WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric pressure ionization

  1. Ionization of EPA contaminants in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization and atmospheric pressure laser ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI. PMID:25828352

  2. Hydrocarbon analysis using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    KAUST Repository

    Jjunju, Fred P M

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of the various petroleum constituents (hydronaphthalenes, thiophenes, alkyl substituted benzenes, pyridines, fluorenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) was achieved under ambient conditions without sample preparation by desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI). Conditions were chosen for the DAPCI experiments to control whether ionization was by proton or electron transfer. The protonated molecule [M+H]+ and the hydride abstracted [MH]+ form were observed when using an inert gas, typically nitrogen, to direct a lightly ionized plasma generated by corona discharge onto the sample surface in air. The abundant water cluster ions generated in this experiment react with condensed-phase functionalized hydrocarbon model compounds and their mixtures at or near the sample surface. On the other hand, when naphthalene was doped into the DAPCI gas stream, its radical cation served as a charge exchange reagent, yielding molecular radical cations (M+) of the hydrocarbons. This mode of sample ionization provided mass spectra with better signal/noise ratios and without unwanted side-products. It also extended the applicability of DAPCI to petroleum constituents which could not be analyzed through proton transfer (e.g., higher molecular PAHs such as chrysene). The thermochemistry governing the individual ionization processes is discussed and a desorption/ionization mechanism is inferred. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  3. ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE-IONIZATION MASS-SPECTROMETRY .1. INSTRUMENTATION AND IONIZATION TECHNIQUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUINS, AP

    1994-01-01

    Mass spectrometer ion sources are normally located inside a high-vacuum envelope. Such low-pressure ion sources can make use of a range of different ionization methods and are in routine use in analytical mass spectrometers. An ion source operating at atmospheric pressure is better suited, and may b

  4. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-04-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  5. The updated bottom up solution applied to atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Updated Bottom Up Solution (UBUS) was recently applied to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) of triacylglycerols (TAGs). This report demonstrates that the UBUS applies equally well to atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) MS and to electrospray ionizatio...

  6. Comparison of electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization for a lipidomic analysis of Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert, Laurent; Gaudin, Mathieu; Libong, Danielle; Touboul, David; Abreu, Sonia; Loiseau, Philippe M; Laprévote, Olivier; Chaminade, Pierre

    2012-06-15

    A comparison of electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) for the analysis of a wide range of lipids has been performed on standard mixtures and extracts of Leishmania donovani promastigotes resistant to Amphotericin B (AmB). Calibration model, precision, limits of detection and quantification (LOD and LOQ) were assessed for each source. APPI provided the highest signal, signal-to-noise (S/N), and sensitivity for non-polar and low-polarity lipids, while ESI and APCI gave better results for the most polar ones. The linear model was valid for all lipids, except for one class with APPI, six classes with ESI, and eleven classes with APCI. LODs ranged from 0.2 to 20 μg mL(-1) for ESI, from 0.1 to 10 μg mL(-1) for APCI, and from 0.02 to 9.5 μg mL(-1) for APPI. LOQs ranged from 0.2 to 61 μg mL(-1) for ESI, from 0.4 to 31 μg mL(-1) for APCI, and from 0.1 to 29 μg mL(-1) for APPI. Each source provided similar lipid composition and variations in a comparison of three different L. donovani samples: miltefosine-treated, miltefosine-resistant and treated miltefosine-resistant parasites. A treated miltefosine-resistant sample was finally analyzed with each ion source in order to verify that the same lipid molecular species are detected. PMID:22560453

  7. Applications of a versatile technique for trace analysis: atmospheric pressure negative chemical ionization.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, B A; Davidson, W R; Lovett, A M

    1980-01-01

    The ability to use ambient air as a carrier and reagent gas in an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source allows instantaneous air analysis to be combined with hypersensitivity toward a wide variety of compounds. The TAGA (Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyser) is an instrument which is designed to use both positive and negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) for trace gas analysis; this paper describes several applications of negative APCI which demonstrates that the techni...

  8. Corona discharge secondary ionization of laser desorbed neutral molecules from a liquid matrix at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turney, Kevin [Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Harrison, W.W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)]. E-mail: harrison@chem.ufl.edu

    2006-06-15

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is studied at atmospheric pressure using liquid sampling methods. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer couples to an open sample stage accessed by a UV laser for desorption and ionization. Also coupled to the sampling state is a corona discharge for auxiliary ionization of desorbed neutral molecules. The interaction of the laser desorption and corona ionization is studied for a range of desorption conditions, showing enhanced analyte ionization, but the effect is analytically advantageous only at low desorption rates. The effect of corona discharge voltage was also explored. The decoupling of neutral molecule formation and subsequent ionization provides an opportunity to study each process separately.

  9. Specific interaction between negative atmospheric ions and organic compounds in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Sakai, Mami; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between negative atmospheric ions and various types of organic compounds were investigated using atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. Atmospheric negative ions such as O(2)(-), HCO(3)(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), and NO(3)(-)(HNO(3)) having different proton affinities served as the reactant ions for analyte ionization in APCDI in negative-ion mode. The individual atmospheric ions specifically ionized aliphatic and aromatic compounds with various functional groups as atmospheric ion adducts and deprotonated analytes. The formation of the atmospheric ion adducts under certain discharge conditions is most likely attributable to the affinity between the analyte and atmospheric ion and the concentration of the atmospheric ion produced under these conditions. The deprotonated analytes, in contrast, were generated from the adducts of the atmospheric ions with higher proton affinity attributable to efficient proton abstraction from the analyte by the atmospheric ion. PMID:22528201

  10. Super-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry and its application to ultrafast online protein digestion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2016-06-01

    Ion source pressure plays a significant role in the process of ionization and the subsequent ion transmission inside a mass spectrometer. Pressurizing the ion source to a gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is a relatively new approach that aims to further improve the performance of atmospheric pressure ionization sources. For example, under a super-atmospheric pressure environment, a stable electrospray can be sustained for liquid with high surface tension such as pure water, because of the suppression of electric discharge. Even for nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI), which is known to work with aqueous solution, its stability and sensitivity can also be enhanced, particularly in the negative mode when the ion source is pressurized. A brief review on the development of super-atmospheric pressure ion sources, including high-pressure electrospray, field desorption and superheated ESI, and the strategies to interface these ion sources to a mass spectrometer will be given. Using a recent ESI prototype with an operating temperature at 220 °C under 27 atm, we also demonstrate that it is possible to achieve an online Asp-specific protein digestion analysis in which the whole processes of digestion, ionization and MS acquisition could be completed on the order of a few seconds. This method is fast, and the reaction can even be monitored on a near-real-time basis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27270863

  11. Real-Time Flavor Release from French Fries Using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, W.A.M.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Boelrijk, A.E.M.; Burgering, M.J.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Flavor release from French fries was measured with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) using both assessors (in vivo) and a mouth model system (in vitro). Several volatiles measured with APCI were identified with MS-MS. The effect of frying time, salt addition, and a

  12. Characterization of typical chemical background interferences in atmospheric pressure ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Xinghua; Bruins, Andries P.; Covey, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    The structures and origins of typical chemical background noise ions in positive atmospheric pressure ionization liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (API LC/MS) are investigated and summarized in this study. This was done by classifying chemical background ions using precursor and product ion sc

  13. Measurement of the First Townsend's Ionization Coefficients in Helium, Air, and Nitrogen at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Junxia; Luo, Haiyun; Yue, Yang; Wang, Xinxin

    2014-07-01

    In the past the first Townsend’s ionization coefficient α could only be measured with Townsend discharge in gases at low pressure. After realizing Townsend discharge in some gases at atmospheric pressure by using dielectric barrier electrodes, we had developed a new method for measuring α coefficient at atmospheric pressure, a new optical method based on the discharge images taken with ICCD camera. With this newly developed method α coefficient in helium, nitrogen and air at atmospheric pressure were measured. The results were found to be in good agreement with the data obtained at lower pressure but same reduced field E/p by other groups. It seems that the value of α coefficient is sensitive to the purity of the working gas.

  14. The Townsend coefficient of ionization in atmospheric pressure rare gas plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvereva, G.

    2015-12-01

    In the work the influence of the processes characteristic for atmospheric pressure heavy inert gases discharge plasma on the value of the first Townsend ionization coefficient were investigated. Krypton plasma was considered. Calculations have shown that the greatest impact on the value of the first Townsend ionization coefficient has dissociative recombination of molecular ions, followed by descending influence processes occur: stepwise ionization, the electron-electron collisions and superelastic ones. The effect of these processes begins to appear at concentrations of electrons and excited particles higher than 1012 cm-3. At times shorter than the time of molecular ions formation, when dissociative recombination is absent, should expect a significant increase of the ionization coefficient.

  15. Analysis of insect triacylglycerols using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kofroňová, Edita; Cvačka, Josef; Jiroš, Pavel; Sýkora, D.; Valterová, Irena

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 5 (2009), s. 519-525. ISSN 1438-7697 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4055403; GA MŠk 2B06007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : atmospheric pressure chemical ionization * bumblebees * fat body * NARP-HPLC Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.831, year: 2009

  16. Choosing between atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization interfaces for the HPLC/MS analysis of pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    An evaluation of over 75 pesticides by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) clearly shows that different classes of pesticides are more sensitive using either atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) or electrospray ionization (ESI). For example, neutral and basic pesticides (phenylureas, triazines) are more sensitive using APCI (especially positive ion). While cationic and anionic herbicides (bipyridylium ions, sulfonic acids) are more sensitive using ESI (especially negative ion). These data are expressed graphically in a figure called an ionization-continuum diagram, which shows that protonation in the gas phase (proton affinity) and polarity in solution, expressed as proton addition or subtraction (pKa), is useful in selecting APCI or ESI. Furthermore, sodium adduct formation commonly occurs using positive ion ESI but not using positive ion APCI, which reflects the different mechanisms of ionization and strengthens the usefulness of the ionization-continuum diagram. The data also show that the concept of "wrong-way around" ESI (the sensitivity of acidic pesticides in an acidic mobile phase) is a useful modification of simple pKa theory for mobile-phase selection. Finally, this finding is used to enhance the chromatographic separation of oxanilic and sulfonic acid herbicides while maintaining good sensitivity in LC/MS using ESI negative.

  17. High-resolution atmospheric pressure infrared laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging of biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römpp, Andreas; Schäfer, Karl Christian; Guenther, Sabine; Wang, Zheng; Köstler, Martin; Leisner, Arne; Paschke, Carmen; Schramm, Thorsten; Spengler, Bernhard

    2013-09-01

    An atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging ion source has been developed that combines high spatial resolution and high mass resolution for the in situ analysis of biological tissue. The system is based on an infrared laser system working at 2.94 to 3.10 μm wavelength, employing a Nd:YAG laser-pumped optical parametrical oscillator. A Raman-shifted Nd:YAG laser system was also tested as an alternative irradiation source. A dedicated optical setup was used to focus the laser beam, coaxially with the ion optical axis and normal to the sample surface, to a spot size of 30 μm in diameter. No additional matrix was needed for laser desorption/ionization. A cooling stage was developed to reduce evaporation of physiological cell water. Ions were formed under atmospheric pressure and transferred by an extended heated capillary into the atmospheric pressure inlet of an orbital trapping mass spectrometer. Various phospholipid compounds were detected, identified, and imaged at a pixel resolution of up to 25 μm from mouse brain tissue sections. Mass accuracies of better than 2 ppm and a mass resolution of 30,000 at m/z = 400 were achieved for these measurements. PMID:23877173

  18. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for complex thiophenic mixture analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Hourani, Nadim

    2013-10-01

    Rationale Polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs) are detrimental species for refining processes in petroleum industry. Current mass spectrometric Methods that determine their composition are often preceded by derivatization and dopant addition approaches. Different ionization Methods have different impact on the molecular assignment of complex PASHs. The analysis of such species under atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) is still considered limited due to uncontrolled ion generation with low- and high-mass PASHs. Methods The ionization behavior of a model mixture of five selected PASH standards was investigated using an APCI source with nitrogen as the reagent gas. A complex thiophenic fraction was separated from a vacuum gas oil (VGO) and injected using the same method. The samples were analyzed using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). RESULTS PASH model analytes were successfully ionized and mainly [M + H]+ ions were produced. The same ionization pattern was observed for the real thiophenic sample. It was found that S1 class species were the major sulfur-containing species found in the VGO sample. These species indicated the presence of alkylated benzothiophenic (BT), dibenzothiophenic (DBT) and benzonaphthothiophenic (BNT) series that were detected by APCI-FTICR MS. CONCLUSIONS This study provides an established APCI-FTICR MS method for the analysis of complex PASHs. PASHs were detected without using any derivatization and without fragmentation. The method can be used for the analysis of S-containing crude oil samples. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Asymptotic analysis of simple ionization kinetics of air flows at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degond, Pierre [Mathematiques pour l' Industrie et la Physique, UFR MIG, Universite Paul Sabatier Toulouse 3, 118, route de Narbonne, 31 062 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Quinio, Geraldine [Mathematiques pour l' Industrie et la Physique, UFR MIG, Universite Paul Sabatier Toulouse 3, 118, route de Narbonne, 31 062 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Rogier, Francois [Onera centre de Toulouse, Departement Traitement de l' Information et Modelisation, 2, avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse cedex (France)

    2005-05-07

    The purpose of this paper is to propose and analyse a simplified model for plasma generation in air flows at atmospheric pressure. The starting point is a model previously proposed by Lowke (1992 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 25 202-10), enriched with a loss term which schematically takes into account the drag of the metastable and ionized species by the flow. An asymptotic analysis of this model confirmed by numerical simulations is proposed and shows that plasma generation is a two or three time scale process (depending on the electric field value). Eventually, the existence of the plasma over long time scales depends on the value of the flow velocity relative to a threshold value, which can be approximately computed analytically. A procedure for generating a plasma at atmospheric pressure in air at low energetic cost is also suggested.

  20. Determination of sulfonamides in meat by liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) has been used for the determination of sulfonamides in meat. Five typical sulfonamides were selected as target compounds, and beef meat was selected as a matrix sample. As internal standards, sulfapyridine and isotope labeled sulfamethazine (13C6-SMZ) were used. Compared to the results of recent reports, our results have shown improved precision to a RSD of 1.8% for the determination of sulfamethazine spiked with 75 ng/g level in meat

  1. Gas phase studies on terpenes by ion mobility spectrometry using different atmospheric pressure chemical ionization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsdorf, H.; Stone, J. A.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2005-11-01

    The ionization pathways and drift behavior were determined for sets of constitutional isomeric and stereoisomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (unsaturated monocyclic terpenes, unsaturated and saturated bicyclic terpenes) using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) to assess how structural and stereochemical differences influence ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed for constitutional isomers using ion mobility spectrometry with photoionization (PI) and corona discharge (CD) ionization. Photoionization provides ion mobility spectra containing one major peak for saturated compounds while at two peaks were observed for unsaturated compounds, which can be assigned to product ions related to monomer and dimer ions. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found depending on the position of the double bond. Although IMS using corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra are complex and differ from those obtained using photoionization. Additional cluster ions and fragment ions were detected. Only small differences in ion mobility spectra were observed for the diastereomers while the enantiomers provide identical spectra. The structure of the product ions formed was checked by investigations using the coupling of ion mobility spectrometry with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS).

  2. Gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Pekka; Luosujärvi, Laura; Haapala, Markus; Grigoras, Kestas; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-05-01

    An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) microchip is presented for combining a gas chromatograph (GC) to a mass spectrometer (MS). The chip includes capillary insertion channel, stopper, vaporizer channel, nozzle and nebulizer gas inlet fabricated on the silicon wafer, and a platinum heater sputtered on a glass wafer. These two wafers are joined by anodic bonding creating a two-dimensional version of an APCI microchip. The sample from GC is directed via heated transfer line capillary to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle forms narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona discharge needle, and the ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The GC-microchip APCI-MS combination provides an efficient method for qualitative and quantitative analysis. The spectra produced by microchip APCI show intensive protonated molecule and some fragmentation products as in classical chemical ionization for structure elucidation. In quantitative analysis the GC-microchip APCI-MS showed good linearity (r(2) = 0.9989) and repeatability (relative standard deviation 4.4%). The limits of detection with signal-to-noise ratio of three were between 0.5 and 2 micromol/L with MS mode using selected ion monitoring and 0.05 micromol/L with MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring. PMID:16642989

  3. The transfer of atmospheric-pressure ionization waves via a metal wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our study has shown that the atmospheric-pressure He ionization waves (IWs) may be transferred from one dielectric tube (tube 1) to the other one (tube 2) via a floating metal wire. The propagation of IWs along the two tubes is not affected by the diameter of a floating metal wire, however, their propagation is strongly dependent on the length of a floating metal wire. The propagation of one IW along the tube 1 may result in the second IW propagating reversely inside the tube in vicinity of a floating metal wire, which keeps from their further propagation through the tube 1. After they merge together as one conduction channel inside the tube 1, the transferred plasma bullet starts to propagate along the tube 2. The propagation of transferred plasma bullets along the tube 2 is mainly determined by the capacitance and inductance effects, and their velocity and density can be controlled by the length of a floating metal wire

  4. The transfer of atmospheric-pressure ionization waves via a metal wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Yang; Liu, Dongping, E-mail: Dongping.liu@dlnu.edu.cn [Liaoning Key Lab of Optoelectronic Films & Materials, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, Wenchun [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Peng, Yifeng; Niu, Jinhai; Bi, Zhenhua; Ji, Longfei; Song, Ying; Wang, Xueyang; Qi, Zhihua [Liaoning Key Lab of Optoelectronic Films & Materials, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Our study has shown that the atmospheric-pressure He ionization waves (IWs) may be transferred from one dielectric tube (tube 1) to the other one (tube 2) via a floating metal wire. The propagation of IWs along the two tubes is not affected by the diameter of a floating metal wire, however, their propagation is strongly dependent on the length of a floating metal wire. The propagation of one IW along the tube 1 may result in the second IW propagating reversely inside the tube in vicinity of a floating metal wire, which keeps from their further propagation through the tube 1. After they merge together as one conduction channel inside the tube 1, the transferred plasma bullet starts to propagate along the tube 2. The propagation of transferred plasma bullets along the tube 2 is mainly determined by the capacitance and inductance effects, and their velocity and density can be controlled by the length of a floating metal wire.

  5. Collision-induced dissociation analysis of negative atmospheric ion adducts in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2013-05-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments were performed on atmospheric ion adducts [M + R](-) formed between various types of organic compounds M and atmospheric negative ions R(-) [such as O2(-), HCO3(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO2(-), NO3(-), and NO3(-)(HNO3)] in negative-ion mode atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. All of the [M + R](-) adducts were fragmented to form deprotonated analytes [M - H](-) and/or atmospheric ions R(-), whose intensities in the CID spectra were dependent on the proton affinities of the [M - H](-) and R(-) fragments. Precursor ions [M + R](-) for which R(-) have higher proton affinities than [M - H](-) formed [M - H](-) as the dominant product. Furthermore, the CID of the adducts with HCO3(-) and NO3(-)(HNO3) led to other product ions such as [M + HO](-) and NO3(-), respectively. The fragmentation behavior of [M + R](-) for each R(-) observed was independent of analyte type (e.g., whether the analyte was aliphatic or aromatic, or possessed certain functional groups). PMID:23479312

  6. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Fingerprinting the Macondo Oil Spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobodin, Vladislav V; Maksimova, Ekaterina V; Rodgers, Ryan P

    2016-07-01

    We report the first application of a new mass spectrometry technique (gas chromatography combined to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry, GC/APCI-MS/MS) for fingerprinting a crude oil and environmental samples from the largest accidental marine oil spill in history (the Macondo oil spill, the Gulf of Mexico, 2010). The fingerprinting of the oil spill is based on a trace analysis of petroleum biomarkers (steranes, diasteranes, and pentacyclic triterpanes) naturally occurring in crude oil. GC/APCI enables soft ionization of petroleum compounds that form abundant molecular ions without (or little) fragmentation. The ability to operate the instrument simultaneously in several tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) modes (e.g., full scan, product ion scan, reaction monitoring) significantly improves structural information content and sensitivity of analysis. For fingerprinting the oil spill, we constructed diagrams and conducted correlation studies that measure the similarity between environmental samples and enable us to differentiate the Macondo oil spill from other sources. PMID:27281271

  7. Laser-Ionization TOF Mass Spectrometer Characterization of Benzene Destruction in Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jiahong; XIAO Qingmei; WANG Liping; YAO Zhi; DING Hongbin

    2009-01-01

    Benzene is.a major industrial air pollutant and can cause serious human health disorders. In this paper an investigation on benzene destruction, in an atmospheric-pressure fast-flow pulsed DC-discharge by means of laser ionization combined with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry, is reported. Most by-products including transient reactive species from the benzene discharge were characterized by molecular beam sampling combined with TOF mass spectrometry.It is showed that, with a gas mixture of 0.5% C6H6 in Ar, benzene can be effectively destroyed by discharge plasma. The intermediate species consisted of small fragments of CNHm (n=3~5,m =1~11), cycle-chain species of CNHm (n=6~9, m = 7~10) and polycyclic species CNHm (n ≥9,m = 8~12). The alternation of mass peaks (intensity) with even/odd electrons was observed in the measured mass spectra. The results indicated that the alternation is mainly due to the different ionization potentials of the open shell and close shell species. Based on the examination of the features of the species' composition, the primary reaction pathways are proposed and discussed.

  8. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As(+)) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH(+)) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As(+) through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As(+) signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH(+) signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As(+). Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27098411

  9. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As+) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH+) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As+ through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As+ signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH+ signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As+.

  10. Feasibility of desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to monitor urinary steroid metabolites during pregnancy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaikkinen, A.; Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Kauppila, T. J.; Cvačka, Josef; Kostiainen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 880, Jun 23 (2015), s. 84-92. ISSN 0003-2670 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551204 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : desorption electrospray ionization * desorption atmospheric pressure * photoionization * mass spectrometry * pregnancy Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.513, year: 2014

  11. Secondary ionization of chemical warfare agent simulants: atmospheric pressure ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Wes E; Clowers, Brian H; Haigh, Paul E; Hill, Herbert H

    2003-11-15

    For the first time, the use of a traditional ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry (radioactive nickel ((63)Ni) beta emission ionization) and three alternative ionization sources (electrospray ionization (ESI), secondary electrospray ionization (SESI), and electrical discharge (corona) ionization (CI)) were employed with an atmospheric pressure ion mobility orthogonal reflector time-of-flight mass spectrometer (IM(tof)MS) to detect chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants from both aqueous- and gas-phase samples. For liquid-phase samples, ESI was used as the sample introduction and ionization method. For the secondary ionization (SESI, CI, and traditional (63)Ni ionization) of vapor-phase samples, two modes of sample volatilization (heated capillary and thermal desorption chamber) were investigated. Simulant reference materials, which closely mimic the characteristic chemical structures of CWA as defined and described by Schedule 1, 2, or 3 of the Chemical Warfare Convention treaty verification, were used in this study. A mixture of four G/V-type nerve simulants (dimethyl methylphosphonate, pinacolyl methylphosphonate, diethyl phosphoramidate, and 2-(butylamino)ethanethiol) and one S-type vesicant simulant (2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide) were found in each case (sample ionization and introduction methods) to be clearly resolved using the IM(tof)MS method. In many cases, reduced mobility constants (K(o)) were determined for the first time. Ion mobility drift times, flight times, relative signal intensities, and fragmentation product signatures for each of the CWA simulants are reported for each of the methods investigated. PMID:14615983

  12. Capillary liquid chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Pekka; Jäntti, Sirkku; Grigoras, Kestas; Saarela, Ville; Ketola, Raimo A; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-07-01

    A miniaturized nebulizer chip for capillary liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS) is presented. The APCI chip consists of two wafers, a silicon wafer and a Pyrex glass wafer. The silicon wafer has a DRIE etched through-wafer nebulizer gas inlet, an edge capillary insertion channel, a stopper, a vaporizer channel and a nozzle. The platinum heater electrode and pads for electrical connection were patterned on to the Pyrex glass wafer. The two wafers were joined by anodic bonding, creating a microchip version of an APCI-source. The sample inlet capillary from an LC column is directly connected to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle in the microchip forms a narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona needle, and the formed ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The nebulizer chip enables for the first time the use of low flow rate separation techniques with APCI-MS. The performance of capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS was tested with selected neurosteroids. The capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS provides quantitative repeatability and good linearity. The limits of detection (LOD) with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 in MS/MS mode for the selected neurosteroids were 20-1000 fmol (10-500 nmol l(-1)). LODs (S/N = 3) with commercial macro APCI with the same compounds using the same MS were about 10 times higher. Fast heat transfer allows the use of the optimized temperature for each compound during an LC run. The microchip APCI-source provides a convenient and easy method to combine capillary LC to any API-MS equipped with an APCI source. The advantages and potentials of the microchip APCI also make it a very attractive interface in microfluidic APCI-MS. PMID:16804601

  13. Tracing origins of complex pharmaceutical preparations using surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinglei; Jia, Bin; Huang, Keke; Hu, Bin; Chen, Rong; Chen, Huanwen

    2010-10-01

    A novel strategy to trace the origins of commercial pharmaceutical products has been developed based on the direct chemical profiling of the pharmaceutical products by surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS). Besides the unambiguous identification of active drug components, various compounds present in the matrixes are simultaneously detected without sample pretreatment, providing valuable information for drug quality control and origin differentiation. Four sources of commercial amoxicillin products made by different manufacturers have been successfully differentiated. This strategy has been extended to secerning six sources of Liuwei Dihuang Teapills, which are herbal medicine preparations with extremely complex matrixes. The photolysis status of chemical drug products and the inferior natural herd medicine products prepared with different processes (e.g., extra heating) were also screened using the method reported here. The limit of detection achieved in the MS/MS experiments was estimated to be 1 ng/g for amoxicillin inside the capsule product. Our experimental data demonstrate that DAPCI-MS is a useful tool for rapid pharmaceutical analysis, showing promising perspectives for tracking the entire pharmaceutical supply chain to prevent counterfeit intrusions. PMID:20809628

  14. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of explosives using alternating current corona discharge ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, D T; Chen, L C; Yu, Z; Yamabe, S; Sakaki, S; Hiraoka, K

    2015-04-01

    The high-sensitive detection of explosives is of great importance for social security and safety. In this work, the ion source for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry using alternating current corona discharge was newly designed for the analysis of explosives. An electromolded fine capillary with 115 µm inner diameter and 12 mm long was used for the inlet of the mass spectrometer. The flow rate of air through this capillary was 41 ml/min. Stable corona discharge could be maintained with the position of the discharge needle tip as close as 1 mm to the inlet capillary without causing the arc discharge. Explosives dissolved in 0.5 µl methanol were injected to the ion source. The limits of detection for five explosives with 50 pg or lower were achieved. In the ion/molecule reactions of trinitrotoluene (TNT), the discharge products of NOx (-) (x = 2,3), O3 and HNO3 originating from plasma-excited air were suggested to contribute to the formation of [TNT - H](-) (m/z 226), [TNT - NO](-) (m/z 197) and [TNT - NO + HNO3 ](-) (m/z 260), respectively. Formation processes of these ions were traced by density functional theory calculations. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26149109

  15. On-line characterization of gaseous and particulate organic analytes using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion source is applied for direct analysis of volatile or low volatile organic compounds in air. The method is based on the direct introduction of the analytes in the gas phase and/or particle phase into the ion source of a commercial ion-trap mass spectrometer. Two methods are employed for the production of primary ions at atmospheric pressure, photoionization and corona discharge. It is shown that in the presence of a dopant, photoionization can be a highly efficient ionization method also for real-time analysis with detection limits for selected analytes in the lower ppt-range. Using corona discharge for the production of primary ions, which is instrumentally easier since no additional chemicals have to be added to the sample flow, we demonstrate the analytical potential of on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for reaction monitoring experiments. To do so, an atmospherically relevant gas phase reaction is carried out in a 500 l reaction chamber and gaseous and particulate compounds are monitored in the positive and negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer

  16. Gas chromatography interfaced with atmospheric pressure ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry by low-temperature plasma ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Asger W.; Kofoed-Sorensen, Vivi; Svensmark, Bo;

    2013-01-01

    A low temperature plasma (LTP) ionization interface between a gas chromatograph (GC) and an atmospheric pressure inlet mass spectrometer, was constructed. This enabled time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection of GC-eluting compounds. The performance of the setup was evaluated by injection of...... mixtures of common volatile organic compounds. Amounts down to ca. 0.5 ng (on column) could be detected for most compounds and with a chromatographic performance comparable to that of GC/EIMS. In the positive mode, LTP ionization resulted in a compound specific formation of molecular ions M+center dot...

  17. Quantitative analysis of adenosine using Liquid Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization - tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS/MS)

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dycke, Annelies; Verstraete, Alain; Pil, Kristof; Raedt, Robrecht; Vonck, Kristl; Boison, Detlev; Boon, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine-secreting cellular brain implants constitute a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of epilepsy. To engineer neural stem cells for therapeutic adenosine delivery, a reliable and fast analytical method is necessary to quantify cell-based adenosine release. Here we describe the development, optimization and validation of adenosine measurement using liquid chromatography – atmospheric pressure chemical ionization – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS in posit...

  18. Production and Utilization of CO3- Produced by a Corona Discharge in Air for Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.

    2010-12-14

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization is a multistep ionization process used in mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. The formation of product ions depends upon interactions with the analyte and the reactant ion species formed in the ionization source. The predominant reactant ion observed in a point-to-plane corona discharge in air occurs at m/z 60. There have been multiple references in the literature to the identity of this ion with some disagreement. It was postulated to be either CO3- or N2O2-. The identity of this ion is important as it is a key to the ionization of analytes. It was determined here to be CO3- through the use of 18O labeled oxygen. Further confirmation was provided through MS/MS studies. The ionization of nitroglycerine (NG) with CO3- produced the adduct NG•CO3-. This was compared to ionization with NO3- and Cl- reactant ions that also formed adducts with NG. The fragmentation patterns of these three adducts provides insight into the charge distribution and indicates that CO3- has a relatively high electron affinity similar to that of nitrate.

  19. Atmospheric pressure photoionisation : An ionization method for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robb, DB; Covey, TR; Bruins, AP

    2000-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) has been successfully demonstrated to provide high sensitivity to LC-MS analysis. A vacuum-ultraviolet lamp designed for photoionization detection in gas chromatography is used as a source of 10-eV photons. The mixture of samples and solvent eluting from a

  20. Atmospheric pressure ionization waves propagating through a flexible high aspect ratio capillary channel and impinging upon a target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure ionization waves (IWs) propagating in flexible capillary tubes are a unique way of transporting a plasma and its active species to remote sites for applications such as biomedical procedures, particularly in endoscopic procedures. The propagation mechanisms for such IWs in tubes having aspect ratios of hundreds to thousands are not clear. In this paper, results are discussed from a numerical investigation of the fundamental properties of ionization waves generated by nanosecond voltage pulses inside a 15 cm long, 600 µm wide (aspect ratio 250), flexible dielectric channel. The channel, filled with a Ne/Xe = 99.9/0.1 gas mixture at 1 atm, empties into a small chamber separated from a target substrate by 1 cm. The IWs propagate through the entire length of the channel while maintaining similar strength and magnitude. Upon exiting the channel into the chamber, the IW induces a second streamer discharge at the channel–chamber junction. This streamer then propagates across the chamber and impinges upon the target. The average speeds of the capillary-bounded IW are about 5 × 107 cm s−1 and 1 × 108 cm s−1 for positive and negative polarities, respectively. The propagation speed is sensitive to the curvature of the channel. In both cases, the peak in ionization tends to be located along the channel walls and alternates from side-to-side depending on the direction of the local instantaneous electric field and curvature of the channel. The ionization region following the IW extends up to several centimeters inside the channel, as opposed to being highly localized at the ionization front in unconstrained, atmospheric pressure IWs. The maximum speed of the IW in the chamber is about twice that in the channel. (paper)

  1. Potential of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry for screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Carlos; Portolés, Tania; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Abad, Esteban; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Fiedler, Heidelore; Gómara, Belén; Beltrán, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    A fast method for the screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane (sum of all isomers) by gas chromatography using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC-APCI-QqQ) is proposed. This novel procedure makes use of the soft atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source, which results in less fragmentation of the analyte than by conventional electron impact (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) sources, favoring the formation of the [M - Br](+) ion and, thus, enhancing sensitivity and selectivity. Detection was based on the consecutive loses of HBr from the [M - Br](+) ion to form the specific [M - H5Br6](+) and [M - H4Br5](+) ions, which were selected as quantitation (Q) and qualification (q) transitions, respectively. Parameters affecting ionization and MS/MS detection were studied. Method performance was also evaluated; calibration curves were found linear from 1 pg/μL to 100 pg/μL for the total HBCD concentration; instrumental detection limit was estimated to be 0.10 pg/μL; repeatability and reproducibility, expressed as relative standard deviation, were better than 7% in both cases. The application to different real samples [polyurethane foam disks (PUFs), food, and marine samples] pointed out a rapid way to identify and allow quantification of this compound together with a number of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDE congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two other novel brominated flame retardants [i.e., decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE)] because of their presence in the same fraction when performing the usual sample treatment. PMID:26554601

  2. Influence of field emission on the propagation of cylindrical fast ionization wave in atmospheric-pressure nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of field emission of electrons from surfaces on the fast ionization wave (FIW) propagation in high-voltage nanosecond pulse discharge in the atmospheric-pressure nitrogen is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model. A strong influence of field emission on the FIW dynamics and plasma parameters is obtained. Namely, the accounting for the field emission makes possible the bridging of the cathode-anode gap by rather dense plasma (˜1013 cm-3) in less than 1 ns. This is explained by the generation of runaway electrons from the field emitted electrons. These electrons are able to cross the entire gap pre-ionizing it and promoting the ionization wave propagation. We have found that the propagation of runaway electrons through the gap cannot be accompanied by the streamer propagation, because the runaway electrons align the plasma density gradients. In addition, we have obtained that the field enhancement factor allows controlling the speed of ionization wave propagation.

  3. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs

  4. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) with atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry for drug detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscioli, Kristyn M; Tufariello, Jessica A; Zhang, Xing; Li, Shelly X; Goetz, Gilles H; Cheng, Guilong; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H

    2014-04-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was coupled to an ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometer (IM-TOFMS) for the direct analysis of active ingredients in pharmaceutical samples. The DESI source was also coupled with a standalone IMS demonstrating potential of portable and inexpensive drug-quality testing platforms. The DESI-IMS required no sample pretreatment as ions were generated directly from tablets and cream formulations. The analysis of a range of over-the-counter and prescription tablet formations was demonstrated for amphetamine (methylphenidate), antidepressant (venlafaxine), barbiturate (Barbituric acid), depressant (alprazolam), narcotic (3-methylmorphine) and sympatholytic (propranolol) drugs. Active ingredients from soft and liquid formulations, such as Icy Hot cream (methyl salicylate) and Nyquil cold medicine (acetaminophen, dextromethorphan, doxylamine) were also detected. Increased sensitivity for selective drug responses was demonstrated through the formation of sodiated adduct ions by introducing small quantities of NaCl into the DESI solvent. Of the drugs and pharmaceuticals tested in this study, 68% (22 total samples) provided a clear ion mobility response at characteristic mobilities either as (M + H)(+), (M - H)(-), or (M + Na)(+) ions. PMID:24551872

  5. Use of electron ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spetrometry for screening and identification of organic pollutants in waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portoles, T.; Mol, J.G.J.; Sancho, J.V.; Hernandez, F.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach has been developed for multiclass screening of organic contaminants in water based on the use of gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC–(APCI)QTOF MS). The soft ionization promo

  6. Athabasca oil sands process water: characterization by atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Mark P; Witt, Matthias; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M

    2010-05-01

    The Athabasca oil sands in Canada are a less conventional source of oil which have seen rapid development. There are concerns about the environmental impact, with particular respect to components in oil sands process water which may enter the aquatic ecosystem. Naphthenic acids have been previously targeted for study, due to their implications in toxicity toward aquatic wildlife, but it is believed that other components, too, contribute toward the potential toxicity of the oil sands process water. When mass spectrometry is used, it is necessary to use instrumentation with a high resolving power and mass accuracy when studying complex mixtures, but the technique has previously been hindered by the range of compounds that have been accessible via common ionization techniques, such as electrospray ionization. The research described here applied Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry in conjunction with electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization, in both positive-ion and negative-ion modes, to the characterization of oil sands process water for the first time. The results highlight the need for broader characterization when investigating toxic components within oil sands process water. PMID:20359201

  7. SFC-APLI-(TOF)MS: Hyphenation of Supercritical Fluid Chromatography to Atmospheric Pressure Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klink, Dennis; Schmitz, Oliver Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure laser ionization mass spectrometry (APLI-MS) is a powerful method for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, which are ionized in a selective and highly sensitive way via resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. APLI was presented in 2005 and has been hyphenated successfully to chromatographic separation techniques like high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC). In order to expand the portfolio of chromatographic couplings to APLI, a new hyphenation setup of APLI and supercritical-fluid chromatography (SFC) was constructed and aim of this work. Here, we demonstrate the first hyphenation of SFC and APLI in a simple designed way with respect to different optimization steps to ensure a sensitive analysis. The new setup permits qualitative and quantitative determination of native and also more polar PAH molecules. As a result of the altered ambient characteristics within the source enclosure, the quantification of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HP) in human urine is possible without prior derivatization. The limit of detection for 1-HP by SFC-APLI-TOF(MS) was found to be 0.5 μg L(-1), which is lower than the 1-HP concentrations found in exposed persons. PMID:26633261

  8. A corona discharge atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source with selective NO(+) formation and its application for monoaromatic VOC detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Martin; Matejčík, Štefan

    2013-11-21

    We have developed a new type of corona discharge (CD) for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) for application in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as well as in mass spectrometry (MS). While the other CD-APCI sources are able to generate H3O(+)·(H2O)n as the major reactant ions in N2 or in zero air, the present CD-APCI source has the ability to generate up to 84% NO(+)·(H2O)n reactant ions in zero air. The change of the working gas from zero air to N2 allows us to change the major reactant ions from NO(+)·(H2O)n to H3O(+)·(H2O)n. In this paper we present the description of the new CD-APCI and discuss the processes associated with the NO(+) formation. The selective formation of NO(+)·(H2O)n reactant ions offers chemical ionization based on these ions which can be of great advantage for some classes of chemicals. We demonstrate here a significant increase in the sensitivity of the IMS-MS instrument for monoaromatic volatile organic compound (VOC) detection upon NO(+)·(H2O)n chemical ionization. PMID:24081306

  9. Comparative analysis of different plant oils by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Annamaria; Héberger, Károly; Forgács, Esther

    2002-11-01

    Different vegetable oil samples (almond, avocado, corngerm, grapeseed, linseed, olive, peanut, pumpkin seed, soybean, sunflower, walnut, wheatgerm) were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry. A gradient elution technique was applied using acetone-acetonitrile eluent systems on an ODS column (Purospher, RP-18e, 125 x 4 mm, 5 microm). Identification of triacylglycerols (TAGs) was based on the pseudomolecular ion [M+1]+ and the diacylglycerol fragments. The positional isomers of triacylglycerol were identified from the relative intensities of the [M-RCO2]+ fragments. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) as a common multivariate mathematical-statistical calculation was successfully used to distinguish the oils based on their TAG composition. LDA showed that 97.6% of the samples were classified correctly. PMID:12462617

  10. Laserspray ionization on a commercial atmospheric pressure-MALDI mass spectrometer ion source: selecting singly or multiply charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Charles N; Larsen, Barbara S; Trimpin, Sarah

    2010-06-15

    Multiply charged ions, similar to those obtained with electrospray ionization, are produced at atmospheric pressure (AP) using standard MALDI conditions of laser fluence and reflective geometry. Further, the charge state can be switched to singly charged ions nearly instantaneously by changing the voltage applied to the MALDI target plate. Under normal AP-MALDI operating conditions in which a voltage is applied to the target plate, primarily singly charged ions are observed, but at or near zero volts, highly charged ions are observed for peptides and proteins. Thus, switching between singly and multiply charged ions requires only manipulation of a single voltage. As in ESI, multiple charging, produced using the AP-MALDI source, allows compounds with molecular weights beyond the mass-to-charge limit of the mass spectrometer to be observed and improves the fragmentation relative to singly charged ions. PMID:20469839

  11. Desorption/ionization of biomolecules from aqueous solutions at atmospheric pressure using an infrared laser at 3 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiko, Victor V; Taranenko, Nelli I; Berkout, Vadym D; Yakshin, Mikhail A; Prasad, Coorg R; Lee, H Sang; Doroshenko, Vladimir M

    2002-04-01

    A new atmospheric pressure (AP) infrared (IR) matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion source was developed and interfaced with a Thermo Finnigan LCQ ion trap mass spectrometer. The source utilized a miniature all-solid-state optical parametric oscillator (OPO)-based IR laser system tunable in the lambda = 1.5-4 microm spectral range and a nitrogen ultraviolet (UV) laser (lambda = 337 nm) for use in comparative studies. The system demonstrated comparable performance at 3 microm and 337 nm wavelengths if UV matrices were used. However, AP IR-MALDI using a 3 microm wavelength showed good performance with a much broader choice of matrices including glycerol and liquid water. AP IR-MALDI mass spectra of peptides in the mass range up to 2000 Da were obtained directly from aqueous solutions at atmospheric conditions for the first time. A potential use of the new AP IR-MALDI ion source includes direct MS analysis of biological cells and tissues in a normal atmospheric environment as well as on-line coupling of mass spectrometers with liquid separation techniques. PMID:11951973

  12. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltman, Melanie J. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  13. Gas Chromatography Coupled to Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry for Improvement of Data Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemer, Theo; Rüger, Christopher P; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) offers the advantage of molecular ion information with low fragmentation. Hyphenating APCI to gas chromatography (GC) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables an improved characterization of complex mixtures. Data amounts acquired by this system are very huge, and existing peak picking algorithms are usually extremely time-consuming, if both gas chromatographic and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometric data are concerned. Therefore, automatic routines are developed that are capable of handling these data sets and further allow the identification and removal of known ionization artifacts (e.g., water- and oxygen-adducts, demethylation, dehydrogenation, and decarboxylation). Furthermore, the data quality is enhanced by the prediction of an estimated retention index, which is calculated simply from exact mass data combined with a double bond equivalent correction. This retention index is used to identify mismatched elemental compositions. The approach was successfully tested for analysis of semivolatile components in heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel as well as primary combustion particles emitted by a ship diesel research engine. As a result, 10-28% of the detected compounds, mainly low abundant species, classically assigned by using only the mass spectrometric information, were identified as not valid and removed. Although GC separation is limited by the slow acquisition rate of the FT-ICR MS (<1 Hz), a database driven retention time comparison, as commonly used for low resolution GC/MS, can be applied for revealing isomeric information. PMID:26560682

  14. Analysis of psychoactive cathinones and tryptamines by electrospray ionization atmospheric pressure ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanu, A Bakarr; Brandt, Simon D; Williams, Mike D; Zhang, Nancy; Hill, Herbert H

    2013-09-17

    The ability to use positive ion monitoring mode with an atmospheric pressure ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometer (APIM(tof)MS) to detect psychoactive cathinones and tryptamines from aqueous phase samples was evaluated. The study used a traditional electrospray ionization (ESI) source for sample introduction and ionization. A total of four cathinones (mephedrone, butylone, 4-Me-PPP, and 4-MEC) and five tryptamines (5-EtO-DPT, 5-EtO-DALT, 5-EtO-MIPT, 5-EtO-ALCHT, and 5-EtO-2MALET) were investigated, and we report on parent ions, collision induced dissociation (CID) fragment ions, reduced mobility (Ko), mass flight times, and detection limits obtained from a single instrument run for the psychoactive substances. Detection limits reported ranged from 3 to 11 μM concentration for the compounds studied. This detection limit range corresponded to 1-5 ng of material needed for improved detection on the instrument. This article demonstrates that it was possible to use a single instrument platform for the separation, detection, and identification of cathinones and tryptamines in less than 1 min. The application holds great promise for detecting and identifying a new class of drugs often referred to as "bath salts" or "legal highs" distributed over the Internet. PMID:23875808

  15. Atmospheric pressure-thermal desorption (AP-TD)/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry for the rapid analysis of Bacillus spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Franco; Zhang, Shaofeng; Shin, Yong-Seung; Drolet, Barbara

    2010-04-01

    A technique is described where an atmospheric pressure-thermal desorption (AP-TD) device and electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry (MS) are coupled and used for the rapid analysis of Bacillus subtilis spores in complex matrices. The resulting AP-TD/ESI-MS technique combines the generation of volatile compounds and/or pyrolysis products with soft-ionization MS detection. In the AP-TD/ESI-MS approach, an electrospray solvent plume was used as the ionization vehicle of thermally desorbed neutrals at atmospheric pressure prior to mass spectrometric analysis using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The approach is quantitative with the volatile standard dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and with the use of an internal standard (diethyl methylphosphonate, DEMP). A linear response was obtained as tested in the 1-50 ppm range (R(2) = 0.991) with a standard error of the estimate of 0.193 (0.9% RSD, n = 5). Bacterial spores were detected by performing pyrolysis in situ methylation with the reagent tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) for the detection of the bacterial spore biomarker dipicolinic acid (DPA) as the dimethylated derivative (2Me-DPA). This approach allowed spore detection even in the presence of growth media in crude lyophilized samples. Repetitive analyses could be performed with a duty cycle of less than 5 min total analysis time (including sample loading, heating and data acquisition). This strategy proved successful over other direct ambient MS approaches like DESI-MS and AP-TD/ESI-MS without the in situ derivatization step to detect the dipicolinic acid biomarker from spores. A detection limit for the dimethylated DPA biomarker was estimated at 1 ppm (equivalent to 0.01 mug of DPA deposited in the thermal desorption tube), which corresponded to a calculated detection limit of 10(5) spores deposited or 0.1% by weight spore composition in solid samples (assuming a 1 mg sample size). The AP-TD/ESI source used in conjunction with the in situ

  16. Development of an ion mobility spectrometer for use in an atmospheric pressure ionization ion mobility spectrometer/mass spectrometer instrument for fast screening analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sysoev, A; Adamov, A; Vildanoja, J; Ketoja, RA; Kostiainen, R; Kotiaho, T

    2004-01-01

    An ion mobility spectrometer that can easily be installed as an intermediate component between a commercial triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer and its original atmospheric pressure ionization (API) sources was developed. The curtain gas from the mass spectrometer is also used as the ion mobility sp

  17. Application of gas chromatography–(triple quadrupole) massspectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for thedetermination of multiclass pesticides in fruits and vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cherta, L.; Portoles, T.; Beltran, J.; Pitarch, E.; Mol, J.G.J.; Hernandez, F.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-residue method for the determination of 142 pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables has been developed using a new atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for coupling gas chromatography (GC) to tandem mass spectrometry (MS). Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode has bee

  18. Analysis of vitamin K-1 in fruits and vegetables using accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäpelt, Rie Bak; Jakobsen, Jette

    2016-01-01

    spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in selected reaction monitoring mode with deuterium-labeled vitamin K1 as an internal standard. The precision was estimated as the pooled estimate of three replicates performed on three different days for spinach, peas, apples, banana, and beetroot...

  19. Are clusters important in understanding the mechanisms in atmospheric pressure ionization? Part 1: Reagent ion generation and chemical control of ion populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Sonja; Derpmann, Valerie; Wißdorf, Walter; Klopotowski, Sebastian; Kersten, Hendrik; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten; Albrecht, Sascha; Bruins, Andries P; Dousty, Faezeh; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto; O'Brien, Rob; Robb, Damon B; Syage, Jack A

    2014-08-01

    It is well documented since the early days of the development of atmospheric pressure ionization methods, which operate in the gas phase, that cluster ions are ubiquitous. This holds true for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, as well as for more recent techniques, such as atmospheric pressure photoionization, direct analysis in real time, and many more. In fact, it is well established that cluster ions are the primary carriers of the net charge generated. Nevertheless, cluster ion chemistry has only been sporadically included in the numerous proposed ionization mechanisms leading to charged target analytes, which are often protonated molecules. This paper series, consisting of two parts, attempts to highlight the role of cluster ion chemistry with regard to the generation of analyte ions. In addition, the impact of the changing reaction matrix and the non-thermal collisions of ions en route from the atmospheric pressure ion source to the high vacuum analyzer region are discussed. This work addresses such issues as extent of protonation versus deuteration, the extent of analyte fragmentation, as well as highly variable ionization efficiencies, among others. In Part 1, the nature of the reagent ion generation is examined, as well as the extent of thermodynamic versus kinetic control of the resulting ion population entering the analyzer region. PMID:24850441

  20. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portoles, T.; Mol, J.G.J.; Sancho, J.V.; Lopez, F.J.; Hernandez, F.

    2014-01-01

    A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target acq

  1. Radio frequency induced ionized collisional flow model for application at atmospheric pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the development and application of a versatile finite-element method to discretize direct current and radio frequency (rf) induced plasma-sheath dynamics, using multifluid equations. For the former, argon gas is assumed, and the solution is verified by comparison with a theoretical model obtained from the literature. For rf discharges, partially ionized helium gas is considered between two electrodes coated in a dielectric material. The computed solutions for charge densities, the ion velocity and the neutral gas density and crossflow distributions show expected trends. Specifically, ion and electron number densities at the peak discharge current are compared with published numerical results. The derived electric field is utilized with a simple phenomenological model applicable to the transverse velocity in a one-dimensional situation to predict the anticipated hump in the near wall profile. The next step of extending the model, through future work, to two dimensions and for polyphase supply as implemented in realistic configurations is greatly facilitated by the generality of the chosen finite-element method

  2. Qualitative analysis of some carboxylic acids by ion-exclusion chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helale, Murad I H; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Taoda, Hiroshi; Hu, Wenzhi; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Haddad, Paul R

    2002-05-17

    A simple, selective and sensitive method for the determination of carboxylic acids has been developed. A mixture of formic, acetic, propionic, valeric, isovaleric, isobutyric, and isocaproic acids has been separated on a polymethacrylate-based weak acidic cation-exchange resin (TSK gel OA pak-A) based on an ion-exclusion chromatographic mechanism with detection using UV-photodiode array, conductivity and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). A mobile phase consisting of 0.85 mM benzoic acid in 10% aqueous methanol (pH 3.89) was used to separate the above carboxylic acids in about 40 min. For LC-MS, the APCI interface was used in the negative ionization mode. Linear plots of peak area versus concentration were obtained over the range 1-30 mM (r2=0.9982) and 1-30 mM (r2=0.9958) for conductimetric and MS detection, respectively. The detection limits of the target carboxylic acids calculated at S/N=3 ranged from 0.078 to 2.3 microM for conductimetric and photometric detection and from 0.66 to 3.82 microM for ion-exclusion chromatography-APCI-MS. The reproducibility of retention times was 0.12-0.16% relative standard deviation for ion-exclusion chromatography and 1.21-2.5% for ion-exclusion chromatography-APCI-MS. The method was applied to the determination of carboxylic acids in red wine, white wine, apple vinegar, and Japanese rice wine. PMID:12108651

  3. Characterization of nonpolar lipids and steroids by using laser-induced acoustic desorption/chemical ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Z; Daiya, S; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) combined with ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} chemical ionization (CI) was tested for the analysis of nonpolar lipids and selected steroids in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR). The nonpolar lipids studied, cholesterol, 5α-cholestane, cholesta-3,5-diene, squalene, and β-carotene, were found to solely form the desired water replacement product (adduct-H{sub 2}O) upon reaction with the ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} ions. The steroids, androsterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), estrone, estradiol, and estriol, also form abundant adduct-H{sub 2}O ions, but less abundant adduct-2H{sub 2}O ions were also observed. Neither (+)APCI nor (+)ESI can ionize the saturated hydrocarbon lipid, cholestane. APCI successfully ionizes the unsaturated hydrocarbon lipids to form exclusively the intact protonated analytes. However, it causes extensive fragmentation for cholesterol and the steroids. The worst case is cholesterol that does not produce any stable protonated molecules. On the other hand, ESI cannot ionize any of the hydrocarbon analytes, saturated or unsaturated. However, ESI can be used to protonate the oxygen-containing analytes with substantially less fragmentation than for APCI in all cases except for cholesterol and estrone. In conclusion, LIAD/ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} chemical ionization is superior over APCI and ESI for the mass spectrometric characterization of underivatized nonpolar lipids and steroids.

  4. Self-Aspirated Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Source for Direct Sampling of Analytes on Surfaces and in Liquid Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, Keiji G [ORNL; Ford, Michael J [ORNL; Tomkins, Bruce A [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    A self-aspirating heated nebulizer probe is described and demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of analytes on surfaces and in liquid samples by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry. Functionality and performance of the probe as a self-aspirating APCI source is demonstrated using reserpine and progesterone as test compounds. The utility of the probe to sample analytes directly from surfaces was demonstrated first by scanning development lanes of a reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography plate in which a three-component dye mixture, viz., Fat Red 7B, Solvent Green 3, and Solvent Blue 35, was spotted and the components were separated. Development lanes were scanned by the sampling probe operated under computer control (x, y plane) while full-scan mass spectra were recorded using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. In addition, the ability to sample the surface of pharmaceutical tablets (viz., Extra Strength Tylenol(reg. sign) and Evista(reg. sign) tablets) and to detect the active ingredients (acetaminophen and raloxifene, respectively) selectively was demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Finally, the capability to sample analyte solutions from the wells of a 384-well microtiter plate and to perform quantitative analyses using MS/MS detection was illustrated with cotinine standards spiked with cotinine-d{sub 3} as an internal standard.

