    Nanocrystalline metal powders comprising tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium and/or niobium can be synthesized using a combustion reaction. Methods for synthesizing the nanocrystalline metal powders are characterized by forming a combustion synthesis solution by dissolving in water an oxidizer, a fuel, and a base-soluble, ammonium precursor of tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, or niobium in amounts that yield a stoichiometric burn when combusted. The combustion synthesis solution is then heated to a temperature sufficient to substantially remove water and to initiate a self-sustaining combustion reaction. The resulting powder can be subsequently reduced to metal form by heating in a reducing gas environment.

  7. Reaction of Unalloyed and Cr-Mo Alloyed Steels with Nitrogen from the Sintering Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlapka, Magdalena; Gierl-Mayer, Christian; Calderon, Raquel de Oro; Danninger, Herbert; Bengtsson, Sven; Dudrova, Eva

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen is usually regarded as an inert sintering atmosphere for PM steels; however, this cannot be taken for granted in particular for steels alloyed with nitride forming elements. Among those elements, chromium has become more and more important as an alloying element in sintered low alloy structural steels in the last decade due to the moderate alloying cost and the excellent mechanical properties obtainable, in particular when sinter hardening is applied. The high affinity of Cr to oxygen and the possible ways to overcome related problems have been the subject of numerous studies, while the fact that chromium is also a fairly strong nitride forming element has largely been neglected at least for low alloy steel grades, although frequently used materials like steels from Cr and Cr-Mo prealloyed powders are commonly sintered in atmospheres consisting mainly of nitrogen. In the present study, nitrogen pickup during sintering at different temperatures and for varying times has been studied for Cr-Mo prealloyed steel grades as well as for unalloyed carbon steel. Also the effect of the cooling rate and its influence on the properties, of the microstructure and the composition have been investigated. It showed that the main nitrogen uptake occurs not during isothermal sintering but rather during cooling. It could be demonstrated that a critical temperature range exists within which the investigated CrM-based steel is particularly sensitive to nitrogen pickup.

  8. Protonation Reaction of Benzonitrile Radical Anion and Absorption of Product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holcman, Jerzy; Sehested, Knud

    1975-01-01

    The rate constant for the protonation of benzonitrile radical anions formed in pulse radiolysis of aqueous benzonitrile solutions is (3.5 ± 0.5)× 1010 dm3 mol–1 s–1. A new 270 nm absorption band is attributed to the protonated benzonitrile anion. The pK of the protonation reaction is determined...

  9. Determination of 68Ga production parameters by different reactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gallium-68 (1/2 = 68 min, + = 89%) is an important positron-emitting radionuclide for positron emission tomography and used in nuclear medicine for diagnosing tumours. This study gives a suitable reaction to produce 68Ga. Gallium-68 excitation function via 68Zn(, ) 68Ga, 68Zn(, 2) 68Ga, 70Zn(, 3) 68Ga and ...

  10. Formation of nitro products from the gas-phase OH radical-initiated reactions of toluene, naphthalene, and biphenyl: effect of NO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Noriko; Atkinson, Roger; Arey, Janet

    2008-12-15

    Aromatic hydrocarbons, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), are released into the atmosphere principally during incomplete combustion and account for approximately 20% of nonmethane organic compounds in urban air. Reaction with OH radicals is the dominant atmospheric chemical loss process for aromatic hydrocarbons, leading mainly to the formation of an OH-aromatic or OH-PAH adduct which then reacts with O2 and/or NO2. For OH-monocyclic aromatic adducts, reaction with O2 dominates under atmospheric conditions; however, no data are available concerning the relative importance of reactions of OH-PAH adducts with O2 and NO2. We have measured formation yields of 3-nitrotoluene, 1- and 2-nitronaphthalene, and 3-nitrobiphenyl from the OH radical-initiated reactions of toluene, naphthalene, and biphenyl as a function of NO2 concentration. Our data showthatthe OH-aromatic adduct reactions with O2 and NO2 are of equal importance in the atmosphere at NO2 mixing ratios of approximately 3.3 ppmV for toluene, approximately 0.06 ppmV for naphthalene, and approximately 0.6 ppmV for biphenyl. Ambient concentrations of toluene, naphthalene, and biphenyl and their nitrated products measured at a site in the Los Angeles air basin are consistent with our laboratory measurements.

  11. Flow cytofluorometric analysis of enzyme reactions based on quenching of fluorescence by the final reaction product: detection of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in human erythrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, C. J.; Dolbeare, F.; Aten, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    We developed a method for accurate cytofluorometric analysis of the final reaction product of enzyme reactions in individual cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity in human erythrocytes was demonstrated cytochemically, and the amount of final reaction product (formazan) per cell

  12. Effect of an allophanic soil on humification reactions between catechol and glycine: Spectroscopic investigations of reaction products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Masami; Miura, Akitaka; Sasaki, Masahide; Izumo, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Adduction of amino acids to phenols is a possible humification reaction pathway [F.J. Stevenson, Humus Chemistry: Genesis, Composition, Reaction, second ed., Wiley, New York, 1994, pp. 188-211; M.C. Wang, P.M. Huang, Sci. Total Environ. 62 (1987) 435; M.C. Wang, P.M. Huang, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 55 (1991) 1156; M.C. Wang, P.M. Huang, Geoderma 112 (2003) 31; M.C. Wang, P.M. Huang, Geoderma 124 (2005) 415]. To elucidate the reaction kinetics and products of abiotic humification, the effects of an allophanic soil on the adduction of amino acids to phenols were investigated using catechol (CT) and glycine (Gly) as a model phenol and amino acid, respectively. An aqueous solution containing CT and Gly (pH 7.0) in the presence of allophanic soil was incubated for 2 weeks, and the kinetics of the humification reactions were monitored by analysis of absorptivity at 600 nm ( E600). A mixture of CT and Gly in the absence of allophanic soil was used as a control. The E600 value increased markedly in the presence of allophanic soil. In addition, unreacted CT was detected in the control reaction mixture, but not in the allophane-containing reaction mixture. Under the sterilized conditions, absorbance at 600 nm for the control reaction mixture was significantly smaller than that for the allophanic soil-containing reaction mixture, which indicates there was no microbial participation during incubation. These results indicate that the allophanic soil effectively facilitated humification reactions between CT and Gly. The reaction mixtures were acidified and humic-like acid (HLA) was isolated as a precipitate. The elemental composition, acidic functional group contents, molecular weight, FT-IR, solid-state CP-MAS 13C NMR, and 1H NMR spectra of the purified HLAs were analyzed. The results of these analyses indicate that the nitrogen atom of Gly binds to the aromatic carbon of CT in the HLA products.

  13. Laboratory studies of reactions of atmospheric gases with components of mineral dust aerosol and research in chemical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer Dianne

    Mineral dust aerosol surfaces provide a medium in the atmosphere for heterogeneous chemistry to occur, which can alter the chemical balance of the Earth's atmosphere. It is becoming increasingly clear that the heterogeneous chemistry of these aerosols is a function of relative humidity (RH), as water on the surface of these particles can enhance or inhibit reactivity depending on the reaction. In this thesis, the uptake of water on clays and oxides was investigated, as well as phase transitions for atmospherically relevant salts. Reactions of carbon dioxide and nitric acid on oxide particles in the presence and absence of water were also examined. Following the reaction of HNO 3 on an alumina surface, photoirradiation experiments were preformed to determine the effect of irradiation on the adsorbed nitrate. The results presented in this thesis provide insight into the heterogeneous reactivity of mineral dust aerosol in the presence and absence of co-adsorbed water, as well as a fundamental understanding of water uptake on soluble and insoluble aerosols. A new method, using a quartz crystal microbalance, was developed to attempt to obtain a better fundamental understanding of different mineral dust components. In addition to the laboratory research, research in chemical education is also presented in this thesis. Two different types of work being done in the area of chemical education are shown. First a new experiment was implemented into an undergraduate physical chemistry course. The technique, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, was chosen for its ability to expose students to a technique that is commonly used in laboratory research as well as the ease for which high quality results can be obtained. Students used ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor sulfate, SO 42-, adsorption on TiO2 thin films. Second, the role of cognitive load and problem difficulty was accessed with data acquired while students completed an introductory-level chemistry word problem using a web-based tool

  14. Effects of hydrolysis and carbonization reactions on hydrochar production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakkaew, K; Koottatep, T; Polprasert, C

    2015-09-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a thermal conversion process which converts wet biomass into hydrochar. In this study, a low-energy HTC process named "Two-stage HTC" comprising of hydrolysis and carbonization stages using faecal sludge as feedstock was developed and optimized. The experimental results indicated the optimum conditions of the two-stage HTC to be; hydrolysis temperature of 170 °C, hydrolysis reaction time of 155 min, carbonization temperature of 215 °C, and carbonization reaction time of 100 min. The hydrolysis reaction time and carbonization temperature had a statistically significant effect on energy content of the produced hydrochar. Energy input of the two-stage HTC was about 25% less than conventional HTC. Energy efficiency of the two-stage HTC for treating faecal sludge was higher than that of conventional HTC and other thermal conversion processes such as pyrolysis and gasification. The two-stage HTC could be considered as a potential technology for treating FS and producing hydrochar. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Origin of Nanobubbles Electrochemically Formed in a Magnetic Field: Ionic Vacancy Production in Electrode Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aogaki, Ryoichi; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Miura, Makoto; Oshikiri, Yoshinobu; Miura, Miki; Morimoto, Ryoichi; Takagi, Satoshi; Mogi, Iwao; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-07-01

    As a process complementing conventional electrode reactions, ionic vacancy production in electrode reaction was theoretically examined; whether reaction is anodic or cathodic, based on the momentum conservation by Newton’s second law of motion, electron transfer necessarily leads to the emission of original embryo vacancies, and dielectric polarization endows to them the same electric charge as trans- ferred in the reaction. Then, the emitted embryo vacancies immediately receive the thermal relaxation of solution particles to develop steady-state vacancies. After the vacancy production, nanobubbles are created by the collision of the vacancies in a vertical magnetic field.

  16. Plant surface reactions: an opportunistic ozone defence mechanism impacting atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jud, W.; Fischer, L.; Canaval, E.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Tissier, A.; Hansel, A.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. Plant injuries have been linked to the uptake of ozone through stomatal pores and oxidative damage of the internal leaf tissue. But a striking question remains: can surface reactions limit the stomatal uptake of ozone and therefore reduce its detrimental effects to plants?In this laboratory study we could show that semi-volatile organic compounds exuded by the glandular trichomes of different Nicotiana tabacum varieties are an efficient ozone sink at the plant surface. In our experiments, different diterpenoid compounds were responsible for a strongly variety-dependent ozone uptake of plants under dark conditions, when stomatal pores are almost closed. Surface reactions of ozone were accompanied by a prompt release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be linked to the corresponding precursor compounds: ozonolysis cis-abienol (C20H34O) - a diterpenoid with two exocyclic double bonds - caused emissions of formaldehyde (HCHO) and methyl vinyl ketone (C4H6O). The ring-structured cembratrien-diols (C20H34O2) with three endocyclic double bonds need at least two ozonolysis steps to form volatile carbonyls such as 4-oxopentanal (C5H8O2), which we could observe in the gas phase, too.Fluid dynamic calculations were used to model ozone distribution in the diffusion-limited leaf boundary layer under daylight conditions. In the case of an ozone-reactive leaf surface, ozone gradients in the vicinity of stomatal pores are changed in such a way that the ozone flux through the open stomata is strongly reduced.Our results show that unsaturated semi-volatile compounds at the plant surface should be considered as a source of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, impacting gas phase chemistry, as well as efficient ozone sink improving the ozone tolerance of plants.

  17. Plant surface reactions: an opportunistic ozone defence mechanism impacting atmospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. Plant injuries have been linked to the uptake of ozone through stomatal pores and oxidative damage of the internal leaf tissue. But a striking question remains: can surface reactions limit the stomatal uptake of ozone and therefore reduce its detrimental effects to plants?In this laboratory study we could show that semi-volatile organic compounds exuded by the glandular trichomes of different Nicotiana tabacum varieties are an efficient ozone sink at the plant surface. In our experiments, different diterpenoid compounds were responsible for a strongly variety-dependent ozone uptake of plants under dark conditions, when stomatal pores are almost closed. Surface reactions of ozone were accompanied by a prompt release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be linked to the corresponding precursor compounds: ozonolysis cis-abienol (C20H34O – a diterpenoid with two exocyclic double bonds – caused emissions of formaldehyde (HCHO and methyl vinyl ketone (C4H6O. The ring-structured cembratrien-diols (C20H34O2 with three endocyclic double bonds need at least two ozonolysis steps to form volatile carbonyls such as 4-oxopentanal (C5H8O2, which we could observe in the gas phase, too.Fluid dynamic calculations were used to model ozone distribution in the diffusion-limited leaf boundary layer under daylight conditions. In the case of an ozone-reactive leaf surface, ozone gradients in the vicinity of stomatal pores are changed in such a way that the ozone flux through the open stomata is strongly reduced.Our results show that unsaturated semi-volatile compounds at the plant surface should be considered as a source of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, impacting gas phase chemistry, as well as efficient ozone sink improving the ozone tolerance of plants.

  18. Application of the aza-Diels-Alder reaction in the synthesis of natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Min-Hui; Green, Nicholas J; Xu, Sheng-Zhen

    2017-04-11

    The Diels-Alder reaction that involves a nitrogen atom in the diene or dienophile is termed the aza-Diels-Alder reaction. As well as the powerful all-carbon Diels-Alder reaction, the aza-Diels-Alder reaction has also played an important role in the total synthesis of natural products. Herein, we review various natural products using an aza-Diels-Alder reaction as a key step to their total synthesis, and divide the syntheses into inter- and intra-molecular aza-Diels-Alder reactions and a retro-aza-Diels-Alder reaction. Inter- and intra-molecular aza-Diels-Alder reactions involve an imine as an electron deficient dienophile and an imine as an electron deficient azadiene. The significance of the aza-Diels-Alder reaction for the construction of a six-membered ring containing nitrogen is tremendous, but the development of asymmetric, in particular catalytic enantioselective intramolecular aza-Diels-Alder reaction in the total synthesis of natural products remains highly challenging, and will no doubt see enormous advances in the future.

  19. Propagation and secondary production of low energy antiprotons in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, T.; Moats, A.

    1985-01-01

    Current theories, in which the observed antiproton component is attributed strictly to secondary production in high energy inelastic collisions of protons with the interstellar medium or the atmosphere, apparently fail to explain the relatively high p vertical intensities measured at mountain and balloon altitudes. Therefore, a more careful calculation of the theoretical secondary intensity spectra is required before more exotic sources for these excess p's can be explored. A one dimensional diffusion equation is used to calculate the expected vertical intensity of p's due only to secondary production in the atmosphere; any assumed primary p spectrum is also included. Two adjustable parameters, the inelasticity and charge exchange in nucleon-nucleus collisions, were included in the algorithm. In order to obtain an independent estimate of their values the proton vertical intensities in the atmosphere were calculated, adjusting the parameters until the curves fit the experimental proton data, and then assumed that these values were identical in antinucleon-nucleus collisions.

  20. Ion/molecule reactions in the orifice-skimmer region of an atmospheric pressure Penning ionization mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Hiroko; Fujimaki, Susumu; Kambara, Shizuka; Suzuki, Shigeo; Hashimoto, Yutaka; Okazaki, Shigemitsu; Wada, Akira; Beech, Iwona B; Sunner, Jan; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure Penning ionization mass spectra of methanol were measured as functions of Ar or He gas pressure in the first vacuum chamber, the position of the skimmer, and the voltage applied between the orifice and the skimmer. When the orifice and the skimmer were coaxial with a distance of 4 mm, the distribution of CH3OH2+(CH3OH)n clusters was only weakly dependent on both Ar pressure (in the range of 19-220 Pa) and orifice-skimmer voltage (in the range of 1-45 V). The ion/molecule reaction CH3OH2+ + CH3OH --> CH3+(CH3OH) + H2O was observed in the free jet expansion, especially at high orifice-skimmer voltage values. When the orifice and the skimmer were off-centered and the distance between them was increased to 18 mm, the formation of large CH3OH2+(CH3OH)n clusters, as well as their dissociation, were seen. The endothermic proton transfer reaction, CH3+(CH3OH) + CH3OH --> CH3OH2+ + CH3OCH3, occurred at high orifice-skimmer voltage. The collision-induced dissociation of cluster ions by He gas in the first vacuum chamber was much more efficient than by Ar. These results demonstrated that the mass spectra are highly dependent on skimmer position and on orifice-skimmer voltage and that ions observed by mass spectrometry do not necessarily reflect the abundance of ions produced in the atmospheric pressure ion source. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The effects of reactants ratios, reaction temperatures and times on Maillard reaction products of the L-ascorbic acid/L-glutamic acid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yan ZHOU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transformation law of the Maillard reaction products with three different reactants ratios - equimolar reactants, excess L-glutamic acid and excess L-ascorbic acid reaction respectively, five different temperatures, and different time conditions for the L-ascorbic acid / L-glutamic acid system were investigated. Results showed that, the increase of the reaction time and temperature led to the increase of the browning products, uncoloured intermediate products, as well as aroma compounds. Compared with the equimolar reaction system, the excess L-ascorbic acid reaction system produced more browning products and uncoloured intermediate products, while the aroma compounds production remained the same. In the excess L-glutamic acid system, the uncoloured intermediate products increased slightly, the browning products remained the same, while the aroma compounds increased.

  2. Hydroxyproline reaction with free radicals generated during benzoyl peroxide catalytic decomposition of carbon tetrachloride Structure of reaction products formed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, G D; Castro, J A

    1996-09-01

    Benzoyl peroxide catalytic decomposition of carbon tetrachloride in a model system produces trichloromethyl and trichloromethylperoxyl free radicals. These radicals are also produced by CCl4 bioactivation in liver and are considered to be responsible for the deleterious effects of this hepatotoxin. In this study, it is attempted to learn about how the .CCl3 and CCl3O2. tend to react with hydroxyproline in a model system. Hydroxyproline was selected because of its role in collagen metabolism. During the interaction of both radicals with hydroxyproline a total of 16 reaction products were isolated and identified by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis. All of them were hydroxyproline analogs, no single one contained C from CCl4 and only three contained chlorine. Consequently, most adducts would be missed in experiments where formation of reaction products are studied by formation of(14)C or(36)Cl labeled adducts (e.g. covalent binding studies used by toxicologists). If similar hydroxyproline analog reaction products were observed during CCl4 intoxication it might be reasonably expected that they interfered with collagen metabolism and participate in cirrhogenic effects of CCl4 on the liver.

  3. Advances of zeolite based membrane for hydrogen production via water gas shift reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Rizki, Z.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen is considered as a promising energy vector which can be obtained from various renewable sources. However, an efficient hydrogen production technology is still challenging. One technology to produce hydrogen with very high capacity with low cost is through water gas shift (WGS) reaction. Water gas shift reaction is an equilibrium reaction that produces hydrogen from syngas mixture by the introduction of steam. Conventional WGS reaction employs two or more reactors in series with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given volume of catalyst. Membrane reactor as new technology can cope several drawbacks of conventional reactor by removing reaction product and the reaction will favour towards product formation. Zeolite has properties namely high temperature, chemical resistant, and low price makes it suitable for membrane reactor applications. Moreover, it has been employed for years as hydrogen selective layer. This review paper is focusing on the development of membrane reactor for efficient water gas shift reaction to produce high purity hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Development of membrane reactor is discussed further related to its modification towards efficient reaction and separation from WGS reaction mixture. Moreover, zeolite framework suitable for WGS membrane reactor will be discussed more deeply.

  4. Miscible viscous fingering involving production of gel by chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Hoshino, Kenichi

    2015-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated miscible viscous fingering with chemical reactions producing gel. Here, two systems were employed. In one system, sodium polyacrylate (SPA) solution and aluminum ion (Al3 +) solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. In another system, SPA solution and ferric ion (Fe3 +) solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. In the case of Al3 +, displacement efficiency was smaller than that in the non-reactive case, whereas in the case of Fe3 +, the displacement efficiency was larger. We consider that the difference in change of the patterns in the two systems will be caused by the difference in the properties of the gels. Therefore, we have measured the rheological properties of the gels by means of a rheometer. We discuss relationship between the VF patterns and the rheological measurement.

  5. "Soft-pion" production in the reaction NN-->NNπ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubach, J.; Silbar, R. R.; Kloet, W. M.

    1980-12-01

    We examine the reaction NN-->NNπ for "soft-pion" kinematics (p-->π=0 in the center of mass). An earlier calculation based on the Adler-Dothan theorem severely underestimated the p-->π=0 cross section for pp-->npπ+ at 740 MeV. We attempt to understand this discrepancy in the context of a relativistic, unitary, three-body isobar model. The postemission Δ-pole contributions are shown to be very important, even for these "soft-pion" kinematics. Relatively high partial waves in the NN-->NΔ isobar amplitude are significant. However, after summing all the postemission and preemission diagrams, the discrepancy with experiment is only partially removed.

  6. Urinary excretion of dietary Maillard reaction products in healthy adult female cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooijen, C; Bosch, Guido; Butré, C I; Van Der Poel, A F B; Wierenga, P A; Alexander, L; Hendriks, W H

    2016-01-01

    During processing of foods, the Maillard reaction occurs, resulting in the formation of advanced Maillard reaction products (MRP). Varying amounts of MRP have been found in commercially processed pet foods. Dietary MRP can be absorbed and contribute to the endogenous pool of MRP and possibly the

  7. 21 CFR 73.3127 - Vinyl alcohol/methyl methacrylate-dye reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vinyl alcohol/methyl methacrylate-dye reaction... Vinyl alcohol/methyl methacrylate-dye reaction products. (a) Identity. The color additives are formed by reacting the dyes, either alone or in combination, with a vinyl alcohol/methyl methacrylate copolymer, so...

  8. Recent applications of intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions to natural product synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, M.; Tanner, David Ackland

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review presents some recent examples of intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) reactions as key complexity-generating steps in the total synthesis of structurally intricate natural products. The opportunities afforded by transannular (TADA) versions of the IMDA reaction in complex molecule...

  9. Direct photon production in heavy-ion reactions at SPS and RHIC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A review on experimental results for direct photon production in heavy ion reactions is given. A brief survey of early direct photon limits from SPS experiments is presented. The first measurement of direct photons in heavy ion reactions from the WA98 collaboration is discussed and compared to theoretical calculations.

  10. Compositional evolution of particle-phase reaction products and water in the heterogeneous OH oxidation of model aqueous organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chim, Man Mei; Cheng, Chiu Tung; Davies, James F.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Zuend, Andreas; Nin Chan, Man

    2017-12-01

    Organic compounds present at or near the surface of aqueous droplets can be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase OH radicals, which alter the molecular distribution of the reaction products within the droplet. A change in aerosol composition affects the hygroscopicity and leads to a concomitant response in the equilibrium amount of particle-phase water. The variation in the aerosol water content affects the aerosol size and physicochemical properties, which in turn governs the oxidation kinetics and chemistry. To attain better knowledge of the compositional evolution of aqueous organic droplets during oxidation, this work investigates the heterogeneous OH-radical-initiated oxidation of aqueous methylsuccinic acid (C5H8O4) droplets, a model compound for small branched dicarboxylic acids found in atmospheric aerosols, at a high relative humidity of 85 % through experimental and modeling approaches. Aerosol mass spectra measured by a soft atmospheric pressure ionization source (Direct Analysis in Real Time, DART) coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer reveal two major products: a five carbon atom (C5) hydroxyl functionalization product (C5H8O5) and a C4 fragmentation product (C4H6O3). These two products likely originate from the formation and subsequent reactions (intermolecular hydrogen abstraction and carbon-carbon bond scission) of tertiary alkoxy radicals resulting from the OH abstraction occurring at the methyl-substituted carbon site. Based on the identification of the reaction products, a kinetic model of oxidation (a two-product model) coupled with the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model is built to simulate the size and compositional changes of aqueous methylsuccinic acid droplets during oxidation. Model results show that at the maximum OH exposure, the droplets become slightly more hygroscopic after oxidation, as the mass fraction of water is predicted to increase from 0.362 to 0.424; however, the

  11. Compositional evolution of particle-phase reaction products and water in the heterogeneous OH oxidation of model aqueous organic aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Chim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic compounds present at or near the surface of aqueous droplets can be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase OH radicals, which alter the molecular distribution of the reaction products within the droplet. A change in aerosol composition affects the hygroscopicity and leads to a concomitant response in the equilibrium amount of particle-phase water. The variation in the aerosol water content affects the aerosol size and physicochemical properties, which in turn governs the oxidation kinetics and chemistry. To attain better knowledge of the compositional evolution of aqueous organic droplets during oxidation, this work investigates the heterogeneous OH-radical-initiated oxidation of aqueous methylsuccinic acid (C5H8O4 droplets, a model compound for small branched dicarboxylic acids found in atmospheric aerosols, at a high relative humidity of 85 % through experimental and modeling approaches. Aerosol mass spectra measured by a soft atmospheric pressure ionization source (Direct Analysis in Real Time, DART coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer reveal two major products: a five carbon atom (C5 hydroxyl functionalization product (C5H8O5 and a C4 fragmentation product (C4H6O3. These two products likely originate from the formation and subsequent reactions (intermolecular hydrogen abstraction and carbon–carbon bond scission of tertiary alkoxy radicals resulting from the OH abstraction occurring at the methyl-substituted carbon site. Based on the identification of the reaction products, a kinetic model of oxidation (a two-product model coupled with the Aerosol Inorganic–Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC model is built to simulate the size and compositional changes of aqueous methylsuccinic acid droplets during oxidation. Model results show that at the maximum OH exposure, the droplets become slightly more hygroscopic after oxidation, as the mass fraction of water is predicted to increase from

  12. A new branch of advertising: reviewing factors that influence reactions to product placement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reijmersdal, E.; Neijens, P.; Smit, E.G.

    2009-01-01

    This iiterature review presents a quantitative synthesis of 57 studies on product placement and shows which factors are most effective, it shows that placement characteristics, such as placement commerciality, modality, and prominence, have a strong impact on audience reactions. Audience

  13. Electrical conductivity and viscosity of melts of products of the reaction of zirconium with potassium halides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifonov, K.I.; Zagidulin, S.M.; Katyshev, S.F.; Desyatnik, V.N.

    1986-12-20

    The authors report results of a study of the electrical conductivity and viscosity of melts of products of the reaction of zirconium with potassium chloride and fluoride in binary and ternary mixtures composed of these substances.

  14. Chemical alterations taken place during deep-fat frying based on certain reaction products: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Saleh, Ahmed S M; Chen, Jing; Shen, Qun

    2012-09-01

    Deep-fat frying at 180 °C or above is one of the most common food processing methods used for preparing of human kind foods worldwide. However, a serial of complex reactions such as oxidation, hydrolysis, isomerization, and polymerization take place during the deep-fat frying course and influence quality attributes of the final product such as flavor, texture, shelf life and nutrient composition. The influence of these reactions results from a number of their products including volatile compounds, hydrolysis products, oxidized triacylglycerol monomers, cyclic compounds, trans configuration compounds, polymers, sterol derivatives, nitrogen- and sulphur-containing heterocyclic compounds, acrylamide, etc. which are present in both frying oil and the fried food. In addition, these reactions are interacted and influenced by various impact factors such as frying oil type, frying conditions (time, temperature, fryer, etc.) and fried material type. Based on the published literatures, three main organic chemical reaction mechanisms namely hemolytic, heterolytic and concerted reaction were identified and supposed to elucidate the complex chemical alterations during deep-fat frying. However, well understanding the mechanisms of these reactions and their products under different conditions helps to control the deep-fat frying processing; therefore, producing healthy fried foods. By means of comprehensively consulting the papers which previously studied on the chemical changes occurred during deep-fat frying process, the major reaction products and corresponding chemical alterations were reviewed in this work. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamical Coupled-Channel Model of Meson Production Reactions in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.-S. H. Lee; A. Matsuyama; T. Sato

    2006-11-15

    A dynamical coupled-channel model is presented for investigating the nucleon resonances (N*) in the meson production reactions induced by pions and photons. Our objective is to extract the N* parameters and to investigate the meson production reaction mechanisms for mapping out the quark-gluon substructure of N* from the data. The model is based on an energy-independent Hamiltonian which is derived from a set of Lagrangians by using a unitary transformation method.

  16. The unexpected product of Diels-Alder reaction between "indanocyclon" and maleimide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Michał A.; Roszkowski, Piotr; Struga, Marta; Szulczyk, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    A heterocyclic compound commonly known as "indanocyclon" undergoes an unexpected Diels-Alder addition with maleimide. The resulting product has been isolated and characterized in order to get an information about its structure and possible mechanism of the reaction. Extensive comparison of single crystal properties of 3-(2,8-dioxo-1,3-diphenyl-2,8-dihydrocyclopenta[a]inden-8a(1H)-yl)pyrrolidine-2,5-dione and favorable product of the reaction has been also performed.

  17. Synthesis of high-purity Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6} powder by solid state reaction under hydrogen atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin-mura, Kiyoto; Otani, Yu; Ogawa, Seiya [Course of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Niwa, Eiki; Hashimoto, Takuya [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-8-1 Sakurajousui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Hoshino, Tsuyoshi [Breeding Functional Materials Development Group, Department of Blanket Systems Research, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuchi, Omotedate, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Sasaki, Kazuya, E-mail: k_sasaki@tokai-u.ac.jp [Course of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Department of Prime Mover Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A fine pure Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6} powder was synthesized by using Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} via a solid state reaction. • Influences on the purity of product powder, lattice defect, and crystal orientation were revealed. • The suitable synthesis conditions of the fine and high purity Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6} powder were found. • The reaction process of the synthesis of Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6} was estimated. - Abstract: Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6} contains a large amount of Li and has a significant potential as a tritium breeder. However, few syntheses of fine-grain, high-purity Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6} powder have been reported. In this study, a high-purity powder of Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6} was synthesized by solid state reaction under hydrogen atmosphere combined with an effective lithium source and a suitable initial Li:Zr molar ratio. Mixed powders of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} were fired at around 630 °C in H{sub 2} for several hours and several firing cycles. The low firing temperature inhibited the vaporization of Li during the heating, so that excessive amounts of Li were not needed for the synthesis, and the Li:Zr ratio in the starting material was 10:1 (mol:mol). In this synthesis, Li{sub 2}O was generated via the decomposition of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} during firing in H{sub 2}, and reacted with ZrO{sub 2} to form Li{sub 6}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, which reacted with itself to form Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6}.

  18. Characterization of reaction products of iron and iron salts and aqueous plant extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaen, J.A. [Universidad de Panama, Centro de Investigaciones con Tecnicas Nucleares/Depto. de Quimica (Panama); Garcia de Saldana, E.; Hernandez, C. [Universidad de Panama, Maestria en Ciencias Quimicas (Panama)

    1999-11-15

    The complexes formed in aqueous solution as a result of a reaction of iron and iron salts (Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}) and some plant extracts were analyzed using Moessbauer spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared. The extracts were obtained from Opuntia elatior mill., Acanthocereus pentagonus (L.) Britton, Mimosa tenuiflora, Caesalpinia coriaria (Jacq.) Willd., Bumbacopsis quinata (Jacq.) Dugand and Acacia mangium Willd., plants growing wildly in different zones of the Isthmus of Panama. Results suggest the formation of mono- and bis-type complexes, and in some cases, the occurrence of a redox reaction. The feasibility of application of the studied extracts as atmospheric corrosion inhibitors is discussed.

  19. Characterization of reaction products of iron and iron salts and aqueous plant extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaén, J. A.; García de Saldaña, E.; Hernández, C.

    1999-11-01

    The complexes formed in aqueous solution as a result of a reaction of iron and iron salts (Fe2+ and Fe3+) and some plant extracts were analyzed using Mössbauer spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared. The extracts were obtained from Opuntia elatior mill., Acanthocereus pentagonus (L.) Britton, Mimosa tenuiflora, Caesalpinia coriaria (Jacq.) Willd., Bumbacopsis quinata (Jacq.) Dugand and Acacia mangium Willd., plants growing wildly in different zones of the Isthmus of Panama. Results suggest the formation of mono- and bis-type complexes, and in some cases, the occurrence of a redox reaction. The feasibility of application of the studied extracts as atmospheric corrosion inhibitors is discussed.

  20. The Phase Behavior Effect on the Reaction Engineering of Transesterification Reactions and Reactor Design for Continuous Biodiesel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernica, Stephen N.

    transitions from two phases to a single phase, or pseudo-single phase. The transition to a single phase or pseudo-single phase is a function of the methanol content. Regardless, the maximum observed reaction rate occurs at the point of the phase transition, when the concentration of triglycerides in the methanol phase is largest. The phase transition occurs due to the accumulation of the primary product, biodiesel methyl esters. Through various experiments, it was determined that the rate of the triglyceride mass transfer into the methanol phase, as well as the solubility of triglycerides in methanol, increases with increasing methyl ester concentration. Thus, there exists some critical methyl ester concentration which favors the formation of a single or pseudo-single phase system. The effect of the by-product glycerol on the reaction kinetics was also investigated. It was determined that at low methanol to triglyceride molar ratios, glycerol acts to inhibit the reaction rate and limit the overall triglyceride conversion. This occurs because glycerol accumulates in the methanol phase, i.e. the primary reaction volume. When glycerol is at relatively high concentrations within the methanol phase, triglycerides become excluded from the reaction volume. This greatly reduces the reaction rate and limits the overall conversion. As the concentration of methanol is increased, glycerol becomes diluted and the inhibitory effects become dampened. Assuming pseudo-homogeneous phase behavior, a simple kinetic model incorporating the inhibitory effects of glycerol was proposed based on batch reactor data. The kinetic model was primarily used to theoretically compare the performance of different types of continuous flow reactors for continuous biodiesel production. It was determined that the inhibitory effects of glycerol result in the requirement of very large reactor volumes when using continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR). The reactor volume can be greatly reduced using tubular style

  1. Atmospheric Deposition And MediterraneAN sea water productiviTy (Thales - ADAMANT) An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulaki, Sylvia; Petihakis, George; Triantafyllou, George; Pitta, Paraskevi; Papadimitriou, Vassileios; Tsiaras, Konstantinos; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Kanakidou, Maria

    2015-04-01

    In the marine environment the salinity and biological pumps sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide. The biological pump is directly related to marine primary production which is controlled by nutrient availability mainly of iron, nitrogen and phosphorus. The Mediterranean Sea, especially the eastern basin is one of the most oligotrophic seas. The nitrogen (N) to phosphorus (P) ratio is unusually high, especially in the eastern basin (28:1) and primary production is limited by phosphorus availability. ADAMANT project contributes to new knowledge into how nutrients enter the marine environment through atmospheric deposition, how they are assimilated by organisms and how this influences carbon and nutrient fluxes. Experimental work has been combined with atmospheric and marine models. Important knowledge is obtained on nutrients deposition through mesocosm experiments on their uptake by the marine systems and their effects on the marine carbon cycle and food chain. Kinetic parameters of adsorption of acidic and organic volatile compounds in atmospheric samples of dust and marine salts are estimated in conjunction with solubility of N and P in mixtures contained in dust. Atmospheric and oceanographic models are coupled to create a system that is able to holistically simulate the effects of atmospheric deposition on the marine environment over time, beginning from the pre-industrial era until the future years (hind cast, present and forecast simulations). This research has been co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework - Research Funding Program: THALES, Investing in knowledge society through European Social Fund.

  2. Optimizing Catalysts for Solar Fuel Production: Spectroscopic Characterization of the Key Reaction Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    the key reaction intermediates Mark A. Johnson Department of Chemistry Yale University New Haven, CT 28 February 2013 The long-standing focus...intermediates in the pyridine-based photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2 as well as several oxidation catalysts based on Ir, Mn and Ni organometallic ...dependence of proton coupled covalent bond formation An interesting aspect of ion chemistry in Earth’s atmosphere comes from the field observation

  3. The formation of free radical intermediates in the reactions of gaseous NO 2 with solid NaCl and NaBr—Atmospheric and toxicological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, J. K. S.; Pitts, J. N.; Beichert, P.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    The reaction of gaseous NO 2 with alkali halides is of significant interest for its potential to occur in polluted marine atmospheres ((Finlayson-Pitts, 1993), Res. Chem. Int.19, 235-249). We report here a new paramagnetic signal in NaBr and NaCl formed upon reaction with gaseous NO 2 and assigned to a radical anion intermediate of the type [X… NO 2] - where X = Br, Cl. This is a new type of V k center (Castner and Känzig, 1957, J. Phys. Chem. Solids3, 178-195; Fowler, 1968; Seidel, 1969, in Magnetic Resonance and Radiofrequency Spectroscopy (edited by Averbuch P.), North Holland, Amsterdam, pp. 141-156), which is remarkably stable. Indeed, with NaCl it can be observed for several days following the reaction after handling the sample in room light and ambient air. This intermediate may be responsible at least in part for synergistic effects observed in the deep lung in rats exposed simultaneously to gaseous NO 2 and NaCl aerosol (Last and Warren, 1987, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.90, 34-42). While the gaseous product ClNO was suggested earlier as the causative agent (Last and Warren, 1987, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.90, 34-42), it is highly reactive with liquid water and will be removed largely in the upper respiratory tract, while small particles are able to penetrate into the deep lung. Given the ubiquitous occurrence (Finlayson-Pitts and Pitts, 1986, Atmospheric Chemistry: Fundamentals and Experimental Techniques, Wiley, New York), of NO 2 and airborne salt particles, which occur not only in marine areas but also significant distances inland (Shaw, 1991, J. geophys. Res.96, 22,369-22,372) as well as in the plumes from oil well burning (Lowenthal et al., 1993, Geophys. Res. Lett.20, 691-693; Stevens et al., 1993, Wat. Sci. Technol.27, 223-233; Sheridan et al., 1992, Geophys. Res. Lett.19, 389-392; Parungo et al., 1992, J. geophys. Res. 97, 15,867-15,882; Cahill et al., 1992, J. geophys. Res.97, 14,513-14,520) this radical anion could provide a vehicle for delivery

  4. Atmospheric and Radiometric Correction Algorithms for the Multitemporal Assessment of Grasslands Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús A. Prieto-Amparan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A key step in the processing of satellite imagery is the radiometric correction of images to account for reflectance that water vapor, atmospheric dust, and other atmospheric elements add to the images, causing imprecisions in variables of interest estimated at the earth’s surface level. That issue is important when performing spatiotemporal analyses to determine ecosystems’ productivity. In this study, three correction methods were applied to satellite images for the period 2010–2014. These methods were Atmospheric Correction for Flat Terrain 2 (ATCOR2, Fast Line-of-Sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH, and Dark Object Substract 1 (DOS1. The images included 12 sub-scenes from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM and the Operational Land Imager (OLI sensors. The images corresponded to three Permanent Monitoring Sites (PMS of grasslands, ‘Teseachi’, ‘Eden’, and ‘El Sitio’, located in the state of Chihuahua, Mexico. After the corrections were applied to the images, they were evaluated in terms of their precision for biomass estimation. For that, biomass production was measured during the study period at the three PMS to calibrate production models developed with simple and multiple linear regression (SLR and MLR techniques. When the estimations were made with MLR, DOS1 obtained an R2 of 0.97 (p < 0.05 for 2012 and values greater than 0.70 (p < 0.05 during 2013–2014. The rest of the algorithms did not show significant results and DOS1, which is the simplest algorithm, resulted in the best biomass estimator. Thus, in the multitemporal analysis of grassland based on spectral information, it is not necessary to apply complex correction procedures. The maps of biomass production, elaborated from images corrected with DOS1, can be used as a reference point for the assessment of the grassland condition, as well as to determine the grazing capacity and thus the potential animal production in such ecosystems.

  5. Cytotoxicity study of reaction products between isatin and furan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Arifuzzaman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Isatin, 5-chloroisatin, 7-bromoisatin and 7-ethylisatin on treatment with furan in presence of diethylamine yield furan moiety inclusion products bis-diisatin [3,3´] furan, bis-[5,5´] dichlorodiisatin [3,3´] furan, bis-[7,7´] dibromodiisatin [3,3´] furan and bis-[7,7´] diethyldiisatin [3,3´] furan respectively in moderate yields. The cytotoxicity of these compounds was studied by the brine shrimp lethality bioassay and the Structure Activity Relationships (SAR of these compounds has been discussed. The present study shows that the compound bis-[7,7´] dibromodiisatin [3,3´] furan had pronounced cytotoxicity whereas compounds bis-[5,5´] dichlorodiisatin [3,3´] furan and bis-[7,7´] diethyldiisatin [3,3´] furan were moderately active. It is remarkable that the constituent, Y = -Br at seven position in the benzene ring has greater activity than ethyl and chlorine atom.Â

  6. Combined effects of iron and copper from atmospheric dry deposition on ocean productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F. J.; Chen, Y.; Guo, Z. G.; Gao, H. W.; Mackey, K. R.; Yao, X. H.; Zhuang, G. S.; Paytan, A.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric deposition can provide nutrients and potential toxicants to marine ecosystem, hence affecting ocean net primary productivity (NPP). Nonetheless, the interactive effects of mixed aerosol components on phytoplankton have rarely been reported. Here we explored the combined effects of iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) on NPP over the East China Sea. In aerosol addition mesocosm experiments, phytoplankton growth was suppressed under high aerosol Cu but was increased when high Cu was accompanied by high Fe in aerosols. A time series of soluble aerosol Fe and Cu deposition was obtained and compared to regional chlorophyll a (Chl a) abundances from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer/Aqua. Strong positive correlations were observed between the dry flux ratios of soluble Fe/Cu and Chl a abundances in the large offshore area, whereas these variables were uncoupled in coastal regions where riverine input and upwelling dominated the biogeochemistry. Current work provides insight into the complex linkage between atmospheric deposition and marine productivity.