  5. Continuous Flow Atmospheric Pressure Laser Desorption/Ionization Using a 6–7-µm-Band Mid-Infrared Tunable Laser for Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ryuji Hiraguchi; Hisanao Hazama; Kenichirou Senoo; Yukinori Yahata; Katsuyoshi Masuda; Kunio Awazu

    2014-01-01

    A continuous flow atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization technique using a porous stainless steel probe and a 6–7-µm-band mid-infrared tunable laser was developed. This ion source is capable of direct ionization from a continuous flow with a high temporal stability. The 6–7-µm wavelength region corresponds to the characteristic absorption bands of various molecular vibration modes, including O–H, C=O, CH3 and C–N bonds. Consequently, many organic compounds and solvents, including ...

  6. Online measurement of biogenic organic acids in the boreal forest using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, A. L.; Brüggemann, M.; ńijälä, M.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Corrigan, A. L.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Russell, L. M.; Kulmala, M.; Williams, J.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    Emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) by vegetation in the boreal forest and their subsequent atmospheric oxidation leads to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) which has important impacts on climate and human health. Oxidation of BVOCs produces a variety of mostly unidentified species in oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA). Presently aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) are able to determine quantitative information about the relative oxygen to carbon content of organic aerosols and thereby reveal the photochemical age and volatility of organic aerosol by distinguishing between low volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA), semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA) and hydrocarbon like organic aerosol (HOA)[1]. However, the AMS can usually not be used to measure and quantify single organic compounds such as individual biogenic organic marker compounds. Here we show the results of online measurements of gas and particle phase biogenic acids during HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 at Hyytiälä, Finland. This was achieved by coupling a self built miniature Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (mVACES) as described by Geller et al. [2] with an Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (APCI IT MS; Hoffmann et al., [3]). The benefits of the on-line APCI-MS are soft ionization with little fragmentation compared to AMS, high measurement frequency and less sampling artifacts than in the common procedure of taking filter samples, extraction and detection with LC-MS. Furthermore, the ion trap of the instrument allows MS/MS experiments to be performed by isolation of single m/z ratios of selected molecular species. By subsequent addition of energy, the trapped ions form characteristic fragments which enable structural insight on the molecular level. Comparison of APCI-MS data to AMS data, acquired with a C-ToF-AMS [4], revealed a good correlation coefficient for total organics and sulphate. Furthermore, data show

  7. Simultaneous determination of hydroxycinnamates and catechins in human urine samples by column switching liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Salka E.; Sandström, B.

    2003-01-01

    atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) MS using single ion monitoring (SIM) in negative mode. Linear calibration graphs were achieved in the dynamic range of 10-1000 ng/ml urine. The inter- and intraassay coefficients of variation (C.V.%) for the analysis of the four compounds in quality control...... urine samples were between 7.8 and 10.9, n=17 (reproducibility), and the repeatability of the assay was between 2.5 and 5.0% (n = 12). Analyses of urine samples from a human dietary intervention study with intake of 600 g of fruits and vegetables were demonstrated. To our knowledge, this is the first...

  8. Identification and quantification of flavonoids in human urine samples by column switching liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S. E.; Freese, R.; Cornett, Claus;

    2000-01-01

    column-switching, using the first column (a Zorbax 300SB C-3 column) for sample cleanup and eluting the heart-cut flavonoid fraction onto the second column (a Zorbax SE C-18 column) for separation and detection by ultraviolet and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization MS using single ion monitoring in...... variation for the analysis of the 12 different flavonoids in quality control urine samples were 12.3% on average (range 11.0-13.7%, n = 24, reproducibility) and the repeatability of the assay were 5.0% (mean, range 0.1-14.8%, it = 12). A subset of 10 urine samples from a human dietary intervention study...

  9. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Jan; Kroll, Marius M; Rathsack, Philipp; Otto, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS). Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols. PMID:27066076

  10. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zuber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS. Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols.

  11. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions in asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-07-01

    An analytical method using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in asphalt fractions has been developed. The 14 compounds determined, characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings, are expected to be present in asphalt and are considered carcinogenic and mutagenic. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all of the compounds. The limits of detection ranged from 0.5 to 346.5 μg/L and the limits of quantification ranged from 1.7 to 1550 μg/L. The method was validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (NIST SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations agreed with the certified values. The method was applied to asphalt samples after its fractionation according to ASTM D4124 and the method of Green. The concentrations of the seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons quantified in the sample ranged from 0.86 mg/kg for benzo[ghi]perylene to 98.32 mg/kg for fluorene. PMID:25885756

  12. Very small ionization pressure gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very small ionization pressure gauge has been developed to operate in the pressure range 10-6 Torr to 100μ. A metal construction and external cooling fins result in a very rugged device with exceptionally small outgassing properties. The gauge also incorporates a replaceable filament-grid assembly on a single plug which allows the simple replacement of both the filament and the grid when needed

  13. Use of electron ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry for screening and identification of organic pollutants in waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, Tania; Mol, Johannes G J; Sancho, Juan V; Hernández, Félix

    2014-04-25

    A new approach has been developed for multiclass screening of organic contaminants in water based on the use of gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). The soft ionization promoted by the APCI source allows effective and wide-scope screening based on the investigation of the molecular ion and/or protonated molecule. This is in contrast to electron ionization (EI) where ionization typically results in extensive fragmentation, and diagnostic ions and/or spectra need to be known a priori to facilitate detection of the analytes in the raw data. Around 170 organic contaminants from different chemical families were initially investigated by both approaches, i.e. GC-(EI)TOF and GC-(APCI)QTOF, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and a notable number of pesticides and relevant metabolites. The new GC-(APCI)QTOF MS approach easily allowed widening the number of compounds investigated (85 additional compounds), with more pesticides, personal care products (UV filters, musks), polychloronaphthalenes (PCNs), antimicrobials, insect repellents, etc., most of them considered as emerging contaminants. Both GC-(EI)TOF and GC-(APCI)QTOF methodologies have been applied, evaluating their potential for a wide-scope screening in the environmental field. PMID:24674644

  14. Screening of lake sediments for emerging contaminants by liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaia-Hernandez, Aurea C; Krauss, Martin; Hollender, Juliane

    2013-01-15

    We developed a multiresidue method for the target and suspect screening of more than 180 pharmaceuticals, personal care products, pesticides, biocides, additives, corrosion inhibitors, musk fragrances, UV light stabilizers, and industrial chemicals in sediments. Sediment samples were freeze-dried, extracted by pressurized liquid extraction, and cleaned up by liquid-liquid partitioning. The quantification and identification of target compounds with a broad range of physicochemical properties (log K(ow) 0-12) was carried out by liquid chromatography followed by electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) coupled to high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (HRMS/MS). The overall method average recoveries and precision are 103% and 9% (RSD), respectively. The method detection limits range from 0.010 to 4 ng/g(dw), while limits of quantification range from 0.030 to 14 ng/g(dw). The use of APPI as an alternative ionization source helped to distinguish two isomeric musk fragrances by means of different ionization behavior. The method was demonstrated on sediment cores from Lake Greifensee located in northeastern Switzerland. The results show that biocides, musk fragrances, and other personal care products were the most frequently detected compounds with concentrations ranging from pg/g(dw) to ng/g(dw), whereas none of the targeted pharmaceuticals were found. The concentrations of many urban contaminants originating from wastewater correlate with the highest phosphorus input into the lake as a proxy for treatment efficiency. HRMS enabled a retrospective analysis of the full-scan data acquisition allowing the detection of suspected compounds like quaternary ammonium surfactants, the biocide triclocarban, and the tentative identification of further compounds without reference standards, among others transformation products of triclosan and triclocarban. PMID:23215447

  15. Identification and quantification of flavonoids in human urine samples by column switching liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Salka E.; Freese, R.; Cornett, C.;

    2000-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic mass spectrometric (HPLC-MS) method is described for the determination and quantification of 12 dietary flavonoid glycosides and aglycons in human urine samples. Chromatographic separation of the analytes of interest was achieved by...... column-switching, using the first column (a Zorbax 300SB C-3 column) for sample cleanup and eluting the heart-cut flavonoid fraction onto the second column (a Zorbax SE C-18 column) for separation and detection by ultraviolet and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization MS using single ion monitoring in...... variation for the analysis of the 12 different flavonoids in quality control urine samples were 12.3% on average (range 11.0-13.7%, n = 24, reproducibility) and the repeatability of the assay were 5.0% (mean, range 0.1-14.8%, it = 12). A subset of 10 urine samples from a human dietary intervention study...

  16. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) ionization source for elemental mass spectrometry: preliminary parametric evaluation and figures of merit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarles, C Derrick; Carado, Anthony J; Barinaga, Charles J; Koppenaal, David W; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    A new, low-power ionization source for the elemental analysis of aqueous solutions has recently been described. The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) source operates at relatively low currents (elements indicate that sodium concentrations of up to 50 μg mL(-1) generally cause suppressions of less than 50%, dependant upon the analyte species. Based on the results of this series of studies, preliminary limits of detection (LOD) have been established through the generation of calibration functions. While solution-based concentration LOD levels of 0.02-2 μg mL(-1) are not impressive on the surface, the fact that they are determined via discrete 5 μL injections leads to mass-based detection limits at picogram to single-nanogram levels. The overhead costs associated with source operation (10 W d.c. power, solution flow rates of elemental mass spectrometry. PMID:21910014

  17. Determination of oxygen and nitrogen derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions of asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-12-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was used for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon derivatives, the oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, formed in asphalt fractions. Two different methods have been developed for the determination of five oxygenated and seven nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings and present mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all compounds. The detection limits of the methods ranged from 0.1 to 57.3 μg/L for nitrated and from 0.1 to 6.6 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The limits of quantification were in the range of 4.6-191 μg/L for nitrated and 0.3-8.9 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The methods were validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (National Institute of Standards and Technology SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations (two nitrated derivatives) agreed with the certified values. The methods were applied in the analysis of asphalt samples after their fractionation into asphaltenes and maltenes, according to American Society for Testing and Material D4124, where the maltenic fraction was further separated into its basic, acidic, and neutral parts following the method of Green. Only two nitrated derivatives were found in the asphalt sample, quinoline and 2-nitrofluorene, with concentrations of 9.26 and 2146 mg/kg, respectively, whereas no oxygenated derivatives were detected. PMID:26446274

  18. An evaluation of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the rapid and simultaneous measurement of carbamate pesticides and organophorus pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface (LC/APCI/MS) is evaluated for the simultaneous determination of carbamate pesticides and organophosphorus pesticides in a single chromatographic analysis. APCI mass spectra of those compounds were obtained to study their ionization characteristics. APCI provided abundant ions such as protonated molecules and characteristic fragment ions for carbamate pesticides and organophosphorus pesticides. To evaluate the feasibility of the LC/APCI/MS for a routine quantitative analysis, the linearity and repeatability of LC/APCI/MS were examined by measuring standard solution mixtures of five carbamate pesticides and four organophosphorus pesticides over the range of 1 to 100 μg/mL. The peak areas in chromatograms of characteristic ions for those compounds showed less than 3% of variation from run to tun. The standard calibration curves for the nine pesticides show good linearity in the concentration range. The detection limits of the LC/APCI/MS system for those compounds range from 0.006 to 0.2 ng

  19. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs. PMID:24678766

  20. Potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source in gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the screening of urinary exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raro, M; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Sancho, J V; Hernández, F; Garrostas, L; Marcos, J; Ventura, R; Segura, J; Pozo, O J

    2016-02-01

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis has been evaluated for the screening of 16 exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) in urine. The sample treatment is based on the strategy currently applied in doping control laboratories i.e. enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and derivatization to form the trimethylsilyl ether-trimethylsilyl enol ether (TMS) derivatives. These TMS derivatives are then analyzed by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using a triple quadrupole instrument (GC-QqQ MS/MS) under selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The APCI promotes soft ionization with very little fragmentation resulting, in most cases, in abundant [M + H](+) or [M + H-2TMSOH](+) ions, which can be chosen as precursor ions for the SRM transitions, improving in this way the selectivity and sensitivity of the method. Specificity of the transitions is also of great relevance, as the presence of endogenous compounds can affect the measurements when using the most abundant ions. The method has been qualitatively validated by spiking six different urine samples at two concentration levels each. Precision was generally satisfactory with RSD values below 25 and 15% at the low and high concentration level, respectively. Most the limits of detection (LOD) were below 0.5 ng mL(-1). Validation results were compared with the commonly used method based on the electron ionization (EI) source. EI analysis was found to be slightly more repeatable whereas lower LODs were found for APCI. In addition, the applicability of the developed method has been tested in samples collected after the administration of 4-chloromethandienone. The highest sensitivity of the APCI method for this compound, allowed to increase the period in which its administration can be detected. PMID:26772132

  1. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. V. ALFVÉN IONIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of continuous radio and sporadic X-ray emission from low-mass objects suggest they harbor localized plasmas in their atmospheric environments. For low-mass objects, the degree of thermal ionization is insufficient to qualify the ionized component as a plasma, posing the question: what ionization processes can efficiently produce the required plasma that is the source of the radiation? We propose Alfvén ionization as a mechanism for producing localized pockets of ionized gas in the atmosphere, having sufficient degrees of ionization (≥10–7) that they constitute plasmas. We outline the criteria required for Alfvén ionization and demonstrate its applicability in the atmospheres of low-mass objects such as giant gas planets, brown dwarfs, and M dwarfs with both solar and sub-solar metallicities. We find that Alfvén ionization is most efficient at mid to low atmospheric pressures where a seed plasma is easier to magnetize and the pressure gradients needed to drive the required neutral flows are the smallest. For the model atmospheres considered, our results show that degrees of ionization of 10–6-1 can be obtained as a result of Alfvén ionization. Observable consequences include continuum bremsstrahlung emission, superimposed with spectral lines from the plasma ion species (e.g., He, Mg, H2, or CO lines). Forbidden lines are also expected from the metastable population. The presence of an atmospheric plasma opens the door to a multitude of plasma and chemical processes not yet considered in current atmospheric models. The occurrence of Alfvén ionization may also be applicable to other astrophysical environments such as protoplanetary disks

  2. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. V. ALFVÉN IONIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, C. R.; Helling, Ch.; Rimmer, P. B. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Diver, D. A., E-mail: craig.stark@st-andrews.ac.uk [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Kelvin Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-10

    Observations of continuous radio and sporadic X-ray emission from low-mass objects suggest they harbor localized plasmas in their atmospheric environments. For low-mass objects, the degree of thermal ionization is insufficient to qualify the ionized component as a plasma, posing the question: what ionization processes can efficiently produce the required plasma that is the source of the radiation? We propose Alfvén ionization as a mechanism for producing localized pockets of ionized gas in the atmosphere, having sufficient degrees of ionization (≥10{sup –7}) that they constitute plasmas. We outline the criteria required for Alfvén ionization and demonstrate its applicability in the atmospheres of low-mass objects such as giant gas planets, brown dwarfs, and M dwarfs with both solar and sub-solar metallicities. We find that Alfvén ionization is most efficient at mid to low atmospheric pressures where a seed plasma is easier to magnetize and the pressure gradients needed to drive the required neutral flows are the smallest. For the model atmospheres considered, our results show that degrees of ionization of 10{sup –6}-1 can be obtained as a result of Alfvén ionization. Observable consequences include continuum bremsstrahlung emission, superimposed with spectral lines from the plasma ion species (e.g., He, Mg, H{sub 2}, or CO lines). Forbidden lines are also expected from the metastable population. The presence of an atmospheric plasma opens the door to a multitude of plasma and chemical processes not yet considered in current atmospheric models. The occurrence of Alfvén ionization may also be applicable to other astrophysical environments such as protoplanetary disks.

  3. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was increased by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ~40 ng m−3 for pinonic acid by using the miniature Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (mVACES upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards – pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total sub-micron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94 demonstrates soft ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene cannot account for all of the measured fragments, which illustrates the complexity of ambient aerosol and possibly indicates unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursor in the boreal forest.

  4. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft-ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was improved by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ∼40 ng m3 for pinonic acid by using the miniature versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (mVACES upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards – pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total submicron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%, based on the response of pinic acid. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94 demonstrates soft-ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene cannot account for all of the measured fragments. Possible explanations for those unaccounted fragments are the presence of unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursors, or that different products are formed by a

  5. Gas chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry for the analysis of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Dawei; Jogsten, Ingrid Ericson; Dunstan, Jody; Hagberg, Jessika; Wang, Thanh; Ruzzin, Jerome; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; van Bavel, Bert

    2016-07-01

    A method using a novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for coupling gas chromatography (GC/APCI) to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the determination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention is presented. One microliter injection of a six-point calibration curve of native PCBs and OCPs, ranging from 0.04 to 300pg/μL, was performed. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the relative response factors (RRFs) was less than 15% with a coefficient of determination (r(2))>0.995. Meanwhile, two calibration solutions (CS), CS 2 (0.4pg/μL) and CS 3 (4pg/μL) were analyzed to study the repeatability calculated for both area and RRFs. The RSD for RRF ranged from 3.1 to 16% and 3.6 to 5.5% for CS 2 and CS 3, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) determined by peak-to-peak signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 were compared between the GC/APCI/MS/MS and a GC coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (GC/HRMS) system. GC/APCI/MS/MS resulted in lower LOD for most of the compounds, except for PCB#74, cis-chlordane and trans-chlordane. GC/APCI/MS/MS and GC/HRMS were also compared by performing analysis on 75 human serum samples together with eight QA/QC serum samples. The comparison between GC/APCI/MS/MS system and GC/HRMS system for 16 of the targeted compounds was carried out. No statistically significant difference was discovered. Due to increased sensitivity and user friendly operation under atmospheric pressure, GC/APCI/MS/MS is a powerful alternative technique that can easily meet the specification of GC/HRMS. PMID:27236485

  6. Quantitation of triacylglycerols in edible oils by off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a single column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang; Hu, Na; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Chen, Hong

    2015-07-24

    In this investigation, off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a single column has been applied for the identification and quantification of triacylglycerols in edible oils. A novel mixed-mode phenyl-hexyl chromatographic column was employed in this off-line two-dimensional separation system. The phenyl-hexyl column combined the features of traditional C18 and silver-ion columns, which could provide hydrophobic interactions with triacylglycerols under acetonitrile conditions and can offer π-π interactions with triacylglycerols under methanol conditions. When compared with traditional off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography employing two different chromatographic columns (C18 and silver-ion column) and using elution solvents comprised of two phases (reversed-phase/normal-phase) for triacylglycerols separation, the novel off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography using a single column can be achieved by simply altering the mobile phase between acetonitrile and methanol, which exhibited a much higher selectivity for the separation of triacylglycerols with great efficiency and rapid speed. In addition, an approach based on the use of response factor with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been developed for triacylglycerols quantification. Due to the differences between saturated and unsaturated acyl chains, the use of response factors significantly improves the quantitation of triacylglycerols. This two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system was successfully applied for the profiling of triacylglycerols in soybean oils, peanut oils and lord oils. A total of 68 triacylglycerols including 40 triacylglycerols in soybean oils, 50 triacylglycerols in peanut oils and 44 triacylglycerols in lord oils have been identified and quantified. The liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data were analyzed

  7. Determination of talinolol in human plasma using automated on-line solid phase extraction combined with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgogne, Emmanuel; Grivet, Chantal; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2005-06-01

    A specific LC-MS/MS assay was developed for the automated determination of talinolol in human plasma, using on-line solid phase extraction system (prospekt 2) combined with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) tandem mass spectrometry. The method involved simple precipitation of plasma proteins with perchloric acid (contained propranolol) as the internal standard (IS) and injection of the supernatant onto a C8 End Capped (10 mmx2 mm) cartridge without any evaporation step. Using the back-flush mode, the analytes were transferred onto an analytical column (XTerra C18, 50 mmx4.6 mm) for chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry detection. One of the particularities of the assay is that the SPE cartridge is used as a column switching device and not as an SPE cartridge. Therefore, the same SPE cartridge could be used more than 28 times, significantly reducing the analysis cost. APCI ionization was selected to overcome any potential matrix suppression effects because the analyte and IS co-eluted. The mean precision and accuracy in the concentration range 2.5-200 ng/mL was found to be 103% and 7.4%, respectively. The data was assessed from QC samples during the validation phase of the assay. The lower limit of quantification was 2.5 ng/mL, using a 250 microL plasma aliquot. The LC-MS/MS method provided the requisite selectivity, sensitivity, robustness accuracy and precision to assess pharmacokinetics of the compound in several hundred human plasma samples. PMID:15866498

  8. Gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for fluorotelomer alcohols and perfluorinated sulfonamides determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, Tania; Rosales, Luis E; Sancho, Juan V; Santos, F Javier; Moyano, Encarnación

    2015-09-25

    Ionization and in source-fragmentation behavior of four fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOH) (4:2 FTOH, 6:2 FTOH, 8:2 FTOH and 10:2 FTOH) and four N-alkyl fluorooctane sulfonamides/-ethanols (N-MeFOSA, N-EtFOSA, N-MeFOSE and N-EtFOSE) by APCI has been studied and compared with the traditionally used EI and CI. Protonated molecule was the base peak of the APCI spectrum in all cases giving the possibility of selecting it as a precursor ion for MS/MS experiments. Following, CID fragmentation showed common product ions for all FOSAs/FOSEs (C4F7 and C3F5). Nevertheless, the different functionality gave characteristic pattern fragmentations. For instance, FTOHs mainly loss H2O+HF, FOSAs showed the losses of SO2 and HF while FOSEs showed the losses of H2O and SO2. Linearity, repeatability and LODs have been studied obtaining instrumental LODs between 1 and 5fg. Finally, application to river water and influent and effluent waste water samples has been carried out in order to investigate the improvements in detection capabilities of this new source in comparison with the traditionally used EI/CI sources. Matrix effects in APCI have been evaluated in terms of signal enhancement/suppression when comparing standards in solvent and matrix. No matrix effects were observed and concentrations found in samples were in the range of 1-100pgL(-1) far below the LODs achieved with methods previously reported. Unknown related perfluoroalkyl substances, as methyl-sulfone and methyl-sulfoxide analogues for FTOHs, were also discovered and tentatively identified. PMID:26298605

  9. Characterization of gamma-irradiated polyethylene terephthalate by liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-molecular-weight (low-MW) constituents of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), irradiated with 6Co gamma rays at 25 and 50 kGy, were analyzed by HPLC-MS with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI). Consistent with earlier results, the concentrations of the major compounds that are present in the non-irradiated PET do not change perceptibly. However, we find a small but significant increase in terephthalic acid ethylester, from less than 1 mg/kg in the non-irradiated control to ca. 2 mg/kg after 50 kGy, which has not been described before. The finding is important because it gives an impression of the sensitivity of the analytical method. Additionally, it shows that even very radiation-resistant polymers can form measurable amounts of low-MW radiolysis products. The potential and limitations of LC-MS for the analysis of radiolysis products and unidentified migrants are briefly discussed in the context of the question: How can we validate our analytical methods for unknown analytes?

  10. Analysis of vitamin K1 in fruits and vegetables using accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäpelt, Rie Bak; Jakobsen, Jette

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rapid, sensitive, and specific analytical method to study vitamin K1 in fruits and vegetables. Accelerated solvent extraction and solid phase extraction was used for sample preparation. Quantification was done by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in selected reaction monitoring mode with deuterium-labeled vitamin K1 as an internal standard. The precision was estimated as the pooled estimate of three replicates performed on three different days for spinach, peas, apples, banana, and beetroot. The repeatability was 5.2% and the internal reproducibility was 6.2%. Recovery was in the range 90-120%. No significant difference was observed between the results obtained by the present method and by a method using the same principle as the CEN-standard i.e. liquid-liquid extraction and post-column zinc reduction with fluorescence detection. Limit of quantification was estimated to 0.05 μg/100g fresh weight. PMID:26304366

  11. Localization of double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Háková, Eva; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Míková, Radka; Schwarzová-Pecková, Karolina; Bosáková, Zuzana; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-07-01

    A method for localizing double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) was developed. The technique was based on collision-induced dissociation or pulsed Q collision-induced dissociation of the C3H5N(+•) adducts ([M + 55](+•)) formed in the presence of acetonitrile in the APCI source. The spectra were investigated using a large series of standards obtained from commercial sources and prepared by randomization. The fragmentation spectra made it possible to determine (i) the total number of carbons and double bonds in the molecule, (ii) the number of carbons and double bonds in acyls, (iii) the acyl in the sn-2 position on the glycerol backbone, and (iv) the double-bond positions in acyls. The double-bond positions were determined based on two types of fragments (alpha and omega ions) formed by cleavages of C-C bonds vinylic to the original double bond. The composition of the acyls and their positions on glycerol were established from the masses and intensities of the ions formed by the elimination of fatty acids from the [M + 55](+•) precursor. The method was applied for the analysis of triacylglycerols in olive oil and vernix caseosa. PMID:25701424

  12. Carbamazepine in municipal wastewater and wastewater sludge: ultrafast quantification by laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, D P; Brar, S K; Tyagi, R D; Picard, P; Surampalli, R Y

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the distribution of the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) in wastewater (WW) and aqueous and solid phases of wastewater sludge (WWS) was carried out. A rapid and reliable method enabling high-throughput sample analysis for quicker data generation, detection, and monitoring of CBZ in WW and WWS was developed and validated. The ultrafast method (15s per sample) is based on the laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD-APCI) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The optimization of instrumental parameters and method application for environmental analysis are presented. The performance of the novel method was evaluated by estimation of extraction recovery, linearity, precision and detection limit. The method detection limits was 12 ng L(-1) in WW and 3.4 ng g(-1) in WWS. The intra- and inter-day precisions were 8% and 11% in WW and 6% and 9% in WWS, respectively. Furthermore, three extraction methods, ultrasonic extraction (USE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with three different solvent condition such as methanol, acetone and acetonitrile:ethyle acetate (5:1, v/v) were compared on the basis of procedural blank and method recovery. Overall, ASE showed the best extraction efficiency with methanol as compared to USE and MAE. Furthermore, the quantification of CBZ in WW and WWS samples showed the presence of contaminant in all stages of the treatment plant. PMID:22967548

  13. Determination of the mycotoxin moniliformin in cultures of Fusarium subglutinans and in naturally contaminated maize by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewram, V; Nieuwoudt, T W; Marasas, W F; Shephard, G S; Ritieni, A

    1999-07-01

    A LC-MS method employing triethylamine as ion-pairing reagent for the determination of moniliformin in culture material and naturally contaminated maize samples is described. Mass spectrometric detection of moniliformin was accomplished following atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to yield the deprotonated molecular ion [M-H]- at m/z 97. The moniliformin response was found to be linear over the injected range 10 ng to 700 ng and a detection limit of 10 ng was attainable at a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 4. Five South African strains of Fusarium subglutinans were grown on maize kernels and moniliformin extracted with an acetonitrile-water (95:5) mixture. Following sample clean up with reversed-phase (C18) solid-phase extraction cartridges, the extracts were subjected to LC-MS analysis. Triethylamine was used as an ion-pair reagent and found to improve the retention characteristics of moniliformin without any detrimental effects to the instrument. Moniliformin concentrations ranged between 130 mg/kg and 1460 mg/kg culture. Application of this method to naturally contaminated maize samples from Transkei showed that it was capable of measuring moniliformin levels down to 10 micrograms/kg in selected moldy maize cobs. This is the first report on the application of LC-MS to the analysis of moniliformin in cultures of F. subglutinans and in naturally contaminated maize. PMID:10427758

  14. The Use of Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry with High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Other Separation Techniques for Identification of Triacylglycerols

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Sigler, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2007), s. 252-271. ISSN 1573-4110 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/0219 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : triacylglycerols * atmospheric presssure chemical ionization * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.815, year: 2007

  15. Features of ionization of atmospheric air at radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One studied the peculiarities of heterogeneous ionization at radioactive contamination of the atmosphere lower layers. When analyzing the radiochemical conversion of the atmosphere one determined that at rather high 0.1-1 MPa pressures the ranges with high concentration of ionized particles, so-called tracks of high-energy corpuscular (protons, α- and β-particles) emissions might be formed in the air. A model of the atmosphere track ionization taking account of the elementary processes within the tracks that was: kinetics, molecular diffusion and ion drift within the electrical field, was proposed. Paper presents all basic elementary ion-molecular processes in the ionized troposphere and determines the application limits of the mentioned model

  16. Diclofenac in municipal wastewater treatment plant: quantification using laser diode thermal desorption--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--tandem mass spectrometry approach in comparison with an established liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonappan, Linson; Pulicharla, Rama; Rouissi, Tarek; Brar, Satinder K; Verma, Mausam; Surampalli, Rao Y; Valero, José R

    2016-02-12

    Diclofenac (DCF), a prevalent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) is often detected in wastewater and surface water. Analysis of the pharmaceuticals in complex matrices is often laden with challenges. In this study a reliable, rapid and sensitive method based on laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD/APCI) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed for the quantification of DCF in wastewater and wastewater sludge. An established conventional LC-ESI-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry) method was compared with LDTD-APCI-MS/MS approach. The newly developed LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method reduced the analysis time to 12s in lieu of 12 min for LC-ESI-MS/MS method. The method detection limits for LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method were found to be 270 ng L(-1) (LOD) and 1000 ng L(-1) (LOQ). Furthermore, two extraction procedures, ultrasonic assisted extraction (USE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for the extraction of DCF from wastewater sludge were compared and ASE with 95.6 ± 7% recovery was effective over USE with 86 ± 4% recovery. The fate and partitioning of DCF in wastewater (WW) and wastewater sludge (WWS) in wastewater treatment plant was also monitored at various stages of treatment in Quebec Urban community wastewater treatment plant. DCF exhibited affinity towards WW than WWS with a presence about 60% of DCF in WW in contrary with theoretical prediction (LogKow=4.51). PMID:26805597

  17. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn) for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J.; Kulmala, M.; D. R. Worsnop; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Ehn, M.; Brüggemann, M; M. Äijälä; Vogel, A. L.; Hoffmann, T.

    2013-01-01

    The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft-ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was improved by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ∼40 ng m3 for pinonic acid) b...

  18. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn) for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J.; Kulmala, M.; D. R. Worsnop; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Ehn, M.; Brüggemann, M; M. Äijälä; Vogel, A. L.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was increased by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ~40 ng m−3 for pinonic ac...

  19. A high-performance liquid chromatographic-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometric method for determination of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, David E; Laycock, John D; Huang, Wei; Foltz, Rodger L

    2004-09-01

    Risperidone, a benzisoxazole derivative, is an antipsychotic agent used for the treatment of schizophrenia. We developed a liquid chromatographic-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-APCI-MS-MS) method with improved sensitivity, selectivity, and dynamic range for determination of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone in human plasma. A structural analogue of risperidone, RO68808 (5 ng/mL), is added as the internal standard to 1 mL of human plasma. Plasma is made basic, extracted with pentane/methylene chloride (3:1), the organic phase evaporated to dryness, and the residue is reconstituted in water with 0.1% formic acid/acetonitrile (20:1). For LC-MS-MS analysis, a Metachem Inertsel HPLC column (2.1 x 150 mm, 5-microm particle size) is connected to a Finnigan TSQ7000 tandem MS via the Finnigan API interface. Both electrospray (ESI) and APCI produced predominantly MH(+) ions for the two analytes and the internal standard. Ions detected by selected reaction monitoring correspond to the following transitions: m/z 411 to 191 for risperidone, m/z 427 to 207 for 9-hydroxyrisperidone, and m/z 421 to 201 for the internal standard. APCI provided a larger dynamic range (0.1 to 25 ng/mL) and better precision and accuracy than ESI. Intrarun accuracy and precision determined at 0.1, 0.25, 2.5, and 15 ng/mL were within 12% of target with %CVs not exceeding 10.9%. Interrun accuracy and precision determined at the same concentrations were within 9.6% of target with %CVs not exceeding 6.7%. Analytes were stable in plasma after 24 h at room temperature, 2 freeze-thaw cycles, and 490 days at -20 degrees C. PMID:15516302

  20. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We examined source crude oil and weathered oils from M/V Hebei accident. • APPI hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh mass spectrometry was applied. • N1 class compounds with 2° and/or 3° amine decrease in larger scale than pyridines. • Preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed. • Significant increase in S1O1 compounds was observed as the weathering proceeds. - Abstract: The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N+· and [N − H + D]+ ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N + H]+ and [N + D]+ ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S1O1 + H]+ and [S1O1 + D]+ ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S1 class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components

  1. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH+, MOH+, and MO2H+, respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH+ sharply decreased, that of MOH+ increased once and then decreased, and that of MO2H+ sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO2H+ at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH+ and 100 times higher than that of MOH+ in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO2H+ signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m3, which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m3, which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m3 vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  2. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Ananna; Kim, Donghwi [Kyungpook National University, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon [Oil and POPs Research Group, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, KIOST, Geoje 656-834 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghwan, E-mail: sunghwank@knu.ac.kr [Kyungpook National University, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Green Nano Center, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We examined source crude oil and weathered oils from M/V Hebei accident. • APPI hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh mass spectrometry was applied. • N{sub 1} class compounds with 2° and/or 3° amine decrease in larger scale than pyridines. • Preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed. • Significant increase in S{sub 1}O{sub 1} compounds was observed as the weathering proceeds. - Abstract: The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N{sup +}· and [N − H + D]{sup +} ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N + H]{sup +} and [N + D]{sup +} ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S{sub 1}O{sub 1} + H]{sup +} and [S{sub 1}O{sub 1} + D]{sup +} ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S{sub 1} class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components.

  3. Determination of eight nitrosamines in water at the ng L{sup -1} levels by liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripolles, Cristina; Pitarch, Elena; Sancho, Juan V.; Lopez, Francisco J. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain); Hernandez, Felix, E-mail: felix.hernandez@qfa.uji.es [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain)

    2011-09-19

    Highlights: {center_dot} Eight N-nitrosamines in water by LC(APCI)MS/MS QqQ analysis. {center_dot} Validation at two levels: 10 ng L{sup -1} (LOQ) and 100 ng L{sup -1} in drinking water. {center_dot} Developed method applied to different types of water samples. {center_dot} NDMA was the analyte more frequently detected and at the highest concentration levels. - Abstract: In this work, we have developed a sensitive method for detection and quantification of eight N-nitrosamines, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosomorpholine (NMor), N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA), N-nitrosopirrolidine (NPyr), N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosopiperidine (NPip), N-nitroso-n-dipropylamine (NDPA) and N-nitrosodi-n-butylamine (NDBA) in drinking water. The method is based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in positive mode with a triple quadrupole analyzer (QqQ). The simultaneous acquisition of two MS/MS transitions in selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM) for each compound, together with the evaluation of their relative intensity, allowed the simultaneous quantification and reliable identification in water at ppt levels. Empirical formula of the product ions selected was confirmed by UHPLC-(Q)TOF MS accurate mass measurements from reference standards. Prior to LC-MS/MS QqQ analysis, a preconcentration step by off-line SPE using coconut charcoal EPA 521 cartridges (by passing 500 mL of water sample) was necessary to improve the sensitivity and to meet regulation requirements. For accurate quantification, two isotope labelled nitrosamines (NDMA-d{sub 6} and NDPA-d{sub 14}) were added as surrogate internal standards to the samples. The optimized method was validated at two concentration levels (10 and 100 ng L{sup -1}) in drinking water samples, obtaining satisfactory recoveries (between 90 and 120%) and precision (RSD < 20%). Limits of detection were found to be in the range of 1-8 ng L{sup -1

  4. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Applicability of GC-(APCI)QTOF MS as new tool for wide-scope screening of pesticides in fruits and vegetables demonstrated. • Validation of screening method according to SANCO/12571/2013. • Detection of the pesticides based on the presence of M+·/MH+ in most cases. • Screening detection limit 0.01 mg kg−1 for 77% of the pesticides investigated. • Successful identification at 0.01 mg kg−1 for 70% of the pesticides/matrix combinations. - Abstract: A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target acquisition was performed through two alternating scan events: one at low collision energy and another at a higher collision energy ramp (MSE). In this way, both protonated molecule and/or molecular ion together with fragment ions were obtained in a single run. Validation was performed according to SANCO/12571/2013 by analysing 20 samples (10 different commodities in duplicate), fortified with a test set of 132 pesticides at 0.01, 0.05 and 0.20 mg kg−1. For screening, the detection was based on one diagnostic ion (in most cases the protonated molecule). Overall, at the 0.01 mg kg−1 level, 89% of the 2620 fortifications made were detected. The screening detection limit for individual pesticides was 0.01 mg kg−1 for 77% of the pesticides investigated. The possibilities for identification according to the SANCO criteria, requiring two ions with a mass accuracy ≤±5 ppm and an ion-ratio deviation ≤±30%, were investigated. At the 0.01 mg kg−1 level, identification was possible for 70% of the pesticides detected during screening. This increased to 87% and 93% at the 0.05 and 0.20 mg kg−1 level, respectively. Insufficient sensitivity for the second ion was the main reason for the inability to

  5. Determination of benzoylurea insecticide residues in tomatoes by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet-diode array and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoglou, Anastasios N; Bempelou, Eleftheria D; Liapis, Konstantinos S; Ziogas, Basil N

    2007-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method using high-performance liquid chromatography/ mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of 5 benzoylurea insecticides-diflubenzuron, triflumuron, teflubenzuron, lufenuron, and flufenoxuron-in tomatoes. Residues were successfully separated on a C18 column by methanol-water isocratic elution. Detection was carried out by an ultraviolet diode array detector (UV-DAD) coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer, using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in negative-ion mode. The main ions were the deprotonated molecules [M-H]- for triflumuron, and the anions formed by elimination of hydrofluoric acid [M-H-HF]- for diflubenzuron and flufenoxuron, and [M-2H-HF] for lufenuron and teflubenzuron. The calibration plots were linear for both detectors over the range 0.05 to 10 microg/mL, and the method presented good quality parameters. The limits of detection for standard solutions were 0.008-0.01 mg/L (equivalent to 0.08-0.1 ng injected) for both detectors, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were approximately 10 times lower than national maximum residue levels (MRLs). Depending on the compound and the detector, the LOQ values ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 ng injected. The optimum LC-UV-DAD/APCI-MS conditions were applied to the analysis of benzoylureas in tomatoes. The obtained recoveries from fortified tomato samples (50 g), extracted with ethyl acetate and purified by solid-phase extraction on silica sorbent, were 88-100 and 92.9-105% for the UV-DAD and MS detectors, respectively, with precision values (relative standard deviations) of 2.9-11 and 3.7-14%, respectively. The method was applied to 12 tomato samples from local markets, and diflubenzuron and lufenuron were detected in only one sample at concentrations lower than the MRLs. The results indicate that the developed LC/MS method is accurate, precise, and sensitive for quantitative and qualitative analysis at low levels of benzoylureas

  6. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portolés, T. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, 12071 Castellón (Spain); RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Akkermaalsbos 2, 6708 WB Wageningen (Netherlands); Mol, J.G.J. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Akkermaalsbos 2, 6708 WB Wageningen (Netherlands); Sancho, J.V.; López, Francisco J. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, 12071 Castellón (Spain); Hernández, F., E-mail: hernandf@uji.es [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, 12071 Castellón (Spain)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Applicability of GC-(APCI)QTOF MS as new tool for wide-scope screening of pesticides in fruits and vegetables demonstrated. • Validation of screening method according to SANCO/12571/2013. • Detection of the pesticides based on the presence of M+·/MH+ in most cases. • Screening detection limit 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} for 77% of the pesticides investigated. • Successful identification at 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} for 70% of the pesticides/matrix combinations. - Abstract: A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target acquisition was performed through two alternating scan events: one at low collision energy and another at a higher collision energy ramp (MS{sup E}). In this way, both protonated molecule and/or molecular ion together with fragment ions were obtained in a single run. Validation was performed according to SANCO/12571/2013 by analysing 20 samples (10 different commodities in duplicate), fortified with a test set of 132 pesticides at 0.01, 0.05 and 0.20 mg kg{sup −1}. For screening, the detection was based on one diagnostic ion (in most cases the protonated molecule). Overall, at the 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} level, 89% of the 2620 fortifications made were detected. The screening detection limit for individual pesticides was 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} for 77% of the pesticides investigated. The possibilities for identification according to the SANCO criteria, requiring two ions with a mass accuracy ≤±5 ppm and an ion-ratio deviation ≤±30%, were investigated. At the 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} level, identification was possible for 70% of the pesticides detected during screening. This increased to 87% and 93% at the 0.05 and 0.20 mg kg{sup −1} level, respectively. Insufficient sensitivity for the second

  7. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.; Herrmann, H.W.; Henins, I.; Selwyn, G.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a non-thermal, high pressure plasma discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g., He/O2/H2O) which flows between two concentric cylindrical electrodes: an outer grounded electrode and an inner electrode powered at 13.56 MHz RF. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, ionized or dissociated by electron impact. The fast-flowing effluent consists of ions and electrons, which are rapidly lost by recombination, highly reactive radicals (e.g., O, OH), and metastable species (e.g., O2). The metastable O2, which is reactive to hydrocarbon and other organic species, has been observed through optical emission spectroscopy to decrease by a factor of 2 from the APPJ nozzle exit to a distance of 10 cm. Unreacted metastable O2, and that which does not impinge on a surface, will then decay back to ordinary ground state O2, resulting in a completely dry, environmentally-benign form of surface cleaning. Applications such as removal of photoresist, oxide films and organic residues from wafers for the electronics industry, decontamination of civilian and military areas and personnel exposed to chemical or biological warfare agents, and paint (e.g., graffiti) removal are being considered.

  8. Atmospheric pressure plasma research activity in korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma is generated by electrical discharge. Most plasma generation has been carried out at low-pressure gas typically less than one millionth of atmospheric pressure. Plasmas are in general generated from impact ionizations of neutral gas molecules by accelerated electrons. The energy gain of electrons accelerated in an electrical field is proportional to the mean free path. Electrons gain more energy at low-pressure gas and generate plasma easily by the ionization of neutrals, because the mean free path is longer. For this reason conventional plasma generation is carried out at low pressures. However, many practical applications require plasmas at high-pressure. In order to avoid the requirement for vacuum pump, researchers in Korea start to develop plasmas in high-pressure chambers where the pressure is 1 atmosphere or greater. Material processing, environmental protection/restoration and improved energy production efficiency using plasma are only possible for inexpensive bulk plasmas. We thus generate plasmas by new methods and plan to set foundations for new plasma technologies for 21st century industries. This technological research will play a central role in material processing, environmental and energy production industries

  9. Hydraulic effects in a radiative atmosphere with ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, P.; Brandenburg, A.

    2016-03-01

    Context. In his 1978 paper, Eugene Parker postulated the need for hydraulic downward motion to explain magnetic flux concentrations at the solar surface. A similar process has also recently been seen in simplified (e.g., isothermal) models of flux concentrations from the negative effective magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI). Aims: We study the effects of partial ionization near the radiative surface on the formation of these magnetic flux concentrations. Methods: We first obtain one-dimensional (1D) equilibrium solutions using either a Kramers-like opacity or the H- opacity. The resulting atmospheres are then used as initial conditions in two-dimensional (2D) models where flows are driven by an imposed gradient force that resembles a localized negative pressure in the form of a blob. To isolate the effects of partial ionization and radiation, we ignore turbulence and convection. Results: Because of partial ionization, an unstable stratification always forms near the surface. We show that the extrema in the specific entropy profiles correspond to the extrema in the degree of ionization. In the 2D models without partial ionization, strong flux concentrations form just above the height where the blob is placed. Interestingly, in models with partial ionization, such flux concentrations always form at the surface well above the blob. This is due to the corresponding negative gradient in specific entropy. Owing to the absence of turbulence, the downflows reach transonic speeds. Conclusions: We demonstrate that, together with density stratification, the imposed source of negative pressure drives the formation of flux concentrations. We find that the inclusion of partial ionization affects the entropy profile dramatically, causing strong flux concentrations to form closer to the surface. We speculate that turbulence effects are needed to limit the strength of flux concentrations and homogenize the specific entropy to a stratification that is close to marginal.

  10. Novel analytical approach for brominated flame retardants based on the use of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry with emphasis in highly brominated congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, Tania; Sales, Carlos; Gómara, Belén; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Beltrán, Joaquim; Herrero, Laura; González, María José; Hernández, Félix

    2015-10-01

    The analysis of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) commonly relies on the use of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operating in electron ionization (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using quadrupole, triple quadrupole, ion trap, and magnetic sector analyzers. However, these brominated contaminants are examples of compounds for which a soft and robust ionization technique might be favorable since they show high fragmentation in EI and low specificity in ECNI. In addition, the low limits of quantification (0.01 ng/g) required by European Commission Recommendation 2014/118/EU on the monitoring of traces of BFRs in food put stress on the use of highly sensitive techniques/methods. In this work, a new approach for the extremely sensitive determination of BFRs taking profit of the potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) combined with GC and triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass analyzer is proposed. The objective was to explore the potential of this approach for the BFRs determination in samples at pg/g levels, taking marine samples and a cream sample as a model. Ionization and fragmentation behavior of 14 PBDEs (congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two novel BFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), in the GC-APCI-MS system has been investigated. The formation of highly abundant (quasi) molecular ion was the main advantage observed in relation to EI. Thus, a notable improvement in sensitivity and specificity was observed when using it as precursor ion in tandem MS. The improved detectability (LODs < 10 fg) achieved when using APCI compared to EI has been demonstrated, which is especially relevant for highly brominated congeners. Analysis of samples from an intercomparison exercise and samples from the marine field showed the potential of this approach for the reliable identification and quantification at very low

  11. Microplasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nitrogen microplasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure was developed for treating thermally sensitive materials. For example, the plasma sources in treatment of vulnerable biological materials must operate near the room temperature at the atmospheric pressure, without any risk of arcing or electrical shock. The microplasma jet device operated by an electrical power less than 10 W exhibited a long plasma jet of about 6.5 cm with temperature near 300 K, not causing any harm to human skin. Optical emission measured at the wide range of 280-800 nm indicated various reactive species produced by the plasma jet

  12. Laserspray Ionization, a New Atmospheric Pressure MALDI Method for Producing Highly Charged Gas-phase Ions of Peptides and Proteins Directly from Solid Solutions*

    OpenAIRE

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D.; Herath, Thushani N.; McEwen, Charles N.

    2009-01-01

    The first example of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) process producing multiply charged mass spectra nearly identical to those observed with electrospray ionization (ESI) is presented. MALDI is noted for its ability to produce singly charged ions, but in the experiments described here multiply charged ions are produced by laser ablation of analyte incorporated into a common MALDI matrix, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, using standard solvent-based sample preparation protocols...

  13. Preliminary Figures of Merit for Isotope Ratio Measurements: The Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma Ionization Source Coupled to an Orbitrap Mass Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegg, Edward D.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    In order to meet a growing need for fieldable mass spectrometer systems for precise elemental and isotopic analyses, the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has a number of very promising characteristics. One key set of attributes that await validation deals with the performance characteristics relative to isotope ratio precision and accuracy. Owing to its availability and prior experience with this research team, the initial evaluation of isotope ratio (IR) performance was performed on a Thermo Scientific Exactive Orbitrap instrument. While the mass accuracy and resolution performance for Orbitrap analyzers are well-documented, no detailed evaluations of the IR performance have been published. Efforts described here involve two variables: the inherent IR precision and accuracy delivered by the LS-APGD microplasma and the inherent IR measurement qualities of Orbitrap analyzers. Important to the IR performance, the various operating parameters of the Orbitrap sampling interface, high-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) stage, and ion injection/data acquisition have been evaluated. The IR performance for a range of other elements, including natural, depleted, and enriched uranium isotopes was determined. In all cases, the precision and accuracy are degraded when measuring low abundance (abundance species. The results suggest that the LS-APGD is a promising candidate for field deployable MS analysis and that the high resolving powers of the Orbitrap may be complemented with a here-to-fore unknown capacity to deliver high-precision IRs.

  14. Analysis of secondary organic aerosol using a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor (MOVI) coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI-IT/MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggemann, M.; Vogel, A.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the development and characterization of a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor (MOVI) which is coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI-IT/MS), and its application in laboratory and field measurements. The MOVI-APCI-IT/MS allows the quantification of organic acids and other oxidation products of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) on a semi-continuous basis. Furthermore, the vapor pressure and saturation concentration of the particle components can be estimated. The MOVI was first described in 2010 by Yatavelli and Thornton (Yatavelli and Thornton, 2010). It is a single stage, multi-nozzle impactor with 100 nozzles, each having a diameter of 150 μm. At a flow-rate of 10 L·min-1 air is drawn through the MOVI and particles are collected on a deposition plate. The cut-point diameter (d50, diameter of 50% collection efficiency) is at 130 nm. A low pressure-drop of only 5.3% of atmospheric pressure behind the nozzles allows collecting not only low-volatile but even semi-volatile compounds, which are an important part of SOA. After collecting particles hydrocarbon-free synthetic air is led over the collection surface into the APCI-IT/MS and the collection surface is heated up to 120 ° C in less than 200 s, volatilizing the sampled SOA. The vaporized compounds are transferred into the ion source and subsequently analyzed by mass spectrometry. Due to the soft ionization at atmospheric pressure the obtained mass spectra show only low fragmentations and can easily be interpreted. In laboratory experiments the MOVI-APCI-IT/MS was used for the chemical analysis of SOA generated from α-pinene-ozonolysis in a smog chamber. The limit of detection was found at 7.3 ng for pinic acid. The vapor pressure log p0 and the saturation concentration C25* for pinic acid were calculated from the desorption temperature using the method presented by Faulhaber et al. (Faulhaber et al., 2009

  15. Hydraulic effects in a radiative atmosphere with ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, Pallavi

    2014-01-01

    In a paper of 1978, Eugene Parker postulated the need for hydraulic downward motion to explain magnetic flux concentrations at the solar surface. A similar process has recently also been seen in simplified (e.g., isothermal) models of flux concentrations from the negative effective magnetic pressure instability. We study the effects of partial ionization near the radiative surface on the formation of such magnetic flux concentrations. We first obtain one-dimensional (1D) equilibrium solutions using either a Kramers-like opacity or the ${\\rm H}^{-}$ opacity. The resulting atmospheres are then used as initial conditions in two-dimensional (2D) models where flows are driven by an imposed gradient force resembling a localized negative pressure in the form of a blob. To isolate the effects of partial ionization and radiation, we ignore turbulence and convection. In 1D models, due to partial ionization, an unstable stratification forms always near the surface. We show that the extrema in the specific entropy profil...

  16. Preliminary Figures of Merit for Isotope Ratio Measurements: The Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma Ionization Source Coupled to an Orbitrap Mass Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegg, Edward D.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    In order to meet a growing need for fieldable mass spectrometer systems for precise elemental and isotopic analyses, the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has a number of very promising characteristics. One key set of attributes that await validation deals with the performance characteristics relative to isotope ratio precision and accuracy. Owing to its availability and prior experience with this research team, the initial evaluation of isotope ratio (IR) performance was performed on a Thermo Scientific Exactive Orbitrap instrument. While the mass accuracy and resolution performance for Orbitrap analyzers are well-documented, no detailed evaluations of the IR performance have been published. Efforts described here involve two variables: the inherent IR precision and accuracy delivered by the LS-APGD microplasma and the inherent IR measurement qualities of Orbitrap analyzers. Important to the IR performance, the various operating parameters of the Orbitrap sampling interface, high-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) stage, and ion injection/data acquisition have been evaluated. The IR performance for a range of other elements, including natural, depleted, and enriched uranium isotopes was determined. In all cases, the precision and accuracy are degraded when measuring low abundance (<0.1% isotope fractions). In the best case, IR precision on the order of 0.1% RSD can be achieved, with values of 1%-3% RSD observed for low-abundance species. The results suggest that the LS-APGD is a promising candidate for field deployable MS analysis and that the high resolving powers of the Orbitrap may be complemented with a here-to-fore unknown capacity to deliver high-precision IRs.

  17. Preliminary Figures of Merit for Isotope Ratio Measurements: The Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma Ionization Source Coupled to an Orbitrap Mass Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegg, Edward D.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    In order to meet a growing need for fieldable mass spectrometer systems for precise elemental and isotopic analyses, the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has a number of very promising characteristics. One key set of attributes that await validation deals with the performance characteristics relative to isotope ratio precision and accuracy. Owing to its availability and prior experience with this research team, the initial evaluation of isotope ratio (IR) performance was performed on a Thermo Scientific Exactive Orbitrap instrument. While the mass accuracy and resolution performance for Orbitrap analyzers are well-documented, no detailed evaluations of the IR performance have been published. Efforts described here involve two variables: the inherent IR precision and accuracy delivered by the LS-APGD microplasma and the inherent IR measurement qualities of Orbitrap analyzers. Important to the IR performance, the various operating parameters of the Orbitrap sampling interface, high-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) stage, and ion injection/data acquisition have been evaluated. The IR performance for a range of other elements, including natural, depleted, and enriched uranium isotopes was determined. In all cases, the precision and accuracy are degraded when measuring low abundance (<0.1% isotope fractions). In the best case, IR precision on the order of 0.1% RSD can be achieved, with values of 1%-3% RSD observed for low-abundance species. The results suggest that the LS-APGD is a promising candidate for field deployable MS analysis and that the high resolving powers of the Orbitrap may be complemented with a here-to-fore unknown capacity to deliver high-precision IRs.

  18. Domestic atmospheric pressure thermal deaerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, P. V.; Gimmelberg, A. S.; Mikhailov, V. G.; Baeva, A. N.; Chuprakov, M. V.; Grigoriev, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    Based on many years of experience and proven technical solutions, modern atmospheric pressure deaerators of the capacity of 0.4 to 800 t/h were designed and developed. The construction of such deaerators is based on known and explored technical solutions. A two-stage deaeration scheme is applied where the first stage is a jet dripping level (in a column) and the second one is a bubble level (in a tank). In the design of deaeration columns, low-pressure hydraulic nozzles (Δ p TPP at heating and industrial-heating plants. The atmospheric pressure thermal deaerators developed at NPO TsKTI with consideration of the current requirements are recommended for the use in water preparation schemes of various power facilities.