  7. Modified Atmosphere Systems and Shelf Life Extension of Fish and Fishery Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A. Mireles DeWitt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This review aims at summarizing the findings of studies published over the past 15 years on the application of modified atmosphere (MA systems for shelf life extension of fish and fishery products. This review highlights the importance of CO2 in the preservation of seafood products, and underscores the benefits of combining MA technology with product storage in the superchilled temperature range. It is generally accepted that MA technology cannot improve product quality and should not be utilized as a substitute for good sanitation and strict temperature control. Benefits derived from application of MA, however, can significantly impact preservation of product quality and it subsequent shelf-life. For this reason, this review is the first of its kind to propose detailed handling and quality guidelines for fresh fish to realize the maximum benefit of MA technology.

  8. Modified Atmosphere Systems and Shelf Life Extension of Fish and Fishery Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Christina A. Mireles; Oliveira, Alexandra C.M.

    2016-01-01

    This review aims at summarizing the findings of studies published over the past 15 years on the application of modified atmosphere (MA) systems for shelf life extension of fish and fishery products. This review highlights the importance of CO2 in the preservation of seafood products, and underscores the benefits of combining MA technology with product storage in the superchilled temperature range. It is generally accepted that MA technology cannot improve product quality and should not be utilized as a substitute for good sanitation and strict temperature control. Benefits derived from application of MA, however, can significantly impact preservation of product quality and it subsequent shelf-life. For this reason, this review is the first of its kind to propose detailed handling and quality guidelines for fresh fish to realize the maximum benefit of MA technology. PMID:28231143

  9. Deterioration and shelf-life extension of fish and fishery products by modified atmosphere packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payap Masniyom

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Fish and fishery products have been recognized as a nutrition source due to their high protein content. Moreover, theycontain considerable amount of unsaturated fatty acids, especially omega-3 fatty acids, which are regarded as preventivecompounds. However, shelf-life of seafood is limited by biochemical and microbiological changes. Modified atmospherepackaging (MAP is widely used for minimally processed fishery products including fresh meat for retarding microbial growthand enzymatic spoilage. CO2, O2, and N2 are most often used in MAP. CO2 enriched atmosphere inhibits the autolyticdegradation of fish muscle during storage. However, high levels of CO2 negatively affect product quality, especially by increasingdrip loss and altering texture. Development of satisfactory methods for shelf-life extension that ensure qualitymaintenance of products with minimum loss has drawn the attention of food technologists. The application of MAP andcombination process in seafood is a promising preservation method to extend the shelf-life of fish and fishery products.

  10. Production of Neutron-Rich Ca Isotopes in Transfer-Type Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Penionzhkevich, Yu E; Antonenko, N V

    2005-01-01

    Possibilities of production of neutron-rich isotopes $^{56,58,60}$Ca in transfer-type reactions are analyzed. The optimal conditions for their production are suggested. The neutron separation energies in nuclei near the neutron drip line can be estimated by measuring the excitation functions.

  11. Reactions of lactones with tropospheric oxidants: A kinetics and products study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walavalkar, M. P.; Sharma, A.; Dhanya, S.; Naik, P. D.

    2017-07-01

    Tropospheric lifetimes of two lactones, gamma-valerolactone (GVL) and alpha-methyl gamma-butyrolactone (AMGBL) in terms of their reactions with two important tropospheric oxidants- OH and Cl - are estimated, after determining the respective rate coefficients of their reactions in the gas phase using relative rate method. Values of the rate coefficients of the reactions of GVL (kOH = (1.95 ± 0.58) x 10-12; kCl = 2.26 ± 0.53 × 10-11 cm3molecule-1s-1) and AMGBL (kOH = 1.81 ± 0.43 × 10-12; kCl = 3.42 ± 0.63 × 10-11 cm3molecule-1s-1) at 298 K imply that reaction with OH is the dominant reaction in the ambient conditions, and that reaction with Cl atom becomes relevant under marine boundary layer (MBL) conditions, reducing the tropospheric lifetimes to almost half. The tropospheric life times of GVL and AMGBL based on their reaction with OH under ambient conditions are comparable, 71.2 and 76.7 h respectively. However, the products of the reactions are found to be different. In GVL, a promising second generation biofuel component, only ring opening reactions are important, acetic acid and CO2 being the only observed volatile products. In AMGBL, additional ring oxidized products are also formed, of which 3,4-dihydro-3-methyl-2,5-furandione is the most dominant one. The absence of such ring oxidized products in GVL is assigned to the difference in the preferred position of H atom abstraction, based on the computed rate coefficients of individual channels reported in the literature. This suggests that the impact in terms of aerosol generation in the troposphere may also be different for GVL and AMGBL, which differ only in the position of methyl substitution.

  12. Degradation of (14)C-labeled few layer graphene via Fenton reaction: Reaction rates, characterization of reaction products, and potential ecological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yiping; Lu, Kun; Mao, Liang; Guo, Xiangke; Gao, Shixiang; Petersen, Elijah J

    2015-11-01

    Graphene has attracted considerable commercial interest due to its numerous potential applications. It is inevitable that graphene will be released into the environment during the production and usage of graphene-enabled consumer products, but the potential transformations of graphene in the environment are not well understood. In this study, (14)C-labeled few layer graphene (FLG) enabled quantitative measurements of FLG degradation rates induced by the iron/hydrogen peroxide induced Fenton reaction. Quantification of (14)CO2 production from (14)C-labeled FLG revealed significant degradation of FLG after 3 days with high H2O2 (200 mmol L(-1)) and iron (100 μmol L(-1)) concentrations but substantially lower rates under environmentally relevant conditions (0.2-20 mmol L(-1) H2O2 and 4 μmol L(-1) Fe(3+)). Importantly, the carbon-14 labeling technique allowed for quantification of the FLG degradation rate at concentrations nearly four orders of magnitude lower than those typically used in other studies. These measurements revealed substantially faster degradation rates at lower FLG concentrations and thus studies with higher FLG concentrations may underestimate the degradation rates. Analysis of structural changes to FLG using multiple orthogonal methods revealed significant FLG oxidation and multiple reaction byproducts. Lastly, assessment of accumulation of the degraded FLG and intermediates using aquatic organism Daphnia magna revealed substantially decreased body burdens, which implied that the changes to FLG caused by the Fenton reaction may dramatically impact its potential ecological effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Antioxidant capacity of reaction products limits the applicability of the Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Mariken J T J; Haenen, Guido R M M; Voss, Hans-Peter; Bast, Aalt

    2004-01-01

    The Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC) assay is based on the scavenging of the 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical (ABTS(*)) converting it into a colorless product. The degree of decolorization induced by a compound is related to that induced by trolox, giving the TEAC value. The assay is frequently used for constructing structure activity relationships (SARs). HPLC analysis of the reaction mixture, obtained after scavenging of ABTS(*) by the flavonoid chrysin, shows that a product is formed that also reacts with ABTS(*). The product has a higher antioxidant capacity and reacts faster with ABTS(*) than the parent compound, chrysin. In contrast to the reaction product of chrysin, the reaction product of trolox, which is formed during scavenging of ABTS(*), i.e. trolox quinone, does not react with ABTS(*). The experiments show that the TEAC is the antioxidant capacity of the parent compound plus the potential antioxidant capacity of the reaction product(s). This means that the TEAC assay does not necessarily reflect the antioxidant effect of only one structure. This hampers the applicability of the assay for the construction of SARs and for ranking antioxidants.

  14. Reaction of zearalenone and α-zearalenol with allyl isothiocyanate, characterization of reaction products, their bioaccessibility and bioavailability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, K; Saladino, F; Fernández-Blanco, C; Ruiz, M J; Mañes, J; Fernández-Franzón, M; Meca, G; Luciano, F B

    2017-02-15

    This study investigates the reduction of zearalenone (ZEA) and α-zearalenol (α-ZOL) on a solution model using allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and also determines the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of the reaction products isolated and identified by MS-LIT. Mycotoxin reductions were dose-dependent, and ZEA levels decreased more than α-ZOL, ranging from 0.2 to 96.9% and 0 to 89.5% respectively, with no difference (p⩽0.05) between pH 4 and 7. Overall, simulated gastric bioaccessibility was higher than duodenal bioaccessibility for both mycotoxins and mycotoxin-AITC conjugates, with duodenal fractions representing ⩾63.5% of the original concentration. Simulated bioavailability of reaction products (α-ZOL/ZEA-AITC) were lower than 42.13%, but significantly higher than the original mycotoxins. The cytotoxicity of α-ZOL and ZEA in Caco-2/TC7 cells was also evaluated, with toxic effects observed at higher levels than 75μM. Further studies should be performed to evaluate the toxicity and estrogenic effect of α-ZOL/ZEA-AITC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Controlled Nitric Oxide Production via O(1D) + N2O Reactions for Use in Oxidation Flow Reactor Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Andrew; Massoli, Paola; Zhang, Xuan; Canagaratna, Manjula; Nowak, John; Daube, Conner; Yan, Chao; Nie, Wei; Onasch, Timothy; Jayne, John; hide

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation flow reactors that use low-pressure mercury lamps to produce hydroxyl (OH) radicals are an emerging technique for studying the oxidative aging of organic aerosols. Here, ozone (O3) is photolyzed at 254 nm to produce O(1D) radicals, which react with water vapor to produce OH. However, the need to use parts-per-million levels of O3 hinders the ability of oxidation flow reactors to simulate NOx-dependent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation pathways. Simple addition of nitric oxide (NO) results in fast conversion of NOx (NO+NO2) to nitric acid (HNO3), making it impossible to sustain NOx at levels that are sufficient to compete with hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals as a sink for organic peroxy (RO2) radicals. We developed a new method that is well suited to the characterization of NOx-dependent SOA formation pathways in oxidation flow reactors. NO and NO2 are produced via the reaction O(1D)+N2O->2NO, followed by the reaction NO+O3->NO2+O2. Laboratory measurements coupled with photochemical model simulations suggest that O(1D)+N2O reactions can be used to systematically vary the relative branching ratio of RO2 +NO reactions relative to RO2 +HO2 and/or RO2+RO2 reactions over a range of conditions relevant to atmospheric SOA formation. We demonstrate proof of concept using high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) measurements with nitrate (NO-3 ) reagent ion to detect gas-phase oxidation products of isoprene and -pinene previously observed in NOx-influenced environments and in laboratory chamber experiments.

  16. Controlled nitric oxide production via O(1D) + N2O reactions for use in oxidation flow reactor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Andrew; Massoli, Paola; Zhang, Xuan; Canagaratna, Manjula; Nowak, John; Daube, Conner; Yan, Chao; Nie, Wei; Onasch, Timothy; Jayne, John; Kolb, Charles; Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, Douglas; Brune, William

    2017-06-01

    Oxidation flow reactors that use low-pressure mercury lamps to produce hydroxyl (OH) radicals are an emerging technique for studying the oxidative aging of organic aerosols. Here, ozone (O3) is photolyzed at 254 nm to produce O(1D) radicals, which react with water vapor to produce OH. However, the need to use parts-per-million levels of O3 hinders the ability of oxidation flow reactors to simulate NOx-dependent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation pathways. Simple addition of nitric oxide (NO) results in fast conversion of NOx (NO + NO2) to nitric acid (HNO3), making it impossible to sustain NOx at levels that are sufficient to compete with hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals as a sink for organic peroxy (RO2) radicals. We developed a new method that is well suited to the characterization of NOx-dependent SOA formation pathways in oxidation flow reactors. NO and NO2 are produced via the reaction O(1D) + N2O → 2NO, followed by the reaction NO + O3 → NO2 + O2. Laboratory measurements coupled with photochemical model simulations suggest that O(1D) + N2O reactions can be used to systematically vary the relative branching ratio of RO2 + NO reactions relative to RO2 + HO2 and/or RO2 + RO2 reactions over a range of conditions relevant to atmospheric SOA formation. We demonstrate proof of concept using high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) measurements with nitrate (NO3-) reagent ion to detect gas-phase oxidation products of isoprene and α-pinene previously observed in NOx-influenced environments and in laboratory chamber experiments.

  17. (3)He-particle-induced reactions on (nat)Sb for production of (124)I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, K F; Qaim, S M; Saleh, Z A; Coenen, H H

    2006-04-01

    Excitation functions of the reactions (nat)Sb((3)He,xn)(124,123,121)I were measured from their respective thresholds up to 35 MeV, with particular emphasis on data for the production of the medically important radionuclide (124)I. The conventional stacked-foil technique was used. From the experimental data the theoretical yields of the three investigated radionuclides were calculated. The yield of (124)I over the energy range E9(30He) = 35 --> 13 MeV amounts to 0.95 MBq/microA h. The radionuclidic impurities are discussed. A comparison of (3)He- and alpha-particle-induced reactions on antimony for production of (124)I is given. The alpha-particle-induced reaction on enriched (121)Sb and the (3)He-particle-induced reaction on enriched (123)Sb would lead to comparable (124)I yields, but the level of impurities in the latter case would be somewhat higher.

  18. Production of specific structured lipids by enzymatic interesterification: optimization of the reaction by response surface design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Skands, Anja Rebecca Havegaard; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    (DAGs). A five-factor response surface design was used to evaluate the influences of five major factors and their relationships. The five factors were water content (Wc, wt% based on enzyme used), reaction temperature (Te,°C), enzyme load (El, wt% based on substrates), reaction time (Tr, hour....... Thus we conclude that the quadratic response models adequately expressed the reaction. Based on the models, the reaction was optimized for the maximum net incorporation and minimum DAG content. The reaction and the control of water content or water activity (Aw) was also discussed.......Rapeseed oil and capric acid were interesterified in solvent-free media catalyzed by Lipozyme IM (Rhizomucor miehei) to produce specific-structured lipids (SSLs). The process was optimized by response surface design concerning the effects of acyl migration and the by-products of diacylglycerols...

  19. SCALP: Scintillating ionization chamber for ALPha particle production in neutron induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhaut, B.; Durand, D.; Lecolley, F. R.; Ledoux, X.; Lehaut, G.; Manduci, L.; Mary, P.

    2017-09-01

    The SCALP collaboration has the ambition to build a scintillating ionization chamber in order to study and measure the cross section of the α-particle production in neutron induced reactions. More specifically on 16O and 19F targets. Using the deposited energy (ionization) and the time of flight measurement (scintillation) with a great accuracy, all the nuclear reaction taking part on this project will be identify.

  20. VAMOS: A variable mode high acceptance spectrometer for identifying reaction products induced by SPIRAL beams

    CERN Document Server

    Savajols, H

    2003-01-01

    The study of reactions induced by the SPIRAL beams at GANIL requires new techniques: the low intensity of secondary beams implies the need of a very high efficiency detection system; the study of nearly or completely unknown nuclei, over a wide range of masses and energies, needs a very efficient method for attributing a reaction product to a nucleus. The variable mode high acceptance spectrometer VAMOS is being designed and built especially for this purpose.

  1. Reactions of the CN Radical with Benzene and Toluene: Product Detection and Low-Temperature Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevitt, Adam J.; Goulay, Fabien; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-12-23

    Low temperature rate coefficients are measured for the CN + benzene and CN + toluene reactions using the pulsed Laval nozzle expansion technique coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The CN + benzene reaction rate coefficient at 105, 165 and 295 K is found to be relatively constant over this temperature range, 3.9 - 4.9 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. These rapid kinetics, along with the observed negligible temperature dependence, are consistent with a barrierless reaction entrance channel and reaction efficiencies approaching unity. The CN + toluene reaction is measured to have a slower rate coefficient of 1.3 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 105 K. At room temperature, non-exponential decay profiles are observed for this reaction that may suggest significant back-dissociation of intermediate complexes. In separate experiments, the products of these reactions are probed at room temperature using synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectrometry. For CN + benzene, cyanobenzene (C6H5CN) is the only product recorded with no detectable evidence for a C6H5 + HCN product channel. In the case of CN + toluene, cyanotoluene (NCC6H4CH3) constitutes the only detected product. It is not possible to differentiate among the ortho, meta and para isomers of cyanotoluene because of their similar ionization energies and the ~;; 40 meV photon energy resolution of the experiment. There is no significant detection of benzyl radicals (C6H5CH2) that would suggest a H-abstraction or a HCN elimination channel is prominent at these conditions. As both reactions are measured to be rapid at 105 K, appearing to have barrierless entrance channels, it follows that they will proceed efficiently at the temperatures of Saturn?s moon Titan (~;;100 K) and are also likely to proceed at the temperature of interstellar clouds (10-20 K).

  2. Understanding the aqueous phase ozonolysis of isoprene: distinct product distribution and mechanism from the gas phase reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous phase reaction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs has not been considered in most analyses of atmospheric chemical processes. However, some experimental evidence has shown that, compared to the corresponding gas phase reaction, the aqueous chemical processes of VOCs in the bulk solutions and surfaces of ambient wet particles (cloud, fog, and wet aerosols may potentially contribute to the products and formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. In the present study, we performed a laboratory experiment of the aqueous ozonolysis of isoprene at different pHs (3–7 and temperatures (4–25 °C. We detected three important kinds of products, including carbonyl compounds, peroxide compounds, and organic acids. Our results showed that the molar yields of these products were nearly independent of the investigated pHs and temperatures, those were (1 carbonyls: 56.7 ± 3.7 % formaldehyde, 42.8 ± 2.5 % methacrolein (MAC, and 57.7 ± 3.4 % methyl vinyl ketone (MVK; (2 peroxides: 53.4 ± 4.1 % hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and 15.1 ± 3.1 % hydroxylmethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP; and (3 organic acids: undetectable (<1 % estimated by the detection limit. Based on the amounts of products formed and the isoprene consumed, the total carbon yield was estimated to be 94.8 ± 4.1 %. This implied that most of the products in the reaction system were detected. The combined yields of both MAC + MVK and H2O2 + HMHP in the aqueous isoprene ozonolysis were much higher than those observed in the corresponding gas phase reaction. We suggest that these unexpected high yields of carbonyls and peroxides are related to the greater capability of condensed water, compared to water vapor, to stabilize energy-rich Criegee radicals. This aqueous ozonolysis of isoprene (and possibly other biogenic VOCs could potentially occur on the surfaces of ambient wet particles and plants. Moreover, the high-yield carbonyl and peroxide products

  3. Application of modified atmosphere packaging on aquacultured fish and fish products: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouletis, Achilleas D; Arvanitoyannis, Ioannis S; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2017-07-24

    The aquaculture industry has undergone a rapid and continuous growth during the last decade due to increased demands in seafood consumption and reduced pelagic fish production. The aquaculture sector can provide products with a consistent flow and quality standards to cover the market's needs. The modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) technique has evolved over the last two decades and many reports indicate its beneficial effect on many quality parameters during fish and shellfish preservation. The use of MAP can clearly offer an advantage to the safer distribution of quality aquacultured fishery products. This article summarizes most of the experimental data of packaging techniques applied (MAP, VP, various pretreatments and packaging materials) on aquacultured fish and fish products to provide a clear view of the potential for a future commercial use.

  4. A novel APPI-MS setup for in situ degradation product studies of atmospherically relevant compounds: capillary atmospheric pressure photo ionization (cAPPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Hendrik; Derpmann, Valerie; Barnes, Ian; Brockmann, Klaus J; O'Brien, Rob; Benter, Thorsten

    2011-11-01

    We report on the development of a novel atmospheric pressure photoionization setup and its applicability for in situ degradation product studies of atmospherically relevant compounds. A custom miniature spark discharge lamp was embedded into an ion transfer capillary, which separates the atmospheric pressure from the low pressure region in the first differential pumping stage of a conventional atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer. The lamp operates with a continuous argon flow and produces intense light emissions in the VUV. The custom lamp is operated windowless and efficiently illuminates the sample flow through the transfer capillary on an area smaller than 1 mm(2). Limits of detection in the lower ppbV range, a temporal resolution of milliseconds in the positive as well as the quasi simultaneously operating negative ion mode, and a significant reduction of ion transformation processes render this system applicable to real time studies of rapidly changing chemical systems. The method termed capillary atmospheric pressure photo ionization (cAPPI) is characterized with respect to the lamp emission properties as a function of the operating conditions, temporal response, and its applicability for in situ degradation product studies of atmospherically relevant compounds, respectively.

  5. Attempt to confirm superheavy element production in the 48Ca +238U reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregorich, K.E.; Loveland, W.; Peterson, D.; Zielinski, P.M.; Nelson, S.L.; Chung, Y.H.; Dullmann, Ch.E.; Folden III, C.M.; Aleklett,K.; Eichler, R.; Hoffman D.C.; Omtvedt, J.P.; Pang, G.K.; Schwantes,J.M.; Soverna, S.; Sprunger, P.; Sudowe, R.; Wilson, R.E.; Nitsche, H.

    2005-03-24

    An attempt to confirm production of superheavy elements in the reaction of 48Ca beams with actinide targets has been performed using the 238U(48Ca,3n)283112 reaction. Two 48Ca projectile energies were used, that spanned the energy range where the largest cross sections have been reported for this reaction. No spontaneous fission events were observed. No alpha decay chains consistent with either reported or theoretically predicted element 112 decay properties were observed. The cross section limits reached are significantly smaller than the recently reported cross sections.

  6. Analysis of a Buckwald-Hartwig amination: reaction for pharmaceutical production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    The Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction is widely used in the production of N-arylated amines in the pharmaceutical industry. The reaction is betweenan aryl halogen and a primary or secondary amine in the presence of a base and a homogeneous catalyst giving the desired N-arylated amine. Due to mi...... of rate constants it was possible to predict the course of reaction for different concentrations of the catalyst, though some deviation was seen at low concentration....... reactants were added to an already reacted reaction mixture. A significant wash out of triphenylphosphine and palladium from the catalyst was also identified during the course of reaction and separation. Finally, the influence on the reaction rate and product distribution of the reaction between has been...... investigated. The following parameters were considered: concentration of the homogeneous Pd-catalyst, ratio between the palladium source and the active ligands, and the presence of water and ambi­ent air. It was found that an increased concentration of the catalyst gave an increased rate of consumption of p...

  7. Analysis of a Buchwald-Hartwig amination: reaction for pharmaceutical production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik

    The Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction is widely used in the production of N-arylated amines in the pharmaceutical industry. The reaction is betweenan aryl halogen and a primary or secondary amine in the presence of a base and a homogeneous catalyst giving the desired N-arylated amine. Due to mi...... of rate constants it was possible to predict the cource of reaction for different concentrations of the catalyst, though some deviation was seen at low concentration....... reactants were added to an already reacted reaction mixture. A significant wash out of triphenylphosphine aud palladium from the catalyst was also identified during the course of reaction and separation. Finally, the influence on the reaction rate and product distribution of the reaction between has been...... investigated. The following parameters were considered: concentration of the homogeneous Pd-catalyst, ratio between the palladium source and the active ligands, and the presence of water and ambi­ent air. It was found that an increased concentration of the catalyst gave an increased rate of consumption of p...

  8. Mutagenicity screening of reaction products from the enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of phenolic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, I.J.; Aitken, M.D.; Ball, L.M.; Heck, P.E. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    Phenol-oxidizing enzymes such as peroxidases, laccases, and mushroom polyphenol oxidase are capable of catalyzing the oxidation of a wide range of phenolic pollutants. Although the use of these enzymes in waste-treatment applications has been proposed by a number of investigators, little information exists on the toxicological characteristics of the oxidation products. The enzymes chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and mushroom polyphenol oxidase were used in this study to catalyze the oxidation of phenol, several mono-substituted phenols, and pentachlorophenol. Seventeen reaction mixtures representing selected combinations of enzyme and parent phenol were subjected to mutagenicity screening using the Ames Salmonella typhimurium plate incorporation assay; five selected mixtures were also incubated with the S9 microsomal preparation to detect the possible presence of promutagens. The majority of reaction mixtures tested were not directly mutagenic, and none of those tested with S9 gave a positive response. Such lack of mutagenicity of enzymatic oxidation products provides encouragement for establishing the feasibility of enzyme-catalyzed oxidation as a waste-treatment process. The only positive responses were obtained with reaction products from the lignin peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of 2-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol. Clear positive responses were observed when strain TA100 was incubated with 2-nitrophenol reaction-product mixtures, and when strain TA98 was incubated with the 4-nitrophenol reaction mixture. Additionally, 2,4-dinitrophenol was identified as a reaction product from 4-nitrophenol, and preliminary evidence indicates that both 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrophenol are produced from the oxidation of 2-nitrophenol. Possible mechanism by which these nitration reactions occur are discussed.

  9. Interface reaction between Fe3-xSnxO4 and CaO roasted under CO-CO2 atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zijian; Zhang, Yuanbo; Han, Benlai; Chen, Yingming; Lu, Manman; Peng, Zhiwei; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao

    2017-11-01

    Part of tin in the magnetite-type tin-bearing ores existed as isomorphous Sn4+ in the lattice of magnetite (Fe3-xSnxO4, X = 0-1.0), which was impossible to separate and recover by physical beneficiation methods In this study, a calcified roasting process under CO-CO2 atmosphere was applied to separate tin from the magnetite-type tin-bearing tailings, and the results indicated that the isomorphous Sn4+ in the magnetite was removed effectively. Then, Fe2.6Sn0.4O4 was synthesized to investigate the interface reaction mechanisms between CaO and Fe3-xSnxO4. The results indicated that the calcified roasting process can be divided into three stages: the ionic migration of Sn4+ on the interface between CaO and Fe3-xSnxO4 and formation of calcium stannates (Ca2SnO4/CaSnO3), diffusion of Sn4+ through the product layer (CaSnO4/Ca2SnO4), the oxidation of FeO to Fe3O4 by CO2. These findings can provide theoretical support for the utilization of magnetite-type tin-bearing tailings by the calcified roasting process.

  10. A novel crystallization technique of hydroxyapatite utilizing contact reaction of minute droplet with atmospheric plasmas: Effects of the liquid source composition on the produced crystal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Matsumoto, M.; Onoe, K.

    2017-10-01

    To develop the technique for the control of the crystal composition and properties such as size distribution and morphology utilizing the contact reaction field around the minute droplets in atmospheric pressure plasma, fine spherical particles of hydroxyapatite ((Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2); HAp) were synthesized by a new plasma crystallization method. In this work, to elucidate the effects of the production region and crystal properties of hydroxyapatite for the liquid source composition, Ca2+ concentration and the Ca/P molar ratio in minute droplets were varied. The following results were obtained: (1) fine spherical HAp particles can be produced by the introduction of minute droplets with the initial Ca2+ concentration ((CCa)0) of 0.50 mol/l and the Ca/P molar ratio of 1.67. (2) When the (CCa)0 is set in the range higher than 1.00 mol/l at the constant Ca/P molar ratio of 1.67, fine spherical particles of β-TCP and HAp mixture are crystallized. (3) For the Ca/P molar ratio below 1.67, α-TCP and HAp co-precipitated. (4) The composition of the produced particles depends on both the reactant concentration and Ca/P molar ratio in the HAp source solution. (5) The dependence of the reactant concentration on the average size of the produced HAp particles is large compared with droplet size.

  11. Reactions of Organic Peroxides with Alcohols in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-the Pitfalls of Quantifying Triacetone Triperoxide (TATP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colizza, Kevin; Yevdokimov, Alexander; McLennan, Lindsay; Smith, James L; Oxley, Jimmie C

    2018-02-01

    Over the last several decades, mass spectrometry has become one of the principle methods for compound identification and quantification. While for analytical purposes, fragments which are not fully characterized in terms of origin and intensity as a function of experimental conditions have been used, understanding the nature of those species is very important. Herein we discuss such issues relative to triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and its frequently observed fragment at m/z 89. This "fragment" has been identified as the gas-phase reaction product of TATP with one or two methanol molecules/ions. Additionally, the origin and conditions of other fragments at m/z 91, 75, and 74 associated with TATP will be addressed. Similar analytical issues associated with other multi-peroxide organic compounds [hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), methyl ethyl ketone peroxides (MEKP)] will also be discussed. Solution storage conditions for TATP, HMTD, and tetramethylene diperoxide diamine dialdehyde have been determined. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Reactions of Organic Peroxides with Alcohols in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization—the Pitfalls of Quantifying Triacetone Triperoxide (TATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colizza, Kevin; Yevdokimov, Alexander; McLennan, Lindsay; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2017-11-01

    Over the last several decades, mass spectrometry has become one of the principle methods for compound identification and quantification. While for analytical purposes, fragments which are not fully characterized in terms of origin and intensity as a function of experimental conditions have been used, understanding the nature of those species is very important. Herein we discuss such issues relative to triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and its frequently observed fragment at m/z 89. This "fragment" has been identified as the gas-phase reaction product of TATP with one or two methanol molecules/ions. Additionally, the origin and conditions of other fragments at m/z 91, 75, and 74 associated with TATP will be addressed. Similar analytical issues associated with other multi-peroxide organic compounds [hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), methyl ethyl ketone peroxides (MEKP)] will also be discussed. Solution storage conditions for TATP, HMTD, and tetramethylene diperoxide diamine dialdehyde have been determined. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Topical botanically derived products: use, skin reactions, and usefulness of patch tests. A multicentre Italian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Monica; Borghi, Alessandro; Gallo, Rosella; Schena, Donatella; Pigatto, Paolo; Lauriola, Maria Michela; Guarneri, Fabrizio; Stingeni, Luca; Vincenzi, Colombina; Foti, Caterina; Virgili, Annarosa

    2014-02-01

    The evidence on the safety of topical preparations containing botanical extracts is limited. To assess (i) the use of botanically derived compounds in a large population, (ii) the incidence of cutaneous side-effects, and (iii) the diagnostic usefulness of patch testing. A questionnaire was used in 2661 patients to assess both the prevalence and type of topical botanical preparations used, and the occurrence of adverse skin reactions. Patients declaring adverse reactions were patch tested with (i) the Italian (SIDAPA) baseline series, (ii) an additional botanical series, and (iii) the patients' own products. Of the patients, 1274 (48%) reported the use of topical botanical products; 139 patients (11%) commented on adverse cutaneous reactions; 75 (54%) showed positive reactions with the Italian baseline series. Among the 122 patients tested with the botanical series, 19 (16%) showed positive reactions, in many cases with concomitant relevant positivity to at least one allergen of the Italian series connected with cosmetics. The commonest botanically derived allergens were propolis, Compositae extracts, and Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil. Contact allergy is a possible adverse effect of natural products. Baseline series supplemented with the commonest botanical allergens may be adequate for detecting most of the cases of contact allergy to natural topical products. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Improving Outreach in Atmospheric Sciences: Assessment of Users of Climate Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changnon, David

    2004-04-01

    Over the past six years, 27 projects were conducted involving weather climate product development by students working with weather-sensitive decision makers in various institutions. Thirteen of these decision makers were interviewed during 2003 to assess the post-product impacts. This assessment revealed that successful integration of climate-related products and information into the decision process depended on the following four factors: 1) the user's basic knowledge of atmospheric sciences, 2) their ability to manage risks associated with use of uncertain climate information, 3) their access to climate information and expertise in a timely fashion, and 4) demonstrations of value from the use of the project information. These interactive projects, which included a university faculty climatologist, undergraduate meteorology students, and the decision makers, had increased decision makers' awareness of, and interest in, climatological information (data, derived products, seasonal outlooks, etc.). The projects also identified where climate information and expertise could be obtained, and established a continuing dialogue between the climatologist and users. These projects further demonstrated that most decision makers, even those in the same weather-sensitive sector, often face very different issues that require specialized, value-added information that goes well beyond the generalized information produced by government agencies. Because of this ongoing shift in user needs, the atmospheric science community may have to broaden the educational experiences for future students.A supplement to this article is available online (DOI: 10.1175/BAMS-84-4-Changnon)

  15. A new model of cosmogenic production of radiocarbon 14C in the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kovaltsov, G A; Usoskin, I G

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of full new calculation of radiocarbon 14C production in the Earth atmosphere, using a numerical Monte-Carlo model. We provide, for the first time, a tabulated 14C yield function for the energy of primary cosmic ray particles ranging from 0.1 to 1000 GeV/nucleon. We have calculated the global production rate of 14C, which is 1.64 and 1.88 atoms/cm2/s for the modern time and for the pre-industrial epoch, respectively. This is close to the values obtained from the carbon cycle reservoir inventory. We argue that earlier models overestimated the global 14C production rate because of outdated spectra of cosmic ray heavier nuclei. The mean contribution of solar energetic particles to the global 14C is calculated as about 0.25% for the modern epoch. Our model provides a new tool to calculate the 14C production in the Earth's atmosphere, which can be applied, e.g., to reconstructions of solar activity in the past.

  16. Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2011-01-01

    ) museum. Augmentation, in this expanding digital field, is part of a production of new public spaces, as well as a new reality that affects and traverses art and institutions immanently and througout. The expanding digital field is transforming art and the art museum in a number of fundamental ways, a few...... of which I will look into in this paper. It has been suggested that ... we are in the midst of an explosion of emerging human-computer interaction techniques that redefine our understanding of both computers and interaction. We propose the notion of Reality-Based Interaction (RBI) as a unifying concept...... that ties together ... (Robert J.K. Jacob, 2008) I suggest that a negotiation between reality-based interaction and a digital dialectic (Lunenfeld, 1999)(Søndergaard M. o., 2008) is becoming still more evident, on two levels: 1) As an investigation into (the visuality of) a digital reality under...

  17. Characterization of atmospheric air pollutants at two sites in northern Kyushu, Japan - chemical form, and chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimohara, Takaaki; Oishi, Okihiro; Utsunomiya, Akira; Mukai, Hitoshi; Hatakeyama, Shiro; Eun-Suk, Jang; Uno, Itsushi; Murano, Kentaro

    Airborne gaseous and particulate matter in winter was measured over for 37 days in January and December 1997 at 2 sampling sites in northern Kyushu, Japan. One sampling site, Goto Island (an isolated island in the East China Sea), was about 200 km southwest of the other sampling site, Dazaifu city. In winter, acidic sulfates generated over the East Asian continent were transported to northwest Kyushu, to places such as Goto Island and the inland Kyushu area, and high sulfate concentrations were observed at the 2 sampling sites when strong NW winds blew. Acidity around Goto was mainly influenced by particulate NH 4HSO 4. The concentrations of NH 3 at Goto Island were lower than at Dazaifu city. The difference in NH 3 levels at the 2 sampling sites plays an important role in the chemical forms and sizes of the particulate matter. Nitrates at Goto Island were mostly present as NaNO 3 and Ca(NO 3) 2 in coarse-size particles. During the process of long-range transport of air pollutants from the Asian continent to Goto, gaseous HNO 3 was produced by a photochemical reactions of nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere, and particulate NaNO 3 and gaseous HCl were formed by a chlorine-loss reaction between NaCl and gaseous HNO 3. When strong NW winds blew, acidic sulfates together with some of the NaNO 3 and/or Ca(NO 3) 2 and some of gaseous HCl and HNO 3, which exist in the sea to the west of Kyushu and Goto Island, were transported to inland Kyushu such as Dazaifu city. During the process of transport, most of the acidic sulfates and acidic gases were mixed with regional air pollutants such as chlorides and nitrates existing around Dazaifu city, and neutralized forming (NH 4) 2SO 4, NH 4Cl and NH 4NO 3 in an environment of excess NH 3. Therefore, the main chemical forms of NO 3- at Dazaifu city varied day-by-day from fine-sized NH 4NO 3 to coarse-sized NaNO 3 and/or Ca(NO 3) 2. The appearance of NO 3- in coarse-size particles at Dazaifu city was due to the transport of NO 3

  18. Dietary Maillard reaction products and their fermented products reduce cardiovascular risk in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, N S; Park, M R; Lee, K W; Kim, S H; Kim, Y

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the effects of Maillard reaction products (MRP) and MRP fermented by lactic acid bacteria on antioxidants and their enhancement of cardiovascular health in ICR mouse and rat models. In previous in vitro studies, the selected lactic acid bacteria were shown to significantly affect the activity of MRP. The expression of genes (e.g., superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) related to antioxidant activity was upregulated by Maillard-reacted sodium caseinate (cMRP), and cMRP fermented by Lactobacillus fermentum H9 (F-cMRP) synergistically increased the expression of catalase and superoxide dismutase when compared with the high-cholesterol-diet group. Bleeding time, the assay for determination of antithrombotic activity, was significantly prolonged by Maillard-reacted whey protein concentration (wMRP) and wMRP fermented by Lactobacillus gasseri H10 (F-wMRP), similar to the bleeding time of the aspirin group (positive control). In addition, the acute pulmonary thromboembolism-induced mice overcame severe body paralysis or death in both the wMRP and the F-wMRP groups. In the serum-level experiment, cMRP and F-cMRP significantly reduced the serum total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and triglycerides but had only a slight effect on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The levels of aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase also declined in the cMRP and F-cMRP intake groups compared with the high-cholesterol-diet group. In particular, F-cMRP showed the highest reducing effects on triglycerides, aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase. Moreover, the expression of cholesterol-related genes in the F-cMRP group demonstrated greater effects than for the cMRP group in the level of cholesterol 7 α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), and low-density lipoprotein receptors compared with the high-cholesterol-diet group. The protective role of cMRP and F-cMRP in the high

  19. Deep Subthreshold Ξ- Production in Ar+KCl Reactions at 1.76AGeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agakishiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Bassini, R.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A. V.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Chernenko, S.; Christ, T.; Destefanis, M.; Díaz, J.; Dohrmann, F.; Dybczak, A.; Eberl, T.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O. V.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gil, A.; Gilardi, C.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Kanaki, K.; Karavicheva, T.; Kirschner, D.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kotte, R.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Lang, S.; Lange, J. S.; Lapidus, K.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Mishra, D.; Morinière, E.; Mousa, J.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Otwinowski, J.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Roy-Stephan, M.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Sailer, B.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Sudol, M.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wisniowski, M.; Wojcik, T.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y. V.; Zhou, P.; Zumbruch, P.

    2009-09-01

    We report first results on a deep subthreshold production of the doubly strange hyperon Ξ- in a heavy-ion reaction. At a beam energy of 1.76AGeV the reaction Ar+KCl was studied with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer at SIS18/GSI. A high-statistics and high-purity Λ sample was collected, allowing for the investigation of the decay channel Ξ-→Λπ-. The deduced Ξ-/(Λ+Σ0) production ratio of (5.6±1.2-1.7+1.8)×10-3 is significantly larger than available model predictions.

  20. Reaction product analysis of aconitine in dilute ethanol using ESI-Q-ToF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Peng; Liu, Yong-Gang; Li, Fei; Qiao, Yan-Jiang

    2012-04-01

    The study was done to identify the reaction products of aconitine in dilute ethanol using electrospray ionization-triple quad time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-TOF-MS). Five hydrolysates were detected, their pseudo-molecules are 632, 604, 586, 570, 500, they are 8-ethyoxyl-14-benzoylaconitine, benzoylaconine, pyraconitine, 8-acetyl-14-ethyoxylaconitine, aconine, respectively. Among them, 8-ethyoxyl-14-benzoylaconitine and 8-acetyl-14-ethyoxylaconitine were identified firstly as reaction products of aconitine in dilute ethanol, and can thus be used as indicators in quality control of medicinal Aconitum preparations used in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

  1. Production of lactic acid from C6-polyols by alkaline hydrothermal reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Huazhen; Jin Fangming; Wu Bing; Cao Jianglin; Duan Xiaokun [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Kishita, Atsushi, E-mail: fmjin@tongji.edu.c [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    Production of lactic acid from C6-polyols (Mannitol) under alkaline hydrothermal conditions was investigated. Experiments were performed to examine the difference in the production of lactic acid between C6-polyols and C3-polyols (glycerine), as well as C6-aldoses (glucose). Results showed that the yield of lactic acid from C6-polyols was lower than that from both glycerine and glucose. It indicated that long chain polyols might follow a different reaction pathway from that of glycerine. Further investigation is needed to clarify the reaction mechanism and improve the relatively low lactic acid acid yield from C6-polyols.

  2. Middle atmosphere NO/x/ production due to ion propulsion induced radiation belt proton precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikin, A. C.; Jackman, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    The suggestion that keV Ar(+) resulting from ion propulsion operations during solar power satellite construction could cause energetic proton precipitation from the inner radiation belt is examined to determine if such precipitation could cause significant increases in middle atmosphere nitric oxide concentrations thereby adversely affecting stratospheric ozone. It is found that the initial production rate of NO (mole/cu cm-sec) at 50 km is 130 times that due to nitrous oxide reacting with excited oxygen. However, since the time required to empty the inner belt of protons is about 1 sec and short compared to the replenishment time due to neutron decay, precipitation of inner radiation belt protons will have no adverse atmospheric environmental effect.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10189 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether, morpholinepropanamine... Substances § 721.10189 Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde... products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether, morpholinepropanamine...