  19. Comparing Laser Desorption Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Coupled to Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry To Characterize Shale Oils at the Molecular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yunjo; Jin, Jang Mi; Witt, Matthias; Birdwell, Justin E.; Na, Jeong-Geol; Roh, Nam-Sun; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-01-01

    Laser desorption ionization (LDI) coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to analyze shale oils. Previous work showed that LDI is a sensitive ionization technique for assessing aromatic nitrogen compounds, and oils generated from Green River Formation oil shales are well-documented as being rich in nitrogen. The data presented here demonstrate that LDI is effective in ionizing high-double-bond-equivalent (DBE) compounds and, therefore, is a suitable method for characterizing compounds with condensed structures. Additionally, LDI generates radical cations and protonated ions concurrently, the distribution of which depends upon the molecular structures and elemental compositions, and the basicity of compounds is closely related to the generation of protonated ions. This study demonstrates that LDI FT-ICR MS is an effective ionization technique for use in the study of shale oils at the molecular level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that LDI FT-ICR MS has been applied to shale oils.

  20. Investigation of the ionization mechanism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using an ethanol/bromobenzene/chlorobenzene/anisole mixture as a dopant in liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Amad, Maan H.

    2012-09-23

    RATIONALE An ethanol-based multicomponent dopant consisting of ethanol/chlorobenzene/bromobenzene/anisole (98.975:0.1:0.9:0.025, v/v/v/v) has been used as a dopant for atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this study the mechanism of ionization of PAHs assisted by the ethanol-based multicomponent dopant is investigated. METHODS The reactant background cluster ions of the ethanol-based multicomponent dopant observed in the positive ion APPI were studied. These studies were performed to investigate the mechanism behind the generation of a molecular radical cation (M +•) for PAHs by APPI assisted by the ethanol-based multicomponent dopant. Full scan and MS/MS analyses were conducted using an LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The effect of acidification of the mobile phase on the dopant cluster ion formation was also investigated. RESULTS With the ethanol-based multicomponent dopant, a single type of molecular radical cation M +• was observed for the studied PAHs. The characteristic ion signal of the multicomponent dopant mixture consisted of mainly anisole photoions at m/z 108.05697 and its adduct ions at m/z 124.05188 and 164.07061. The anisole ion response at m/z 108.05697 was stable in the presence of acetonitrile, methanol, water and 0.1% formic acid mobile phase composition. CONCLUSIONS The abundance formation of anisole photoions shows the universality of this multicomponent dopant in ionizing compounds with ionization energy ranging from 7.1-8.2 eV. Since the ionization energy of anisole is 8.2 eV and is lower than those of chlorobenzene (9.07 eV) and bromobenzene (9.0 eV), the mechanism of formation of anisole photoions even with its very minute amounts was not only governed by its photoionization by the krypton lamp photon energy (10.0 eV and 10.6 eV), but also by charge transfer from bromobenzene and chlorobenzene radical cations. PAH molecules were mainly ionized by charge transfer reaction from

  1. Evaluation of the capabilities of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls in complex-matrix food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, T; Sales, C; Abalos, M; Sauló, J; Abad, E

    2016-09-21

    The use of the novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography (GC) coupled to triple quadrupole using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and its potential for the simultaneous determination of the 12 dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls (DL-PCBs) in complex food and feed matrices has been evaluated. In first place, ionization and fragmentation behavior of DL-PCBs on the APCI source under charge transfer conditions has been studied followed by their fragmentation in the collision cell. Linearity, repeatability and sensitivity have been studied obtaining instrumental limits of detection and quantification of 0.0025 and 0.005 pg μL(-1) (2.5 and 5 fg on column) respectively for every DL-PCB. Finally, application to real samples has been carried out and DL-PCB congeners (PCB 77, 81, 105, 114, 118, 123, 126, 156, 157, 167, 169, 189) have been detected in the different samples in the range of 0.40-10000 pg g(-1). GC-(APCI)MS/MS has been proved as a suitable alternative to the traditionally accepted confirmation method based on the use of high resolution mass spectrometry and other triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry techniques operating with electron ionization. The development of MS/MS methodologies for the analysis of dioxins and DL-PCBs is nowadays particularly important, since this technique was included as a confirmatory method in the present European Union regulations that establish the requirements for the determination of these compounds in food and feed matrices. PMID:27590550

  2. Matrix effect in the analysis of drugs of abuse from urine with desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS) and desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → DAPPI-MS and DESI-MSI in the analysis of drugs of abuse from urine. → DAPPI-MS has better urine matrix tolerance over DESI-MS. → Urine matrix can affect the ionization mechanism in DAPPI. → DAPPI-MS/MS can be used for screening of drugs from urine after sample pretreatment. - Abstract: We have studied the matrix effect within direct analysis of benzodiazepines and opioids from urine with desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS). The urine matrix was found to affect the ionization mechanism of the opioids in DAPPI-MS favoring proton transfer over charge exchange reaction. The sensitivity for the drugs in solvent matrix was at the same level with DESI-MS and DAPPI-MS (LODs 0.05-6 μg mL-1) but the decrease in sensitivity due to the urine matrix was higher with DESI (typically 20-160-fold) than with DAPPI (typically 2-15-fold) indicating better matrix tolerance of DAPPI over DESI. Also in MS/MS mode, DAPPI provided better sensitivity than DESI for the drugs in urine. The feasibility of DAPPI-MS/MS was then studied in screening the same drugs from five authentic, forensic post mortem urine samples. A reference measurement with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (including pretreatment) revealed 16 findings from the samples, whereas with DAPPI-MS/MS after sample pretreatment, 15 findings were made. Sample pretreatment was found necessary, since only eight findings were made from the same samples untreated.

  3. 大气压介质阻挡放电中电子碰撞电离系数α的测定%Preliminary Measurement of Electron Impact Ionization Coefficient in Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉俊霞; 罗海云; 梁卓; 王新新

    2012-01-01

    电子碰撞电离系数α是气体放电研究中的一个重要物理参数,但现有的α系数数值都是在低气压Townsend放电实验中得到的,它们不适用于大气压下气体放电。为了尝试解决这个问题,提出了一种大气压下α系数的光学测量方法,它借助介质阻挡电极结构,在某些大气压气体中产生瞬态或稳态Townsend放电,利用带像增强器高速数码相机的纳秒曝光功能,记录气隙中瞬态发光强度空间分布,并与Townsend放电对应的理论发光强度分布进行比较,根据两者的最佳拟合效果推导出α系数。该方法被用于测定大气压氮气α系数,结果表明其基本可行,但仍需继续加以完善。%Electron impact ionization coefficient a is one of the most important parameters used in the study of gas discharge. However, the a values usually determined in the experiments on Townsend discharge in gases at low pressure are not applicable to the gas discharges in atmospheric gases. Aiming at solving this problem, a method for determining the a values in the gases at atmospheric pressure was proposed. Dielectric barrier Townsend discharges were produced in some gases at atmospheric pressure. The distribution of the light intensity in the discharge gap was recorded by taking side-view photograph using an ICCD camera with an extremely short exposure time and compared with the theoretical distributions with different presumed ~. The a value was determined by the best fitting of the theoretical distribution to the experimental one. The method was proved to be applicable in the determination of a for nitrogen at atmospheric pressure.

  4. Measurement of ionization distribution in the lower atmosphere caused by cosmic-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmic-ray ionization in the lower atmosphere was measured by the pressurized ionization chamber on lakes with different altitude and latitude in Yunnan province and Xinjiang Autonomy Region and on a high-altitude ballon. The variation of cosmic-ray ionization with latitude was also measured from Hainandao island to Manzhouli. An expression for distribution of cosmic-ray ionization with altitude and latitude was given by: I(h, λm, Y) = (I0 + 0.0098λm) exp (7.27 x 10-5h1.184)I

  5. High-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection characterization of Delta5-polyenoic fatty acids in triacylglycerols from conifer seed oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lísa, Miroslav; Holcapek, Michal; Rezanka, Tomás; Kabátová, Nadezda

    2007-03-30

    Edible conifer seeds can serve as a source of triacylglycerols (TGs) with unusual Delta5 unsaturated polymethylene interrupted fatty acids (UPIFAs), such as cis-5,9-octadecadienoic (taxoleic), cis-5,9,12-octadecatrienoic (pinolenic), cis-5,11-eicosadienoic (keteleeronic) and cis-5,11,14-eicosatrienoic acids (sciadonic). Conifer seed oils from European Larch (Larix decidua), Norway Spruce (Picea abies) and European Silver Fir (Abies alba) have been analyzed by non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (NARP-HPLC) with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI)-MS detection. The influence of different positions of double bonds in Delta5-UPIFAs on the retention and fragmentation behavior is described and used for the successful identification of TGs in each oil. TGs containing Delta5-UPIFAs have a higher retention in comparison with common TGs found in plant oils with single methylene interrupted Delta6(9)-FAs and also significantly changed relative abundances of fragment ions in APCI mass spectra. Results obtained from HPLC/MS analyses are supported by validated GC/FID analyses of fatty acid methyl esters after the transesterification. The total content of Delta5-UPIFAs is about 32% for European Larch, 27% for Norway Spruce and 20% for European Silver Fir. In total, 20 FAs with acyl chain lengths from 16 to 24 carbon atoms and from 0 to 3 double bonds have been identified in 64 triacylglycerols from 3 conifer seed oils. PMID:17307191

  6. The role of physical and chemical properties of Pd nanostructured materials immobilized on inorganic carriers on ion formation in atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silina, Yuliya E; Koch, Marcus; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2014-06-01

    Fundamental parameters influencing the ion-producing efficiency of palladium nanostructures (nanoparticles [Pd-NP], nanoflowers, nanofilms) during laser irradiation were studied in this paper. The nanostructures were immobilized on the surface of different solid inorganic carrier materials (porous and mono-crystalline silicon, anodic porous aluminum oxide, glass and polished steel) by using classical galvanic deposition, electroless local deposition and sputtering. It was the goal of this study to investigate the influence of both the nanoparticular layer as well as the carrier material on ion production for selected analyte molecules. Our experiments demonstrated that the dimensions of the synthesized nanostructures, the thickness of the active layers, surface disorders, thermal conductivity and physically or chemically adsorbed water influenced signal intensities of analyte ions during surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) while no effects such as plasmon resonance, photoelectric effect or catalytic activity were expected to occur. Excellent LDI abilities were seen for Pd-NPs immobilized on steel, while Pd nanoflowers on porous silicon exhibited several disadvantages; viz, strong memory effects, dependency of the analytical signal on amount of physically and chemically adsorbed water inside porous carrier, reduced SALDI activity from unstable connections between Pd and semiconductor material, decrease of the melting point of pure silicon after Pd immobilization and resulting strong laser ablation of metal/semiconductor complex, as well as significantly changed surface morphology after laser irradiation. The analytical performance of Pd-NP/steel was further improved by applying a hydrophobic coating to the steel surface before galvanic deposition. This procedure increased the distance between Pd-NPs, thus reducing thermal stress upon LDI; it simultaneously decreased spot sizes of deposited sample solutions. PMID:24913399

  7. Special issue: diagnostics of atmospheric pressure microplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2013-11-01

    In recent decades, a strong revival of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma studies has developed in the form of microplasmas. Microplasmas have typical scales of 1 mm or less and offer a very exciting research direction in the field of plasma science and technology as the discharge physics can be considerably different due to high collisionality and the importance of plasma-surface interaction. These high-pressure small-scale plasmas have a diverse range of physical and chemical properties. This diversity coincides with various applications including light/UV sources [1], material processing [2], chemical analysis [3], material synthesis [4], electromagnetics [5], combustion [6] and even medicine [7]. At atmospheric pressure, large scale plasmas have the tendency to become unstable due to the high collision rates leading to enhanced heating and ionization compared to their low-pressure counterparts. As low-pressure plasmas typically operate in reactors with sizes of tens of centimetres, scaling up the pressure to atmospheric pressure the size of the plasma reduces to typical sizes below 1 mm. A natural approach of stabilizing atmospheric pressure plasmas is thus the use of microelectrode geometries. Traditionally microplasmas have been produced in confined geometries which allow one to stabilize dc excited discharges. This stabilization is intrinsically connected to the large surface-to-volume ratio which enhances heat transfer and losses of charged and excited species to the walls. Currently challenging boundaries are pushed by producing microcavity geometries with dimensions of the order of 1 µm [8]. The subject of this special issue, diagnostics of microplasmas, is motivated by the many challenges in microplasma diagnostics in view of the complex chemistry and strong spatial (and even temporal) gradients of species densities and plasma properties. Atmospheric pressure plasmas have a very long history dating back more than 100 years, with early work of

  8. Method development for the determination of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in human plasma without derivatization by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Kakehi, Masaaki; Satomi, Yoshinori; Kamiguchi, Hidenori; Jinno, Fumihiro

    2015-10-01

    We developed a highly sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface to determine 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a major metabolite of cholesterol formed by cytochrome P450 family 46A1, in human plasma without any derivatization step. Phosphate buffered saline including 1% Tween 80 was used as the surrogate matrix for preparation of calibration curves and quality control samples. The saponification process to convert esterified 24S-hydroxycholesterol to free sterols was optimized, followed by liquid-liquid extraction using hexane. Chromatographic separation of 24S-hydroxycholesterol from other isobaric endogenous oxysterols was successfully achieved with gradient mobile phase comprised of 0.1% propionic acid and acetonitrile using L-column2 ODS (2 μm, 2.1 mm id × 150 mm). This assay was capable of determining 24S-hydroxycholesterol in human plasma (200 μL) ranging from 1 to 100 ng/mL with acceptable intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy. The potential risk of in vitro formation of 24S-hydroxycholesterol by oxidation from endogenous cholesterol in human plasma was found to be negligible. The stability of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in relevant solvents and human plasma was confirmed. This method was successfully applied to quantify the plasma concentrations of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in male and female volunteers. PMID:26249017

  9. Quality classification of Spanish olive oils by untargeted gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and metabolomics-based statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, C; Cervera, M I; Gil, R; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Beltran, J

    2017-02-01

    The novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source has been used in combination with gas chromatography (GC) coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) for determination of volatile components of olive oil, enhancing its potential for classification of olive oil samples according to their quality using a metabolomics-based approach. The full-spectrum acquisition has allowed the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in olive oil samples, including Extra Virgin, Virgin and Lampante qualities. A dynamic headspace extraction with cartridge solvent elution was applied. The metabolomics strategy consisted of three different steps: a full mass spectral alignment of GC-MS data using MzMine 2.0, a multivariate analysis using Ez-Info and the creation of the statistical model with combinations of responses for molecular fragments. The model was finally validated using blind samples, obtaining an accuracy in oil classification of 70%, taking the official established method, "PANEL TEST", as reference. PMID:27596432

  10. HPLC-UV ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE IONIZATION MASS-SPECTROMETRIC DETERMINATION OF THE DOPAMINE-D2 AGONIST N-0923 AND ITS MAJOR METABOLITES AFTER OXIDATIVE-METABOLISM BY RAT-LIVER, MONKEY LIVER, AND HUMAN LIVER-MICROSOMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SWART, PJ; BRONNER, GM; BRUINS, AP; ENSING, K; TEPPER, PG; DEZEEUW, RA

    1993-01-01

    An innovative custom-built atmospheric ionization source afforded an opportunity to perform on-line LC/MS analysis and to obtain identification of metabolites without need to rely on radioactive profiling. An HPLC with a UV detector coupled to a modified R 3010 triple quadrupole mass spectrometer wa

  11. Parameterization of ionization induced in the atmosphere by precipitating particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artamonov, Anton; Usoskin, Ilya; Kovaltsov, Gennady

    We present a physical model to calculate ionization induced in the atmosphere by precipitating particles. This model is based on the Bethe-Bloch equation applied for precipitating particles such as: electrons, alpha-particles and protons. The energy range of precipitating particles is up to 5MeV and 80MeV/nuc respectively. This model provides an easy implementation with a robust realization of model calculations for a wide range of incident energies of precipitating particles. This method is limited to the upper-middle atmosphere. An ionization yield function [see, Usoskin and Kovaltsov, 2006; Usoskin, Kovaltsov, Mironova, 2010] can be also used in this model, making it possible to calculate the atmospheric ionization effect of precipitating particles for the entire atmosphere, dawn to the ground.

  12. Ionization by Cosmic Rays in the Atmosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, R. B.; Gronoff, G.; Mertens, C. J.; Blattnig, S.

    2011-12-01

    In-situ measurements by Cassini-Huygens have shown the importance of ionizing particles (solar photons, magnetospheric electrons and protons, cosmics rays) on the atmosphere of Titan. Ionizing particles play an important role in the atmospheric chemistry of Titan and must therefore be accurately modeled to understand the contribution of the differing sources of ionization. To model the initial galactic cosmic ray environment, the Badwar-O'Neill cosmic ray spectrum model was adapted for use at Titan. The Aeroplanets model, an electron transport model for the study of airglow and aurora, was then coupled to the Planetocosmics model, a Monte-carlo cosmic ray transport and energy deposition model, to compute ion production from cosmic rays. In addition, the NAIRAS model, a cosmic ray irradiation model adapted for fast computations, was adopted to the Titan environment and, for the first time, used to compute an ionization profile on a planet other than Earth and compared to the Planetocosmics results. For the first time, the importance of high charge cosmic rays on the ionization of the Titan atmosphere was demonstrated. High charge cosmic rays were found to be especially important below an altitude of 400 km, contributing significantly to the total ionization. Specifically, between 200 km and 400 km, alpha and higher charge cosmic rays are responsible for 40% of the ionization. The increase due to high charge cosmic rays was found for both the Planetocosmics and NAIRAS models.

  13. The Thermodynamical Instability Induced by Pressure Ionization in Fluid Helium

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qiong; Zhang, Gong-Mu; Zhao, Yan-Hong; Lu, Guo; Tian, Ming-Feng; Song, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A systematic study of pressure ionization is carried out in the chemical picture by the example of fluid helium. By comparing the variants of the chemical model, it is demonstrated that the behavior of pressure ionization depends on the construction of the free energy function. In the chemical model with the Coulomb free energy described by the Pad\\'e interpolation formula, thermodynamical instability induced by pressure ionization is found to be manifested by a discontinuous drop or a continuous fall and rise along the pressure-density curve as well as the pressure-temperature curve, which is very much like the first order liquid-liquid phase transition of fluid hydrogen from the first principles simulations. In contrast, in the variant chemical model with the Coulomb free energy term empirically weakened, no thermodynamical instability is induced when pressure ionization occurs, and the resulting equation of state achieves good agreement with the first principles simulations of fluid helium.

  14. Part-per-trillion level determination of antifouling pesticides and their byproducts in seawater samples by off-line solid-phase extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, K; Ferrer, I; Barceló, D

    2000-05-19

    A new method for the simultaneous determination of antifouling pesticides and some of their byproducts such as dichlofluanid, diuron and its byproducts [demethyldiuron and 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)urea], (2-thiocyanomethylthio)ben: zothiazole, chlorothalonil, Sea-nine 211, Irgarol 1051 and one of its byproducts (2-methylthio-4-tert.-butylamino-s-triazine) in seawater was developed. The extraction of these compounds from the filtered seawater samples was performed off-line with different solid-phase extraction sorbents using (I) a 500 mg graphitized carbon black cartridge (ENVI-Carb) and (II) 200 mg polymeric cartridges (LiChrolut EN and Isolute ENV+) and passing 500 ml of the sample through these cartridges. The detection was carried out by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry both in the negative and positive ion modes. The recovery ranged from 76 to 96% for the whole antifouling group with the ENVI-Carb cartridges and the detection limit was at the part-per-trillion level except for TCMTB. The method utilizing the polymeric cartridge proved to be very useful, time saving and with good recoveries when only Irgarol and its byproduct, Sea-nine 211 and diuron and its byproducts, have to be analyzed. The different cartridges were applied to the analysis of these pesticides in different marinas of the Catalan coast; diuron, dichlofluanid, Sea-nine 211, Irgarol as well as demethyldiuron and the Irgarol byproduct being the must ubiquitous pollutants. Maximum concentration levels were 2-3.5 microg/l of diuron and Sea-nine 211, respectively. PMID:10870693

  15. Development of a new multi-residue laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection and quantification of pesticides and pharmaceuticals in wastewater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Michel; Fayad, Paul B; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2012-11-19

    A new solid phase extraction (SPE) method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the simultaneous determination of nine selected emerging contaminants in wastewater (atrazine, desethylatrazine, 17β-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, norethindrone, caffeine, carbamazepine, diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole). We specifically included pharmaceutical compounds from multiple therapeutic classes, as well as pesticides. Sample pre-concentration and clean-up was performed using a mixed-mode SPE cartridge (Strata ABW) having both cation and anion exchange properties, followed by analysis by laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS). The LDTD interface is a new high-throughput sample introduction method, which reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample as compared to minutes with traditional liquid-chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several SPE parameters were evaluated in order to optimize recovery efficiencies when extracting analytes from wastewater, such as the nature of the stationary phase, the loading flow rate, the extraction pH, the volume and composition of the washing solution and the initial sample volume. The method was successfully applied to real wastewater samples from the primary sedimentation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Recoveries of target compounds from wastewater ranged from 78% to 106%, the limit of detection ranged from 30 to 122ng L(-1) while the limit of quantification ranged from 90 to 370ng L(-1). Calibration curves in the wastewater matrix showed good linearity (R(2)≥0.991) for all target analytes and the intraday and interday coefficient of variation was below 15%, reflecting a good precision. PMID:23140957

  16. Atmospheric fate of non volatile and ionizable compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Antonio; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Jolliet, Olivier;

    2011-01-01

    A modified version of theMultimedia Activity Model for Ionics MAMI, including two-layered atmosphere,air–water interface partitioning, intermittent rainfall and variable cloud coverage was developed to simulate the atmospheric fate of ten low volatility or ionizable organic chemicals. Probabilistic...... simulations describing the uncertainty of substance and environmental input properties were run to evaluate the impact of atmospheric parameters, ionization and air–water (or air–ice) interface enrichment. The rate of degradation and the concentration of OH radicals, the duration of dry and wet periods, and...... the parameters describing air–water partitioning (KAW and temperature) and ionization (pKa and pH) are the key parameters determining the potential for long range transport. Wet deposition is an important removal process, but its efficiency is limited, primarily by the duration of the dry period...

  17. Ion-ion reactions for charge reduction of biopolymer at atmospheric pressure ambient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Ming Zhou; Jian Hua Ding; Xie Zhang; Huan Wen Chen

    2007-01-01

    Extractive electrospray ionization source (EESI) was adapted for ion-ion reaction, which was demonstrated by using a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer for the first ion-ion reaction of biopolymers in the atmospheric pressure ambient.

  18. Bisulphate-cluster based atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometer for ultra-high sensitivity (10 ppq) detection of atmospheric amines: proof-of-concept and first ambient data from boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    Sipilä, M.; N. Sarnela; Jokinen, T; Junninen, H.; Hakala, J.; Rissanen, M. P.; T. Petäjä; Worsnop, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric amines may play a crucial role in formation of new aerosol particles via nucleation with sulphuric acid. Recent studies have revealed that concentrations below 1 ppt can significantly promote nucleation of sulphuric acid particles. While sulphuric acid detection is relatively straightforward, no amine measurements to date have been able to reach the critical sub-ppt concentration range and atmospheric amine concentrations are in general poorly ch...

  19. Bisulfate – cluster based atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometer for high-sensitivity (< 100 ppqV) detection of atmospheric dimethyl amine: proof-of-concept and first ambient data from boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    Sipilä, M.; N. Sarnela; Jokinen, T; Junninen, H.; Hakala, J.; Rissanen, M. P.; Praplan, A.; M. Simon; A. Kürten; BIANCHI, F.; Dommen, J; J. Curtius; T. Petäjä; Worsnop, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric amines may play a crucial role in formation of new aerosol particles via nucleation with sulfuric acid. Recent studies have revealed that concentrations below 1 pptV can significantly promote nucleation of sulfuric acid particles. While sulfuric acid detection is relatively straightforward, no amine measurements to date have been able to reach the critical sub-pptV concentration range and atmospheric amine concentrations are in general poorly characterized. In th...

  20. Transport of Ionizing Radiation in Terrestrial-like Exoplanet Atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, David S.; Scalo, John; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2003-01-01

    (Abridged) The propagation of ionizing radiation through model atmospheres of terrestrial-like exoplanets is studied for a large range of column densities and incident photon energies using a Monte Carlo code we have developed to treat Compton scattering and photoabsorption. Incident spectra from parent star flares, supernovae, and gamma-ray bursts are modeled and compared to energetic particles in importance. We find that terrestrial-like exoplanets with atmospheres thinner than about 100 g ...

  1. Pressurized ionization chamber detectors for industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of the thickness of the sheets made of different materials, e.g. metal, plastic, paper, cellulose, rubber, etc., is one of many industrial applications of nuclear techniques. The ionizing radiation detectors of ionization chamber type are based on measuring the variations in either exposure rate (for gamma radiation) or absorbed dose rate (for beta radiation) occurring in materials of different thickness, placed between the radiation source and the detector. The variations in exposure rate and absorbed dose rate can be traced by using radiation detectors of the ionization chamber type, which convert the exposure rate, X point, or the absorbed dose rate, D point, into a proportional electric current. The more stable the ionization current of the chambers (keeping a constant exposure rate or absorbed dose rate), the slighter the variations that can be detected in either exposure rate or absorbed dose rate, hence in the absorbing material placed between the radiation source and the detector. Based on these facts, several variants of such detectors, including the ionization chamber CIS-P5M-100Kr, CIS-P2M-1000Kr and CIS-P8M-70Kr, have been made. (author)

  2. Comparison of various liquid chromatographic methods involving UV and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric detection for the efficient trace analysis of phenylurea herbicides in various types of water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heeft, E; Dijkman, E; Baumann, R A; Hogendoorn, E A

    2000-05-19

    The performance of mass spectrometric (MS) detection and UV detection in combination with reversed-phase liquid chromatography without and with the use of coupled column RPLC (LC-LC) has been compared for the trace analysis of phenylurea herbicides in environmental waters. The selected samples of this comparative study originated from an inter-laboratory study. For both detection modes, a 50 mm x 4.6 mm I.D. column and a 100 mm x 4.6 mm I.D. column packed with 3 microm C18 were used as the first (C-1) and second (C-2) column, respectively. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry was performed on a magnetic sector instrument. The LC-LC-MS analysis was carried out on-line by means of direct large volume (11.7 ml) injection (LVI). The performance of both on-line (LVI, 4 ml of sample) and off-line LC-LC-UV (244 nm) analysis was investigated. The latter procedure consisted of a solid-phase extraction (SPE) of 250 ml of water sample on a 500 mg C18 cartridge. The comparative study showed that LC-LC-MS is more selective then LC-LC-UV and, in most cases, more sensitive. The LVI-LC-LC-MS approach combines direct quantification and confirmation of most of the analytes down to a level of 0.01 microg/l in water samples in less then 30 min. As regards LC-LC-UV, the off-line method appeared to be a more viable approach in comparison with the on-line procedure. This method allows the screening of phenylurea's in various types of water samples down to a level of at least 0.05 microg/l. On-line analysis with LVI provided marginal sensitivity (limits of detection of about 0.1 microg/l) and selectivity was sometimes less in case of surface water samples. Both the on-line LVI-LC-LC-MS method and the LC-LC-UV method using off-line SPE were validated by analysing a series of real-life reference samples. These samples were part of an inter-laboratory test and contained residues of herbicides ranging from 0.02 to 0.8 microg/l. Beside good correlation between the methods

  3. Rapid Screening of Inferior Quality Oils by Surface Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry%表面解吸常压化学电离质谱法快速筛查劣质食用油

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方小伟; 张丽丽; 贾滨; 张兴磊; 陈焕文

    2011-01-01

    采用自行研制的表面解吸常压化学电离源(SDAPCI),在无需样品预处理的前提下用质谱法直接分析不同品质油品(地沟油、市售品牌食用油),获得其化学指纹图谱,并通过主成分分析(PCA)方法,对指纹谱图信息进行数据分析,进而对不同品质油品进行筛查。结果表明:(1)地沟油与品牌食用油的指纹谱图间存在差异(;2)SDAPCI-MS结合PCA方法,能较好地将地沟油样品与正常的食用油样品进行区分(;3)本方法无需前处理、灵敏度高,分析速度快(单个样品分析时间约1.0 min),实现了高通量油样的快速筛查,为食品安全中快速筛查地沟油提供了一种快速、高效、灵敏的分析方法。%By using a home-made surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source,illicit cooking oils and normal edible oils were directly analyzed by mass spectrometry without any sample pretreatment.The MS data were further analyzed using principal component analysis(PCA).The SDAPCI-MS fingerprints of illicit cooking oils were different from those of normal edible oils.With the application of PCA,illicit cooking oils were successfully differentiated from normal oils.The method developed here is attractive by showing the advantages of no need for sample pretreatment,high sensitivity and high analytical speed(1.0 min per sample),and thus provides a fast and effective method to screen illicit cooking oils for the sake of food safety.

  4. Ionization Parameter: A Diagnostic of Radiation Pressure Dominated HII Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Sherry; Matzner, C. D.

    2011-01-01

    When irradiation is sufficiently intense, the structure of an HII region will be dominated by radiation pressure and stellar winds, rather than ionized gas pressure. This state is of considerable interest because of its role in the formation of massive stars, the disruption of giant molecular clouds, and the evolution of starburst galaxies. We discuss the usefulness of the ionization parameter U, as often derived from observed line ratios between species which exist only in ionized gas, as a diagnostic for the radiation pressure-dominated state. In ionization-bounded directions, U cannot exceed a maximum value Umax determined by equilibrium between radiation and gas pressure forces. Lower values of U will occur, however, when the pressure of shocked stellar winds is significant, or when neutral gas is broken into clumps with sufficiently small radii of curvature. Applying these considerations to a prominent ionized shell around 30 Doradus and to the inner starburst region of M82, along with Cloudy simulations, we conclude that both are dominated by a combination of radiation pressure and shocked winds.

  5. Effect of increased ionization on the atmospheric electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is a review of atmospheric electrical theory with the purpose of predicting the atmospheric electrical effects of increased ionization caused by radioactive inert gases. A time-independent perturbation model for the global atmospheric electric circuit precdicts that the electric field at the sea surface would be reduced to about 76% of its unperturbed value by a surface 85Kr concentration of 3 nCi/m3. The electric field at a typical land station is predicted to be about 84% of its unperturbed value. Some scientists have suggested that the atmospheric electric field is part of a closed electrical feedback loop. The present model does not include such a closed feedback loop and may underestimate the total effects. This model is also useful for interpreting atmospheric electrical responses to natural fluctuations in the cosmic-ray component of background radiation

  6. Effect of gas pressure on ionization of ambient gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An Nd: YAG pulsed laser (145 mJ) was used to ablate aluminum target and Ar was used as protecting gas. Time-and space-resolved spectra of the plasmas under pressure 100 Pa, 1 kPa, 10 kPa and 100 kPa were acquired with time- and space-resolved technique. The characteristics of the plasma radiating under each pressure were briefly described, and the laws of Ar characteristical radiaton were analyzed in detail. Based on the profile of Ar characteristical radiation under these pressure, the relation between protecting gas pressure and its ionization was briefly discussed, and explained with quantum theory. Farther more, the mechanism of ambient gas ionization was investigated. As the result, it was suggested that the main mechanism inducing protecting gas to ionize should be the absorption of the plasma continuum radiation by the gas.

  7. Breaking the pumping speed barrier in mass spectrometry: discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2008-06-01

    The performance of mass spectrometers with limited pumping capacity is shown to be improved through use of a discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface (DAPI). A proof-of-concept DAPI interface was designed and characterized using a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. The interface consists of a simple capillary directly connecting the atmospheric pressure ion source to the vacuum mass analyzer region; it has no ion optical elements and no differential pumping stages. Gases carrying ionized analytes were pulsed into the mass analyzer for short periods at high flow rates rather than being continuously introduced at lower flow rates; this procedure maximized ion transfer. The use of DAPI provides a simple solution to the problem of coupling an atmospheric pressure ionization source to a miniature instrument with limited pumping capacity. Data were recorded using various atmospheric pressure ionization sources, including electrospray ionization (ESI), nano-ESI, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) sources. The interface was opened briefly for ion introduction during each scan. With the use of the 18 W pumping system of the Mini 10, limits of detection in the low part-per-billion levels were achieved and unit resolution mass spectra were recorded. PMID:18461971

  8. Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Sterilization Shower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhiraman, R. P.; Beeler, D.; Meyyappan, M.; Khare, B. N.

    2012-10-01

    Low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma sterilization shower to address both forward and backward biological contamination issues is presented. The molecular effects of plasma exposure required to sterilize microorganisms is also analysed.

  9. Computational investigations of atmospheric pressure discharges

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Muhammad Munawar

    2010-01-01

    This research work presents the numerical simulations of multispecies multi-dimensional fluid model of atmospheric pressure discharge. The semi-implicit sequential iterative scheme is used to solve the coupled system of plasma fluid model equations with a proper set of boundary conditions. A one- dimensional self consistent drift-diffusion fluid model is developed to investigate the characteristics of atmospheric pressure discharge in pure helium and He-N2 gases. The uniform atmos...

  10. Transport of Ionizing Radiation in Terrestrial-like Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D S; Wheeler, J C; Smith, David S.; Scalo, John

    2003-01-01

    (Abridged) Propagation of ionizing radiation, as from parent star flares, supernovae, or gamma-ray bursts, is studied for a suite of simple model atmospheres of terrestrial-like exoplanets covering a large range of column densities and incident photon energies. We developed a Monte Carlo code to treat the Compton scattering and photoabsorption. Atmospheres thinner than about 100 g cm^-2 transmit a significant fraction of incident gamma-rays, but even the thinnest atmospheres are essentially opaque to X-rays below about 30 keV. For thicker atmospheres, the incident ionizing radiation is efficiently blocked, but most of the incident energy is redistributed via secondary electron excitation into diffuse UV and visible aurora-like emission, increasing the atmospheric transmission by many orders of magnitude; in some cases the transmission can be up to 10%, depending on the intervening UV opacity. For Earth, between 2 x 10^-3 and 4 x 10^-2 of the incident flux reaches the ground in the 200-320 nm range, depending ...

  11. Special issue: diagnostics of atmospheric pressure microplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2013-11-01

    In recent decades, a strong revival of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma studies has developed in the form of microplasmas. Microplasmas have typical scales of 1 mm or less and offer a very exciting research direction in the field of plasma science and technology as the discharge physics can be considerably different due to high collisionality and the importance of plasma-surface interaction. These high-pressure small-scale plasmas have a diverse range of physical and chemical properties. This diversity coincides with various applications including light/UV sources [1], material processing [2], chemical analysis [3], material synthesis [4], electromagnetics [5], combustion [6] and even medicine [7]. At atmospheric pressure, large scale plasmas have the tendency to become unstable due to the high collision rates leading to enhanced heating and ionization compared to their low-pressure counterparts. As low-pressure plasmas typically operate in reactors with sizes of tens of centimetres, scaling up the pressure to atmospheric pressure the size of the plasma reduces to typical sizes below 1 mm. A natural approach of stabilizing atmospheric pressure plasmas is thus the use of microelectrode geometries. Traditionally microplasmas have been produced in confined geometries which allow one to stabilize dc excited discharges. This stabilization is intrinsically connected to the large surface-to-volume ratio which enhances heat transfer and losses of charged and excited species to the walls. Currently challenging boundaries are pushed by producing microcavity geometries with dimensions of the order of 1 µm [8]. The subject of this special issue, diagnostics of microplasmas, is motivated by the many challenges in microplasma diagnostics in view of the complex chemistry and strong spatial (and even temporal) gradients of species densities and plasma properties. Atmospheric pressure plasmas have a very long history dating back more than 100 years, with early work of

  12. Microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Toshiki; Hidaka, Hiroki; Muguruma, Hitoshi

    2016-07-01

    Microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization is presented. A system with a re-entrant microwave cavity realizes simple matching, stable plasma, and free space under the orifice of plasma steam. Hexamethyldisiloxane is employed as a monomer, while argon is used as a carrier gas. The effective area of the hydrophobic coating film used corresponds to a circle of 20 mm diameter and the deposition rate considered is 5 nm/min. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy shows that the coating film has a large molecular weight (>200 kDa), suggesting that a high-crosslinking and three-dimensional polymer matrix is formed and microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization is fulfilled.

  13. Atmospheric pressure plasma analysis by modulated molecular beam mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fractional number density measurements for a rf plasma 'needle' operating at atmospheric pressure have been obtained using a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) system designed for diagnostics of atmospheric plasmas. The MBMS system comprises three differentially pumped stages and a mass/energy analyzer and includes an automated beam-to-background measurement facility in the form of a software-controlled chopper mechanism. The automation of the beam modulation allows the neutral components in the plasma to be rapidly and accurately measured using the mass spectrometer by threshold ionization techniques. Data are reported for plasma generated by a needle plasma source operated using a helium/air mixture. In particular, data for the conversion of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen into nitric oxide are discussed with reference to its significance for medical applications such as disinfecting wounds and dental cavities and for microsurgery

  14. Non disturbing characterization and quantification of natural organic matter (NOM) contained in clay rock pore water by mass spectrometry using electro-spray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    formation is of great importance. In this context, establishing accurate sequencing of structural units for the DOM shall be attempted. The present work is focused on small organic molecules that are present in the COx formation and that could also play a key role in the migration processes. It would be valuable to develop rapid analytical methods that require only a small sample volume and minimal pretreatment. Of particular importance is the ability to analyze bulk pore water samples as opposed to samples subjected to specific extraction techniques, fractionation, and/or concentration. Mass Spectrometry with either the Electro-Spray or the Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization modes has been proved to be a powerful tool for aquatic humic substances since it allows the determination of the molecular weight distribution and the access to the different molecular weights. In this study, we have employed ESI-MS and APCI-MS to identify the chemical composition of NOM contained in the pore water from the argillite clay rock. Due to the very small quantities of COx pore water available from boreholes, these techniques are thus very suitable. The DOM in pore water has never been characterized on a well preserved pore water sample. The following aspects were considered in the present work: (1) the use of either ESI or APCI to select the most appropriated mode of ionization for providing the best information depending on the class of compound examined (2) a unique and original experimental process developed to get pore water from a core sample (3) the determination of concentration of dissolved organic matter and the evaluation of the organic matter maturity by Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and (4) the application of the proposed instrumental methods for the characterization of organic components from natural pore waters. For the first time to our knowledge, a quite exhaustive inventory of the small organic compounds presents is given without proceeding to any

  15. Application of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma in Polymer and Composite Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hang

    2015-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure helium and oxygen plasma was used to investigate surface activation and bonding in polymer composites. This device was operated by passing 1.0-3.0 vol% of oxygen in helium through a pair of parallel plate metal electrodes powered by 13.56 or 27.12 MHz radio frequency power. The gases were partially ionized between the capacitors where plasma was generated. The reactive species in the plasma were carried downstream by the gas flow to treat the substrate surface. The...

  16. Electron-ion recombination study in argon at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with a wall-stabilized arc burning in argon at atmospheric pressure. A transient mode is obtained using a fast thyristor connected to the electrodes, which short-circuits the discharge. By means of two wavelengths laser interferometry and spectroscopy measurements we have determined the temporal changes of the electron density, ground state atom density and excited atom density. We have shown that, when the electric field is suppressed, the electron temperature rapidly decreases to the gas temperature before changing electron and atom densities. This phenomenon is applied to determine the gas temperature and to evaluate the role played by ionization in electron density balance. The coefficients of ambipolar diffusion, ionization and recombination and an apparent recombination coefficient are determined versus electron temperature and compared with theoretical values

  17. Simultaneous extraction of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid from human plasma and simultaneous estimation by liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/tandem mass spectrometry detection. Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Kandikere, Vishwottam; Mudigonda, Koteshwara; Ajjala, Devender; Suraneni, Ramakrishna; Thoddi, Parthasarathi

    2011-01-01

    A simple analytical method using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in atmospheric chemical ionization mode (APCI) for the simultaneous estimation of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, CAS 50-78-2) and its active metabolite salicylic acid (SA, CAS 69-72-7) in human plasma has been developed and validated. ASA and SA were analyzed simultaneously despite differences in plasma concentration ranges of ASA and SA after oral administration of ASA. In spite of having different chemical, ionization and chromatographic properties, ASA and SA were extracted simultaneously from the plasma sample using acetonitrile protein precipitation followed by liquid-liquid extraction. The analytes were separated on a reversed phase column with rapid gradient program using mobile phase consisting of ammonium acetate buffer and methanol. The structural analogue diclofenac was used as an internal standard. The multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions m/z 179 --> 137 for ASA, m/z 137 --> 65 for SA and m/z 294 --> 250 for IS were used. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.02-10 microg/mL for ASA and 0.1-50 microg/mL for SA. The between-batch precision (%CV) ranged from 2.1 to 7.9% for ASA and from 0.2 to 5.2% for SA. The between-batch accuracy ranged from 95.4 to 96.7% for ASA and from 94.6 to 111.3% for SA. The validated method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of ASA after single oral administration of 650 mg test formulation versus two 325 mg reference formulations of ASA in human subjects. PMID:21755814

  18. Runaway electron beam in atmospheric pressure discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreshkin, E. V.; Barengolts, S. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    A numerical simulation was performed to study the formation of a runaway electron (RAE) beam from an individual emission zone in atmospheric pressure air discharges with a highly overvolted interelectrode gap. It is shown that the formation of a RAE beam in discharges at high overvoltages is much contributed by avalanche processes.

  19. Dynamics behavior of homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Gu, Biao; Wang, Wenchun; Wang, Dezhen; Peng, Xuwen

    2009-07-01

    An experimental study on the dynamics behavior of homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge (HDBD) at atmospheric pressure is described in this paper. Two kinds of discharge mode, glow and Townsend discharge modes, can be easily identified according to the differential conductivity of current-voltage relationship in the ascent stage of discharge current for the atmospheric HDBD. A (three-dimensional) 3D phase space made by discharge current, gas gap voltage, and charge density of dielectric-plate surface was utilized in the study. By projecting the discharge evolution trajectory in the 3D space, the 3D trajectory of multiple current peaks discharge in atmospheric helium shows a limited cycle with convolutions and undergoes a series of bifurcation process; however, the 3D trajectory of atmospheric N2 HDBD is a limited cycle without any convolution and bifurcation process. In addition, the first ionization coefficient of working gas plays a key role to determine the discharge mode of atmospheric HDBD, the transition of discharge mode and the dynamics stability of atmospheric HDBD.

  20. Response of cyanobacteria to low atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lifeng; Yu, Qingni; Ai, Weidang; Tang, Yongkang; Ren, Jin; Guo, Shuangsheng

    2014-10-01

    Maintaining a low pressure environment in a controlled ecological life support system would reduce the technological complexity and resupply cost in the course of the construction of a future manned lunar base. To estimate the effect of a hypobaric environment in a lunar base on biological components, such as higher plants, microbes, and algae, cyanobacteria was used as the model by determining their response of growth, morphology, and physiology when exposed to half of standard atmospheric pressure for 16 days (brought back to standard atmospheric pressure 30 minutes every two days for sampling). The results indicated that the decrease of atmospheric pressure from 100 kPa to 50 kPa reduced the growth rates of Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia sp., Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and Anabaena flos-aquae. The ratio of carotenoid to chlorophyll a content in the four tested strains increased under low pressure conditions compared to ambient conditions, resulting from the decrease of chlorophyll a and the increase of carotenoid in the cells. Moreover, low pressure induced the reduction of the phycocyanin content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and Anabaena flos-aquae. The result from the ultrastructure observed using SEM indicated that low pressure promoted the production of more extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) compared to ambient conditions. The results implied that the low pressure environment of 50 kPa in a future lunar base would induce different effects on biological components in a CELSS, which must be considered during the course of designing a future lunar base. The results will be a reference for exploring the response of other biological components, such as plants, microbes, and animals, living in the life support system of a lunar base.

  1. Diagnostics of atmospheric pressure air plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure air plasmas are often thought to be in Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium (LTE) owing to fast interspecies collisional exchanges at high pressure. As will be seen here, this assumption cannot be relied upon, particularly with respect to optical diagnostics. Large velocity gradients in flowing plasmas and/or elevated electron temperatures created by electrical discharges can result in large departures from chemical and thermal equilibrium. Diagnostic techniques based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) have been developed and applied at Stanford University to the investigation of atmospheric pressure plasmas under conditions ranging from thermal and chemical equilibrium to thermochemical nonequilibrium. This article presents a review of selected temperature and species concentration measurement techniques useful for the study of air and nitrogen plasmas

  2. A modified setup for measuring the first ionization coefficient of tissue equivalent gases at low pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petri, Anna R.; Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Bueno, Carmen C., E-mail: arpetri@ipen.br, E-mail: josemary@ipen.br, E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mangiarotti, Alessio, E-mail: alessio@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2015-07-01

    In our previous works, measurements of the first Townsend ionization coefficient, α, for pure nitrogen and isobutane at atmospheric pressure as a function of the reduced electric field were carried out in the range of 145 to 194 Td to prevent the chamber from electrical discharges. In order to increase this upper limit, the setup was modified for operating at low pressure. The detector has a Resistive Plate Chamber-like configuration where the primary ionization is produced by the incidence of nitrogen pulsed laser beam on an aluminum electrode. To validate the technique, measurements of the first Townsend ionization coefficient in nitrogen as a function of the reduced electric field were carried out at atmospheric pressure and at 100hPa, as this is an extensively studied gas with well-established data. Good agreement among our results, data from the literature and Magboltz simulations, leading to extend our method to Tissue Equivalent (TE) gases whose α is unknown. Preliminary measurements of α in a methane-based TE gas (CH{sub 4} - 64.4%, CO{sub 2} - 32.4% and N{sub 2} - 3.2%) are also presented. (author)

  3. A modified setup for measuring the first ionization coefficient of tissue equivalent gases at low pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our previous works, measurements of the first Townsend ionization coefficient, α, for pure nitrogen and isobutane at atmospheric pressure as a function of the reduced electric field were carried out in the range of 145 to 194 Td to prevent the chamber from electrical discharges. In order to increase this upper limit, the setup was modified for operating at low pressure. The detector has a Resistive Plate Chamber-like configuration where the primary ionization is produced by the incidence of nitrogen pulsed laser beam on an aluminum electrode. To validate the technique, measurements of the first Townsend ionization coefficient in nitrogen as a function of the reduced electric field were carried out at atmospheric pressure and at 100hPa, as this is an extensively studied gas with well-established data. Good agreement among our results, data from the literature and Magboltz simulations, leading to extend our method to Tissue Equivalent (TE) gases whose α is unknown. Preliminary measurements of α in a methane-based TE gas (CH4 - 64.4%, CO2 - 32.4% and N2 - 3.2%) are also presented. (author)

  4. Research on atmospheric pressure plasma processing sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gui-cai; Na, Yan-xiang; Dong, Xiao-long; Sun, Xiao-liang

    2013-08-01

    The water pollution has become more and more serious with the industrial progress and social development, so it become a worldwide leading environmental management problem to human survival and personal health, therefore, countries are looking for the best solution. Generally speaking, in this paper the work has the following main achievements and innovation: (1) Developed a new plasma device--Plasma Water Bed. (2) At atmospheric pressure condition, use oxygen, nitrogen, argon and helium as work gas respectively, use fiber spectrometer to atmospheric pressure plasma discharge the emission spectrum of measurement, due to the different work gas producing active particle is different, so can understand discharge, different particle activity, in the treatment of wastewater, has the different degradation effects. (3) Methyl violet solution treatment by plasma water bed. Using plasma drafting make active particles and waste leachate role, observe the decolorization, measurement of ammonia nitrogen removal.

  5. [Development of a chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer for continuous measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl radical].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jian; Hua, Lei; Hou, Ke-Yong; Jiang, Lei; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Wu-Duo; Chen, Ping; Wang, Wei-Guo; Di, Tian; Li, Hai-Yang

    2014-05-01

    A home-made chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) has been developed for continuous measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl radical. Based on the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization technique, an ionization source with orthogonal dual tube structure was adopted in the instrument, which minimized the interference between the reagent gas ionization and the titration reaction. A 63Ni radioactive source was fixed inside one of the orthogonal tubes to generate reactant ion of NO(-)(3) from HNO3 vapor. Hydroxyl radical was first titrated by excess SO2 to form equivalent concentrations of H2SO4 in the other orthogonal tube, and then reacted with NO(-)(3) ions in the chemical ionization chamber, leading to HSO(-)(4) formation. The concentration of atmospheric hydroxyl radical can be directly calculated by measuring the intensities of the HSOj product ions and the NO(-)(3) reactant ions. The analytical capability of the instrument was demonstrated by measuring hydroxyl radical in laboratory air, and the concentration of the hydroxyl radical in the investigated air was calculated to be 1.6 x 106 molecules*cm ', based on 5 seconds integration. The results have shown that the instrument is competent for in situ continuous measurements of atmospheric trace radical. PMID:25055654

  6. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Processing for Polymer Adhesion: A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma processing has attracted significant interests over decades due to its usefulness and a variety of applications. Adhesion improvement of polymer surfaces is among the most important applications of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment. Reflecting recent significant de...

  7. 大气压基质辅助激光解析离子源高分辨飞行时间质谱仪的研制%The Study of Atmospheric Pressure Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization and High Mass Resolution Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    粘慧青; 黄正旭; 郭长娟; 高伟; 周振

    2007-01-01

    本文介绍了实验室自制的大气压基质辅助激光解析离子源(Atmospheric Pressure Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization,AP-MALDI)高分辨飞行时间质谱仪(Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometer,TOFMS)的原理、结构以及初步的实验结果.通过对多肽样品gramicidin S的分析,国内首次实现在自制AP-MALDI-TOFMS上得到生物大分子谱图.结果表明,AP-MALDI高分辨TOFMS可以实现大气压下大通量的大分子精确质量检测.仪器分辨率优于8000(Full Width at Half Maximum,FWHM),最低检测限可达25fmol.

  8. Non-equilibrium helium ionization in an MHD simulation of the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The ionization state of the gas in the dynamic solar chromosphere can depart strongly from the instantaneous statistical equilibrium commonly assumed in numerical modeling. We improve on earlier simulations of the solar atmosphere that only included non-equilbrium hydrogen ionization by performing a 2D radiation-magneto-hydrodynamics simulation featuring non-equilibrium ionization of both hydrogen and helium. The simulation includes the effect of hydrogen Lyman-$\\alpha$ and the EUV radiation from the corona on the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. Details on code implementation are given. We obtain helium ion fractions that are far from their equilibrium values. Comparison with models with LTE ionization shows that non-equilibrium helium ionization leads to higher temperatures in wave fronts and lower temperatures in the gas between shocks. Assuming LTE ionization results in a thermostat-like behaviour with matter accumulating around the temperatures where the LTE ionization fractions change rapidly. ...

  9. Laser-enhanced ionization of mercury atoms in an inert atmosphere with avalanche amplification of the signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, W L; Matveev, O I; Cabredo, S; Omenetto, N; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1997-07-01

    A new method for laser-enhanced ionization detection of mercury atoms in an inert gas atmosphere is described. The method, which is based on the avalanche amplification of the signal resulting from the ionization from a selected Rydberg level reached by a three-step laser excitation of mercury vapor in a simple quartz cell, can be applied to the determination of this element in various matrices by the use of conventional cold atomization techniques. The overall (collisional + photo) ionization efficiency is investigated at different temperatures, and the avalanche amplification effect is reported for Ar and P-10 gases at atmospheric pressure. It is shown that the amplified signal is related to the number of charges produced in the laser-irradiated volume. Under amplifier noise-limited conditions, a detection limit of ∼15 Hg atoms/laser pulse in the interaction region is estimated. PMID:21639354

  10. Formation Mechanism of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Nan; Cao, Zexian

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet can protrude some 5.0 cm into air. It holds promise for multivarious innovative applications, but its formation mechanism remains unsettled. We show that the plasma jet is essentially a streamer corona totally independent of, but obscured by, dielectric barrier discharge. Consequently, the jets can be equally successfully generated even with one single bare metal electrode attached to the tube orifice, both downstream and upstream simultaneously, and at a significantly reduced voltage. These results will help understand the underlying physics and facilitate a safer and more flexible implementation of this marvelous plasma source.

  11. A dielectric barrier discharge in neon at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dielectric barrier discharge in neon at atmospheric pressure is investigated with electrical measurement and fast photography. It is found that a stable diffuse discharge can be easily generated in a gap with a gap space of 0.5-6 mm and is identified with a glow discharge. The first breakdown voltage of the gap is considerably higher than that of the same gap working in a stable diffuse discharge mode, which indicates that Penning ionization of neon metastables from the previous discharge with inevitable gas impurities plays an important role in the decrease in the breakdown voltage. Discharge patterns are observed in a gap shorter than 1 mm. From the experiments with a wedge-like gap, it is found that the discharge patterns are formed in the area with a higher applied electric field, which suggests that a higher applied electric field may cause a transition from a diffuse glow to discharge patterns.

  12. Comparison of free radicals formation induced by cold atmospheric plasma, ultrasound, and ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Mati Ur; Jawaid, Paras; Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Plasma medicine is increasingly recognized interdisciplinary field combining engineering, physics, biochemistry and life sciences. Plasma is classified into two categories based on the temperature applied, namely "thermal" and "non-thermal" (i.e., cold atmospheric plasma). Non-thermal or cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is produced by applying high voltage electric field at low pressures and power. The chemical effects of cold atmospheric plasma in aqueous solution are attributed to high voltage discharge and gas flow, which is transported rapidly on the liquid surface. The argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) induces efficient reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aqueous solutions without thermal decomposition. Their formation has been confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping, which is reviewed here. The similarities and differences between the plasma chemistry, sonochemistry, and radiation chemistry are explained. Further, the evidence for free radical formation in the liquid phase and their role in the biological effects induced by cold atmospheric plasma, ultrasound and ionizing radiation are discussed. PMID:27085689

  13. Ionization Processes in the Atmosphere of Titan (Research Note). III. Ionization by High-Z Nuclei Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronoff, G.; Mertens, C.; Lilensten, J.; Desorgher, L.; Fluckiger, E.; Velinov, P.