  4. Kinetic modelling of NH3 production in N2-H2 non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jungmi; Pancheshnyi, Sergey; Tam, Eugene; Lowke, John J.; Prawer, Steven; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2017-04-01

    Detailed plasma kinetics modelling is presented of a low electron energy N2-H2 atmospheric-pressure discharge for ammonia synthesis. The model considers both electron and vibrational kinetics, including excited N2(X, ν) and H2(X, ν) species, and surface reactions such as those occurring by the Eley-Rideal and Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanisms and dissociative adsorption of molecules. The predictions of the model are compared to the measured NH3 concentration produced in a packed-bed dielectric barrier discharge reactor as a function of process parameters such as input gas composition and applied voltage. Unlike typical low-pressure plasma processes, under the plasma conditions considered here (reduced electric field E/N in the range 30-50 Td, electron density of the order 108 cm-3), the influence of ions is not significant. Instead, the reactions between radicals and vibrationally-excited molecules are more important. The active species in surface reactions, such as surface-adsorbed atomic nitrogen N(s) or hydrogen H(s), are found to be predominantly generated through the dissociative adsorption of molecules, in contrast to previously proposed mechanisms for plasma catalysis under low-pressure, high-E/N conditions. It is found that NH radicals play an important role at the early stages of the NH3-generation process, NH in turn is produced from N and H2(ν). Electron kinetics is shown to play a critical role in the molecular dissociation and vibrational excitation reactions that produce these precursors. It is further found that surface-adsorbed atomic hydrogen H(s) takes a leading role in the formation of NH3, which is another significant difference from the mechanisms in conventional thermo-chemical processes and low-pressure plasmas. The applied voltage, the gas temperature, the N2:H2 ratio in the input gas mixture and the reactivity of the surface material are all found to influence the ammonia production. The calculated results reproduce the observed trends in

  5. Production of Zinc Borate for Pilot-Scale Equipment and Effects of Reaction Conditions on Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek BARDAKCI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, zinc borate (ZB was synthesized by reacting zinc oxide and boric acid in the presence of standard ZB (w/w, in terms of boric acid in order to promote crystallization. The effects of seed, H3BO3/ZnO (boric acid/zinc oxide ratio, reaction time, water volume, reaction temperature and cooling temperature on yield were investigated for pilot-scale equipment. The results indicated that the addition of seed (w/w to a saturated solution of reactants increased the yield of the reaction. The results of reaction yields obtained from either magnetically or mechanically stirred systems were compared. At various reaction times, the optimal yield was 86.78 % in a saturated aqueous solution. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and Thermogravimetric / Differential Thermal Analysis (TG/DTA. The results displayed that ZB was successfully produced under the optimized reaction conditions and the product synthesized had high thermal stability.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.2.4432

  6. Dynamical deformation in heavy ion reactions and the characteristics of quasifission products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S. Q.; Gao, Y.; Li, J. Q.; Zhang, H. F.

    2017-10-01

    The investigation of the characteristics of low-energy heavy ion reactions covering both fusion and quasifission is carried out within the dinuclear system (DNS) concept, which is developed to include the deformation variables of fragments in addition to the mass numbers of the fragments, so that the energy dissipation, nucleon exchange, and deformation evolutions of the colliding nuclei as well as their correlations are treated simultaneously, and the potential energy surface of the system is thus reaction-time dependent. The direct consequence of introducing the deformation of fragments as dynamical variables is that one must treat the orientation between the two deformed nuclei. This is solved by introducing a barrier function. It is found that the model can reproduce data about the mass, as well as the total kinetic energy and its dispersion, of the reaction products very well, revealing that the DNS model has a reasonable theoretical foundation and thus can reliably describe the reaction mechanism.

  7. Food Processing and Maillard Reaction Products: Effect on Human Health and Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Tamanna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction produces flavour and aroma during cooking process; and it is used almost everywhere from the baking industry to our day to day life to make food tasty. It is often called nonenzymatic browning reaction since it takes place in the absence of enzyme. When foods are being processed or cooked at high temperature, chemical reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars leads to the formation of Maillard reaction products (MRPs. Depending on the way the food is being processed, both beneficial and toxic MRPs can be produced. Therefore, there is a need to understand the different types of MRPs and their positive or negative health effects. In this review we have summarized how food processing effects MRP formation in some of the very common foods.

  8. Catalyst deactivation due to deposition of reaction products in macropores during hydroprocessing of petroleum residuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khang, S.J.; Mosby, J.F.

    1986-04-01

    A pore-filling model is proposed to describe deactivation of hydroprocessing catalysts of a wide-pore structure in well-mixed and plug-flow reactors where the catalyst pellets are deactivated due to slow and uniform deposition of reaction products (mostly metal compounds) in their macropores. The model based on no mass-transfer restriction in the main channels of the pores incorporates additional active sites created by metal compounds in the deposited layers and has been shown to have two parameters of the similar type of the Thiele modulus. The model along with lumped reaction kinetics is applied for hydroprocessing reactions in trickle-bed reactors and provides reasonable deactivation curves for desulfurization and demetallation reaction when less than 50% of the original pore volume is filled with metal compounds.

  9. Pion Production from dp→ dNπ-Reactions with Deuteron Beams at CELSIUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiff, J.; Koch, I.; Rohdjess, H.; Scobel, W.

    1998-11-01

    The reactions dp→ dpπo and dp→ dnπ+ have been measured at CELSIUS with deuteron beam energies between 436 MeV and 558 MeV. The observed energy and angular distributions show contributions of comparable size from different production mechanisms like quasi-free NN→ dπand a 3-nucleon dN→ dNπproduction mechanism.

  10. Pion production from dp [yields] dN[pi]-reactions with deuteron beams at CELSIUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiff, J.; Scobel, W. (Institut fuer Experimentalphysik Universtaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany)); Koch, I. (Dept. of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)); Rohdjess, H. (Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany)); PROMICE/WASA Collaboration

    1998-11-01

    The reactions dp [yields] dp[pi][sup 0] and dp [yields] dn[pi][sup +] have been measured at CELSIUS with deuteron beam energies between 436 MeV and 558 MeV. The observed energy and angular distributions show contributions of comparable size from different production mechanisms like quasi-free NN [yields] d[pi] and a 3-nucleon dN [yields] dN[pi] production mechanism. (author) 6 refs, 3 figs

  11. Concurrent extraction and reaction for the production of biodiesel from wet microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hanjin; Lee, HanSol; Park, Min S; Yang, Ji-Won; Lee, Jae W

    2014-01-01

    This work addresses a reliable in situ transesterification process which integrates lipid extraction from wet microalgae, and its conversion to biodiesel, with a yield higher than 90 wt.%. This process enables single-step production of biodiesel from microalgae by mixing wet microalgal cells with solvent, methanol, and acid catalyst; and then heating them in one pot. The effects of reaction parameters such as reaction temperature, wet cell weight, reaction time, and catalyst volume on the conversion yield are investigated. This simultaneous extraction and transesterification of wet microalgae may enable a significant reduction in energy consumption by eliminating the drying process of algal cells and realize the economic production of biodiesel using wet microalgae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Limonene and its ozone-initiated reaction products attenuate allergic lung inflammation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jitka S; Nørgaard, Asger W; Koponen, Ismo K

    2016-01-01

    , and to neurogenic inflammation. The terpene, d-limonene, is used as a fragrance in numerous consumer products. When limonene reacts with the pulmonary irritant ozone, a complex mixture of gas and particle phase products is formed, which causes sensory irritation. This study investigated whether limonene, ozone...... or the reaction mixture can exacerbate allergic lung inflammation and whether airway irritation is enhanced in allergic BALB/cJ mice. Naïve and allergic (ovalbumin sensitized) mice were exposed via inhalation for three consecutive days to clean air, ozone, limonene or an ozone-limonene reaction mixture. Sensory......, it was found that limonene and the ozone-limonene reaction mixture reduced allergic inflammation possibly due to antioxidant properties. Ozone induced sensory irritation in both naïve and allergic mice. However, allergic but not naïve mice were protected from pulmonary irritation induced by ozone. This study...

  13. Characterization of ionic liquid‐based biocatalytic two‐phase reaction system for production of biodiesel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhavathi Devi, Bethala Lakshmi Anu; Guo, Zheng; Xu, Xuebing

    2011-01-01

    The property of a variety of ionic liquids (ILs) as reaction media was evaluated for the production of biodiesel by enzymatic methanolysis of rapeseed oil. The IL Ammoeng 102, containing tetraaminum cation with C18 acyl and oligoethyleneglycol units, was found to be capable of forming oil....../IL biphasic reaction system by mixing with substrates, which is highly effective for the production of biodiesel with more than 98% biodiesel yield and nearly 100% conversion of oil. Conductor‐like screening model for real solvent (COSMO‐RS) in silico prediction of substrate solubility and simulation...... of partition coefficient change vs. reaction evolution indicated that the amphiphilic property of Ammoeng 102 might be responsible for creating efficient interaction of immiscible substrates; while big difference of partition coefficients of generated biodiesel and glycerol between the two phases suggests...

  14. Decadal Variations in Eastern Canada’s Taiga Wood Biomass Production Forced by Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Etienne Boucher; Antoine Nicault; Dominique Arseneault; Yves Bégin; Mehdi Pasha Karami

    2017-01-01

    .... Here, we analyze an extensive network of black spruce (Picea mariana Mill.) ring width and wood density measurements and provide new evidence that wood biomass production is influenced by large-scale, internal ocean-atmosphere processes...

  15. Reaction of Aldehydes/Ketones with Electron-Deficient 1,3,5-Triazines Leading to Functionalized Pyrimidines as Diels-Alder/Retro-Diels-Alder Reaction Products: Reaction Development and Mechanistic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Dang, Qun; Cai, Pei-Jun; Gao, Yang; Yu, Zhi-Xiang; Bai, Xu

    2017-03-03

    Catalytic inverse electron demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) reactions of heterocyclic aza-dienes are rarely reported since highly reactive and electron-rich dienophiles are often found not compatible with strong acids such as Lewis acids. Herein, we disclose that TFA-catalyzed reactions of electron-deficient 1,3,5-triazines and electron-deficient aldehydes/ketones can take place. These reactions led to highly functionalized pyrimidines as products in fair to good yields. The reaction mechanism was carefully studied by the combination of experimental and computational studies. The reactions involve a cascade of stepwise inverse electron demand hetero-Diels-Alder (ihDA) reactions, followed by retro-Diels-Alder (rDA) reactions and elimination of water. An acid was required for both ihDA and rDA reactions. This mechanism was further verified by comparing the relative reactivity of aldehydes/ketones and their corresponding vinyl ethers in the current reaction system.

  16. Urinary excretion of dietary maillard reaction products in healthy adult female cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van C.; Bosch, G.; Butre, C.I.; Poel, van der A.F.B.; Wierenga, P.A.; Alexander, L.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2016-01-01

    Download »Citation Alerts »Sign up for TOC email alerts Share »Email this content »Recommend to librarian Facebook Twitter doi:10.2527/jas.2015-9550 Urinary excretion of dietary Maillard reaction products in healthy adult female cats12 C. van Rooijen*, G. Bosch 3*, C. I. Butré†, A. F. B. van der

  17. Characterization of cement minerals, cements and their reaction products at the atomic and nano scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen; Hall, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances and highlights in characterization methods are reviewed for cement minerals, cements and their reaction products. The emphasis is on X-ray and neutron diffraction, and on nuclear magnetic resonance methods, although X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopies are discussed briefly...

  18. Rapid and sensitive detection of Campylobacter spp. in chicken products by using the polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesendorf, B A; Quint, W G; Henkens, M H; Stegeman, H; Huf, F A; Niesters, H G

    1992-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) after a short enrichment culture was used to detect Campylobacter spp. in chicken products. After the 16S rRNA gene sequence of Campylobacter jejuni was determined and compared with known sequences from other enterobacteria, a primer and probe combination was

  19. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic). 721.4461 Section 721.4461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 72...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified... modified alkoxysilane salt (generic). 721.9514 Section 721.9514 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES...

  1. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... provisions of subpart A of this part apply to this section except as modified by this paragraph. (1...

  2. Age-related accumulation of Maillard reaction products in human articular cartilage collagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, N.; Degroot, J.; Oldehinkel, E.; Bank, R. A.; Thorpe, S. R.; Baynes, J. W.; Bayliss, M. T.; Bijlsma, J. W.; Lafeber, F. P.; TeKoppele, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Non-enzymic modification of tissue proteins by reducing sugars, the so-called Maillard reaction, is a prominent feature of aging. In articular cartilage, relatively high levels of the advanced glycation end product (AGE) pentosidine accumulate with age. Higher pentosidine levels have been associated

  3. Production of hydrogen bromide by bromine-methane reactions at elevated temperature.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Larson, Richard S.

    2003-05-01

    Hydrogen bromide is a potentially useful intermediate for hydrogen production by electrolysis because it has a low cell potential and is extremely soluble in water. Processes have been proposed to exploit these properties, but among the important issues to be resolved is the efficiency of HBr production from hydrocarbon precursors. This investigation evaluated a fundamental facet of such a technology by studying the reaction of methane and bromine at elevated temperature to determine the yield and kinetics of HBr formation. Laboratory experimentation and computational chemistry were combined to provide a description of this reaction for possible application to reactor design at a larger scale. Experimental studies with a tubular flow reactor were used to survey a range of reactant ratios and reactor residence times at temperatures between 500 C and 800 C. At temperatures near 800 C with excess methane, conversions of bromine to HBr exceeded 90% and reaction products included solid carbon (soot) in stoichiometric amounts. At lower temperatures, HBr conversion was significantly reduced, the products included much less soot, and the formation of bromocarbon compounds was indicated qualitatively. Calculations of chemical equilibrium behavior and reaction kinetics for the experimental conditions were performed using the Sandia CHEMKIN package. An elementary multistep mechanism for the gas-phase chemistry was used together with a surface mechanism that assumed facile deposition of radical species at the reactor walls. Simulations with the laminar-flow boundary-layer code of the CHEMKIN package gave reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  4. Carbon dioxide absorption and release properties of pyrolysis products of dolomite calcined in vacuum atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Kuzuya, Toshihiro; Hirai, Shinji; Li, Jihua; Li, Te

    2014-01-01

    The decomposition of dolomite into CaO and MgO was performed at 1073 K in vacuum and at 1273 K in an Ar atmosphere. The dolomite calcined in vacuum was found to have a higher specific surface area and a higher micropore volume when compared to the dolomite calcined in the Ar atmosphere. These pyrolysis products of dolomite were reacted with CO2 at 673 K for 21.6 ks. On the absorption of CO2, the formation of CaCO3 was observed. The degree of absorption of the dolomite calcined in vacuum was determined to be above 50%, which was higher than the degree of absorption of the dolomite calcined in the Ar atmosphere. The CO2 absorption and release procedures were repeated three times for the dolomite calcined in vacuum. The specific surface area and micropore volume of calcined dolomite decreased with successive repetitions of the CO2 absorption and release cycles leading to a decrease in the degree of absorption of CO2.

  5. Carbon Dioxide Absorption and Release Properties of Pyrolysis Products of Dolomite Calcined in Vacuum Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Kuzuya, Toshihiro; Hirai, Shinji; Li, Jihua; Li, Te

    2014-01-01

    The decomposition of dolomite into CaO and MgO was performed at 1073 K in vacuum and at 1273 K in an Ar atmosphere. The dolomite calcined in vacuum was found to have a higher specific surface area and a higher micropore volume when compared to the dolomite calcined in the Ar atmosphere. These pyrolysis products of dolomite were reacted with CO2 at 673 K for 21.6 ks. On the absorption of CO2, the formation of CaCO3 was observed. The degree of absorption of the dolomite calcined in vacuum was determined to be above 50%, which was higher than the degree of absorption of the dolomite calcined in the Ar atmosphere. The CO2 absorption and release procedures were repeated three times for the dolomite calcined in vacuum. The specific surface area and micropore volume of calcined dolomite decreased with successive repetitions of the CO2 absorption and release cycles leading to a decrease in the degree of absorption of CO2. PMID:25136696

  6. One-Pot Synthesis of N-(α-Peroxy)Indole/Carbazole via Chemoselective Three-Component Condensation Reaction in Open Atmosphere

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xinbo

    2015-11-06

    A facile one-pot synthesis of N-(α-peroxy)indole and N-(α-peroxy)carbazole has been developed using metal-free, organo-acid-catalyzed three-component condensation reactions of indole/carbazole, aldehyde, and peroxide. Based on the reaction discovered, a new synthetic proposal for Fumitremorgin A and Verruculogen is introduced. Such a protocol could be easily handled and scaled up in an open atmosphere with a wide substrate scope, enabling the construction of a new molecule library.

  7. Atmospheric Pb and Ti accumulation rates from Sphagnum moss: dependence upon plant productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempter, H; Krachler, M; Shotyk, W

    2010-07-15

    The accumulation rates of atmospheric Pb and Ti were obtained using the production rates of Sphagnum mosses collected in four ombrotrophic bogs from two regions of southern Germany: Upper Bavaria (Oberbayern, OB) and the Northern Black Forest (Nordschwarzwald, NBF). Surfaces of Sphagnum carpets were marked with plastic mesh and one year later the production of plant matter was harvested. Metal concentrations were determined in acid digests using sector field ICP-MS employing well established analytical procedures. Up to 12 samples (40 x 40 cm) were collected per site, and 6-10 sites were investigated per bog. Variations within a given sampling site were in the range 2.3-4x for Pb concentrations, 1.8-2.5x for Ti concentrations, 3-8.3x for Pb/Ti, 5.6-7.8x for Pb accumulation rates, and 2.3-6.4x for Ti accumulation rates. However, the median values of these parameters for the sites (6-10 per bog) were quite consistent. The mosses from the bogs in NBF exhibited significantly greater productivity (187-202 g m(-2) a(-1)) compared to the OB peat bogs (71-91 g m(-2) a(-1)), and these differences had a pronounced effect on the Pb and Ti accumulation rates. Highly productive mosses showed no indication of a "dilution effect" of Pb or Ti concentrations, suggesting that more productive plants were simply able to accumulate more particles from the air. The median rates of net Pb accumulation by the mosses are in excellent agreement with the fluxes obtained by direct atmospheric measurements at nearby monitoring stations in both regions (EMEP and MAPESI data).

  8. Gas phase formation of extremely oxidized pinene reaction products in chamber and ambient air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ehn

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available High molecular weight (300–650 Da naturally charged negative ions have previously been observed at a boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, Finland. The long-term measurements conducted in this work showed that these ions are observed practically every night between spring and autumn in Hyytiälä. The ambient mass spectral patterns could be reproduced in striking detail during additional measurements of α-pinene (C10H16 oxidation at low-OH conditions in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC. The ions were identified as clusters of the nitrate ion (NO3 and α-pinene oxidation products reaching oxygen to carbon ratios of 0.7–1.3, while retaining most of the initial ten carbon atoms. Attributing the ions to clusters instead of single molecules was based on additional observations of the same extremely oxidized organics in clusters with HSO4 (Hyytiälä and C3F5O2 (JPAC. The most abundant products in the ion spectra were identified as C10H14O7, C10H14O9, C10H16O9, and C10H14O11. The mechanism responsible for forming these molecules is still not clear, but the initial reaction is most likely ozone attack at the double bond, as the ions are mainly observed under dark conditions. β-pinene also formed highly oxidized products under the same conditions, but less efficiently, and mainly C9 compounds which were not observed in Hyytiälä, where β-pinene on average is 4–5 times less abundant than α-pinene. Further, to explain the high O/C together with the relatively high H/C, we propose that geminal diols and/or hydroperoxide groups may be important. We estimate that the night-time concentration of the sum of the neutral extremely oxidized products is on the order of 0.1–1 ppt (~10

  9. Haze production in the atmospheres of super-Earths and mini-Neptunes: Insight from PHAZER lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Sarah; He, Chao; Kempton, Eliza; Moses, Julianne I.; Vuitton, Veronique; Lewis, Nikole

    2017-10-01

    Super-Earths and mini-Neptunes (~1.2-3 Earth radii) comprise a large fraction of planets in the universe and TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite) will increase the number that are amenable to atmospheric characterization with observatories like JWST (James Webb Space Telescope). These atmospheres should span a large range of temperature and atmospheric composition phase space, with no solar system analogues. Interpretation of current and future atmospheric observations of super-Earths and mini-Neptunes requires additional knowledge about atmospheric chemistry and photochemical haze production. We have experimentally investigated haze formation for H2, H2O, and CO2 dominated atmospheres (100x, 1000x, and 10000x solar metallicity) for a range of temperatures (300 K, 400 K, and 600 K) using the PHAZER (Planetary Haze Research) experiment at Johns Hopkins University. This is a necessary step in understanding which, if any, super-Earths and mini-Neptunes possess the conditions required for efficient production of photochemical haze in their atmospheres. We find that the production rates vary over a few orders of magnitudes with some higher than our nominal Titan experiments. We therefore expect that planets in this temperature and atmospheric composition phase space will exhibit a range of particle concentrations and some may be as hazy as Titan.

  10. Reactions between water-soluble organic acids and nitrates in atmospheric aerosols: Recycling of nitric acid and formation of organic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2) occurs when nitrogen oxides and nitric acid (HNO3) react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory-generated particles composed of water-soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e., NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates and release gaseous HNO3 during the dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase because of its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that, in turn, may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling that may further affect concentrations of gas and condensed phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  11. Kinetics and products of gas-phase reactions of ozone with methyl methacrylate, methyl acrylate, and ethyl acrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, F; Eyglunent, G; Daële, V; Mellouki, A

    2010-08-19

    The kinetics and products of the gas-phase reactions of ozone with methyl methacrylate, methyl acrylate, and ethyl acrylate have been investigated at 760 Torr total pressure of air and 294 +/- 2 K. The rate coefficients obtained (in cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) units) were as follows: k(methyl methacrylate) = (6.7 +/- 0.9) x 10(-18), k(methyl acrylate) = (0.95 +/- 0.07) x 10(-18), and k(ethyl acrylate) = (1.3 +/- 0.1) x 10(-18). In addition to formaldehyde being observed as a product of the three reactions, the other major reaction products were methyl pyruvate from reaction of ozone with methyl methacrylate, methyl glyoxylate from reaction of ozone with methyl acrylate, and ethyl glyoxylate from reaction of ozone with ethyl acrylate. Possible reaction mechanisms leading to the observed products are presented and discussed.

  12. Marginal Lands Gross Primary Production Dominate Atmospheric CO2 Interannual Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlström, A.; Raupach, M. R.; Schurgers, G.; Arneth, A.; Jung, M.; Reichstein, M.; Smith, B.

    2014-12-01

    Since the 1960s terrestrial ecosystems have acted as a substantial sink for atmospheric CO2, sequestering about one quarter of anthropogenic emissions in an average year. Variations in this land carbon sink are also responsible for most of the large interannual variability in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. While most evidence places the majority of the sink in highly productive forests and at high latitudes experiencing warmer and longer growing seasons, the location and the processes governing the interannual variations are still not well characterised. Here we evaluate the hypothesis that the long-term trend and the variability in the land CO2 sink are respectively dominated by geographically distinct regions: the sink by highly productive lands, mainly forests, and the variability by semi-arid or "marginal" lands where vegetation activity is strongly limited by water and therefore responds strongly to climate variability. Using novel analysis methods and data from both upscaled flux-tower measurements and a dynamic global vegetation model, we show that (1) the interannual variability in the terrestrial CO2 sink arises mainly from variability in terrestrial gross primary production (GPP); (2) most of the interannual variability in GPP arises in tropical and subtropical marginal lands, where negative anomalies are driven mainly by warm, dry conditions and positive anomalies by cool, wet conditions; (3) the variability in the GPP of high-latitude marginal lands (tundra and shrublands) is instead controlled by temperature and light, with warm bright conditions resulting in positive anomalies. The influence of ENSO (El Niño-Southern Oscillation) on the growth rate of atmospheric CO2 concentrations is mediated primarily through climatic effects on GPP in marginal lands, with opposite signs in subtropical and higher-latitude regions. Our results show that the land sink of CO2 (dominated by forests) and its interannual variability (dominated by marginal lands) are

  13. Importance of Photobacterium phosphoreum in relation to spoilage of modified atmosphere-packed fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Paw; Mejlholm, Ole; Christiansen, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    products and the organism is likely to be of importance for spoilage of several modified atmosphere-packed (MAP) marine fish species when stored at chill temperatures. Some microbiological methods recommended for control of fish products by national and international authorities are inappropriate......Occurrence and growth of Photobacterium phosphoreum were studied in 20 experiments with fresh fish from Denmark, Iceland and Greece. The organism was detected in all marine fish species but not in fish from fresh water. Growth of P. phosphoreum to high levels (>10(7) cfu g(-1)) was observed in most...... for detection of psychrotolerant and heat-labile micro-organisms like P. phosphoreum. These methods have been used in many previous studies of MAP fish and this could explain why, contrary to the findings in the present study, P. phosphoreum in general was not detected previously in spoiled MAP fish....

  14. Factors affecting release of ethanol vapour in active modified atmosphere packaging systems for horticultural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerawate Utto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The active modified atmosphere packaging (active MAP system , which provides interactive postharvest control , using ethanol vapour controlled release, is one of the current interests in the development of active packaging for horticultural products. A number of published research work have discussed the relationship between the effectiveness of ethanol vapour and its concentration in the package headspace, including its effect on postharvest decay and physiological controls. This is of importance because a controlled release system should release and maintain ethanol vapour at effective concentrations during the desired storage period. A balance among the mass transfer processes of ethanol vapour in the package results in ethanol vapour accumulation in the package headspace. Key factors affecting these processes include ethanol loading, packaging material, packaged product and storage environment (temperature and relative h umidity. This article reviews their influences and discusses future work required to better understand their influences on ethanol vapour release and accumulations in active MAP.

  15. Updated atmospheric speciated mercury emissions from iron and steel production in China during 2000-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingru; Gao, Wei; Wang, Shuxiao; Hao, Jiming

    2017-09-01

    Iron and steel production (ISP) is one of the significant atmospheric Hg emission sources in China. Atmospheric mercury (Hg) emissions from ISP during 2000-2015 were estimated by using a technology-based emission factor method. To support the application of this method, databases of Hg concentrations in raw materials, technology development trends, and Hg removal efficiencies of air pollution control devices (APCDs) were constructed through national sampling and literature review. Hg input to ISP increased from 21.6 t in 2000 to 94.5 t in 2015. In the various types of raw materials, coking coal and iron concentrates contributed 35-46 and 25-32 % of the total Hg input. Atmospheric Hg emissions from ISP increased from 11.5 t in 2000 to 32.7 t in 2015 with a peak of 35.6 t in 2013. Pollution control promoted the increase in average Hg removal efficiency, from 47 % in 2000 to 65 % in 2015. During the study period, sinter/pellet plants and blast furnaces were the largest two emission processes. However, emissions from roasting plants and coke ovens cannot be ignored, which accounted for 22-34 % of ISP's emissions. Overall, Hg speciation shifted from 50/44/6 (gaseous elemental Hg (Hg0)/gaseous oxidized Hg (HgII)/particulate-bound Hg (Hgp)) in 2000 to 40/59/1 in 2015, which indicated a higher proportion of Hg deposition around the emission points. Future emissions of ISP were expected to decrease based on the comprehensive consideration crude-steel production, steel scrap utilization, energy saving, and pollution control measures.

  16. Updated atmospheric speciated mercury emissions from iron and steel production in China during 2000–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron and steel production (ISP is one of the significant atmospheric Hg emission sources in China. Atmospheric mercury (Hg emissions from ISP during 2000–2015 were estimated by using a technology-based emission factor method. To support the application of this method, databases of Hg concentrations in raw materials, technology development trends, and Hg removal efficiencies of air pollution control devices (APCDs were constructed through national sampling and literature review. Hg input to ISP increased from 21.6 t in 2000 to 94.5 t in 2015. In the various types of raw materials, coking coal and iron concentrates contributed 35–46 and 25–32 % of the total Hg input. Atmospheric Hg emissions from ISP increased from 11.5 t in 2000 to 32.7 t in 2015 with a peak of 35.6 t in 2013. Pollution control promoted the increase in average Hg removal efficiency, from 47 % in 2000 to 65 % in 2015. During the study period, sinter/pellet plants and blast furnaces were the largest two emission processes. However, emissions from roasting plants and coke ovens cannot be ignored, which accounted for 22–34 % of ISP's emissions. Overall, Hg speciation shifted from 50/44/6 (gaseous elemental Hg (Hg0/gaseous oxidized Hg (HgII/particulate-bound Hg (Hgp in 2000 to 40/59/1 in 2015, which indicated a higher proportion of Hg deposition around the emission points. Future emissions of ISP were expected to decrease based on the comprehensive consideration crude-steel production, steel scrap utilization, energy saving, and pollution control measures.

  17. Induction of mitotic gene conversion by browning reaction products and its modulation by naturally occurring agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, M P; Stich, H F; Powrie, W D; Wu, C H

    1982-05-01

    Mitotic gene conversion in the D7 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was significantly enhanced by exposure to non-enzymatic browning reaction products. These products were formed during the heating of sugar (caramelization reaction) or sugar-amino acid mixtures (Maillard reaction) at temperatures normally used during the cooking of food. Several modulating factors of this convertogenic activity were identified. These factors included two main groups: (1) trace metals which are widely distributed in the environment; and (2) several cellular enzymatic systems. The convertogenic activities of a heated glucose-lysine mixture and a commercial caramel powder were completely suppresses when yeast were concurrently exposed to these products and to either FeIII or CuII. Equimolar concentrations of MnII or sodium selenite had no effect on the convertogenic activity of the products of either model system. Horse-radish peroxidase, beef liver catalase and rat liver S9 preparations each decreased the frequency of gene conversion induced by the caramel powder and the heated glucose-lysine products. This modulating activity of the enzymes was lost if they were heat-inactivated. These studies indicate the presence of a variety of protective mechanisms which can modify genotoxic components in complex food mixtures.

  18. Encapsulation of ascorbic acid promotes the reduction of Maillard reaction products in UHT milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troise, Antonio Dario; Vitiello, Daniele; Tsang, Catherine; Fiore, Alberto

    2016-06-15

    The presence of amino groups and carbonyls renders fortified milk with ascorbic acid particularly susceptible to the reduction of available lysine and to the formation of Maillard reaction products (MRPs), as Nε-(carboxyethyl)-l-lysine (CEL), Nε-(carboxymethyl)-l-lysine (CML), Amadori products (APs) and off-flavors. A novel approach was proposed to control the Maillard reaction (MR) in fortified milk: ascorbic acid was encapsulated in a lipid coating and the effects were tested after a lab scale UHT treatment. Encapsulation promoted a delayed release of ascorbic acid and a reduction in the formation of MRPs. Total lysine increased up to 45% in milk with encapsulated ascorbic acid, while reductions in CML, CEL and furosine ranged from 10% to 53% compared with control samples. The effects were also investigated towards the formation of amide-AGEs (advanced glycation end products) by high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) revealing that several mechanisms coincide with the MR in the presence of ascorbic acid.

  19. Theoretical study on production cross sections of exotic actinide nuclei in multinucleon transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Long

    2017-12-01

    Within the dinuclear system (DNS) model, the multinucleon transfer reactions 129,136Xe + 248Cm, 112Sn + 238U, and 144Xe + 248Cm are investigated. The production cross sections of primary fragments are calculated with the DNS model. By using a statistical model, we investigate the influence of charged particle evaporation channels on production cross sections of exotic nuclei. It is found that for excited neutron-deficient nuclei the charged particle evaporation competes with neutron emission and plays an important role in the cooling process. The production cross sections of several exotic actinide nuclei are predicted in the reactions 112Sn + 238U and 136,144Xe + 248Cm. Considering the beam intensities, the collisions of 136,144Xe projectiles with a 248Cm target for producing neutron-rich nuclei with Z=92‑96 are investigated. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11605296) and Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, China (2016A030310208)

  20. Land-atmosphere interaction patterns in southeastern South America using satellite products and climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spennemann, P. C.; Salvia, M.; Ruscica, R. C.; Sörensson, A. A.; Grings, F.; Karszenbaum, H.

    2018-02-01

    In regions of strong Land-Atmosphere (L-A) interaction, soil moisture (SM) conditions can impact the atmosphere through modulating the land surface fluxes. The importance of the identification of L-A interaction regions lies in the potential improvement of the weather/seasonal forecast and the better understanding of the physical mechanisms involved. This study aims to compare the terrestrial segment of the L-A interaction from satellite products and climate models, motivated by previous modeling studies pointing out southeastern South America (SESA) as a L-A hotspot during austral summer. In addition, the L-A interaction under dry or wet anomalous conditions over SESA is analyzed. To identify L-A hotspots the AMSRE-LPRM SM and MODIS land surface temperature products; coupled climate models and uncoupled land surface models were used. SESA highlights as a strong L-A interaction hotspot when employing different metrics, temporal scales and independent datasets, showing consistency between models and satellite estimations. Both AMSRE-LPRM bands (X and C) are consistent showing a strong L-A interaction hotspot over the Pampas ecoregion. Intensification and a larger spatial extent of the L-A interaction for dry summers was observed in both satellite products and models compared to wet summers. These results, which were derived from measured physical variables, are encouraging and promising for future studies analyzing L-A interactions. L-A interaction analysis is proposed here as a meeting point between remote sensing and climate modelling communities of Argentina, within a region with the highest agricultural and livestock production of the continent, but with an important lack of in-situ SM observations.

  1. Real-time monitoring of the progress of polymerization reactions directly on surfaces at open atmosphere by ambient mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørgaard, Asger W; Vaz, Boniek G; Lauritsen, Frants R; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2010-12-15

    The progress of an on-surface polymerization process involving alkyl and perfluoroalkyl silanes and siloxanes was monitored in real-time via easy ambient sonic spray ionization mass spectrometry (EASI-MS). When sprayed on surfaces, the organosilicon compounds present in commercially available nanofilm products (NFPs) react by condensation to form a polymeric coating. A NFP for coating of floor materials (NFP-1) and a second NFP for coating tiles and ceramics (NFP-2) were applied to glass, filter paper or cotton surfaces and the progress of the polymerization was monitored by slowly scanning the surface. Via EASI(+)-MS monitoring, significant changes in the composition of hydrolysates and condensates of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl triisopropoxysilane (NFP-1) and hexadecyl triethoxysilane (NFP-2) were observed over time. The abundances of the hydrolyzed species decreased compared with those of the non-hydrolysed species for both NFP-1 and NFP-2 and the heavier oligomers became relatively more abundant over a period of 15-20 min. A similar tendency favouring the heavier oligomers was observed via EASI(-)-MS. This work illustrates the potential of ambient mass spectrometry for the direct monitoring of polymerization reactions on surfaces. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Ozone deposition velocities, reaction probabilities and product yields for green building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamble, S. P.; Corsi, R. L.; Morrison, G. C.

    2011-12-01

    Indoor surfaces can passively remove ozone that enters buildings, reducing occupant exposure without an energy penalty. However, reactions between ozone and building surfaces can generate and release aerosols and irritating and carcinogenic gases. To identify desirable indoor surfaces the deposition velocity, reaction probability and carbonyl product yields of building materials considered green (listed, recycled, sustainable, etc.) were quantified. Nineteen separate floor, wall or ceiling materials were tested in a 10 L, flow-through laboratory reaction chamber. Inlet ozone concentrations were maintained between 150 and 200 ppb (generally much lower in chamber air), relative humidity at 50%, temperature at 25 °C and exposure occurred over 24 h. Deposition velocities ranged from 0.25 m h -1 for a linoleum style flooring up to 8.2 m h -1 for a clay based paint; reaction probabilities ranged from 8.8 × 10 -7 to 6.9 × 10 -5 respectively. For all materials, product yields of C 1 thru C 12 saturated n-aldehydes, plus acetone ranged from undetectable to greater than 0.70 The most promising material was a clay wall plaster which exhibited a high deposition velocity (5.0 m h -1) and a low product yield (

  3. An Investigation of the Complexity of Maillard Reaction Product Profiles from the Thermal Reaction of Amino Acids with Sucrose Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Golon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal treatment of food changes its chemical composition drastically with the formation of “so-called” Maillard reaction products, being responsible for the sensory properties of food, along with detrimental and beneficial health effects. In this contribution, we will describe the reactivity of several amino acids, including arginine, lysine, aspartic acid, tyrosine, serine and cysteine, with carbohydrates. The analytical strategy employed involves high and ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry followed by chemometric-type data analysis. The different reactivity of amino acids towards carbohydrates has been observed with cysteine and serine, resulting in complex MS spectra with thousands of detectable reaction products. Several compounds have been tentatively identified, including caramelization reaction products, adducts of amino acids with carbohydrates, their dehydration and hydration products, disproportionation products and aromatic compounds based on molecular formula considerations.

  4. An Investigation of the Complexity of Maillard Reaction Product Profiles from the Thermal Reaction of Amino Acids with Sucrose Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golon, Agnieszka; Kropf, Christian; Vockenroth, Inga; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2014-08-07

    Thermal treatment of food changes its chemical composition drastically with the formation of "so-called" Maillard reaction products, being responsible for the sensory properties of food, along with detrimental and beneficial health effects. In this contribution, we will describe the reactivity of several amino acids, including arginine, lysine, aspartic acid, tyrosine, serine and cysteine, with carbohydrates. The analytical strategy employed involves high and ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry followed by chemometric-type data analysis. The different reactivity of amino acids towards carbohydrates has been observed with cysteine and serine, resulting in complex MS spectra with thousands of detectable reaction products. Several compounds have been tentatively identified, including caramelization reaction products, adducts of amino acids with carbohydrates, their dehydration and hydration products, disproportionation products and aromatic compounds based on molecular formula considerations.

  5. Investigation on the quasifission process by theoretical analysis of experimental data of fissionlike reaction products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giardina, G; Mandaglio, G; Curciarello, F; Leo, V De; Fazio, G; Manganaro, M; Romaniuk, M [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Nasirov, A K [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980, Dubna (Russian Federation); Sacca, C, E-mail: giardina@nucleo.unime.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy)

    2011-02-01

    The hindrance to complete fusion is a phenomenon presenting in the most part of the capture events in reactions with massive nuclei. This phenomenon is due to the onset of the quasifission process which competes with complete fusion during the evolution of the composed system formed at capture stage. The branching ratio between quasifission and complete fusion strongly depends from different characteristics of reacting nuclei in the entrance channel. The experimental and theoretical investigations of reaction dynamics connected with the formation of composed system is nowadays the main subject of the nuclear reactions. There is ambiguity in establishment of the reaction mechanism leading to the observed binary fissionlike fragments. The correct estimation of the fusion probability is important in planning experiments for the synthesis of superheavy elements. The experimental determination of evaporation residues only is not enough to restore the true reaction dynamics. The experimental observation of fissionlike fragments only cannot assure the correct distinguishing of products of the quasifission, fast fission, and fusion-fission processes which have overlapping in the mass (angular, kinetic energy) distributions of fragments. In this paper we consider a wide set of reactions (with different mass asymmetry and mass symmetry parameters) with the aim to explain the role played by many quantities on the reaction mechanisms. We also present the results of study of the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 249}Bk reaction used to synthesize superheavy nuclei with Z = 117 by the determination of the evaporation residue cross sections and the effective fission barriers < B{sub f} > of excited nuclei formed along the de-excitation cascade of the compound nucleus.

  6. Exploring the control of land-atmospheric oscillations over terrestrial vegetation productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depoorter, Mathieu; Green, Julia; Gentine, Pierre; Liu, Yi; van Eck, Christel; Regnier, Pierre; Dorigo, Wouter; Verhoest, Niko; Miralles, Diego

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation dynamics play an important role in the climate system due to their control on the carbon, energy and water cycles. The spatiotemporal variability of vegetation is regulated by internal climate variability as well as natural and anthropogenic forcing mechanisms, including fires, land use, volcano eruptions or greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean-atmospheric oscillations, affect the fluxes of heat and water over continents, leading to anomalies in radiation, precipitation or temperature at widely separated locations (i.e. teleconnections); an effect of ocean-atmospheric oscillations on terrestrial primary productivity can therefore be expected. While different studies have shown the general importance of internal climate variability for global vegetation dynamics, the control by particular teleconnections over the regional growth and decay of vegetation is still poorly understood. At continental to global scales, satellite remote sensing offers a feasible approach to enhance our understanding of the main drivers of vegetation variability. Traditional studies of the multi-decadal variability of global vegetation have been usually based on the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), which extends back to the early '80s. There are, however, some limitations to NDVI observations; arguably the most important of these limitations is that from the plant physiology perspective the index does not have a well-defined meaning, appearing poorly correlated to vegetation productivity. On the other hand, recently developed records from other remotely-sensed properties of vegetation, like fluorescence or microwave vegetation optical depth, have proven a significantly better correspondence to above-ground biomass. To enhance our understanding of the controls of ocean-atmosphere oscillations over vegetation, we propose to explore the link between climate oscillation extremes and net primary productivity

  7. Microbiological and sensorial quality assessment of ready-to-cook seafood products packaged under modified atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speranza, B; Corbo, M R; Conte, A; Sinigaglia, M; Del Nobile, M A

    2009-01-01

    The effects of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) (30:40:30 O(2):CO(2):N(2) and 5:95 O(2):CO(2)) on the quality of 4 ready-to-cook seafood products were studied. In particular, the investigation was carried out on hake fillets, yellow gurnard fillets, chub mackerel fillets, and entire eviscerated cuttlefish. Quality assessment was based on microbiological and sensorial indices determination. Both packaging gas mixtures contributed to a considerable slowing down of the microbial and sensorial quality loss of the investigated seafood products. Results showed that sensorial quality was the subindex that limited their shelf life. In fact, based primarily on microbiological results, samples under MAP remained acceptable up to the end of storage (that is, 14 d), regardless of fish specie. On the other hand, results from sensory analyses showed that chub mackerel fillets in MAP were acceptable up to the 6th storage d, whilst hake fillets, yellow gurnard fillets, and entire cuttlefish became unacceptable after 10 to 11 d. However, compared to control samples, an increase in the sensorial shelf life of MAP samples (ranging from about 95% to 250%) was always recorded. Practical Application: Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) is an inexpensive and uncomplicated method of extending shelf life of packed seafood. It could gain great attention from the fish industrial sector due to the fact that MAP is a practical and economic technique, realizable by small technical expedients. Moreover, there is great attention from the food industry and retailers to react to the growing demand for convenience food, thus promoting an increase in the assortments of ready-to-cook seafood products.

  8. Characterizations of self-combustion reactions (SCR) for the production of nanomaterials used as advanced cathodes in Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haik, Ortal; Martha, Surendra K.; Sclar, Hadar; Samuk-Fromovich, Zvi; Zinigrad, Ella; Markovsky, Boris [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Kovacheva, Daniela; Saliyski, Nikolay [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Aurbach, Doron, E-mail: aurbach@mail.biu.ac.il [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2009-09-10

    In this work, self-combustion reactions (SCR) for the preparation of important cathode materials for rechargeable Li-ion batteries were investigated by thermal analytical tools (DSC, ARC, TGA), electron microscopy, XRD, various spectroscopies (MS, Raman, FTIR) and elemental analysis by ICP. The systems studied include solutions containing metal nitrates at the right stoichiometry and sucrose as a fuel, for the preparation of LiMn{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}O{sub 2} (layered), LiMn{sub 1.5}Ni{sub 0.5}O{sub 4} (spinel), LiMn{sub 0.33}Ni{sub 0.33}Co{sub 0.33}O{sub 2} (layered), and LiMn{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} (layered). Similar products, which do not depend on the atmosphere of the processes (air or inert) were obtained by spontaneous SCR and the gradual heating of the same solutions by DSC, ARC, and TGA. The reactions involve the partial caramelization of sucrose, complicated by red-ox reactions with the nitrates that form solid products, whose organic part is finally decomposed around 400 {sup o}C. The presence of cobalt ions has a stabilizing effect, which is expressed by the low dissolution rates of Li ions from the solid products thus formed, into aqueous solutions. The reaction mechanisms are discussed herein.

  9. Product lambda-doublet ratios for the O(3P) + D2 reaction: A mechanistic imprint

    CERN Document Server

    Jambrina, P G; Aldegunde, J; Brouard, M; Aoiz, F J

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, the development of theoretical methods have allowed chemists to reproduce and explain almost all of the experimental data associated with elementary atom plus diatom collisions. However, there are still a few examples where theory cannot account yet for experimental results. This is the case for the preferential population of one of the $\\Lambda$-doublet states produced by chemical reactions. In particular, recent measurements of the OD($^2\\Pi$) product of the O($^3$P) + D$_2$ reaction have shown a clear preference for the $\\Pi(A')$ $\\Lambda$-doublet states, in apparent contradiction with {\\em ab initio} calculations, which predict a larger reactivity on the $A"$ potential energy surface. Here we present a method to calculate the $\\Lambda$-doublet ratio when concurrent potential energy surfaces participate in the reaction. It accounts for the experimental $\\Lambda$-doublet populations via explicit consideration of the stereodynamics of the process. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that...

  10. Determination of Free Fatty Acid by FT-NIR Spectroscopy in Esterification Reaction for Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djéssica Tatiana Raspe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the use of FT-NIR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate calibration to determine the percentage of free fatty acids (FFA in samples obtained by the esterification of FFA in vegetable oils. The analytical method used as calibration matrix samples of the reaction medium of esterification of oleic acid in soybean oil in proportions of 0.3 to 40 wt% (by weight of oleic acid obtained under different experimental conditions and utilized the partial least squares (PLS regression. The efficiency of the method was tested to predict the content of FFA in reactions of esterification of oleic acid in soybean oil catalysed by KSF clay and Amberlyst 15 commercial resin, both in a batch mode. Good Correlations were observed between the FT-NIR/PLS method and the reference method (AOCS. The results confirm that FT-NIR spectroscopy, in combination with multivariate calibration, is a promising technique for monitoring esterification reaction for biodiesel production.

  11. Apparatus for production, measurement and reaction studies of dissociated gases at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, J. D.; Gilbreath, W. P.

    1975-01-01

    An apparatus is described which is used for the controlled production, characterization, and study of dissociated gases in a microwave discharge at elevated temperatures. A unique feature is the ability to produce and study a microwave discharge plasma in the heated zone. This allows elevated temperature reactions to be studied in high concentrations of dissociated gases. Further, the system permits weight change measurements of specimens in the plasma, thus facilitating reaction rate determinations. Included is a description of a cavity for use on a 50-mm diameter cylindrical reactor. The effects of flow rate, pressure, temperature, power, metal sample, and sampling position on dissociation percentage of oxygen in the apparatus are described as well as a technique for sample temperature measurements in the plasma which permits determination of high temperature recombination coefficients and reaction rates.

  12. Product differentiation by analysis of DNA melting curves during the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ririe, K M; Rasmussen, R P; Wittwer, C T

    1997-02-15

    A microvolume fluorometer integrated with a thermal cycler was used to acquire DNA melting curves during polymerase chain reaction by fluorescence monitoring of the double-stranded DNA specific dye SYBR Green I. Plotting fluorescence as a function of temperature as the thermal cycler heats through the dissociation temperature of the product gives a DNA melting curve. The shape and position of this DNA melting curve are functions of the GC/AT ratio, length, and sequence and can be used to differentiate amplification products separated by less than 2 degrees C in melting temperature. Desired products can be distinguished from undesirable products, in many cases eliminating the need for gel electrophoresis. Analysis of melting curves can extend the dynamic range of initial template quantification when amplification is monitored with double-stranded DNA specific dyes. Complete amplification and analysis of products can be performed in less than 15 min.

  13. Prediction of bakery products nutritive value based on mathematical modeling of biochemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Ponomareva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Researches are devoted to identifying changes in the chemical composition of whole-grain wheat bread during baking and to forecasting of food value of bakery products by mathematical modeling of biochemical transformations. The received model represents the invariant composition, considering speed of biochemical reactions at a batch of bakery products, and allowing conduct virtual experiments to develop new types of bread for various categories of the population, including athletes. The offered way of modeling of biochemical transformations at a stage of heat treatment allows to predict food value of bakery products, without spending funds for raw materials and large volume of experiment that will provide possibility of economy of material resources at a stage of development of new types of bakery products and possibility of production efficiency increase.

  14. A kinetic and mechanistic study of the reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with 3,3,3-trifluoropropanol under atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Tanya; Bossoutrot, Valérie; Magneron, Isabelle; Wirtz, Klaus; Treacy, Jack; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Sidebottom, Howard; Le Bras, Georges

    2005-01-20

    Product distribution studies of the OH radical and Cl atom initiated oxidation of CF3CH2CH2OH in air at 1 atm and 298 +/- 5 K have been carried out in laboratory and outdoor atmospheric simulation chambers in the presence and absence of NOx. The results show that CF3CH2CHO is the only primary product and that the aldehyde is fairly rapidly removed from the system. In the absence of NOx the major degradation product of CF3CH2CHO is CF3CHO, and the combined yields of the two aldehydes formed from CF3CH2CH2OH are close to unity (0.95 +/- 0.05). In the presence of NOx small amounts of CF3CH2C(O)O2NO2 were also observed (<15%). At longer reaction times CF3CHO is removed from the system to give mainly CF2O. The laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique was used to determine values of k(OH + CF3CH2CH2OH) = (0.89 +/- 0.03) x 10(-12) and k(OH + CF3CH2CHO) = (2.96 +/- 0.04) x 10(-12) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1). A relative rate method has been employed to measure the rate coefficients k(OH + CF3CH2CH2OH) = (1.08 +/- 0.05) x 10(-12), k(OH + C6F13CH2CH2OH) = (0.79 +/- 0.08) x 10(-12), k(Cl + CF3CH2CH2OH) = (22.4 +/- 0.4) x 10(-12), and k(Cl + CF3CH2CHO) = (25.7 +/- 0.4) x 10(-12) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1). The results from this investigation are discussed in terms of the possible importance of emissions of fluorinated alcohols as a source of fluorinated carboxylic acids in the environment.

  15. The HNO3 forming branch of the HO2 + NO reaction: pre-industrial-to-present trends in atmospheric species and radiative forcings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. A. Isaksen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent laboratory measurements have shown the existence of a HNO3 forming branch of the HO2 + NO reaction. This reaction is the main source of tropospheric O3, through the subsequent photolysis of NO2, as well as being a major source of OH. The branching of the reaction to HNO3 reduces the formation of these species significantly, affecting O3 abundances, radiative forcing and the oxidation capacity of the troposphere. The Oslo CTM2, a three-dimensional chemistry transport model, is used to calculate atmospheric composition and trends with and without the new reaction branch. Results for the present day atmosphere, when both temperature and pressure effects on the branching ratio are accounted for, show an 11 % reduction in the calculated tropospheric burden of O3, with the main contribution from the tropics. An increase of the global, annual mean methane lifetime by 10.9 %, resulting from a 14.1 % reduction in the global, annual mean OH concentration is also found. Comparisons with measurements show that including the new branch improves the modelled O3 in the Oslo CTM2, but that it is not possible to conclude whether the NOy distribution improves. We model an approximately 11 % reduction in the tropical tropospheric O3 increase since pre-industrial times, and a 4 % reduction of the increase in total tropospheric burden. Also, an 8 % decrease in the trend of OH concentrations is calculated, when the new branch is accounted for. The radiative forcing due to changes in O3 over the industrial era was calculated as 0.33 W m−2, reducing to 0.26 W m−2 with the new reaction branch. These results are significant, and it is important that this reaction branching is confirmed by other laboratory groups.

  16. Limonene and its ozone-initiated reaction products attenuate allergic lung inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jitka S; Nørgaard, Asger W; Koponen, Ismo K; Sørli, Jorid B; Paidi, Maya D; Hansen, Søren W K; Clausen, Per Axel; Nielsen, Gunnar D; Wolkoff, Peder; Larsen, Søren Thor

    2016-11-01

    Inhalation of indoor air pollutants may cause airway irritation and inflammation and is suspected to worsen allergic reactions. Inflammation may be due to mucosal damage, upper (sensory) and lower (pulmonary) airway irritation due to activation of the trigeminal and vagal nerves, respectively, and to neurogenic inflammation. The terpene, d-limonene, is used as a fragrance in numerous consumer products. When limonene reacts with the pulmonary irritant ozone, a complex mixture of gas and particle phase products is formed, which causes sensory irritation. This study investigated whether limonene, ozone or the reaction mixture can exacerbate allergic lung inflammation and whether airway irritation is enhanced in allergic BALB/cJ mice. Naïve and allergic (ovalbumin sensitized) mice were exposed via inhalation for three consecutive days to clean air, ozone, limonene or an ozone-limonene reaction mixture. Sensory and pulmonary irritation was investigated in addition to ovalbumin-specific antibodies, inflammatory cells, total protein and surfactant protein D in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and hemeoxygenase-1 and cytokines in lung tissue. Overall, airway allergy was not exacerbated by any of the exposures. In contrast, it was found that limonene and the ozone-limonene reaction mixture reduced allergic inflammation possibly due to antioxidant properties. Ozone induced sensory irritation in both naïve and allergic mice. However, allergic but not naïve mice were protected from pulmonary irritation induced by ozone. This study showed that irritation responses might be modulated by airway allergy. However, aggravation of allergic symptoms was observed by neither exposure to ozone nor exposure to ozone-initiated limonene reaction products. In contrast, anti-inflammatory properties of the tested limonene-containing pollutants might attenuate airway allergy.

  17. Uses of alpha particles, especially in nuclear reaction studies and medical radionuclide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qaim, Syed M.; Spahn, Ingo; Scholten, Bernhard; Neumaier, Bernd [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Medizin (INM), Nuklearchemie (INM-5)

    2016-11-01

    Alpha particles exhibit three important characteristics: scattering, ionisation and activation. This article briefly discusses those properties and outlines their major applications. Among others, α-particles are used in elemental analysis, investigation and improvement of materials properties, nuclear reaction studies and medical radionuclide production. The latter two topics, dealing with activation of target materials, are treated in some detail in this paper. Measurements of excitation functions of α-particle induced reactions shed some light on their reaction mechanisms, and studies of isomeric cross sections reveal the probability of population of high-spin nuclear levels. Regarding medical radionuclides, an overview is presented of the isotopes commonly produced using α-particle beams. Consideration is also given to some routes which could be potentially useful for production of a few other radionuclides. The significance of α-particle induced reactions to produce a few high-spin isomeric states, decaying by emission of low-energy conversion or Auger electrons, which are of interest in localized internal radiotherapy, is outlined. The α-particle beam, thus broadens the scope of nuclear chemistry research related to development of non-standard positron emitters and therapeutic radionuclides.

  18. Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jerry Y.S. [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2013-01-29

    Gasification of biomass or heavy feedstock to produce hydrogen fuel gas using current technology is costly and energy-intensive. The technology includes water gas shift reaction in two or more reactor stages with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given catalyst volume. This project is focused on developing a membrane reactor for efficient conversion of water gas shift reaction to produce a hydrogen stream as a fuel and a carbon dioxide stream suitable for sequestration. The project was focused on synthesizing stable, hydrogen perm-selective MFI zeolite membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation; fabricating tubular MFI zeolite membrane reactor and stable water gas shift catalyst for membrane reactor applications, and identifying experimental conditions for water gas shift reaction in the zeolite membrane reactor that will produce a high purity hydrogen stream. The project has improved understanding of zeolite membrane synthesis, high temperature gas diffusion and separation mechanisms for zeolite membranes, synthesis and properties of sulfur resistant catalysts, fabrication and structure optimization of membrane supports, and fundamentals of coupling reaction with separation in zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction. Through the fundamental study, the research teams have developed MFI zeolite membranes with good perm-selectivity for hydrogen over carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water vapor, and high stability for operation in syngas mixture containing 500 part per million hydrogen sulfide at high temperatures around 500°C. The research teams also developed a sulfur resistant catalyst for water gas shift reaction. Modeling and experimental studies on the zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction have demonstrated the effective use of the zeolite membrane reactor for production of high purity hydrogen stream.

  19. Effect of Solvents on the Product Distribution and Reaction Rate of a Buchwald-Hartwig Amination Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2006-01-01

    The Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction between p-bromotoluene and piperazine in the presence of the homogeneous catalytic system Pd(dba)(2)/(+/-)-BINAP and the base NaO-t-Bu was investigated in two different classes of solvents: aprotic, nonpolar and aprotic, polar. The reaction was carried out...... solvent for the Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction under the conditions applied was m-xylene....

  20. Expansion of chemical space for natural products by uncommon P450 reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingwang; Li, Shengying

    2017-08-30

    Covering: 2000 to 2017Cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s) are the most versatile biocatalysts in nature. The catalytic competence of these extraordinary hemoproteins is broadly harnessed by numerous chemical defenders such as bacteria, fungi, and plants for the generation of diverse and complex natural products. Rather than the common tailoring reactions (e.g. hydroxylation and epoxidation) mediated by the majority of biosynthetic P450s, in this review, we will focus on the unusual P450 enzymes in relation to new chemistry, skeleton construction, and structure re-shaping via their own unique catalytic power or the intriguing protein-protein interactions between P450s and other proteins. These uncommon P450 reactions lead to a higher level of chemical space expansion for natural products, through which a broader spectrum of bioactivities can be gained by the host organisms.

  1. Entropy production of a steady-growth cell with catalytic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himeoka, Yusuke; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-10-01

    Cells generally convert external nutrient resources to support metabolism and growth. Understanding the thermodynamic efficiency of this conversion is essential to determine the general characteristics of cellular growth. Using a simple protocell model with catalytic reaction dynamics to synthesize the necessary enzyme and membrane components from nutrients, the entropy production per unit-cell-volume growth is calculated analytically and numerically based on the rate equation for chemical kinetics and linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The minimal entropy production per unit-cell growth is found to be achieved at a nonzero nutrient uptake rate rather than at a quasistatic limit as in the standard Carnot engine. This difference appears because the equilibration mediated by the enzyme exists only within cells that grow through enzyme and membrane synthesis. Optimal nutrient uptake is also confirmed by protocell models with many chemical components synthesized through a catalytic reaction network. The possible relevance of the identified optimal uptake to optimal yield for cellular growth is also discussed.

  2. Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Affects Ectomycorrhizal Species Abundance and Increases Sporocarp Production under Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas L. Godbold

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic activities during the last century have increased levels of atmospheric CO2. Forest net primary productivity increases in response to elevated CO2, altering the quantity and quality of carbon supplied to the rhizosphere. Ectomycorrhizal fungi form obligate symbiotic associations with the fine roots of trees that mediate improved scavenging for nutrients in exchange for a carbohydrate supply. Understanding how the community structure of ectomycorrhizal fungi is altered by climate change is important to further our understanding of ecosystem function. Betula pendula and Fagus sylvatica were grown in an elevated CO2 atmosphere delivered using free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE under field conditions in the U.K., and Picea abies was grown under elevated CO2 in glass domes in the Czech Republic. We used morphotyping and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region of the fungal ribosomal operon to study ectomycorrhizal community structure. Under FACE, un-colonised roots tips increased in abundance for Fagus sylvatica, and during 2006, sporocarp biomass of Peziza badia significantly increased. In domes, ectomycorrhizal community composition shifted from short-distance and smooth medium-distance to contact exploration types. Supply and competition for carbon belowground can influence ectomycorrhizal community structure with the potential to alter ecosystem function.

  3. Hadron Production for the Neutrino Factory and for the Atmospheric Neutrino Flux

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The HARP experiment carries out, at the CERN PS, a programme of measurements of secondary hadron production, over the full solid angle, produced on thin and thick nuclear targets by beams of protons and pions with momenta in the range 2 to 15~\\GeVc. The first aim of this experiment is to acquire adequate knowledge of pion yields for an optimal design of the proton driver of the Neutrino Factory. The second aim is to reduce substantially the existing $\\sim 30$\\% uncertainty in the calculation of absolute atmospheric neutrino fluxes and the $\\sim 7$\\% uncertainty in the ratio of neutrino flavours, required for a refined interpretation of the evidence for neutrino oscillation from the study of atmospheric neutrinos in present and forthcoming experiments. The HARP experiment comprises a large-acceptance charged-particle magnetic spectrometer of conventional design, located in the East Hall of the CERN PS and using the T9 tagged charged-particle beam. The main detector is a cylindrical TPC inside a solenoid magnet...

  4. Synergistic Effects of Turbine Wakes and Atmospheric Stability on Power Production at an Onshore Wind Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Marjanovic, N

    2012-01-25

    This report examines the complex interactions between atmospheric stability and turbine-induced wakes on downwind turbine wind speed and power production at a West Coast North American multi-MW wind farm. Wakes are generated when the upwind flow field is distorted by the mechanical movement of the wind turbine blades. This has two consequences for downwind turbines: (1) the downwind turbine encounters wind flows with reduced velocity and (2) the downwind turbine encounters increased turbulence across multiple length scales via mechanical turbulence production by the upwind turbine. This increase in turbulence on top of ambient levels may increase aerodynamic fatigue loads on the blades and reduce the lifetime of turbine component parts. Furthermore, ambient atmospheric conditions, including atmospheric stability, i.e., thermal stratification in the lower boundary layer, play an important role in wake dissipation. Higher levels of ambient turbulence (i.e., a convective or unstable boundary layer) lead to higher turbulent mixing in the wake and a faster recovery in the velocity flow field downwind of a turbine. Lower levels of ambient turbulence, as in a stable boundary layer, will lead to more persistent wakes. The wake of a wind turbine can be divided into two regions: the near wake and far wake, as illustrated in Figure 1. The near wake is formed when the turbine structure alters the shape of the flow field and usually persists one rotor diameter (D) downstream. The difference between the air inside and outside of the near wake results in a shear layer. This shear layer thickens as it moves downstream and forms turbulent eddies of multiple length scales. As the wake travels downstream, it expands depending on the level of ambient turbulence and meanders (i.e., travels in non-uniform path). Schepers estimates that the wake is fully expanded at a distance of 2.25 D and the far wake region begins at 2-5 D downstream. The actual distance traveled before the wake

  5. 40 CFR 721.10190 - Formaldehyde, polymer with aliphatic diamine and phenol, reaction products with 4-methyl-2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Formaldehyde, polymer with aliphatic... Formaldehyde, polymer with aliphatic diamine and phenol, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone (generic... identified generically as formaldehyde, polymer with aliphatic diamine and phenol, reaction products with 4...

  6. 40 CFR 721.5560 - Formaldehyde, polymer with (chloromethyl) oxirane and phenol, reaction products with 6H-dibenz[c...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Formaldehyde, polymer with... Formaldehyde, polymer with (chloromethyl) oxirane and phenol, reaction products with 6H-dibenz oxaphosphorin-6... identified as formaldehyde, polymer with (chloromethyl) oxirane and phenol, reaction products with 6H-dibenz...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10145 - Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... identified generically as modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified reaction products of alkyl....10145 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT...

  8. Measurement of reaction cross sections of fission products induced by DT neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Daisuke; Murata, Isao; Takahashi, Akito [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    With the view of future application of fusion reactor to incineration of fission products, we have measured the {sup 129}I(n,2n){sup 128}I reaction cross section by DT neutrons with the activation method. The measured cross section was compared with the evaluated nuclear data of JENDL-3.2. From the result, it was confirmed that the evaluation overestimated the cross section by about 20-40%. (author)

  9. Composite Si/C/N powder production by laser induced gas phase reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borsella, E.; Botti, S.; Fantoni, R.; Alexandrescu, R.; Morjan, I.; Popescu, C.; Dikonimos-Makris, T.; Giorgi, R.; Enzo, S.

    1991-08-01

    Ultrafine amorphous Si/C/N ternary powders were prepared in a CO/sub 2/ laser assisted process. This paper demonstrates the possibility of driving the C/N ratio the powder by properly choosing the experimental conditions and the gaseous reactant ratio in the initial mixture containing silane, dimethylamine and ammonia. A kinetic model which accounts for reaching the equilibrium between the gaseous reaction intermediates and the solid products is proposed.

  10. Effects of arsenic incorporation on jarosite dissolution rates and reaction products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Matthew R.; Madden, Andrew S.; Elwood Madden, Megan E.; Hu, Qinhong

    2013-07-01

    Batch dissolution experiments were undertaken on synthetic arsenojarosites at pH 2, pH 8, and in ultra-pure water to better understand the influence of As incorporation on the kinetics and reaction products of jarosite dissolution. Incongruent jarosite dissolution was observed in all experiments. Arsenojarosite lacks the pH dependency observed in K-jarosite dissolution, likely the result of surface arsenate-iron complexes preventing protonation at low pH and repelling hydroxyls at high pH. The stronger bonding of arsenate to iron, compared to sulfate to iron, leads to an enrichment of surface layer arsenate-iron complex sites, inhibiting the dissolution of jarosite with time. The secondary reaction products formed during the dissolution of arsenojarosite include maghemite, goethite, and hematite in ultra-pure water, and ferrihydrite in pH 8 Tris buffered solution. Maghemite initially forms and transitions to hematite with time in ultra-pure water, but increasing arsenic concentrations slow this transition. At pH >3.5, arsenic from the dissolution of arsenojarosite adsorbs onto newly formed reaction products. Arsenic also inhibits the formation of goethite and reduces the crystallinity of the observed maghemite reaction products. The coprecipitation of iron oxides with increasing amounts of arsenic results in a change from spherical to "worm-like" aggregate morphology and provides a sink for arsenic released during arsenojarosite dissolution. This study shows that in open systems with a flush of fresh solution, arsenic incorporation in jarosite results in an increase in dissolution rates. In closed systems, however, increasing surface arsenate-iron complexes inhibit further dissolution of the underlying bulk material, causing a reduction in dissolution rates as arsenic incorporation increases.

  11. Coupling of North Pacific Productivity, Beringian Precipitation, and Antarctic Bottom Water Formation: an Atmospheric Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caissie, B.; Wilkie, K. M. K.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in primary productivity in the North Pacific occur on a variety of timescales from seasonal to orbital. A prime indicator of this productivity is expressed as laminated intervals deposited simultaneously in intermediate-depth waters across the North Pacific and its marginal seas at Glacial Terminations. Debate continues regarding the mechanism that triggered this anoxia in the North Pacific. Some argue for a change in intermediate water ventilation, and others for simply an increase in primary productivity. While little evidence has been found for a change in ventilation of intermediate waters, primary productivity increased dramatically at Terminations. However, the cause of this primary productivity is currently unknown. Some have suggested increasing aeolian iron deposition, increasing nutrient input due to rising sea level, or changes in stratification. Here we show that although there is no change in intermediate water ventilation during laminated intervals, there is a significant change in the rate of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) Formation. We use new diatom records from the Bering Sea and previously published sediment records from the South Pacific and Lake El'gygytgyn, Russia to show that AABW formation is coupled with primary productivity in the North Pacific and terrestrial precipitation in Beringia. During three interglacials (MIS 1, MIS 5, and MIS 11), primary productivity, driven by increased upwelling, is high when AABW formation is high. This increased upwelling in turn increases the open water area of the Bering Sea, pushes sea ice farther north and increases moisture supply to the Beringian continent. At peak interglacials, productivity in the North Pacific and Beringian temperatures decrease simultaneously with a decrease in AABW formation. We attribute these changes to large-scale atmospheric climate modes linking changes in the strength and position of the Aleutian Low to upwelling of nutrient-rich waters in the North Pacific and Bering

  12. Vocal tract resonances in oscine bird sound production: evidence from birdsongs in a helium atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, S

    The complexity and dependence on learning of many bird sounds have suggested parallels between birdsong and human speech, but the mechanisms by which each is produced have been supposed to differ markedly. In human speech, resonances of the vocal tract are thought to modulate in complex ways the sound produced by vibration of the vocal folds. The current theory of birdsong production holds that all variation in sound quality arises from the primary sound-producing organ, the syrinx, and that resonances of the vocal tract play no part. Here I present evidence, obtained from acoustic analyses of birdsongs recorded in a helium atmosphere, which contradicts this hypothesis. Not only does the songbird's vocal tract act as an acoustic filter, but its filter characteristics are actively coordinated with the output of the syrinx. Songbird and human phonation are thus more analogous than previously thought, in that both require coordination of an array of diverse motor systems.

  13. Magnitude of fission product depositions from atmospheric nuclear weapon test fallout in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Philippe; Louvat, Didier

    2004-04-01

    The external dose attributable to fallout from worldwide atmospheric nuclear testing, which represents about 40% of the total effective dose received before 2000, is dominated by specific fission products such as 95Zr, 104Ba, 106Ru, 103Ru, and 144Ce, which are far less well-documented than 90Sr and 137Cs. The depositions of these nuclides over France were calculated on the basis of activity measurements in air and rainwater samples collected from 1961 to 1977. These depositions were then compared to the same radionuclides activities measured in grass during that period. This study shows that the transfer and deposition processes occur in a very similar manner for all the studied radionuclides. Depositions calculated in this study, consistent in most cases with UNSCEAR estimates, constitute a good basis for the external dose assessment of nuclear weapon test fallout over Western Europe.

  14. Polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR for large-scale enzymatic production of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Wang

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNAs or their mRNA targets prove to be powerful tools for molecular biology research and may eventually emerge as new therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides are often contaminated with highly homologous failure sequences. Synthesis of a certain oligonucleotide is difficult to scale up because it requires expensive equipment, hazardous chemicals and a tedious purification process. Here we report a novel thermocyclic reaction, polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR, for the amplification of oligonucleotides. A target oligonucleotide and a tandem repeated antisense probe are subjected to repeated cycles of denaturing, annealing, elongation and cleaving, in which thermostable DNA polymerase elongation and strand slipping generate duplex tandem repeats, and thermostable endonuclease (PspGI cleavage releases monomeric duplex oligonucleotides. Each round of PEAR achieves over 100-fold amplification. The product can be used in one more round of PEAR directly, and the process can be further repeated. In addition to avoiding dangerous materials and improved product purity, this reaction is easy to scale up and amenable to full automation. PEAR has the potential to be a useful tool for large-scale production of antisense oligonucleotide drugs.

  15. Crystal structure of an EAL domain in complex with reaction product 5'-pGpG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Robert-Paganin

    Full Text Available FimX is a large multidomain protein containing an EAL domain and involved in twitching motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present here two crystallographic structures of the EAL domain of FimX (residues 438-686: one of the apo form and the other of a complex with 5'-pGpG, the reaction product of the hydrolysis of c-di-GMP. In both crystal forms, the EAL domains form a dimer delimiting a large cavity encompassing the catalytic pockets. The ligand is trapped in this cavity by its sugar phosphate moiety. We confirmed by NMR that the guanine bases are not involved in the interaction in solution. We solved here the first structure of an EAL domain bound to the reaction product 5'-pGpG. Though isolated FimX EAL domain has a very low catalytic activity, which would not be significant compared to other catalytic EAL domains, the structure with the product of the reaction can provides some hints in the mechanism of hydrolysis of the c-di-GMP by EAL domains.

  16. Production of noble gas isotopes by proton-induced reactions on lead and bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leya, I.; Wieler, R.; David, J.-C.; Leray, S.; Donadille, L.; Cugnon, J.; Michel, R.

    2006-06-01

    We measured integral thin target cross-sections for the proton-induced production of He-, Ne-, Ar-, Kr-, and Xe-isotopes from lead and bismuth from the respective reaction threshold up to 2.6 GeV. The production of noble gas isotopes from lead and bismuth is of special importance for design studies of accelerator driven nuclear reactors and/or energy amplifiers. For all experiments with proton energies above 200 MeV a new mini-stack approach was used instead of the stacked-foil technique in order to minimise influences of secondary particles. The phenomenology of the determined excitation functions enables us to distinguish between the different reaction modes fragmentation, hot and cold symmetric fission, asymmetric fission, and deep spallation. For lead more than 420 cross-sections for 23 nuclear reactions have been measured. While the lead data have already been published, here we present first results for the production of noble gas isotopes from bismuth. The experimental data are compared to results from the theoretical nuclear model code INCL4/ABLA. This comparison clearly indicates that experimental data are still needed because the predictive power of nuclear model codes, though permanently improving, does still not allow to reliably predict the cross-sections needed for most applications and irradiation experiments remain indispensable.

  17. Production of TEMPO by O atoms in atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma–liquid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elg, Daniel T.; Yang, I.-Wei; Graves, David B.

    2017-11-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas enable plasma treatment of surfaces without requiring a low-pressure environment. These plasmas are currently of interest for, among other things, their biomedical applications, many of which are enabled by production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). Plasma–liquid interactions are especially important due to the high amounts of water in biological materials. However, the chemistries of these plasmas are very complex and are not well-understood. One method to quantify plasma–liquid interactions is to dissolve a reactant into the liquid which, when exposed to plasma-created RONS, forms a measurable product. In particular, the oxidation of the spin trap TEMP to TEMPO has been used to track trends in reactive oxygen species. However, the effect of individual species on TEMP has not previously been determined. This paper differentiates the oxidation of TEMP due to various oxygen species produced by a He plasma jet operating in a controllable environment. Oxidation of TEMP is mainly to O atoms, with small or negligible contributions from other species. Thus, the TEMPO yield will also be used to illuminate trends in O atom production.

  18. Syngas production from tar reforming by microwave plasma jet at atmospheric pressure: power supplied influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Medeiros, Henrique; Justiniano, Lucas S.; Gomes, Marcelo P.; Soares da Silva Sobrinho, Argemiro; Petraconi Filho, Gilberto

    2013-09-01

    Now a day, scientific community is searching for new fuels able to replace fossil fuels with economic and environment gains and biofuel play a relevant rule, mainly for the transport sector. A major process to obtaining such type of renewable resource is biomass gasification. This process has as product a gas mixture containing CO, CH4, and H2 which is named synthesis gas (syngas). However, an undesirable high molecular organic species denominated tar are also produced in this process which must be removed. In this work, results of syngas production via tar reforming in the atmospheric pressure microwave discharge having as parameter the power supply. Argon, (argon + ethanol), and (argon + tar solution) plasma jet were produced by different values of power supplied (from 0.5 KW to 1.5 KW). The plasma compounds were investigated by optical spectroscopy to each power and gas composition. The main species observed in the spectrum are Ar, CN, OII, OIV, OH, H2, H(beta), CO2, CO, and SIII. This last one came from tar. The best value of the power applied to syngas production from tar reforming was verified between 1.0 KW and 1.2 KW. We thank the following institutions for financial support: CNPq, CAPES, and FAPESP.

  19. Production of Energetic Active-Oxygen Species at Atmospheric Pressure by Linear Microplasma Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, Wilson; Galbally-Kinney, Kristin; Davis, Steven; Hoskinson, Alan; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    Linear arrays of stripline resonators operated at microwave frequencies and low powers provide spatially and temporally continuous micro-discharges with high E/N at atmospheric pressure. When implemented in a discharge-flow reactor, these microplasmas excite metastable singlet molecular oxygen and dissociate oxygen molecules to produce atomic oxygen, with efficiencies comparable to conventional microwave resonant cavities at low pressures. At elevated pressure, production of atomic oxygen leads to prompt formation of ozone immediately downstream of the discharge exit. We have observed and quantified the production of O2(a 1 Δ) metastables and O3 in the effluent of linear microplasma arrays for O2/He, O2/Ar, O2/N2/He,andO2/N2/Ar mixtures as functions of pressure, gas flow rate, and species mixing ratio. We compare results for single-array microplasmas, where the discharge products are formed in a small volume and entrained into the bulk flow, and overlapping dual-array microplasmas which process larger gas flow volumes. Supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory and Department of Energy.

  20. The direct oxidative diene cyclization and related reactions in natural product synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The direct oxidative cyclization of 1,5-dienes is a valuable synthetic method for the (diastereoselective preparation of substituted tetrahydrofurans. Closely related reactions start from 5,6-dihydroxy or 5-hydroxyalkenes to generate similar products in a mechanistically analogous manner. After a brief overview on the history of this group of transformations and a survey on mechanistic and stereochemical aspects, this review article provides a summary on applications in natural product synthesis. Moreover, current limitations and future directions in this area of chemistry are discussed.

  1. Biodiesel Fuel Production by the Transesterification Reaction of Soybean Oil Using Immobilized Lipase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Otávio L.; Bevilaqua, Juliana V.; Leal, Márcia C. M. R.; Freire, Denise M. G.; Langone, Marta A. P.

    The enzymatic alcoholysis of soybean oil with methanol and ethanol was investigated using a commercial, immobilized lipase (Lipozyme RM IM). The effect of alcohol (methanol or ethanol), enzyme concentration, molar ratio of alcohol to soybean oil, solvent, and temperature on biodiesel production was determined. The best conditions were obtained in a solvent-free system with ethanol/oil molar ratio of 3.0, temperature of 50°C, and enzyme concentration of 7.0% (w/w). Three-step batch ethanolysis was most effective for the production of biodiesel. Ethyl esters yield was about 60% after 4 h of reaction.

  2. Production of noble gas isotopes by proton-induced reactions on lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leya, I.; Wieler, R.; David, J.-C.; Leray, S.; Donadille, L.; Cugnon, J.; Michel, R.

    2005-02-01

    We measured integral thin target cross sections for the proton-induced production of He-, Ne-, Ar-, Kr- and Xe-isotopes from lead from the respective reaction threshold up to 2.6 GeV. The production of noble gas isotopes from lead is of special importance for design studies of accelerator driven nuclear reactors and/or energy amplifiers. For all experiments with proton energies above 200 MeV a new mini-stack approach was used instead of the stacked-foil technique in order to minimise the influences of secondary particles on the residual nuclide production. About 420 cross sections for 23 nuclear reactions were determined. The phenomenology of the determined excitation functions enables us to distinguish between the different reaction modes fragmentation, hot and cold symmetric fission, asymmetric fission and deep spallation. Cross sections for the production of 21Ne and 38Ar measured below 100 MeV and 200 MeV, respectively, enable us to study nuclide production below the nominal Coulomb-barrier. The experimental data are compared to results from the theoretical nuclear model code INCL4/ABLA. While the model describes the production of 4He reasonably well, it underestimates the cross sections for Ne- and Ar-isotopes produced via deep spallation and/or multifragmentation by up to two orders of magnitude. For the Kr- and Xe-isotopes the agreement between modelled and measured data strongly depends on the reaction mechanisms. While INCL4/ABLA describes the production of n-poor Kr-isotopes via hot-symmetric fission and the production of Xe-isotopes via asymmetric fission reasonably well, i.e. within a factor of 2, the discrepancies between modelled and measured cross sections for the n-rich Kr-isotopes produced via cold symmetric fission are significantly larger. For the Xe-isotopes produced via spallation, i.e. at energies higher than about 600 MeV, the model completely fails to describe the experimental data. Therefore, the comparison of measured and modelled thin

  3. Combustion products of plastics as indicators for refuse burning in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneit, Bernd R T; Medeiros, Patricia M; Didyk, Borys M

    2005-09-15

    Despite all of the economic problems and environmental discussions on the dangers and hazards of plastic materials, plastic production worldwide is growing at a rate of about 5% per year. Increasing techniques for recycling polymeric materials have been developed during the last few years; however, a large fraction of plastics are still being discarded in landfills or subjected to intentional or incidental open-fire burning. To identify specific tracer compounds generated during such open-fire combustion, both smoke particles from burning and plastic materials from shopping bags, roadside trash, and landfill garbage were extracted for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Samples were collected in Concón, Chile, an area frequently affected by wildfire incidents and garbage burning, and the United States for comparison. Atmospheric samples from various aerosol sampling programs are also presented as supportive data. The major components of plastic extracts were even-carbon-chain n-alkanes (C16-C40), the plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, and the antioxidants and lubricants/antiadhesives Irganox 1076, Irgafos 168, and its oxidation product tris(2,4-di-tertbutylphenyl) phosphate. Major compounds in smoke from burning plastics include the non-source-specific n-alkanes (mainly even predominance), terephthalic acid, phthalates, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, with minor amounts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (including triphenylbenzenes) and tris(2,4-di-tert-butylphenyl)phosphate. 1,3,5-Triphenylbenzene and tris(2,4-di-tert-butylphenyl)- phosphate were found in detectable amounts in atmospheric samples where plastics and refuse were burned in open fires, and thus we propose these two compounds as specific tracers for the open-burning of plastics.

  4. Production of stable, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive plasmas using gases other than helium or neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeyoung; Henins, Ivars

    2005-06-21

    The present invention enables the production of stable, steady state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive .alpha.-mode plasmas using gases other than helium and neon. In particular, the current invention generates and maintains stable, steady-state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas using pure argon or argon with reactive gas mixtures, pure oxygen or air. By replacing rare and expensive helium with more readily available gases, this invention makes it more economical to use atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas for various materials processing applications.

  5. Gas-phase reactivity of peptide thiyl (RS•), perthiyl (RSS•), and sulfinyl (RSO•) radical ions formed from atmospheric pressure ion/radical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lei; Xia, Yu

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the formation of gas-phase peptide perthiyl (RSS•) and thiyl (RS•) radical ions besides sulfinyl radical (RSO•) ions from atmospheric pressure (AP) ion/radical reactions of peptides containing inter-chain disulfide bonds. The identity of perthiyl radical was verified from characteristic 65 Da (•SSH) loss in collision-induced dissociation (CID). This signature loss was further used to assess the purity of peptide perthiyl radical ions formed from AP ion/radical reactions. Ion/molecule reactions combined with CID were carried out to confirm the formation of thiyl radical. Transmission mode ion/molecule reactions in collision cell (q2) were developed as a fast means to estimate the population of peptide thiyl radical ions. The reactivity of peptide thiyl, perthiyl, and sulfinyl radical ions was evaluated based on ion/molecule reactions toward organic disulfides, allyl iodide, organic thiol, and oxygen, which followed in order of thiyl (RS•) > perthiyl (RSS•) > sulfinyl (RSO•). The gas-phase reactivity of these three types of sulfur-based radicals is consistent with literature reports from solution studies.