    2011-01-01

    Context. The Cassini-Huygens mission has revealed the importance of particle precipitation in the atmosphere of Titan thanks to in-situ measurements. These ionizing particles (electrons, protons, and cosmic rays) have a strong impact on the chemistry, hence must be modeled. Aims. We revisit our computation of ionization in the atmosphere of Titan by cosmic rays. The high-energy high-mass ions are taken into account to improve the precision of the calculation of the ion production profile. Methods. The Badhwahr and O Neill model for cosmic ray spectrum was adapted for the Titan model. We used the TransTitan model coupled with the Planetocosmics model to compute the ion production by cosmic rays. We compared the results with the NAIRAS/HZETRN ionization model used for the first time for a body that differs from the Earth. Results. The cosmic ray ionization is computed for five groups of cosmic rays, depending on their charge and mass: protons, alpha, Z = 8 (oxygen), Z = 14 (silicon), and Z = 26 (iron) nucleus. Protons and alpha particles ionize mainly at 65 km altitude, while the higher mass nucleons ionize at higher altitudes. Nevertheless, the ionization at higher altitude is insufficient to obscure the impact of Saturn s magnetosphere protons at a 500 km altitude. The ionization rate at the peak (altitude: 65 km, for all the different conditions) lies between 30 and 40/cu cm/s. Conclusions. These new computations show for the first time the importance of high Z cosmic rays on the ionization of the Titan atmosphere. The updated full ionization profile shape does not differ significantly from that found in our previous calculations (Paper I: Gronoff et al. 2009, 506, 955) but undergoes a strong increase in intensity below an altitude of 400 km, especially between 200 and 400 km altitude where alpha and heavier particles (in the cosmic ray spectrum) are responsible for 40% of the ionization. The comparison of several models of ionization and cosmic ray spectra (in

  14. Ultra-Low Breakdown Voltage of Field Ionization in Atmospheric Air Based on Silicon Nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classic field ionization requires extremely high positive electric fields, of the order of a few million volts per centimeter. Here we show that field ionization can occur at dramatically lower fields on the electrode of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with dense surface states and large field enhancement factor. A field ionization structure using SiNWs as the anode has been investigated, in which the SiNWs were fabricated by improved chemical etching process. At room temperature and atmospheric pressure, breakdown of the air is reproducible with a fixed anode-to-cathode distance of 0.5 μm. The breakdown voltage is ∼38 V, low enough to be achieved by a battery-powered unit. Two reasons can be given for the low breakdown voltage. First, the gas discharge departs from the Paschen's law and the breakdown voltage decreases sharply as the gap distance falls in μm range. The other reason is the large electric field enhancement factor (β) and the high density of surface defects, which cause a highly non-uniform electric field for field emission to occur

  15. Determination of Ionization Coefficient of Atmospheric Helium in Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A weakly luminous layer close to the anode is observed at time far ahead of the current pulse in dielectric barrier discharge of helium at atmospheric pressure and it is considered as the result of a very weak Townsend discharge. Based on the assumption that the space charge produced by this Townsend discharge is too small to distort the uniform electric field in the gas gap, the electrons have more or less the same energy over the entire gap and the spatial distribution of the discharge light is proportional to the distribution of electron density. This light distribution is obtained by processing side-view photograph of discharge gap using an intensified charge coupled device camera with an exposure time of 20 ns. By fitting a theoretically derived formula with the measured curve of light distribution, the Townsend electron ionization coefficient a is determined to be 31 cm−1 at E/p = 3.6 V·cm−1·Torr−1, which is much higher than that obtained by solving the Boltzmann equation of pure helium. It is believed that penning ionization of helium metastables with impurity of nitrogen molecules makes great contribution to the experimentally determined α value. The contribution of this penning ionization to α is roughly estimated. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  16. Determination of Ionization Coefficient of Atmospheric Helium in Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Zhuo; LUO Hai-Yun; Wang Xin-Xin; LV Bo; GUAN Zhi-Cheng; WANG Li-Ming

    2008-01-01

    A weakly luminous layer close to the anode is observed at time far ahead of the current pulse in dielectric barrier discharge of helium at atmospheric pressure and it is considered as the result of a very weak Townsend discharge. Based on the assumption that the space charge produced by this Townsend discharge is too small to distort the uniform electric field in the gas gap, the electrons have more or less the same energy over the entire gap and the spatial distribution of the discharge light is proportional to the distribution of electron density. This light distribution is obtained by processing side-view photograph of discharge gap using an intensified charge coupled device camera with an exposure time of 20ns. By fitting a theoretically derived formula with the measured curve of light distribution, the Townsend electron ionization coefficient α is determined to be 31 cm-1 at E/p = 3.6 V.cm-1.Torr-1, which is much higher than that obtained by solving the Boltzmann equation of pure helium. It is believed that penning ionization of helium metastables with impurity of nitrogen molecules makes great contribution to the experimentally determined α value. The contribution of this penning ionization to a is roughly estimated.

  17. Response of cyanobacteria to low atmosphere pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lifeng; Ai, Weidang; Guo, Shuangsheng; Tang, Yongkang; Yu, Qingni; Shen, Yunze; Ren, Jin

    Maintaining a low pressure environment would reduce the technological complexity and constructed cost of future lunar base. To estimate the effect of hypobaric of controlled ecological life support system in lunar base on terrestrial life, cyanobacteria was used as the model to exam the response of growth, morphology, physiology to it. The decrease of atmosphere pressure from 100 KPa to 50 KPa reducing the growth rates of Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Anabaena Hos-aquae, the chlorophyll a content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp, Anabaena Hos-aquae, the carotenoid content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the phycocyanin content in Microcystis aeruginosa. This study explored the biological characteristics of the cyanobacteria under low pressure condition, which aimed at understanding the response of the earth's life to environment for the future moon base, the results enrich the research contents of the lunar biology and may be referred for the research of other terrestrial life, such as human, plant, microbe and animal living in life support system of lunar base.

  18. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  19. Atmospheric pressure variations and abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) presents with increased frequency in the winter and spring months. Seasonal changes in atmospheric pressure mirrors this pattern. AIM: To establish if there was a seasonal variation in the occurrence of RAAA and to determine if there was any association with atmospheric pressure changes. METHODS: A retrospective cohort-based study was performed. Daily atmospheric pressure readings for the region were obtained. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant monthly variation in RAAA presentation with 107 cases (52.5%) occurring from November to March. The monthly number of RAAA and the mean atmospheric pressure in the previous month were inversely related (r = -0.752, r (2) = 0.566, P = 0.03), and there was significantly greater daily atmospheric pressure variability on days when patients with RAAA were admitted. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest a relationship between atmospheric pressure and RAAA.

  20. Atmospheric ionization induced by precipitating electrons: Comparison of CRAC:EPII model with parametrization model

    CERN Document Server

    Artamonov, A A; Usoskin, I G

    2016-01-01

    A new model CRAC:EPII (Cosmic Ray Atmospheric Cascade: Electron Precipitation Induced Ionization) is presented. The CRAC:EPII is based on Monte Carlo simulation of precipitating electrons propagation and interaction with matter in the Earth atmosphere. It explicitly considers energy deposit: ionization, pair production, Compton scattering, generation of Bremsstrahlung high energy photons, photo-ionization and annihilation of positrons, multiple scattering as physical processes accordingly. The propagation of precipitating electrons and their interactions with atmospheric molecules is carried out with the GEANT4 simulation tool PLANETOCOSMICS code using NRLMSISE 00 atmospheric model. The ionization yields is compared with an analytical parametrization for various energies of incident precipitating electron, using a flux of mono-energetic particles. A good agreement between the two models is achieved. Subsequently, on the basis of balloon-born measured spectra of precipitating electrons at 30.10.2002 and 07.01....

  1. Competitive Deprotonation and Superoxide [O2 (-•)] Radical-Anion Adduct Formation Reactions of Carboxamides under Negative-Ion Atmospheric-Pressure Helium-Plasma Ionization (HePI) Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Isra; Pinto, Spencer; Weisbecker, Carl; Attygalle, Athula B

    2016-03-01

    Carboxamides bearing an N-H functionality are known to undergo deprotonation under negative-ion-generating mass spectrometric conditions. Herein, we report that N-H bearing carboxamides with acidities lower than that of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O(•)) preferentially form superoxide radical-anion (O2 (-•)) adducts, rather than deprotonate, when they are exposed to the glow discharge of a helium-plasma ionization source. For example, the spectra of N-alkylacetamides show peaks for superoxide radical-anion (O2 (-•)) adducts. Conversely, more acidic amides, such as N-alkyltrifluoroacetamides, preferentially undergo deprotonation under similar experimental conditions. Upon collisional activation, the O2 (-•) adducts of N-alkylacetamides either lose the neutral amide or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O(•)) to generate the superoxide radical-anion (m/z 32) or the deprotonated amide [m/z (M - H)(-)], respectively. For somewhat acidic carboxamides, the association between the two entities is weak. Thus, upon mildest collisional activation, the adduct dissociates to eject the superoxide anion. Superoxide-adduct formation results are useful for structure determination purposes because carboxamides devoid of a N-H functionality undergo neither deprotonation nor adduct formation under HePI conditions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26545766

  2. Competitive Deprotonation and Superoxide [O2 -•] Radical-Anion Adduct Formation Reactions of Carboxamides under Negative-Ion Atmospheric-Pressure Helium-Plasma Ionization (HePI) Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Isra; Pinto, Spencer; Weisbecker, Carl; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2016-03-01

    Carboxamides bearing an N-H functionality are known to undergo deprotonation under negative-ion-generating mass spectrometric conditions. Herein, we report that N-H bearing carboxamides with acidities lower than that of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O•) preferentially form superoxide radical-anion (O2 -•) adducts, rather than deprotonate, when they are exposed to the glow discharge of a helium-plasma ionization source. For example, the spectra of N-alkylacetamides show peaks for superoxide radical-anion (O2 -•) adducts. Conversely, more acidic amides, such as N-alkyltrifluoroacetamides, preferentially undergo deprotonation under similar experimental conditions. Upon collisional activation, the O2 -• adducts of N-alkylacetamides either lose the neutral amide or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O•) to generate the superoxide radical-anion ( m/z 32) or the deprotonated amide [ m/z (M - H)-], respectively. For somewhat acidic carboxamides, the association between the two entities is weak. Thus, upon mildest collisional activation, the adduct dissociates to eject the superoxide anion. Superoxide-adduct formation results are useful for structure determination purposes because carboxamides devoid of a N-H functionality undergo neither deprotonation nor adduct formation under HePI conditions.

  3. Repetitive nanosecond glow discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packan, Denis

    Nonequilibrium, weakly ionized plasmas are widely used in the industry, but they are restricted to the domain of continuous discharges at low gas pressure or with specialty gases because of stability and power budget constraints. In this study, repetitively pulsed discharges were investigated as a way to decrease the power budget of atmospheric air plasmas by several orders of magnitude compared to continuous discharges, for an electron density of 1012 cm-3. The principle of the pulsed scheme is to use nanosecond electrical pulses to ionize air diffusely and with high efficiency, and to match the pulse interval with the recombination time of the plasma in order to maintain an elevated average electron density. Maxwellian and non-Maxwellian models of the physical processes in the discharge were examined, and the discharge parameters were chosen to minimize the power. Using a 10 ns, 12 kV, 100 kHz repetitive pulse generator, it was found that a repetitive nanosecond glow discharge could be operated in stable manner in atmospheric pressure air at 2000 K at an electron density of about 10 12 cm-3. Two pulsed discharges, with repetition frequencies of 100 kHz and 30 kHz, are described in this work. The electrode gap is 1 cm and the pulsed voltage is about 5 kV/cm. Electrical and optical methods were developed to measure the electron density in the discharge. The electron density was measured from the electrical conductivity during both the pulse and recombination phases, from the absolute intensity of the N2 Second Positive system during the pulse phase, and from the NO-gamma system during the recombination phase. The average electron density was found to be 1.4 x 1012 cm -3 for the 100 kHz discharge, and 1.8 x 102 cm-3 for the 30 kHz discharge, with peak values of 2 x 1012 cm-3 and 1013 cm-3, respectively. The power budget for the 30 kHz discharge was measured, from the voltage and current during the pulse phase, to be about 10 W/cm3, which represents an improvement of

  4. Numerical simulations of superlattice patterns in dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fucheng; Wang, Xiaofei; He, Yafeng; Dong, Lifang

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the numerical investigation on superlattice patterns in atmospheric pressure glow discharges in dielectric barrier discharges by using a self-consistent 2D fluid model. It is found that the superlattice pattern is an interleaving of two filamentary sub-patterns with alternate spatial and temporal characteristics. The competition between the volume ionization and the memory effects of both surface charges and space charges is expected to the formation mechanism of this superlattice pattern.

  5. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed

  6. A new multiplex method for the diagnosis of peroxisomal disorders allowing simultaneous determination of plasma very-long-chain fatty acids, phytanic, pristanic, docosahexaenoic and bile acids by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, Michela; Rizzo, Cristiano; Boenzi, Sara; Cappa, Marco; Bertini, Enrico; Antonetti, Giacomo; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    Peroxisomal disorders (PDs) present with wide phenotypic variability. An appropriate diagnosis requires a complete analysis of peroxisomal metabolites. We developed a multiplex LC-MS/MS method, using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization allowing the simultaneous determination in plasma of very-long-chain fatty acids, phytanic, pristanic, docosahexaenoic acids and di- and tri-hydroxycolestanoic bile acids. Two hundred microliters of plasma extracted with acetonitrile and 200μl extracted with hexane after an acid hydrolysis were combined, evaporated, dissolved in 10μl of methanol and analyzed. The acquisition was in negative-ion mode using multiple reaction monitoring. The method was validated analytically and clinically. Linearity was 0.1-200μmol/l for docosanoic, cis-13-docosenoic, tetracosanoic, cis-15-tetracosenoic and phytanic acids; 0.01-10μmol/l for hexacosanoic acid; 0.02-20μmol/l for di-hydroxycolestanoic, tri-hydroxycolestanoic and pristanic acids; 0.3-300μmol/l for docosahexaenoic acid. Intra-day and inter-day CVs were below 3.88 and 3.98 respectively for all compounds. Samples from patients with known peroxisomal disorders were compared with controls and the method allowed to confirm the diagnosis in all subjects with a 100% sensitivity. The advantage of this multiplex method is to allow in a single chromatographic run the simultaneous determination of a large number of peroxisome biomarkers with a simple preparative phase without derivatization. PMID:27189059

  7. The Possible Role of Penning Ionization Processes in Planetary Atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Falcinelli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we suggest Penning ionization as an important route of formation for ionic species in upper planetary atmospheres. Our goal is to provide relevant tools to researchers working on kinetic models of atmospheric interest, in order to include Penning ionizations in their calculations as fast processes promoting reactions that cannot be neglected. Ions are extremely important for the transmission of radio and satellite signals, and they govern the chemistry of planetary ionospheres. Molecular ions have also been detected in comet tails. In this paper recent experimental results concerning production of simple ionic species of atmospheric interest are presented and discussed. Such results concern the formation of free ions in collisional ionization of H2O, H2S, and NH3 induced by highly excited species (Penning ionization as metastable noble gas atoms. The effect of Penning ionization still has not been considered in the modeling of terrestrial and extraterrestrial objects so far, even, though metastable helium is formed by radiative recombination of He+ ions with electrons. Because helium is the second most abundant element of the universe, Penning ionization of atomic or molecular species by He*(23S1 is plausibly an active route of ionization in relatively dense environments exposed to cosmic rays.

  8. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchinsky, V. A. [Keiser University, Fort Lauderdale Campus, FL, 33309, USA; Raitses, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-05-18

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322–6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement.

  9. Gas flow dependence of atmospheric pressure plasma needle discharge characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Muyang; Yang, Congying; Liu, Sanqiu; Chen, Xiaochang; Ni, Gengsong; Wang, Dezhen

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional coupled model of neutral gas flow and plasma dynamics is presented to explain the gas flow dependence of discharge characteristics in helium plasma needle at atmospherics pressure. The diffusional mixing layer between the helium jet core and the ambient air has a moderate effect on the streamer propagation. The obtained simulation results present that the streamer shows the ring-shaped emission profile at a moderate gas flow rate. The key chemical reactions which drive the streamer propagation are electron-impact ionization of helium neutral, nitrogen and oxygen molecules. At a moderate gas flow rate of 0.5 slm, a significant increase in propagation velocity of the streamer is observed due to appropriate quantity of impurities air diffuse into the helium. Besides, when the gas flow rate is below 0.35 slm, the radial density of ground-state atomic oxygen peaks along the axis of symmetry. However, when the gas flow rate is above 0.5 slm, a ring-shaped density distribution appears. The peak density is on the order of 1020 m-3 at 10 ns in our work.

  10. Microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography hyphenated to atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schappler, Julie; Guillarme, Davy; Rudaz, Serge; Veuthey, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    CZE is an appropriate technique for separating charged species, but lacks selectivity for neutral compounds. Alternative approaches such as microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) have been developed to broaden its range of applications. Hyphenation of MEEKC with MS is an attractive perspective since it can enhance sensitivity and selectivity. The on-line coupling of MEEKC with MS, however, is not straightforward due to the low compatibility of non-volatile surfactant additives (e.g. SDS) and the commonly used API source, namely ESI. In order to hyphenate MEEKC with MS detection, the atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source was investigated. Possibilities offered by the coupling of MEEKC with APPI-MS were highlighted for the complex separation of ionized and neutral compounds in both the positive and negative modes. MEEKC-APPI-MS performance, in terms of selectivity, efficiency and sensitivity was compared to CZE-ESI-MS and MEEKC-ESI-MS for the screening of doping substances (beta-blockers, central stimulants, diuretics, etc). Relevant selectivity and detectability, particularly for neutral, structurally related and isobaric compounds was demonstrated with the MEEKC-APPI-MS approach opening new avenues for CE-MS, in addition to the well-established CZE-ESI-MS technique. PMID:18161697

  11. Requirements for plasma synthesis of nanocrystals at atmospheric pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While well-defined high quality semiconductor nanocrystals have been synthesized successfully in low pressure nonthermal plasmas, moving the field of plasma nanoparticle synthesis to atmospheric pressures is important for lowering its cost and making the process attractive for some industrial applications. Here we present a heating and charging model for silicon nanoparticles during their synthesis in plasmas maintained over a wide range of pressures (10 − 105 Pa). We consider three collisionality regimes and determine the dominant contribution of each regime to heating and charging of nanoparticles under various plasma conditions. For plasmas maintained at atmospheric pressures we find that the ion current is mainly due to the collisional hydrodynamic contribution. Based on the model, we predict that the formation of nanocrystals at atmospheric pressure requires significantly higher plasma densities than those at low pressures. Strong nanoparticle cooling at atmospheric pressures necessitates high ion densities to reach temperatures required for crystallization of nanoparticles. Using experimentally determined plasma properties from the literature we estimate the nanoparticle temperature that can be achieved during synthesis at atmospheric pressures and predict that temperatures well above those required for crystallization can be achieved. Based on these results we suggest design principles for nanocrystal synthesis at atmospheric pressures. (paper)

  12. Surface corona-bar discharges for production of pre-ionizing UV light for pulsed high-pressure plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-atmospheric pressure, pulsed electric discharge excited lasers require pre-ionization to produce spatially uniform glows. Many such systems use corona bars to produce ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light as photo-ionization sources for this purpose. Corona bars are transient surface discharges, typically in a cylindrical geometry, that sustain high electron temperatures and so are efficient UV and VUV sources. In this paper, results from a numerical study of surface corona-bar discharges in a multi-atmosphere pressure Ne/Xe gas mixture are discussed. The discharge consists of a high-voltage electrode placed on the surface of a corona bar which is a dielectric tube surrounding a cylindrical metal electrode. After the initial breakdown an ionization front propagates along the circumference of the corona bar and produces a thin plasma sheet near the dielectric surface. The propagation speed of the ionization front ranges from 2 x 107 to 3.5 x 108 cm s-1, depending on the applied voltage and dielectric constant of the corona-bar insulator. As the discharge propagates around the circumference, the surface of the corona-bar is charged. The combined effects of surface curvature and charge deposition result in a non-monotonic variation of the electric field and electron temperature as the ionization front traverses the circumference. The UV fluxes collected on a surrounding circular surface correlate with the motion of the ionization front but with a time delay due to the relatively long lifetime of the precursor to the emitting species Ne2*.

  13. Ionization mechanism of the ambient pressure pyroelectric ion source (APPIS) and its applications to chemical nerve agent detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidholdt, Evan L; Beauchamp, J L

    2009-11-01

    We present studies of the ionization mechanism operative in the ambient pressure pyroelectric ionization source (APPIS), along with applications that include detection of simulants for chemical nerve agents. It is found that ionization by APPIS occurs in the gas-phase. As the crystal is thermally cycled over a narrow temperature range, electrical discharges near the surface of the crystal produce energetic species which, through reactions with atmospheric molecules, result in reactant ions such as protonated water clusters or clusters of hydroxide and water. Reactant ions can be observed directly in the mass spectrometer. These go on to react with trace neutrals via proton transfer reactions to produce the ions observed in mass spectra, which are usually singly protonated or deprotonated species. Further implicating gas-phase ionization, observed product distributions are highly dependent on the composition of ambient gases, especially the concentration of water vapor and oxygen surrounding the source. For example, basic species such as triethylamine are observed as singly protonated cations at a water partial pressure of 10 torr. At a water pressure of 4 torr, reactive oxygen species are formed and lead to observation of protonated amine oxides. The ability of the APPIS source to detect basic molecules with high proton affinities makes it highly suited for the detection of chemical nerve agents. We demonstrate this application using simulants corresponding to VX and GA (Tabun). With the present source configuration pyridine is detected readily at a concentration of 4 ppm, indicating ultimate sensitivity in the high ppb range. PMID:19682922

  14. Atmospheric pressure plasma for surface modification

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Rory A

    2012-01-01

    This Book's focus and intent is to impart an understanding of the practical application of atmospheric plasma for the advancement of a wide range of current and emerging technologies. The primary key feature of this book is the introduction of over thirteen years of practical experimental evidence of successful surface modifications by atmospheric plasma methods. It offers a handbook-based approach for leveraging and optimizing atmospheric plasma technologies which are currently in commercial use. It also offers a complete treatment of both basic plasma physics and industrial plasma process

  15. Perspectives on atmospheric-pressure plasmas for nanofabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-pressure, low-temperature plasmas are widely used for materials applications in industries ranging from electronics to medicine. To avoid the high costs associated with vacuum equipment, there has always been a strong motivation to operate plasmas at higher pressures, up to atmospheric. However, high-pressure operation of plasmas often leads to instabilities and gas heating, conditions that are unsuitable for materials applications. The recent development of microscale plasmas (i.e. microplasmas) has helped realize the sustainment of stable, non-thermal plasmas at atmospheric pressure and enable low-cost materials applications. There has also been an unexpected benefit of atmospheric-pressure operation: the potential to fabricate nanoscale materials which is not possible by more conventional, low-pressure plasmas. For example, in a high-pressure environment, nanoparticles can be nucleated in the gas phase from vapour (or solid metal) precursors. Alternatively, non-thermal, atmospheric-pressure plasmas can be coupled with liquids such as water or ethanol to nucleate and modify solution-phase nanoparticles. In this perspective paper, we review some of these recent efforts and provide an outlook for the rapidly emerging field of atmospheric-pressure plasmas for nanofabrication.

  16. Radiative ion-ion neutralization: a new gas-phase atmospheric pressure ion transduction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eric J; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H

    2012-06-01

    All atmospheric pressure ion detectors, including photo ionization detectors, flame ionization detectors, electron capture detectors, and ion mobility spectrometers, utilize Faraday plate designs in which ionic charge is collected and amplified. The sensitivity of these Faraday plate ion detectors are limited by thermal (Johnson) noise in the associated electronics. Thus approximately 10(6) ions per second are required for a minimal detection. This is not the case for ion detection under vacuum conditions where secondary electron multipliers (SEMs) can be used. SEMs produce a cascade of approximately 10(6) electrons per ion impinging on the conversion dynode. Similarly, photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) can generate approximately 10(6) electrons per photon. Unlike SEMs, however, PMTs are evacuated and sealed so that they are commonly used under atmospheric pressure conditions. This paper describes an atmospheric pressure ion detector based on coupling a PMT with light emitted from ion-ion neutralization reactions. The normal Faraday plate collector electrode was replaced with an electrode "needle" used to concentrate the anions as they were drawn to the tip of the needle by a strong focusing electric field. Light was emitted near the surface of the electrode when analyte ions were neutralized with cations produced from the anode. Although radiative-ion-ion recombination has been previously reported, this is the first time ions from separate ionization sources have been combined to produce light. The light from this radiative-ion-ion-neutralization (RIIN) was detected using a photon multiplier such that an ion mobility spectrum was obtained by monitoring the light emitted from mobility separated ions. An IMS spectrum of nitroglycerin (NG) was obtained utilizing RIIN for tranducing the mobility separated ions into an analytical signal. The implications of this novel ion transduction method are the potential for counting ions at atmospheric pressure and for obtaining ion

  17. Study of the energy response of high pressure ionization chamber for high energy gamma-ray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Zheng-Dong; XU Xun-Jiang; WANG Jian-Hua; LIU Shu-Dong; LI Jian-Ping

    2008-01-01

    The energy response calibration of the commonly used high pressure ionization chamber is very difficult to obtain when the gamma-ray energy is more than 3 MeV.In order to get the calibration of the higher part of the high pressure ionization chamber,we use the Fluka Monte Carlo program to perfclrm the energy response in both the spherical and the cylindrical high pressure ionization chamber which are full of argon gas.The results compared with prior study when the gamma-ray energy is less than 1.25 MeV.Our result of Monte Carlo calculation shows agreement with those obtained by measurement within the uncertainty of the respective methods.The calculation of this study is significant for the high pressure ionization chamber to measure the high energy gamma-ray.

  18. Non-Thermal Sanitation By Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC's Non-Thermal Sanitation by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma technology sanitizes fresh fruits and vegetables without the use of consumable chemicals and without...

  19. Non-Thermal Sanitation By Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a non-thermal technology based on atmospheric-pressure (AP) cold plasma to sanitize foods, food packaging materials, and other hardware...

  20. Cosmic ray induced ionization in the atmosphere estimated with CORSIKA code simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron production rate q produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in the atmosphere is modelled in this paper. New calculations carried out with Monte Carlo CORSIKA 6.52 code using FLUKA 2006 and QGSJET II hadronic interaction models are presented. The energy deposit of GCR proton induced air showers is simulated. On the basis of computational results the ionization yield function Y and the ion pair production q in the atmosphere are obtained. The impact of different shower components: electromagnetic, muon and hadronic is estimated. The simulations are carried out with realistic atmospheric model (US Standard Atmosphere) and following steep energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays. (authors)

  1. Quantitative millimetre wavelength spectrometry at pressures approaching atmospheric II. Determination of oxygen at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A millimetre wavelength (MMW) Fabry-Perot cavity spectrometer described in earlier work has been applied to the measurement of oxygen absorption at 60 GHz and atmospheric pressure in a gas matrix of nitrogen. The spectrometer has also been modified such that the MMW source is stabilised by a sub-harmonic microwave signal transmitted by an infrared carrier on a single mode telecommunications fibre optic. This is a step towards developing an instrument comprising minimal electronic components that can perform MMW spectrometry remotely. Oxygen determinations were achieved by monitoring the change in the quality factor (Q) of a resonant Fabry-Perot cavity due to the presence of an absorbing sample. The MMW absorption of the sample was determined by incrementing the frequency modulation (FM) deviation of the source frequency scanning the cavity resonance profile. The response curve of absorption signal versus fraction of oxygen in nitrogen was found to be linear throughout the working range of 1-100% O2 (v/v) in N2 with a slope of (1.407±0.007)x10-4 m-1 (% O2)-1. The detection limit (3x standard deviation of the background) was found to be ∼0.8% (v/v). The MMW technique employed is advantageous since, unlike common MMW techniques, there is no vacuum requirement. Application of this method, to the monitoring of oxygen in gas mixtures of practical importance, is proposed. Values of the oxygen spectral absorption coefficients of lines between 55 and 60 GHz were measured at reduced pressure and found to be within ±2% of previous literature values. A pressure correction coefficient for O2 absorption at 60 GHz in the 45-121 kPa range was obtained and found to be (1.354±0.014)x10-4 m-1 kPa-1

  2. Ionization chemistry in the H2O-dominant atmospheres of the icy moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shematovich, V. I.; Johnson, R. E.

    2007-08-01

    The main pathways of the ionization chemistry for pure H2O- and mixed H2O+O2+CO2+NH3+CH4 atmospheres which are representative for neutral and ionized atmospheres of the icy bodies in the Jovian and Saturnian systems are discussed. The gaseous envelopes of the icy moons of the giant planets are formed usually due to the surface radiolysis by the solar UV radiation and energetic magnetospheric plasma (Johnson, 1990). The standard astrochemical UMIST2005 (UDFA05) network is used to infer the main chemical pathways of ionization chemistry in the pure or with admixtures of other volatile molecules water vapor atmospheres. In case of the H2O- dominant atmosphere the parent H2O molecules are easily dissociated and ionized by the solar UVradiation and the energetic magnetospheric electrons. These impact processes result in the formation of the secondary neutral and ionized products - chemically active radicals O and OH, and H+, H2+, O+, OH+, and H2O+ ions. Secondary ions have admixture abundances in the H2O-dominant atmospheres, because they are efficiently transformed to H3O+ hydroxonium ions in the fast ion-molecular reactions. The major H3O+ hydroxonium ion does not chemically interact with other neutrals, and is destroyed in the dissociative recombination with thermal electrons mainly reproducing the chemically simple H, H2, O, and OH species. In case of the mixed H2O+O2-dominant atmosphere corresponding to the near-surface atmospheres of icy moons (Shematovich et al., 2005), the ionization chemistry results in the formation of the second major ion O2+ - because ion of molecular oxygen has the lower ionization potential comparing with other parent species -H2, H2O, CO2. The H+, O+, OH+, and H2O+ ions can be easily converted to O2+ ions through the ion-molecular reactions. In case of significant admixture of molecular hydrogen it is possible to transfer the O2+ ions to the O2H+ ions through the fast reaction with H2 and further to the H3O+ ions through the ion

  3. Trends in the Neutral and Ionized Upper Atmosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laštovička, Jan; Solomon, S.C.; Qian, L.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 168, 1-4 (2012), s. 113-145. ISSN 0038-6308 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/10/1792 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Global change * Long-term trends * Ionosphere * Upper atmosphere Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 5.519, year: 2012 http://www.springerlink.com/content/d4015w2q031q5048/fulltext.pdf

  4. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet

  5. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babij, Michał; Kowalski, Zbigniew W; Nitsch, Karol; Silberring, Jerzy; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-05-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet. PMID:24880391

  6. Application of atmospheric pressure plasma in polymer and composite adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hang

    An atmospheric pressure helium and oxygen plasma was used to investigate surface activation and bonding in polymer composites. This device was operated by passing 1.0-3.0 vol% of oxygen in helium through a pair of parallel plate metal electrodes powered by 13.56 or 27.12 MHz radio frequency power. The gases were partially ionized between the capacitors where plasma was generated. The reactive species in the plasma were carried downstream by the gas flow to treat the substrate surface. The temperature of the plasm gas reaching the surface of the substrate did not exceed 150 °C, which makes it suitable for polymer processing. The reactive species in the plasma downstream includes ~ 1016-1017 cm-3 atomic oxygen, ~ 1015 cm-3 ozone molecule, and ~ 10 16 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecule (O2 1Deltag). The substrates were treated at 2-5 mm distance from the exit of the plasma. Surface properties of the substrates were characterized using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Subsequently, the plasma treated samples were bonded adhesively or fabricated into composites. The increase in mechanical strength was correlated to changes in the material composition and structure after plasma treatment. The work presented hereafter establishes atmospheric pressure plasma as an effective method to activate and to clean the surfaces of polymers and composites for bonding. This application can be further expanded to the activation of carbon fibers for better fiber-resin interactions during the fabrication of composites. Treating electronic grade FR-4 and polyimide with the He/O2 plasma for a few seconds changed the substrate surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, which allowed complete wetting of the surface by epoxy in underfill applications. Characterization of the surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows formation of oxygenated functional groups, including hydroxyl, carbonyl, and

  7. A Spectacular Experiment Exhibiting Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Noxaïc, Armand

    2014-01-01

    The experiment described here is fairly easy to reproduce and dramatically shows the magnitude of ambient air pressure. Two circular plates of aluminum are applied one against the other. How do you make their separation very difficult? With only the help of an elastic band! You don't have to use a vacuum pump for this experiment.

  8. Ionization in Earth's atmosphere following the solar storm on January 20, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seripienlert, A.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Saiz, A.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Mangeard, P. S.; Tortermpun, U.

    2014-12-01

    To estimate possible effects of atmospheric ionization on clouds and Earth's climate as well as radiation exposure of air travelers and aircraft electronics due to space weather, relativistic solar ions are the only solar particles of concern because the less energetic particles do not penetrate to cloud/aircraft altitudes. Some solar storms produce relativistic ions that lead to showers of secondary particles in Earth's atmosphere and generate signals in ground-based detectors such as neutron monitors at a rate that can be observed above the background due to galactic cosmic rays, hence the term ground-level enhancements (GLEs). In this work we study the January 20, 2005 event, one of the most intense GLEs ever observed. From the bare counter to neutron monitor count rate ratio at South Pole, we estimate a spectral index in rigidity of 5.0. From the Spaceship Earth network, supplemented to comprise 13 polar neutron monitors, we model the time profile of relativistic solar ions impinging on Earth's atmosphere in the polar regions. We then perform Monte Carlo simulations using a realistic atmospheric model to determine ionization as a function of altitude and time in Earth's atmosphere. The results will allow us to investigate a possible connection between solar activity and Earth's climate as mediated by the cosmic ray flux, atmospheric ionization, and cloud formation. This work is partially supported by Thailand Research Fund and a Postdoctoral Fellowship from Mahidol University.

  9. Short- and Medium-Term Induced Ionization in the Earth Atmosphere by Galactic and Solar Cosmic Rays

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Mishev

    2013-01-01

    The galactic cosmic rays are the main source of ionization in the troposphere of the Earth. Solar energetic particles of MeV energies cause an excess of ionization in the atmosphere, specifically over polar caps. The ionization effect during the major ground level enhancement 69 on January 20, 2005 is studied at various time scales. The estimation of ion rate is based on a recent numerical model for cosmic-ray-induced ionization. The ionization effect in the Earth atmosphere is obtained on th...

  10. Detailed and simplified non-equilibrium helium ionization in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Leenaarts, Jorrit

    2014-01-01

    Helium ionization plays an important role in the energy balance of the upper chromosphere and transition region. Helium spectral lines are also often used as diagnostics of these regions. We carry out 1D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the solar atmosphere and find that the helium ionization is mostly set by photoionization and direct collisional ionization, counteracted by radiative recombination cascades. By introducing an additional recombination rate mimicking the recombination cascades, we construct a simplified 3 level helium model atom consisting of only the ground states. This model atom is suitable for modeling non-equilibrium helium ionization in 3D numerical models. We perform a brief investigation of the formation of the He I 10830 and He II 304 spectral lines. Both lines show non-equilibrium features that are not recovered with statistical equilibrium models, and caution should therefore be exercised when such models are used as a basis in the interpretation of observations.

  11. Modeling of the initiation and evolution of a laser-ionized column in the lower atmosphere - 314.5 nm wavelength resonant multiphoton ionization of naturally occurring argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzer, G. J.; Stockley, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    A 3+1 resonant multiphoton ionization process in naturally occurring argon is studied at 314.5 nm as a candidate for providing a long ionized channel through the atmosphere. Results are presented which indicate peak electron densities up to 10 exp 8/cu cm can be created using laser intensities on the order of 10 exp 8 W/sq cm.

  12. Diagnostics of plasma-biological surface interactions in low pressure and atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru

    2014-08-01

    Mechanisms of plasma-surface interaction are required to understand in order to control the reactions precisely. Recent progress in atmospheric pressure plasma provides to apply as a tool of sterilization of contaminated foodstuffs. To use the plasma with safety and optimization, the real time in situ detection of free radicals - in particular dangling bonds by using the electron-spin-resonance (ESR) technique has been developed because the free radical plays important roles for dominantly biological reactions. First, the kinetic analysis of free radicals on biological specimens such as fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum interacted with atomic oxygen generated plasma electric discharge. We have obtained information that the in situ real time ESR signal from the spores was observed and assignable to semiquinone radical with a g-value of around 2.004 and a line width of approximately 5G. The decay of the signal was correlated with a link to the inactivation of the fungal spore. Second, we have studied to detect chemical modification of edible meat after the irradiation. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF-MS) and ESR, signals give qualification results for chemical changes on edible liver meat. The in situ real-time measurements have proven to be a useful method to elucidate plasma-induced surface reactions on biological specimens.

  13. Mechanisms for negative reactant ion formation in an atmospheric pressure corona discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.

    2009-06-02

    In an effort to better understand the formation of negative reactant ions in air produced by an atmospheric pressure corona discharge source, the neutral vapors generated by the corona were introduced in varying amounts into the ionization region of an ion mobility spectrometer/mass spectrometer containing a 63Ni ionization source. With no discharge gas the predominant ions were O2- , however, upon the introduction of low levels of discharge gas the NO2- ion quickly became the dominant species. As the amount of discharge gas increased the appearance of CO3- was observed followed by the appearance of NO3-. At very high levels, NO3- species became effectively the only ion present and appeared as two peaks in the IMS spectrum, NO3- and the NO3-•HNO3 adduct, with separate mobilities. Since explosive compounds typically ionize in the presence of negative reactant ions, the ionization of an explosive, RDX, was examined in order to investigate the ionization properties with these three primary ions. It was found that RDX forms a strong adduct with both NO2- and NO3- with reduced mobility values of 1.49 and 1.44 cm2V-1s-1, respectively. No adduct was observed for RDX with CO3- although this adduct has been observed with a corona discharge mass spectrometer. It is believed that this adduct, although formed, does not have a sufficiently long lifetime (greater than 10 ms) to be observed in an ion mobility spectrometer.

  14. Temperature field simulation of gob influenced by atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王刚; 罗海珠; 梁运涛; 王继仁

    2015-01-01

    The current temperature field model of mine gob does not take the boundary conditions of the atmospheric pressure into account, while the actual atmospheric pressure is influenced by weather, so as to produce differences between ventilation negative pressure of the working face and the negative pressure of gas drainage in gob, thus interfering the calculated results of gob temperature field. According to the characteristics of the actual air flow and temperature change in gob, a two-dimensional temperature field model of the gob was built, and the relational model between the air pressure of intake and outlet of the gob and the atmospheric pressure was established, which was introduced into the boundary conditions of temperature field to conduct calculation. By means of analysis on the simulation example, and comparison with the traditional model, the results indicate that atmospheric pressure change had notable impact on the distribution of gob temperature field. The laboratory test system of gob temperature field was constructed, and the relative error between simulated and measured value was no greater than 9.6%, which verified the effectiveness of the proposed model. This work offers theoretical basis for accurate calculation of temperature and prediction of ignition source in mine gob, and has important implications on preventing spontaneous combustion of coal.

  15. Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.; Thomas, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV . An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chem...

  16. Ionization and dissociation of dense hydrogen at high pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-consistent fluid variational free energy model has been used to describe an interacting mixture of H2, H, H+, and e in the chemical equilibrium. this general model describes the phenomena of dissociation and ionization caused by pressure and temperature effects, as encountered in astrophysical situations and high-pressure experiments. The present model is thermodynamically unstable in the pressure-ionization regime and predicts the existence of a plasmas phase transition occurs between a critical point Tc=15.5 K, Pc=58.3 GPa, and ρc=0.3226 g/cm3. In the high-density phase, complete pressure ionization is reached suddenly. Theoretical results for the critical point of the hypothetical plasma phase transition in hydrogen have been compared with the calculations of the various models. (authors)

  17. Application of Relationship Between Groundwater Level and Atmospheric Pressure Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. J.; Lee, K.

    2013-12-01

    Change in atmospheric pressure affects ground water levels. Barometric efficiency, which is an indicator for different exposure to the atmospheric pressure of observation well and adjacent ground cover, can be used as an effective tool for estimating some groundwater properties. If the top of an observation well is sealed and contact with the atmosphere is blocked, there would be no pressure difference between the well and adjacent ground cover. As a result, the difference between barometric efficiency values of sealed and unsealed well of identical condition can indicates the effect of atmospheric pressure changes on the groundwater level. One month observation data of hydraulic head and atmospheric pressure at Wonju-si in Gangwon-do, Korea are used. Two different methods, Clark's method and graphical method, are adopted to estimate the barometric efficiency. Because the efficiency has implication on the properties of aquifer covering condition, mapping of this efficiency might be used for estimating groundwater vulnerability of contamination from surface-loaded sources.

  18. Prediction of atmospheric pressure glow discharge in dielectric-barrier system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoxi; He, Feng; Ouyang, Jiting

    2010-06-01

    A one-dimensional fluid model was used to investigate the breakdown mechanism and discharge mode in dielectric-barrier system. The results show that the dielectric barrier discharge mode depends strongly on the gas property (i.e., the electron multiplication). The atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier glow discharge could only be achieved in a gas (e.g., noble gas) in which the first Townsend ionization coefficient is sufficiently small and the electron multiplication does not rise up rapidly with the electric field, while could not be sustained in the gas (e.g., N2 and O2) in which the electron multiplication is sensitive to the field.

  19. Improved COsmic Ray Ionization Model for Atmosphere and Ionosphere (CORIMIA) with account of Monte Carlo Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The COsmic Ray Ionization Model for Ionosphere and Atmosphere (CORIMIA) is physical space weather model with fully operational implementations. CORIMIA produce values of electron production for different altitudes (30 – 120 km), solar activities (low, moderate and high), geomagnetic and atmospheric cut offs. CORIMIA can determine the energy intervals contributions for all groups of CR nuclei. The effects of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar cosmic rays (SCR) and anomalous cosmic rays (ACR) in the middle atmosphere are computed. The structure of the proposed model allows its decomposition in several submodels. Each submodel is further decomposed in submodels with account to the different characteristic ionization losses energy intervals. The ionization losses function is calculated taking into account the energetic particles charge decrease interval. The energy intervals investigation takes place according to the goal of the user of the model with respect to accuracy and interval types. CORIMIA program is applicable for the ionosphere and atmosphere above 30 km. Below this altitude numerical model such as CORSIKA are applied. At present the composite CORIMIA – CORSIKA programs are used.

  20. Direct Analysis of Micro Area on Tooth Surface by Surface Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry%表面解吸常压化学电离质谱法直接分析牙齿微区表面

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王姜; 李倩; 顾海巍; 郭晓暾; 杨水平; 王志豪

    2015-01-01

    A novel analytical platform based on a nanoliter needle for sampling and surface desorption atmos-pheric pressure chemistry ionization mass spectrometry ( SDAPCI-MS ) for analysis was developed for the di-rect, fast and micro-area analysis of different parts of a human tooth, including cavity, cavity edge, tooth cusp and tooth sulcus. The results showed that the mass spectra from the four sampling spots on the same tooth were different, and that SDAPCI-MS detected lactic acid, pyruvic acid, phenylacetic acid and propanoic acid were confirmed using tandem mass spectrometry( MS/MS) . Principal component analysis( PCA) of the mass spec-tral data successfully differentiated the different sampling spots, levels of tooth decay and levels of gum disease. Therefore, our nano-SDAPCI-MS approach provides a promising way for micro-area analysis with fast, minimal pretreatment sampling, enabling rapid, simple and reliable surface MS investigation.%采用纳升取样表面解吸常压化学电离质谱法( nano-SDAPCI-MS)结合主成分分析( PCA),建立了一种采用具有微米级针尖的金属取样针直接对龋齿不同部位取样并进行快速质谱分析的方法。数据分析结果表明,同一颗龋齿不同部位的质谱指纹谱图之间存在差异;在不需要样品预处理的前提下通过串联质谱快速测定了龋齿中的乳酸、丙酮酸、苯乙酸和丙酸等成分。采用PCA方法可较好地将龋齿病灶位置与邻近正常组织进行区分,也可对不同牙病及健康牙齿进行区分。本方法可方便地对牙齿进行直接微区分析,为鉴别牙齿疾病及观测治疗效果提供了一种快速、简单的方法,为生物体中微细部位的快速取样及直接质谱分析提供了一种可能的解决方案。

  1. The evolution of atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma jets: jet current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we report insights into the dynamics of atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma jets (APLTPJs). The plasma jet current was measured by a Pearson current monitor for different operating conditions. These jet current measurements confirmed a proposed photo-ionization model based on streamer theory. Our results are supported by intensified charged-couple device camera observations. It was found that a secondary discharge ignition, arising from the positive high-voltage electrode, causes the inhibition of plasma bullet propagation. Our observations also showed the existence of an ionization channel between the APLTPJ reactor and the plasma bullet. In addition, the maximum electron density along the plasma jet was estimated using Ohm's law, and an empirical relationship was derived between the plasma bullet velocity and the plasma bullet area. (paper)

  2. Atmospheric pressure photoionization as a powerful tool for large-scale lipidomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Mathieu; Imbert, Laurent; Libong, Danielle; Chaminade, Pierre; Brunelle, Alain; Touboul, David; Laprévote, Olivier

    2012-05-01

    Lipidomic studies often use liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS) for separation, identification, and quantification. However, due to the wide structural diversity of lipids, the most apolar part of the lipidome is often detected with low sensitivity in ESI. Atmospheric pressure (APPI) can be an alternative ionization source since normal-phase solvents are known to enhance photoionization of these classes. In this paper, we intend to show the efficiency of APPI to identify different lipid classes, with a special interest on sphingolipids. In-source APPI fragmentation appears to be an added value for the structural analysis of lipids. It provides a detailed characterization of both the polar head and the non polar moiety of most lipid classes, and it makes possible the detection of all lipids in both polarities, which is not always possible with ESI. PMID:22359092

  3. Study of collisional and radiatif processes for atmospheric pressure argon plasma in stationary state and quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The positive column of a wall-stabilized arc burning in argon at atmospheric pressure is studied. In the first part, experimental values of electron and atom number densities are presented. They have been obtained in stationary state and during the arc decay by means of spectroscopy and two wavelengths laser interferometry measurements. The theoretical study has been developed with a collisional-radiative model coupled with the electron energy balance. Electron-ion recombination and ionization coefficients have been calculated solving rate equations. Then the model has been adapted for studying a stationary plasma and the calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental values. The theoretical study of the plasma decay has allowed us to determine the influence of recombination, ionization, diffusion and convection in the evolution of densities and temperatures. Temporal variations of the difference between electron temperature and gas temperature have been explained by analysing the electron energy balance

  4. Characteristics of RF Cold Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Liang; MENG Yuedong; SHU Xingsheng

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of a stable discharge at atmospheric pressure is investigated.The plasma source consisted of two closely spaced parallel-plated perforated electrodes,driven by a radio frequency power to generate a uniform cold plasma in Helium at atmospheric pressure.Both alpha and gamma modes were clearly observed.The hollow cathode effects were found in the discharge.The influence of the dielectric barrier on the discharge was also investigated by utilizing a surface-anodized aluminium electrode as the anode.

  5. A simplified nitrogen laser setup operated at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruangsri, Artit; Wungmool, Piyachat; Tesana, Siripong; Suwanatus, Suchat; Hormwantha, Tongchai; Chiangga, Surasak; Luengviriya, Chaiya

    2015-07-01

    A transversely excited atmospheric pressure nitrogen laser (TEA N2 Laser) is a molecular pulse gas laser, operated at atmospheric pressure, which generates an electromagnetic wave in ultraviolet wavelength of 337.1 nm. It can operate without an optical resonator. We present a TEA N2 laser setup excited by an electronic discharge circuit known as the Blumlein circuit. Our setup is composed of simple components commonly found in everyday life. The setup can be utilized in classroom to demonstrate the dependence of the laser intensity on the flow rate of nitrogen gas.

  6. Characterization of Dust-Plasma Interactions In Non-Thermal Plasmas Under Low Pressure and the Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilik, Narula

    difficulties in maintaining an APGD is ensuring its uniformity over large discharge volume. By examining past atmospheric pressure plasma reactor designs and looking into the details of the atmospheric pressure gas breakdown mechanism, three design features are proposed to ensure the APGD uniformity. These include the use of a dielectric barrier and the RF driving frequency, as well as a pre-ionization technique achieved by having a non-uniform gap spacing in a capacitively-coupled concentric cylinder reactor. The resulting APGD reactor operates stably in the abnormal glow regime using either helium or argon as the carrier gas. Diethylzinc (DEZ) and oxygen precursors are injected into the APGD to form zinc oxide nanocrystals. The physical and optical properties of these nanocrystals are characterized, and the system parameters that impact the nanoparticle size and deposition rate are identified.

  7. Modeling Pressure-Ionization of Hydrogen in the Context of Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Saumon, D S; Wagner, D J; Xie, X

    1999-01-01

    The recent development of techniques for laser-driven shock compression of hydrogen has opened the door to the experimental determination of its behavior under conditions characteristic of stellar and planetary interiors. The new data probe the equation of state (EOS) of dense hydrogen in the complex regime of pressure ionization. The structure and evolution of dense astrophysical bodies depend on whether the pressure ionization of hydrogen occurs continuously or through a ``plasma phase transition'' (PPT) between a molecular state and a plasma state. For the first time, the new experiments constrain predictions for the PPT. We show here that the EOS model developed by Saumon and Chabrier can successfully account for the data, and we propose an experiment that should provide a definitive test of the predicted PPT of hydrogen. The usefulness of the chemical picture for computing astrophysical EOS and in modeling pressure ionization is discussed.

  8. Inner-shell ionization by relativistic radiation pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute inner-shell ionization cross sections have been measured in the energy range 15 0 <= 65 [MeV] for elements with atomic numbers between 18 and 92 to study the interaction of relativistic electrons with bound electrons. Up to now no measurements were available in that energy range. In experiments concerning K-shells the measurement accuracy was about 4%. The deviations between the experimental data and the theoretical cross sections calculated on the basis of a relativistic quantum mechanical inonization theory are less then 10%. All measured data are covered within a variational width of 8% by a scaling law derived from a simple model. Using the measured X-ray spectra intensity ratios of characteristic L-lines could be determined. The method of X-ray fluorescence analysis with high energetic electrons in the MeV range has been used for the first time to analyze trace amounts of elements. (KBE)

  9. Radiation exposure of airline crew members to the atmospheric ionizing radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of radiation exposures in the ionizing radiation environment of the atmosphere is currently in progress for the Italian civil aviation flight personnel. After a description of the considered data sources/ the philosophy of the study is presented/ and an overview is given of the data processing with regard to flight routes/ the computational techniques for radiation dose evaluation along the flight paths and for the exposure matrix building/ along with an indication of the results that the study should provide.

  10. Direct Measurement of Atmospheric Ammonia from an Airborne Miniature Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (miniCIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casados, K.; Schill, S.; Freeman, S.; Zoerb, M.; Bertram, T. H.; Lefer, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia is emitted into the atmosphere from a variety of sources such as trees, ocean, diary fields, biomass burning, and fuel emissions. Previous studies have investigated the environmental impacts of atmospheric ammonia which can include chemical reactivity, nucleation of fine particulate matter 2.5 (PM 2.5 ), and implications for human health, but its chemical nature and relatively short lifetime make direct measurement of atmospheric ammonia difficult. During the 2015 NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) an airborne miniature Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (miniCIMS) was deployed on the NASA DC-8 flying laboratory in the Southern California region. The spatial and temporal variability of measured atmospheric ammonia concentrations will be discussed.

  11. Atmospheric pressure and suicide attempts in Helsinki, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen, Laura; Ruuhela, Reija; Ostamo, Aini; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Suominen, Kirsi; Partonen, Timo

    2012-11-01

    The influence of weather on mood and mental health is commonly debated. Furthermore, studies concerning weather and suicidal behavior have given inconsistent results. Our aim was to see if daily weather changes associate with the number of suicide attempts in Finland. All suicide attempts treated in the hospitals in Helsinki, Finland, during two separate periods, 8 years apart, were included. Altogether, 3,945 suicide attempts were compared with daily weather parameters and analyzed with a Poisson regression. We found that daily atmospheric pressure correlated statistically significantly with the number of suicide attempts, and for men the correlation was negative. Taking into account the seasonal normal value during the period 1971-2000, daily temperature, global solar radiation and precipitation did not associate with the number of suicide attempts on a statistically significant level in our study. We concluded that daily atmospheric pressure may have an impact on suicidal behavior, especially on suicide attempts of men by violent methods ( P suicide attempts. Men seem to be more vulnerable to attempt suicide under low atmospheric pressure and women under high atmospheric pressure. We show only statistical correlations, which leaves the exact mechanisms of interaction between weather and suicidal behavior open. However, suicidal behavior should be assessed from the point of view of weather in addition to psychiatric and social aspects.