  6. Dark hydrogen production in nitrogen atmosphere - An approach for sustainability by marine cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya valderiana BDU 20041

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabaharan, D.; Arun Kumar, D.; Uma, L.; Subramanian, G. [National Facility for Marine Cyanobacteria (Sponsored by DBT, Govt. of India), Department of Marine Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirapalli 620 024 (India)

    2010-10-15

    Biological hydrogen production is an ideal system for three main reasons i) forms a renewable energy source, ii) gives clean fuel and iii) serves as a good supplement to oil reserves. The major challenges faced in biological hydrogen production are the presence of uptake hydrogenase and lack of sustainability in the cyanobacterial hydrogen production system. Three different marine cyanobacterial species viz. Leptolyngbya valderiana BDU 20041, Dichothrix baueriana BDU 40481 and Nostoc calcicola BDU 40302 were studied for their potential use in hydrogen production. Among these, L. valderiana BDU 20041, was found to produce hydrogen even in 100% nitrogen atmosphere which was 85% of the hydrogen produced in argon atmosphere. This is the first report of such a high rate of production of hydrogen in a nitrogen atmosphere by a cyanobacterium, which makes it possible to develop sustained hydrogen production systems. L. valderiana BDU 20041, a dark hydrogen producer uses the reductant essentially supplied by the respiratory pathway for hydrogen production. Using inhibitors, this organism was found to produce hydrogen due to the activities of both nitrogenase and bidirectional hydrogenase, while it had no 'uptake' hydrogenase activity. The other two organisms though had low levels of bidirectional hydrogenase, possessed considerable 'uptake' hydrogenase activity and hence could not release much hydrogen either in argon or nitrogen atmosphere. (author)

  7. Inferring ozone production in an urban atmosphere using measurements of peroxynitric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Spencer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Observations of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2 obtained simultaneously with those of NO and NO2 provide a sensitive measure of the ozone photochemical production rate. We illustrate this technique for constraining the ozone production rate with observations obtained from the NCAR C-130 aircraft platform during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO intensive in Mexico during the spring of 2006. Sensitive and selective measurements of HO2NO2 were made in situ using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS. Observations were compared to modeled HO2NO2 concentrations obtained from the NASA Langley highly-constrained photochemical time-dependent box model. The median observed-to-calculated ratio of HO2NO2 is 1.18. At NOx levels greater than 15 ppbv, the photochemical box model underpredicts observations with an observed-to-calculated ratio of HO2NO2 of 1.57. As a result, we find that at high NOx, the ozone production rate calculated using measured HO2NO2 is faster than predicted using accepted photochemistry. Inclusion of an additional HOx source from the reaction of excited state NO2 with H2O or reduction in the rate constant of the reaction of OH with NO2 improves the agreement.

  8. Gas-Solid Reaction Route toward the Production of Intermetallics from Their Corresponding Oxide Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Ahmed

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Near-net shape forming of metallic components from metallic powders produced in situ from reduction of corresponding pure metal oxides has not been explored to a large extent. Such a process can be probably termed in short as the “Reduction-Sintering” process. This methodology can be especially effective in producing components containing refractory metals. Additionally, in situ production of metallic powder from complex oxides containing more than one metallic element may result in in situ alloying during reduction, possibly at lower temperatures. With this motivation, in situ reduction of complex oxides mixtures containing more than one metallic element has been investigated intensively over a period of years in the department of materials science, KTH, Sweden. This review highlights the most important features of that investigation. The investigation includes not only synthesis of intermetallics and refractory metals using the gas solid reaction route but also study the reaction kinetics and mechanism. Environmentally friendly gases like H2, CH4 and N2 were used for simultaneous reduction, carburization and nitridation, respectively. Different techniques have been utilized. A thermogravimetric analyzer was used to accurately control the process conditions and obtain reaction kinetics. The fluidized bed technique has been utilized to study the possibility of bulk production of intermetallics compared to milligrams in TGA. Carburization and nitridation of nascent formed intermetallics were successfully carried out. A novel method based on material thermal property was explored to track the reaction progress and estimate the reaction kinetics. This method implies the dynamic measure of thermal diffusivity using laser flash method. These efforts end up with a successful preparation of nanograined intermetallics like Fe-Mo and Ni-W. In addition, it ends up with simultaneous reduction and synthesis of Ni-WN and Ni-WC from their oxide mixtures

  9. Atmospheric chemistry of HFC-134a. Kinetic and mechanistic study of the CF3CFHO2 + NO2 reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelberg, T.E.; Nielsen, O.J.; Sehested, J.

    1994-01-01

    A pulse radiolysis system was used to study the kinetics of the reaction of CF3CFHO2 with NO2. By monitoring the rate of the decay of NO2 using its absorption at 400 nm the reaction rate constant was determined to be k = (5.0 +/- 0.5) x 10(-12) cm3 molecule-1 s-1. A long path length Fourier...

  10. The impact of energy production on the atmosphere: Laboratory and field studies of emissions from oil and gas production and their chemical transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui

    Over the past decades, the rapid development of energy production in the U.S. has led to significant changes in atmospheric emissions and transformation of trace gas and particles, which are still very uncertain and poorly understood. Through laboratory, modeling and field experiments we hope to better understand the trace gas emission and their contribution to secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formation in the oil and natural gas (O&NG) operations. A fast time-response Oxidation Flow Reactor (OFR) is used for the study of SOA formation from oil vapors. The radical chemistry and quantification of OH exposure (OHexp) in the reactor under various conditions were investigated using a photochemical kinetic model. An OHexp estimation equation derived from the model was shown to agree with measurements in several field campaigns. This work further establishes the usefulness of such reactors in atmospheric studies. Motivated from the SOA observations of Gulf of Mexico oil spill, the SOA formation from organic compounds of different volatility in the oil vapors was studied in the laboratory using OFR. We use the evaporation time dependence on volatility of the precursors to quantify their contribution to total SOA formation. This study shows (1) organic compounds of intermediate volatility contribute the large majority of SOA mass formed, (2) the mass spectral signature of SOA shows good agreement with that of ambient SOA formed during oil spill. These results in O&NG operations, the air toxic hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) can be released at wellheads, separation and storage tanks. Here, quantitative, fast time-response measurements of H2S using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass-Spectrometry (PTR-MS) instruments in an O&NG field are presented. A laboratory calibration study was performed to measure the humidity dependent sensitivities of H2S. The close correlation between H2S and CH4 and significant H2S levels downwind of storage tanks suggest that H2S emissions associated with O

  11. Carbon Dioxide Utilization by the Five-Membered Ring Products of Cyclometalation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omae, Iwao

    2016-04-01

    In carbon dioxide utilization by cyclometalated five-membered ring products, the following compounds are used in four types of applications: 1. 2-Phenylpyrazole iridium compounds, pincer phosphine iridium compounds and 2-phenylimidazoline iridium compounds are used as catalysts for both formic acid production from CO 2 and H 2 , and hydrogen production from the formic acid. This formic acid can be a useful agent for H 2 production and storage for fuel cell electric vehicles. 2. Other chemicals, e.g. , dimethyl carbonate, methane, methanol and CO, are produced with dimethylaminomethylphenyltin compounds, pincer phosphine iridium compounds, pincer phosphine nickel compound and ruthenium carbene compound or 2-phenylpyridine iridium compounds, and phenylbenzothiazole iridium compounds as the catalysts for the reactions with CO 2 . 3. The five-membered ring intermediates of cyclometalation reactions with the conventional substrates react with carbon dioxide to afford their many types of carboxylic acid derivatives. 4. Carbon dioxide is easily immobilized at room temperature with immobilizing agents such as pincer phosphine nickel compounds, pincer phosphine palladium compounds, pincer N , N -dimethylaminomethyltin compounds and tris(2-pyridylthio)methane zinc compounds.

  12. Microbial production of metabolites and associated enzymatic reactions under high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yongsheng; Jiang, Hua

    2016-11-01

    High environmental pressure exerts an external stress on the survival of microorganisms that are commonly found under normal pressure. In response, many growth traits alter, including cell morphology and physiology, cellular structure, metabolism, physical and chemical properties, the reproductive process, and defense mechanisms. The high-pressure technology (HP) has been industrially utilized in pressurized sterilization, synthesis of stress-induced products, and microbial/enzymatic transformation of chemicals. This article reviews current research on pressure-induced production of metabolites in normal-pressure microbes and their enzymatic reactions. Factors that affect the production of such metabolites are summarized, as well as the effect of pressure on the performance of microbial fermentation and the yield of flavoring compounds, different categories of induced enzymatic reactions and their characteristics in the supercritical carbon dioxide fluid, effects on enzyme activity, and the selection of desirable bacterial strains. Technological challenges are discussed, and future research directions are proposed. Information presented here will benefit the research, development, and application of the HP technology to improve microbial fermentation and enzymatic production of biologically active substances, thereby help to meet their increasing demand from the ever-expanding market.

  13. ASR prevention — Effect of aluminum and lithium ions on the reaction products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemann, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.leemann@empa.ch [Laboratory for Concrete/Construction Chemistry, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Bernard, Laetitia [Laboratory for Nanoscale Materials Science, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Alahrache, Salaheddine; Winnefeld, Frank [Laboratory for Concrete/Construction Chemistry, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of the recent progress in the understanding of the mechanisms enabling aluminum-containing SCM like metakaolin and added LiNO{sub 3} to limit the extent of ASR in mortar and concrete, some gaps still remain. They concern mainly the effect of aluminum-containing SCM on the formed ASR products and the influence of aggregate characteristics on the effectiveness of LiNO{sub 3}. In this study, a model system, concrete and mortar were investigated by pore solution analysis, TGA, XRD, NMR, SEM combined with EDX and ToF-SIMS to address these questions. The amount of aluminum present in the pore solution of concrete and mortar is only able to slow down SiO{sub 2} dissolution but not to alter morphology, structure and composition of the reaction products. LiNO{sub 3} can suppress ASR by forming dense products protecting reactive minerals from further reaction. But its effectiveness is decreasing with increasing specific surface area of the reactive minerals in aggregates. - Highlights: • Aluminum of SCM slows down SiO{sub 2} dissolution. • Aluminum of SCM does not alter morphology and structure of ASR product. • ASR suppressing effect of LiNO{sub 3} depends on specific surface area of the aggregates.

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Study on the OH-Reaction Kinetics and Photochemistry of Acetyl Fluoride (CH3C(O)F), an Atmospheric Degradation Intermediate of HFC-161 (C2H5F).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xinli; Zügner, Gábor L; Farkas, Mária; Illés, Ádám; Sarzyński, Dariusz; Rozgonyi, Tamás; Wang, Baoshan; Dóbé, Sándor

    2015-07-16

    The direct reaction kinetic method of low pressure fast discharge flow (DF) with resonance fluorescence monitoring of OH (RF) has been applied to determine rate coefficients for the overall reactions OH + C2H5F (EtF) (1) and OH + CH3C(O)F (AcF) (2). Acetyl fluoride reacts slowly with the hydroxyl radical, the rate coefficient at laboratory temperature is k2(300 K) = (0.74 ± 0.05) × 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (given with 2σ statistical uncertainty). The temperature dependence of the reaction does not obey the Arrhenius law and it is described well by the two-exponential rate expression of k2(300-410 K) = 3.60 × 10(-3) exp(-10500/T) + 1.56 × 10(-13) exp(-910/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The rate coefficient of k1 = (1.90 ± 0.19) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) has been determined for the EtF-reaction at room temperature (T = 298 K). Microscopic mechanisms for the OH + CH3C(O)F reaction have also been studied theoretically using the ab initio CBS-QB3 and G4 methods. Variational transition state theory was employed to obtain rate coefficients for the OH + CH3C(O)F reaction as a function of temperature on the basis of the ab initio data. The calculated rate coefficients are in good agreement with the experimental data. It is revealed that the reaction takes place predominantly via the indirect H-abstraction mechanism involving H-bonded prereactive complexes and forming the nascent products of H2O and the CH2CFO radical. The non-Arrhenius behavior of the rate coefficient at temperatures below 500 K is ascribed to the significant tunneling effect of the in-the-plane H-abstraction dynamic bottleneck. The production of FC(O)OH + CH3 via the addition/elimination mechanism is hardly competitive due to the significant barriers along the reaction routes. Photochemical experiments of AcF were performed at 248 nm by using exciplex lasers. The total photodissociation quantum yield for CH3C(O)F has been found significantly less than unity; among the primary

  15. Inhibition of enzymatic browning in actual food systems by the Maillard reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogol, Burçe Ataç; Yildirim, Asli; Gökmen, Vural

    2010-12-01

    The Maillard reaction occurring between amino acids and sugars produces neo-formed compounds having certain levels of antioxidant activity depending on the reaction conditions and the type of reactants. The objective of this study was to investigate enzymatic browning inhibition capacity of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) formed from different amino acids including arginine (Arg), histidine (His), lysine (Lys) and proline (Pro). The inhibitory effects of the MRPs on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) were determined. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of MRPs derived from different amino acids were in the order Arg > His > Lys > Pro. The TAC and PPO inhibition of MRPs were evaluated as a function of temperature (80-120 °C), time (1-6 h) and pH (2-12). Arg-Glc and His-Glc MRPs exhibited strong TAC and PPO inhibition. Increasing temperature (up to 100 °C) and time also increased TAC and PPO inhibition. Kinetics analysis indicated a mixed type inhibition of PPO by MRPs. The results indicate that the MRPs derived from Arg and His under certain reaction conditions significantly prevent enzymatic browning in actual food systems. The intermediate compounds capable of preventing enzymatic browning are reductones and dehydroreductones, as confirmed by liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Unique Pattern of Protein-Bound Maillard Reaction Products in Manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) Honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Michael; Rückriemen, Jana; Sandner, Daniel; Henle, Thomas

    2017-05-03

    As a unique feature, honey from the New Zealand manuka tree (Leptospermum scoparium) contains substantial amounts of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) and methylglyoxal (MGO). Although MGO is a reactive intermediate in the Maillard reaction, very little is known about reactions of MGO with honey proteins. We hypothesized that the abundance of MGO should result in a particular pattern of protein-bound Maillard reaction products (MRPs) in manuka honey. A protein-rich high-molecular-weight fraction was isolated from 12 manuka and 8 non-manuka honeys and hydrolyzed enzymatically. By HPLC-MS/MS, 8 MRPs, namely, N-ε-fructosyllysine, N-ε-maltulosyllysine, carboxymethyllysine, carboxyethyllysine (CEL), pyrraline, formyline, maltosine, and methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 (MG-H1), were quantitated. Compared to non-manuka honeys, the manuka honeys were characterized by high concentrations of CEL and MG-H1, whereas the formation of N-ε-fructosyllysine was suppressed, indicating concurrence reactions of glucose and MGO at the ε-amino group of protein-bound lysine. Up to 31% of the lysine and 8% of the arginine residues, respectively, in the manuka honey protein can be modified to CEL and MG-H1, respectively. CEL and MG-H1 concentrations correlated strongly with the MGO concentration of the honeys. Manuka honey possesses a special pattern of protein-bound MRPs, which might be used to prove the reliability of labeled MGO levels in honeys and possibly enable the detection of fraudulent MGO or DHA addition to honey.

  17. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Tyler C; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L

    2015-06-23

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO₂ from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin.

  18. Measurement of the Residual Gases O2 and CO2 in Meat Products Packed in Modified Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Čapla

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, consumers have increased demand for quality and food safety and also rising demand for natural foods without chemical additives. There are many ways to presserve freshness of these products, one of them is modified atmosphere packaging, which can mean elimination and/or replacement surrounding the product before closing it in package with a mixture of gases other than the original ambient air atmosphere. for replacement of atmosphere are generally used three types of gases such as carbon dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen. this type of packaging is often used for meat and meat products, which belongs to foods that are under normal conditions perishable and for increasing the shelf life of meat products are also used various other preservation methods or their combinations. Packaging of meat and meat products in modified atmosphere is usually made with a high content of carbon dioxide, which has good bacteriostatic and fungistatic effect and is also an effective mean for increasing the shelf life of packaged products during storage and sale.

  19. Study of the corrosion products formed on carbon steels in the tropical atmosphere of Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaén, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction (in selected samples have been used to characterize corrosion products on carbon steels after atmospheric exposure to the tropical Panamanian locations of Panama and Colon, classified according to ISO 9223 as C3 and C5, respectively. Goethite (α-FeOOH of intermediate particle size (20-100 nm, lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH, a spinel phase consisting of non-stoichiometric magnetite (Fe3-xO4 and/or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3 and nano-sized particles were identified in the corrosion products. The spinel phase is related to short term atmospheric exposure transforms in time to other corrosion products. The corrosion resistance increased with fraction of goethite following a saturation-type behavior.

    Se caracterizaron los productos de corrosión de aceros al carbono expuestos a las atmósferas tropicales panameñas localizadas en Panamá y Colón, mediante el uso de la espectroscopia Mössbauer y difracción de rayos-X (en muestras seleccionadas. Las atmósferas se clasifican como C3 y C5, respectivamente, de acuerdo a la norma ISO 9223. Se lograron identificar los compuestos goethita (α-FeOOH de tamaño de partícula intermedio (20-100 nm, lepidocrocita (γ-FeOOH, una fase de espinela consistente en magnetita no estequiométrica (Fe3-xO4 y/o maghemita (γ-Fe2O3, y nanopartículas. La fase de espinela se puede correlacionar con exposiciones cortas a la atmósfera, transformándose en el tiempo en otros productos de corrosión. La resistencia a la corrosión se incrementa con la cantidad de goethita siguiendo una conducta de saturación.

  20. Size and asymmetry of the reaction entrance channel: Influence on the probability of neck production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, P. M.; Vannini, G.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Colonna, N.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Gramegna, F.; Iori, I.; Maiolino, C.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Mastinu, P. F.; Migneco, E.; Moroni, A.; Piattelli, P.; Rui, R.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.

    2005-06-01

    The results of experiments performed to investigate the Ni + Al, Ni + Ni, Ni + Ag reactions at 30 MeV / nucleon are presented. From the study of dissipative midperipheral collisions, it has been possible to detect events in which intermediate mass fragments (IMF) production takes place. The decay of a quasi-projectile has been identified; its excitation energy leads to a multifragmentation totally described in terms of a statistical disassembly of a thermalized system ( T≃4 MeV, E≃4 MeV/nucleon). Moreover, for the systems Ni + Ni, Ni + Ag, in the same nuclear reaction, a source with velocity intermediate between that of the quasi-projectile and that of the quasi-target, emitting IMF, is observed. The fragments produced by this source are more neutron rich than the average matter of the overall system, and have a charge distribution different, with respect to those statistically emitted from the quasi-projectile. The above features can be considered as a signature of the dynamical origin of the midvelocity emission. The results of this analysis show that IMF can be produced via different mechanisms simultaneously present within the same collision. Moreover, once fixed the characteristics of the quasi-projectile in the three considered reactions (in size, excitation energy and temperature), one observes that the probability of a partner IMF production via dynamical mechanism has a threshold (not present in the Ni + Al case) and increases with the size of the target nucleus.

  1. Eta Production At Threshold In The Reaction, Pions On Protons Going To Eta And Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, T W

    2000-01-01

    The eta meson production thresholds in the reactions p- p→h and K- p→Lh are close to the mass of the S11(N*(1535)) and S01 (Λ*(1670)) resonances, respectively. Both of these resonances have an unexpectedly large branching ratio into the eta channel despite a large handicap in the phase space. Data with low uncertainties, particularly angular distributions, for these reactions are needed to assist in understanding the role of these resonances near the eta threshold. A factor of four discrepancy exists in the present determination of the hN scattering length, and the hL scattering is unknown due to a lack of data with small uncertainties near the production threshold. This experiment, E909, was performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS Facility in March and April 1995. The reactions were studied from threshold (Pπ = 685 MeV/c and P K = 723 MeV/c) up to 760 MeV/c. There were two measurements taken; the differential cross section as a function of momentum, and the ang...

  2. A dataset of 200 structured product labels annotated for adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Shooshan, Sonya E; Rodriguez, Laritza; Aronson, Alan R; Lang, Francois; Rogers, Willie; Roberts, Kirk; Tonning, Joseph

    2018-01-30

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs), unintended and sometimes dangerous effects that a drug may have, are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality during medical care. To date, there is no structured machine-readable authoritative source of known ADRs. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) partnered with the National Library of Medicine to create a pilot dataset containing standardised information about known adverse reactions for 200 FDA-approved drugs. The Structured Product Labels (SPLs), the documents FDA uses to exchange information about drugs and other products, were manually annotated for adverse reactions at the mention level to facilitate development and evaluation of text mining tools for extraction of ADRs from all SPLs. The ADRs were then normalised to the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and to the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA). We present the curation process and the structure of the publicly available database SPL-ADR-200db containing 5,098 distinct ADRs. The database is available at https://bionlp.nlm.nih.gov/tac2017adversereactions/; the code for preparing and validating the data is available at https://github.com/lhncbc/fda-ars.

  3. Reactions of hexadehydro-Diels-Alder benzynes with structurally complex multifunctional natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sean P.; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2017-06-01

    An important question in organic chemistry concerns the extent to which benzynes—one of the classical reactive intermediates in organic chemistry—can react in discriminating fashion with trapping reagents. In particular, whether these species can react selectively with substrates containing multiple functional groups and possible sites of reactivity has remained unanswered. Natural products comprise a palette of multifunctional compounds with which to address this question. Here, we show that benzynes produced by the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) reaction react with many secondary metabolites with a preference for one among several pathways. Examples demonstrating such selectivity include reactions with: phenolics, through dearomatizing ortho-substitution; alkaloids, through Hofmann-type elimination; tropolone and furan, through cycloaddition; and alkaloids, through three-component fragmentation-coupling reactions. We also demonstrate that the cinchona alkaloids quinidine and quinine give rise to products (some in as few as three steps) that enable subsequent and rapid access to structurally diverse polyheterocyclic compounds. The results show that benzynes are quite discriminating in their reactivity—a trait perhaps not broadly enough appreciated.

  4. Deep-release of Epon 828 epoxy from the shock-driven reaction product phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, John; Fredenburg, Anthony; Coe, Joshua; Dattelbaum, Dana

    2017-06-01

    A challenge in improving equations-of-state (EOS) for polymers and their product phase is the lack of off-Hugoniot data. Here, we describe a novel experimental approach for obtaining release pathways along isentropes from the shocked products. A series of gas-gun experiments was conducted to obtain release isentropes of the products for 70/30 wt% Epon 828 epoxy resin/Jeffamine T-403 curing agent. Thin epoxy flyers backed by a low-density syntactic foam were impacted into LiF windows at up to 6.3 mm/ μs, creating stresses in excess of those required for reaction ( 25 GPa). Following a sustained shock input, a rarefaction fan from the back of the thin flyer reduced the pressure in the epoxy products along a release isentrope. Optical velocimetry (PDV) was used to measure the particle velocity at the epoxy/LiF interface. Numerical simulations using several different EOS describing the reactant-to-product transformation were conducted, and the results were compared with measured wave profiles. The best agreement with experiment was obtained using separate tabular EOS for the polymer ``reactant'' (e.g. epoxy) and product mixture, suggesting the transition to the products is irreversible.

  5. Multiphasic Reaction Modeling for Polypropylene Production in a Pilot-Scale Catalytic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jakir Hossain Khan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel multiphasic model for the calculation of the polypropylene production in a complicated hydrodynamic and the physiochemical environments has been formulated, confirmed and validated. This is a first research attempt that describes the development of the dual-phasic phenomena, the impact of the optimal process conditions on the production rate of polypropylene and the fluidized bed dynamic details which could be concurrently obtained after solving the model coupled with the CFD (computational fluid dynamics model, the basic mathematical model and the moment equations. Furthermore, we have established the quantitative relationship between the operational condition and the dynamic gas–solid behavior in actual reaction environments. Our results state that the proposed model could be applied for generalizing the production rate of the polymer from a chemical procedure to pilot-scale chemical reaction engineering. However, it was assumed that the solids present in the bubble phase and the reactant gas present in the emulsion phase improved the multiphasic model, thus taking into account that the polymerization took place mutually in the emulsion besides the bubble phase. It was observed that with respect to the experimental extent of the superficial gas velocity and the Ziegler-Natta feed rate, the ratio of the polymer produced as compared to the overall rate of production was approximately in the range of 9%–11%. This is a significant amount and it should not be ignored. We also carried out the simulation studies for comparing the data of the CFD-dependent dual-phasic model, the emulsion phase model, the dynamic bubble model and the experimental results. It was noted that the improved dual-phasic model and the CFD model were able to predict more constricted and safer windows at similar conditions as compared to the experimental results. Our work is unique, as the integrated developed model is able to offer clearer ideas

  6. The Effect of Store Atmosphere and Product Packaging Towards Consumer Buying Behavior, at Hush Puppies Store Manado

    OpenAIRE

    Supit, Pratisia Prisilia Tifanny

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of consumer depends on a number of factors and not limited to the services that are provided in retailed stores. Hence marketers use as many approaches as possible, in order to encourage the consumers to approach, buy and stay longer. Two of the approaches are to build up mood in their store atmosphere and the packaging of the product. The purpose of this research is to find the effect store atmosphere and product packaging on consumer buying behavior of Hush Puppies Manado. T...

  7. Studies of short-lived products of spallation fission reactions at TRIUMF

    CERN Document Server

    Bischoff, G; D'Auria, J M; Dautet, H; Lee, J K P; Pate, B D; Wiesehahn, W

    1976-01-01

    The gas-jet recoil transport technique has been used to transport products from spallation and fission reactions from a target chamber to a shielded location for nuclear spectroscopic studies. These involve X- beta - gamma coincidence measurements and (shortly) time- of-flight mass spectroscopy. It has been deduced that the proton beam at present intensities has no appreciable effect on the ability of ethylene and other cluster-producing gases to transport radioactivity. Preliminary results will be presented for shortlived fission products from uranium, and for spallation products of iodine and argon. The latter were obtained from the bombardment of gas and aerosol targets mixed with the transporting gas in the target chamber, which appears to be a generally useful technique.

  8. Reactions of SO 2 on hydrated cement particle system for atmospheric pollution reduction: A DRIFTS and XANES study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Girish; Wu, Qiyuan; Moon, Juhyuk; Orlov, Alexander

    2017-07-01

    An investigation of the adsorptive property of hydrated cement particle system for sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal was conducted. In situ and ex situ experiments using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) characterization techniques were employed to identify surface species formed during the exposure to SO2. Oxidation of SO2 to sulfate and sulfite species observed during these experiments indicated dominant reaction pathways for SO2 reaction with concrete constituents, such as calcium hydroxide, which were also moderated by adsorption on porous surfaces of crushed aggregates. The impact of variable composition of concrete on its adsorption capacity and reaction mechanisms was also proposed in this work.

  9. Cyclotron production of I-123: An evaluation of the nuclear reactions which produce this isotope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodd, V. J.; Scholz, K. L.; Blue, J. W.; Wellamn, H. N.

    1970-01-01

    The reactions studied which produce I-123 directly were Sb-121(He-4,2n) I-123, Sb-121(He-3,n) I-123, Te-122(d,n) I-123, Te-122(He-4,p2n) I-123, Te-122(He-3,pn) I-123, and Te-123(He-3,p2n) I-123. Reactions which produce I-123 indirectly through the positron decay of 2.1-hour Xe-123 were Te-122(He-4,3n) Xe-123, Te-122(He-3,2n) Xe-123 and Te-123(He-3,3n) Xe-123. Use of the gas flow I-123 cyclotron target assembly is recommended for the production of I-123 with radiochemical purity greater than 99.995%.

  10. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinghao; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters. PMID:26430733

  11. High density labeling of polymerase chain reaction products with the fluorescent base analogue tCo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Gudrun; Urban, Milan; Purse, Byron W; Kuchta, Robert D

    2009-11-01

    Fluorescent DNA of high molecular weight is an important tool for studying the physical properties of DNA and DNA-protein interactions, and it plays a key role in modern biotechnology for DNA sequencing and detection. While several DNA polymerases can incorporate large numbers of dye-linked nucleotides into primed DNA templates, the amplification of the resulting densely labeled DNA strands by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is problematic. Here, we report a method for high density labeling of DNA in PCR reactions employing the 5'-triphosphate of 1,3-diaza-2-oxo-phenoxazine (tCo) and Deep Vent DNA polymerase. tCo is a fluorescent cytosine analogue that absorbs and emits light at 365 and 460 nm, respectively. We obtained PCR products that were fluorescent enough to directly visualize them in a gel by excitation with long UV light, thus eliminating the need for staining with ethidium bromide. Reactions with Taq polymerase failed to produce PCR products in the presence of only small amounts of dtCoTP. A comparative kinetic study of Taq and Deep Vent polymerase revealed that Taq polymerase, although it inserts dtCoTP with high efficiency opposite G, is prone to forming mutagenic tCo-A base pairs and does not efficiently extend base pairs containing tCo. These kinetics features explain the poor outcome of the PCR reactions with Taq polymerase. Since tCo substitutes structurally for cytosine, the presented labeling method is believed to be less invasive than labeling with dye-linked nucleotides and, therefore, produces DNA that is ideally suited for biophysical studies.

  12. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijuan Qu

    Full Text Available Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters.

  13. Influence of atmospheric rivers on vegetation productivity and fire patterns in the southwestern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Christine M.; Dettinger, Michael; Soulard, Christopher E.

    2017-01-01

    In the southwestern U.S., the meteorological phenomenon known as atmospheric rivers (ARs) has gained increasing attention due to its strong connections to floods, snowpacks, and water supplies in the West Coast states. Relatively less is known about the ecological implications of ARs, particularly in the interior Southwest, where AR storms are less common. To address this gap, we compared a chronology of AR landfalls on the west coast between 1989 and 2011 and between 25°N and 42.5°N to annual metrics of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI; an indicator of vegetation productivity) and daily resolution precipitation data to assess influences of AR-fed winter precipitation on vegetation productivity across the southwestern U.S. We mapped correlations between winter AR precipitation during landfalling ARs and (1) annual maximum NDVI and (2) area burned by large wildfires summarized by ecoregion during the same year as the landfalls and during the following year. Interannual variations of AR precipitation strongly influenced both NDVI and area burned by wildfire in some dryland ecoregions. The influence of ARs on dryland vegetation varied significantly depending on the latitude of landfall, with those ARs making landfall below 35°N latitude more strongly influencing these systems, and with effects observed as far as 1300 km from the landfall location. As climatologists' understanding of the synoptic patterns associated with the occurrence of ARs continues to evolve, an increased understanding of how AR landfalls, in aggregate, influence vegetation productivity and associated wildfire activity in dryland ecosystems may provide opportunities to better predict ecological responses to climate and climate change.

  14. Oxidation of triclosan by ferrate: Reaction kinetics, products identification and toxicity evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Bin [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ying Guangguo, E-mail: guang-guo.ying@csiro.au [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhao Jianliang; Zhang Lijuan; Fang Yixiang [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Nghiem, Long Duc [School of Civil Mining and Environmental Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Triclosan reacted rapidly with ferrate. {yields} Oxidation resulted in a decrease in algal toxicity. {yields} No inhibition of algae growth from ferrate. - Abstract: The oxidation of triclosan by commercial grade aqueous ferrate (Fe(VI)) was investigated and the reaction kinetics as a function of pH (7.0-10.0) were experimentally determined. Intermediate products of the oxidation process were characterized using both GC-MS and RRLC-MS/MS techniques. Changes in toxicity during the oxidation process of triclosan using Fe(VI) were investigated using Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata growth inhibition tests. The results show that triclosan reacted rapidly with Fe(VI), with the apparent second-order rate constant, k{sub app}, being 754.7 M{sup -1} s{sup -1} at pH 7. At a stoichiometric ratio of 10:1 (Fe(VI):triclosan), complete removal of triclosan was achieved. Species-specific rate constants, k, were determined for reaction of Fe(VI) with both the protonated and deprotonated triclosan species. The value of k determined for neutral triclosan was 6.7({+-}1.9) x 10{sup 2} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, while that measured for anionic triclosan was 7.6({+-}0.6) x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The proposed mechanism for the oxidation of triclosan by the Fe(VI) involves the scission of ether bond and phenoxy radical addition reaction. Coupling reaction may also occur during Fe(VI) degradation of triclosan. Overall, the degradation processes of triclosan resulted in a significant decrease in algal toxicity. The toxicity tests showed that Fe(VI) itself dosed in the reaction did not inhibit green algae growth.

  15. Safety assessment of Maillard reaction products of chicken bone hydrolysate using Sprague-Dawley rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Zhi Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Maillard reaction products of chicken bone hydrolysate (MRPB containing 38% protein, which is a derived product from chicken bone, is usually used as a flavor enhancer or food ingredient. In the face of a paucity of reported data regarding the safety profile of controversial Maillard reaction products, the potential health effects of MRPB were evaluated in a subchronic rodent feeding study. Methods: Sprague–Dawley rats (SD, 5/sex/group were administered diets containing 9, 3, 1, or 0% of MRPB derived from chicken bone for 13 weeks. Results: During the 13-week treatment period, no mortality occurred, and no remarkable changes in general condition and behavior were observed. The consumption of MRPB did not have any effect on body weight or feed and water consumption. At the same time, there was no significant increase in the weights of the heart, liver, lung, kidney, spleen, small intestine, and thymus in groups for both sexes. Serological examination showed serum alanine aminotransferase in both sexes was decreased significantly, indicating liver cell protection. No treatment-related histopathological differences were observed between the control and test groups. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, the addition of 9% MRPB in the diet had no adverse effect on both male and female SD rats during the 90-day observation. Those results would provide useful information on the safety of a meaty flavor enhancer from bone residue as a byproduct of meat industry.

  16. Application of micro X-ray diffraction to investigate the reaction products formed by the alkali silica reaction in concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dähn, R.; Arakcheeva, A.; Schaub, Ph.; Pattison, P.; Chapuis, G.; Grolimund, D.; Wieland, E.; Leemann, A. (Ecole); (PSI); (Phase Solutions); (ESRF)

    2015-12-21

    Alkali–silica reaction (ASR) is one of the most important deterioration mechanisms in concrete leading to substantial damages of structures worldwide. Synchrotron-based micro-X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD) was employed to characterize the mineral phases formed in micro-cracks of concrete aggregates as a consequence of ASR. This particular high spatial resolution technique enables to directly gain structural information on ASR products formed in a 40-year old motorway bridge damaged due to ASR. Micro-X-ray-fluorescence was applied on thin sections to locate the reaction products formed in veins within concrete aggregates. Micro-XRD pattern were collected at selected points of interest along a vein by rotating the sample. Rietveld refinement determined the structure of the ASR product consisting of a new layered framework similar to mountainite and rhodesite. Furthermore, it is conceivable that understanding the structure of the ASR product may help developing new technical treatments inhibiting ASR.

  17. Relating gas chromatographic profiles to sensory measurements describing the end products of the Maillard reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanimirova, I; Boucon, C; Walczak, B

    2011-01-30

    Often in analytical practice, a set of samples is described by different types of measurements in the hope that a comprehensive characterisation of samples will provide a more complete picture and will help in determining the similarities among samples. The main focus is then on how to combine the information described by different measurement variables and how to analyse it simultaneously. In other words, the main goal is to find a common representation of samples that emphasises the individual and common properties of the different blocks of variables. Several methods can be adopted for the simultaneous analysis of multiblock data with a common object mode. These are: consensus principal component analysis (CPCA), SUM-PCA, multiple factor analysis (MFA) and structuration des tableaux à trois indices de la statistique (STATIS).In this article we present a comparison of the performances of these methods for data describing the chemistry and sensory profiles of the Maillard reaction products. The aroma compounds formed during the reaction of thermal heating between one or two selected amino acids and one or two reducing sugars have been analysed by head space gas chromatography and the intensity and nature of the odour of the resulting products has been evaluated according to selected descriptors by a panel of sensory experts.The results showed that using the information of the chromatographic and sensory data in conjunction enhanced the interpretability of the data. SUM-PCA and more specifically multiple factor analysis, MFA, allowed for a detailed study of the similarities of mixtures in terms of reaction products and sensory profiles. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Iron oxide and pyrocatechol: a spectroscopy study of the reaction products

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner José Barreto; Sônia Regina Giancoli Barreto; Ivanira Moreira; Yoshio Kawano

    2006-01-01

    The reaction of 1,2-dihydroxy-benzene (pyrocatechol) (C6H6O2) with iron oxide (Fe2O3) and sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3) in aqueous medium (pH 7) was investigated. Pyrocatechol suffers autoxidation and coordinates with Fe3+ in solution. The presence of S2O3(2-) in solution was fundamental to generate and stabilize the pyrocatechol oxidation products as o-semiquinones. This compound was isolated and its structure characterized using FT-IR, EPR and UV-Vis Spectroscopy as [CTA][Fe(SQ)2(Cat)]. A th...

  19. Multiscale Modeling of Poly(lactic acid) Production: From Reaction Conditions to Rheology of Polymer Melt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zubov, Alexandr; Sin, Gürkan

    2018-01-01

    process based on hybrid Monte Carlo approach, and (iii) mesoscopic public domain model of polymer chain reptation dynamics. Based on the input reaction conditions, the macro-scale model predicts L,L-lactide conversion and averaged molar mass of PLLA, while the micro-scale and meso-scale simulations allow......Abstract Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) is a fully biodegradable bioplastic with promising market potential. The paper deals with systematic development and analysis of the modeling framework allowing direct mapping between PLLA production process conditions and rheological properties of the polymer...

  20. Production of noble gas isotopes by proton-induced reactions on bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leya, I.; David, J.-C.; Leray, S.; Wieler, R.; Michel, R.

    2008-04-01

    We measured integral thin target cross sections for the proton-induced production of He-, Ne-, Ar-, Kr- and Xe-isotopes from bismuth (Bi) from the respective reaction thresholds up to 2.6 GeV. Here we present 275 cross sections for 23 nuclear reactions. The production of noble gas isotopes from Bi is of special importance for design studies of accelerator driven systems (EA/ADS) and nuclear spallation sources. For experiments with proton energies above 200 MeV the mini-stack approach was used instead of the stacked-foil technique in order to minimise the influences of secondary particles on the residual nuclide production. Comparing the cross sections for Bi to the data published recently for Pb indicates that for 4He the cross sections for Bi below 200 MeV are up to a factor of 2-3 higher than the Pb data, which can be explained by the production of α-decaying Po-isotopes from Bi but not from Pb. Some of the cross sections for the production of 21Ne from Bi are affected by recoil effects from neighboured Al-foils, which compromises a study of a possible lowering of the effective Coulomb-barrier. The differences in the excitation functions between Pb and Bi for Kr- and Xe-isotopes can be explained by energy-dependent higher fission cross sections for Bi compared to Pb. The experimental data are compared to results from the theoretical nuclear model codes INCL4/ABLA and TALYS. The INCL4/ABLA system describes the cross sections for the production of 4He-, Kr- and Xe-isotopes reasonably well, i.e. mostly within a factor of a few. In contrast, the model completely fails describing 21Ne, 22Ne, 36Ar and 38Ar, which are produced via spallation and/or multifragmentation. The TALYS code is only able to accurately predict reaction thresholds. The absolute values are either significantly over- or underestimated. Consequently, the comparison of measured and modelled thin target cross sections clearly indicates that experimental data are still needed because the predictive

  1. Production of high-energy gamma rays by cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere and lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    The production of gamma rays above 10 MeV by the interaction of cosmic rays in the atmosphere and the lunar surface is simulated using Monte Carlo methods. The calculation incorporates a new model of high-energy nucleon-nucleus interactions based on empirical fits to inclusive cross sections for the production of pions and nucleons. The atmospheric gamma ray flux is calculated as a function of direction, energy, and atmospheric depth. These calculations are compared with observations from balloons and from the SAS 2 satellite. Estimates of the flux of earth albedo electrons produced by cosmic ray interactions are presented. The lunar gamma ray albedo is calculated and compared with an upper limit based on SAS 2 measurements.

  2. Atmospheric Dispositifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Through the coupling of dispositif with atmosphere this paper engages in a discussion of the atmospherics as both a form of knowledge and a material practice. In doing so the objective is to provide an inventory of tools and methodologies deployed in the construction of atmosphere understood......, the conceptual foundations and protocols for the production of atmosphere in architecture might be found beneath the surface of contemporary debates. In this context, the notion of atmospheric dispositif – illustrated through an oeuvre of the German architect Werner Ruhnau and its theoretical and historical...

  3. Microwave Spectroscopic Study of the Atmospheric Oxidation Product m-TOLUIC Acid and its Monohydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jabiri, Mohamad; Schnitzler, Elijah G.; Seifert, Nathan A.; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2017-06-01

    m-Toluic acid is a photo-oxidation product of m-xylene, a chemical byproduct of the oil and gas industry, and is a common component of secondary atmospheric aerosol. Organic acids, such as m-toluic acid, are also thought to play an important role in the initial steps of aerosol formation, which involves formation of hydrogen bonded clusters with molecular species, such as water, ammonia, and sulfuric acid. Somewhat surprisingly, the rotational spectrum of the m-toluic acid monomer has not been studied before. We have identified four stable conformers using ab initio calculations at the MP2/6-311++G(2df,2pd) level of theory. The two lowest energy conformers are rather close in energy and their rotational spectra were measured using a Balle-Flygare type microwave spectrometer. The structures and barriers to methyl internal rotation were determined. We have identified four isomers of the monohydrate of m-toluic acid using ab initio calculations. Measurements of the microwave spectra of the two lowest energy isomers are underway with a newly constructed chirped pulse microwave Fourier transform spectrometer in the frequency range from 2 to 6 GHz. The spectra and analyses will be presented.

  4. Accurate quantitation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate and its degradation products using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brust, H.; Asten, A. van; Koeberg, M.; Dalmolen, J.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Schoenmakers, P.

    2014-01-01

    After an explosion of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), its degradation products pentaerythritol trinitrate (PETriN), dinitrate (PEDiN) and mononitrate (PEMN) were detected using liquid chromatography-atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS). Discrimination between

  5. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of ready-to-eat meat: Inactivation of Listeria innocua and changes in product quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rød, Sara Katrine; Hansen, Flemming; Leipold, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The application of cold atmospheric pressure plasma for decontamination of a sliced ready-to-eat (RTE) meat product (bresaola) inoculated with Listeria innocua was investigated. Inoculated samples were treated at 15.5, 31, and 62 W for 2–60 s inside sealed linear-low-density-polyethylene bags...

  6. Carbon Dioxide Production Responsibility on the Basis of comparing in Situ and mean CO2 Atmosphere Concentration Data

    OpenAIRE

    Mavrodiev, S. Cht.; Pekevski, L.; Vachev, B.

    2008-01-01

    The method is proposed for estimation of regional CO2 and other greenhouses and pollutants production responcibility. The comparison of CO2 local emissions reduction data with world CO2 atmosphere data will permit easy to judge for overall effect in curbing not only global warming but also chemical polution.

  7. Analysis of reaction products of food contaminants and ingredients: Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) in canned foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coulier, L.; Bradley, E.L.; Bas, R.C.; Verhoeckx, K.C.M.; Driffield, M.; Harmer, N.; Castle, L.

    2010-01-01

    Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) is an epoxide that is used as a starting substance in the manufacture of can coatings for food-contact applications. Following migration from the can coating into food, BADGE levels decay and new reaction products are formed by reaction with food ingredients. The

  8. 40 CFR 721.3830 - Formaldehyde, reaction products with an alkylated phenol and an aliphatic amine (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Formaldehyde, reaction products with... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3830 Formaldehyde, reaction... new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Formaldehyde...

  9. pH-Controlled Oxidation of an Aromatic Ketone: Structural Elucidation of the Products of Two Green Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, C. Eric

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory experiment emphasizing the structural elucidation of organic compounds has been developed as a discovery exercise. The "unknown" compounds are the products of the pH-controlled oxidation of 4'-methoxyacetophenone with bleach. The chemoselectivity of this reaction is highly dependent on the pH of the reaction media: under basic…

  10. Sensitivity of the Reaction Mechanism of the Ozone Depletion Events during the Arctic Spring on the Initial Atmospheric Composition of the Troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Cao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ozone depletion events (ODEs during the Arctic spring have been investigated since the 1980s. It was found that the depletion of ozone is highly associated with the release of halogens, especially bromine containing compounds. These compounds originate from various substrates such as the ice/snow-covered surfaces in Arctic. In the present study, the dependence of the mixing ratios of ozone and principal bromine species during ODEs on the initial composition of the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer was investigated by using a concentration sensitivity analysis. This analysis was performed by implementing a reaction mechanism representing the ozone depletion and halogen release in the box model KINAL (KInetic aNALysis of reaction mechanics. The ratios between the relative change of the mixing ratios of particular species such as ozone and the variation in the initial concentration of each atmospheric component were calculated, which indicate the relative importance of each initial species in the chemical kinetic system. The results of the computations show that the impact of various chemical species is different for ozone and bromine containing compounds during the depletion of ozone. It was found that CH3CHO critically controls the time scale of the complete removal of ozone. However, the rate of the ozone loss and the maximum values of bromine species are only slightly influenced by the initial value of CH3CHO. In addition, according to the concentration sensitivity analysis, the reduction of initial Br2 was found to cause a significant retardant of the ODE while the initial mixing ratio of HBr exerts minor influence on both ozone and bromine species. In addition, it is also interesting to note that the increase of C2H2 would significantly raise the amount of HOBr and Br in the atmosphere while the ozone depletion is hardly changed.

  11. The applicability of proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for determination of isocyanic acid (ICA) in work room atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Mikolaj Jan; Olsen, Raymond; Nielsen, Claus Jørgen; Thomassen, Yngvar; Molander, Paal

    2014-01-01

    A method is presented for the real-time quantitative determination of isocyanic acid (ICA) in air using proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Quantum mechanical calculations were performed to establish the ion-polar molecule reaction rate of ICA and other isocyanates. The PTR-MS was calibrated against different ICA air concentrations and humidity conditions using Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) as quantitative reference. Based on these experiments a simple humidity dependant model was derived for correction of the PTR-MS response for ICA. The corrected PTR-MS data was linearly correlated (R(2) > 0.99) with the data acquired by FT-IR. The PTR-MS instrumental limit of detection (LOD) for ICA was 2.3 ppb. Humid atmospheres resulted in LODs of 3.4 and 7.8 ppb, at an absolute humidity (AH) of 4.0 and 15.5 g m(-3), respectively. Furthermore, off-line sampling using denuder and impinger samplers using di-n-butylamine (DBA) as derivatization reagent was compared with PTR-MS measurements in a dynamically generated standard ICA atmosphere. Denuder (n = 4) and impinger (n = 4) sampling subsequent to liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) determination compared to corrected PTR-MS data resulted in recoveries of 79.6 (8.1% RSD) and 99.9 (9.3% RSD) %, respectively. Measurements of ICA from thermally decomposed cured 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI)-paint was performed using PTR-MS and denuder (n = 3) sampling. The relation between the average ICA responses using denuders (34.4 ppb) and PTR-MS (42.6 ppb) was 80.6%, which coincided well with the relative recovery obtained from the controlled laboratory experiments using dynamically generated ICA atmospheres (79.6%). The variability in ICA air concentration during the welding process (170% RSDPTR-MS) illustrated the need for real-time measurements.

  12. Mn(II) oxidation in Fenton and Fenton type systems : Identification of Reaction Efficiency and Reaction Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Genuchten, C.M.; Peña, Jasquelin

    2017-01-01

    Efficient and low-cost methods of removing aqueous Mn(II) are required to improve the quality of impacted groundwater supplies. In this work, we show that Fe(0) electrocoagulation (EC) permits the oxidative removal of Mn(II) from solution by reaction with the reactive oxidant species produced

  13. Mass production of chemicals from biomass-derived oil by directly atmospheric distillation coupled with co-pyrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xue-Song; Yang, Guang-Xi; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Wu-Jun; Ding, Hong-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Production of renewable commodity chemicals from bio-oil derived from fast pyrolysis of biomass has received considerable interests, but hindered by the presence of innumerable components in bio-oil. In present work, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated an innovative approach combining atmospheric distillation of bio-oil with co-pyrolysis for mass production of renewable chemicals from biomass, in which no waste was produced. It was estimated that 51.86?wt.% of distillate just containi...

  14. Relating Nimbus-7 37 GHz data to global land-surface evaporation, primary productivity and the atmospheric CO2 concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1988-01-01

    Global observations at 37 GHz by the Nimbus-7 SMMR are related to zonal variations of land surface evaporation and primary productivity, as well as to temporal variations of atmospheric CO2 concentration. The temporal variation of CO2 concentration and the zonal variations of evaporation and primary productivity are shown to be highly correlated with the satellite sensor data. The potential usefulness of the 37-GHz data for global biospheric and climate studies is noted.

  15. Diversion of the melanin synthetic pathway by dopamine product scavengers: A quantum chemical modeling of the reaction mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Demissie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the stability and reactivity of the oxidation products as well as L-cysteine and N-acetylcysteine adducts of dopamine studied using quantum chemical calculations. The overall reactions studied were subdivided into four reaction channels. The first reaction channel is the oxidation of dopamine to form dopaminoquinone. The second reaction channel leads to melanin formation through subsequent reactions. The third and fourth reaction channels are reactions leading to the formation of dopaminoquinone adducts which are aimed to divert the synthesis of melanin. The results indicate that L-cysteine and N-acetylcysteine undergo chemical reactions mainly at C5 position of dopaminoquinone. The analyses of the thermodynamic energies indicate that L-cysteine and N-acetylcysteine covalently bind to dopaminoquinone by competing with the internal cyclization reaction of dopaminoquinone which leads to the synthesis of melanin. The analysis of the results, based on the reaction free energies, is also supported by the investigation of the natural bond orbitals of the reactants and products.

  16. Adverse reactions to cosmetic products and the Notification System in Health Surveillance: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Huf

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This paper is part of a study that investigates the quality of cosmetic products and evaluates the cosmetic surveillance system. OBJECTIVE: This study presents the results of a research that aimed to describe the point of view of the population in terms of the prevalence of Adverse Reactions (AR and information about the surveillance system. METHODS: A structured questionnaire was applied to a random sample of 200 people from the administrative staff of the Municipal Guard of Rio de Janeiro. RESULTS: 38% of the participants declared AR to some cosmetic product used in the past two years. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is an unpublished study in Brazil, which presents results regarding the estimated prevalence of AR similarly to international studies.

  17. Reactions of clofibric acid with oxidative and reductive radicals-Products, mechanisms, efficiency and toxic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csay, Tamás; Rácz, Gergely; Salik, Ádám; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2014-09-01

    The degradation of clofibric acid induced by hydroxyl radical, hydrated electron and O2-•/HO2• reactive species was studied in aqueous solutions. Clofibric acid was decomposed more effectively by hydroxyl radical than by hydrated electron or O2-•/HO2•. Various hydroxylated, dechlorinated and fragmentation products have been identified and quantified. A new LC-MS method was developed based on 18O isotope labeling to follow the formation of hydroxylated derivatives of clofibric acid. Possible degradation pathways have been proposed. The overall degradation was monitored by determination of sum parameters like COD, TOC and AOX. It was found that the organic chlorine degrades very effectively prior to complete mineralization. After the treatment no toxic effect was found according to Vibrio fischeri tests. However, at early stages some of the reaction products were more harmful than clofibric acid.

  18. Ozonation of trimethoprim in aqueous solution: identification of reaction products and their toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Jiangmeng; Huang, Jun; Wang, Bin; Cao, Qiming; Deng, Shubo; Yu, Gang

    2013-05-15

    This work aimed to better understand the ozonation process of a typical antibiotic pharmaceutical, trimethoprim in aqueous solution. The parent compound was almost completely degraded with ozone dose up to 3.5 mg/L with no mineralization. Twenty one degradation products were identified using an electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Several ozonation pathways were proposed including hydroxylation, demethylation, carbonylation, deamination and methylene group cleavage. Two species of luminescent bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum and Vibrio qinghaiensis were selected to assess the toxicity of ozonation products. For P. phosphoreum, higher level of toxicity was observed compared to the parent compound, but a negligible toxicity change was observed for V. qinghaiensis, indicating different modes of action for the same water sample. This was further confirmed by quantitative structure-active relationship analysis. This work proves the dominant role of ozone rather than hydroxyl radicals in the reaction and the potential risk after ozonation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Predictivity of animal studies for human injection site reactions with parenteral drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Jeffery A

    2008-08-01

    The value and predictive power of nonclinical studies for potential effects of investigational medicinal products in humans is often debated. The subject of general predictivity of animal toxicity studies has been addressed on several occasions, with one of the most recent efforts being conducted by an ILSI Task Group [Olson H, et al. Concordance of the toxicity of pharmaceuticals in humans and animals. Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2000; 32: 56-67]. This review provides a summary of the evaluation of cutaneous toxicity, its histopathological assessment, and experience of the biopharmaceutical industry with respect to injection site reactions with parenteral drug products with a pragmatic perspective on the predictivity of standard animal studies with respect to these responses in humans.

  20. 40 CFR 721.6181 - Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether, substituted proplyamine and...-phenol polymer glycidyl ether, substituted proplyamine and polyethylenepolyamines (generic). (a) Chemical... as fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether...

  1. Detection of Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction Product by Utilizing the 5' → 3' Exonuclease Activity of Thermus aquaticus DNA Polymerase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pamela M. Holland; Richard D. Abramson; Robert Watson; David H. Gelfand

    1991-01-01

    The 5' → 3' exonuclease activity of the thermostable enzyme Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase may be employed in a polymerase chain reaction product detection system to generate a specific detectable signal...

  2. Revised Production Rates for Na-22 and Mn-54 in Meteorites Using Cross Sections Measured for Neutron-induced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with extraterrestrial bodies produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. The production rates of many relatively short-lived radionuclides, including 2.6-year Na-22 and 312-day Mn-54, have been measured in several meteorites collected very soon after they fell. Theoretical models used to calculate production rates for comparison with the measured values rely on input data containing good cross section measurements for all relevant reactions. Most GCR particles are protons, but secondary neutrons make most cosmogenic nuclides. Calculated production rates using only cross sections for proton-induced reactions do not agree well with measurements. One possible explanation is that the contribution to the production rate from reactions initiated by secondary neutrons produced in primary GCR interactions should be included explicitly. This, however, is difficult to do because so few of the relevant cross sections for neutron-induced reactions have been measured.

  3. New insights into atmospherically relevant reaction systems using direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Fairhurst, Michelle C.; Wingen, Lisa M.; Perraud, Véronique; Ezell, Michael J.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2017-04-01

    The application of direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART-MS), which is finding increasing use in atmospheric chemistry, to two different laboratory model systems for airborne particles is investigated: (1) submicron C3-C7 dicarboxylic acid (diacid) particles reacted with gas-phase trimethylamine (TMA) or butylamine (BA) and (2) secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles from the ozonolysis of α-cedrene. The diacid particles exhibit a clear odd-even pattern in their chemical reactivity toward TMA and BA, with the odd-carbon diacid particles being substantially more reactive than even ones. The ratio of base to diacid in reacted particles, determined using known diacid-base mixtures, was compared to that measured by high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-AMS), which vaporizes the whole particle. Results show that DART-MS probes ˜ 30 nm of the surface layer, consistent with other studies on different systems. For α-cedrene SOA particles, it is shown that varying the temperature of the particle stream as it enters the DART-MS ionization region can distinguish between specific components with the same molecular mass but different vapor pressures. These results demonstrate the utility of DART-MS for (1) examining reactivity of heterogeneous model systems for atmospheric particles and (2) probing components of SOA particles based on volatility.

  4. Rhodium-catalyzed [5 + 2 + 1] cycloaddition of ene-vinylcyclopropanes and CO: reaction design, development, application in natural product synthesis, and inspiration for developing new reactions for synthesis of eight-membered carbocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Yu, Zhi-Xiang

    2015-08-18

    Practical syntheses of natural products and their analogues with eight-membered carbocyclic skeletons are important for medicinal and biological investigations. However, methods and strategies to construct the eight-membered carbocycles are limited. Therefore, developing new methods to synthesize the eight-membered carbocycles is highly desired. In this Account, we describe our development of three rhodium-catalyzed cycloadditions for the construction of the eight-membered carbocycles, which have great potential in addressing the challenges in the synthesis of medium-sized ring systems. The first reaction described in this Account is our computationally designed rhodium-catalyzed two-component [5 + 2 + 1] cycloaddition of ene-vinylcyclopropanes (ene-VCPs) and CO for the diastereoselective construction of bi- and tricyclic cyclooctenones. The design of this reaction is based on the hypothesis that the C(sp(3))-C(sp(3)) reductive elimination of the eight-membered rhodacycle intermediate generated from the rhodium-catalyzed cyclopropane cleavage and alkene insertion, giving Wender's [5 + 2] cycloadduct, is not easy. Under CO atmosphere, CO insertion may occur rapidly, converting the eight-membered rhodacycle into a nine-membered rhodacycle, which then undergoes an easy C(sp(2))-C(sp(3)) reductive elimination process and furnishes the [5 + 2 + 1] product. This hypothesis was supported by our preliminary DFT studies and also served as inspiration for the development of two [7 + 1] cycloadditions: the [7 + 1] cycloaddition of buta-1,3-dienylcyclopropanes (BDCPs) and CO for the construction of cyclooctadienones, and the benzo/[7 + 1] cycloaddition of cyclopropyl-benzocyclobutenes (CP-BCBs) and CO to synthesize the benzocyclooctenones. The efficiency of these rhodium-catalyzed cycloadditions can be revealed by the application in natural product synthesis. Two eight-membered ring-containing natural products, (±)-asterisca-3(15),6-diene and (+)-asteriscanolide, have been

  5. Cloud condensation nuclei production associated with atmospheric nucleation: a synthesis based on existing literature and new results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.-M. Kerminen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper synthesizes the available scientific information connecting atmospheric nucleation with subsequent cloud condensation nuclei (CCN formation. We review both observations and model studies related to this topic, and discuss the potential climatic implications. We conclude that CCN production associated with atmospheric nucleation is both frequent and widespread phenomenon in many types of continental boundary layers, and probably also over a large fraction of the free troposphere. The contribution of nucleation to the global CCN budget spans a relatively large uncertainty range, which, together with our poor understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions, results in major uncertainties in the radiative forcing by atmospheric aerosols. In order to better quantify the role of atmospheric nucleation in CCN formation and Earth System behavior, more information is needed on (i the factors controlling atmospheric CCN production and (ii the properties of both primary and secondary CCN and their interconnections. In future investigations, more emphasis should be put on combining field measurements with regional and large-scale model studies.

  6. Single molecule analysis of bacterial polymerase chain reaction products in submicrometer fluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavis, Samuel M; Corgié, Stéphane C; Cipriany, Benjamin R; Craighead, Harold G; Walker, Larry P

    2007-09-20

    Laser induced fluorescence in submicrometer fluidic channels was used to characterize the synthesis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from a model bacterial system in order to explore the advantages and limitations of on chip real time single molecule PCR analysis. Single oligonucleotide universal bacterial primers and PCR amplicons from the 16S rDNA of Thermobifida fusca (325 bp) were directly detected at all phases of the reaction with low sample consumption and without post-amplification purification or size screening. Primers were fluorescently labeled with single Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorophores, resulting in double labeled, two color amplicons. PCR products were driven electrokinetically through a fused silica channel with a 250 nm by 500 nm rectangular cross section. Lasers with 488 nm and 568 nm wavelengths were focused and overlapped on the channel for fluorescence excitation. All molecules entering the channel were rapidly and uniformly analyzed. Photon burst analysis was used to detect and identify individual primers and amplicons, and fluorescence correlation and cross-correlation spectroscopy were used to account for analyte flow speed. Conventional gel and capillary electrophoresis were also used to characterize the PCR amplification, and the results of differences in detection sensitivity and analyte discrimination were examined. Limits were imposed by the purity and labeling efficiency of the PCR reagents, which must be improved in parallel with increases in detection sensitivity.

  7. Evaluation of tissue reaction, cell viability and cytokine production induced by Sealapex Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Eduardo Gomes-Filho

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA, Sealapex, and a combination of Sealapex and MTA (Sealapex Plus on the reaction of subcutaneous connective tissue of rats, and on cell viability and cytokine production in mouse fibroblasts. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The tissue reaction was carried out with dentin tubes containing the materials implanted in the dorsal connective tissue of rats. The histological analysis was performed after 7 and 30 days. Millipore culture plate inserts with polyethylene tubes filled with materials were placed into 24-well cell culture plates with mouse fibroblasts to evaluate the cell viability by MTT assay. ELISA assays were also performed after 24 h of exposure of the mouse fibroblasts to set material disks. RESULTS: Histopathologic examination showed Von Kossa-positive granules that were birefringent to polarized light for all the studied materials at the tube openings. No material inhibited the cell viability in the in vitro test. It was detected IL-6 production in all root-end filling materials. MTA and Sealapex Plus induced a slight raise of mean levels of IL-1β. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that Sealapex Plus is biocompatible and stimulates the mineralization of the tissue.

  8. Condensed species in products of the reaction of SF6 with Cu up to 4000 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coufal, O.; Toman, P.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is concerned with condensed species in the equilibrium composition of a system of products of the reaction of sulphur hexafluoride with copper. It is assumed that SF6 is an insulation medium in the circuit breaker and reacts with the Cu contained in the circuit breaker contacts or in other parts of the circuit breaker. The system of products of the reaction of SF6 with Cu is assumed to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium for temperatures ranging from ambient temperature to 4000 K, with the pressure in the system being within an interval from 0.1 MPa to 2 MPa. The occurrence of condensed species and their phase transformations significantly affect the composition and thus also the system properties in a range of temperatures at which arc ignition or arc extinction take place. Data on the condensed species considered are analysed and the effects of the phase rule and the selected theoretical model on the occurrence of condensed species in the equilibrium composition are examined.

  9. Products and stability of phosphate reactions with lead under freeze-thaw cycling in simple systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafsteinsdottir, Erla G., E-mail: erla.hafsteinsdottir@gmail.com [Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); White, Duanne A., E-mail: duanne.white@mq.edu.au [Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Gore, Damian B., E-mail: damian.gore@mq.edu.au [Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Stark, Scott C., E-mail: scott.stark@aad.gov.au [Environmental Protection and Change, Australian Antarctic Division, Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities, Tasmania 7050 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    Orthophosphate fixation of metal contaminated soils in environments that undergo freeze-thaw cycles is understudied. Freeze-thaw cycling potentially influences the reaction rate, mineral chemical stability and physical breakdown of particles during fixation. This study determines what products form when phosphate (triple superphosphate [Ca(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sub 2}] or sodium phosphate [Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}]) reacts with lead (PbSO{sub 4} or PbCl{sub 2}) in simple chemical systems in vitro, and assesses potential changes in formation during freeze-thaw cycles. Systems were subjected to multiple freeze-thaw cycles from +10 deg. C to -20 deg. C and then analysed by X-ray diffractometry. Pyromorphite formed in all systems and was stable over multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Low temperature lead orthophosphate reaction efficiency varied according to both phosphate and lead source; the most time-efficient pyromorphite formation was observed when PbSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} were present together. These findings have implications for the manner in which metal contaminated materials in freezing ground can be treated with phosphate. - Highlights: > Formation of lead phosphate products in cold environments is identified. > Potential change in formation during freeze-thaw cycling is assessed. > Lead phosphate reaction efficiency varies according to phosphate and lead source. > Pyromorphite formation is stable during 240 freeze-thaw cycles. - Pyromorphite, formed from Pb phosphate fixation, is stable during multiple freeze-thaw cycles but the efficiency of the fixation depends on the phosphate source and the type of Pb mineral.

  10. The Issue of Calculating the Final Temperature of the Products of Rapid Exothermic Chemical Reactions with Significant Energy Release in a Closed Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, V.; Geidmanis, D.

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical problem solved in this article is the calculation of thermodynamic parameters such as final temperature, distribution of the liquid and dry saturated vapour phases of the substance that are considered to be in thermodynamic equilibrium, and pressure of the system of several reaction products after adding to the system a certain amount of heat or the thermal effect released during rapid exothermic reaction in a closed volume that occurs so fast that it can be considered to be adiabatic, and when the volume of liquid reagents is several orders of magnitude less than the volume of the reactor. The general multi-substance problem is reduced to a theoretical problem for one substance of calculation thermodynamic parameters of system after adding a certain amount of heat that gives theoretically rigorous isochoric calculation. In this article, we substantiate our view that isochoric pass of calculation is more robust compared to seemingly more natural isobaric pass of calculation, if the later involves quite not trivial calculation of the adiabatic compression of a two-phase system (liquid - dry saturated vapour) that can pass itself into another kind of state (liquid - wet saturated vapour), which requires, apparently, more complex descriptions compared with isochoric calculation because the specific heat capacity of wet saturated vapour can be negative. The solved theoretical problem relates to a practical problem that has been a driver for our research as part of a design of the reactor of the titanium reduction from magnesium and titanium tetrachloride supplied into atmosphere of the reactor at high temperatures when both reagents are in gaseous state. The reaction is known to be exothermic with a high thermal effect, and estimate of the final temperature and pressure of the products of reaction, for instance, designing the reactor allows eliminating the possibility of the reaction products to penetrate backwards into supply tracts of the reagents

  11. Identification ofListeriaSpp. Strains Isolated from Meat Products and Meat Production Plants by Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Roberta; Piras, Francesca; Ladu, Daniela; Putzolu, Miriam; Consolati, Simonetta Gianna; Mazzette, Rina

    2015-11-02

    Listeriosis is a foodborne disease caused by Listeria monocytogenes and is considered as a serious health problem, due to the severity of symptoms and the high mortality rate. Recently, other Listeria species have been associated with disease in human and animals. The aim of this study was to develop a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in order to simultaneously detect six Listeria species (L. grayi , L. welshimeri , L. ivanovii , L. monocytogenes , L. seeligeri , L. innocua) in a single reaction. One hundred eighteen Listeria spp . strains, isolated from meat products (sausages) and processing plants (surfaces in contact and not in contact with meat), were included in the study. All the strains were submitted to biochemical identification using the API Listeria system. A multiplex PCR was developed with the aim to identify the six species of Listeria . PCR allowed to uniquely identify strains that had expressed a doubtful profile with API Listeria The results suggest that the multiplex PCR could represent a rapid and sensitive screening test, a reliable method for the detection of all Listeria species, both in contaminated food and in clinical samples, and also a tool that could be used for epidemiological purposes in food-borne outbreaks. A further application could be the development of a PCR that can be directly applied to the pre-enrichment broth.

  12. Temperature-dependent rate coefficients for the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with the atmospheric biogenics isoprene, alpha-pinene and delta-3-carene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Terry J.; Dulitz, Katrin; Groß, Christoph B. M.; Crowley, John N.

    2017-12-01

    Pulsed laser methods for OH generation and detection were used to study atmospheric degradation reactions for three important biogenic gases: OH + isoprene (Reaction R1), OH +α-pinene (Reaction R2) and OH + Δ-3-carene (Reaction R3). Gas-phase rate coefficients were characterized by non-Arrhenius kinetics for all three reactions. For (R1), k1 (241-356 K) = (1.93±0.08) × 10-11exp{(466±12)/T} cm3 molecule-1 s-1 was determined, with a room temperature value of k1 (297 K) = (9.3±0.4) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, independent of bath-gas pressure (5-200 Torr) and composition (M = N2 or air). Accuracy and precision were enhanced by online optical monitoring of isoprene, with absolute concentrations obtained via an absorption cross section, σisoprene = (1.28±0.06) × 10-17 cm2 molecule-1 at λ = 184.95 nm, determined in this work. These results indicate that significant discrepancies between previous absolute and relative-rate determinations of k1 result in part from σ values used to derive the isoprene concentration in high-precision absolute determinations.Similar methods were used to determine rate coefficients (in 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1) for (R2)-(R3): k2 (238-357 K) = (1.83±0.04) × exp{(330±6)/T} and k3 (235-357 K) = (2.48±0.14) × exp{(357±17)/T}. This is the first temperature-dependent dataset for (R3) and enables the calculation of reliable atmospheric lifetimes with respect to OH removal for e.g. boreal forest springtime conditions. Room temperature values of k2 (296 K) = (5.4±0.2) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 and k3 (297 K) = (8.1±0.3) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 were independent of bath-gas pressure (7-200 Torr, N2 or air) and in good agreement with previously reported values. In the course of this work, 184.95 nm absorption cross sections were determined: σ = (1.54±0.08) × 10-17 cm2 molecule-1 for α-pinene and (2.40±0.12) × 10-17 cm2 molecule-1 for Δ-3-carene.

  13. On the effect of nuclear interactions in neutrino reactions with oxygen targets and its role in atmospheric neutrino anomaly; De l`effet des interactions nucleaires dans les reactions de neutrinos sur des cibles d`oxygene et de son role dans l`anomalie des neutrinos atmospheriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marteau Jacques [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1998-12-10

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced by interactions of the cosmic rays with the atmosphere`s nuclei. The observed ratio of muonic to electronic neutrinos is smaller than the theoretical one (up to a factor 2), this is the so-called atmospheric anomaly. This anomaly could be linked to that observed in the solar neutrino experiments. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effects of nuclear correlations upon the interaction of the atmospheric neutrinos with the oxygen nuclei of the water Cherenkov detectors. The products of these interactions are detected and identified thanks to the light ring the produce. The events are classified according to the number of produced rings which is computed from the neutrino-oxygen event rates in each exclusive reaction channel. The interpretation of the experimental results has been up to now limited to the quasi-elastic nucleon and {Delta} channels but other reaction channels exist which can lead to identification problems. A special role is played by the non-pionic decay channels of the {Delta} resonance which induce single ring events that have not been considered so far. To calculate them we adopted the nuclear response formalism and started with a semi-classical approximation. This allowed us to take into account the nuclear correlations by solving exactly the RPA equations in the ring approximation. It was found that these correlations strongly modify the inclusive and exclusive neutrino-oxygen cross sections and absolute interaction rates while the ratio of the interaction rates {mu}/e is not very much affected. The analysis in the exclusive channels leads to the result that the number of pions predicted in the simulations is overestimated. In conclusion, this work has shown the importance of the nuclear correlations in the neutrino-oxygen interaction and its impact on the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. It goes beyond the usual quasi-elastic approximations and can be moreover extended to other target nuclei, such as iron

  14. Activation cross sections of $\\alpha$-particle induced nuclear reactions on hafnium and deuteron induced nuclear reaction on tantalum: production of $^{178}$W/$^{178m}$Ta generator

    CERN Document Server

    Tárk'anyi, F; Ditrói, F; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V; Uddin, M S

    2014-01-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of charged particle production routes of medically relevant radionuclei, the excitation function for indirect production of $^{178m}$Ta through $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,xn)$^{178}$W-$^{178m}$Ta nuclear reaction was measured for the first time up to 40 MeV. In parallel, the side reactions $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,x)$^{179,177,176,175}$W, $^{183,182,178g,177,176,175}$Ta, $^{179m,177m,175}$Hf were also assessed. Stacked foil irradiation technique and $\\gamma$-ray spectrometry were used. New experimental cross section data for the $^{nat}$Ta(d,xn)$^{178}$W reaction are also reported up to 40 MeV. The measured excitation functions are compared with the results of the ALICE-IPPE, and EMPIRE nuclear reaction model codes and with the TALYS 1.4 based data in the TENDL-2013 library. The thick target yields were deduced and compared with yields of other charged particle ((p,4n), (d,5n) and ($^3$He,x)) production routes for $^{178}$W.

  15. Two dimensional simulation of hydrogen iodide decomposition reaction using fluent code for hydrogen production using nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Jung Sik [The Institute of Machinery and Electronic Technology, Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Young Joon; Lee, Ki Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae Hyuk [Division of Marine Engineering System, Korea Maritime and Ocean University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The operating characteristics of hydrogen iodide (HI) decomposition for hydrogen production were investigated using the commercial computational fluid dynamics code, and various factors, such as hydrogen production, heat of reaction, and temperature distribution, were studied to compare device performance with that expected for device development. Hydrogen production increased with an increase of the surface-to-volume (STV) ratio. With an increase of hydrogen production, the reaction heat increased. The internal pressure and velocity of the HI decomposer were estimated through pressure drop and reducing velocity from the preheating zone. The mass of H2O was independent of the STV ratio, whereas that of HI decreased with increasing STV ratio.

  16. Oxidation Products of Biogenic Emissions Contribute to Nucleation of Atmospheric Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Riccobono, Francesco; Baltensperger, Urs; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Wimmer, Daniela; Wex, Heike; Weingartner, Ernest; Wagner, Paul E; Vrtala, Aron; Viisanen, Yrjö; Vaattovaara, Petri; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, Antonio; Stratmann, Frank; Stozhkov, Yuri; Spracklen, Dominick V; Sipilä, Mikko; Praplan, Arnaud P; Petäjä, Tuukka; Onnela, Antti; Nieminen, Tuomo; Mathot, Serge; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Laaksonen, Ari; Kvashin, Alexander N.; Kürten, Andreas; Kupc, Agnieszka; Keskinen, Helmi; Kajos, Maija; Junninen, Heikki; Hansel, Armin; Franchin, Alessandro; Flagan, Richard C; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Duplissy, Jonathan; Dunne, Eimear M; Downard, Andrew; David, André; Breitenlechner, Martin; Bianchi, Federico; Amorim, Antonio; Almeida, João; Rondo, Linda; Ortega, Ismael K; Dommen, Josef; Scott, Catherine E; Vrtala, Aron; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Seinfeld, John H; Sipila, Mikko; Donahue, Neil M; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric new-particle formation affects climate and is one of the least understood atmospheric aerosol processes. The complexity and variability of the atmosphere has hindered elucidation of the fundamental mechanism of new-particle formation from gaseous precursors. We show, in experiments performed with the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN, that sulfuric acid and oxidized organic vapors at atmospheric concentrations reproduce particle nucleation rates observed in the lower atmosphere. The experiments reveal a nucleation mechanism involving the formation of clusters containing sulfuric acid and oxidized organic molecules from the very first step. Inclusion of this mechanism in a global aerosol model yields a photochemically and biologically driven seasonal cycle of particle concentrations in the continental boundary layer, in good agreement with observations.

  17. Secondary organic aerosol from ozone-initiated reactions with terpene-rich household products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Beverly; Coleman, Beverly K.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Destaillats, Hugo; Nazaroff, William W.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) data from a series of small-chamber experiments in which terpene-rich vapors from household products were combined with ozone under conditions analogous to product use indoors. Reagents were introduced into a continuously ventilated 198 L chamber at steady rates. Consistently, at the time of ozone introduction, nucleation occurred exhibiting behavior similar to atmospheric events. The initial nucleation burst and growth was followed by a period in which approximately stable particle levels were established reflecting a balance between new particle formation, condensational growth, and removal by ventilation. Airborne particles were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, 10 to 400 nm) in every experiment and with an optical particle counter (OPC, 0.1 to 2.0 ?m) in a subset. Parameters for a three-mode lognormal fit to the size distribution at steady state were determined for each experiment. Increasing the supply ozone level increased the steady-state mass concentration and yield of SOA from each product tested. Decreasing the air-exchange rate increased the yield. The steady-state fine-particle mass concentration (PM1.1) ranged from 10 to> 300 mu g m-3 and yields ranged from 5percent to 37percent. Steady-state nucleation rates and SOA mass formation rates were on the order of 10 cm-3 s-1 and 10 mu g m-3 min-1, respectively.

  18. Atmospheric chemistry of (Z)-CF3CH═CHCF3: OH radical reaction rate coefficient and global warming potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baasandorj, Munkhbayar; Ravishankara, A R; Burkholder, James B

    2011-09-29

    Rate coefficients, k, for the gas-phase reaction of the OH radical with (Z)-CF(3)CH═CHCF(3) (cis-1,1,1,4,4,4-hexafluoro-2-butene) were measured under pseudo-first-order conditions in OH using pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) to produce OH and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to detect it. Rate coefficients were measured over a range of temperatures (212-374 K) and bath gas pressures (20-200 Torr; He, N(2)) and found to be independent of pressure over this range of conditions. The rate coefficient has a non-Arrhenius behavior that is well-described by the expression k(1)(T) = (5.73 ± 0.60) × 10(-19) × T(2) × exp[(678 ± 10)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) where k(1)(296 K) was measured to be (4.91 ± 0.50) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and the uncertainties are at the 2σ level and include estimated systematic errors. Rate coefficients for the analogous OD radical reaction were determined over a range of temperatures (262-374 K) at 100 Torr (He) to be k(2)(T) = (4.81 ± 0.20) × 10(-19) × T(2) × exp[(776 ± 15)/T], with k(2)(296 K) = (5.73 ± 0.50) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). OH radical rate coefficients were also measured at 296, 345, and 375 K using a relative rate technique and found to be in good agreement with the PLP-LIF results. A room-temperature rate coefficient for the O(3) + (Z)-CF(3)CH═CHCF(3) reaction was measured using an absolute method with O(3) in excess to be reaction was estimated to be ~20 days. Infrared absorption spectra of (Z)-CF(3)CH═CHCF(3) measured in this work were used to determine a (Z)-CF(3)CH═CHCF(3) global warming potential (GWP) of ~9 for the 100 year time horizon. A comparison of the OH reactivity of (Z)-CF(3)CH═CHCF(3) with other unsaturated fluorinated compounds is presented.

  19. Reaction of isoprene on thin sulfuric acid films: kinetics, uptake, and product analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Brandon M; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2010-06-15

    A high vacuum Knudsen flow reactor was used to determine the reactive uptake coefficient, gamma, of isoprene on sulfuric acid films as a function of sulfuric acid weight percent, temperature, and relative humidity. No discernible dependence was observed for gamma over the range of temperatures (220 - 265 K) and pressures (10(-7) Torr -10(-4) Torr) studied. However, the uptake coefficient increased with increased sulfuric acid concentration between the range of 78 wt % (gamma(i) approximately 10(-4)) and 93 wt % (gamma(i) approximately 10(-3)). In addition to the Knudsen Cell, a bulk study was conducted between 60 and 85 wt % H(2)SO(4) to quantify uptake at lower acid concentrations and to determine reaction products. After exposing sulfuric acid to gaseous isoprene the condensed phase products were extracted and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Isoprene was observed to polymerize in the sulfuric acid and form yellow/red colored monoterpenes and cyclic sesquiterpenes. Finally, addition of water to the 85 wt % sulfuric acid/isoprene product mixture released these terpenes from the condensed phase into the gas phase. Together these experiments imply that direct isoprene uptake will not produce significant SOA; however, terpene production from the small uptake may be relevant for ultrafine particles and could affect growth and nucleation.

  20. Gas-Phase Photolysis of Pyruvic Acid: The Effect of Pressure on Reaction Rates and Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed Harris, Allison E; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Carpenter, Barry K; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-12-29

    In this work, we investigate the impact of pressure and oxygen on the kinetics of and products from the gas-phase photolysis of pyruvic acid. The results reveal a decrease in the photolysis quantum yield as pressure of air or nitrogen is increased, a trend not yet documented in the literature. A Stern-Volmer analysis demonstrates this effect is due to deactivation of the singlet state of pyruvic acid when the photolysis is performed in nitrogen, and from quenching of both the singlet and triplet state in air. Consistent with previous studies, acetaldehyde and CO 2 are observed as the major products; however, other products, most notably acetic acid, are also identified in this work. The yield of acetic acid increases with increasing pressure of buffer gas, an effect that is amplified by the presence of oxygen. At least two mechanisms are necessary to explain the acetic acid, including one that requires reaction of photolysis intermediates with O 2 . These findings extend the fundamental understanding of the gas-phase photochemistry of pyruvic acid, highlighting the importance of pressure on the photolysis quantum yields and products.

  1. Integration of MODIS land and atmosphere products with a coupled-process model to estimate gross primary productivity and evapotranspiration from 1 km to global scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Youngryel; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Kobayashi, Hideki; van Ingen, Catharine; Li, Jie; Black, T. Andy; Beringer, Jason; van Gorsel, Eva; Knohl, Alexander; Law, Beverly E.; Roupsard, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    We propose the Breathing Earth System Simulator (BESS), an upscaling approach to quantify global gross primary productivity and evapotranspiration using MODIS with a spatial resolution of 1-5 km and a temporal resolution of 8 days. This effort is novel because it is the first system that harmonizes and utilizes MODIS Atmosphere and Land products on the same projection and spatial resolution over the global land. This enabled us to use the MODIS Atmosphere products to calculate atmospheric radiative transfer for visual and near infrared radiation wave bands. Then we coupled atmospheric and canopy radiative transfer processes, with models that computed leaf photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and transpiration on the sunlit and shaded portions of the vegetation and soil. At the annual time step, the mass and energy fluxes derived from BESS showed strong linear relations with measurements of solar irradiance (r2 = 0.95, relative bias: 8%), gross primary productivity (r2 = 0.86, relative bias: 5%) and evapotranspiration (r2 = 0.86, relative bias: 15%) in data from 33 flux towers that cover seven plant functional types across arctic to tropical climatic zones. A sensitivity analysis revealed that the gross primary productivity and evapotranspiration computed in BESS were most sensitive to leaf area index and solar irradiance, respectively. We quantified the mean global terrestrial estimates of gross primary productivity and evapotranpiration between 2001 and 2003 as 118 ± 26 PgC yr-1 and 500 ± 104 mm yr-1 (equivalent to 63,000 ± 13,100 km3 yr-1), respectively. BESS-derived gross primary productivity and evapotranspiration estimates were consistent with the estimates from independent machine-learning, data-driven products, but the process-oriented structure has the advantage of diagnosing sensitivity of mechanisms. The process-based BESS is able to offer gridded biophysical variables everywhere from local to the total global land scales with an 8-day interval over

  2. Overview of suspected adverse reactions to veterinary medicinal products reported in South Africa (March 2002 – February 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Naidoo

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The Veterinary Pharmacovigilance and Medicines Information Centre is responsible for the monitoring of veterinary adverse drug reactions in South Africa. An overview of reports of suspected adverse drug reactions received by the centre during the period March 2002 to February 2003 is given. In total, 40 reports were received. This had declined from the previous year. Most reports involved suspected adverse reactions that occurred in dogs and cats. Most of the products implicated were Stock Remedies. The animal owner predominantly administered these products. Only 1 report was received from a veterinary pharmaceutical company. Increasing numbers of reports are being received from veterinarians.

  3. High yield production of the medical radioisotope {sup 167}Tm by the {sup 167}Er(d,2n) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermanne, A., E-mail: aherman@vub.ac.b [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels (Belgium); Adam Rebeles, R. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels (Belgium); Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Spahn, I. [Institut fuer Nuklearchemie, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Ignatyuk, A.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-15

    As part of our systematic comparison of (p,n) and (d,2n) reactions, the excitation functions of the {sup 167}Er(d,2n){sup 167}Tm production reaction and reactions leading to Tm radio-impurities were investigated up to 20 MeV. A stacked foil irradiation technique and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy is used. The measured excitation functions are compared with results of ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D and TALYS reaction model codes and with data from our earlier investigations on natural Er. Thick target yields and contamination levels are discussed. A comparison with other charged particle production routes for {sup 167}Tm shows that deuteron induced reactions are not competitive.

  4. Applications of theoretical methods in atmospheric science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Matthew Stanley; Goodsite, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    in addressing an issue of primary concern: understanding photochemical reaction rates at the various conditions found in the atmosphere. Atmospheric science includes both atmospheric chemistry and atmospheric physics, meteorology, climatology and the study of extraterrestrial atmospheres....