  12. Atmospheric pressure photoionization using tunable VUV synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliani, A., E-mail: alexandre.giuliani@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); INRA, U1008 CEPIA, Rue de la Geraudiere, F-44316 Nantes (France); Giorgetta, J.-L.; Ricaud, J.-P. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jamme, F. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); INRA, U1008 CEPIA, Rue de la Geraudiere, F-44316 Nantes (France); Rouam, V.; Wien, F. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laprevote, O. [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse, ICSN-CNRS, 1 Avenue de la Terrasse, 91190 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Chimie-Toxicologie Analytique et cellulaire, IFR 71, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, Universite Paris Descartes, 4 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 75006 Paris (France); Refregiers, M. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coupling of an atmospheric pressure photoionization source with a vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) beamline. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The set up allows photoionization up to 20 eV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared to classical atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), our set up offers spectral purity and tunability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Allows photoionization mass spectrometry on fragile and hard to vaporize molecules. - Abstract: We report here the first coupling of an atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source with a synchrotron radiation beamline in the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV). A commercial APPI source of a QStar Pulsar i from AB Sciex was modified to receive photons from the DISCO beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation facility. Photons are delivered at atmospheric pressure in the 4-20 eV range. The advantages of this new set up, termed SR-APPI, over classical APPI are spectral purity and continuous tunability. The technique may also be used to perform tunable photoionization mass spectrometry on fragile compounds difficult to vaporize by classical methods.

  13. Einstein's Tea Leaves and Pressure Systems in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Amit; Marshall, John

    2010-01-01

    Tea leaves gather in the center of the cup when the tea is stirred. In 1926 Einstein explained the phenomenon in terms of a secondary, rim-to-center circulation caused by the fluid rubbing against the bottom of the cup. This explanation can be connected to air movement in atmospheric pressure systems to explore, for example, why low-pressure…

  14. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of glassy carbon for adhesion improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Mortensen, Henrik Junge; Stenum, Bjarne; Goutianos, Stergios; Mitra, Susanta; Ghanbari-Siahkali, Afshin; Kingshott, Peter; Sørensen, Bent F.; Bindslev, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Glassy carbon plates were treated with an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). He gas, gas mixtures of He and reactive gases such as O2, CO2 and NH3, Ar gas and Ar/NH3 gas mixture were used as treatment gases. The oxygen and nitrogen contents on the surface as well as defect...

  15. Spacecraft Sterilization Using Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Moogega; Vaze, Nachiket; Anderson, Shawn; Fridman, Gregory; Vasilets, Victor N.; Gutsol, Alexander; Tsapin, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    As a solution to chemically and thermally destructive sterilization methods currently used for spacecraft, non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas are used to treat surfaces inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans. Evidence of significant morphological changes and reduction in viability due to plasma exposure will be presented, including a 4-log reduction of B. subtilis after 2 minutes of dielectric barrier discharge treatment.

  16. Electrolytic synthesis of ammonia in molten salts under atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tsuyoshi; Nishikiori, Tokujiro; Nohira, Toshiyuki; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-15

    Ammonia was successfully synthesized by using a new electrochemical reaction with high current efficiency at atmospheric pressure and at lower temperatures than the Haber-Bosch process. In this method, nitride ion (N3-), which is produced by the reduction from nitrogen gas at the cathode, is anodically oxidized and reacts with hydrogen to produce ammonia at the anode. PMID:12517136

  17. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svarnas, P.; Matrali, S. H.; Gazeli, K.; Aleiferis, Sp.; Clément, F.; Antimisiaris, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  18. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  19. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svarnas, P.; Aleiferis, Sp. [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Matrali, S. H. [Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Gazeli, K. [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); IPREM-LCABIE, Plasmas et Applications, UPPA, 64000 Pau (France); Clement, F. [IPREM-LCABIE, Plasmas et Applications, UPPA, 64000 Pau (France); Antimisiaris, S. G. [Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (ICES)-FORTH, Rion 26504 (Greece)

    2012-12-24

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  20. Short- and Medium-Term Induced Ionization in the Earth Atmosphere by Galactic and Solar Cosmic Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mishev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The galactic cosmic rays are the main source of ionization in the troposphere of the Earth. Solar energetic particles of MeV energies cause an excess of ionization in the atmosphere, specifically over polar caps. The ionization effect during the major ground level enhancement 69 on January 20, 2005 is studied at various time scales. The estimation of ion rate is based on a recent numerical model for cosmic-ray-induced ionization. The ionization effect in the Earth atmosphere is obtained on the basis of solar proton energy spectra, reconstructed from GOES 11 measurements and subsequent full Monte Carlo simulation of cosmic-ray-induced atmospheric cascade. The evolution of atmospheric cascade is performed with CORSIKA 6.990 code using FLUKA 2011 and QGSJET II hadron interaction models. The atmospheric ion rate is explicitly obtained for various latitudes, namely, 40°N, 60°N and 80°N. The time evolution of obtained ion rates is presented. The short- and medium-term ionization effect is compared with the average effect due to galactic cosmic rays. It is demonstrated that ionization effect is significant only in subpolar and polar atmosphere during the major ground level enhancement of January 20, 2005. It is negative in troposphere at midlatitude, because of the accompanying Forbush effect.

  1. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power θ necessary for sustaining an electron - ion pair, electron - neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer ven, and gas temperature Tg. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency ω/2π = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature Tg are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L ≅ 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W - the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number

  2. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.

    2008-03-01

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power θ necessary for sustaining an electron—ion pair, electron—neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer ven, and gas temperature Tg. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency ω/2π = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature Tg are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L ≈ 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W—the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number.

  3. Quality characteristics of the radish grown under reduced atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Lanfang H.; Bisbee, Patricia A.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Birmele, Michele N.; Prior, Ronald L.; Perchonok, Michele; Dixon, Mike; Yorio, Neil C.; Stutte, Gary W.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    This study addresses whether reduced atmospheric pressure (hypobaria) affects the quality traits of radish grown under such environments. Radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Bomb Hybrid II) plants were grown hydroponically in specially designed hypobaric plant growth chambers at three atmospheric pressures; 33, 66, and 96 kPa (control). Oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures were maintained constant at 21 and 0.12 kPa, respectively. Plants were harvested at 21 days after planting, with aerial shoots and swollen hypocotyls (edible portion of the radish referred to as the “root” hereafter) separated immediately upon removal from the chambers. Samples were subsequently evaluated for their sensory characteristics (color, taste, overall appearance, and texture), taste-determining factors (glucosinolate and soluble carbohydrate content and myrosinase activity), proximate nutrients (protein, dietary fiber, and carbohydrate) and potential health benefit attributes (antioxidant capacity). In roots of control plants, concentrations of glucosinolate, total soluble sugar, and nitrate, as well as myrosinase activity and total antioxidant capacity (measured as ORACFL), were 2.9, 20, 5.1, 9.4, and 1.9 times greater than the amount in leaves, respectively. There was no significant difference in total antioxidant capacity, sensory characteristics, carbohydrate composition, or proximate nutrient content among the three pressure treatments. However, glucosinolate content in the root and nitrate concentration in the leaf declined as the atmospheric pressure decreased, suggesting perturbation to some nitrogen-related metabolism.

  4. Ir/thz Double Resonance Signatures at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Dane J.; Tanner, Elizabeth A.; Everitt, Henry O.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; Neese, Christopher F.; Holt, Jennifer; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2010-06-01

    IR/THz double resonance (DR) spectroscopy, historically used to investigate molecular collision dynamics and THz molecular lasers at low pressures (remote sensing at atmospheric pressure. Molecular specificity is obtained through the rare coincidence(s) between molecule-specific ro-vibrational energy levels and CO2 laser lines. The resulting molecule-specific, DR-induced, THz spectroscopic signatures strongly depend on the type of ro-vibrational transition involved (P, Q, or R), the type of vibrational level excited (stretching or bending), and the molecular mass. To illustrate these sensitivities, calculated DR spectra of prototypical molecules such as methyl fluoride, methyl chloride, and methyl cyanide will be discussed. Although atmospheric pressure broadening obfuscates pure rotational spectra, we show how it can enhance the DR signature in two ways: by relaxing the pump coincidence requirement and by adding the DR signatures of multiple nearby transitions. We will present estimates of this enhancement, including cases where the coincidences that produce the strongest DR signatures at atmospheric pressure do not exist at low pressures.

  5. Radiation Pressure Confinement -- III. The origin of the broad ionization distribution in AGN outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Jonathan; Laor, Ari; Baskin, Alexei; Holczer, Tomer

    2014-01-01

    The winds of ionized gas driven by Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) can be studied through absorption features in their X-ray spectra. A recurring feature of these outflows is their broad ionization distribution, including essentially all ionization levels (e.g., Fe^0+ to Fe^25+). The absorption measure distribution (AMD) is defined as the distribution of column density with ionization parameter |dN / dlog xi|. The AMD extends over a wide range of 0.1 < xi < 10^4 (cgs), and is remarkably similar in different objects. Power-law fits to the observed AMDs (|dN / dlog xi| ~ N_1 xi^a) yield N_1 = 3x10^21 cm^-2 +- 0.4 dex and a = 0 -- 0.4. What is the source of this broad ionization distribution, and what sets the small range of observed $N_1$ and $a$ values? A common interpretation is a multiphase outflow, with a wide range of gas densities in a uniform pressure medium. However, it has already been shown that the incident radiation pressure leads to a gas pressure gradient in the photoionized gas, and therefore ...

  6. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure discharges for surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout the last decades, plasma technology has been established in a series of surface treatment applications, e.g. for semiconductor processing or optical coatings. The majority of plasma assisted technologies is based on low pressure processes. In recent years, however, non-thermal atmospheric pressure discharges have attracted considerable interest because of their simplified technical devices for industrial applications as compared to low pressure processes which require vacuum equipment. Hence, batch processing can be avoided, thus facilitating the implementation of plasma process steps into production lines. Investment costs are cut down significantly. The use of atmospheric pressure plasmas for technical applications dates back to the ozone production with dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) by Siemens in 1857. Lately, the application of atmospheric pressure plasmas for surface treatment has been reported, e.g. for the treatment of foils to improve printability, for surface cleaning and protective coatings. The DBD is known as a strongly inhomogeneous, filamentary discharge. A non filamentary, homogeneous DBD was observed in He, N2, other gases, and mixtures. An example of this discharge type and its application for the deposition of thin films by plasma polymerization is discussed in more detail. The standard planar electrode geometry of the DBD is characterized by a narrow inter-electrode gap in the mm-Region. Hence, surface treatment has been restricted to thin, flat substrates. Attempts to overcome these limitations involve micro discharge arrays and jet geometries, which are evoked by an enhanced gas flow, partly in combination with the electric field. Jets are created out of several plasma types, among them corona discharge, DBD, microwave discharge and RF discharge. With these plasma sources, substrate geometries displaying 3-dimensional features can be treated, too. Critical parameters for the comparison of atmospheric pressure surface

  7. A Micromachined Pressure Sensor with Integrated Resonator Operating at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Ren

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel resonant pressure sensor with an improved micromechanical double-ended tuning fork resonator packaged in dry air at atmospheric pressure is presented. The resonator is electrostatically driven and capacitively detected, and the sensor is designed to realize a low cost resonant pressure sensor with medium accuracy. Various damping mechanisms in a resonator that is vibrating at atmospheric pressure are analyzed in detail, and a formula is developed to predict the overall quality factor. A trade-off has been reached between the quality factor, stress sensitivity and drive capability of the resonator. Furthermore, differential sense elements and the method of electromechanical amplitude modulation are used for capacitive detection to obtain a large signal-to-noise ratio. The prototype sensor chip is successfully fabricated using a micromachining process based on a commercially available silicon-on-insulator wafer and is hermetically encapsulated in a custom 16-pin Kovar package. Preliminary measurements show that the fundamental frequency of the resonant pressure sensor is approximately 34.55 kHz with a pressure sensitivity of 20.77 Hz/kPa. Over the full scale pressure range of 100–400 kPa and the whole temperature range of −20–60 °C, high quality factors from 1,146 to 1,772 are obtained. The characterization of the prototype sensor reveals the feasibility of a resonant pressure sensor packaged at atmospheric pressure.

  8. Ionization and scintillation response of high-pressure xenon gas to alpha particles

    CERN Document Server

    Álvarez, V; Cárcel, S; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Díaz, J; Egorov, M; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Freitas, E D C; Gehman, V M; Gil, A; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Díaz, D; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Irastorza, I G; Jinete, M A; Labarga, L; Laing, A; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martín-Albo, J; Miller, T; Moiseenko, A; Monrabal, F; Monteiro, C M B; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Muñoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Palma, R; Pérez, J; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Segui, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Simón, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Tomás, A; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Vázquez, D; Veloso, J F C A; Webb, R; White, J T; Yahlali, N

    2012-01-01

    High-pressure xenon gas is an attractive detection medium for a variety of applications in fundamental and applied physics. In this paper we study the transport properties of ionization electrons, and the mechanism of electron-ion recombination, in xenon gas at 10 bar pressure. For this purpose, we use a source of alpha particles in the NEXT-DEMO time projection chamber, the large scale prototype of the NEXT-100 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment, in three different drift electric field configurations. Our electron drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion results are similar to expectations based on available electron scattering cross sections on pure xenon, favoring low-diffusion models. In addition, two types of measurements addressing the connection between the ionization and scintillation yields were performed. On the one hand we observe, for the first time in xenon gas, large event-by-event correlated fluctuations between the ionization and scintillation signals, similarly to what has already bee...

  9. Atmospheric pressure loading parameters from very long baseline interferometry observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmillan, D. S.; Gipson, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric mass loading produces a primarily vertical displacement of the Earth's crust. This displacement is correlated with surface pressure and is large enough to be detected by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements. Using the measured surface pressure at VLBI stations, we have estimated the atmospheric loading term for each station location directly from VLBI data acquired from 1979 to 1992. Our estimates of the vertical sensitivity to change in pressure range from 0 to -0.6 mm/mbar depending on the station. These estimates agree with inverted barometer model calculations (Manabe et al., 1991; vanDam and Herring, 1994) of the vertical displacement sensitivity computed by convolving actual pressure distributions with loading Green's functions. The pressure sensitivity tends to be smaller for stations near the coast, which is consistent with the inverted barometer hypothesis. Applying this estimated pressure loading correction in standard VLBI geodetic analysis improves the repeatability of estimated lengths of 25 out of 37 baselines that were measured at least 50 times. In a root-sum-square (rss) sense, the improvement generally increases with baseline length at a rate of about 0.3 to 0.6 ppb depending on whether the baseline stations are close to the coast. For the 5998-km baseline from Westford, Massachusetts, to Wettzell, Germany, the rss improvement is about 3.6 mm out of 11.0 mm. The average rss reduction of the vertical scatter for inland stations ranges from 2.7 to 5.4 mm.

  10. Scintillation light, ionization yield and scintillation decay times in high pressure xenon and xenon methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pushkin, K. N.; Akimov, D. Y.; Burenkov, A. A.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Lebedenko, V. N.; Kuznetsov, I. S.; Stekhanov, V. N.; Tezuka, C.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2007-01-01

    Scintillation light, ionization yield and scintillation decay times have been measured in xenon and in its mixture with a 0.05% concentration of methane as a function of the reduced electric field (E/N)-the ratio of the electric field strength to the number density of gas-at a pressure of 21 atm. Th

  11. Hydrogen discharges operating at atmospheric pressure in a semiconductor gas discharge system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aktas, K; Acar, S; Salamov, B G [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-08-15

    Analyses of physical processes which initiate electrical breakdown and spatial stabilization of current and control it with a photosensitive cathode in a semiconductor gas discharge system (SGDS) are carried out in a wide pressure range up to atmospheric pressure p, interelectrode distance d and diameter D of the electrode areas of the semiconductor cathode. The study compares the breakdown and stability curves of the gas discharge in the planar SGDS where the discharge gap is filled with hydrogen and air in two cases. The impact of the ionizing component of the discharge plasma on the control of the stable operation of the planar SGDS is also investigated at atmospheric pressure. The loss of stability is primarily due to modification of the semiconductor-cathode properties on the interaction with low-energy hydrogen ions and the formation of a space charge of positive ions in the discharge gap which changes the discharge from Townsend to glow type. The experimental results show that the discharge current in H{sub 2} is more stable than in air. The breakdown voltages are measured for H{sub 2} and air with parallel-plane electrodes, for pressures between 28 and 760 Torr. The effective secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient is then determined from the breakdown voltage results and compared with the experimental results. The influence of the SEE coefficient is stated in terms of the differences between the experimental breakdown law.

  12. Hydrogen discharges operating at atmospheric pressure in a semiconductor gas discharge system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, K.; Acar, S.; Salamov, B. G.

    2011-08-01

    Analyses of physical processes which initiate electrical breakdown and spatial stabilization of current and control it with a photosensitive cathode in a semiconductor gas discharge system (SGDS) are carried out in a wide pressure range up to atmospheric pressure p, interelectrode distance d and diameter D of the electrode areas of the semiconductor cathode. The study compares the breakdown and stability curves of the gas discharge in the planar SGDS where the discharge gap is filled with hydrogen and air in two cases. The impact of the ionizing component of the discharge plasma on the control of the stable operation of the planar SGDS is also investigated at atmospheric pressure. The loss of stability is primarily due to modification of the semiconductor-cathode properties on the interaction with low-energy hydrogen ions and the formation of a space charge of positive ions in the discharge gap which changes the discharge from Townsend to glow type. The experimental results show that the discharge current in H2 is more stable than in air. The breakdown voltages are measured for H2 and air with parallel-plane electrodes, for pressures between 28 and 760 Torr. The effective secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient is then determined from the breakdown voltage results and compared with the experimental results. The influence of the SEE coefficient is stated in terms of the differences between the experimental breakdown law.

  13. Exposure to the atmospheric ionizing radiation environment: a study on Italian civilian aviation flight personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the effects of high-LET, low-dose and low-dose-rate ionizing radiation and associated risk analysis is underway. This study involves analyzing the atmospheric ionizing radiation exposure (including high-energy neutrons) and associated effects for members of civilian aviation flight personnel, in an attempt to better understand low-dose long-term radiation effects on human subjects. The study population includes all Italian civilian airline flight personnel, both cockpit and cabin crew members, whose work history records and actual flights (route, aircraft type, and date for each individual flight for each person where possible) are available. The dose calculations are performed along specific flight legs, taking into account the actual flight profiles for all different routes and the variations with time of solar and geomagnetic parameters. Dose values for each flight are applied to the flight history of study participants in order to estimate the individual annual and lifetime occupational radiation dose. An update of the study of the physical atmospheric ionizing radiation exposure is given here, in terms of environmental modeling, flight routes, radiation dose evaluation along different flight paths, and exposure matrix construction. The exposure analysis is still in progress, and the first results are expected soon

  14. Influence of Ionization Degrees on the Evolutions of Charged Particles in Atmospheric Plasma at Low Altitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A zero-dimensional model which includes 56 species of reactants and 427 reactions is used to study the behavior of charged particles in atmospheric plasmas with different ionization degrees at low altitude (near 0 km). The constant coefficient nonlinear equations are solved by using the Quasi-steady-state approximation method. The electron lifetimes are obtained for afterglow plasma with different initial values, and the temporal evolutions of the main charged species are presented, which are dominant in reaction processes. The results show that the electron number density decays quickly. The lifetimes of electrons are shortened by about two orders with increasing ionization degree. Electrons then attach to neutral particles and produce negative ions. When the initial electron densities are in the range of 1010 ∼ 1014 cm−3, the negative ions have sufficiently high densities and long lifetimes for air purification, disinfection and sterilization. Electrons, O2−, O4−, CO4− and CO3− are the dominant negative species when the initial electron density ne0 ≤ 1013 cm−3, and only electrons and CO3− are left when ne0 ≥ 1015 cm−3 · N+2, N+4 and O+2 are dominant in the positive charges for any ionization degree. Other positive species, such as O+4, N+3, NO+, NO+2, Ar+2 and H3O+·H2O, are dominant only for a certain ionization degree and in a certain period. (low temperature plasma)

  15. Propagation of atmospheric pressure fronts in long vacuum tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experimental work was undertaken during the development of a system using fast acting valves to protect the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) vacuum chamber at CERN against damage from the implosion of thin wall vacuum chambers. A 30 m cylindrical tube with a diameter of 130 mm and similar to that used on the ISR, was evacuated to 10-2 torr. Following the sudden entry of atmospheric pressure at one end the pressure versus time diagram was observed a several points along the tube. These diagrams show a characteristic 'staircase' function which permits the determination of the propagation velocity. There is an initial weak pressure front of a few torr, propagated at 950 m s-1, which presents little mechanical danger, even to delicate components such as ionisation gauges. After a formation time of 0.1 s, one or more large amplitude (several tens of torr) and potentially dangerous pressure fronts are propagated with a velocity of 770 m s-1

  16. Reduced atmospheric pressure in Radish: Alteration of NCER and transpiration at decreased oxygen partial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Stasiak, Michael; Wheeler, Raymond; Dixon, Mike

    Fundamental to the future of space exploration is the development of advanced life support systems capable of maintaining crews for significant periods without re-supply from Earth. Significant research is focused on the development of bioregenerative life support systems to be used in conjunction with the current physico-chemical methods. These bioregenerative life support systems harness natural ecosystem processes and employ plant photosynthesis and transpiration to produce food, oxygen and regenerate water while consuming carbon dioxide. The forthcoming exploration of the Moon and Mars has prompted interest into the effects of hypobaria on plant development. Reduced atmospheric pressures will lessen the pressure gradient between the structure and the local environment thereby decreasing gas leakage and possibly the structural mass of the plant growth facility. In order to establish the optimal specifications for reduced pressure plant growth structures it is essential to determine the atmospheric pressure limits required for conventional plant development and growth. Due to its physiological importance, oxygen will compose a significant portion of these minimal environments. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that reduced atmospheric pressure and decreased oxygen partial pressures had no effect on radish productivity. Radishes (Raphanus sativa L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) were grown from seed in the University of Guelph's Hypobaric Plant Growth Chambers for a period of 21 days. Treatments included total pressures of 10, 33, 66 and 96 kPa and oxygen partial pressures of 2, 7, 14 and 20 kPa. Experiments demonstrated that reduced partial pressures of oxygen had a greater effect on radish growth than hypobaria. Results showed a reduction in net carbon exchange rate and transpiration with decreasing oxygen partial pressures leading to diminished productivity. Keywords: hypobaric, radish, oxygen partial pressure, variable pressure chamber

  17. Optimizing a remote sensing instrument to measure atmospheric surface pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, G. E.; Gatley, C.; Flower, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric surface pressure can be remotely sensed from a satellite by an active instrument which measures return echoes from the ocean at frequencies near the 60 GHz oxygen absorption band. The instrument is optimized by selecting its frequencies of operation, transmitter powers and antenna size through a new procedure baesd on numerical simulation which maximizes the retrieval accuracy. The predicted standard deviation error in the retrieved surface pressure is 1 mb. In addition the measurements can be used to retrieve water vapor, cloud liquid water and sea state, which is related to wind speed.

  18. The main properties of microwave argon plasma at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma torch sustained by surface wave at atmospheric pressure is theoretically studied by means of 1D model. A steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge is numerically solved together with Maxwell's equations for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave. The axial dependences of the electrons, excited atoms, atomic and molecular ions densities as well as the electron temperature, the mean power per electron and the effective electron-neutral collision frequency are determined. A strong dependence of the plasma properties on the discharge conditions and the gas temperature is obtained.

  19. The main properties of microwave argon plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, E.; Pencheva, M.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma torch sustained by surface wave at atmospheric pressure is theoretically studied by means of 1D model. A steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge is numerically solved together with Maxwell's equations for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave. The axial dependences of the electrons, excited atoms, atomic and molecular ions densities as well as the electron temperature, the mean power per electron and the effective electron-neutral collision frequency are determined. A strong dependence of the plasma properties on the discharge conditions and the gas temperature is obtained.

  20. The main properties of microwave argon plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benova, E; Pencheva, M, E-mail: benova_phys@deo.uni-sofia.b [Department for Language Teaching and International Students, University of Sofia, 27 Kosta Loulchev Street, BG-1111 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-01-01

    Plasma torch sustained by surface wave at atmospheric pressure is theoretically studied by means of 1D model. A steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge is numerically solved together with Maxwell's equations for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave. The axial dependences of the electrons, excited atoms, atomic and molecular ions densities as well as the electron temperature, the mean power per electron and the effective electron-neutral collision frequency are determined. A strong dependence of the plasma properties on the discharge conditions and the gas temperature is obtained.

  1. Thermally induced atmospheric pressure gas discharges using pyroelectric crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a heated pyroelectric crystal, an atmospheric pressure gas discharge was generated through the input of heat. When put through a change in temperature, the polarization of a pyroelectric can change significantly, creating a substantial electric potential at its surface. When configured with a grounded sharp counter electrode, a large inhomogeneous electric field forms in the interstitial gas to initiate a corona-like discharge. Under constant heating conditions, gaseous ions drifting to the pyroelectric accumulate and screen the electric field, extinguishing the discharge. By thermally cycling the pyroelectric, negative and positive discharges are generated during heating and cooling, respectively, with peak currents on the order of 80 nA. Time-integrated visualization confirmed the generation of both a corona-like discharge and a surface discharge on the pyroelectric. Parametric studies identified that thermal cycling conditions significantly influence discharge formation for this new atmospheric pressure discharge approach. (paper)

  2. Atmospheric-pressure plasma sources for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APPs) have attracted great interest and have been widely applied in biomedical applications, as due to their non-thermal and reactive properties, they interact with living tissues, cells and bacteria. Various types of plasma sources generated at atmospheric pressure have been developed to achieve better performance in specific applications. This article presents an overview of the general characteristics of APPs and a brief summary of their biomedical applications, and reviews a wide range of these sources developed for biomedical applications. The plasma sources are classified according to their power sources and cover a wide frequency spectrum from dc to microwaves. The configurations and characteristics of plasma sources are outlined and their biomedical applications are presented. (invited review)

  3. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kangil; Sik Yang, Sang, E-mail: jsjlee@ajou.ac.kr, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jong-Soo, E-mail: jsjlee@ajou.ac.kr, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-06

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  4. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells

  5. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kangil; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho; Sik Yang, Sang; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  6. Bacteria Inactivation Using DBD Plasma Jet in Atmospheric Pressure Argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coaxial dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet was designed, which can be operated in atmospheric pressure argon under an intermediate frequency sinusoidal resonant power supply, and an atmospheric pressure glow-like discharge was achieved. Two kinds of typical bacteria, i.e., the Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coil (E. coil), were employed to study the bacterial inactivation mechanism by means of the non-thermal plasma. The killing log value (KLV) of S. aureus reached up to 5.38 with a treatment time of 90 s and that of E. coil up to 5.36 with 60 s, respectively. According to the argon emission spectra of the plasma jet and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the two bacteria before and after the plasma treatment, it is concluded that the reactive species in the argon plasma played a major role in the bacterial inactivation, while the heat, electric field and UV photons had little effect. (plasma technology)

  7. The first experiments on dielectric barrier discharge under atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain uniform and stable discharge plasma in atmospheric pressure, dielectric barrier discharge experiments were carried out. Main purpose is to examine the applicability of dielectric barrier discharge to production processes of semi-conductors. LSIs and flat display panels. In the experiments, at first, quite stable and uniform discharge was obtained at atmospheric pressure. Effects of applied voltage and frequency on plasma uniformity were studied. Improvement of discharge uniformity by introducing gas flow of helium or nitrogen between the discharge gap was observed. Finally, surface cleaning effect of the present plasma was confirmed by observing contact angle of liquid droplet. At least for cleaning process, possibility of application as process plasma was suggested

  8. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet for liquid spray treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitić, S.; Philipps, J.; Hofmann, D.

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets have been intensively studied in recent years due to growing interest in their use for biomedical applications and surface treatments. Either surfaces can be treated by a plasma jet afterglow for cleaning or activation or a material can be deposited by a reactive gas component activated by plasma. Effects of plasma on liquid have been reported several times where the electron spin trapping method was used for radical detection. Here we propose another method of liquid treatment using the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. In the device presented here, liquid was sprayed in droplets from an inner electrode directly into a plasma jet where it was treated and sprayed out by gas flow. Optical end electrical measurements were done for diagnostics of the plasma while electron paramagnetic resonance measurements were used for detection of radicals (\\text{OH},\\text{OOH},\\text{CH} ) produced by plasma treatment of liquids.

  9. Simulation of low temperature atmospheric pressure corona discharge in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekasov, Vladimir; Kirsanov, Gennady; Eliseev, Stepan; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Sisoev, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to construct a numerical model of corona discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. The calculation was based on the two-dimensional hybrid model. Two different plasma-chemical models were considered. Models were built for RF corona and negative DC corona discharge. The system of equations is solved by the finite element method in the COMSOL Multiphysics. Main parameters of the discharge (the density of charged and excited particles, the electron temperature) and their dependence on the input parameters of the model (geometry, electrode voltage, power) were calculated. The calculations showed that the shape of the electron distribution near the electrode depends on the discharge power. The neutral gas heating data obtained will allow predicting the temperature of the gases at the designing of atmospheric pressure helium plasma sources.

  10. Resonance ionization spectroscopy measurement of the vapor pressure of several molecular species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) has found increasing application to various problems involving detection of low levels of atomic, and more recently molecular, species. This work demonstrates the usefulness of RIS in measuring vapor pressure curves of molecular species at very low pressures. Specifically, the vapor pressures versus temperature relationship for rubidium iodide (RbI) and potassium iodide (KI) was measured by applying RIS to atomic Rb and K, using a two-laser system. A pulsed molecular nitrogen laser first dissociated the RbI to produce ground-state Rb atoms in the experimental cell. A flashlamp-pumped dye laser then ionized the Rb in a process wherein two photons of the same wavelength are absorbed, the first exciting Rb via an allowed transition to an upper state (52S/sub 1/2/ → 62/sub 1/2 or 3/2/) lying in energy slightly more than half the distance to the ionization limit, and the second photon ionizing the excited Rb. In the case of KI, an excimer-laser-pumped dye laser was used in a similar way. An applied dc electric field swept the photoelectrons to a proportional counter for subsequent amplification and detection. The photoelectron signal was then related back to RbI and KI concentrations

  11. Laser ablation of zirconium in gas atmospheres at low pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed nitrogen laser induced ablation of solid zirconium targets was monitored using laser induced fluorescence. Starting from 'new' surfaces, the density evolution under the influence of different gas atmospheres (oxygen, helium, hydrogen and nitrogen) with pressures up to 10-3 mbar has been studied. It was observed that even small amounts of gas lead to a large increase in the velocity and the density of the ablated atomic cloud. (author)

  12. Electrical, Optical and acoustic diagnostics of atmospheric pressure gas discharges

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, Niall

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents original diagnostic investigations of atmospheric pressure gaseous discharges, operating in owing helium and helium with low concentrations (0.1 - 1 %) of gas admixtures, together with novel biomedical surface functionalisations. The initial body of this work focuses on comprehensive electrical and optical diagnostics of the operation of an industrial scale dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), maintained in a 10 l/min w of both helium and helium with 1% admixed ...

  13. Temperature profiles in filamentary dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Jidenko, N; Bourgeois, E; Borra, J-P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The physico-chemical properties of atmospheric pressure filamentary Dielectric Barrier Discharge (f-DBD) depend on its electrical characteristics and thermal profile. In this paper, a method for separating thermal and electrical effects is developed. Therefore, thermal profiles of f-DBD are studied for well defined electrical characteristics of filaments: all filaments are quasi identical with a controlled spatio-temporal density. The temperatures of gas, dielectric surface and pl...

  14. BIOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS OF ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE DIELECTRIC BARRIER DISCHARGES

    OpenAIRE

    Dodet, Bénédicte; Odic, Emmanuel; Salamitou, Sylvie; Goldman, Alice; Goldman, Max

    2006-01-01

    A reduction of more than 4 orders of magnitude of survivors was obtained by exposing a Bacillus Stearothermophilus spores - contaminated surface to an atmospheric pressure DBD post-discharge for 20 minutes. Decontamination mechanisms are investigated assuming that (i) inactivation is obtained when the bacteria DNA is fragmented, (ii) the protein coats are the main protection of the cell core DNA in the case of bacteria spores. The degradation of DNA (plasmid) and protein (RNAse A) samples sub...

  15. Atmospheric pressure plasmas for aerosols processes in materials and environment

    OpenAIRE

    Borra, J.P.; Jidenko, N; Bourgeois, E

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The paper highlights applications of some atmospheric pressure plasmas (dc-corona, streamer and spark and ac-Dielectric Barrier Discharges) to aerosol processes for Materials and Environment (filtration, diagnostics). The production of vapor i.e. condensable gaseous species, leads to nano-sized particles by physical and chemical routes of nucleation in these AP plasmas: (i) when dc streamer and spark filamentary discharges as well as ac filamenta...

  16. Plasma deposition of thiophene derivatives under atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    DAMS, Roel; VANGENEUGDEN, Dirk; Vanderzande, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    Plasma deposition of conjugated polymer films under atmospheric pressure is described. Three thiophene derivatives (thiophene, 3-methylthiophene, and 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) are used as monomers. The plasma depositions with the various precursors are compared using analytical techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and resistance measurements. Good results are obtained with pulsed plasma depositions of...

  17. Assessment of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment for Implant Osseointegration

    OpenAIRE

    Danna, Natalie R.; Beutel, Bryan G.; Nick Tovar; Lukasz Witek; Charles Marin; Bonfante, Estevam A.; Rodrigo Granato; Marcelo Suzuki; Coelho, Paulo G

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the osseointegrative effects of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) surface treatment for implants in a canine model. Control surfaces were untreated textured titanium (Ti) and calcium phosphate (CaP). Experimental surfaces were their 80-second air-based APP-treated counterparts. Physicochemical characterization was performed to assess topography, surface energy, and chemical composition. One implant from each control and experimental group (four in total) was placed in one ...

  18. Thin film deposition on powder surfaces using atmospheric pressure discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of SiOx containing films on NaCl and KBr particles in dielectric barrier discharge under atmospheric pressure was investigated. As precursor hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in argon-oxygen gas mixtures were used. The deposited layers were studied by means of light microscopy, SEM and XPS investigations. The particles could be completely covered by SiOx. With increasing oxygen content in the coating the carbon content decreases

  19. High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

    1996-02-01

    The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

  20. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastuta, Andrei Vasile; Topala, Ionut; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Bd. Carol No. 11, 700506, Iasi (Romania); Grigoras, Constantin, E-mail: andrei.nastuta@uaic.ro [Physiopathology Department, Grigore T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115, Iasi (Romania)

    2011-03-16

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  1. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  2. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile Nastuta, Andrei; Topala, Ionut; Grigoras, Constantin; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe

    2011-03-01

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  3. Fluid model of a single striated filament in an RF plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigeneger, F.; Loffhagen, D.

    2016-06-01

    The filaments occurring in an RF argon atmospheric-pressure plasma jet are investigated by means of numerical modelling. The special setup of the jet leads to the establishment of filaments in very regular modes under certain conditions. Such a single filament generated in the active volume between the powered and grounded electrode is described by a time-dependent, spatially two-dimensional fluid model. This self-consistent model includes those mechanisms which can lead to constriction and stratification such as the heat balance equation and the dependence of electron collision rate coefficients on the ionization degree. A curved filament with a contracted radial profile of particle densities and very pronounced striations along its trace has been obtained by the model calculation for a typical discharge parameter condition of the plasma jet. The resulting calculated electron density and mean energy in the filament as well as the period length of the striations agree qualitatively with recent experimental observations. The analysis of the ionization budget makes clear that the constriction and stratification is mainly caused by the different nonlinear dependences of ionization and recombination rates on the electron density.

  4. Virtual Frisch-grid ionization chambers filled with high-pressure Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Austin, Robert; Bolozdynya, Alexander; Richards, John D.

    2004-10-01

    New approaches to the design of high-pressure Xe (HPXe) ionization chambers are described. HPXe ionization chambers represent a well-known technique for detecting gamma rays in the energy range between 50 keV and 3 MeV. Since the HPXe detector is an electron-only carrier device, its commonly accepted design includes a Frisch-grid-a metal mesh employed for the electrostatic shielding from the immobile positive ions. The grid is a key element of the device"s design which provides good energy resolution of the detector, typically 2-3% FWHM at 662 keV. However, the grid makes the design more complex and less rugged, especially for field applications. Recently, we developed several designs of HPXe ionization chambers without shielding grids. The results obtained from the testing of these devices are presented here.

  5. Highly physical penumbra solar radiation pressure modeling with atmospheric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Robert; Flury, Jakob; Bandikova, Tamara; Schilling, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    We present a new method for highly physical solar radiation pressure (SRP) modeling in Earth's penumbra. The fundamental geometry and approach mirrors past work, where the solar radiation field is modeled using a number of light rays, rather than treating the Sun as a single point source. However, we aim to clarify this approach, simplify its implementation, and model previously overlooked factors. The complex geometries involved in modeling penumbra solar radiation fields are described in a more intuitive and complete way to simplify implementation. Atmospheric effects are tabulated to significantly reduce computational cost. We present new, more efficient and accurate approaches to modeling atmospheric effects which allow us to consider the high spatial and temporal variability in lower atmospheric conditions. Modeled penumbra SRP accelerations for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites are compared to the sub-nm/s2 precision GRACE accelerometer data. Comparisons to accelerometer data and a traditional penumbra SRP model illustrate the improved accuracy which our methods provide. Sensitivity analyses illustrate the significance of various atmospheric parameters and modeled effects on penumbra SRP. While this model is more complex than a traditional penumbra SRP model, we demonstrate its utility and propose that a highly physical model which considers atmospheric effects should be the basis for any simplified approach to penumbra SRP modeling.

  6. Desorption electro-flow focusing ionization of explosives and narcotics for ambient pressure mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Thomas P; Brewer, Tim M; Gillen, Greg

    2013-10-01

    Desorption electro-flow focusing ionization (DEFFI), a desorption-based ambient ion source, was developed, characterized, and evaluated as a possible source for field deployable ambient pressure mass spectrometry (APMS). DEFFI, based on an electro-flow focusing system, provides a unique configuration for the generation of highly charged energetic droplets for sample analysis and ionization. A concentrically flowing carrier gas focuses the liquid emanating from a capillary through a small orifice, generating a steady fluid jet. An electric field is applied across this jet formation region, producing high velocity charged droplets that impinge on an analyte laden surface. This configuration separates the jet charging region from the external environment, eliminating detrimental effects from droplet space charge or target surface charging. The sample desorption and ionization processes operate similar to desorption electrospray ionization (DESI). DEFFI demonstrated strong signal intensities and improved signal-to-noise ratios in both positive and negative mode mass spectrometry for narcotics, i.e., cocaine, and explosives, i.e., cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), respectively. A characterization of DEFFI ionization mechanisms identified operation regimes of both electrospray and corona discharge based analyte ionization, as well as limitations in overall signal. In addition, the DEFFI response was directly compared to DESI-MS under similar operating conditions. This comparison established a wider and more stable optimal operating range, while requiring an order of magnitude lower applied gas pressure and applied potential for DEFFI than DESI. These reductions are due to the physical mode of jet formation and geometric configuration differences between DEFFI and DESI, pointing to a potential benefit of DEFFI-MS for field implementation. PMID:23923127

  7. Analytical model of atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive Penning discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric and near-atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive discharges have wide applications. An analytic equilibrium solution is developed based on a homogeneous, current-driven discharge model that includes sheath and electron multiplication effects and contains two electron populations. A simplified chemistry is used with four unknown densities: hot electrons, warm electrons, positive ions and metastables. The dominant electron-ion pair production is Penning ionization, and the dominant ion losses are to the walls. The equilibrium particle balances are used to determine a single ionization balance equation for the warm electron temperature, which is solved, both approximately within the α- and γ-modes, and exactly by conventional root-finding techniques. All other discharge parameters are found, the extinction and α-γ transitions are determined, and a similarity law is given, in which the equilibrium for a short gap at high pressure can be rescaled to a longer gap at lower pressure. Within the α-mode, we find the scaling of the discharge parameters with current density, frequency, gas density and gap width. The analytic results are compared to hybrid and particle-in-cell (PIC) results for He/0.1%N2, and to hybrid results for He/0.1%H2O. For nitrogen, a full reaction set is used for the hybrid calculations and a simplified reaction set for the PIC simulations. For the chemically complex water trace gas, a set of 209 reactions among 43 species is used. The analytic results are found to be in reasonably good agreement with the more elaborate hybrid and PIC calculations.

  8. Application of diffuse discharges of atmospheric pressure formed by runaway electrons for modification of copper and stainless steel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasenko, V. F., E-mail: VFT@loi.hcei.tsc.ru; Shulepov, M. A.; Erofeev, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of studies devoted to the influence of a runaway electron pre-ionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) formed in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure on the surface of copper and stainless steel are presented. Nanosecond high-voltage pulses were used to obtain REP DD in different gases at high pressures in a chamber with a flat anode and a cathode possessing a small radius of curvature. This mode of discharge was implemented owing to the generation of runaway electrons and X-rays. The conditions under which the surface of copper and stainless steel was cleaned from carbon and oxidized are described.

  9. Low pressure electrospray ionization system and process for effective transmission of ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Keqi; Page, Jason S.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-03-02

    A system and method are disclosed that provide up to complete transmission of ions between coupled stages with low effective ion losses. A novel "interfaceless" electrospray ionization system is further described that operates the electrospray at a reduced pressure such that standard electrospray sample solutions can be directly sprayed into an electrodynamic ion funnel which provides ion focusing and transmission of ions into a mass analyzer.

  10. High pressure xenon (HPXe) ionization chamber for γ-ray spectrometry at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High pressure xenon ionization chambers with Frisch grid are promising devices for γ ray spectrometry at room temperature and above because of their good performances (particularly their energy resolution). In this work, the characteristics and typical performances of these detectors are presented. Some improvements of electronics and signal processing are also investigated in the aim of making these chambers even more versatile and performing. (authors)

  11. Influence of Ionization Degrees on the Evolutions of Charged Particles in Atmospheric Plasma at Low Altitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Xuexia; DENG Zechao; JIA Pengying; LIANG Weihua; LI Xia

    2012-01-01

    A zero-dimensional model which includes 56 species of reactants and 427 reactions is used to study the behavior of charged particles in atmospheric plasmas with different ionization degrees at low altitude (near 0 km). The constant coefficient nonlinear equations are solved by using the Quasi-steady-state approximation method. The electron lifetimes are obtained for afterglow plasma with different initial values, and the temporal evolutions of the main charged species are presented, which are dominant in reaction processes. The results show that the electron number density decays quickly. The lifetimes of electrons are shortened by about two orders with increasing ionization degree. Electrons then attach to neutral particles and produce negative ions. When the initial electron densities are in the range of 10l~ ~ 1014 cm-3, the negative ions have sufficiently high densities and long lifetimes for air purification, disinfection and sterilization. Electrons, O(2,-), O(4,-) CO(4,-) and CO(3,-) are the dominant negative species when the initial electron density neo ≤ 1013 cm^(-3), and only electrons and CO3 are left when neo 〉 1015 cm^(-3). N(+,2), N+ and O(+,2) are dominant in the positive charges for any ionization degree. Other positive species, such as 0(+,4), N(+,3), NO(+,2), NO(+,2), Ar(+,2) and H3O+. H2O, are dominant only for a certain ionization degree and in a certain period.

  12. Aliphatic and aromatic amines in atmospheric aerosol particles: comparison of three ionization techniques in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and method development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Jiménez, José; Hautala, Sanna; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Laitinen, Totti; Hartonen, Kari; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2012-08-15

    A complete methodology was developed for the determination of ten aliphatic and nine aromatic amines in atmospheric aerosol particles. Before the liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometric separation and determination, the derivatization reaction of the analytes using dansyl chloride was accelerated by ultrasounds. From three different ionization techniques studied electrospray ionization was superior in terms of sensitivity, linearity, repeatability and reproducibility over atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and photoionization for the target analytes. The method developed was validated for the gas phase, 30 nm and total suspended atmospheric aerosol particles. The method quantification limits ranged between 1.8 and 71.7 pg. The accuracy and the potential matrix effects were evaluated using a standard addition methodology. Recoveries from 92.1% to 109.1%, the repeatability from 0.6% to 8.4% and the reproducibility from 2.3% to 9.8% were obtained. The reliability of the methodology was proved by the statistical evaluation. Finally, the developed methodology was applied to the determination of the target analytes in eight size separated ultrafine particulate (Dp=30±4 nm) samples and in eight total suspended particulate samples collected at the SMEAR II station. The mean concentrations for aliphatic amines were between 0.01 and 42.67 ng m(-3) and for aromatic amines between 0.02 and 1.70 ng m(-3). Thirteen amines were quantified for the first time in 30 nm aerosol particles. PMID:22841047

  13. Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization with polydimethylsiloxane as extraction phase and sample plate material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaikkinen, A. [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, P.O. Box 56, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Kotiaho, T. [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, P.O. Box 56, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Kostiainen, R. [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, P.O. Box 56, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Kauppila, T.J., E-mail: tiina.kauppila@helsinki.fi [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, P.O. Box 56, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-12-03

    Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI) is an ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry (MS) that can be used to ionize polar as well as neutral and completely non-polar analytes. In this study polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was used as a solid phase extraction sorbent for DAPPI-MS analysis. Pieces of PDMS polymer were soaked in an aqueous sample, where the analytes were sorbed from the sample solution to PDMS. After this, the extracted analytes were desorbed directly from the polymer by the hot DAPPI spray solvent plume, without an elution step. Swelling and extracting the PDMS with a cleaning solvent prior to extraction diminished the high background in the DAPPI mass spectrum caused by PDMS oligomers. Acetone, hexane, pentane, toluene, diisopropylamine and triethylamine were tested for this purpose. The amines were most efficient in reducing the PDMS background, but they also suppressed the signals of low proton affinity analytes. Toluene was chosen as the optimum cleaning solvent, since it reduced the PDMS background efficiently and gave intensive signals of most of the studied analytes. The effects of DAPPI spray solvents toluene, acetone and anisole on the PDMS background and the ionization of analytes were also compared and extraction conditions were optimized. Anisole gave a low background for native PDMS, but toluene ionized the widest range of analytes. Analysis of verapamil, testosterone and anthracene from purified, spiked wastewater was performed to demonstrate that the method is suited for in-situ analysis of water streams. In addition, urine spiked with several analytes was analyzed by the PDMS method and compared to the conventional DAPPI procedure, where sample droplets are applied on PMMA surface. With the PDMS method the background ion signals caused by the urine matrix were lower, the S/N ratios of analytes were 2-10 times higher, and testosterone, anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene that were not detected from PMMA in urine

  14. Estimation of the cosmic ray ionization in the Earth's atmosphere during GLE71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Dorman

    2016-07-01

    DYASTIMA is an application, based on Geant4, which simulates the cascades of particles that are generated due to the interactions of cosmic ray particles with the atmospheres of the planets. The first version of DYASTIMA has been successfully applied to the Earth's atmosphere, providing results that are in accordance with the publications of other models. Since then, important improvements and extensions have been made to this application, including a graphical user interface environment that allows the more effective management of the configuration parameters. Also, the actual modeling of the atmosphere has been changed allowing the definition of more complex cases and at the same time providing, in a more efficient way (with respect to the program's previous version) enhanced outputs. In this work, we combine the new version of DYASTIMA with the NMBANGLE PPOLA model, that estimates the spectrum of SEPs during relativistic proton events using ground level neutron monitor data from the worldwide network. Such a joint model has as a primary scope the simulation of a SEP event and of its secondary products at different altitudes in the Earth's atmosphere, providing at the same time an estimation of the respective ionization rates and of their spatial and temporal dependence. We apply this joint model to GLE 71, on 17 May 2012, and we discuss the results.

  15. Surface analysis of polymers treated by remote atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Eleazar; Hicks, Robert F

    2010-03-01

    The surfaces of high-density polyethylene (HDPE), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and polyethersulfone (PES) were treated with a low-temperature, atmospheric pressure oxygen and helium plasma. The polymers were exposed to the downstream afterglow of the plasma, which contained primarily oxygen atoms and metastable oxygen molecules ((1)Delta(g) O(2)), and no ions or electrons. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of HDPE revealed that 20% of the carbon atoms were converted into oxidized functional groups, with about half of these being carboxylic acids. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy of all three polymers was obtained in order to determine the types of functional groups formed by atmospheric plasma exposure. It was found that the polymers were rapidly oxidized with addition of alcohols, ketones, and carboxylic acids to the carbon backbone. Chain scission occurred on HDPE and PMMA, while on PES the aromatic groups underwent ring-opening and insertion of carboxylic acid. PMID:19950952

  16. Decomposition of benzene in a corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Kohki [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan); Centre of Environmental Science and Disaster Mitigation for Advanced Research, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan); Matsuzawa, Toshiharu; Itoh, Hidenori [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan)

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the decomposition characteristics of benzene in a positive DC corona discharge between multineedle and plane electrodes with a background gas of nitrogen-oxygen mixture at atmospheric pressure. We obtained C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, HCOOH, CO and CO{sub 2} as benzene fragments and by-products, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and HCN as minor intermediate products. Benzene was primarily converted into CO{sub 2} via CO at low oxygen concentrations (0.2%) and via CO and HCOOH at the atmospheric oxygen concentration (20%). Further, 57% and 24% of carbon atoms were deposited on the plane electrode and the discharge chamber at oxygen concentrations of 0.2% and 20%, respectively.

  17. Characterizations of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Erdinc

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets (APLTPJs) driven by short pulses have recently received great attention because of their potential in biomedical and environmental applications. This potential is due to their user-friendly features, such as low temperature, low risk of arcing, operation at atmospheric pressure, easy handheld operation, and low concentration of ozone generation. Recent experimental observations indicate that an ionization wave exists and propagates along the plasma jet. The plasma jet created by this ionization wave is not a continuous medium but rather consists of a bullet-like-structure known as "Plasma Bullet". More interestingly, these plasma bullets actually have a donut-shaped makeup. The nature of the plasma bullet is especially interesting because it propagates in the ambient air at supersonic velocities without any externally applied electric field. In this dissertation, experimental insights are reported regarding the physical and chemical characteristics of the APLTPJs. The dynamics of the plasma bullet are investigated by means of a high-speed ICCD camera. A plasma bullet propagation model based on the streamer theory is confirmed with adequate explanations. It is also found that a secondary discharge, ignited by the charge accumulation on the dielectric electrode surfaces at the end of the applied voltage, interrupts the plasma bullet propagation due to an opposing current along the ionization channel. The reason for this interesting phenomenon is explained in detail. The plasma bullet comes to an end when the helium mole fraction along the ionization channel, or applied voltage, or both, are less than some critical values. The presence of an inert gas channel in the surrounding air, such as helium or argon, has a critical role in plasma bullet formation and propagation. For this reason, a fluid dynamics study is employed by a commercially available simulation software, COMSOL, based on finite element method. Spatio

  18. Excitation dynamics of micro-structured atmospheric pressure plasma arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Boettner, H; Waskoenig, J.; Connell, D O '; Winter, J; Schulz-von der Gathen, V

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The spatial dynamics of the optical emission from an array of 50 times 50 individual micro cavity plasma devices are investigated. The array is operated in argon and argon-neon mixtures close to atmospheric pressure with an AC voltage. The optical emission is analysed with phase and space resolution. It has been found that the emission is not continuous over the entire AC period, but occurs once per half period. Each of the observed emission phases shows a self-pulsing of the disc...

  19. Heat transport of nitrogen in helium atmospheric pressure microplasma

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Shaofeng

    2013-01-01

    Stable DC atmospheric pressure normal glow discharges in ambient air were produced between the water surface and the metallic capillary coupled with influx of helium gas. Multiple independent repeated trials indicated that vibrational temperature of nitrogen rises from 3200 to 4622 K, and rotational temperature of nitrogen decreases from 1270 to 570 K as gas flux increasing from 20 to 80 sccm and discharge current decreasing from 11 to 3 mA. Furthermore, it was found that the vibrational degree of the nitrogen molecule has priority to gain energy than the rotational degree of nitrogen molecule in nonequilibrium helium microplasma.

  20. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of glassy carbon for adhesion improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Mortensen, Henrik Junge; Stenum, Bjarne;

    2007-01-01

    density increased with the plasma treatments. Adhesion test of the treated glassy carbon covered with cured epoxy showed cohesive failure, indicating strong bonding after the treatments. This is in contrast to the adhesion tests of untreated samples where the epoxy readily peeled off the glassy carbon.......Glassy carbon plates were treated with an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). He gas, gas mixtures of He and reactive gases such as O2, CO2 and NH3, Ar gas and Ar/NH3 gas mixture were used as treatment gases. The oxygen and nitrogen contents on the surface as well as defect...

  1. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes

  2. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max Karasik

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes.

  3. Electrical characterization of atmospheric pressure DBD in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air was generated between two rectangular copper electrodes covering the lower electrode with a dielectric (glass or polycarbonate -PC) using low frequency (line frequency-50Hz) high voltage power supply. The discharge was studied for inter-electrode gap spacing in the range of 2 mm – 5 mm and their influence on breakdown voltage. Voltage-current characteristics and the analysis of the distribution of current pulses per half cycle of the current waveform indicated that the discharge is more uniform in 3 mm inter-electrode gap spacing with PC as a dielectric rather than glass. (author)

  4. Microwave generation of stable atmospheric-pressure fireballs in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generation of stable buoyant fireballs in a microwave cavity in air at atmospheric pressure without the use of vaporized solids is described. These fireballs have some of the characteristics of ball lightning and resemble those reported by Dikhtyar and Jerby [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 045002 (2006)], although of a different color, and do not require the presence of molten or vaporized material. Mechanisms of microwave plasma formation and fluid dynamics can account for the observed behavior of the fireballs, which do not appear to meet the accepted definition of dusty plasmas in this case. Relevance to models of ball lightning and industrial applications are discussed

  5. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma as an antifungal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microhollow cathode based, direct-current, atmospheric pressure, He/O2 (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to inactive antifungal resistants Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Candida glabrata in air and in water. Effective inactivation (>90%) was achieved in 10 min in air and 1 min in water. Antifungal susceptibility tests showed drastic reduction of the minimum inhibitory concentration after plasma treatment. The inactivation was attributed to the reactive oxygen species generated in plasma or in water. Hydroxyl and singlet molecular oxygen radicals were detected in plasma-water system by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. This approach proposed a promising clinical dermatology therapy.

  6. Generation of subnanosecond electron beams in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2009-11-01

    Optimum conditions for the generation of runaway electron beams with maximum current amplitudes and densities in nanosecond pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are determined. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with a current amplitude of ˜30 A, a current density of ˜20 A/cm2, and a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps has been observed behind the output foil of an air-filled diode. It is shown that the position of the SAEB current maximum relative to the voltage pulse front exhibits a time shift that varies when the small-size collector is moved over the foil surface.

  7. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet interactions with plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of a cold (<40 deg. C) radio frequency-driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet on plasmid DNA has been investigated. Gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the DNA forms post-treatment. The experimental data are fitted to a rate equation model that allows for quantitative determination of the rates of single and double strand break formation. The formation of double strand breaks correlates well with the atomic oxygen density. Taken with other measurements, this indicates that neutral components in the jet are effective in inducing double strand breaks.

  8. Atmospheric pressure plasma surface modification of carbon fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Michelsen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    Carbon fibres are continuously treated with dielectric barrier discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure in various gas conditions for adhesion improvement in mind. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis indicated that oxygen is effectively introduced onto the carbon fibre surfaces by He, He...... temperature for a month the O/C ratio at the plasma treated surfaces decreased to 0.151, which is close to that of the untreated ones. It can be attributed to the adsorption of hydrocarbon contamination at the plasma treated surfaces....

  9. Beyond Naphthenic Acids: Environmental Screening of Water from Natural Sources and the Athabasca Oil Sands Industry Using Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Mark P.; Peru, Kerry M.; Fahlman, Brian; Hewitt, L. Mark; Frank, Richard A.; Headley, John V.

    2015-09-01

    There is a growing need for environmental screening of natural waters in the Athabasca region of Alberta, Canada, particularly in the differentiation between anthropogenic and naturally-derived organic compounds associated with weathered bitumen deposits. Previous research has focused primarily upon characterization of naphthenic acids in water samples by negative-ion electrospray ionization methods. Atmospheric pressure photoionization is a much less widely used ionization method, but one that affords the possibility of observing low polarity compounds that cannot be readily observed by electrospray ionization. This study describes the first usage of atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (in both positive-ion and negative-ion modes) to characterize and compare extracts of oil sands process water, river water, and groundwater samples from areas associated with oil sands mining activities. When comparing mass spectra previously obtained by electrospray ionization and data acquired by atmospheric pressure photoionization, there can be a doubling of the number of components detected. In addition to polar compounds that have previously been observed, low-polarity, sulfur-containing compounds and hydrocarbons that do not incorporate a heteroatom were detected. These latter components, which are not amenable to electrospray ionization, have potential for screening efforts within monitoring programs of the oil sands.

  10. Ultrapressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay using atmospheric pressure photoionization (UPLC-APPI-MS/MS) for quantification of 4-methoxydiphenylmethane in pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Nashid; Fitzpatrick, Sean; Shim, Yun M; Paige, Mikell; Chow, Diana Shu-Lian

    2016-09-01

    4-Methoxydiphenylmethane (4-MDM), a selective augmenter of Leukotriene A4 Hydrolase (LTA4H), is a new anti-inflammatory compound for potential treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Currently, there is no liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantification of 4-MDM. A major barrier for developing the LC-MS/MS method is the inability of electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) to ionize 4-MDM due to its hydrophobicity and lack of any functional group for ionization. With the advent of atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) technique, many hydrophobic compounds have been demonstrated to ionize by charge transfer reactions. In this study, a highly sensitive ultrapressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry assay using atmospheric pressure photoionization (UPLC-APPI-MS/MS) for the quantifications of 4-MDM in rat plasma has been developed and validated. 4-MDM was extracted from the plasma by solid phase extraction (SPE) and separated chromatographically using a reverse phase C8 column. The photoionization (PI) was achieved by introducing anisole as a dopant to promote the reaction of charge transfer. The assay with a linear range of 5 (LLOQ)-400ngmL(-1) met the regulatory requirements for accuracy, precision and stability. The validated assay was employed to quantify the plasma concentrations of 4-MDM after an oral dosing in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. PMID:27232150

  11. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency glow discharges operated with argon added ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rf, atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas with bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, thin film deposition, disinfection and sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics are presented for the rf APGD plasmas generated with pure argon or argon-ethanol mixture as the plasma-forming gas and using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes. The experimental results show that the breakdown voltage can be reduced significantly when a small amount of ethanol is added into argon, probably due to the fact that the Penning ionization process is involved, and a pure α-mode discharge can be produced more easily with the help of ethanol. The uniformity of the rf APGDs of pure argon or argon-ethanol mixtures using bare metallic electrodes is identified with the aid of the intensified charge coupled device images

  12. Effect of Swirling Desolvation Gas Flow in an Atmospheric Pressure Ion Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savtchenko, Serguei; Ashgriz, Nasser; Jolliffe, Chuck; Cousins, Lisa; Gamble, Heather

    2014-09-01

    A numerical study is performed to examine the effect of introducing a swirling desolvation gas flow on the flow transport characteristics in an electrospray and an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) system. An ion source having three coaxial tubes is considered: (1) an inner capillary tube to inject the liquid sample, (2) a center coaxial tube to provide a room temperature gas flow to nebulize the liquid, referred to as the nebulizing gas flow, and (3) an outer coaxial tube having a converging exit to supply a high temperature gas for droplet desolvation, referred to as the desolvation gas flow. The results show that a swirling desolvation gas flow reduces the dispersion of the nebulizing gas and suppresses turbulent diffusion. The effect of swirling desolvation flow on the trajectory of a range of droplet sizes emitted from a source is also considered.

  13. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency glow discharges operated with argon added ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen-Ting; Li, Guo; Li, He-Ping; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Hua-Bo; Zeng, Shi; Gao, Xing; Luo, Hui-Ying

    2007-06-01

    Rf, atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas with bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, thin film deposition, disinfection and sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics are presented for the rf APGD plasmas generated with pure argon or argon-ethanol mixture as the plasma-forming gas and using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes. The experimental results show that the breakdown voltage can be reduced significantly when a small amount of ethanol is added into argon, probably due to the fact that the Penning ionization process is involved, and a pure α-mode discharge can be produced more easily with the help of ethanol. The uniformity of the rf APGDs of pure argon or argon-ethanol mixtures using bare metallic electrodes is identified with the aid of the intensified charge coupled device images.

  14. Simulations of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharges in atmospheric pressure air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soo Bak, Moon; Cappelli, Mark A. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2013-03-21

    This paper describes simulations of nanosecond pulse plasma formation between planer electrodes covered by dielectric barriers in air at atmospheric pressure and 340 K. The plasma formation process starts as electrons detach from negative ions of molecular oxygen that are produced from the previous discharge pulse. An ionization front is found to form close to the positively biased electrode and then strengthens and propagates towards the grounded electrode with increasing gap voltage. Charge accumulation and secondary emission from the grounded electrode eventually lead to sheath collapse. One interesting feature is a predicted reversal in gap potential due to the accumulated charge, even when there is no reversal in applied potential. The simulation results are compared to recent measurement of mid-gap electric field under the same discharge conditions [Ito et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 065002 (2011)].

  15. Supershort electron beam and voluminous heavy-current air discharge at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conditions of the electron beam and voluminous discharge formation in the air at the atmospheric pressure and subnanosecond pulse tension front are studied. It is shown that the electron beam in the gaseous diode originates at the pulse tension front over time of ∼ 0.5 ns and has duration at the semiheight of ≤0.4 ns. The electron beam with the electrons average energy of 60-80 keV and current amplitude of ≥70 A is obtained. It is assumed that the electron beam is formed from the electron avalanches, originating in the gap on the account of the gas ionization by fast electrons at achieving the critical field between the expanding plasma cloud front and anode

  16. Two-dimensional simulation of discharge channels in atmospheric-pressure single dielectric barrier discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiao; Wang, Yanhui, E-mail: wangyh@dlut.edu.cn; Wang, Dezhen, E-mail: wangdez@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-11-15

    A two-dimensional fluid model is developed to study the filaments (or discharge channels) in atmospheric-pressure discharge with one plate electrode covered by a dielectric layer. Under certain discharge parameters, one or more stable filaments with wide radii could be regularly arranged in the discharge space. Different from the short-lived randomly distributed microdischarges, this stable and thick filament can carry more current and have longer lifetime. Because only one electrode is covered by a dielectric layer in the simulation, the formed discharge channel extends outwards near the dielectric layer and shrinks inwards near the naked electrode, agreeing with the experimental results. In this paper, the evolution of channel is studied, and its behavior is like a streamer or an ionization wave, but the propagation distance is short. The discharge parameters such as voltage amplitude, electrode width, and N{sub 2} impurities content could significantly influence the number of discharge channel, which is discussed in the paper.

  17. Atmospheric Pressure Cold Argon/Oxygen Plasma Jet Assisted by Preionization of Syringe Needle Electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium argon/oxygen plasma jet assisted by the preionization of syringe needle electrode discharge is reported. With the syringe needle plasma as its pre-ionization source, the hybrid barrier-jet was shown to generate uniform discharge with a lower breakdown voltage and a relatively low gas temperature varying from 390 K to 440 K, even when the vol.% oxygen in argon was up to 6%. Utilizing the actinometry method, the concentration of atomic oxygen was estimated to be about in an orders of magnitude of 1017 cm-3. The argon/oxygen plasma jet was then employed to clean out heat transfer oil, with a maximum cleaning rate of 0.1 mm/s achieved.

  18. Ultrasound enhanced plasma surface modification at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Norrman, Kion;

    2012-01-01

    Efficiency of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment can be highly enhanced by simultaneous high power ultrasonic irradiation onto the treating surface. It is because ultrasonic waves with a sound pressure level (SPL) above ∼140 dB can reduce the thickness of a boundary gas layer between the plasma....... The ultrasonic irradiation during the plasma treatment consistently enhanced the treatment efficiency. The principal effect of ultrasonic irradiation can be attributed to enhancing surface oxidation during plasma treatment. In addition, ultrasonic irradiation can suppress arcing, and the uniformity of...... and the material surface, and thus, many reactive species generated in the plasma can reach the surface before they are inactivated and can be efficiently utilised for surface modification. In the present work, glass fibre reinforced polyester plates were treated using a dielectric barrier discharge...

  19. Ultrasound enhanced plasma surface modification at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Norrman, Kion;

    Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment can be highly enhanced by simultaneous high-power ultrasonic irradiation onto the treating surface. It is because ultrasonic waves with a sound pressure level (SPL) above approximately 140 dB can reduce the thickness of a boundary gas layer between the plasma...... air are separated using a polyethylene film. The gliding arc was extended by a high speed air flow into ambient air, directed the polyester surface at an angle of approximately 30o. The ultrasonic waves were introduced vertically to the surface. After the plasma treatment using each plasma source...... without ultrasonic irradiation, the water contact angle dropped markedly, and tended to decrease furthermore at higher power. The ultrasonic irradiation during the plasma treatment consistently improved the wettability. Oxygen containing polar functional groups were introduced at the surface by the plasma...

  20. Collisional-radiative model of helium microwave discharges at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M.; Alves, L. L.; Gadonna, K.; Belmonte, T.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a stationary collisional-radiative model to describe the behavior of helium microwave discharges (2.45 GHz), produced in cylindrical geometry (1 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. The model couples the rate balance equations for the charged particles (electrons, He+ and He2+ions), the He(n Townsend ionization coefficient. The model was solved for typical 5x1014 cm-3 electron density and 2500 K gas temperature, yielding [He2+]/[He+] ~ 0.92 and [He2*]/[He] ~ 3.4x10-8. Results show also that the He2+ions are produced mainly from the 3-body conversion of He+ ions and lost by the corresponding reverse reaction together with diffusion and dissociative recombination. The He2*is produced by a 3-body reaction involving the 23P states and by the electron-stabilized recombination of He2+and is lost by electron dissociation. This paper presents a stationary collisional-radiative model to describe the behavior of helium microwave discharges (2.45 GHz), produced in cylindrical geometry (1 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. The model couples the rate balance equations for the charged particles (electrons, He+ and He2+ions), the He(n Townsend ionization coefficient. The model was solved for typical 5x1014 cm-3 electron density and 2500 K gas temperature, yielding [He2+]/[He+] ~ 0.92 and [He2*]/[He] ~ 3.4x10-8. Results show also that the He2+ions are produced mainly from the 3-body conversion of He+ ions and lost by the corresponding reverse reaction together with diffusion and dissociative recombination. The He2*is produced by a 3-body reaction involving the 23P states and by the electron-stabilized recombination of He2+and is lost by electron dissociation. Work supported by FCT-MCTES under PTDC/FIS/65924/2006.

  1. Characterization of pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma streams (PAPS) generated by a plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study of atmospheric-pressure rare gas plasma propagation in a high-aspect-ratio capillary is reported. The plasma is generated with a plasma gun device based on a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor powered by either nanosecond or microsecond rise-time high-voltage pulses at single-shot to multi-kHz frequencies. The influence of the voltage waveform, pulse polarity, pulse repetition rate and capillary material have been studied using nanosecond intensified charge-coupled device imaging and plasma-front velocity measurements. The evolution of the plasma appearance during its propagation and the study of the role of the different experimental parameters lead us to suggest a new denomination of pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma streams to describe all the plasma features, including the previously so-called plasma bullet. The unique properties of such non-thermal plasma launching in capillaries, far from the primary DBD plasma, are associated with a fast ionization wave travelling with velocity in the 107–108 cm s−1 range. Voltage pulse tailoring is shown to allow for a significant improvement of such plasma delivery. Thus, the plasma gun device affords unique opportunities in biomedical endoscopic applications. (paper)

  2. Atmospheric pressure imaging mass spectrometry of drugs with various ablating lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric pressure mass spectrometric detection efficiency of organic species (tofisopam and verapamil) was measured by means of the laser ablation of dried solution drops containing known amount of the analyte. Ablated molecules were ionized by an atmospheric pressure laser plasma cell and then introduced in the TOF mass-spectrometer. The spot was formed by dripping 2 μl of solution on the stainless steel substrate and consequent drying. Then it was scanned by an intense ablating beam of various lasers (CO2, Nd:YAG and femtosecond fiber laser) until the spot was completely eroded during the non-stop MS-analysis of ablated material. The sensitivity was defined as the ratio of the total ion current integral of the relevant mass peaks to the amount of molecules in the spot. All the tested lasers are suitable for the ablation and subsequent MS-detection of organic species in dried solution spots given enough power deposition is provided. The measured sensitivity values reach 0.1 ions/fg of tested analytes

  3. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p Altman coefficient is 4.8 %). It appears from this study that changes in absolute intracranial pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  4. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. III. BREAKDOWN CONDITIONS FOR MINERAL CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helling, Ch.; Jardine, M.; Stark, C. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Diver, D., E-mail: ch@leap2010.eu [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-20

    Electric discharges were detected directly in the cloudy atmospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, are debatable for Venus, and indirectly inferred for Neptune and Uranus in our solar system. Sprites (and other types of transient luminous events) have been detected only on Earth, and are theoretically predicted for Jupiter, Saturn, and Venus. Cloud formation is a common phenomenon in ultra-cool atmospheres such as in brown dwarf and extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Cloud particles can be expected to carry considerable charges which may trigger discharge events via small-scale processes between individual cloud particles (intra-cloud discharges) or large-scale processes between clouds (inter-cloud discharges). We investigate electrostatic breakdown characteristics, like critical field strengths and critical charge densities per surface, to demonstrate under which conditions mineral clouds undergo electric discharge events which may trigger or be responsible for sporadic X-ray emission. We apply results from our kinetic dust cloud formation model that is part of the DRIFT-PHOENIX model atmosphere simulations. We present a first investigation of the dependence of the breakdown conditions in brown dwarf and giant gas exoplanets on the local gas-phase chemistry, the effective temperature, and primordial gas-phase metallicity. Our results suggest that different intra-cloud discharge processes dominate at different heights inside mineral clouds: local coronal (point discharges) and small-scale sparks at the bottom region of the cloud where the gas density is high, and flow discharges and large-scale sparks near, and maybe above, the cloud top. The comparison of the thermal degree of ionization and the number density of cloud particles allows us to suggest the efficiency with which discharges will occur in planetary atmospheres.

  5. A dc non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A direct current (dc), non-thermal, atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet is generated with helium/oxygen gas mixture as working gas. The electrical property is characterized as a function of the oxygen concentration and show distinctive regions of operation. Side-on images of the jet were taken to analyze the mode of operation as well as the jet length. A self-pulsed mode is observed before the transition of the discharge to normal glow mode. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed from both end-on and side-on along the jet to analyze the reactive species generated in the plasma. Line emissions from atomic oxygen (at 777.4 nm) and helium (at 706.5 nm) were studied with respect to the oxygen volume percentage in the working gas, flow rate and discharge current. Optical emission intensities of Cu and OH are found to depend heavily on the oxygen concentration in the working gas. Ozone concentration measured in a semi-confined zone in front of the plasma jet is found to be from tens to ∼120 ppm. The results presented here demonstrate potential pathways for the adjustment and tuning of various plasma parameters such as reactive species selectivity and quantities or even ultraviolet emission intensities manipulation in an atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma source. The possibilities of fine tuning these plasma species allows for enhanced applications in health and medical related areas. (paper)

  6. Compact atmospheric pressure plasma self-resonant drive circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, V. J.; Anghel, S. D.

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports on compact solid-state self-resonant drive circuits that are specifically designed to drive an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge of small volume (0.5 cm3). The atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) device can be operated with helium, argon or a mixture of both. Equivalent electrical models of the self-resonant drive circuits and discharge are developed and used to estimate the plasma impedance, plasma power density, current density or electron number density of three APP devices. These parameters and the kinetic gas temperature are dependent on the self-resonant frequency of the APP device. For a fixed switching frequency and APP device geometry, the plasma parameters are controlled by adjusting the dc voltage at the primary coil and the gas flow rate. The resonant frequency is controlled by the selection of the switching power transistor and means of step-up voltage transformation (ferrite core, flyback transformer, or Tesla coil). The flyback transformer operates in the tens of kHz, the ferrite core in the hundreds of kHz and Tesla coil in the MHz range. Embedded within this work is the principle of frequency pulling which is exemplified in the flyback transformer circuit that utilizes a pickup coil for feedback control of the switching frequency.

  7. Charging of aerosol and nucleation in atmospheric pressure electrical discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borra, J P [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas, CNRS-Univ. Paris-Sud, F-91405, SUPELEC, 3 Rue Joliot Curie, Gif-sur-Yvette, F-91192 (France)], E-mail: jp.borra@pgp.u-psud.fr

    2008-12-15

    The paper focuses on applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas (dc corona, streamer, spark and ac dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs)) in aerosol processes for materials and environment. Since aerosol kinematics depends mainly on electric forces acting on charged particles, the two mechanisms of aerosol charging by the collection of ions are presented in corona, post-corona and DBDs. In such defined charging conditions, field and diffusion charging laws are depicted, with respect to applications of controlled kinematics of charged aerosol. Then key parameters controlling the formation by nucleation and the growth by coagulation of particles in plasmas are presented. Sources of vapor leading to nucleated nanoparticles are depicted in atmospheric pressure electrical discharges: (i) when filamentary dc streamer and spark as well as ac-DBDs interact with metal or dielectric surfaces and (ii) when discharges induce reactions with gaseous precursors in volume. In both cases, condensable gaseous species are produced, leading to nano-sized particles by physical and chemical routes of nucleation. The composition, size and structure of primary nanoparticles as well as the final size of agglomerates are related to plasma parameters (energy, number per unit surface and time and thermal gradients around each filament as well as the transit time)

  8. Characterization of a steam plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atmospheric steam plasma jet generated by an original dc water plasma torch is investigated using electrical and spectroscopic techniques. Because it directly uses the water used for cooling electrodes as the plasma-forming gas, the water plasma torch has high thermal efficiency and a compact structure. The operational features of the water plasma torch and the generation of the steam plasma jet are analyzed based on the temporal evolution of voltage, current and steam pressure in the arc chamber. The influence of the output characteristics of the power source, the fluctuation of the arc and current intensity on the unsteadiness of the steam plasma jet is studied. The restrike mode is identified as the fluctuation characteristic of the steam arc, which contributes significantly to the instabilities of the steam plasma jet. In addition, the emission spectroscopic technique is employed to diagnose the steam plasma. The axial distributions of plasma parameters in the steam plasma jet, such as gas temperature, excitation temperature and electron number density, are determined by the diatomic molecule OH fitting method, Boltzmann slope method and Hβ Stark broadening, respectively. The steam plasma jet at atmospheric pressure is found to be close to the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state by comparing the measured electron density with the threshold value of electron density for the LTE state. Moreover, based on the assumption of LTE, the axial distributions of reactive species in the steam plasma jet are estimated, which indicates that the steam plasma has high chemical activity.

  9. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert F. Hicks; Hans W. Herrmann

    2003-12-15

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate a practical, environmentally benigh technology for the surface decontamination and decommissioning of radioactive waste. A low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasma has been developed with initial support from the DOE, Environmental Management Sciences Program. This devise selectively etches radioactive metals from surfaces, rendering objects radiation free and suitable for decommissioning. The volatile reaction products are captured on filters, which yields a tremendous reduction in the volume of the waste. The technology shows a great potential for accelerating the clean-up effort for the equipment and structures contaminated with radioactive materials within the DOE complex. The viability of this technology has been demonstrated by selectively and rapidly stripping uranium from stainless steel surfaces at low temperature. Studies on uranium oxide have shown that etch rates of 4.0 microns per minute can be achieved at temperature below 473 K. Over the past three years, we have made numerous improvements in the design of the atmospheric pressure plasma source. We are now able to scale up the plasma source to treat large surface areas.

  10. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate a practical, environmentally benigh technology for the surface decontamination and decommissioning of radioactive waste. A low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasma has been developed with initial support from the DOE, Environmental Management Sciences Program. This devise selectively etches radioactive metals from surfaces, rendering objects radiation free and suitable for decommissioning. The volatile reaction products are captured on filters, which yields a tremendous reduction in the volume of the waste. The technology shows a great potential for accelerating the clean-up effort for the equipment and structures contaminated with radioactive materials within the DOE complex. The viability of this technology has been demonstrated by selectively and rapidly stripping uranium from stainless steel surfaces at low temperature. Studies on uranium oxide have shown that etch rates of 4.0 microns per minute can be achieved at temperature below 473 K. Over the past three years, we have made numerous improvements in the design of the atmospheric pressure plasma source. We are now able to scale up the plasma source to treat large surface areas

  11. Etching process of silicon dioxide with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrahigh etch rate (14 μm/min) of SiO2 and a high selectivity of SiO2/Si over 200 were achieved using a microwave-excited nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma source employing He, NF3, and H2O gases, which have been developed for application to microelectromechanical systems and other bionanotechnology fields. In order to clarify the etching mechanism, two diagnostic methods have been performed: (1) imaging of plasma emission with an intensified charge-coupled device camera, and (2) absorption measurements using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The etching characteristics are discussed in relation to the spatial distributions of the species involved. The etch rate depended considerably on the distance between the plasma and the substrate. Some radicals generated from the feed gases reached the substrate directly, while other radicals recombined into different species, which reached the substrate. An abundance of HF molecules were produced through a reaction between radicals generated by the atmospheric pressure discharge of NF3 and H2O. From these measurements, it has been found that the HF molecules generated played a role in producing the high etch rate of SiO2 and high etch selectivity of SiO2/Si

  12. Nonlinear lumped circuit modeling of an atmospheric pressure rf discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapke, M.; Ziegler, D.; Mussenbrock, T.; Gans, T.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.

    2006-10-01

    The subject of our modeling approach is a specifically modified version of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ, originally proposed by Selwyn and coworkers^1) with reduced discharge volume, the micro atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ). The μ-APPJ is a homogeneous nonequilibrium discharge operated with Argon or Helium as the feedstock gas and a percentage volume admixture of a molecular gas (O2, H2, N2). The efficiency of the discharge is mainly due to the dissociated and activated molecules in the effluent that can be selected depending on the application. A variety of applications in surface treatment have already been demonstrated, e.g., in semiconductor technology, restoration and bio-medicine. In this contribution we present and analyze a nonlinear lumped circuit model of the μ-APPJ. We apply a two-scale formalism. The bulk is modeled by a generalized Ohm's law, whereas the sheath is described on a considerably higher level of mathematical sophistication. The main focus lies on the spectrum of the discharge current in order to support the characterization of the discharge via model-based diagnostics, i.e., the estimation of the spatially averaged electron density from the frequency of certain self-excitated collective resonance modes. J. Park et al., Appl. Phy. Lett. 76, 288 (2000)

  13. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet for treatment of polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wolter

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Polymers are commonly used as packing materials as well as for optical and microelectronic applications. For these purposes different requirements like impermeability for different gases, scratching firmness and electrical conductivity are demanded. Since, polymers usually do not exhibit these attributes a surface modification is necessary.Design/methodology/approach: This paper describes possibilities for coating of polymers with a cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ. Due to the rather low temperature of the process the plasma jet is suitable for the treatment of temperature-sensitive materials with melting points below 150°C. For coating of polymers the organic precursor Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO has been used to deposit silicon oxide layers on surface.Findings: Spatial distributions of reactive species have been measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES in the range between 280 and 1100 nm during the plasma process. The energy influx to the substrate was determined by thermal probe measurements. For the affirmation of the chemical composition of the surface X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS has been performed.Practical implications: It could be confirmed that SiOx thin film deposition on polymeric substrate using commercially available APPJ with no internal precursor feeding is possible.Originality/value: The examinations of atmospheric pressure plasma jet for treatment of polymers.

  14. Hazardous gas treatment using atmospheric pressure microwave discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizeraczyk, Jerzy; Jasinski, Mariusz; Zakrzewski, Zenon [Centre for Plasma and Laser Engineering, Institute of Fluid Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Fiszera 14, 80-231 Gdansk (Poland)

    2005-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure microwave discharge methods and devices used for producing non-thermal plasmas for control of gaseous pollutants are described in this paper. The main part of the paper is concerned with microwave torch discharges (MTDs). Results of laboratory experiments on plasma abatement of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in their mixtures with either synthetic air or nitrogen in low ({approx}100 W) and moderate (200-400 W) microwave torch plasmas at atmospheric pressure are presented. Three types of MTD generators, i.e. low-power coaxial-line-based MTDs, moderate-power waveguide-based coaxial-line MTDs and moderate-power waveguide-based MTDs were used. The gas flow rate and microwave (2.45 GHz) power delivered to the discharge were in the range of 1-3 litre min{sup -1} and 100-400 W, respectively. The concentrations of the processed gaseous pollutants were from several to several tens of per cent. The results showed that the MTD plasmas fully decomposed the VOCs at a relatively low energy cost. The energy efficiency of decomposition of several gaseous pollutants reached 1000 g (kW-h){sup -1}. This suggests that MTD plasmas can be useful tools for decomposition of highly concentrated VOCs.

  15. Compact atmospheric pressure plasma self-resonant drive circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on compact solid-state self-resonant drive circuits that are specifically designed to drive an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge of small volume (0.5 cm3). The atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) device can be operated with helium, argon or a mixture of both. Equivalent electrical models of the self-resonant drive circuits and discharge are developed and used to estimate the plasma impedance, plasma power density, current density or electron number density of three APP devices. These parameters and the kinetic gas temperature are dependent on the self-resonant frequency of the APP device. For a fixed switching frequency and APP device geometry, the plasma parameters are controlled by adjusting the dc voltage at the primary coil and the gas flow rate. The resonant frequency is controlled by the selection of the switching power transistor and means of step-up voltage transformation (ferrite core, flyback transformer, or Tesla coil). The flyback transformer operates in the tens of kHz, the ferrite core in the hundreds of kHz and Tesla coil in the MHz range. Embedded within this work is the principle of frequency pulling which is exemplified in the flyback transformer circuit that utilizes a pickup coil for feedback control of the switching frequency. (paper)

  16. Radiation exposure of airline crew members to the atmospheric ionizing radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All risk assessment techniques for possible health effects from low dose rate radiation exposure should combine knowledge both of the radiation environment and of the biological response, whose effects (e.g. carcinogenesis) are usually evaluated through mathematical models and/or animal and cell experiments. Data on human exposure to low dose rate radiation exposure and its effects are not readily available, especially with regards to stochastic effects, related to carcinogenesis and therefore to cancer risks, for which the event probability increases with increasing radiation exposure. The largest source of such data might be airline flight personnel, if enrolled for studies on health effects induced by the cosmic-ray generated atmospheric ionizing radiation, whose total dose, increasing over the years, might cause delayed radiation-induced health effects, with the high-LET and highly ionizing neutron component typical of atmospheric radiation. In 1990 flight personnel has been given the status of 'occupationally exposed to radiation' by the International Commission for Radiation Protection (ICRP), with a received radiation dose that is at least twice larger than that of the general population. The studies performed until now were limited in scope and cohort size, and moreover no information whatsoever on radiation occupational exposure (e.g. dose, flight hours, route haul, etc.) was used in the analysis, so no correlation has been until now possible between atmospheric ionizing radiation and (possibly radiation-induced) observed health effects. Our study addresses the issues, by considering all Italian civilian airline flight personnel, both cockpit and cabin crew members, with about 10,000 people selected, whose records on work history and actual flights (route, aircraft type, date, etc. for each individual flight for each person where possible) are considered. Data on actual flight routes and profiles have been obtained for the whole time frame. The actual dose

  17. Vapor Pressure of Hexamethylene Triperoxide Diamine (HMTD) Estimated Using Secondary Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aernecke, Matthew J; Mendum, Ted; Geurtsen, Geoff; Ostrinskaya, Alla; Kunz, Roderick R

    2015-11-25

    A rapid method for vapor pressure measurement was developed and used to derive the vapor pressure curve of the thermally labile peroxide-based explosive hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) over the temperature range from 28 to 80 °C. This method uses a controlled flow of vapor from a solid-phase HMTD source that is presented to an ambient-pressure-ionization mass spectrometer equipped with a secondary-electrospray-ionization (SESI) source. The subpart-per-trillion sensitivity of this system enables direct detection of HMTD vapor through an intact [M + H](+) ion in real time at temperatures near 20 °C. By calibrating this method using vapor sources of cocaine and heroin, which have known pressure-temperature (P-T) curves, the temperature dependence of HMTD vapor was determined, and a Clausius-Clapeyron plot of ln[P (Pa)] vs 1/[T (K)] yielded a straight line with the expression ln[P (Pa)] = {(-11091 ± 356) × 1/[T (K)]} + 25 ± 1 (error limits are the standard error of the regression analysis). From this equation, the sublimation enthalpy of HMTD was estimated to be 92 ± 3 kJ/mol, which compares well with the theoretical estimate of 95 kJ/mol, and the vapor pressure at 20 °C was estimated to be ∼60 parts per trillion by volume, which is within a factor of 2 of previous theoretical estimates. Thus, this method provides not only the first direct experimental determination of HMTD vapor pressure but also a rapid, near-real-time capability to quantitatively measure low-vapor-pressure compounds, which will be useful for aiding in the development of training aids for bomb-sniffing canines. PMID:26505487

  18. The influence of atmospheric pressure on landfill methane emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane (CH4) emissions to the atmosphere in the United States. However, few measurements of whole landfill CH4 emissions have been reported. Here, we present the results of a multi-season study of whole landfill CH4 emissions using atmospheric tracer methods at the Nashua, New Hampshire Municipal landfill in the northeastern United States. The measurement data include 12 individual emission tests, each test consisting of 5-8 plume measurements. Measured emissions were negatively correlated with surface atmospheric pressure and ranged from 7.3 to 26.5 m3 CH4 min-1. A simple regression model of our results was used to calculate an annual emission rate of 8.4x106 m3 CH4 year-1. These data, along with CH4 oxidation estimates based on emitted landfill gas isotopic characteristics and gas collection data, were used to estimate annual CH4 generation at this landfill. A reported gas collection rate of 7.1x106 m3 CH4 year-1 and an estimated annual rate of CH4 oxidation by cover soils of 1.2x106 m3 CH4 year-1 resulted in a calculated annual CH4 generation rate of 16.7x106 m3 CH4 year-1. These results underscore the necessity of understanding a landfill's dynamic environment before assessing long-term emissions potential

  19. High Sensitivity Combined with Extended Structural Coverage of Labile Compounds via Nanoelectrospray Ionization at Subambient Pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Jonathan T.; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Shukla, Anil K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi

    2014-10-07

    Subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) has proven to be effective in producing ions with high efficiency and transmitting them to low pressures for high sensitivity mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Here we present evidence that not only does the SPIN source improve MS sensitivity but also allows for gentler ionization conditions. The gentleness of a conventional heated capillary electrospray ionization (ESI) source and the SPIN source was compared by the liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of colominic acid. Colominic acid is a mixture of sialic acid polymers of different lengths containing labile glycosidic linkages between monomer units necessitating a gentle ion source. By coupling the SPIN source with high resolution mass spectrometry and using advanced data processing tools, we demonstrate much extended coverage of sialic acid polymer chains as compared to using the conventional ESI source. Additionally we show that SPIN-LC-MS is effective in elucidating polymer features with high efficiency and high sensitivity previously unattainable by the conventional ESI-LC-MS methods.  

  20. Ionized-cluster source based on high-pressure corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: It has been demonstrated that energetic beams of large clusters, with thousands of atoms, can be a powerful tool for surface modification. Normally ionized cluster beams are obtained by electron impact on neutral beams produced in a supersonic expansion. At the University of Innsbruck we are pursuing the realization of a high current cluster ion source based on the corona discharge.The idea in the present case is that the ionization should occur prior to the supersonic expansion, thus supersede the need of subsequent electron impact. In this contribution we present the project of our source in its initial stage. The intensity distribution of cluster sizes as a function of the source parameters, such as input pressure, temperature and gap voltage, are investigated with the aid of a custom-built time of flight mass spectrometer. (author)

  1. Secondary ozonides of endo-cyclic alkenes analyzed by atmospheric sampling Townsend discharge ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nøjgaard, J. K.; Nørgaard, A. W.; Wolkoff, P.

    2007-05-01

    Secondary ozonides (SOZ) of cyclohexene, 1-methylcyclohexene, 4-isopropyl-1-methylcyclohexene and d-limonene were cryo-synthesized by ozonolysis in pentane and purified on a silica gel column. The mass spectra obtained by atmospheric sampling Townsend discharge ionization (ASTDI) and collision activated dissociation (CAD) of the protonized SOZ showed characteristic losses evident of the ozonide structure. Oxygen was eliminated as, e.g., O and O2, and loss of (HCHO + HCHO) or (O + CO2) corresponded to the SOZ base-peak for the substituted cyclohexenes by ASTDI-MS. The CAD spectra of the protonized species by use of methane as chemical ionization gas, showed consecutive losses of three oxygen atoms. Elimination of hydroxy-methyl hydroperoxide (HMHP) was particular important for the protonized SOZ, unlike consecutive loss of (HCHO + HCHO) or (O + CO2). In addition, the spectra of d-limonene were characterized by an unique loss of H2O2. These losses appear to be useful for identification of SOZ in gas-phase ozonolysis mixtures of endo-cyclic alkenes, which makes ASTDI an alternative to other on-line techniques for analysis of SOZ in ozonolysis mixtures.

  2. Measurement of viscosity of gaseous mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. J.; Mall, G. H.; Chegini, H.

    1986-01-01

    Coefficients of viscosity of various types of gas mixtures, including simulated natural-gas samples, have been measured at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a modified capillary tube method. Pressure drops across the straight capillary tube section of a thermal mass flowmeter were measured for small, well-defined, volume flow rates for the test gases and for standard air. In this configuration, the flowmeter provides the volumetric flow rates as well as a well-characterized capillary section for differential pressure measurements across it. The coefficients of viscosity of the test gases were calculated using the reported value of 185.6 micro P for the viscosity of air. The coefficients of viscosity for the test mixtures were also calculated using Wilke's approximation of the Chapman-Enskog (C-E) theory. The experimental and calculated values for binary mixtures are in agreement within the reported accuracy of Wilke's approximation of the C-E theory. However, the agreement for multicomponent mixtures is less satisfactory, possible because of the limitations of Wilkes's approximation of the classical dilute-gas state model.

  3. Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges in Air at Atmospheric Pressure -- Experiment and Theory of Regime Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, David; Lacoste, Deanna; Laux, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and inter-electrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. Notably, there is a minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime that increases with decreasing gas temperature. A theory is developed to describe the Corona-to-Glow (C-G) and Glow-to-Spark (G-S) transitions for NRP discharges. The C-G transition is shown to depend on the Avalanche-to-Streamer Transition (AST) as well as the electric field strength in the positive column. The G-S transition is due to the thermal ionization instability. The minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime can be understood by considering that the applied voltage of the AST must be lower than that of the thermal ionization instability. This is a previously unknown criterion for generating glow discharges, as it does not correspond to the Paschen minimum or to the Meek-Raether criterion.

  4. Atmospheric pressure plasma jets interacting with liquid covered tissue: touching and not-touching the liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Tian, Wei; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-11-01

    In the use of atmospheric pressure plasma jets in biological applications, the plasma-produced charged and neutral species in the plume of the jet often interact with a thin layer of liquid covering the tissue being treated. The plasma-produced reactivity must then penetrate through the liquid layer to reach the tissue. In this computational investigation, a plasma jet created by a single discharge pulse at three different voltages was directed onto a 200 µm water layer covering tissue followed by a 10 s afterglow. The magnitude of the voltage and its pulse length determined if the ionization wave producing the plasma plume reached the surface of the liquid. When the ionization wave touches the surface, significantly more charged species were created in the water layer with H3O+aq, O3-aq, and O2-aq being the dominant terminal species. More aqueous OHaq, H2O2aq, and O3aq were also formed when the plasma plume touches the surface. The single pulse examined here corresponds to a low repetition rate plasma jet where reactive species would be blown out of the volume between pulses and there is not recirculation of flow or turbulence. For these conditions, NxOy species do not accumulate in the volume. As a result, aqueous nitrites, nitrates, and peroxynitrite, and the HNO3aq and HOONOaq, which trace their origin to solvated NxOy, have low densities.

  5. Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry: a complementary approach for the chemical analysis of atmospheric aerosols

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Parshintsev, J.; Vaikkinen, A.; Lipponen, K.; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Cvačka, Josef; Kostiainen, R.; Kotiaho, T.; Hartonen, K.; Riekkola, M. L.; Kauppila, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 13 (2015), s. 1233-1241. ISSN 0951-4198 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551204 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : atmospheric aerosols * mass spectrometry * ambient ionization Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.253, year: 2014

  6. Influence of Ionization Degrees on Conversion of CO and CO2 in Atmospheric Plasma near the Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A zero-dimensional model is used to study the processes of physical and chemical reactions in atmospheric plasma with different ionization degrees near the ground (0 km). The temporal evolutions of CO, CO2 and other main reactants (namely OH and O2), which affect the conversion of CO and CO2, are obtained for afterglow plasma with different initial values. The results show that the consumption rate of CO is largest when the initial electron number density ne0=1012 cm−3, i.e. the ionization degree is 0.000004%. The number density of CO2 is relatively small when ne0=1016 cm−3, i.e. the ionization degree is 0.04%, whereas they are very close under the condition of other ionization degrees. Considering the total number densities of CO and CO2 and the consumption rate of CO comprehensively, the best condition is ne0=1013 cm−3, i.e. the ionization degree is 0.00004% for reducing the densities of CO and CO2 in the atmospheric plasma. The temporal evolutions of N+, Ar+, CO+ and CO2+ are also shown, and the influences on the temporal evolutions of CO and CO2 are analyzed with increasing ionization degree

  7. Sterilization of Turmeric by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma has been employed for sterilizing dry turmeric powders. A 6 kV, 6 kHz frequency generator was used to generate plasma with Ar, Ar/O2, He, and He/O2 gases between the 5 mm gap of two quartz covered electrodes. The complete sterilization time of samples due to plasma treatment was measured. The most important contaminant of turmeric is bacillus subtilis. The results show that the shortest sterilization time of 15 min is achieved by exposing the samples to Ar/O2 plasma. Survival curves of samples are exponential functions of time and the addition of oxygen to plasma leads to a significant increase of the absolute value of time constant of the curves. Magnitudes of protein and DNA in treated samples were increased to a similar value for all samples. Taste, color, and solubility of samples were not changed after the plasma treatment

  8. Sterilization of Turmeric by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setareh, Salarieh; Davoud, Dorranian

    2013-11-01

    In this study atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma has been employed for sterilizing dry turmeric powders. A 6 kV, 6 kHz frequency generator was used to generate plasma with Ar, Ar/O2, He, and He/O2 gases between the 5 mm gap of two quartz covered electrodes. The complete sterilization time of samples due to plasma treatment was measured. The most important contaminant of turmeric is bacillus subtilis. The results show that the shortest sterilization time of 15 min is achieved by exposing the samples to Ar/O2 plasma. Survival curves of samples are exponential functions of time and the addition of oxygen to plasma leads to a significant increase of the absolute value of time constant of the curves. Magnitudes of protein and DNA in treated samples were increased to a similar value for all samples. Taste, color, and solubility of samples were not changed after the plasma treatment.

  9. Electrical characterization of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the electrical characterization of dielectric barrier discharge produced at atmospheric pressure using a high voltage power supply operating at 50Hz. The characteristics of the discharge have been studied under different values as such applied voltage and the electrode gap width. The results presented in this work can be helpful in understanding the influence of dielectric material on the nature of the discharge. An attempt has also been made to investigate the influence of ballast resistor on the magnitude of discharge current and also the density of micro-discharges. Our results indicated that with this power supply and electrode geometry, a relatively more homogenous discharge is observed for 3 mm spacing. (author)

  10. Controlled Microdroplet Transport in an Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma

    CERN Document Server

    Maguire, P D; Kelsey, C P; Bingham, A; Montgomery, E P; Bennet, E D; Potts, H E; Rutherford, D; McDowell, D A; Diver, D A; Mariotti, D

    2015-01-01

    We report the controlled injection of near-isolated micron-sized liquid droplets into a low temperature He-Ne steady-state rf plasma at atmospheric pressure. The H2O droplet stream is constrained within a 2 mm diameter quartz tube. Imaging at the tube exit indicates a log-normal droplet size distribution with an initial count mean diameter of 15 micrometers falling to 13 micrometers with plasma exposure. The radial velocity profile is approximately parabolic indicating near laminar flow conditions with the majority of droplets travelling at >75% of the local gas speed and having a plasma transit time of < 100 microseconds. The maximum gas temperature, determined from nitrogen spectral lines, was below 400 K and the observed droplet size reduction implies additional factors beyond standard evaporation, including charge and surface chemistry effects. The successful demonstration of controlled microdroplet streams opens up possibilities for gas-phase microreactors and remote delivery of active species for pla...

  11. Simulation of nonstationary phenomena in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Frants, O. B.; Nekhoroshev, V. O.; Suslov, A. I.; Kas'yanov, V. S.; Shemyakin, I. A.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Nonstationary processes in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge manifest themselves in spontaneous transitions from the normal glow discharge into a spark. In the experiments, both so-called completed transitions in which a highly conductive constricted channel arises and incomplete transitions accompanied by the formation of a diffuse channel are observed. A model of the positive column of a discharge in air is elaborated that allows one to interpret specific features of the discharge both in the stationary stage and during its transition into a spark and makes it possible to calculate the characteristic oscillatory current waveforms for completed transitions into a spark and aperiodic ones for incomplete transitions. The calculated parameters of the positive column in the glow discharge mode agree well with experiment. Data on the densities of the most abundant species generated in the discharge (such as atomic oxygen, metastable nitrogen molecules, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and negative oxygen ions) are presented.

  12. Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges for sterilization and surface treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal dielectric barrier discharges can be generated in different configurations for different applications. For sterilization, a parallel-plate electrode configuration with glass dielectric that discharges in air was used. Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus cereus) were successfully inactivated using sinusoidal high voltage of ∼15 kVp-p at 8.5 kHz. In the surface treatment, a hemisphere and disc electrode arrangement that allowed a plasma jet to be extruded under controlled nitrogen gas flow (at 9.2 kHz, 20 kVp-p) was applied to enhance the wettability of PET (Mylar) film

  13. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  14. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency (ν/ω) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption ν/ω = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary ν/ω. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance

  15. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert F. Hicks; Gary S. Selwyn

    2001-01-09

    Project was to develop a low-cost, environmentally benign technology for the decontamination and decommissioning of transuranic waste. With the invention of the atmospheric-pressure plasma jet the goal was achieved. This device selectively etches heavy metals from surfaces, rendering objects radiation free and suitable for decommissioning. The volatile reaction products are captured on filters, which yields a tremendous reduction in the volume of the waste. Studies on tantalum, a surrogate material for plutonium, have shown that etch rate of 6.0 microns per minute can be achieved under mild conditions. Over the past three years, we have made numerous improvements in the design of the plasma jet. It may now be operated for hundreds of hours and not undergo any degradation in performance. Furthermore, small compact units have been developed, which are easily deployed in the field.

  16. Controlling the NO production of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of NO radicals by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet has been investigated by means of absorption spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region (IR) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the ultraviolet (UV) part of the spectrum. The plasma jet investigated here operates in argon with air admixtures up to 1%. The study shows that OES can be used to characterize the relative NO production at small air admixtures. The Production of NO radicals can be controlled by variation of air admixture. Important to note—especially for operation in ambient conditions—is that a small addition of water vapour strongly affects the production of NO radicals especially at higher air admixtures (greater than 0.2%). (paper)

  17. Analysis of the cathodic region of atmospheric pressure discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cathodic region of atmospheric pressure arcs is dominated by a number of different mechanisms. This makes a theoretical model extremely difficult. A description of this region based on fundamental physical principles is given. Using a previously published model of the inhomogeneous boundary layer of a Saha plasma (Schmitz H and Riemann K-U 2001 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 34 1193), the description is set on a firm theoretical basis. A number of equations including the energy balances of plasma boundary and cathode body lead to a maximum closure of the system. The values for the boundary conditions toward the plasma column could be motivated by a simple minimum principle argument thus eliminating all arbitrary fitting parameters. Results are given for a variety of external parameters and three different discharge gases. The comparison with experimental results shows excellent agreement. (author)

  18. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2007-04-01

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency (ν/ω) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption ν/ω = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary ν/ω. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance.

  19. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pencheva, M [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Benova, E [Department for Language Teaching and International Students, Sofia University, 27 Kosta Loulchev Street, BG-1111 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zhelyazkov, I [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2007-04-15

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency ({nu}/{omega}) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption {nu}/{omega} = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary {nu}/{omega}. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance.

  20. Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges for sterilization and surface treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, O. H.; Lai, C. K.; Choo, C. Y.; Wong, C. S.; Nor, R. M. [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Thong, K. L. [Microbiology Division, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal dielectric barrier discharges can be generated in different configurations for different applications. For sterilization, a parallel-plate electrode configuration with glass dielectric that discharges in air was used. Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus cereus) were successfully inactivated using sinusoidal high voltage of ∼15 kVp-p at 8.5 kHz. In the surface treatment, a hemisphere and disc electrode arrangement that allowed a plasma jet to be extruded under controlled nitrogen gas flow (at 9.2 kHz, 20 kVp-p) was applied to enhance the wettability of PET (Mylar) film.

  1. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Project was to develop a low-cost, environmentally benign technology for the decontamination and decommissioning of transuranic waste. With the invention of the atmospheric-pressure plasma jet the goal was achieved. This device selectively etches heavy metals from surfaces, rendering objects radiation free and suitable for decommissioning. The volatile reaction products are captured on filters, which yields a tremendous reduction in the volume of the waste. Studies on tantalum, a surrogate material for plutonium, have shown that etch rate of 6.0 microns per minute can be achieved under mild conditions. Over the past three years, we have made numerous improvements in the design of the plasma jet. It may now be operated for hundreds of hours and not undergo any degradation in performance. Furthermore, small compact units have been developed, which are easily deployed in the field

  2. Diagnostics of atmospheric pressure capillary DBD oxygen plasma jet

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, N C; Pramanik, B K

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure capillary dielectric barrier oxygen discharge plasma jet is developed to generate non-thermal plasma using unipolar positive pulse power supply. Both optical and electrical techniques are used to investigate the characteristics of the produced plasma as function of applied voltage and gas flow rate. Analytical results obtained from the optical emission spectroscopic data reveal the gas temperature, rotational temperature, excitation temperature and electron density. Gas temperature and rotational temperature are found to decrease with increasing oxygen flow rate but increase linearly with applied voltage. It is exposed that the electron density is boosting up with enhanced applied voltage and oxygen flow rate, while the electron excitation temperature is reducing with rising oxygen flow rate. Electrical characterization demonstrates that the discharge frequency is falling with flow rate but increasing with voltage. The produced plasma is applied preliminarily to study the inactivation yie...

  3. Development of ac corona discharge modes at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corona discharges in gases exist under several distinctive forms. In this paper, a survey study has been made of ac corona discharge modes generated in some different gases fed in a wire-duct reactor with a constant rate of flowing at atmospheric pressure. The properties of different corona modes are analyzed under some condition transitions from Trichel pulses to a steady glow. In the course of the presented experimental work, numerous apparent contradictions with earlier observations necessitated further study and are given to provide more information on the physical mechanisms of the ac corona discharges. Furthermore, we have gained insight into some new technologies and applications of the environmentally friendly corona and plasma discharges.

  4. Bacterial Inactivation by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Sanxi; Cheng, Cheng; Ni, Guohua; Meng, Yuedong; Chen, Hua

    2008-08-01

    Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli seeded in two media (agar and filter papers) were exposed to after-glow plasma emitted from a atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet generator in open air with a temperature of about 30-80 °C. In order to estimate the inactivation of microorganism using DBD plasma jet, various plasma conditions (such as treatment time and feed-gas composition of plasma jet) were changed. The results shown that the effective area of inactivation increased with the plasma treatment time as the bacteria seeded in Agar medium. The effective area of inactivation was much bigger than plasma jet treatment area after 5 min treatment. With the use of filter papers as the supporting media, the addition of reactive gases (oxygen, hydrogen peroxide vapor) into the plasma jet system, compared with only pure noble gas, led to a significant improvement in the bacterial Inactivation efficacy.

  5. Deposition of carbon nanostructures on metal substrates at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Zh; Nikovski, M.; Kiss'ovski, Zh

    2016-03-01

    The microwave-plasma-enhanced CVD of carbon nanostructures at atmospheric pressure allows shorter deposition times and reduces the complexity of the experimental set-up. In our study, the substrate temperature was varied in a wide range (300 – 700 C) using microwave plasma heating, as well as an additional heater. The distance between the substrate and the plasma flame was also varied in order to establish the conditions for an efficient deposition process, the latter being carried out at specific argon/hydrogen/methane gas mixtures. Optical measurements of the plasma flame spectrum were conducted to obtain the gas temperature and the plasma density and to analyze the existence of reactive species. The carbon nanostructures deposited on the metal samples were investigated by SEM. The relation between the morphology and the gas-discharge conditions is discussed.

  6. Sterilization of Surfaces with a Handheld Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Robert; Habib, Sara; Chan, Wai; Gonzalez, Eleazar; Tijerina, A.; Sloan, Mark

    2009-10-01

    Low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown great promise for decontaminating the surfaces of materials and equipment. In this study, an atmospheric pressure, oxygen and argon plasma was investigated for the destruction of viruses, bacteria, and spores. The plasma was operated at an argon flow rate of 30 L/min, an oxygen flow rate of 20 mL/min, a power density of 101.0 W/cm^3 (beam area = 5.1 cm^2), and at a distance from the surface of 7.1 mm. An average 6log10 reduction of viable spores was obtained after only 45 seconds of exposure to the reactive gas. By contrast, it takes more than 35 minutes at 121^oC to sterilize anthrax in an autoclave. The plasma properties were investigated by numerical modeling and chemical titration with nitric oxide. The numerical model included a detailed reaction mechanism for the discharge as well as for the afterglow. It was predicted that at a delivered power density of 29.3 W/cm^3, 30 L/min argon, and 0.01 volume% O2, the plasma generated 1.9 x 10^14 cm-3 O atoms, 1.6 x 10^12 cm-3 ozone, 9.3 x 10^13 cm-3 O2(^1δg), and 2.9 x 10^12 cm-3 O2(^1σ^+g) at 1 cm downstream of the source. The O atom density measured by chemical titration with NO was 6.0 x 10^14 cm-3 at the same conditions. It is believe that the oxygen atoms and the O2(^1δg) metastables were responsible for killing the anthrax and other microorganisms.

  7. Mass Spectrometry of Atmospheric Pressure Surface Wave Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridenti, M. A.; Souza-Corrêa, J. A.; Amorim, J.

    2016-05-01

    By applying mass spectrometry techniques, we carried out measurements of ionic mass spectrum and their energy distribution in order to investigate an atmospheric argon discharge by using a surfatron surface-wave device. The mass and energy distribution measurements were performed with fixed flow rate (2.5 SLM) of pure argon gas (99.999%) and different Ar-O2 gas mixture compositions (99-1, 98-2 and 97-3). The mass spectra and energy distributions were recorded for Ar+, O+, O+ 2, N+ and N2 +. The axial distribution profiles of ionic mass and their energy were obtained for different experimental conditions as a function of the plasma length. The results showed that the peak of the positive ion energy distributions shifted to higher energies and also that the distribution width increased as the distance between the sampling orifice and the launcher gap was increased. It was also found that under certain experimental conditions the ion flux of atomic species were higher than the ion flux of their diatomic counterpart. The motivation of this study was to obtain a better understanding of a surface wave discharge in atmospheric pressure that may play a key role on new second generation biofuel technologies.