  5. Ozone-initiated terpene reaction products in five European offices: replacement of a floor cleaning agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørgaard, A W; Kofoed-Sørensen, V; Mandin, C; Ventura, G; Mabilia, R; Perreca, E; Cattaneo, A; Spinazzè, A; Mihucz, V G; Szigeti, T; de Kluizenaar, Y; Cornelissen, H J M; Trantallidi, M; Carrer, P; Sakellaris, I; Bartzis, J; Wolkoff, P

    2014-11-18

    Cleaning agents often emit terpenes that react rapidly with ozone. These ozone-initiated reactions, which occur in the gas-phase and on surfaces, produce a host of gaseous and particulate oxygenated compounds with possible adverse health effects in the eyes and airways. Within the European Union (EU) project OFFICAIR, common ozone-initiated reaction products were measured before and after the replacement of the regular floor cleaning agent with a preselected low emitting floor cleaning agent in four offices located in four EU countries. One reference office in a fifth country did not use any floor cleaning agent. Limonene, α-pinene, 3-carene, dihydromyrcenol, geraniol, linalool, and α-terpineol were targeted for measurement together with the common terpene oxidation products formaldehyde, 4-acetyl-1-methylcyclohexene (4-AMCH), 3-isopropenyl-6-oxo-heptanal (IPOH), 6-methyl-5-heptene-2-one, (6-MHO), 4-oxopentanal (4-OPA), and dihydrocarvone (DHC). Two-hour air samples on Tenax TA and DNPH cartridges were taken in the morning, noon, and in the afternoon and analyzed by thermal desorption combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and HPLC/UV analysis, respectively. Ozone was measured in all sites. All the regular cleaning agents emitted terpenes, mainly limonene and linalool. After the replacement of the cleaning agent, substantially lower concentrations of limonene and formaldehyde were observed. Some of the oxidation product concentrations, in particular that of 4-OPA, were also reduced in line with limonene. Maximum 2 h averaged concentrations of formaldehyde, 4-AMCH, 6-MHO, and IPOH would not give rise to acute eye irritation-related symptoms in office workers; similarly, 6-AMCH, DHC and 4-OPA would not result in airflow limitation to the airways.

  6. Production of neutron-rich nuclides in the vicinity of N = 126 shell closure in multinucleon transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multinucleon transfer in low-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions is widely discussed as a method of production of yet-unknown neutron-rich nuclei hardly accessible (or inaccessible by other methods. Modeling of complicated dynamics of nuclear reactions induced by heavy ions is done within a multidimensional dynamical model of nucleus-nucleus collisions based on the Langevin equations. The model gives a continuous description of the system evolution starting from the well-separated target and projectile in the entrance channel of the reaction up to the formation of final reaction products. In this paper, rather recent sets of experimental data for the 136Xe+198Pt,208Pb reactions are analyzed together with the production cross sections for neutron-rich nuclei in the vicinity of the N = 126 magic shell.

  7. Measurements of photo-oxidation products from the reaction of a series of alkyl-benzenes with hydroxyl radicals during EXACT using comprehensive gas chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Hamilton

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Photo-oxidation products from the reaction of a series of alkyl-benzenes, (benzene, toluene, p-xylene and 1,3,5-trimethyl-benzene with hydroxyl radicals in the presence of NOx have been investigated using comprehensive gas chromatography (GCxGC. A GCxGC system has been developed which utilises valve modulation and independent separations as a function of both volatility and polarity. A number of carbonyl-type compounds were identified during a series of reactions carried out at the European Photoreactor (EUPHORE, a large volume outdoor reaction chamber in Valencia, Spain. Experiments were carried as part of the EXACT project (Effects of the oXidation of Aromatic Compounds in the Troposphere. Two litre chamber air samples were cryo-focused, with a sampling frequency of 30 minutes, allowing the evolution of species to be followed over oxidation periods of 3-6 hours. To facilitate product identification, several carbonyl compounds, which were possible products of the photo-oxidation, were synthesised and used as reference standards. For toluene reactions, observed oxygenated intermediates found included the co-eluting pair a-angelicalactone/4-oxo-2-pentenal, maleic anhydride, citraconic anhydride, benzaldehyde and p-methyl benzoquinone. In the p-xylene experiment, the products identified were E/Z-hex-3-en-2,5-dione and citraconic anhydride. For 1,3,5-TMB reactions, the products identified were 3,5-dimethylbenzaldehyde, 3,5-dimethyl-3H-furan-2-one and 3-methyl-5-methylene-5H-furan-2-one. Preliminary quantification was carried out on identified compounds using liquid standards. Comparison of FTIR and GCxGC for the measurement of the parent aromatics generally showed good agreement. Comparison of the concentrations observed by GCxGC to concentration-time profiles simulated using the Master Chemical Mechanism, MCMv3, demonstrates that this mechanism significantly over-predicts the concentrations of many product compounds and highlights the

  8. Optimizing Photosynthetic and Respiratory Parameters Based on the Seasonal Variation Pattern in Regional Net Ecosystem Productivity Obtained from Atmospheric Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z.; Chen, J.; Zheng, X.; Jiang, F.; Zhang, S.; Ju, W.; Yuan, W.; Mo, G.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we explore the feasibility of optimizing ecosystem photosynthetic and respiratory parameters from the seasonal variation pattern of the net carbon flux. An optimization scheme is proposed to estimate two key parameters (Vcmax and Q10) by exploiting the seasonal variation in the net ecosystem carbon flux retrieved by an atmospheric inversion system. This scheme is implemented to estimate Vcmax and Q10 of the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) to improve its NEP simulation in the Boreal North America (BNA) region. Simultaneously, in-situ NEE observations at six eddy covariance sites are used to evaluate the NEE simulations. The results show that the performance of the optimized BEPS is superior to that of the BEPS with the default parameter values. These results have the implication on using atmospheric CO2 data for optimizing ecosystem parameters through atmospheric inversion or data assimilation techniques.

  9. Multicomponent Hetero-[4 + 2] Cycloaddition/Allylboration Reaction: From Natural Product Synthesis to Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dennis G; Rybak, Taras; Verdelet, Tristan

    2016-11-15

    Multicomponent reactions (MCR), transformations employing three or more simple substrates in a single and highly atom-economical operation, are very attractive in both natural product synthesis and diversity-oriented synthesis of druglike molecules. Several popular multicomponent reactions were designed by combining two well-established individual reactions that utilize mutually compatible substrates. In this regard, it is not surprising that the merging of two reactions deemed as workhorses of stereoselective synthesis, the Diels-Alder cycloaddition and carbonyl allylboration, would produce a powerful and highly versatile tandem MCR process. The idea of using 1,3-dienylboronates in [4 + 2] cycloadditions as a means to produce cyclic allylic boronates was first reported by Vaultier and Hoffmann in 1987. In their seminal study, a 1-boronodiene was reacted with electron-poor alkenes, and the intermediate cycloadducts were isolated and added to aldehydes in a separate step leading to α-hydroxyalkylated carbocycles via a highly diastereoselective allylboration reaction. The one-pot three-component variant was realized in 1999 by Lallemand and co-workers, and soon after groups led by Hall and Carboni reported heterocyclic variants of the tandem [4 + 2] cycloaddition/allylboration to prepare α-hydroxyalkylated piperidine and pyran containing compounds, respectively. These classes of heterocycles are ubiquitous in Nature and are important components of pharmaceuticals. This Account summarizes the development and evolution of this powerful multicomponent reaction for accessing nonaromatic heterocycles and its many applications in natural products synthesis and drug discovery. The aza[4 + 2]cycloaddition/allylboration MCR was first optimized in our laboratory using 4-boronylhydrazonobutadienes and N-substituted maleimides, and it was exploited in the preparation of combinatorial libraries of polysubstituted imidopiperidines that feature as many as four elements of

  10. Reaction mechanisms in the geopolymeric conversion of inorganic waste to useful products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deventer, J.S.J. van [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Vic. 3010 (Australia)]. E-mail: jannie@unimelb.edu.au; Provis, J.L. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Vic. 3010 (Australia); Duxson, P. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Vic. 3010 (Australia); Lukey, G.C. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Vic. 3010 (Australia)

    2007-01-31

    High-performance materials for construction, waste immobilisation and an ever-growing range of niche applications are produced by the reaction sequence known as 'geopolymerisation'. In this process, an alkaline activating solution reacts with a solid aluminosilicate source, with solidification possible within minutes and very rapid early strength development. Geopolymers have been observed to display remarkable chemical and thermal stability, but due to their largely X-ray amorphous nature have only recently been accurately characterised. It has previously been shown that both fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag are highly effective as solid constituents of geopolymer reaction slurries, providing readily soluble alumina and silica that undergo a dissolution-reorientation-solidification process to form a geopolymeric material. Here a conceptual model for geopolymerisation is presented, allowing elucidation of the individual mechanistic steps involved in this complex and rapid process. The model is based on the reactions known to occur in the weathering of aluminosilicate minerals under alkaline conditions, which occur in a highly accelerated manner under the conditions required for geopolymerisation. Transformation of the waste materials to the mixture of gel and nanocrystalline/semicrystalline phases comprising the geopolymeric product is described. Presence of calcium in the solid waste materials affects the process of geopolymerisation by providing extra nucleation sites for precipitation of dissolved species, which may be used to tailor setting times and material properties if desired. Application of geopolymer technology in remediation of toxic or radioactive contaminants will depend on the ability to analyse and predict long-term durability and stability based on initial mix formulation. The model presented here provides a framework by which this will be made possible.

  11. Observation of Exotic Meson Production in the Reaction {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {eta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, E. I.; Stienike, D. L.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Adams, G. S.; Adams, T.; Bar-Yam, Z.; Bishop, J. M.; Bodyagin, V. A.; Brown, D. S.; Cason, N. M. (and others)

    2001-04-30

    An amplitude analysis of an exclusive sample of 5765 events from the reaction {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{eta}{prime}{pi}{sup -}p at 18 GeV/c is described. The {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup -} production is dominated by natural parity exchange and by three partial waves: those with J{sup PC}=1{sup -+} , 2{sup ++} , and 4{sup ++} . A mass-dependent analysis of the partial-wave amplitudes indicates the production of the a{sub 2}(1320) meson as well as the a{sub 4}(2040) meson, observed for the first time decaying to {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup -} . The dominant, exotic (non-q{bar q}) 1{sup -+} partial wave is shown to be resonant with a mass of 1.597{+-}0.010{sup +0.045}{sub -0.010} GeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 0.340{+-}0.040{+-}0.050 GeV /c{sup 2} . This exotic state, the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) , is produced with a t dependence which is different from that of the a{sub 2}(1320) meson, indicating differences between the production mechanisms for the two states.

  12. Production mechanism of new neutron-rich heavy nuclei in the 136Xe +198Pt reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Wen, Peiwei; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Gen; Li, Bing; Xu, Xinxin; Liu, Zhong; Zhu, Shaofei; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2018-01-01

    The multinucleon transfer reaction of 136Xe +198Pt at Elab = 7.98 MeV/nucleon is investigated by using the improved quantum molecular dynamics model. The quasielastic, deep-inelastic, and quasifission collision mechanisms are studied via analyzing the angular distributions of fragments and the energy dissipation processes during the collisions. The measured isotope production cross sections of projectile-like fragments are reasonably well reproduced by the calculation of the ImQMD model together with the GEMINI code. The isotope production cross sections for the target-like fragments and double differential cross sections of 199Pt, 203Pt, and 208Pt are calculated. It is shown that about 50 new neutron-rich heavy nuclei can be produced via deep-inelastic collision mechanism, where the production cross sections are from 10-3 to 10-6 mb. The corresponding emission angle and the kinetic energy for these new neutron-rich nuclei locate at 40∘-60∘ and 100-200 MeV, respectively.

  13. Reaction between B{sub 4}C and austenitic stainless steel in oxidizing atmosphere at temperatures below 1673 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Ryosuke; Ueda, Shigeru, E-mail: tie@tagen.tohokku.ac.jp; Kim, Sun-Joong; Gao, Xu; Kitamura, Shin-ya

    2015-11-15

    Synopsis: The control rod of a light water nuclear reactor is constructed of a pole comprising stainless steel filled with a boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) core. To appraise the stability of this control rod in the event of a severe accident, the reactions of the system of B{sub 4}C and grade 304 austenitic stainless steel (SS) were observed at 1473 K in Ar, air, and a mixture of both. To clarify the reaction mechanism and the influence of the oxygen partial pressure, the weight change ratio was monitored and differential thermal analysis was performed at the temperature range from room temperature to 1673 K to monitor the reaction under controlled oxygen partial pressure. The results showed that there was no direct reaction between B{sub 4}C and SS. When the temperature was higher than the melting point of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (743 K), the molten B{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed by oxidation of B{sub 4}C covered the surface of SS by spreading wetting. This B{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer functioned to transport oxygen from the atmosphere to SS, leading to accelerated oxidation of SS. As a result, a Fe–Cr–Ni–B–O oxide phase covered the surface of SS. Oxygen continuously entered the oxide phase with prolonged reaction time, and oxides such as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and FeOx–Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} were found on the outer layer. Therefore, in the presence of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed by oxidation of B{sub 4}C, the oxidation of SS was accelerated below the eutectic temperature of the Fe–C system. - Highlights: • The reactions of the system of B{sub 4}C and grade 304 austenitic stainless steel (SS) were studied at 1473 K. • The molten B{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed by oxidation of B{sub 4}C covered the surface of SS by spreading wetting at the temperature above 743 K. • In the presence of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the oxidation of SS was accelerated.

  14. Detection of reactive oxygen species supplied into the water bottom by atmospheric non-thermal plasma jet using iodine-starch reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Eto, Wataru; Hamada, Masaki; Wakabayashi, Yasutaka; Abe, Yasufumi; Kihara, Keisuke

    2015-08-01

    The supply of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to a target through liquid by plasma jet should be clarified. In this study, a non-thermal plasma jet was irradiated onto the water surface in atmospheric air, and the ROS reaching the water bottom were detected using a gel reagent with iodine-starch reactions. As a result, two-dimensional ROS distributions were visually obtained at the bottom, and the relative ROS concentration was obtained by absorbance measurement. Oxygen addition to helium led to a higher ROS supply into the bottom than helium plasma jet and ozone exposure. A doughnut-shaped ROS distribution was clearly observed at the bottom under certain conditions. The ROS concentration at the bottom significantly depended on irradiation distance and water layer thickness. It is observed from the results obtained using a liquid reagent that the plasma-jet-induced flow and the mixing effect play an important role in ROS supply into the bottom.

  15. Atmospheric chemistry of dimethyl sulfide. Kinetics of the CH3SCH2O2 + NO2 reaction in the gas phase at 296 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.J.; Sehested, J.; Wallington, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    The pulse radiolysis of SF6/CH3SCH3/O-2/NO2 gas mixtures was used to generate CH3SCH2O2 radicals in the presence of NO2. By monitoring the rate of NO2 decay using its absorption at 400 nm, rate constants for the reaction of CH3SCH2O2 radicals with NO2 were measured to be (9.2 +/- 0.9) x 10(-12) a......(-12) and (7.1 +/- 0.9) X 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at room temperature in 1000 and 300 mbar of SF6 diluent, respectively. Results are discussed with respect to the atmospheric chemistry of dimethyl sulfide....

  16. Spatial distribution of the atmospheric radionuclide production by galactic cosmic rays and its imprint in natural archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A. K.; Blinov, A. V.; Frolov, D. A.; Konstantinov, A. N.; Ostryakov, V. M.; Vasilyev, G. I.

    2017-11-01

    We used the GEANT4 toolkit to simulate the altitude and latitude profiles of the production rate of 14C, 10Be and 36Cl radionuclides by the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) interactions in the terrestrial atmosphere at a varying geomagnetic field. We found that applying two intranuclear cascade models incorporated in GEANT4 (Binary Intranuclear Cascade, BIC, and Bertini Intranuclear Cascade, BERT) result in significantly different production rate values. We present the conclusions about the certain model relevance to the abundance of these isotopes in the surface fallout, ice-core records and lunar soil depth profile. Comparison of our simulations with the recent publication of Poluianov et al. (2016) shows a good agreement for 14C (BIC) and 10Be (BERT) and a definite by the factor 2-3 difference in the 36Cl (BIC) atmospheric yield functions. Also, the mean level and amplitude of the 10Be variations in polar ice from central regions of Antarctica and Greenland could be accounted for its tropospheric production by GCRs. The fallout rate of 36Cl there can be explained assuming its additional input from the stratosphere. Significant additional variations of radionuclide sedimentation rate in polar regions may arise due to tropopause height changes even at a constant atmospheric production rate of the certain isotope.

  17. Meteorites, Organics and Fischer-Tropsch Type Reaction: Production and Destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Natasha M.; Burton, A. S.; Nurth, J. A., III

    2011-01-01

    There has been an ongoing debate about the relative importance about the various chemical reactions that fonned organics in the early solar system. One proposed method that has long been recognized as a potential source of organics is Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) synthesis. This process is commonly used in industry to produce fuels (i.e., complex hydrocarbons) by catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide. Hill and Nuth were the first to publish results of FTT experiments that also included Haber-Bosch (HB) processes (hydrogenation of nitrogen. Their findings included the production of nitrilebearing compounds as well as trace amounts of methyl amine. Previous experience with these reactions revealed that the organic coating deposited on the grains is also an efficient catalyst and that the coating is composed of insoluble organic matter (10M) and could be reminiscent of the organic matrix found in some meteorites. This current set of FTT-styled experiments tracks the evolution of a set of organics, amino acids, in detail.

  18. Formation of early and advanced Maillard reaction products correlates to the ripening of cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanneberg, Robert; Salzwedel, Grit; Glomb, Marcus A

    2012-01-18

    The present study deals with the characterization of the ripening of cheese. A traditional German acid curd cheese was ripened under defined conditions at elevated temperature, and protein and amino acid modifications were investigated. Degree of proteolysis and analysis of early [Amadori compound furosine (6)] and advanced [N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (4), N(ε)-carboxyethyllysine (5)] Maillard reaction products confirmed the maturation to proceed from the rind to the core of the cheese. Whereas 6 was decreased, 4 and 5 increased over time. Deeper insight into the Maillard reaction during the ripening of cheese was achieved by the determination of selected α-dicarbonyl compounds. Especially methylglyoxal (2) showed a characteristic behavior during storage of the acid curd cheese. Decrease of this reactive structure was directly correlated to the formation of 5. To extend the results of experimental ripening to commercial cheeses, different aged Gouda types were investigated. Maturation times of the samples ranged from 6 to 8 weeks (young) to more than 1 year (aged). Again, increase of 5 and decrease of 2 were able to describe the ripening of this rennet coagulated cheese. Therefore, both chemical parameters are potent markers to characterize the degree of maturation, independent of coagulation.

  19. Complex fragment production in Kr-induced reactions at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorno, A.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M. (Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica INFN, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud); Bonasera, A. (INFN, Catania (Italy)); Cavinato, M.; Gulminelli, F. (Milan Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica INFN, Milan (Italy)); Cunsolo, A. (Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica INFN, Catania (Italy)); Di Leo, G.C. (Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica)

    1991-07-15

    Several features of complex fragment production at intermediate energies can be understood from the coupling of a dynamical description, which takes into account entrance-channel properties, and a statistical decay of equilibrated primary sources. We discuss this point using two different models for the dynamics, both based on the idea of the competition between mean field and two-body effects in this intermediate-energy range. The importance of a slow emission of large clusters in the de-excitation stage is stressed, with the possibility of using a suitably extended evaporation code. Fragment yields and spectra are analysed for Kr-induced reactions on C, Al, Ti at 34.4 MeV/A and on Au at 43 MeV/A. The effects of a different equation of state (e.o.s.) used in microscopic calculations is analysed. A stiffer e.o.s. implies more stopping of the fragments. Finally, projectile-like fragments produced in the Kr+Au reaction at 200 MeV/A are analysed. The predictions of the participant-spectator model are confirmed in this energy range. (orig.).

  20. The Production of Biodiesel and Bio-kerosene from Coconut Oil Using Microwave Assisted Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAIFUDDIN, N.; SITI FAZLILI, A.; KUMARAN, P.; PEI-JUA, N.; PRIATHASHINI, P.

    2016-03-01

    Biofuels including biodiesel, an alternative fuel, is renewable, environmentally friendly, non-toxic and low emissions. The raw material used in this work was coconut oil, which contained saturated fatty acids about 90% with high percentage of medium chain (C8-C12), especially lauric acid and myristic acid. The purpose of this research was to study the effect of power and NaOH catalyst in transesterification assisted by microwave for production of biofuels (biodiesel and bio-kerosene) derived from coconut oil. The reaction was performed with oil and methanol using mole ratio of 1:6, catalyst concentration of 0.6% with microwave power at 100W, 180W, 300W, 450W, 600W, and 850W. The reaction time was set at of 3, 5, 7, 10 and 15 min. The results showed that microwave could accelerate the transesterification process to produce biodiesel and bio-kerosene using NaOH catalyst. The highest yield of biodiesel was 97.17 %, or 99.05 % conversion at 5 min and 100W microwave power. Meanwhile, the bio-kerosene obtained was 65% after distillation.

  1. Methyl Ester Production via Heterogeneous Acid-Catalyzed Simultaneous Transesterification and Esterification Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrayanah, S.; Erwin; Marsih, I. N.; Suprapto; Murwani, I. K.

    2017-05-01

    The heterogeneous acid catalysts (MgF2 and ZnF2) have been used to catalyze the simultaneous transesterification and esterification reactions of crude palm oil (CPO) with methanol. Catalysts were synthesized by sol-gel method (combination of fluorolysis and hydrolysis). The physicochemical, structural, textural, thermal stability of the prepared catalysts was investigated by N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, FT-IR, SEM and TG/DTG. Both MgF2 and ZnF2 have rutile structures with a different phase. The surface area of ZnF2 is smaller than that of MgF2, but the pore size and volume of ZnF2 are larger than those of MgF2. However, these materials are thermally stable. The performance of the catalysts is determined from the yield of catalysts toward the formation of methyl ester determined based on the product of methyl ester obtained from the reaction. The catalytic activity of ZnF2 is higher than MgF2 amounted to 85.21% and 26.82% with the optimum condition. The high activity of ZnF2 could be attributed to its pore diameter and pore volume but was not correlated with its surface area. The yield of methyl ester decreased along with the increase in molar ratio of methanol/CPO from 85.21 to 80.99 for ZnF2, respectively.

  2. Reaction of proton pump inhibitors with model peptides results in novel products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Charles; Zhu, Lixin; Guan, Shenheng; Machen, Terry E; Forte, John G

    2013-01-01

    The proposed mechanism for proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is that PPIs are activated at low pH to the sulfenamide form, which reacts with the sulfhydryl group of cysteine(s) at the active site of the proton pump, to produce reducible disulfide-bonded PPI-proton pump conjugates. However, this mechanism cannot explain the observations that some PPI-protein conjugates are irreducible. This study was designed to investigate the chemistry of the irreducible conjugates by mass spectrometry, using three PPIs and 17 cysteine-containing peptides. While some peptides favored the formation of reducible PPI-peptide adduct, the other peptides mainly produced irreducible adducts. Characterization of the irreducible adduct revealed that the irreducible bonding required the participation of both a sulfhydryl group and a nearby primary amino group. High resolution mass spectrometry suggested a molecular structure of the irreducible adduct. These results suggested a reaction mechanism in which the PPI pyridone form reacted with an amino group and a sulfhydryl group to form an irreducible adduct. The irreducible adduct becomes the dominant product over time because of the irreversible nature of the pyridone-mediated reaction. These findings may explain the irreducible inhibition of H/K-ATPase by PPIs and their relatively slow biological turnover in vivo. [Supplementary materials: available only at http://dx.doi.org/10.1254/jphs.13058FP].

  3. Iron oxide and pyrocatechol: a spectroscopy study of the reaction products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner José Barreto

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of 1,2-dihydroxy-benzene (pyrocatechol (C6H6O2 with iron oxide (Fe2O3 and sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3 in aqueous medium (pH 7 was investigated. Pyrocatechol suffers autoxidation and coordinates with Fe3+ in solution. The presence of S2O3(2- in solution was fundamental to generate and stabilize the pyrocatechol oxidation products as o-semiquinones. This compound was isolated and its structure characterized using FT-IR, EPR and UV-Vis Spectroscopy as [CTA][Fe(SQ2(Cat]. A thermal mass loss mechanism was proposed based on Thermogravimetric Analysis (TG to support the structural characterization.

  4. Broadband Microwave Study of Reaction Intermediates and Products Through the Pyrolysis of Oxygenated Biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Hernandez-Castillo, Alicia O.; Fritz, Sean; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2017-06-01

    The rapidly growing list of potential plant-derived biofuels creates a challenge for the scientific community to provide a molecular-scale understanding of their combustion. Development of accurate combustion models rests on a foundation of experimental data on the kinetics and product branching ratios of their individual reaction steps. Therefore, new spectroscopic tools are necessary to selectively detect and characterize fuel components and reactive intermediates generated by pyrolysis and combustion. Substituted furans, including furanic ethers, are considered second-generation biofuel candidates. Following the work of the Ellison group, an 8-18 GHz microwave study was carried out on the unimolecular and bimolecular decomposition of the smallest furanic ether, 2-methoxy furan, and it`s pyrolysis intermediate, the 2-furanyloxy radical, formed in a high-temperature pyrolysis source coupled to a supersonic expansion. Details of the experimental setup and analysis of the spectrum of the radical will be discussed.

  5. Intermediate mass fragment production in the proton-induced reactions of heavy targets

    CERN Document Server

    Deppman, A; Guimaraes, V; Karapetyan, G S; Balabekyan, A R; Demekhina, N A; Adam, J

    2013-01-01

    The production of intermediate-mass fragments (IMFs) formed in the proton-induced reaction with $^{238}$U and $^{237}$Np at 660 MeV was measured in the LNP Phasotron and in U-400M Cyclotron, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Russia. We have applied the induced-activation method in off-line analysis. A total of 115 isotopes of all elements in the range $7 \\leq A \\leq 69$ were unambiguously identified with high precision. There is a consideration that the formed nuclides could be produced in a very asymmetric binary decay of heavy nuclei originating from the spallation of heavy targets. Mass-yield distributions were derived from the data, and were compared with the the simulation code CRISP for multi modal fission.

  6. Pion production in dp-->dNπ reactions with deuteron projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiff, J.; Koch I.; Scobel, W.; Rohdjeß, H.; Dyring, J.; Fransson, K.; Gustafsson, L.; Häggström, S.; Höistad, B.; Johanson, J.; Johansson, A.; Johansson, T.; Khoukaz, A.; Kullander, S.; Ruber, R. J.; Złomańczuk, J.; Dunin, V.; Morosov, B.; Sukhanov, A.; Zernov, A.; Kupść, A.; Marciniewski, P.; Stepaniak, J.; Bilger, R.; Brodowski, W.; Clement, H.; Wagner, G. J.; Calén, H.; Ekström, C.; Zabierowski, J.; Shwartz, B.; Sukhanov, A.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Turowiecki, A.

    2000-12-01

    Kinematically complete events have been studied for the reactions dp-->dpπ0 and dp-->dnπ+ at projectile energies between 437 and 559 MeV. The measurement covers a range of pion momenta η=pmaxπ,c.m./mπc from near the production threshold (η=0.32) to η=0.86 close to the NN-->NNπ threshold. The measurements were performed at the CELSIUS storage ring with the PROMICE/WASA setup. Angular and spectral distributions of the charged ejectiles as well as total cross sections are decomposed into the fractions that can be attributed to a quasifree NN-->dπ process with a spectator nucleon, and to a process involving all three nucleons. The quasifree contribution increases with energy and dominates from the NN-->NNπ threshold on. The results are compared to calculations with a spectator model with and without dp final state interactions.

  7. Ion production and ionization effect in the atmosphere during the Bastille day GLE 59 due to high energy SEPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishev, A. L.; Velinov, P. I. Y.

    2018-01-01

    The influence of high energy particles, specifically cosmic rays, on atmospheric physics and chemistry is highly discussed. In most of the proposed models the role of ionization in the atmosphere due to cosmic rays is not negligible. Moreover, effect(s) on minor constituents and aerosols are recently observed, specifically over the polar regions during strong solar particle events. According to the recent findings for such effects it is necessary an essential increase of ion production, specifically during the winter period. The galactic cosmic rays are the main source of ionization in the Earth's stratosphere and troposphere. Occasionally, the atmospheric ionization is significantly enhanced during strong solar energetic particles events, specifically over the polar caps. During the solar cycle 23 several strong ground level enhancements were observed. One of the strongest was the Bastille day event occurred on 14 July 2000. Using a full Monte Carlo 3-D model, we compute the atmospheric ionization, considering explicitly the contribution of cosmic rays with galactic and solar origin, focusing on high energy particles. The model is based on atmospheric cascade simulation with the PLANETOCOSMICS code. The ion production rate is computed as a function of the altitude above the sea level. The ion production rate is computed on a step ranging from 10 to 30 min throughout the event, considering explicitly the spectral and angular characteristics of the high energy part of solar protons as well as their time evolution. The corresponding event averaged ionization effect relative to the average due to galactic cosmic rays is computed in lower stratosphere and upper troposphere at various altitudes, namely 20 km, 15 km, 12 km and 8 km above the sea level in a sub-polar and polar regions. The 24h and the weekly ionization effects are also computed in the troposphere and low stratosphere. Several applications are discussed.

  8. Atmospheric corrosion in subtropical areas: XRD and electrochemical study of zinc atmospheric corrosion products in the province of Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)]. E-mail: jmorales@ull.es; Diaz, F. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Hernandez-Borges, J. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Universidad de La Laguna, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Gonzalez, S. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2006-02-15

    In the present paper, zinc sheets have been exposed for 4 years to the action of different atmospheres in 35 test sites located in the province of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. Corrosion products formed on the surface of the samples have been identified by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) for the first and second year of exposure. Zincite, hydrozincite, simonkolleite, zinc chlorohydroxysulphate, zinc oxysulphate and zinc hydroxysulphate have been identified in the test sheets. Preliminary results of an electrochemical study of the breakdown potential of zinc samples are also presented in order to test the protective effect of the film formed on the surface of the samples. It was found that the protective effect of this film increases linearly with exposure time.

  9. Mitigation of ASR by the use of LiNO{sub 3}—Characterization of the reaction products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemann, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.leemann@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lörtscher, Luzia [Institute for Surface Science and Technology (D-MATL), ETH Zurich, Schafmattstr. 6, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Bernard, Laetitia; Le Saout, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M. [Institute for Surface Science and Technology (D-MATL), ETH Zurich, Schafmattstr. 6, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-05-01

    The influence of the LiNO{sub 3} on the ASR product was studied both in a model system and in mortars. In the model system, the addition of LiNO{sub 3} decreases the dissolution rate and the solubility of silica. Lithium changes the 2-dimensional cross-linked (Q{sub 3} dominated) network of the ASR product into a less structured, Q{sub 2} dominated product, likely by adopting the role of calcium. In the mortar samples the addition of LiNO{sub 3} decreases expansion and significantly influences the chemical composition and the morphology of the reaction product. Lithium decreases the calcium, sodium and potassium content and changes the relatively porous plate-like reaction product into a dense one without texture. The findings in the mortars indicate that the ASR-suppressing effect of lithium is caused by the lower potential of the reaction product to swell. Furthermore, it forms a protective barrier after an initial reaction slowing down ASR. - Highlights: • Detection of lithium in ASR product by ToF-SIMS • Relation between composition of pore solution and ASR product • Identification of ASR suppressing mechanisms of LiNO{sub 3}.

  10. Photochemistry in Outer Solar System Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Darrell F.

    2005-01-01

    The photochemistries of the H2-He atmospheres of the gas giants Jupiter, Saturn and ice giants Uranus and Neptune and Titan’s mildly reducing N2 atmosphere are reviewed in terms of general chemical and physical principles. The thermochemical furnace regions in the deep atmospheres and the photochemical regions of the giant planets are coupled by vertical mixing to ensure efficient recyling of photochemical products. On Titan,mass loss of hydrogen ensures photochemical evolution of methane into less saturated hydrocarbons. A summary discussion of major dissociation paths and essential chemical reactions is given. The chapter ends with a overview of vertical transport processes in planetary atmospheres.

  11. The quantification of free Amadori compounds and amino acids allows to model the bound Maillard reaction products formation in soybean products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troise, Antonio Dario; Wiltafsky, Markus; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Vitaglione, Paola

    2018-01-01

    The quantification of protein bound Maillard reaction products (MRPs) is still a challenge in food chemistry. Protein hydrolysis is the bottleneck step: it is time consuming and the protein degradation is not always complete. In this study, the quantitation of free amino acids and Amadori products

  12. Analytical and simulation modeling of influence of all kinds of production on the atmosphere and ways of its improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.І. Prylypko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model has been created that determines the dependence for a certain period of time of the total amount of emissions of contaminants into the atmosphere from all types of industrial activity of people using different types of fuel. This dependence is determined by the period of the general operation of production facilities, the period of operation of their equipment, as well as by regulating the amount of fuel consumed, the modernization of production facilities, the installation of additional purification equipment, and the optimization of interbranch relations between different industries. In the paper, general relationships between fuel consumption and emissions of contaminants for a certain period of time were found. The possibilities of minimizing fuel consumption as well as emissions of contaminants are analyzed by adjusting the factors that determine this minimization. Specific actions are proposed to reduce emissions of contaminants into the atmosphere.

  13. Subthreshold pion production in the reaction /sup 139/La + /sup 139/La. -->. pi. /sup + -/ + X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.

    1988-01-01

    We have measured charged pion production in the reaction /sup 139/La + /sup 139/La ..-->.. ..pi../sup + -/ + X at three beam energies (246, 183 and 138 MeVnucleon) below the nucleon-nucleon threshold. Associated multiplicity for charged participants was obtained using a 110-element scintillator multiplicity array. Data were taken over the angular range of 21/degree/ to 67/degree/ in the laboratory (equivalent to 30/degree/ to 90/degree/ in the center of mass). Dependence of the spectra upon pion charge, energy and angle, beam energy, system mass and associated multiplicity was investigated. Based on the isotropic angular distibutions and the associated multiplicities for pion production, it appears that subthreshold pions in the range of our experiment are produced predominantly from a source at rest in the center of mass and involving a large number of nucleons. The general character of the subthreshold pion spectra is comparable to previous results above threshold. However, the scaling of the subthreshold pion yield with system mass deviates from the dependence observed in light systems, to an extent which cannot be explained by a simple nucleon-nucleon model. We also found charge dependent structure in the pion spectra, which we analysed in the framework of both Coulomb distortion and clustering models. We conclude that while we did not find clear evidence of collective effects in subthreshold pion production, it would be very worthwhile to conduct a systematic investigation of pion production for all charge states and over a range of angles, system masses and beam energies, below threshold. 170 refs., 78 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses atmospheric neutrino experiments and the neutrino oscillation studies with these neutrinos.

  15. Raman spectroscopy after accelerated ageing tests to assess the origin of some decayed products found in real historical bricks affected by urban polluted atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguregui, M; Sarmiento, A; Escribano, R; Martinez-Arkarazo, I; Castro, K; Madariaga, J M

    2009-12-01

    Bricks, together with stones and mortars, can be considered as one of the most important building materials that constitute our built heritage. Numerous factors which cause several decaying pathologies in bricks can be listed, but it should be emphasised that the most severe and damaging one is the wet and dry deposition of both combustion and greenhouse gases (CO(2), SO(x) and NO(x) mainly). For instance, after the impact of CO(2) and SO(x), the decayed products promoted in bricks are carbonates and sulphates. Once identified in all these kinds of salts in real samples, it is necessary to make sure that the aggressive atmospheric conditions are sufficient to promote the formation of these salts. Therefore, accelerated exposure test are a good alternative in order to simulate the formation of these decayed compounds and to predict the reactions that promote the decaying mechanism. In this work, brick samples manufactured at different firing temperatures following ancient methods were subjected to humidity/dryness, freeze/thaw, CO(2) and SO(2) (KESTERNICH DIN 50018) accelerated ageing tests followed by a Raman spectroscopy screening in order to verify the formation of sulphate and carbonate salts in bricks on accelerated conditions, simulating the damage caused by a polluted atmosphere throughout many years of exposure.

  16. Ozonolysis of α/β-farnesene mixture: Analysis of gas-phase and particulate reaction products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaoui, Mohammed; Lewandowski, Michael; Offenberg, John H.; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.

    2017-11-01

    Atmospheric oxidation of sesquiterpenes has been of considerable interest recently because of their likely contribution to ambient organic aerosol, but farnesene oxidation has been reported in only a few studies and with limited data. In the present study, a detailed chemical analysis of the organic fraction of gas and particle phases originating from the ozonolysis of a mixture of α-farnesene and β-farnesene was carried out in a 14.5 m3 smog chamber. More than 80 organic compounds bearing OH functionality were detected for the first time in this system in the gas and particle phases. The major secondary organic aerosol (SOA) components included conjugated α-farnesene trienols, hydroxyl carboxylic acid and its corresponding lactones, C3-C7 linear dicarboxylic acids, and hydroxy/carbonyl/carboxylic compounds. Of particular importance was 5,6-dihydroxy-6-methylheptan-2-one (DHMHO), which was detected at high concentration. In the gas phase, the main species identified were trienols and their corresponding epoxides and diepoxides. Proposed reaction schemes are provided for selected compounds. A similar analysis was performed for ambient PM2.5 samples collected during summer 2013 as part of the SOAS to determine farnesene contributions to PM2.5. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis were consistent with the occurrence of several farnesene SOA compounds, indicating the potential impact of farnesene on the regional aerosol burden. The high abundance of DHMHO in chamber SOA and its presence in ambient PM2.5 is particularly important because to our knowledge it is specific to farnesene and therefore could serve as an indicator for farnesene emitted into ambient aerosol. In the absence of authentic standards, however, it is difficult to accurately quantify the contribution of SOA originating from farnesene to ambient PM2.5.

  17. Atmospheric CO2 concentration effects on rice water use and biomass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Uttam; Quick, William Paul; Barrios, Marilou; Sta Cruz, Pompe C; Dingkuhn, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have addressed effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration on rice biomass production and yield but effects on crop water use are less well understood. Irrigated rice evapotranspiration (ET) is composed of floodwater evaporation and canopy transpiration. Crop coefficient Kc (ET over potential ET, or ETo) is crop specific according to FAO, but may decrease as CO2 concentration rises. A sunlit growth chamber experiment was conducted in the Philippines, exposing 1.44-m2 canopies of IR72 rice to four constant CO2 levels (195, 390, 780 and 1560 ppmv). Crop geometry and management emulated field conditions. In two wet (WS) and two dry (DS) seasons, final aboveground dry weight (agdw) was measured. At 390 ppmv [CO2] (current ambient level), agdw averaged 1744 g m-2, similar to field although solar radiation was only 61% of ambient. Reduction to 195 ppmv [CO2] reduced agdw to 56±5% (SE), increase to 780 ppmv increased agdw to 128±8%, and 1560 ppmv increased agdw to 142±5%. In 2013WS, crop ET was measured by weighing the water extracted daily from the chambers by the air conditioners controlling air humidity. Chamber ETo was calculated according to FAO and empirically corrected via observed pan evaporation in chamber vs. field. For 390 ppmv [CO2], Kc was about 1 during crop establishment but increased to about 3 at flowering. 195 ppmv CO2 reduced Kc, 780 ppmv increased it, but at 1560 ppmv it declined. Whole-season crop water use was 564 mm (195 ppmv), 719 mm (390 ppmv), 928 mm (780 ppmv) and 803 mm (1560 ppmv). With increasing [CO2], crop water use efficiency (WUE) gradually increased from 1.59 g kg-1 (195 ppmv) to 2.88 g kg-1 (1560 ppmv). Transpiration efficiency (TE) measured on flag leaves responded more strongly to [CO2] than WUE. Responses of some morphological traits are also reported. In conclusion, increased CO2 promotes biomass more than water use of irrigated rice, causing increased WUE, but it does not help saving water. Comparability

  18. Atmospheric CO2 concentration effects on rice water use and biomass production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam Kumar

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have addressed effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration on rice biomass production and yield but effects on crop water use are less well understood. Irrigated rice evapotranspiration (ET is composed of floodwater evaporation and canopy transpiration. Crop coefficient Kc (ET over potential ET, or ETo is crop specific according to FAO, but may decrease as CO2 concentration rises. A sunlit growth chamber experiment was conducted in the Philippines, exposing 1.44-m2 canopies of IR72 rice to four constant CO2 levels (195, 390, 780 and 1560 ppmv. Crop geometry and management emulated field conditions. In two wet (WS and two dry (DS seasons, final aboveground dry weight (agdw was measured. At 390 ppmv [CO2] (current ambient level, agdw averaged 1744 g m-2, similar to field although solar radiation was only 61% of ambient. Reduction to 195 ppmv [CO2] reduced agdw to 56±5% (SE, increase to 780 ppmv increased agdw to 128±8%, and 1560 ppmv increased agdw to 142±5%. In 2013WS, crop ET was measured by weighing the water extracted daily from the chambers by the air conditioners controlling air humidity. Chamber ETo was calculated according to FAO and empirically corrected via observed pan evaporation in chamber vs. field. For 390 ppmv [CO2], Kc was about 1 during crop establishment but increased to about 3 at flowering. 195 ppmv CO2 reduced Kc, 780 ppmv increased it, but at 1560 ppmv it declined. Whole-season crop water use was 564 mm (195 ppmv, 719 mm (390 ppmv, 928 mm (780 ppmv and 803 mm (1560 ppmv. With increasing [CO2], crop water use efficiency (WUE gradually increased from 1.59 g kg-1 (195 ppmv to 2.88 g kg-1 (1560 ppmv. Transpiration efficiency (TE measured on flag leaves responded more strongly to [CO2] than WUE. Responses of some morphological traits are also reported. In conclusion, increased CO2 promotes biomass more than water use of irrigated rice, causing increased WUE, but it does not help saving water. Comparability

  19. Formation of stratospheric nitric acid by a hydrated ion cluster reaction: Implications for the effect of energetic particle precipitation on the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvissel, O.-K.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Stordal, F.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Santee, M. L.

    2012-08-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the effects of energetic particle precipitation on the middle atmosphere and in particular upon the nitrogen family and ozone, we have modeled the chemical and dynamical middle atmosphere response to the introduction of a chemical pathway that produces HNO3 by conversion of N2O5 upon hydrated water clusters H+·(H2O)n. We have used an ensemble of simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole-Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) chemistry-climate model. The chemical pathway alters the internal partitioning of the NOy family during winter months in both hemispheres, and ultimately triggers statistically significant changes in the climatological distributions of constituents including: i) a cold season production and loss of HNO3 and N2O5, respectively, and ii) a cold season decrease and increase in NOx/NOy-ratio and O3, respectively, in the polar regions of both hemispheres. We see an improved seasonal evolution of modeled HNO3 compared to satellite observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), albeit not enough HNO3 is produced at high altitudes. Through O3changes, both temperature and dynamics are affected, allowing for complex chemical-dynamical feedbacks beyond the cold season when the pathway is active. Hence, we also find a NOxpolar increase in spring-to-summer in the southern hemisphere, and in spring in the northern hemisphere. The springtime NOxincrease arises from anomalously strong poleward transport associated with a weaker polar vortex. We argue that the weakening of zonal-mean polar winds down to the lower stratosphere, which is statistically significant at the 0.90 level in spring months in the southern hemisphere, is caused by strengthened planetary waves induced by the middle and sub-polar latitude zonal asymmetries in O3and short-wave heating.

  20. The C(3P) + NH3 Reaction in Interstellar Chemistry. I. Investigation of the Product Formation Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgalais, Jérémy; Capron, Michael; Abhinavam Kailasanathan, Ranjith Kumar; Osborn, David L.; Hickson, Kevin M.; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Goulay, Fabien; Le Picard, Sébastien D.

    2015-10-01

    The product formation channels of ground state carbon atoms, C(3P), reacting with ammonia, NH3, have been investigated using two complementary experiments and electronic structure calculations. Reaction products are detected in a gas flow tube experiment (330 K, 4 Torr) using tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry. Temporal profiles of the species formed and photoionization spectra are used to identify primary products of the C + NH3 reaction. In addition, H-atom formation is monitored by VUV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) from room temperature to 50 K in a supersonic gas flow generated by the Laval nozzle technique. Electronic structure calculations are performed to derive intermediates, transition states, and complexes formed along the reaction coordinate. The combination of photoionization and LIF experiments supported by theoretical calculations indicate that in the temperature and pressure range investigated, the H + H2CN production channel represents 100% of the product yield for this reaction. Kinetics measurements of the title reaction down to 50 K and the effect of the new rate constants on interstellar nitrogen hydride abundances using a model of dense interstellar clouds are reported in Paper II.

  1. Controlled nitric oxide production via O(1D  + N2O reactions for use in oxidation flow reactor studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lambe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation flow reactors that use low-pressure mercury lamps to produce hydroxyl (OH radicals are an emerging technique for studying the oxidative aging of organic aerosols. Here, ozone (O3 is photolyzed at 254 nm to produce O(1D radicals, which react with water vapor to produce OH. However, the need to use parts-per-million levels of O3 hinders the ability of oxidation flow reactors to simulate NOx-dependent secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation pathways. Simple addition of nitric oxide (NO results in fast conversion of NOx (NO + NO2 to nitric acid (HNO3, making it impossible to sustain NOx at levels that are sufficient to compete with hydroperoxy (HO2 radicals as a sink for organic peroxy (RO2 radicals. We developed a new method that is well suited to the characterization of NOx-dependent SOA formation pathways in oxidation flow reactors. NO and NO2 are produced via the reaction O(1D + N2O  →  2NO, followed by the reaction NO + O3  →  NO2 + O2. Laboratory measurements coupled with photochemical model simulations suggest that O(1D + N2O reactions can be used to systematically vary the relative branching ratio of RO2 + NO reactions relative to RO2 + HO2 and/or RO2 + RO2 reactions over a range of conditions relevant to atmospheric SOA formation. We demonstrate proof of concept using high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS measurements with nitrate (NO3− reagent ion to detect gas-phase oxidation products of isoprene and α-pinene previously observed in NOx-influenced environments and in laboratory chamber experiments.

  2. Production of very neutron-deficient isotopes near {sup 100}Sn via reactions involving light-particle and cluster emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Commara, M.; Gomez del Campo, J.; D' Onofrio, A.; Gadea, A.; Glogowski, M.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Belcari, N.; Borcea, R.; De Angelis, G.; Fahlander, C.; Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Hellstroem, M.; Kirchner, R.; Rejmund, M.; Roca, V.; Roeckl, E.; Romano, M.; Rykaczewski, K.; Schmidt, K.; Terrasi, F

    2000-04-10

    The production of very neutron-deficient isotopes near {sup 100}Sn has been investigated by using on-line mass separation of evaporation residues produced by heavy-ion induced complete-fusion reactions. We measured the cross sections for {sup 99}Cd, {sup 100}In, {sup 101}Sn and {sup 102}In via {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni fusion reactions followed by cluster emission, and via {sup 58}Ni+{sup 50}Cr fusion reactions accompanied by evaporation of protons, neutrons or {alpha} particles. Both types of reactions yield similar cross sections for the production of exotic nuclei near {sup 100}Sn. The data are discussed in comparison with results obtained from statistical-model calculations.

  3. Production of hydrogen in the reaction between aluminum and water in the presence of NaOH and KOH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Porciúncula

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to investigate the production of hydrogen as an energy source by means of the reaction of aluminum with water. This reaction only occurs in the presence of NaOH and KOH, which behave as catalysts. The main advantages of using aluminum for indirect energy storage are: recyclability, non-toxicity and easiness to shape. Alkali concentrations varying from 1 to 3 mol.L-1 were applied to different metallic samples, either foil (0.02 mm thick or plates (0.5 and 1 mm thick, and reaction temperatures between 295 and 345 K were tested. The results show that the reaction is strongly influenced by temperature, alkali concentration and metal shape. NaOH commonly promotes faster reactions and higher real yields than KOH.

  4. Effect of Light Intensities and Atmospheric Gas Conditions on Biohydrogen Production of Microalgae Isolated from Fisheries Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujalin Pholchan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the fishery farming industry has been developed rapidly due to increasing demand and consumption as well as the depletion of wild fish resources. Production processes in the industry usually generate large amounts of wastewater containing high nutrients, posing a threat to downstream water. However, phytoplankton removal techniques commonly used to counteract the threat, though appearing to have low efficiency, are timeconsuming and less sustainable. Microalgae are photosynthetic microorganisms that convert solar energy into hydrogen. Using the isolated algae from fish farms as a source of renewable energy production could be a promising choice for handling fisheries wastewater in a more efficient manner. However, hydrogen production processes from algae still need more studies as their efficiencies vary between algae species and growth factors. In this work, the efficiency of hydrogen production from Scenedesmus accuminatus and Arthrospira platensis harvested from fish farms under three different light intensity conditions and three atmospheric gas conditions was determined. The results showed that the best conditions for hydrogen production from both species included 24 h darkness and carbon dioxide addition. Under the atmospheric gas combination of 99% argon and 1% carbon dioxide, S. accuminatus could produce hydrogen gas as high as 0.572 mol H2/mgCh h within 12 h, while the highest hydrogen production (0.348 mol H2/mgCh h obtained from A. platensis was found under the atmospheric gas mixture of 98% argon and 2% carbon dioxide. Interestingly, S. accuminatus appeared to produce more hydrogen than A. platensis under the same conditions.

  5. Subthreshold Pion Production from Characterized Events in NEON-20 + ALUMINUM-27 Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannuschke, Stefan Andreas

    The production of positively charged pions below the free nucleon-nucleon threshold in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions was investigated. The system studied was ^{20}Ne + ^{27}Al at bombarding energies of 90, 110 and 150 AMeV. Pions and fragments were detected using the MSU 4pi Array yielding complete event characterization. Using the Array to determine the centrality of pion producing events, an apparent enhancement of the production cross section for peripheral events was found. That trend increases with decreasing bombarding energy. The kinetic energy distributions measured for protons and pions are in good agreement with BUU model calculations. The proton spectra are reproduced for all kinetic energies, whereas the pion spectra are under-predicted at the lower energies. Analyzing the energy spectra for all detection angles in terms of a classical Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, the apparent temperatures for protons and pions were extracted. The values for both, pions and protons, are in very good agreement with known systematics. The pion temperatures show no dependence on the event centrality, whereas the ones for proton emission show a steady decrease with increasing impact parameter. Correlations of pions with the event as a whole were also investigated. The azimuthal distribution with respect to the reaction plane shows a weak in-plane emission for pions in the forward direction. A transverse flow analysis for pions and light charged particles shows the typical signal for helium and protons. The pions show an enhancement for forward rapidities at the highest beam energy.

  6. Efficient Production of Papillomavirus Gene Delivery Vectors in Defined In Vitro Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cerqueira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Papillomavirus capsids can package a wide variety of nonviral DNA plasmids and deliver the packaged genetic material to cells, making them attractive candidates for targeted gene delivery vehicles. However, the papillomavirus vectors generated by current methods are unlikely to be suitable for clinical applications. We have developed a chemically defined, cell-free, papillomavirus-based vector production system that allows the incorporation of purified plasmid DNA (pseudogenome into high-titer papillomavirus L1/L2 capsids. We investigated the incorporation of several DNA forms into a variety of different papillomavirus types, including human and animal types. Our results show that papillomavirus capsids can package and transduce linear or circular DNA under defined conditions. Packaging and transduction efficiencies were surprisingly variable across capsid types, DNA forms, and assembly reaction conditions. The pseudoviruses produced by these methods are sensitive to the same entry inhibitors as cell-derived pseudovirions, including neutralizing antibodies and heparin. The papillomavirus vector production systems developed in this study generated as high as 1011 infectious units/mg of L1. The pseudoviruses were infectious both in vitro and in vivo and should be compatible with good manufacturing practice (GMP requirements.

  7. Efficient Production of Papillomavirus Gene Delivery Vectors in Defined In Vitro Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Carla; Thompson, Cynthia D; Day, Patricia M; Pang, Yuk-Ying S; Lowy, Douglas R; Schiller, John T

    2017-06-16

    Papillomavirus capsids can package a wide variety of nonviral DNA plasmids and deliver the packaged genetic material to cells, making them attractive candidates for targeted gene delivery vehicles. However, the papillomavirus vectors generated by current methods are unlikely to be suitable for clinical applications. We have developed a chemically defined, cell-free, papillomavirus-based vector production system that allows the incorporation of purified plasmid DNA (pseudogenome) into high-titer papillomavirus L1/L2 capsids. We investigated the incorporation of several DNA forms into a variety of different papillomavirus types, including human and animal types. Our results show that papillomavirus capsids can package and transduce linear or circular DNA under defined conditions. Packaging and transduction efficiencies were surprisingly variable across capsid types, DNA forms, and assembly reaction conditions. The pseudoviruses produced by these methods are sensitive to the same entry inhibitors as cell-derived pseudovirions, including neutralizing antibodies and heparin. The papillomavirus vector production systems developed in this study generated as high as 1011 infectious units/mg of L1. The pseudoviruses were infectious both in vitro and in vivo and should be compatible with good manufacturing practice (GMP) requirements.

  8. Effect of ammonia on methane production pathways and reaction rates in acetate-fed biogas processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, L P; Mazéas, L; Lü, F; Grossin-Debattista, J; He, P J; Bouchez, T

    2017-04-01

    In order to understand the correlation between ammonia and methanogenesis metabolism, methane production pathways and their specific rates were studied at total ammonium nitrogen (TAN) concentrations of 0.14-9 g/L in three methanogenic sludges fed with acetate, at both mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. Results showed that high levels of TAN had significant inhibition on methanogenesis; this could, however, be recovered via syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO) coupled with Hydrogenotrophic Methanogenesis (HM) performed by acetate oxidizing syntrophs or through Acetoclastic Methanogenesis (AM) catalyzed by Methanosarcinaceae, after a long lag phase >50 d. Free ammonia (NH 3 ) was the active component for this inhibition, of which 200 mg/L is suggested as the threshold for the pathway shift from AM to SAO-HM. Methane production rate via SAO-HM at TAN of 7-9 g/L was about 5-9-fold lower than that of AM at TAN of 0.14 g/L, which was also lower than the rate of AM pathway recovered at TAN of 7 g/L in the incubations with a French mesophilic inoculum. Thermophilic condition favored the establishment of the SAO-catalyzing microbial community, as indicated by the higher reaction rate and shorter lag phase. The operational strategy is thus suggested to be adjusted when NH 3 exceeds 200 mg/L.

  9. Actinide Production in the Reaction of Heavy Ions withCurium-248

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, Kenton James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1983-07-01

    Chemical experiments were performed to examine the usefulness of heavy ion transfer reactions in producing new, neutron-rich actinide nuclides. A general quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic mechanism is proposed, and the utility of this method as opposed to other methods (e.g. complete fusion) is discussed. The relative merits of various techniques of actinide target synthesis are discussed. A description is given of a target system designed to remove the large amounts of heat generated by the passage of a heavy ion beam through matter, thereby maximizing the beam intensity which can be safely used in an experiment. Also described is a general separation scheme for the actinide elements from protactinium (Z = 91) to mendelevium (Z = 101), and fast specific procedures for plutonium, americium and berkelium. The cross sections for the production of several nuclides from the bombardment of 248Cm with 18O, 86Kr and 136Xe projectiles at several energies near and below the Coulomb barrier were determined. The results are compared with yields from 48Ca and 238U bombardments of 248Cm. Simple extrapolation of the product yields into unknown regions of charge and mass indicates that the use of heavy ion transfer reactions to produce new, neutron-rich above-target species is limited. The substantial production of neutron-rich below-target species, however, indicates that with very heavy ions like 136Xe and 238U the new species 248Am, 249Am and 247Pu should be produced with large cross sections from a 248Cm target. A preliminary, unsuccessful attempt to isolate 247Pu is outlined. The failure is probably due to the half life of the decay, which is calculated to be less than 3 minutes. The absolute gamma ray intensities from 251Bk decay, necessary for calculating the 251Bk cross section, are also determined.

  10. Absolutely calibrated mass spectrometry measurement of reactive and stable plasma chemistry products in the effluent of a He/H2O atmospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Gert; Benedikt, Jan; von Keudell, Achim

    2017-08-01

    Mass spectrometry has been used to analyse the effluent of a micro-scaled atmospheric plasma jet operated in helium with a controlled concentration of water vapour. Absolute densities of H2O2 and OH have been measured as function of water vapour concentration and distance from the jet nozzle. The trend for both species densities are correlated and after an initial increase, the densities of H2O2 and OH saturate around 5000 ppm to 6000 ppm of water admixture. The largest densities for H2O2 (2.37× 1014 cm-3 ) and OH (1.96× 1014 cm-3 ) were measured at 7980 ppm water admixture and 2 mm distance from the jet. Densities of HO2 (1× 1014 cm-3 ) and O2 (4× 1014 cm-3 ) have been measured as well, although no trend could be observed. The direct electron impact ionisation cross-section of H2O2 at 70 eV electron energy was experimentally determined to be 1.02 × 10-16 cm2 . The measured densities and profiles have been compared to a 2D axially symmetric fluid model of species transport and recombination reactions. The effluent reaction chemistry is dominated by the hydroxyl radical, where the hydrogen atoms seem to play an important role as well. The analysis of neutral plasma chemistry products have been complemented by measurements of qualitative ion signals.

  11. Chemical modification of a bitumen and its non-fuel uses. [Reactions of tar sand asphaltenes in synthesis of non-fuel products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moschopedis, S.E.; Speight, J.G.

    1974-01-01

    Simple reactions are described whereby tar sand bitumen can be converted to a whole range of materials. Examples are given to illustrate the non-fuel uses of the products. The following reactions of Athabasca asphaltenes are considered: oxidation, halogenation, sulfonation and sulfomethylation, phosphorylation, hydrogenation, reactions with S and O, reactions with metal salts, and miscellaneous chemical conversions. (JGB)

  12. Stable hydrogen production from ethanol through steam reforming reaction over nickel-containing smectite-derived catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Ryohei; Arai, Masahiko

    2014-12-25

    Hydrogen production through steam reforming of ethanol was investigated with conventional supported nickel catalysts and a Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst. The former is initially active, but significant catalyst deactivation occurs during the reaction due to carbon deposition. Side reactions of the decomposition of CO and CH4 are the main reason for the catalyst deactivation, and these reactions can relatively be suppressed by the use of the Ni-containing smectite. The Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst contains, after H2 reduction, stable and active Ni nanocrystallites, and as a result, it shows a stable and high catalytic performance for the steam reforming of ethanol, producing H2.

  13. The kinetics of reaction of the by-products of ablative materials at high temperatures and the rate of heat transfer between hot surfaces and reactive gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokes, G. N.; Beadle, P. C.; Gac, N. A.; Golden, D. M.; King, K. D.; Benson, S. W.

    1971-01-01

    Research has been conducted by means of laboratory experiments to enhance understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions taking place during ablative processes that accompany the reentry or manned space vehicles into planetary atmospheres. Fundamental mechanisms of those chemical reactions believed to be important in the thermal degradation of ablative plastic heat shield materials, and the gases evolved, are described.

  14. Measuring time of flight of fusion products in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device for spatial profiling of fusion reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, D C; Boris, D R; Kulcinski, G L; Santarius, J F; Piefer, G R

    2013-03-01

    A new diagnostic has been developed that uses the time of flight (TOF) of the products from a nuclear fusion reaction to determine the location where the fusion reaction occurred. The TOF diagnostic uses charged particle detectors on opposing sides of the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device that are coupled to high resolution timing electronics to measure the spatial profile of fusion reactions occurring between the two charged particle detectors. This diagnostic was constructed and tested by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Group in the IEC device, HOMER, which accelerates deuterium ions to fusion relevant energies in a high voltage (∼100 kV), spherically symmetric, electrostatic potential well [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley, D. R. Boris, B. B. Cipiti, S. K. Murali, G. R. Piefer, R. F. Radel, T. E. Radel, and A. L. Wehmeyer, Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 1238 (2005)]. The TOF diagnostic detects the products of D(d,p)T reactions and determines where along a chord through the device the fusion event occurred. The diagnostic is also capable of using charged particle spectroscopy to determine the Doppler shift imparted to the fusion products by the center of mass energy of the fusion reactants. The TOF diagnostic is thus able to collect spatial profiles of the fusion reaction density along a chord through the device, coupled with the center of mass energy of the reactions occurring at each location. This provides levels of diagnostic detail never before achieved on an IEC device.

  15. Population-production-pollution nexus based air pollution management model for alleviating the atmospheric crisis in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X T; Tong, Y F; Cui, L; Kong, X M; Sheng, Y N; Chen, L; Li, Y P

    2017-07-15

    In recent years, increscent emissions in the city of Beijing due to expanded population, accelerated industrialization and inter-regional pollutant transportation have led to hazardous atmospheric pollution issues. Although a number of anthropogenic control measures have been put into use, frequent/severe haze events have still challenged regional governments. In this study, a hybrid population-production-pollution nexus model (PPP) is proposed for air pollution management and air quality planning (AMP) with the aim to coordinate human activities and environmental protection. A fuzzy-stochastic mixed quadratic programming method (FSQ) is developed and introduced into a PPP for tackling atmospheric pollution issues with uncertainties. Based on the contribution of an index of population-production-pollution, a hybrid PPP-based AMP model that considers employment structure, industrial layout pattern, production mode, pollutant purification efficiency and a pollution mitigation scheme have been applied in Beijing. Results of the adjustment of employment structure, pollution mitigation scheme, and green gross domestic product under various environmental regulation scenarios are obtained and analyzed. This study can facilitate the identification of optimized policies for alleviating population-production-emission conflict in the study region, as well as ameliorating the hazardous air pollution crisis at an urban level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Amplification of nonspecific products in quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Ruiz-Villalba

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative PCR allows the precise measurement of DNA concentrations and is generally considered to be straightforward and trouble free. However, a survey with 93 validated assays for genes in the Wnt-pathway showed that the amplification of nonspecific products occurs frequently and is unrelated to Cq or PCR efficiency values. Titration experiments showed that the occurrence of low and high melting temperature artifacts was shown to be determined by annealing temperature, primer concentration and cDNA input. To explore the range of input variations that occur in the normal use of the Cre assay these conditions were mimicked in a complete two-way design of template −plasmid DNA- and non-template −mouse cDNA- concentrations. These experiments showed that the frequency of the amplification of the correct product and the artifact, as well as the valid quantification of the correct product, depended on the concentration of the non-template cDNA. This finding questions the interpretation of dilution series in which template as well as non-template concentrations are simultaneously decreasing. Repetition of this cDNA concentration experiment with other templates revealed that exact reproduction qPCR experiments was affected by the time it takes to complete the pipetting of a qPCR plate. Long bench times were observed to lead to significantly more artifacts. However, the measurement of artifact-associated fluorescence can be avoided by inclusion of a small heating step after the elongation phase in the amplification protocol. Taken together, this trouble-shooting journey showed that reliability and reproducibility of qPCR experiments not only depends on standardization and reporting of the biochemistry and technical aspects but also on hitherto neglected factors as sample dilution and waiting times in the laboratory work flow. Keywords: RT-qPCR, Melting curve analysis, Reaction parameters, Artifacts

  17. Ozonolysis of α/β-farnesene mixture: analysis of gas-phase and particulate reaction products

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Atmospheric oxidation of sesquiterpenes has been of considerable interest recently because of their likely contribution to ambient organic aerosol, but farnesene...

  18. Kinetics and product analysis of the reaction catalysed by recombinant homoaconitase from Thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yunhua; Tomita, Takeo; Yamauchi, Kazuma; Nishiyama, Makoto; Palmer, David R J

    2006-06-15

    HACN (homoaconitase) is a member of a family of [4Fe-4S] cluster-dependent enzymes that catalyse hydration/dehydration reactions. The best characterized example of this family is the ubiquitous ACN (aconitase), which catalyses the dehydration of citrate to cis-aconitate, and the subsequent hydration of cis-aconitate to isocitrate. HACN is an enzyme from the alpha-aminoadipate pathway of lysine biosynthesis, and has been identified in higher fungi and several archaea and one thermophilic species of bacteria, Thermus thermophilus. HACN catalyses the hydration of cis-homoaconitate to (2R,3S)-homoisocitrate, but the HACN-catalysed dehydration of (R)-homocitrate to cis-homoaconitate has not been observed in vitro. We have synthesized the substrates and putative substrates for this enzyme, and in the present study report the first steady-state kinetic data for recombinant HACN from T. thermophilus using a (2R,3S)-homoisocitrate dehydrogenase-coupled assay. We have also examined the products of the reaction using HPLC. We do not observe HACN-catalysed 'homocitrate dehydratase' activity; however, we have observed that ACN can catalyse the dehydration of (R)-homocitrate to cis-homoaconitate, but HACN is required for subsequent conversion of cis-homoaconitate into homoisocitrate. This suggests that the in vivo process for conversion of homocitrate into homoisocitrate requires two enzymes, in simile with the propionate utilization pathway from Escherichia coli. Surprisingly, HACN does not show any activity when cis-aconitate is substituted for the substrate, even though other enzymes from the alpha-aminoadipate pathway can accept analogous tricarboxylic acid-cycle substrates. The enzyme shows no apparent feedback inhibition by L-lysine.

  19. Preparation, characterization and toxicology properties of α- and β-chitosan Maillard reaction products nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongcai; Zhang, Yiwen; Bao, Erjaing; Zhao, Yanyun

    2016-08-01

    In this study, β-chitosan (CS) Maillard reaction (MR) NPs was prepared to improve the water solubility of CS NPs. The α- and β-CS MR was firstly induced by high intensity ultrasound-assisted (UA) water-bath heating at 80°C for 8h. The α- and β-CS Maillard reaction products (MRPs NPs were then prepared by ionic gelation method between the positively charged primary amino groups of CS and the negatively charged groups of sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP). The α- and β-CS MRPs NPs had particle size of 42.49 and 61.74nm, and Zeta-potential of 27.43 and 35.13mV, respectively. The prepared α- and β-CS MRPs NPs was characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)-differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to verify whether α- and β-CS MRPs has been incorporated into the CS NPs. The α- and β-CS MRPs NPs exhibited no significant difference (p>0.05) in antioxidant activity compared with α- and β-CS MRPs at the same concentration based on reducing power, DPPH radical scavenging activity, and ORAC values. The cytotoxicity test of α- and β-CS MRPs NPs showed good cell viability (70.86-99.16%) of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC) at the concentration range from 0.12 to 1mg/mL, and fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC)-α- and β-CS MRPs NPs maintained the morphological characteristics of living cells. These results showed that α- and β-CS MRPs NPs can be used as water-soluble antioxidant substances for applications in food and other fields. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Correlating enzymatic browning inhibition and antioxidant ability of Maillard reaction products derived from different amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haining; Zhang, Xiaoming; Karangwa, Eric; Xia, Shuqin

    2017-09-01

    Up to now, only limited research on enzymatic browning inhibition capacity (BIC) of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) has been reported and there are still no overall and systematic researches on MRPs derived from different amino acids. In the present study, BIC and antioxidant capacity, including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity and Fe 2+ reducing power activity, of the MRPs derived from 12 different amino acids and three reducing sugars were investigated. The MRPs of cysteine (Cys), cystine, arginine (Arg) and histidine (His) showed higher BIC compared to other amino acids. Lysine (Lys)-MRPs showed the highest absorbance value at 420 nm (A 420 ) but very limited BIC, whereas Cys-MRPs, showed the highest BIC and the lowest A 420 . The A 420 can roughly reflect the trend of BIC of MRPs from different amino acids, except Cys and Lys. MRPs from tyrosine (Tyr) showed the most potent antioxidant capacity but very limited BIC, whereas Cys-MRPs showed both higher antioxidant capacity and BIC compared to other amino acids. Partial least squares regression analysis showed positive and significant correlation between BIC and Fe 2+ reducing power of MRPs from 12 amino acids with glucose or fructose, except Lys, Cys and Tyr. The suitable pH for generating efficient browning inhibition compounds varies depending on different amino acids: acidic pH was favorable for Cys, whereas neutral and alkaline pH were suitable for His and Arg, respectively. Increasing both heating temperature and time over a certain range could improve the BIC of MRPs of Cys, His and Arg, whereas any further increase deteriorates their browning inhibition efficiencies. The types of amino acid, initial pH, temperature and time of the Maillard reaction were found to greatly influence the BIC and antioxidant capacity of the resulting MRPs. There is no clear relationship between BIC and the antioxidant capacity of MRPs when reactant type and processing parameters of the Maillard

  1. Anaphylaxis and severe systemic reactions caused by skin contact with persulfates in hair-bleaching products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Margriet; van der Heide, Sicco; Coenraads, Pieter Jan; Schuttelaar, Marielouise

    BACKGROUND: Persulfates have been reported to cause both delayed-type and immediate skin reactions. They may also cause immediate reactions of the mucous membranes of the bronchial system through inhalation, leading to asthma and rhinitis. Anaphylactic reactions caused by contact with persulfates

  2. Rising global atmospheric CO2 concentration and implications for crop productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is incontestable evidence that the concentration of atmospheric CO2 is increasing. Regardless of the potential impact of this increase on climate change, CO2 will have a direct effect on plants since it is a primary input for growth. Herein, we discuss relative CO2 responses of C3 and C4 plant...

  3. Observations of Recent Arctic Sea Ice Volume Loss and Its Impact on Ocean-Atmosphere Energy Exchange and Ice Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, N. T.; Markus, T.; Farrell, S. L.; Worthen, D. L.; Boisvert, L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Using recently developed techniques we estimate snow and sea ice thickness distributions for the Arctic basin through the combination of freeboard data from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) and a snow depth model. These data are used with meteorological data and a thermodynamic sea ice model to calculate ocean-atmosphere heat exchange and ice volume production during the 2003-2008 fall and winter seasons. The calculated heat fluxes and ice growth rates are in agreement with previous observations over multiyear ice. In this study, we calculate heat fluxes and ice growth rates for the full distribution of ice thicknesses covering the Arctic basin and determine the impact of ice thickness change on the calculated values. Thinning of the sea ice is observed which greatly increases the 2005-2007 fall period ocean-atmosphere heat fluxes compared to those observed in 2003. Although there was also a decline in sea ice thickness for the winter periods, the winter time heat flux was found to be less impacted by the observed changes in ice thickness. A large increase in the net Arctic ocean-atmosphere heat output is also observed in the fall periods due to changes in the areal coverage of sea ice. The anomalously low sea ice coverage in 2007 led to a net ocean-atmosphere heat output approximately 3 times greater than was observed in previous years and suggests that sea ice losses are now playing a role in increasing surface air temperatures in the Arctic.

  4. Microbial production of ice crystals in clouds as a novel atmospheric biosignature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santl-Temkiv, T.; Sahyoun, M.; Kjeldsen, H.; Ling, M.; Boesen, T.; Karlson, U. G.; Finster, K.

    2014-03-01

    A diverse assembly of exoplanets has been discovered during recent decades (Howard 2013), their atmospheres providing some of the most accessible evidence for the presence of biological activity on these planets. Metabolic gases have been commonly proposed as atmospheric biosignatures (Seager et al 2012). However, airborne microbes are also involved in cloud- and precipitation formation on Earth. Thus, meteorological phenomena may serve as alternative atmospheric biosignatures, for which appropriate observational techniques have yet to be developed. The atmospheric part of the Earth's water cycle heavily relies on the presence of nucleating particles, which promote the condensation and freezing of atmospheric water, both potentially leading to precipitation. While cloud condensation nuclei are diverse and relatively common, ice nuclei are poorly understood and comparably rare airborne particles. According to current knowledge, most ice nucleation below ñ15∞C is driven by the presence of inorganic dust particles, which are considered inactive at higher temperatures. Biogenic IN are the only reported particles that promote ice formation above ñ10∞C. Some bacteria, e.g. Pseudomonas syringae, produce Ice Nucleation Active (INA) proteins that are most efficient ice nuclei currently known. These INA bacteria are common in the atmosphere, and may thus be involved in precipitation processes of mixed phase clouds (Möhler et al 2007). We investigate the relevance of bacterial INA proteins for atmospheric processes using three approaches: (i) study of the presence of INA bacteria and their INA proteins in the atmosphere, (ii) a detailed molecular and physical study of isolated INA proteins, and finally (iii) a modeling study of the importance of INA proteins for ice-path in clouds as well as their importance for precipitation. During 14 precipitation events, we observed that 12% of isolated bacteria carried INA genes. INA bacteria had likely been emitted to the

  5. Overview of the O3M SAF GOME-2 operational atmospheric composition and UV radiation data products and data availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinen, S.; Balis, D.; Bauer, H.; Begoin, M.; Delcloo, A.; Eleftheratos, K.; Gimeno Garcia, S.; Granville, J.; Grossi, M.; Hao, N.; Hedelt, P.; Hendrick, F.; Hess, M.; Heue, K.-P.; Hovila, J.; Jønch-Sørensen, H.; Kalakoski, N.; Kiemle, S.; Kins, L.; Koukouli, M. E.; Kujanpää, J.; Lambert, J.-C.; Lerot, C.; Loyola, D.; Määttä, A.; Pedergnana, M.; Pinardi, G.; Romahn, F.; van Roozendael, M.; Lutz, R.; De Smedt, I.; Stammes, P.; Steinbrecht, W.; Tamminen, J.; Theys, N.; Tilstra, L. G.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Valks, P.; Zerefos, C.; Zimmer, W.; Zyrichidou, I.

    2015-07-01

    The three GOME-2 instruments will provide unique and long data sets for atmospheric research and applications. The complete time period will be 2007-2022, including the period of ozone depletion as well as the beginning of ozone layer recovery. Besides ozone chemistry, the GOME-2 products are important e.g. for air quality studies, climate modeling, policy monitoring and hazard warnings. The heritage for GOME-2 is in the ERS/GOME and Envisat/SCIAMACHY instruments. The current Level 2 (L2) data cover a wide range of products such as trace gas columns (NO2, BrO, H2CO, H2O, SO2), tropospheric columns of NO2, total ozone columns and vertical ozone profiles in high and low spatial resolution, absorbing aerosol indices from the main science channels as well as from the polarization channels (AAI, AAI-PMD), Lambertian-equivalent reflectivity database, clear-sky and cloud-corrected UV indices and surface UV fields with different weightings and photolysis rates. The Ozone Monitoring and Atmospheric Composition Satellite Application Facility (O3M SAF) processing and data dissemination is operational and running 24/7. Data quality is quarantined by the detailed review processes for the algorithms, validation of the products as well as by a continuous quality monitoring of the products and processing. This is an overview paper providing the O3M SAF project background, current status and future plans to utilization of the GOME-2 data. An important focus is the provision of summaries of the GOME-2 products including product principles and validation examples together with the product sample images. Furthermore, this paper collects the references to the detailed product algorithm and validation papers.

  6. The functional properties of chitosan-glucose-asparagine Maillard reaction products and mitigation of acrylamide formation by chitosans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Wen-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chou, Yu-Hao; Hsiao, Hsin-I

    2018-03-15

    This research aims to clarify the interactions that occur in a food model system consisting of glucose, asparagine and chitosans. Low molecular weight chitosan exerted a potent inhibitory effect (46.8%) on acrylamide and Maillard reaction products (MRPs) (>52.6%), respectively. Compared to a previous study conducted using the fructose system, the novel findings of this research demonstrate that the formation of acrylamide and Maillard reaction products was lower with glucose than with fructose when they were used as reducing sugars in food model systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Process for producing organic products containing silicon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and organic amines and products formed thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugar, E.A.; Morgan, P.E.D.

    1988-04-04

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity organic reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon. The process comprises reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity reactive amine reactant in a liquid state at a temperature of from about O/degree/C up to about 300/degree/C. A high purity silicon carbide/silicon nitride ceramic product can be formed from this intermediate product, if desired, by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200-1700/degree/C for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours or the organic reaction product may be employed in other chemical uses.

  8. Reaction of the C2H radical with 1-butyne (C4H6): Low Temperature Kinetics and Isomer-Specific Product Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soorkia, Satchin; Trevitt, Adam J.; Selby, Talitha M.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-12-22

    The rate coefficient for the reaction of the ethynyl radical (C{sub 2}H) with 1-butyne (H-C{triple_bond}C-CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 3}) is measured in a pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus. Ethynyl radicals are formed by laser photolysis of acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) at 193 nm and detected via chemiluminescence (C{sub 2}H + O{sub 2} {yields} CH (A{sup 2}{Delta}) + CO{sub 2}). The rate coefficients are measured over the temperature range of 74-295 K. The C{sub 2}H + 1-butyne reaction exhibits no barrier and occurs with rate constants close to the collision limit. The temperature dependent rate coefficients can be fit within experimental uncertainties by the expression k = (2.4 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -10} (T/295 K)-(0.04 {+-} 0.03) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1}. Reaction products are detected at room temperature (295 K) and 533 Pa using a Multiplexed Photoionization Mass Spectrometer (MPIMS) coupled to the tunable VUV synchrotron radiation from the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Two product channels are identified for this reaction: m/z = 64 (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}) and m/z = 78 (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) corresponding to the CH{sub 3}- and H-loss channels, respectively. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves are used to analyze the isomeric composition of both product channels. The C{sub 5}H{sub 4} products are found to be exclusively linear isomers composed of ethynylallene and methyldiacetylene in a 4:1 ratio. In contrast, the C{sub 6}H{sub 6} product channel includes two cyclic isomers, fulvene 18({+-}5)% and 3,4-dimethylenecyclobut-1-ene 32({+-}8)%, as well as three linear isomers, 2-ethynyl-1,3-butadiene 8({+-}5)%, 3,4-hexadiene-1-yne 28({+-}8)% and 1,3-hexadiyne 14({+-}5)%. Within experimental uncertainties, we do not see appreciable amounts of benzene and an upper limit of 10% is estimated. Diacetylene (C{sub 4}H{sub 2}) formation via the C{sub 2}H{sub 5}-loss channel is also thermodynamically possible but cannot be observed due to experimental

  9. Marine Primary Productivity as a Potential Indirect Source of Selenium and Other Trace Elements in Atmospheric Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazina, Tim; Läderach, Alexander; Jones, Gerrad D; Sodemann, Harald; Wernli, Heini; Kirchner, James W; Winkel, Lenny H E

    2017-01-03

    Atmospheric processes play an important role in the supply of the trace element selenium (Se) as well as other essential trace elements to terrestrial environments, mainly via wet deposition. Here we investigate whether the marine biosphere can be identified as a source of Se and of other trace elements in precipitation samples. We used artificial neural network (ANN) modeling and other statistical methods to analyze relationships between a high-resolution atmospheric deposition chemistry time series (March 2007-January 2009) from Plynlimon (UK) and exposure of air masses to marine chlorophyll a and to other source proxies. Using ANN sensitivity analyses, we found that higher air mass exposure to marine productivity leads to higher concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in rainfall. Furthermore, marine productivity was found to be an important but indirect factor in controlling Se as well as vanadium (V), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn), and aluminum (Al) concentrations in atmospheric deposition, likely via scavenging by organic compounds derived from marine organisms. Marine organisms may thus play an indirect but important role in the delivery of trace elements to terrestrial environments and food chains.

  10. Overview of the O3M SAF GOME-2 operational atmospheric composition and UV radiation data products and data availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinen, S.; Balis, D.; Bauer, H.; Begoin, M.; Delcloo, A.; Eleftheratos, K.; Gimeno Garcia, S.; Granville, J.; Grossi, M.; Hao, N.; Hedelt, P.; Hendrick, F.; Hess, M.; Heue, K.-P.; Hovila, J.; Jønch-Sørensen, H.; Kalakoski, N.; Kauppi, A.; Kiemle, S.; Kins, L.; Koukouli, M. E.; Kujanpää, J.; Lambert, J.-C.; Lang, R.; Lerot, C.; Loyola, D.; Pedergnana, M.; Pinardi, G.; Romahn, F.; van Roozendael, M.; Lutz, R.; De Smedt, I.; Stammes, P.; Steinbrecht, W.; Tamminen, J.; Theys, N.; Tilstra, L. G.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Valks, P.; Zerefos, C.; Zimmer, W.; Zyrichidou, I.

    2016-02-01

    The three Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 instruments will provide unique and long data sets for atmospheric research and applications. The complete time period will be 2007-2022, including the period of ozone depletion as well as the beginning of ozone layer recovery. Besides ozone chemistry, the GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2) products are important e.g. for air quality studies, climate modelling, policy monitoring and hazard warnings. The heritage for GOME-2 is in the ERS/GOME and Envisat/SCIAMACHY instruments. The current Level 2 (L2) data cover a wide range of products such as ozone and minor trace gas columns (NO2, BrO, HCHO, H2O, SO2), vertical ozone profiles in high and low spatial resolution, absorbing aerosol indices, surface Lambertian-equivalent reflectivity database, clear-sky and cloud-corrected UV indices and surface UV fields with different weightings and photolysis rates. The Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M SAF) processes and disseminates data 24/7. Data quality is guaranteed by the detailed review processes for the algorithms, validation of the products as well as by a continuous quality monitoring of the products and processing. This paper provides an overview of the O3M SAF project background, current status and future plans for the utilisation of the GOME-2 data. An important focus is the provision of summaries of the GOME-2 products including product principles and validation examples together with sample images. Furthermore, this paper collects references to the detailed product algorithm and validation papers.

  11. Magnesium stearine production via direct reaction of palm stearine and magnesium hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiwi, M.; Ylitervo, P.; Pettersson, A.; Prakoso, T.; Soerawidjaja, T. H.

    2017-06-01

    The fossil oil production could not compensate with the increase of its consumption, because of this reason the renewable alternative energy source is needed to meet this requirement of this fuel. One of the methods to produce hydrocarbon is by decarboxylation of fatty acids. Vegetable oil and fats are the greatest source of fatty acids, so these can be used as raw material for biohydrocarbon production. From other researchers on their past researchs, by heating base soap from divalent metal, those metal salts will decarboxylate and produce hydrocarbon. This study investigate the process and characterization of magnesium soaps from palm stearine by Blachford method. The metal soaps are synthesized by direct reaction of palm stearine and magnesium hydroxide to produce magnesium stearine and magnesium stearine base soaps at 140-180°C and 6-10 bar for 3-6 hours. The operation process which succeed to gain metal soaps is 180°C, 10 bar, for 3-6 hours. These metal soaps are then compared with commercial magnesium stearate. Based on Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA) results, the decomposition temperature of all the metal soaps were 250°C. Scanning Electron Microscope with Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analysis have shown the traces of sodium sulphate for magnesium stearate commercial and magnesium hydroxide for both type of magnesium stearine soaps. The analysis results from Microwave Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (MP-AES) have shown that the magnesium content of magnesium stearine approximate with magnesium stearate commercial and lower compare with magnesium stearine base soaps. These experiments suggest that the presented saponification process method could produced metal soaps comparable with the commercial metal soaps.

  12. Design and implementation of a control structure for quality products in a crude oil atmospheric distillation column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, David; Favela-Contreras, Antonio; Sotelo, Carlos; Jiménez, Guillermo; Gallegos-Canales, Luis

    2017-11-01