  8. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow combined with laser ablation for direct analysis of compounds separated by thin-layer chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Cegłowski, Michał; Smoluch, Marek; Reszke, Edward; Silberring, Jerzy; Schroeder, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    A thin-layer chromatography-mass spectrometry (TLC-MS) setup for characterization of low molecular weight compounds separated on standard TLC plates has been constructed. This new approach successfully combines TLC separation, laser ablation, and ionization using flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) source. For the laser ablation, a low-priced 445-nm continuous-wave diode laser pointer, with a power of 1 W, was used. The combination of the simple, low-budget laser pointer and the FAP...

  9. Development of Simplified Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Ichiki, Ryuta; Maeda, Akihide; Yamanouchi, Kenta; Akamine, Shuichi; Kanazawa, Seiji; Oita University Team

    2015-09-01

    Nitriding treatment is one of the surface hardening technologies, applied to dies and automobile components. In recent industry, low-pressure nitriding treatment using vacuum system is mainstream. On the other hand, we have originally developed an atmospheric-pressure plasma nitriding which do not need vacuum system. However we needed an air-tight container to purge residual oxygen and external heater to control treatment temperature. To make this technique practical, we addressed to construct a simplified treatment system, where treatment temperature is controlled by thermal plasma itself and oxygen purging is achieved by a simple cover. This means that any air-tight container and external heater is not necessary. As a result, surface temperature is controlled by changing treatment gap from nozzle tip to steel surface. We succeeded in controlling well thickness of hardened layer by adjusting treatment temperature even in such a simplified system. In the conference, we also discuss experimental results for hardening complex shaped materials by using our simplified nitriding.

  10. Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharges: A Low-Cost System for Surface Modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma treatment is a common way for modifying the surface of a material. A simple but effective source for a low-temperature nonequilibrium plasma is dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs), also referred to as silent discharges. DBDs are characterized by the presence of at least one insulating (dielectric) layer in the discharge gap between two metal electrodes. When a high voltage is applied to the DBD configuration, tiny breakdown channels are formed in the discharge gap. These microdischarges are characterized as a weakly ionized plasma containing electrons with energies up to 10 eV and ions at room temperature. The energetic electrons provide an effective tool for chemical surface modification. Typical setups for DBD treatments consist of vacuum chambers and vacuum equipment, and so are very cost-intensive. Atmospheric pressure discharges provide a possibility for low-cost surface chemistry, because the setup consists only of the discharge set-up in normal air or in a specified inert gas atmosphere and a high-voltage amplifier coupled with a frequency generator. Silent discharges in air increase the wettability of polymer foils such as PTFE and FEP, sufficient for cell growth and further for surface-chemical binding of proteins onto the polymer. Thereby a simple and low-cost process to achieve protein chips for biomedical applications may be envisaged

  11. Radio frequency atmospheric pressure glow discharge in α and γ modes between two coaxial electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Wanli; Wang, Dezhen; Zhang, Yuantao

    2008-09-01

    The discharge in pure helium and the influence of small nitrogen impurities at atmospheric pressure are investigated based on a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model controlled by a dielectric barrier between two coaxial electrodes. The simulation of the radiofrequency (rf) discharge is based on the one-dimensional continuity equations for electrons, ions, metastable atoms, and molecules, with the much simpler current conservation law replacing the Poisson equation for electric field. Through a computational study of rf atmospheric glow discharges over a wide range of current density, this paper presents evidence of at least two glow discharge modes, namely the α mode and the γ mode. The simulation results show the asymmetry of the discharge set exercises great influence on the discharge mechanisms compared to that with parallel-plane electrodes. It is shown that the particle densities are not uniform in the discharge region but increase gradually from the outer to the inner electrode in both modes. The contrasting dynamic behaviors of the two glow modes are studied. Secondary electron emission strongly influences gas ionization in the γ mode yet matters little in the α mode.

  12. Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agents using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) [A. Schuetze et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 26, 1685 (1998)] is a nonthermal, high pressure, uniform glow plasma discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g., He/O2/H2O), which flows between an outer, grounded, cylindrical electrode and an inner, coaxial electrode powered at 13.56 MHz rf. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, dissociated or ionized by electron impact. Once the gas exits the discharge volume, ions and electrons are rapidly lost by recombination, but the fast-flowing effluent still contains neutral metastable species (e.g., O2*, He*) and radicals (e.g., O, OH). This reactive effluent has been shown to be an effective neutralizer of surrogates for anthrax spores and mustard blister agent. Unlike conventional wet decontamination methods, the plasma effluent does not cause corrosion and it does not destroy wiring, electronics, or most plastics, making it highly suitable for decontamination of sensitive equipment and interior spaces. Furthermore, the reactive species in the effluent rapidly degrade into harmless products leaving no lingering residue or harmful by-products. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  13. High Pressure Atmospheric Sampling Inlet System for Venus or the Gas Giants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thorleaf Research, Inc. proposes to develop a miniaturized high pressure atmospheric sampling inlet system for sample acquisition in extreme planetary environments,...

  14. Study of short atmospheric pressure dc glow microdischarge in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Chirtsov, Alexander; Emelin, Sergey

    2011-10-01

    The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen and oxygen atoms; ozone molecule; and different nitrogen and oxygen ions with different plasmochemical reactions between them. Simulations predicted the main regions of the dc glow discharges including cathode and anode sheath and plasma of negative glow, Faraday dark space and transition region. Gas heating plays an important role in shaping the discharge profiles. The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen

  15. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Fengsen; Tu, Xin; Bo, Zheng; Cen, Kefa; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions. The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals, high speed photography, and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics. Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g., 10–20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone, in this RGA system, a lower gas flow rate (e.g., 2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions. Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas. The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes, the arc restrike mode, takeover mode, and combined modes, can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas. The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51576174), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120101110099) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2015FZA4011)

  16. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied

  17. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hao; ZHU Fengsen; TU Xin; BO Zheng; CEN Kefa; LI Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    In this work,a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions.The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals,high speed photography,and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics.Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g.,10-20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone,in this RGA system,a lower gas flow rate (e.g.,2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions.Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas.The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes,the arc restrike mode,takeover mode,and combined modes,can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas.The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate.

  18. Basic characteristics of an atmospheric pressure rf generated plasma jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shou-Guo; Li Hai-Jiang; Ye Tian-Chun; Zhao Ling-Li

    2004-01-01

    A plasma jet has been developed which operates using radio frequency (rf) power and produces a stable homogeneous discharge at atmospheric pressure. Its discharge characteristics, especially the dependence of stable discharge operating range on the feed gas, were studied, and the electric parameters such as RMS current, RMS voltage and reflected power were obtained with different gas flows. These studies indicate that there is an optimum range of operation of the plasma jet for a filling with a gas mixture of He and O2. Two "failure" modes of the discharge are identified.One is a filamentary arc when the input power is raised above a critical level, another is that the discharge disappears gradually as the addition of O2 approaches 3.2%. Possible explanations for the two failure modes have been given. The current and voltage waveform measurements show that there is a clear phase shift between normal and failure modes.In addition, Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves as a function of pure helium and for 1% addition of oxygen have been studied.

  19. Temperature profiles in filamentary dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physico-chemical properties of atmospheric pressure filamentary dielectric barrier discharges (f-DBD) depend on coupled electrical characteristics and thermal profiles. In this paper, a method for studying thermal and electrical effects is developed. Therefore, thermal profiles of f-DBD are studied for well-defined electrical characteristics of quasi-identical filaments with controlled distribution in time and space. The temperatures of gas, dielectric surface and plasma depend on the surface density and on the temporal frequency of filaments, defining the input power, and can be tuned by controlling heat transfers. Different methods to control these temperatures are depicted. Moreover, heat transfer through conduction and convection from dielectric surface is shown to be the dominant heating mechanism of the flowing gas in the reactor. Finally, experimental results show that the local temperature gradient around each filament can be controlled by the frequency of the applied voltage. Actually, the temperature difference between the filament and the surrounding gas is constant below 10 kHz but increases linearly with the frequency above 10 kHz. At high frequency, the time between two successive filaments occurring at the same position becomes smaller than the relaxation time constant of thermal exchanges (∼0.1 ms). Hence, this rise in local temperature can be attributed to time-limited heat transfers from the filament axis.

  20. Temperature profiles in filamentary dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jidenko, N; Bourgeois, E; Borra, J-P [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas (UMR 8578 CNRS-Univ Paris-Sud Orsay, F-91405) SUPELEC, Plateau Moulon, F-91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France)

    2010-07-28

    Physico-chemical properties of atmospheric pressure filamentary dielectric barrier discharges (f-DBD) depend on coupled electrical characteristics and thermal profiles. In this paper, a method for studying thermal and electrical effects is developed. Therefore, thermal profiles of f-DBD are studied for well-defined electrical characteristics of quasi-identical filaments with controlled distribution in time and space. The temperatures of gas, dielectric surface and plasma depend on the surface density and on the temporal frequency of filaments, defining the input power, and can be tuned by controlling heat transfers. Different methods to control these temperatures are depicted. Moreover, heat transfer through conduction and convection from dielectric surface is shown to be the dominant heating mechanism of the flowing gas in the reactor. Finally, experimental results show that the local temperature gradient around each filament can be controlled by the frequency of the applied voltage. Actually, the temperature difference between the filament and the surrounding gas is constant below 10 kHz but increases linearly with the frequency above 10 kHz. At high frequency, the time between two successive filaments occurring at the same position becomes smaller than the relaxation time constant of thermal exchanges ({approx}0.1 ms). Hence, this rise in local temperature can be attributed to time-limited heat transfers from the filament axis.

  1. Mass spectrometric diagnosis of an atmospheric pressure helium microplasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambient molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) has been used to study how different capillary widths (530 µm and 2.4 mm) and excitation waveforms (continuous wave kHz and pulsed dc) affect the ionic composition of atmospheric pressure plasma jets. It is shown from time-averaged ion intensities that reducing the width of the jet capillary results in a significant increase in the variety of both positive and negative ions detected within the discharge. We discuss this in terms of changes in flow velocity and the onset of turbulence within the plasma plume. Changing the mode of excitation had little effect on the ionic species detected from the microplasma jet; however, there was a notable shift in dominance towards higher mass ions when operated in a continuous wave kHz mode. The temporal evolution of the ions within the microplasma jet was observed for both excitation sources, operated at 5 and 15 kHz. Positive ions were created during periods correlated with the positive and negative peaks in discharge current, while negative ions were predominantly created at times when the discharge current peak was negative. This phenomenon was independent of the driving waveform. For pulsed dc excitation, considerably fewer positive ions were created in periods related to the negative current peaks, especially at higher frequencies. We propose a simple explanation for these processes based on ideas of streamer propagation and the influence of self-induced electric fields in the plasma plume. (paper)

  2. Ultrasonic nebulization atmospheric pressure glow discharge - Preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greda, Krzysztof; Jamroz, Piotr; Pohl, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge (μAPGD) generated between a small-sized He nozzle jet anode and a flowing liquid cathode was coupled with ultrasonic nebulization (USN) for analytical optical emission spectrometry (OES). The spatial distributions of the emitted spectra from the novel coupled USN-μAPGD system and the conventional μAPGD system were compared. In the μAPGD, the maxima of the intensity distribution profiles of the atomic emission lines Ca, Cd, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na and Sr were observed in the near cathode region, whereas, in the case of the USN-μAPGD, they were shifted towards the anode. In the novel system, the intensities of the analytical lines of the studied metals were boosted from several to 35 times. As compared to the conventional μAPGD-OES with the introduction of analytes through the sputtering and/or the electrospray-like nebulization of the flowing liquid cathode solution, the proposed method with the USN introduction of analytes in the form of a dry aerosol provides improved detectability of the studied metals. The detection limits of metals achieved with the USN-μAPGD-OES method were in the range from 0.08 μg L- 1 for Li to 52 μg L- 1 for Mn.

  3. Using atmospheric pressure plasma treatment for treating grey cotton fabric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Chi-Wai; Lam, Chui-Fung; Chan, Chee-Kooi; Ng, Sun-Pui

    2014-02-15

    Conventional wet treatment, desizing, scouring and bleaching, for grey cotton fabric involves the use of high water, chemical and energy consumption which may not be considered as a clean process. This study aims to investigate the efficiency of the atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment on treating grey cotton fabric when compared with the conventional wet treatment. Grey cotton fabrics were treated with different combinations of plasma parameters with helium and oxygen gases and also through conventional desizing, scouring and bleaching processes in order to obtain comparable results. The results obtained from wicking and water drop tests showed that wettability of grey cotton fabrics was greatly improved after plasma treatment and yielded better results than conventional desizing and scouring. The weight reduction of plasma treated grey cotton fabrics revealed that plasma treatment can help remove sizing materials and impurities. Chemical and morphological changes in plasma treated samples were analysed by FTIR and SEM, respectively. Finally, dyeability of the plasma treated and conventional wet treated grey cotton fabrics was compared and the results showed that similar dyeing results were obtained. This can prove that plasma treatment would be another choice for treating grey cotton fabrics. PMID:24507269

  4. Pulsed, atmospheric pressure plasma source for emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jin, Zhe; Su, Yongxuan

    2004-05-11

    A low-power, plasma source-based, portable molecular light emission generator/detector employing an atmospheric pressure pulsed-plasma for molecular fragmentation and excitation is described. The average power required for the operation of the plasma is between 0.02 W and 5 W. The features of the optical emission spectra obtained with the pulsed plasma source are significantly different from those obtained with direct current (dc) discharge higher power; for example, strong CH emission at 431.2 nm which is only weakly observed with dc plasma sources was observed, and the intense CN emission observed at 383-388 nm using dc plasma sources was weak in most cases. Strong CN emission was only observed using the present apparatus when compounds containing nitrogen, such as aniline were employed as samples. The present apparatus detects dimethylsulfoxide at 200 ppb using helium as the plasma gas by observing the emission band of the CH radical. When coupled with a gas chromatograph for separating components present in a sample to be analyzed, the present invention provides an apparatus for detecting the arrival of a particular component in the sample at the end of the chromatographic column and the identity thereof.

  5. Blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in a cross flow at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Qiang

    2015-07-22

    The blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in cross flows were studied, especially concerning the effect of ambient pressure, by conducting experiments at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures. The combined effects of air flow and pressure were investigated by a series of experiments conducted in an especially built wind tunnel in Lhasa, a city on the Tibetan plateau where the altitude is 3650 m and the atmospheric pressure condition is naturally low (64 kPa). These results were compared with results obtained from a wind tunnel at standard atmospheric pressure (100 kPa) in Hefei city (altitude 50 m). The size of the fuel nozzles used in the experiments ranged from 3 to 8 mm in diameter and propane was used as the fuel. It was found that the blow-out limit of the air speed of the cross flow first increased (“cross flow dominant” regime) and then decreased (“fuel jet dominant” regime) as the fuel jet velocity increased in both pressures; however, the blow-out limit of the air speed of the cross flow was much lower at sub-atmospheric pressure than that at standard atmospheric pressure whereas the domain of the blow-out limit curve (in a plot of the air speed of the cross flow versus the fuel jet velocity) shrank as the pressure decreased. A theoretical model was developed to characterize the blow-out limit of nonpremixed jet flames in a cross flow based on a Damköhler number, defined as the ratio between the mixing time and the characteristic reaction time. A satisfactory correlation was obtained at relative strong cross flow conditions (“cross flow dominant” regime) that included the effects of the air speed of the cross flow, fuel jet velocity, nozzle diameter and pressure.

  6. Analytical approach to cosmic ray ionization by nuclei with charge Z in the middle atmosphere - Distribution of galactic CR effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velinov, P. I. Y.; Mateev, L.

    2008-11-01

    The effects of galactic and solar cosmic rays (CR) in the middle atmosphere are considered in this work. A new analytical approach for CR ionization by protons and nuclei with charge Z in the lower ionosphere and middle atmosphere is developed in this paper. For this purpose the ionization losses (d E/d h) according to the Bohr-Bethe-Bloch formula for the energetic charged particles are approximated in three different energy intervals. More accurate expressions for energy decrease E( h) and electron production rate profiles q( h) are derived. The obtained formulas allow comparatively easy computer programming. The integrand in q( h) gives the possibility for application of adequate numerical methods - such as Romberg method or Gauss quadrature, for the solution of the mathematical problem. On this way the process of interaction of cosmic ray particles with the upper, middle and lower atmosphere will be described much more realistically. Computations for cosmic ray ionization in the middle atmosphere are made. The full CR composition is taken into account: protons, Helium ( α-particles), light L, medium M, heavy H and very heavy VH group of nuclei.

  7. Laser spectroscopy in a laser-produced plasma at atmospheric pressure: comparison between A.E.S., L.I.F., and L.E.I./R.I.S. for the analysis of solid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is trace determination in solid samples by atomic spectroscopy in a laser-produced plasma at atmospheric pressure. Working directly on solid samples with laser ablation allows the micro analysis of all sorts of samples (non-conducting, biologicals...), without chemical preparation and possible pollution by chemical reagents. Working at atmospheric pressure simplifies the set-up and the samples preparation and allows a rapid method of analysis. The analytical studies of the plasma are done using Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (AES) Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Laser Enhanced Ionization (LEI) or Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS): advantages and disadvantages of these techniques are presented

  8. Direct measurement of methyl radicals in a methane/air flame at atmospheric pressure by radar REMPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Bottom, Andrew; Zhang, Zhili; Ombrello, Timothy M; Katta, Viswanath R

    2011-11-21

    We report the direct measurements of methyl radicals (CH(3)) in methane/air flames at atmospheric pressure by using coherent microwave Rayleigh scattering (Radar) from Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI), also known as the Radar REMPI technique. A tunable dye laser was used to selectively induce the (2 + 1) REMPI ionization of methyl radicals (CH(3), 3p(2)A(2)('')0(0)(0) band) in a near adiabatic and premixed laminar methane/air flame, generated by a Hencken burner. In situ measurements of the REMPI electrons were made by non-intrusively using a microwave homodyne transceiver detection system. The REMPI spectrum of the CH(3) radical was obtained and a spatial distribution of the radicals limited by focused laser beam geometry, approximately 20 µm normal to the flame front and 2.4 mm parallel to the flame, was determined. The measured CH(3) was in good agreement with numerical simulations performed using the detailed kinetic mechanism of GRI-3.0. To the authors' knowledge, these experiments represent the first directly-measured spatially-resolved CH(3) in a flame at atmospheric pressure. PMID:22109424

  9. Pressure of a partially ionized hydrogen gas: numerical results from exact low temperature expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alastuey, A. [Laboratoire de Physique, ENS Lyon, CNRS, Lyon (France); Ballenegger, V. [Institut UTINAM, Universite de Franche-Comte, CNRS, Besancon (France)

    2010-01-15

    We consider a partially ionized hydrogen gas at low densities, where it reduces almost to an ideal mixture made with hydrogen atoms in their ground-state, ionized protons and ionized electrons. By performing systematic low-temperature expansions within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential, exact formulae for the first.ve leading corrections to the ideal Saha equation of state have been derived[A. Alastuey, V. Ballenegger et al., J. Stat. Phys. 130, 1119 (2008)]. Those corrections account for all effects of interactions and thermal excitations up to order exp(E{sub H} /kT) included, where E{sub H} {approx_equal} -13.6 eV is the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom. Among the.ve leading corrections, three are easy to evaluate, while the remaining ones involve suitably truncated internal partition functions of H{sub 2} molecules and H{sup -} and H{sub 2}{sup +} ions, for which no analytical formulae are available in closed form. We estimate those partitions functions at.nite temperature via a simple phenomenology based on known values of rotational and vibrational energies. This allows us to compute numerically the leading deviations to the Saha pressure along several isotherms and isochores. Our values are compared with those of the OPAL tables (for pure hydrogen) calculated within the ACTEX method (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. The standard facility for nuclide activity measurement by 4πγ high pressure ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard consists of 4πγ pressurized ionization chambers (IC/2C(1.0 MPa) and IG12/A20(2.0 MPa), small current measurement system, standard bottles, one set of long-live reference sources (226Ra), and lead shields. It has the following advantages: 1) long-term stability less than 0.1% per year; 2) fast speed for activity measurement; 3) Do allowing the direct measurement activity of solutions in ampoules; 4) permit measurement over a long range of activity (104-1010 Bq). For short-live nuclides, it is necessary to know the efficiency of the ionization chamber. The calibration factors can be calculated according to the efficiency curve and the probability of γ-ray emission. The calibration factors of some nuclides are calculated and the deviation of the calculation factors from experiment is less than +-3%. The half-life of 99Tcm is measured, the result is 6.0053 +- 0.0018 h

  11. Atmospheric ionization by high-fluence, hard spectrum solar proton events and their probable appearance in the ice core archive

    CERN Document Server

    Melott, Adrian L; Laird, Claude M; Neuenswander, Ben; Atri, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Solar energetic particles ionize the atmosphere, leading to production of nitrogen oxides. It has been suggested that some such events are visible as layers of nitrate in ice cores, yielding archives of energetic, high fluence solar proton events (SPEs). There has been controversy, due to slowness of transport for these species down from the upper stratosphere; past numerical simulations based on an analytic calculation have shown very little ionization below the mid stratosphere. These simulations suffer from deficiencies: they consider only soft SPEs and narrow energy ranges; spectral fits are poorly chosen; with few exceptions secondary particles in air showers are ignored. Using improved simulations that follow development of the proton-induced air shower, we find consistency with recent experiments showing substantial excess ionization down to 5 km. We compute nitrate available from the 23 February 1956 SPE, which had a high fluence, hard spectrum, and well-resolved associated nitrate peak in a Greenland...

  12. Atmospheric pressure He-air plasma jet: Breakdown process and propagation phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, Asma [Independent University, Bangladesh, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Bashundhara, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Laroussi, Mounir [Old Dominion University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Norfolk, Virginia (United States); Pervez, Mohammad Rasel [Master Mind College, Department of Physics, Dhanmondi, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2013-06-15

    In this paper He-discharge (plasma jet/bullet) in atmospheric pressure air and its progression phenomenon has been studied experimentally using ICCD camera, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calibrated dielectric probe measurements. The repetitive nanosecond pulse has applied to a plasma pencil to generate discharge in the helium gas channel. The discharge propagation speed was measured from the ICCD images. The axial electric field distribution in the plasma jet is inferred from the optical emission spectroscopic data and from the probe measurement. The correlation between the jet velocities, jet length with the pulse duration is established. It shows that the plasma jet is not isolated from the input voltage along its propagation path. The discharge propagation speed, the electron density and the local and average electric field distribution along the plasma jet axis predicted from the experimental results are in good agreement with the data predicted by numerical simulation of the streamer propagation presented in different literatures. The ionization phenomenon of the discharge predicts the key ionization parameters, such as speed, peak electric field in the front, and electron density. The maximum local electric field measured by OES is 95 kV/cm at 1.3 cm of the jet axis, and average EF measured by probe is 24 kV/cm at the same place of the jet. The average and local electron density estimated are in the order of 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and it reaches to the maximum of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}.

  13. Nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure-the spark regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) spark discharges have been studied in atmospheric pressure air preheated to 1000 K. Measurements of spark initiation and stability, plasma dynamics, gas temperature and current-voltage characteristics of the spark regime are presented. Using 10 ns pulses applied repetitively at 30 kHz, we find that 2-400 pulses are required to initiate the spark, depending on the applied voltage. Furthermore, about 30-50 pulses are required for the spark discharge to reach steady state, following initiation. Based on space- and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy, the spark discharge in steady state is found to ignite homogeneously in the discharge gap, without evidence of an initial streamer. Using measured emission from the N2 (C-B) 0-0 band, it is found that the gas temperature rises by several thousand Kelvin in the span of about 30 ns following the application of the high-voltage pulse. Current-voltage measurements show that up to 20-40 A of conduction current is generated, which corresponds to an electron number density of up to 1015 cm-3 towards the end of the high-voltage pulse. The discharge dynamics, gas temperature and electron number density are consistent with a streamer-less spark that develops homogeneously through avalanche ionization in volume. This occurs because the pre-ionization electron number density of about 1011 cm-3 produced by the high frequency train of pulses is above the critical density for streamer-less discharge development, which is shown to be about 108 cm-3.

  14. Atmospheric-pressure molecular imaging of biological tissues and biofilms by LAESI mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Peter; Vertes, Akos

    2010-01-01

    Ambient ionization methods in mass spectrometry allow analytical investigations to be performed directly on a tissue or biofilm under native-like experimental conditions. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) is one such development and is particularly well-suited for the investigation of water-containing specimens. LAESI utilizes a mid-infrared laser beam (2.94 μm wavelength) to excite the water molecules of the sample. When the ablation fluence threshold is exceeded, the sample material is expelled in the form of particulate matter and these projectiles travel to tens of millimeters above the sample surface. In LAESI, this ablation plume is intercepted by highly charged droplets to capture a fraction of the ejected sample material and convert its chemical constituents into gas-phase ions. A mass spectrometer equipped with an atmospheric-pressure ion source interface is employed to analyze and record the composition of the released ions originating from the probed area (pixel) of the sample. A systematic interrogation over an array of pixels opens a way for molecular imaging in the microprobe analysis mode. A unique aspect of LAESI mass spectrometric imaging is depth profiling that, in combination with lateral imaging, enables three-dimensional (3D) molecular imaging. With current lateral and depth resolutions of ~100 μm and ~40 μm, respectively, LAESI mass spectrometric imaging helps to explore the molecular structure of biological tissues. Herein, we review the major elements of a LAESI system and provide guidelines for a successful imaging experiment. PMID:20834223

  15. Nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure-the spark regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, David Z; Lacoste, Deanna A; Laux, Christophe O [Laboratoire EM2C, CNRS UPR288, Ecole Centrale Paris, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2010-12-15

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) spark discharges have been studied in atmospheric pressure air preheated to 1000 K. Measurements of spark initiation and stability, plasma dynamics, gas temperature and current-voltage characteristics of the spark regime are presented. Using 10 ns pulses applied repetitively at 30 kHz, we find that 2-400 pulses are required to initiate the spark, depending on the applied voltage. Furthermore, about 30-50 pulses are required for the spark discharge to reach steady state, following initiation. Based on space- and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy, the spark discharge in steady state is found to ignite homogeneously in the discharge gap, without evidence of an initial streamer. Using measured emission from the N{sub 2} (C-B) 0-0 band, it is found that the gas temperature rises by several thousand Kelvin in the span of about 30 ns following the application of the high-voltage pulse. Current-voltage measurements show that up to 20-40 A of conduction current is generated, which corresponds to an electron number density of up to 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} towards the end of the high-voltage pulse. The discharge dynamics, gas temperature and electron number density are consistent with a streamer-less spark that develops homogeneously through avalanche ionization in volume. This occurs because the pre-ionization electron number density of about 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} produced by the high frequency train of pulses is above the critical density for streamer-less discharge development, which is shown to be about 10{sup 8} cm{sup -3}.

  16. Selective-Reagent-Ionization Mass Spectrometry: New Prospects for Atmospheric Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzer, Philipp; Jordan, Alfons; Hartungen, Eugen; Hanel, Gernot; Jürschik, Simone; Herbig, Jens; Märk, Lukas; Märk, Tilmann D.

    2014-05-01

    Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS), which was introduced to the scientific community in the 1990's, has quickly evolved into a well-established technology for atmospheric research and environmental chemistry [1]. Advantages of PTR-MS are i) high sensitivities of several hundred cps/ppbv, ii) detection limits at or below the pptv level, iii) direct injection sampling (i.e. no sample preparation), iv) response times in the 100 ms regime and v) online quantification. However, one drawback is a somehow limited selectivity, as in case of quadrupole mass filter based instruments only information about nominal m/z are available. In Time-Of-Flight (TOF) mass analyzer based instruments selectivity is drastically increased by a high mass resolution of up to 8000 m/Δm, but e.g. isomers still cannot be separated. In 2009 we introduced an advanced version of PTR-MS, which permits switching the reagent ions from H3O+ to NO+ and O2+, respectively [2]. This novel type of instrumentation was called Selective-Reagent-Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SRI-MS) and has been successfully used to separate isomers, e.g. the biogenic compounds isoprene and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol as shown by Karl et al. [3]. Switching the reagent ions dramatically increases selectivity and thus applicability of SRI-MS in atmospheric research. Here we report on the latest results utilizing an even more advanced embodiment of SRI-MS enabling the use of the additional reagent ions Kr+ and Xe+ [4]. With this technology important atmospheric compounds, such as CO2, CO, CH4, O2, etc. can be quantified and selectivity is increased even further. We present comparison data between diesel and gasoline car exhaust gases and quantitative data on indoor air for these compounds, which are not detectable with classical PTR-MS. Additionally, we show very recent examples of isomers which cannot be separated with PTR-MS but can clearly be distinguished with SRI-MS. Finally, we give an overview of ongoing SRI

  17. The growth of organosilicon film using a hexamethyldisilazane/oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet, using a hexamethyldisilazane and oxygen mixture, was used to deposit an organosilicon thin film on polycarbonate (PC) substrates. The atmospheric pressure plasma jet deposited homogeneous thin films without unfavorable contamination from the plasma source. The surface properties of the organosilicon thin films were studied as a function of oxygen gas flow rate. The atmospheric pressure plasma deposited organosilicon thin films were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV–vis spectrometry and atomic forced microscopy. Surface analysis showed that atmospheric pressure plasma deposited films are more inorganic as the oxygen flow rate increases. The UV–vis spectra, detected in the range 300–800 nm, demonstrated improved transparency in the visible region and increased absorption in UV region of the spectrum. The improved hardness of the atmospheric pressure plasma deposited PC substrates was measured using a pencil hardness testing method and this was related to the chemical composition of the plasma deposited organosilicon thin films. The plasma jet allowed deposition of the coating without a chamber. - Highlights: ► Organosilicon thin films on polycarbonate (PC) by atmospheric pressure plasma jet. ► Properties of SiOx films vary with the injected oxygen flow rate in the plasma jet. ► Improved hardness of atmospheric pressure plasma deposited SiOx films achieved. ► Double-pipe atmospheric pressure plasma jet suitable for chamberless deposition

  18. The growth of organosilicon film using a hexamethyldisilazane/oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chun, E-mail: chunhuang@saturn.yzu.edu.tw; Wu, Shin-Yi; Tsai, Ching-Yuan; Liu, Wei-Ting

    2013-02-01

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet, using a hexamethyldisilazane and oxygen mixture, was used to deposit an organosilicon thin film on polycarbonate (PC) substrates. The atmospheric pressure plasma jet deposited homogeneous thin films without unfavorable contamination from the plasma source. The surface properties of the organosilicon thin films were studied as a function of oxygen gas flow rate. The atmospheric pressure plasma deposited organosilicon thin films were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV–vis spectrometry and atomic forced microscopy. Surface analysis showed that atmospheric pressure plasma deposited films are more inorganic as the oxygen flow rate increases. The UV–vis spectra, detected in the range 300–800 nm, demonstrated improved transparency in the visible region and increased absorption in UV region of the spectrum. The improved hardness of the atmospheric pressure plasma deposited PC substrates was measured using a pencil hardness testing method and this was related to the chemical composition of the plasma deposited organosilicon thin films. The plasma jet allowed deposition of the coating without a chamber. - Highlights: ► Organosilicon thin films on polycarbonate (PC) by atmospheric pressure plasma jet. ► Properties of SiOx films vary with the injected oxygen flow rate in the plasma jet. ► Improved hardness of atmospheric pressure plasma deposited SiOx films achieved. ► Double-pipe atmospheric pressure plasma jet suitable for chamberless deposition.

  19. Thermal mass loss of protoplanetary cores with hydrogen-dominated atmospheres: The influences of ionization and orbital distance

    CERN Document Server

    Erkaev, N V; Odert, P; Kislyakova, K G; Johnstone, C P; Güdel, M; Khodachenko, M L

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the loss rates of the hydrogen atmospheres of terrestrial planets with a range of masses and orbital distances by assuming a 100 times stronger soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) flux. We apply a 1D upper atmosphere radiation absorption and hydrodynamic escape model that takes into account ionization, dissociation and recombination to calculate hydrogen mass loss rates. We study the effect of the ionization, dissociation and recombination on the thermal mass loss rates of hydrogen-dominated super-Earths and compare the results with those obtained by the energy-limited escape formula which is widely used for mass loss evolution studies. Our results indicate that the energy-limited formula can to a great extent over- or underestimate the hydrogen mass loss rates by amounts that depend on the stellar XUV flux and planetary parameters such as mass, size, effective temperature, and XUV absorption radii.

  20. Forbush-effects and atmospheric pressure dynamics at high-altitude Tien Shan station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present atmospheric pressure dynamics studies at the high-altitude Tien Shan station (3340 m above sea level) during 23rd cycle of solar activity after Forbush-effects. It is established that 80 % of Forbush effects with delay 1 ÷ 3 days are accompanied with steady depression of atmospheric pressure irrespective of geomagnetic field conditions. We found that atmospheric pressure dynamics at mountains and ground levels during investigated periods is different. Experimental results are compared with possible mechanisms of influence of sporadic effects of solar activity on circulation of the lower atmosphere.

  1. Effects of a Relativistic Electron Beam Interaction with the Upper Atmosphere: Ionization, X-Rays, and Optical Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R. A.; Nicolls, M. J.; Sanchez, E. R.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Neilson, J.

    2014-12-01

    An artificial beam of relativistic (0.5--10 MeV) electrons has been proposed as an active experiment in the ionosphere and magnetosphere, with applications to magnetic field-line tracing, studies of wave-particle interactions, and beam-atmosphere interactions. The beam-atmosphere interaction, while a scientific endeavor of its own, also provides key diagnostics for other experiments. We present results of Monte Carlo simulations of the interaction of a beam of relativistic electrons with the upper atmosphere as they are injected downwards from a notional high altitude (thermospheric / ionospheric) injection platform. The beam parameters, defined by realistic parameters of a compact linear accelerator, are used to create a distribution of thousands of electrons. Each electron is injected downwards from 300 km altitude towards the dense atmosphere, where it undergoes elastic and inelastic collisions, leading to secondary ionization, optical emissions, and X-rays via bremsstrahlung. Here we describe the Monte Carlo model and present calculations of diagnostic outputs, including optical emissions, X-ray fluxes, secondary ionization, and backscattered energetic electron fluxes. Optical emissions are propagated to the ground through the lower atmosphere, including the effects of atmospheric absorption and scattering, to estimate the brightness of the emission column for a given beam current and energy. Similarly, X-ray fluxes are propagated to hypothetical detectors on balloons and satellites, taking into account Compton scattering and photoabsorption. Secondary ionization is used to estimate the radar signal returns from various ground-based radar facilities. Finally, simulated backscattered electron fluxes are measured at the injection location. The simulation results show that for realizable accelerator parameters, each of these diagnostics should be readily detectable by appropriate instruments.

  2. Oxygen at 2 atmospheres absolute pressure does not increase the radiation sensitivity of normal brain in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial radiation was administered to CD Fisher rats at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 atmospheres oxygen pressure. Life span following radiation was recorded. Surviving animals were killed at 28 weeks and the brains were examined independently by two neuropathologists. Survival time was significantly less in animals receiving higher doses of radiation but showed no relationship to the oxygen pressure in the environment of the animal at the time radiation was administered. Microscopic examination of the brain did not reveal any differences in animals radiated in a normobaric or hyperbaric oxygen environment. It is concluded that hyperbaric oxygen does not sensitize the normal brain to the effects of ionizing radiation

  3. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of flat aluminum surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • DCSBD plasma is applicable for activation and cleaning of flat aluminum surfaces. • Decrease in the value of the contact angle after 1 s plasma treatment was 93%. • EDX measurements confirmed removal of oil contamination by 50% decreasing of carbon. • XPS analyze shown decrease of carbon content and increase of aluminum hydroxide and oxyhydroxide. - Abstract: The atmospheric pressure ambient air and oxygen plasma treatment of flat aluminum sheets using the so-called Diffuse Coplanar Surface Barrier Discharge (DCSBD) were investigated. The main objective of this study is to show the possibility of using DCSBD plasma source to activate and clean aluminum surface. Surface free energy measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used for the characterization of the aluminum surface chemistry and changes induced by plasma treatment. Short plasma exposure times (several seconds) led to a significant increase in the surface free energy due to changes of its polar components. Various ageing effects, depending on the storage conditions were observed and discussed. Effects of air and oxygen plasmas on the removal of varying degrees of artificial hydrocarbon contamination of aluminum surfaces were investigated by the means of EDX, ATR-FTIR and XPS methods. A significant decrease in the carbon surface content after the plasma treatment indicates a strong plasma cleaning effect, which together with high energy efficiency of the DCSBD plasma source points to potential benefits of DCSBD application in processing of the flat aluminum surfaces

  4. Pulsed microwave discharge at atmospheric pressure for NOx decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3.0 GHz pulsed microwave source operated at atmospheric pressure with a pulse power of 1.4 MW, a maximum repetition rate of 40 Hz, and a pulse length of 3.5 μs is experimentally studied with respect to the ability to remove NOx from synthetic exhaust gases. Experiments in gas mixtures containing N2/O2/NO with typically 500 ppm NO are carried out. The discharge is embedded in a high-Q microwave resonator, which provides a reliable plasma ignition. Vortex flow is applied to the exhaust gas to improve gas treatment. Concentration measurements by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirm an NOx reduction of more than 90% in the case of N2/NO mixtures. The admixture of oxygen lowers the reductive potential of the reactor, but NOx reduction can still be observed up to 9% O2 concentration. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering technique is applied to measure the vibrational and rotational temperature of N2. Gas temperatures of about 400 K are found, whilst the vibrational temperature is 3000-3500 K in pure N2. The vibrational temperature drops to 1500 K when O2 and/or NO are present. The randomly distributed relative frequency of occurrence of selected breakdown field intensities is measured by a calibrated, short linear-antenna. The breakdown field strength in pure N2 amounts to 2.2x106 V m-1, a value that is reproducible within 2%. In the case of O2 and/or NO admixture, the frequency distribution of the breakdown field strength scatters more and extends over a range from 3 to 8x106 V m-1

  5. Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges interacting with liquid covered tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of plasmas with liquids is of increasing importance in biomedical applications. Tissues treated by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) in plasma medicine are often covered by a thin layer of liquid, typically a blood serum like water with dissolved gases and proteins up to hundreds of micrometres thick. The liquid processes the plasma-produced radicals and ions prior to their reaching the tissue. In this paper, we report on a computational investigation of the interaction of DBDs in humid air with a thin water layer covering tissue. The water layer, 50–400 µm thick, contains dissolved O2aq (aq means an aqueous species) and alkane-like hydrocarbons (RHaq). In the model, the DBDs are operated with multiple pulses at 100 Hz followed by a 1 s afterglow. Gas phase reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) intersect the water-vapour saturated air above the liquid and then solvate when reaching the water. The photolysis of water by plasma-produced UV/VUV plays a significant role in the production of radicals. Without RHaq, O2aq−, ONOOaq−, NO3aq− and hydronium (H3Oaq+) dominate the water ions with H3Oaq+ determining the pH. The dominant RONS in the liquid are O3aq, H2O2aq, and HNOxaq. Dissolved O2aq assists the production of HNO3aq and HOONOaq during the afterglow. With RHaq, reactive oxygen species are largely consumed, leaving an R·aq (alkyl radical) to reach the tissue. These results are sensitive to the thickness of the water layer. (paper)

  6. Collaborative Research. Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma Chemistry-Photon Synergies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung-Jin [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Eden, James Gary [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Combining the effects of low temperature, atmospheric pressure microplasmas and microplasma photon sources offers the promise of greatly expanding the range of applications for each of them. The plasma sources create active chemical species and these can be activated further by the addition of photons and the associated photochemistry. There are many ways to combine the effects of plasma chemistry and photochemistry, especially if there are multiple phases present. This project combined the construction of appropriate test experimental systems, various spectroscopic diagnostics and mathematical modeling. Through a continuous discussion and co-design process with the UC-Berkeley Team, we have successfully completed the fabrication and testing of all components for a microplasma array-assisted system designed for photon-activated plasma chemistry research. Microcavity plasma lamps capable of generating more than 20 mW/cm2 at 172 nm (Xe dimer) were fabricated with a custom form factor to mate to the plasma chemistry setup, and a lamp was current being installed by the Berkeley team so as to investigate plasma chemistry-photon synergies at a higher photon energy (~7.2 eV) as compared to the UVA treatment that is afforded by UV LEDs operating at 365 nm. In particular, motivated by the promising results from the Berkeley team with UVA treatment, we also produced the first generation of lamps that can generate photons in the 300-370 nm wavelength range. Another set of experiments, conducted under the auspices of this grant, involved the use of plasma microjet arrays. The combination of the photons and excited radicals produced by the plasma column resulted in broad area deactivation of bacteria.

  7. Tailoring non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas for healthcare technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Timo

    2012-10-01

    Non-equilibrium plasmas operated at ambient atmospheric pressure are very efficient sources for energy transport through reactive neutral particles (radicals and metastables), charged particles (ions and electrons), UV radiation, and electro-magnetic fields. This includes the unique opportunity to deliver short-lived highly reactive species such as atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can initiate a wide range of reactions in biochemical systems, both therapeutic and toxic. The toxicological implications are not clear, e.g. potential risks through DNA damage. It is anticipated that interactions with biological systems will be governed through synergies between two or more species. Suitable optimized plasma sources are improbable through empirical investigations. Quantifying the power dissipation and energy transport mechanisms through the different interfaces from the plasma regime to ambient air, towards the liquid interface and associated impact on the biological system through a new regime of liquid chemistry initiated by the synergy of delivering multiple energy carrying species, is crucial. The major challenge to overcome the obstacles of quantifying energy transport and controlling power dissipation has been the severe lack of suitable plasma sources and diagnostic techniques. Diagnostics and simulations of this plasma regime are very challenging; the highly pronounced collision dominated plasma dynamics at very small dimensions requires extraordinary high resolution - simultaneously in space (microns) and time (picoseconds). Numerical simulations are equally challenging due to the inherent multi-scale character with very rapid electron collisions on the one extreme and the transport of chemically stable species characterizing completely different domains. This presentation will discuss our recent progress actively combining both advance optical diagnostics and multi-scale computer simulations.

  8. Common 0.1 bar Tropopause in Thick Atmospheres Set by Pressure-Dependent Infrared Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Tyler D

    2014-01-01

    A minimum atmospheric temperature, or tropopause, occurs at a pressure of around 0.1 bar in the atmospheres of Earth, Titan, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, despite great differences in atmospheric composition, gravity, internal heat and sunlight. In all these bodies, the tropopause separates a stratosphere with a temperature profile that is controlled by the absorption of shortwave solar radiation, from a region below characterised by convection, weather, and clouds. However, it is not obvious why the tropopause occurs at the specific pressure near 0.1 bar. Here we use a physically-based model to demonstrate that, at atmospheric pressures lower than 0.1 bar, transparency to thermal radiation allows shortwave heating to dominate, creating a stratosphere. At higher pressures, atmospheres become opaque to thermal radiation, causing temperatures to increase with depth and convection to ensue. A common dependence of infrared opacity on pressure, arising from the shared physics of molecular absorption, sets t...

  9. Characterization of aromaticity in analogues of titan's atmospheric aerosols with two-step laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Carrasco, Nathalie; Benilan, Yves; Cernogora, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Gazeau, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and Nitrogen containing PAH (PANH) as intermediates of aerosol production in the atmosphere of Titan has been a subject of controversy for a long time. An analysis of the atmospheric emission band observed by the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) at 3.28 micrometer suggests the presence of neutral polycyclic aromatic species in the upper atmosphere of Titan. These molecules are seen as the counter part of negative and positive aromatics ions suspected by the Plasma Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft, but the low resolution of the instrument hinders any molecular speciation. In this work we investigate the specific aromatic content of Titan's atmospheric aerosols through laboratory simulations. We report here the selective detection of aromatic compounds in tholins, Titan's aerosol analogues, produced with a capacitively coupled plasma in a N2:CH4 95:5 gas mixture. For this purpose, Two-Step Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Ma...

  10. First steps towards the reaction kinetics of HMDSO in an atmospheric pressure plasma jet in argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffhagen, Detlef; Becker, Markus M.; Foest, Rüdiger; Schäfer, Jan; Sigeneger, Florian

    2014-10-01

    Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) is a silicon-organic compound which is often used as precursor for thin-film deposition by means of plasma polymerization because of its high deposition rate and low toxicity. To improve the physical understanding of the deposition processes, fundamental investigations have been performed to clarify the plasma-chemical reaction pathways of HMDSO and their effect on the composition and structure of the deposited film. The current contribution represents the main primary and secondary plasma-chemical processes and their reaction products in the effluent region of an argon plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. The importance of the different collision processes of electrons and heavy particles are discussed. Results of numerical modelling of the plasma jet and the Ar-HMDSO reaction kinetics indicate that the fragmentation of HMDSO is mainly initiated by collisions with molecular argon ions, while Penning ionization processes play a minor role for the reaction kinetics in the effluent region of the jet. The work has been supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) under Grant LO 623/3-1.

  11. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets interacting with wet cells: delivery of electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    The use of atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) in plasma medicine have produced encouraging results in wound treatment, surface sterilization, deactivation of bacteria, and treatment of cancer cells. It is known that many of the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species produced by the APPJ are critical to these processes. Other key components to treatment include the ion and photon fluxes, and the electric fields produced in cells by the ionization wave of the APPJ striking in the vicinity of the cells. These relationships are often complicated by the cells being covered by a thin liquid layer—wet cells. In this paper, results from a computational investigation of the interaction of APPJs with tissue beneath a liquid layer are discussed. The emphasis of this study is the delivery of electric fields by an APPJ sustained in He/O2  =  99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air to cells lying beneath water with thickness of 200 μm. The water layer represents the biological fluid typically covering tissue during treatment. Three voltages were analyzed—two that produce a plasma effluent that touches the surface of the water layer and one that does not touch. The effect of the liquid layer thickness, 50 μm to 1 mm, was also examined. Comparisons were made of the predicted intracellular electric fields to those thresholds used in the field of bioelectronics.

  12. Numerical study of the anode boundary layer in atmospheric pressure arc discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, I. L.; Krivtsun, I. V.; Reisgen, U.

    2016-03-01

    The anode boundary layer in atmospheric pressure arc discharges is studied numerically on the basis of the hydrodynamic (diffusion) equations for plasma components. The governing equations are formulated in a unified manner without the assumptions of thermal equilibrium, ionization equilibrium or quasi-neutrality. For comparison, a quasi-neutral model of the anode layer is also considered. The numerical computations are performed for an argon arc at typical values of the current density in anode layers (500-2000 A cm-2). The results of numerical modelling show that the common collisionless model of the sheath fails to describe the sheath region for the problem under consideration. For this reason, a detailed analysis of the anode sheath is performed using the results of unified modelling. In addition, the distributions of plasma parameters in the anode layer are analysed and the basic characteristics of the layer (anode voltage drop, sheath voltage drop, anode layer thickness, sheath thickness, heat flux to the anode) are calculated. Our results are found to be in good agreement with the existing theoretical predictions and experimental data. The dependence of the anode layer characteristics on the current density is also discussed.

  13. A computational modeling study on the helium atmospheric pressure plasma needle discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Mu-Yang; Yang, Cong-Ying; Liu, San-Qiu; Wang, Zhen-Dong; Lv, Yan; Wang, De-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    A two-dimensional coupled model of neutral gas flow and plasma dynamics is employed to investigate the streamer dynamics in a helium plasma needle at atmospheric pressure. A parametric study of the streamer propagation as a function of needle tip curvature radius and helium gas flow rate is presented. The key chemical reactions at the He/air mixing layer which drive the streamer propagation are the direct ionization via collision with electrons, the Penning effect being not so crucial. With increasing the gas flow rate from 0.2 standard liter per minute (SLM) to 0.8 SLM, however, the emissions resulting from reactive oxygen and nitrogen species change from a solid circle to a hollow profile and the average streamer propagation velocity decreases. Air impurities (backdiffusion from ambient air) in the helium jet result in a significant increase in the streamer propagation velocity. Besides, with decreasing the tip curvature radiusfrom 200 μm to 100 μm, the electron avalanche process around the near-tip region is more pronounced. However, the spatially resolved plasma parameters distributions (electron, helium metastables, ground state atomic oxygen, etc.) remain almost the same, except that around the near-tip region where their peak values are more than doubled. Project supported partly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11465013), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant No. 20151BAB212012), and in part by the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2015DFA61800).

  14. Laser induced chemical vapour deposition of TiN coatings at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Croonen, Y.; Verspui, G.

    1993-01-01

    Laser induced Chemical Vapour Deposition of a wide variety of materials has been studied extensively at reduced pressures. However, for this technique to be economically and industrially applicable, processes at atmospheric pressure are preferred. A model study was made on the substrate-coating system molybdenum-titaniumnitride focussing on the feasibility to deposit TiN films locally at atmospheric pressure. The results of this study turned out to be very promising. A Nd-YAG laser beam ([MAT...

  15. Ionization Parameter as a Diagnostic of Radiation and Wind Pressures in H II Regions and Starburst Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yeh, Sherry C C

    2012-01-01

    The ionization parameter U is potentially useful for measuring radiation pressure feedback from massive star clusters, as it reflects the radiation-to-gas-pressure ratio and is readily derived from mid-infrared line ratios. We consider several effects which determine the apparent value of U in HII regions and galaxies. An upper limit is set by the compression of gas by radiation pressure. The pressure from stellar winds and the presence of neutral clumps both reduce U for a given radiation intensity. The most intensely irradiated regions are selectively dimmed by internal dust absorption of ionizing photons, inducing observational bias on galactic scales. We explore these effects analytically and numerically, and use them to interpret previous observational results. We find that radiation confinement sets the upper limit log_10 U = -1 seen in individual regions. Unresolved starbursts display a maximum value of ~ -2.3. While lower, this is also consistent with a large portion of their HII regions being radiati...

  16. Adjustment of high-pressure twin gridded ionization chamber and preliminary measurement of 58Ni(n,p) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-pressure twin gridded ionization chamber is introduced. After some adjustments, the chamber was used to measure the 58Ni(n,p) reaction. The results show that the current system and method are suitable for the research of (n,p) reactions

  17. Ionization in atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets VI: Properties of large-scale discharge events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineral clouds in substellar atmospheres play a special role as a catalyst for a variety of charge processes. If clouds are charged, the surrounding environment becomes electrically activated, and ensembles of charged grains are electrically discharging (e.g., by lightning), which significantly influences the local chemistry creating conditions similar to those thought responsible for life in early planetary atmospheres. We note that such lightning discharges contribute also to the ionization state of the atmosphere. We apply scaling laws for electrical discharge processes from laboratory measurements and numerical experiments to DRIFT-PHOENIX model atmosphere results to model the discharge's propagation downward (as lightning) and upward (as sprites) through the atmospheric clouds. We evaluate the spatial extent and energetics of lightning discharges. The atmospheric volume affected (e.g., by increase of temperature or electron number) is larger in a brown dwarf atmosphere (108-1010 m3) than in a giant gas planet (104-106 m3). Our results suggest that the total dissipated energy in one event is <1012 J for all models of initial solar metallicity. First attempts to show the influence of lightning on the local gas phase indicate an increase of small carbohydrate molecules like CH and CH2 at the expense of CO and CH4. Dust-forming molecules are destroyed and the cloud particle properties are frozen in unless enough time is available for complete evaporation. We summarize instruments potentially suitable to observe lightning on extrasolar objects.

  18. A flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow as an ion source coupled to a differential mobility analyzer for volatile organic compound detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza, Marcos; Orejas, Jaime; López-Vidal, Silvia; Pisonero, Jorge; Bordel, Nerea; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-05-23

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharges have been widely used in the last decade as ion sources in ambient mass spectrometry analyses. Here, an in-house flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) has been developed as an alternative ion source for differential mobility analysis (DMA). The discharge source parameters (inter-electrode distance, current and helium flow rate) determining the atmospheric plasma characteristics have been optimized in terms of DMA spectral simplicity with the highest achievable sensitivity while keeping an adequate plasma stability and so the FAPA working conditions finally selected were: 35 mA, 1 L min(-1) of He and an inter-electrode distance of 8 mm. Room temperature in the DMA proved to be adequate for the coupling and chemical analysis with the FAPA source. Positive and negative ions for different volatile organic compounds were tested and analysed by FAPA-DMA using a Faraday cup as a detector and proper operation in both modes was possible (without changes in FAPA operational parameters). The FAPA ionization source showed simpler ion mobility spectra with narrower peaks and a better, or similar, sensitivity than conventional UV-photoionization for DMA analysis in positive mode. Particularly, the negative mode proved to be a promising field of further research for the FAPA ion source coupled to ion mobility, clearly competitive with other more conventional plasmas such as corona discharge. PMID:27141552

  19. Relating landfill gas emissions to atmospheric pressure using numerical modeling and state-space analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T.G.; Christophersen, Mette; Moldrup, P.; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2003-01-01

    were applied: (I) State-space analysis was used to identify relations between gas flux and short-term (hourly) variations in atmospheric pressure. (II) A numerical gas transport model was fitted to the data and used to quantify short-term impacts of variations in atmospheric pressure, volumetric soil-water...... content, soil gas permeability, soil gas diffusion coefficients, and biological CH4 degradation rate upon landfill gas concentration and fluxes in the soil. Fluxes and concentrations were found to be most sensitive to variations in volumetric soil water content, atmospheric pressure variations and gas...

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Electrospin Hybrid Process for Protective Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitchuli Gangadharan, Narendiran

    2011-12-01

    Chemical and biological (C-B) warfare agents like sarin, sulfur mustard, anthrax are usually dispersed into atmosphere in the form of micro aerosols. They are considered to be dangerous weapon of mass destruction next to nuclear weapons. The airtight protective clothing materials currently available are able to stop the diffusion of threat agents but not good enough to detoxify them, which endangers the wearers. Extensive research efforts are being made to prepare advanced protective clothing materials that not only prevent the diffusion of C-B agents, but also detoxify them into harmless products thus ensuring the safety and comfort of the wearer. Electrospun nanofiber mats are considered to have effective filtration characteristics to stop the diffusion of submicron level particulates without sacrificing air permeability characteristics and could be used in protective application as barrier material. In addition, functional nanofibers could be potentially developed to detoxify the C-B warfare threats into harmless products. In this research, electrospun nanofibers were deposited on fabric surface to improve barrier efficiency without sacrificing comfort-related properties of the fabrics. Multi-functional nanofibers were fabricated through an electrospinning-electrospraying hybrid process and their ability to detoxify simulants of C-B agents was evaluated. Nanofibers were also deposited onto plasma-pretreated woven fabric substrate through a newly developed plasma-electrospinning hybrid process, to improve the adhesive properties of nanofibers on the fabric surface. The nanofiber adhesion and durability properties were evaluated by peel test, flex and abrasion resistance tests. In this research work, following tasks have been carried out: i) Controlled deposition of nanofiber mat onto woven fabric substrate Electrospun Nylon 6 fiber mats were deposited onto woven 50/50 Nylon/Cotton fabric with the motive of making them into protective material against submicron

  1. Effect that atmospheric pressure exerts to DC tracking of polyethylene irradiated with gamma ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the testing method of tracking resistance carried out generally, particular stipulation is not made on atmospheric pressure. But there is the case that electric and electronic equipments are used in the place of low pressure. The lowering of atmospheric pressure affects the phenomenon of tracking deterioration, and it is sufficiently conceivable that tracking resistance changes. So far, the effect that atmospheric pressure exerts on tracking resistance at the time of applying AC voltage has been mainly studied, however recently, DC voltage has become widely utilized, and the elucidation of DC tracking phenomena has become important. The experiment of irradiating Co-60 gamma ray to polyethylene and obtaining the basic data on the effect that atmospheric pressure exerts to DC tracking using those samples was carried out. The experimental setup, the samples and the tracking resistance test are reported. The relation of the weight loss with atmospheric pressure, the relation of the maximum erosion depth and atmospheric pressure, the measurement of the amount of residual carbide and the tracking resistance using brass electrodes are described. (K.I.)

  2. TiN films grown by reactive magnetron sputtering with enhanced ionization at low discharge pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TiN films were produced by reactive magnetron sputtering at a discharge pressure of 0.09 Pa on substrates placed 200 mm away from the magnetron target, using a sputtering system with enhanced ionization by means of multipolar magnetic confinement. The effects on film properties are reported for two ranges of values: an external substrate bias Us of from -35 to -150 V, and a floating potential Ufl of from -24 to -45 V. All films show a dense microstructure, a smooth surface and shiny golden color. The microhardness HV is between 2000 and 2600 kg mm-1, a high critical load of up to Lc = 58 N in scratch tests and the coefficient of friction against a cemented carbide counter ball is between 0.12 and 0.22. The color co-ordinated L*, A* and B* depend on the bias voltage. The brightness L* reaches 78 CIELAB units. The properties of films prepared at Us between -60 and -150 V compare well to those of ion-plated films. The films prepared at | Us | fl, exhibit comparatively low compressive microstresses down to 2.2 GPa and low microstrain down to 3.5 x 10-3. These films show single (111), (200) or (220) textures, or a mixed (200) + (111) texture, depending on the U value at which they were prepared. (author)

  3. Methods for Creation and Detection of Ultra-Strong Artificial Ionization in the Upper Atmosphere (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Briczinski, S. J.; Kendall, E. A.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Michell, R.

    2013-12-01

    The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) transmitter in Alaska has been used to produce localized regions of artificial ionization at altitudes between 150 and 250 km. High power radio waves tuned near harmonics of the electron gyro frequency were discovered by Todd Pederson of the Air Force Research Laboratory to produce ionosonde traces that looked like artificial ionization layers below the natural F-region. The initial regions of artificial ionization (AI) were not stable but had moved down in altitude over a period of 15 minutes. Recently, artificial ionization has been produced by the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 6th harmonics transmissions by the HAARP. In march 2013, the artificial ionization clouds were sustained for more the 5 hours using HAARP tuned to the 4 fce at the full power of 3.6 Mega-Watts with a twisted-beam antenna pattern. Frequency selection with narrow-band sweeps and antenna pattern shaping has been employed for optimal generation of AI. Recent research at HAARP has produced the longest lived and denser artificial ionization clouds using HF transmissions at the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency and ring-shaped radio beams tailored to prevent the descent of the clouds. Detection of artificial ionization employs (1) ionosonde echoes, (2) coherent backscatter from the Kodiak SuperDARN radar, (3) enhanced ion and plasma line echoes from the HAARP MUIR radar at 400 MHz, (4) high resolution optical image from ground sites, and (5) unique stimulated electromagnetic emissions, and (6) strong UHF and L-Band scintillation induced into trans-ionospheric signals from satellite radio beacons. Future HAARP experiments will determine the uses of long-sustained AI for enhanced HF communications.

  4. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry: A tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Cheng, Sy-Chi; Cho, Yi-Tzu [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Shiea, Jentaie, E-mail: jetea@fac.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Cancer Center, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-19

    Highlights: {yields} Ambient ionization technique allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. {yields} We sort ambient ionization techniques into three main analytical strategies, direct ionization, direct desorption/ionization, and two-step ionization. {yields} The underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques are described and compared. - Abstract: Ambient ionization is a set of mass spectrometric ionization techniques performed under ambient conditions that allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. Using combinations of different types of sample introduction systems and ionization methods, several novel techniques have been developed over the last few years with many applications (e.g., food safety screening; detection of pharmaceuticals and drug abuse; monitoring of environmental pollutants; detection of explosives for antiterrorism and forensics; characterization of biological compounds for proteomics and metabolomics; molecular imaging analysis; and monitoring chemical and biochemical reactions). Electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization are the two main ionization principles most commonly used in ambient ionization mass spectrometry. This tutorial paper provides a review of the publications related to ambient ionization techniques. We describe and compare the underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques.

  5. Applications of tunable high energy/pressure pulsed lasers to atmospheric transmission and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R. V.; Seals, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy C12 O2(16) lasers were improved by pulsed high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening of laser lines, permits tuning the laser 'off' atmospheric C12 O2(16) absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers, and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. The atmospheric transmission of tuned C12 O2(16) lasers compares favorably with C12 O2(18) isotope lasers and CO lasers. The advantages of tunable, high energy, high pressure pulsed lasers over tunable diode lasers and waveguide lasers, in combining high energies with a large tuning range, are evaluated for certain applications to remote sensing of atmospheric constituents and pollutants. Pulsed operation considerably increases the signal to noise ratio without seriously affecting the high spectral resolution of signal detection obtained with laser heterodyning.

  6. Pressure of a partially ionized hydrogen gas : numerical results from exact low temperature expansions

    OpenAIRE

    Alastuey, Angel; Ballenegger, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    8 pages International audience We consider a partially ionized hydrogen gas at low densities, where it reduces almost to an ideal mixture made with hydrogen atoms in their ground-state, ionized protons and ionized electrons. By performing systematic low-temperature expansions within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential, exact formulae for the first five leading corrections to the ideal Saha equat...

  7. A Minimized Mutual Information retrieval for simultaneous atmospheric pressure and temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Koner, Prabhat K.; Drummond, James R.

    2010-01-01

    The primary focus of the Mars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) collaboration between NASA and ESA is the detection of the temporal and spatial variation of the atmospheric trace gases using a solar occultation Fourier transform spectrometer. To retrieve any trace gas mixing ratios from these measurements, the atmospheric pressure and temperature have to be known accurately. Thus, a prototype retrieval model for the determination of pressure and temperature from a broadband high resolution infrared Fou...

  8. Development of propulsion for high atmospheric pressure or dense environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsi, G.; Back, L. H.; Dowler, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a propulsion system that employs a detonating propellant is described, and the need for such a system and its use in certain planetary atmospheres are demonstrated. A theoretical formulation of the relevant gas-dynamic processes was developed, and a related series of experimental tests were pursued.

  9. On the physical processes ruling an atmospheric pressure air glow discharge operating in an intermediate current regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-frequency (100 Hz), intermediate-current (50 to 200 mA) glow discharges were experimentally investigated in atmospheric pressure air between blunt copper electrodes. Voltage–current characteristics and images of the discharge for different inter-electrode distances are reported. A cathode-fall voltage close to 360 V and a current density at the cathode surface of about 11 A/cm2, both independent of the discharge current, were found. The visible emissive structure of the discharge resembles to that of a typical low-pressure glow, thus suggesting a glow-like electric field distribution in the discharge. A kinetic model for the discharge ionization processes is also presented with the aim of identifying the main physical processes ruling the discharge behavior. The numerical results indicate the presence of a non-equilibrium plasma with rather high gas temperature (above 4000 K) leading to the production of components such as NO, O, and N which are usually absent in low-current glows. Hence, the ionization by electron-impact is replaced by associative ionization, which is independent of the reduced electric field. This leads to a negative current-voltage characteristic curve, in spite of the glow-like features of the discharge. On the other hand, several estimations show that the discharge seems to be stabilized by heat conduction; being thermally stable due to its reduced size. All the quoted results indicate that although this discharge regime might be considered to be close to an arc, it is still a glow discharge as demonstrated by its overall properties, supported also by the presence of thermal non-equilibrium

  10. On the physical processes ruling an atmospheric pressure air glow discharge operating in an intermediate current regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevosto, L., E-mail: prevosto@waycom.com.ar; Mancinelli, B.; Chamorro, J. C.; Cejas, E. [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600), Santa Fe (Argentina); Kelly, H. [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600), Santa Fe (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Plasma (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA) Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-02-15

    Low-frequency (100 Hz), intermediate-current (50 to 200 mA) glow discharges were experimentally investigated in atmospheric pressure air between blunt copper electrodes. Voltage–current characteristics and images of the discharge for different inter-electrode distances are reported. A cathode-fall voltage close to 360 V and a current density at the cathode surface of about 11 A/cm{sup 2}, both independent of the discharge current, were found. The visible emissive structure of the discharge resembles to that of a typical low-pressure glow, thus suggesting a glow-like electric field distribution in the discharge. A kinetic model for the discharge ionization processes is also presented with the aim of identifying the main physical processes ruling the discharge behavior. The numerical results indicate the presence of a non-equilibrium plasma with rather high gas temperature (above 4000 K) leading to the production of components such as NO, O, and N which are usually absent in low-current glows. Hence, the ionization by electron-impact is replaced by associative ionization, which is independent of the reduced electric field. This leads to a negative current-voltage characteristic curve, in spite of the glow-like features of the discharge. On the other hand, several estimations show that the discharge seems to be stabilized by heat conduction; being thermally stable due to its reduced size. All the quoted results indicate that although this discharge regime might be considered to be close to an arc, it is still a glow discharge as demonstrated by its overall properties, supported also by the presence of thermal non-equilibrium.

  11. Atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of electrochromic organonickel oxide thin films with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposition of electrochromic organonickel oxide (NiOxCy) films onto glass/indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates using atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet under various precursor injection angles is investigated. A precursor [nickelocene, Ni(C5H5)2] vapor, carried by argon gas and mixed with oxygen gas, is injected into an air plasma torch for the deposition of NiOxCy films by a short exposure of the substrate, 20 s, in the plasma. Uniform light modulation on glass/ITO/NiOxCy is produced while the moving glass/ITO substrate is exposed to the plasma torch at room temperature (∼ 23 °C) and under atmospheric pressure. Light modulation with up to a 40.9% transmittance variation at a wavelength of 513.9 nm under Li+ intercalation and de-intercalation in a 1 M LiClO4–propylene carbonate electrolyte is achieved. - Highlights: ► Rapid deposition of electrochromic NiOxCy film by atmospheric pressure plasma jet ► Uniform light modulation on NiOxCy film is produced. ► Nano-grains in NiOxCy films offer fast coloration and bleaching

  12. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Metz, Joannah M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from 1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  13. Exact Mass Measurements for a-Allenic Alcohol by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization/Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何萍; 郭寅龙; 陈国强; 徐代旺; 麻生明

    2003-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/time,of-flight mass speetrmtry (APEI/TOF-MS) was applied to determine the mass of five a.aIIenic alcohols via their vrotonated molecu.lar ions nslna Imsifive ion mode. Polyethylene Idycol (PEG) was used as the hlternal reference. All results were obtained under the resolution of about 5000 FWHM (full width at the half maximum). Solvent effects were studied and the satired results were obtained in acetonitrile. Comvared with the theoreflcal values, nun absolute errors were less thRn 1.0 mmu. The efTeets Of nozzle pote.Jldal, push pulse potential, pug pulse potentlai, puO bias potential and ic(lulsltion rate on exact mass determina/lon were also discussed. APCI/TOF.MS is proven to be a very semi/ire analytical technique and an alternative ionizafion mode in analytical technique lablle compounds with relatively weak polarity, such as a-allenic alcohol.

  14. Characteristics of an atmospheric-pressure line plasma excited by 2.45 GHz microwave travelling wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Haruka; Nakano, Suguru; Itoh, Hitoshi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure line plasma was produced by microwave discharge using a slot antenna with travelling microwave power. Two different types of plasma mode, i.e., “pseudo” and “real” line plasma were investigated using a high-speed camera under different discharge conditions, such as slot gap width and power. Using wide slot gaps (0.5 mm) and low powers (microwave power, the plasma mode changed from the pseudo to real line plasma mode, i.e., the spatiotemporally uniform plasma mode along the slot. A gas temperature was obtained from N2 second positive band spectra as low as 400 K. The movement of the plasma in the pseudo line plasma mode was well explained by a one-dimensional diffusion model including the spatial distribution of the ionization rate in a moving plasma.

  15. A new humane method of stunning broilers using low atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research project evaluated an alternative method of controlled atmosphere stunning of commercial broilers to induce anoxia utilizing a vacuum pump to reduce the oxygen tension, low atmospheric pressure stun (LAPS). A custom built 2 cage-module system (holding a total of 600 broilers each) with...

  16. Turbulent and Nonlinear Ion-Sound Resonance Induced by Ionization Instability in a Low-Pressure Discharge Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In DC discharges with hot filament cathodes and in the presence of control grids, used as low-pressure plasma sources, at low current discharges regime and in a critical range of current depending by the base inert gas used, turbulent and nonlinear LF oscillations, associated with a frequency jumping phenomenon, can be observed. These oscillations are interpreted as nonlinear ion acoustic waves (IAW) induced by ionization instability when the potential grid-anode reaches a value near the first ionization potential and the ion current drifting velocity is of the order of the ion-sound velocity. This process observed for inert gas plasmas (Ar, Kr, Xe), when the electron temperature is very low with respect to the first ionization potential (1/Te = 7-8), is associated with the presence of a DL in the grid-anode interval and to a fast growth of the direct ionization with respect to the stepwise. A linearized theoretical model, suitable for low-pressure gas discharges, seems, in a first approximation, able to explain this phenomenon. (author)

  17. Atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry as a tool for the investigation of the hydrolysis reaction mechanisms of phosphite antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, M.; McMahon, A. W.; Allen, N. S.; Johnson, B. W.; Keck-Antoine, K.; Santos, L.; Neumann, M. G.

    2008-08-01

    The hydrolysis reaction mechanism of phosphite antioxidants is investigated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The phosphites were chosen because they differed in chemical structure and phosphorus content. Dopant assisted-atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) is chosen as the ion source for the ionization of the compounds. In our previous work, DA-APPI was shown to offer an attractive alternative to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) since it provided background-ion free mass spectra and higher sensitivity [M. Papanastasiou, et al., Polymer Degradation and Stability 91 (11) (2006) 2675-2682]. In positive ion mode, the molecules are generally detected in their protonated form. In negative ion mode, the phosphites are unstable and only fragment ions are observed; these however, are characteristic of each phosphite and may be used for the identification of the analytes in complex mixtures. The analytes under investigation are exposed to accelerated humid ageing conditions and their hydrolytic pathway and stability is investigated. Different substituents around the phosphorus atom are shown to have a significant effect on the stability of the phosphites, with phenol substituents producing very hydrolytically stable structures. Alkanox P24 and PEP-36 follow a similar hydrolytic pathway via the scission of the first and then the second POphenol bonds, eventually leading to the formation of phenol, phosphorous acid and pentaerythritol as end products. HP-10 exhibits a rather different structure and the products detected suggest scission of either the POhydrocarbon or one of the POphenol bonds. A phenomenon similar to that of autocatalysis is observed for all phosphites and is attributed to the formation of dialkyl phosphites as intermediate products.

  18. Characterization of pyrogenic black carbon by desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorski, David C; Hamdan, Rasha; McKenna, Amy M; Nyadong, Leonard; Rodgers, Ryan P; Marshall, Alan G; Cooper, William T

    2012-02-01

    We present a new method for molecular characterization of intact biochar directly, without sample preparation or pretreatment, on the basis of desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI) coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry. Conventional ionization methods (e.g., electrospray or atmospheric pressure photoionization) for characterization of natural organic matter have limited utility for the characterization of chars due to incomplete solubility in common solvents. Therefore, direct ionization techniques that do not require sample dissolution prior to analysis are ideal. Here, we apply DAPPI FTICR mass spectrometry to enable the first molecular characterization of uncharred parent oak biomass and after combustion (250 °C) or pyrolysis (400 °C). Parent oak is primarily composed of cellulose-, lignin-, and resin-like compounds. Oak combusted at 250 °C contains condensed aromatic compounds with low H/C and O/C ratios while retaining compounds with high H/C and O/C ratios. The bimodal distribution of aromatic and aliphatic compounds observed in the combusted oak sample is attributed to incomplete thermal degradation of lignin and hemicellulose. Pyrolyzed oak constituents exhibit lower H/C and O/C ratios: approximately three-quarters of the identified species are aromatic. DAPPI FTICR MS results agree with bulk elemental composition as well as functional group distributions determined by elemental analysis and solid state (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Complete molecular characterization of biomass upon thermal transformation may provide insight into the biogeochemical cycles of biochar and future renewable energy sources, particularly for samples currently limited by solubility, separation, and sample preparation. PMID:22242739

  19. Simulation of Electron-Beam Generating Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Liang; LI Hong; LI Benben; ZHOU Junqing; YAN Hong; SU Tie; WANG Huihui; LIUWandong

    2007-01-01

    As electron-beam generating plasma is widely applied,the software tool EGS4(Electron-Gamma Shower) was used to simulate the transmission and energy deposition of electron-beam in air.The simulation results indicated that the range of the electron-beam was inversely proportional to the gas pressure in a wide range of gas pressure,and the electron-beam of 200 keV could generate a plasma with a density 1011 cm-3 in air of latm.In addition,the energy distribution of the beam-electron and plasma density profile produced by the beam were achieved.

  20. Three distinct modes in a surface micro-discharge in atmospheric pressure He + N2 mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Liu, Dingxin; He, Tongtong; Li, Qiaosong; Wang, Xiaohua; Kong, Michael G.

    2015-12-01

    A surface micro-discharge in atmospheric pressure He + N2 mixtures is studied in this paper with an emphasis on the discharge modes. With the N2 admixture increasing from 0.1% to 20%, the discharge evolves from a spatially diffuse mode to a filamentary mode during positive half-cycles of the applied voltage. However during the negative half-cycles, an additional patterned mode emerges between the diffuse and the filamentary modes, which has not been reported before to exist in surface micro-discharges. In the diffuse and patterned modes, the plasmas cover almost the entirety of the mesh area during one cycle after plasma ignition in all mesh elements, and the discharge power increases linearly with the applied voltage. In contrast, plasma coverage of the mesh area is only partial in the filamentary mode and the plasma is more unstable with the discharge power increasing exponentially with the applied voltage. As the surface micro-discharge evolves through the three modes, the density of excited species changes significantly, for instance, the density of N2+(B) drops by ˜20-fold from [N2] = 0.2% to 20%. The N2+(B) is predicted to be generated mainly through successive processes of Penning ionization by helium metastables and electron-impact excitation of N2+(X), the latter is most responsible for the density decrease of N2+(B) because much more N2+(X) is converted to N4+(X) as the increase of N2 fraction. Also, the electron density and electron temperature decrease with the discharge mode transition.

  1. Carrier transport in undoped CdO films grown by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature dependent Hall effect measurements were performed for the undoped CdO films with carrier concentrations (n) ranging from 2.4 × 1019 to 2.0 × 1020 cm−3 grown on c- and r-plane sapphire substrates by the atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition using Cd powder and H2O as source materials. The n dependence of the optical gap energy (Eopt) could be explained by the combination of the band gap widening due to Burstein–Moss shift and the band gap shrinkages due to the electron–electron and electron–impurity interactions. For all the films, the carrier concentrations (n) were independent of measurement temperature (T), indicating that these films were n-type degenerate semiconductors. The barrier heights at grain boundaries determined from the 1000/T-ln(μT) curves were smaller than the thermal energy at 300 K, suggesting that the grain boundary scattering plays a minor role on the carrier transport in comparison with the intra-grain scattering. The n dependence of the gradient of the μ–T curve revealed the continuous transformation of the dominant intra-grain scattering mechanism from the phonon scattering to the ionized impurity scattering with increasing n. - Highlights: • Undoped CdO films were grown on c- and r-plane sapphire substrates by CVD. • Hall effect measurements were performed for the CdO films at 83–343 K. • For many CdO films, the carrier concentration n was independent of temperature. • The grain boundary scattering plays a minor role in the CdO films. • The dominant intra-grain scattering exhibited the continuous change with n

  2. Atmospheric-Pressure Cold Plasma Induces Transcriptional Changes in Ex Vivo Human Corneas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Rosani

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure cold plasma (APCP might be considered a novel tool for tissue disinfection in medicine since the active chemical species produced by low plasma doses, generated by ionizing helium gas in air, induces reactive oxygen species (ROS that kill microorganisms without substantially affecting human cells.In this study, we evaluated morphological and functional changes in human corneas exposed for 2 minutes (min to APCP and tested if the antioxidant n-acetyl l-cysteine (NAC was able to inhibit or prevent damage and cell death.Immunohistochemistry and western blotting analyses of corneal tissues collected at 6 hours (h post-APCP treatment demonstrated no morphological tissue changes, but a transient increased expression of OGG1 glycosylase that returned to control levels in 24 h. Transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real time PCR performed on different corneas revealed in the treated corneas many differentially expressed genes: namely, 256 and 304 genes showing expression changes greater than ± 2 folds in the absence and presence of NAC, respectively. At 6 h post-treatment, the most over-expressed gene categories suggested an active or enhanced cell functioning, with only a minority of genes specifically concerning oxidative DNA damage and repair showing slight over-expression values (<2 folds. Moreover, time-related expression analysis of eight genes up-regulated in the APCP-treated corneas overall demonstrated the return to control expression levels after 24 h.These findings of transient oxidative stress accompanied by wide-range transcriptome adjustments support the further development of APCP as an ocular disinfectant.

  3. Breakdown in Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jets: Nearby Grounds and Voltage Rise Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietz, Amanda; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated to stimulate therapeutic responses in biological systems. These responses are not always consistent. One source of variability may be the design of the APPJs - the number and placement of electrodes, pulse power format - which affects the production of reactive species. In this study, the consequences of design parameters of an APPJ were computationally investigated using nonPDPSIM, a 2 d model. The configuration is a cylindrical tube with one or two ring exterior electrodes, with or without a center pin electrode. The APPJ operates in He/O2 flowing into humid air. We found that the placement of the electrical ground on and around the system is important to the breakdown characteristics of the APPJ, and the electron density and temperature of the resulting plasma. With a single powered ring electrode, the placement of the nearest ground may vary depending on the setup, and this significantly affects the discharge. With two-ring electrodes, the nearest ground plane is well defined, however more distant ground planes can also influence the discharge. With an ionization wave (IW) that propagates out of the tube and into the plume in tens of ns, the rise time of the voltage waveform can be on the same timescale, and so variations in the voltage rise time could produce different IW properties. The effect of ground placement and voltage waveform on IW formation (ns timescales) and production of reactive neutrals (ms timescales) will be discussed. Work supported by DOE (DE-SC0001319) and NSF (CHE-1124724). Done...processed 598 records...15:12:56

  4. Pressure Effects on Product Channels of Hydrocarbon Radical-Radical Reactions; Implications for Modelling of Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, A.; Halpern, J.; N'doumi, M.

    2011-10-01

    Previously we had studied the kinetics and product channels of small unsaturated hydrocarbon radical (C2 and C3s) reactions relevant to planetary atmospheric modelling. Reactions of C2 radicals (such as vinyl, H2CCH and ethynyl C2H) and C3 radicals (such as propargyl, HCCCH2 and allyl, H2CCCH3) can affect the abundances of a large number of stable observable C3, C4, C5, C6 and larger molecules, including linear, aromatic and even poly aromatic molecules. We have experimentally determined pressuredependent product yields for self- and cross-radical reactions performed at 298 K and at selected pressures between ~4 Torr (0.5 kPa) and 760 Torr (101 kPa). Final products were determined by gas chromatograph with mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection (GC/MS/FID). In some cases complementary computational studies extended the pressure and temperature range of the observations and provided valuable information on complex reaction mechanisms. These studies provide a systematic framework so that important energetic and structural parameters for radical-radical reactions can be assessed. Here we report a compilation of our earlier results relevant to planetary atmospheres in addition to recent ones for allyl radical (H2CCCH3) reactions.

  5. Atmospheric sugar alcohols: evaporation rates and saturation vapor pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, Merete; Zardini, Alessandro Alessio; Hong, Juan;

    allowed to evaporate in a laminar flow reactor, and changes in particle size as function of evaporation time are determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. In this work saturation vapor pressures of sugar alcohols at several temperatures have been inferred from such measurements using...

  6. The Effect of Atmospheric Pressure on Rocket Thrust -- Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    The first of a two-part question asks: Does the total thrust of a rocket depend on the surrounding pressure? The answer to this question is provided, with accompanying diagrams of rockets. The second part of the question (and answer) are provided in v20 n7, p479, Oct 1982 of this journal. (Author/JN)

  7. Vertical thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere from temperature and pressure measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkin, V.M.; Blamon, Z.; Lipatov, A.P.; Devyatkin, S.I.; Dyachkov, A.V.; Ignatova, S.I.; Kerzhanovich, V.V.; Malyk, K.; Stadny, V.I.; Sanotskiy, Y.V.

    1986-05-01

    Accurate temperature and pressure measurements were made on the Vega-2 lander during its entire descent. The temperature and pressure at the surface were 733 K and 89.3 bar, respectively. A strong temperature inversion was found in the upper troposphere. Several layers with differing static stability were visible in the atmospheric structure.

  8. Self-sustained carbon monoxide oxidation oscillations on size-selected platinum nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Robert; Andersen, Thomas; Nierhoff, Anders Ulrik Fregerslev;

    2013-01-01

    High-quality mass spectrometry data of the oscillatory behavior of CO oxidation on SiO2 supported Pt-nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure have been acquired as a function of pressure, coverage, gas composition and nanoparticle size. The oscillations are self-sustained for several days at constan...

  9. Ionization in atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets VI: Properties of large-scale discharge events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, R. L.; Helling, Ch.; Hodosán, G.; Bilger, C.; Stark, C. R., E-mail: ch@leap2010.eu [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-20

    Mineral clouds in substellar atmospheres play a special role as a catalyst for a variety of charge processes. If clouds are charged, the surrounding environment becomes electrically activated, and ensembles of charged grains are electrically discharging (e.g., by lightning), which significantly influences the local chemistry creating conditions similar to those thought responsible for life in early planetary atmospheres. We note that such lightning discharges contribute also to the ionization state of the atmosphere. We apply scaling laws for electrical discharge processes from laboratory measurements and numerical experiments to DRIFT-PHOENIX model atmosphere results to model the discharge's propagation downward (as lightning) and upward (as sprites) through the atmospheric clouds. We evaluate the spatial extent and energetics of lightning discharges. The atmospheric volume affected (e.g., by increase of temperature or electron number) is larger in a brown dwarf atmosphere (10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} m{sup 3}) than in a giant gas planet (10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} m{sup 3}). Our results suggest that the total dissipated energy in one event is <10{sup 12} J for all models of initial solar metallicity. First attempts to show the influence of lightning on the local gas phase indicate an increase of small carbohydrate molecules like CH and CH{sub 2} at the expense of CO and CH{sub 4}. Dust-forming molecules are destroyed and the cloud particle properties are frozen in unless enough time is available for complete evaporation. We summarize instruments potentially suitable to observe lightning on extrasolar objects.

  10. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  11. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  12. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established

  13. Silicon-based quantum dots: synthesis, surface and composition tuning with atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Sadegh; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Velusamy, Tamilselvan; Maguire, Paul; Svrcek, Vladmir; Mariotti, Davide

    2015-08-01

    The synthesis of silicon and silicon-based quantum dots (diameter plasmas is reviewed and the most recent developments are also reported. Atmospheric pressure plasmas are then compared with other synthesis methods that include low pressure plasmas, wet chemistry, electrochemical etching and laser-based methods. Finally, progress in the synthesis of alloyed silicon QDs is discussed where the nanoscale Si-Sn and Si-C systems are reported. The report also includes a theoretical analysis that highlights some fundamental differences offered by plasmas at atmospheric pressure and that may provide opportunities for novel materials with advantageous properties.

  14. Modelling of microwave sustained capillary plasma columns at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present a model of argon microwave sustained discharge at high pressure (1 atm), which includes two self-consistently linked parts - electrodynamic and kinetic ones. The model is based on a steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge numerically solved together with Maxwell's equation for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave and wave energy balance equation. It is applied for the purpose of theoretical description of the discharge in a stationary state. The phase diagram, the electron energy distribution function as well as the dependences of the electron and heavy particles densities and the mean input power per electron on the electron number density and wave number are presented

  15. Modelling of microwave sustained capillary plasma columns at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pencheva, M [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Petrova, Ts [Berkeley Research Associate, Inc., Beltsville MD 20705 (United States); Benova, E [Department of Language Learning, Sofia University, 27 Kosta Loulchev Street, BG-1111 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zhelyazkov, I [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2006-07-15

    In this work we present a model of argon microwave sustained discharge at high pressure (1 atm), which includes two self-consistently linked parts - electrodynamic and kinetic ones. The model is based on a steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge numerically solved together with Maxwell's equation for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave and wave energy balance equation. It is applied for the purpose of theoretical description of the discharge in a stationary state. The phase diagram, the electron energy distribution function as well as the dependences of the electron and heavy particles densities and the mean input power per electron on the electron number density and wave number are presented.

  16. Modelling of microwave sustained capillary plasma columns at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencheva, M.; Petrova, Ts; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2006-07-01

    In this work we present a model of argon microwave sustained discharge at high pressure (1 atm), which includes two self-consistently linked parts - electrodynamic and kinetic ones. The model is based on a steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge numerically solved together with Maxwell's equation for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave and wave energy balance equation. It is applied for the purpose of theoretical description of the discharge in a stationary state. The phase diagram, the electron energy distribution function as well as the dependences of the electron and heavy particles densities and the mean input power per electron on the electron number density and wave number are presented.

  17. Germination and growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) at low atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanarkel, Robert; Drew, Malcolm C.

    2002-01-01

    The response of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Waldmann's Green) to low atmospheric pressure was examined during the initial 5 days of germination and emergence, and also during subsequent growth to vegetative maturity at 30 days. Growth took place inside a 66-l-volume low pressure chamber maintained at 70 kPa, and plant response was compared to that of plants in a second, matching chamber that was at ambient pressure (approximately 101 kPa) as a control. In other experiments, to determine short-term effects of low pressure transients, plants were grown at ambient pressure until maturity and then subjected to alternating periods of 24 h of low and ambient atmospheric pressures. In all treatments the partial pressure of O2 was maintained at 21 kPa (approximately the partial pressure in air at normal pressure), and the partial pressure of CO2 was in the range 66.5-73.5 Pa (about twice that in normal air) in both chambers, with the addition of CO2 during the light phase. With continuous exposure to low pressure, shoot and root growth was at least as rapid as at ambient pressure, with an overall trend towards slightly greater performance at the lower pressure. Dark respiration rates were greater at low pressure. Transient periods at low pressure decreased transpiration and increased dark respiration but only during the period of exposure to low pressure. We conclude that long-term or short-term exposure to subambient pressure (70 kPa) was without detectable detriment to vegetative growth and development.

  18. Silicon-based quantum dots: synthesis, surface and composition tuning with atmospheric pressure plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of silicon and silicon-based quantum dots (diameter < 5 nm) is discussed. Specifically the synthesis of Si-based quantum dots (QDs) by atmospheric pressure plasmas is reviewed and the most recent developments are also reported. Atmospheric pressure plasmas are then compared with other synthesis methods that include low pressure plasmas, wet chemistry, electrochemical etching and laser-based methods. Finally, progress in the synthesis of alloyed silicon QDs is discussed where the nanoscale Si–Sn and Si–C systems are reported. The report also includes a theoretical analysis that highlights some fundamental differences offered by plasmas at atmospheric pressure and that may provide opportunities for novel materials with advantageous properties. (review article)

  19. Time-resolved characterization of a filamentary argon discharge at atmospheric pressure in a capillary using emission and absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Sandra; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Niermann, Benedikt; Winter, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    An argon/nitrogen (0.999/0.001) filamentary pulsed discharge operated at atmospheric pressure in a quartz tube is characterized using voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and absorption spectroscopy. Nitrogen is applied as a sensor gas for the purpose of OES diagnostic. The density of argon metastable atoms Ar(3P2) is determined using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Using a plasma chemical model the measured OES data are applied for the characterization of the plasma conditions. Between intense positive pulses the discharge current oscillates with a damped amplitude. It is established that an electric current flows in this discharge not only through a thin plasma filament that is observed in the discharge image but also through the whole cross section of the quartz tube. A diffuse plasma fills the quartz tube during a time between intense current pulses. Ionization waves are propagating in this plasma between the spike and the grounded area of the tube producing thin plasma channels. The diameter of these channels increases during the pause between the propagation of ionization waves probably because of thermal expansion and diffusion. Inside the channels electron densities of ˜2 × 1013 cm-3, argon metastable densities ˜1014 cm-3 and a reduced electric field about 10 Td are determined.

  20. IONIZATION PARAMETER AS A DIAGNOSTIC OF RADIATION AND WIND PRESSURES IN H II REGIONS AND STARBURST GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionization parameter U is potentially useful as a tool to measure radiation pressure feedback from massive star clusters, as it directly reflects the ratio of radiation to gas pressure and is readily derived from mid-infrared line ratios. We consider a number of physical effects which combine to determine the apparent value of U in observations encompassing one or many H II regions. An upper limit is set by the compression of gas by radiation pressure, when this is important. The pressure of shocked stellar winds and the presence of neutral clumps both tend to reduce U for a given intensity of irradiation. The most intensely irradiated regions are selectively dimmed by internal dust absorption of ionizing photons, leading to a bias for observations on galactic scales. We explore these effects in analytical and numerical models for dusty H II regions and use them to interpret previous observational results. We find that radiation pressure confinement sets the upper limit log10U≅-1 seen in individual regions. Unresolved starbursts are known to display a maximum value of ≅ – 2.3. While lower, this is also consistent with a large portion of their H II regions being radiation pressure dominated, given the different technique used to interpret unresolved regions, and given the bias caused by dust absorption. We infer that many individual, strongly illuminated regions cannot be significantly overpressured by stellar winds, and that even when averaged on galactic scales, the shocked wind pressure cannot be large compared to radiation pressure. Therefore, most H II regions cannot be adiabatic wind bubbles. Our models imply a metallicity dependence in the physical structure and dust attenuation of radiation-dominated regions, both of which should vary strongly across a critical metallicity of about one-twentieth solar.

  1. IONIZATION PARAMETER AS A DIAGNOSTIC OF RADIATION AND WIND PRESSURES IN H II REGIONS AND STARBURST GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Sherry C. C.; Matzner, Christopher D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The ionization parameter U is potentially useful as a tool to measure radiation pressure feedback from massive star clusters, as it directly reflects the ratio of radiation to gas pressure and is readily derived from mid-infrared line ratios. We consider a number of physical effects which combine to determine the apparent value of U in observations encompassing one or many H II regions. An upper limit is set by the compression of gas by radiation pressure, when this is important. The pressure of shocked stellar winds and the presence of neutral clumps both tend to reduce U for a given intensity of irradiation. The most intensely irradiated regions are selectively dimmed by internal dust absorption of ionizing photons, leading to a bias for observations on galactic scales. We explore these effects in analytical and numerical models for dusty H II regions and use them to interpret previous observational results. We find that radiation pressure confinement sets the upper limit log{sub 10}U{approx_equal}-1 seen in individual regions. Unresolved starbursts are known to display a maximum value of {approx_equal} - 2.3. While lower, this is also consistent with a large portion of their H II regions being radiation pressure dominated, given the different technique used to interpret unresolved regions, and given the bias caused by dust absorption. We infer that many individual, strongly illuminated regions cannot be significantly overpressured by stellar winds, and that even when averaged on galactic scales, the shocked wind pressure cannot be large compared to radiation pressure. Therefore, most H II regions cannot be adiabatic wind bubbles. Our models imply a metallicity dependence in the physical structure and dust attenuation of radiation-dominated regions, both of which should vary strongly across a critical metallicity of about one-twentieth solar.

  2. Ionization Parameter as a Diagnostic of Radiation and Wind Pressures in H II Regions and Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Sherry C. C.; Matzner, Christopher D.

    2012-10-01

    The ionization parameter {\\cal U} is potentially useful as a tool to measure radiation pressure feedback from massive star clusters, as it directly reflects the ratio of radiation to gas pressure and is readily derived from mid-infrared line ratios. We consider a number of physical effects which combine to determine the apparent value of {\\cal U} in observations encompassing one or many H II regions. An upper limit is set by the compression of gas by radiation pressure, when this is important. The pressure of shocked stellar winds and the presence of neutral clumps both tend to reduce {\\cal U} for a given intensity of irradiation. The most intensely irradiated regions are selectively dimmed by internal dust absorption of ionizing photons, leading to a bias for observations on galactic scales. We explore these effects in analytical and numerical models for dusty H II regions and use them to interpret previous observational results. We find that radiation pressure confinement sets the upper limit log _{10} {\\cal U}\\simeq -1 seen in individual regions. Unresolved starbursts are known to display a maximum value of ~= - 2.3. While lower, this is also consistent with a large portion of their H II regions being radiation pressure dominated, given the different technique used to interpret unresolved regions, and given the bias caused by dust absorption. We infer that many individual, strongly illuminated regions cannot be significantly overpressured by stellar winds, and that even when averaged on galactic scales, the shocked wind pressure cannot be large compared to radiation pressure. Therefore, most H II regions cannot be adiabatic wind bubbles. Our models imply a metallicity dependence in the physical structure and dust attenuation of radiation-dominated regions, both of which should vary strongly across a critical metallicity of about one-twentieth solar.

  3. Simulations of atmospheric pressure discharge in a high-voltage nanosecond pulse using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model in noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure discharge nonequilibrium plasmas have been applied to plasma processing with modern technology. Simulations of discharge in pure Ar and pure He gases at one atmospheric pressure by a high voltage trapezoidal nanosecond pulse have been performed using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model coupled with a renormalization and weighting procedure (mapping algorithm). Numerical results show that the characteristics of discharge in both inert gases are very similar. There exist the effects of local reverse field and double-peak distributions of charged particles' density. The electron and ion energy distribution functions are also observed, and the discharge is concluded in the view of ionization avalanche in number. Furthermore, the independence of total current density is a function of time, but not of position

  4. Simulations of atmospheric pressure discharge in a high-voltage nanosecond pulse using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model in noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Dezhen; Ren, Chunsheng

    2008-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure discharge nonequilibrium plasmas have been applied to plasma processing with modern technology. Simulations of discharge in pure Ar and pure He gases at one atmospheric pressure by a high voltage trapezoidal nanosecond pulse have been performed using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model coupled with a renormalization and weighting procedure (mapping algorithm). Numerical results show that the characteristics of discharge in both inert gases are very similar. There exist the effects of local reverse field and double-peak distributions of charged particles' density. The electron and ion energy distribution functions are also observed, and the discharge is concluded in the view of ionization avalanche in number. Furthermore, the independence of total current density is a function of time, but not of position.

  5. Effects of initiating anaerobic digestion of layer-hen poultry dung at sub-atmospheric pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chima C. Ngumah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of initiating anaerobic digestion (AD of dry layer-hen poultry dung at the sub-atmospheric pressure of -30 cmHg on biodegradation, biogasification, and biomethanation. The setup was performed as a batch process at an average ambient temperature of 29±2 0C and a retention time of 15 days. Comparisons were made with two other experiments which were both begun at ambient atmospheric pressure; one was inoculated with digestate from a previous layer-hen dung AD, while the other was not inoculated. The bioreactors initiated at sub-atmospheric pressure, ambient atmospheric pressure without inoculum, and ambient atmospheric pressure with inoculum showed the following for biogas and biomethane yields respectively: 16.8 cm3 g-1 VS and 15.46 cm3 g 1 VS, 25.10 cm3 g-1 VS and 12.85 cm3 g-1 VS, 21.44 cm3 g-1 VS and 14.88 cm3 g 1 VS. In the same order, after AD, the following values were recorded for volatile solids and total viable counts (prokaryotes and fungi in the digestates: 40.33% and 23.22 x 106 cfu mL-1, 43.42% and 22.17 x 106 cfu mL-1, 41.11% and 13.3 x 106 cfu mL-1. The feedstock showed values of 83.93% and 3.98 x 106 cfu mL-1 for volatile solids and total viable count respectively. There was a slight difference in the volatile solids of the digestates of the three bioreactors after AD. The pH recorded for the feedstock slurry before AD was 7.9 at 30oC, while after AD, the digestates from all the three bioreactors showed the same pH of 5.9 at 29 0C. Statistical analysis using ANOVA showed no significant difference in biogas yields of the feedstock for the three bioreactors (A, B, C. ANOVA showed no significant difference for biomethane yields in the bioreactors initiated at sub-atmospheric pressure and for those initiated at ambient atmospheric pressure with inoculums. However, it showed significant difference in the bioreactor initiated at sub-atmospheric pressure and that initiated at ambient atmospheric

  6. Modification of nitrogen Townsend ionization coefficient in a N2 laser with a weak corona preionization and high gas pressure using laser output power measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikhani, S.; Hariri, A.

    2013-05-01

    Based on the reported experimental measurements on the output power in a transversely excited nitrogen laser with a weak corona preionization and rate equations, a simulation study was made to describe the laser output power behavior. For the study, we first made a literature survey for the appropriate E/p functional dependences of nitrogen molecules on drift velocity vd, and the Townsend ionization coefficient α, to be applied for the laser operational characteristics of high gas pressures up to 1 atmosphere, and 20 Townsend ionization coefficient to include the effect of the preionization for the laser system. This realization revealed that the Townsend coefficient upon utilizing the corona effect, (α/p)corona, can be viewed as a perturbation to be added to the (α/p)main due to the main gas discharge, where the total (α/p)t = (α/p)main + (α/p)corona was used for the calculation. We also introduced a single α/p relation with A* and B* coefficients to explain the gas discharge due to both the main and corona discharges. The results of the two approaches are introduced and have been compared with each other. The present study indicates that laser optical measurements, by themselves, constitute a reliable approach for understanding the physical quantities that are involved during plasma formation in a gas discharge. Details of the approach will be presented in this paper.

  7. Pressure sensing of the atmosphere by solar occultation using broadband CO2 absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. H.; Russell, J. M., III; Drayson, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for obtaining pressure at the tangent point in an IR solar occulation experiment is described. By measuring IR absorption in bands of atmospheric CO2 (e.g., 2.0, 2.7, or 4.3 microns), mean pressure values for each tangent point layer (vertical thickness 2 km or less) of the atmosphere can be obtained with rms errors of less than 3%. The simultaneous retrieval of pressure and gas concentration in a remote-sensing experiment will increase the accuracy of inverted gas concentrations and minimize the dependence of the experiment on pressure or mass path error resulting from use of climatological pressure data, satellite ephemeris, and instrument pointing accuracy.

  8. Plasma Treatment of Industrial Landfill Leachate by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharges%Plasma Treatment of Industrial Landfill Leachate by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵迪; 王达成; 严贵; 马宏; 熊小京; 罗津晶; 张先徽; 刘东平; 杨思泽

    2011-01-01

    An dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system in atmospheric pressure utilized for the treatment of industrial landfill leachate is reported. The discharge parameters, such as the operating frequency, gas flow rate, and treating duration, were found to affect significantly the removal of ammonia nitrogen (AN) in industrial landfill leachate. An increase in treating duration leads to an obvious increase in the removal efficiency of AN (up to 83%) and the leachate color changed from deep grey-black to transparent. Thus the dielectric barrier discharges in atmospheric pressure could degrade the landfill leachate effectively. Typical waveforms of both applied voltage and discharge current were also presented for analyzing the discharge processes under different discharge parameters. Optical emission spectra measurements indicate that oxidation species generated in oxygen DBD plasma play a crucial role in removing AN, oxidizing organic and inorganic substances and decolorizing the landfill leachate.

  9. Multicomponent mixed dopant optimization for rapid screening of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Sioud, Salim

    2012-05-04

    RATIONALE To enhance the ionization efficiencies in atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry a dopant with favorable ionization energy such as chlorobenzene is typically used. These dopants are typically toxic and difficult to mix with water-soluble organic solvents. In order to achieve a more efficient and less toxic dopant, a multicomponent mixed dopant was explored. METHODS A multicomponent mixed dopant for non-targeted rapid screening of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was developed and optimized using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry. Various single and multicomponent mixed dopants consisting of ethanol, chlorobenzene, bromobenzene, anisole and toluene were evaluated. RESULTS Fourteen out of eighteen PAHs were successfully separated and detected at low pg/μL levels within 5 min with high mass accuracy ≤4 ppm. The optimal mixed multicomponent dopant consisted of ethanol/chlorobenzene/bromobenzene/anisole (98.975:0.1:0.9:0.025, v/v %) and it improved the limit of detection (LOD) by 2- to 10-fold for the tested PAHs compared to those obtained with pure chlorobenzene. CONCLUSIONS A novel multicomponent dopant that contains 99% ethanol and 1% mixture of chlorobenzene, bromobenzene and anisole was found to be an effective dopant mixture to ionize PAHs. The developed UPLC multicomponent dopant assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry offered a rapid non targeted screening method for detecting the PAHs at low pg/;μL levels within a 5 min run time with high mass accuracy a;circ4 ppm. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Three electrode atmospheric pressure plasma jet in helium flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletic, Dejan; Puac, Nevena; Malovic, Gordana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2015-09-01

    Plasma jets are widely used in various types of applications and lately more and more in the field of plasma medicine. However, it is not only their applicability that distinguishes them from other atmospheric plasma sources, but also the behavior of the plasma. It was shown that plasma plume is not continuous, but discrete set of plasma packages. Here we present iCCD images and current voltage characteristics of a three electrode plasma jet. Our plasma jet has a simple design with body made of glass tube and two transparent electrodes wrapped around it. The additional third metal tip electrode was positioned at 10 and 25 mm in front of the jet nozzle and connected to the same potential as the powered electrode. Power transmitted to the plasma was from 0.5 W to 4.0 W and the helium flow rate was kept constant at 4 slm. For the 10 mm configuration plasma is ignited on the metal tip in the whole period of the excitation signal and in the positive half cycle plasma ``bullet'' is propagating beyond the metal tip. In contrast to that, for the 25 mm configuration at the tip electrode plasma can be seen only in the minimum and maximum of the excitation signal, and there is no plasma ``bullet'' formation. This research has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Republic of Serbia, under projects ON171037 and III41011.

  11. Atmospheric pressure change associated with the 2003 Tokachi-Oki earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    Watada, Shingo; Kunugi, Takashi; Hirata, Kenji; Sugioka, Hiroko; Nishida, Kiwamu; Sekiguchi, Shoji; Oikawa, Jun; Tsuji, Yoshinobu; Kanamori, Hiroo

    2006-01-01

    Clear atmospheric pressure changes associated with the 2003 Tokachi-Oki, Japan, earthquake with Mw 8.3 were recorded with the microbarographs distributed in Japan. The pressure change starts at the arrival of seismic waves and reaches its maximum amplitude at the arrival of Rayleigh waves, suggesting that the observed pressure change was driven by the ground motion of seismic waves passing by the site. We computed the seismic-to-pressure transfer function (i.e., the spectral ratio of the pres...

  12. Gas chromatographic vapor pressure determination of atmospherically relevant oxidation products of β-caryophyllene and α-pinene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartonen, Kari; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Vilja, Vesa-Pekka; Tiala, Heidi; Knuuti, Sinivuokko; Lai, Ching Kwan; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2013-12-01

    Vapor pressures (subcooled liquid, pliquid) of atmospherically relevant oxidation products of β-caryophyllene (β-caryophyllene aldehyde 0.18 ± 0.03 Pa and β-nocaryophyllene aldehyde 0.17 ± 0.03 Pa), and α-pinene (pinonaldehyde 16.8 ± 0.20 Pa, cis-pinic acid 0.12 ± 0.06 Pa, and cis-pinonic acid 0.99 ± 0.19 Pa) at 298 K were obtained by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (FID) and mass spectrometric (MS) detection. The effects of stationary phase polarity and column film thickness on the vapor pressure values were investigated. Increase in stationary phase polarity provided smaller values, while increase in film thickness gave slightly higher values. Values for vapor pressure were at least two orders of magnitude lower when obtained by a method utilizing vaporization enthalpy (determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) than by retention index method. Finally, the results were compared with values calculated by group contribution theory. For the β-caryophyllene oxidation products, the values measured by gas chromatography were slightly lower than those obtained by theoretical calculations. The opposite trend was observed for the α-pinene oxidation products. The methods based on gas chromatography are concluded to be highly useful for the determination of vapor pressures of semi-volatile compounds. Except for the most polar pinic and pinonic acids, differences between vapor pressure values obtained by GC-FID and GC-MS were small. Since GC-MS provides structural information simultaneously, the use of GC-MS is recommended.

  13. Effect of the atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas on the conformational changes of plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cold atmospheric pressure plasma, which has been widely used for biomedical applications, may potentially affect the conformation of DNA. In this letter, an atmospheric pressure plasma plume is used to investigate its effects on the conformational changes of DNA of plasmid pAHC25. It is found that the plasma plume could cause plasmid DNA topology alteration, resulting in the percentage of the supercoiled plasmid DNA form decreased while that of the open circular and linearized form of plasmid DNA increased as detected by agrose gel electrophoresis. On the other hand, further investigation by using polymerase chain reaction method shows that the atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatments under proper conditions does not affect the genes of the plasmid DNA, which may have potential application in increasing the transformation frequency by genetic engineering.

  14. Polymer Surface Treatment by Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Surface Discharge Plasma:Its Characteristics and Comparison with Low Pressure Oxygen Plasma Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsushi KUWABARA; Shin-ichi KURODA; Hitoshi KUBOTA

    2007-01-01

    The polymer treatment with a low-temperature plasma jet generated on the atmospheric pressure surface discharge (SD) plasma is performed.The change of the surface property over time,in comparison with low pressure oxygen (O2) plasma treatment,is examined.As one compares the treatment by atmospheric pressure plasma to that by the low pressure O2 plasma of PS (polystyrene) the treatment effects were almost in complete agreement.However,when the atmospheric pressure plasma was used for PP(polypropylene),it produced remarkable hydrophilic effects.

  15. Self-Consistent Model for Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharges in Helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show the necessity of leaving out the approximation of constant average electron energy in many fluid models. For this purpose a one-dimensional self-consistent model for He atmospheric barrier discharges is developed. With this model, the electron energy distribution function in the atmospheric pressure glow discharge is obtained without introducing much difficulty, and the new model is readily implemented for investigating discharges in complicated gases. (gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  16. Emission properties of an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet excited by barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet is initiated by the barrier discharge in a capillary, through which argon was flown. The spectral composition of radiation emitted by the jet in the atmosphere and its variation in the space are analyzed in detail. The jet radiation spectrum is shown to be predominantly formed by spectral transitions of argon and oxygen atoms, by electron-vibrational transitions of the first positive system of nitrogen molecules N2, and by transitions of hydroxyl radical OH

  17. Ionization dynamics in the laser plasma in a low pressure gas target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, R. A.; Kalmykov, S. G.; Mozharov, A. M.; Petrenko, M. V.; Sasin, M. E.

    2012-11-01

    In Xe-laser-plasma short-wave-radiation sources, the laser-energy-to-EUV conversion efficiency (CE) turns out to be substantially lower than theoretical expectations. An estimation made in the present work is evidence of what a long period of the primary ionization, lasting up to a moment when high- Z ions appear to emit short-wave photons, can be considered as a main cause for the low CE values. During that period the plasma remains low-ionized and absorbs weakly the laser energy. Data deduced from laser light absorption measurements confirm the estimation above. A preionization of the gas target with the UV excimer laser pulse is proposed as a method to accelerate the ionization process.

  18. Atmospheric Airborne Pressure Measurements Using the Oxygen A Band for the ASCENDS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M.; Riris, H.; Abshire, J. B.; Allan, G. R.; Stephen, M.; Hasselbrack, W.; Mao, J.

    2012-12-01

    We report on airborne atmospheric pressure measurements using fiber-based laser technology and the oxygen A-band at 765 nm. Remote atmospheric temperature and pressure measurements are needed for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions Over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. ASCENDS will measure atmospheric CO2 dry mixing ratios on a global scale. Remote atmospheric pressure measurements are necessary to normalize ASCENDS CO2 measurements. Our work, funded by the ESTO IIP program, uses erbium doped fiber optic amplifiers and non-linear optics technology to tune laser radiation over the Oxygen A-band between 764.5 nm and 765 nm. Surface reflections are fiber-coupled from a receiver telescope to photon counting detectors. Our pulsed, time gated approach resolves ground reflections from cloud returns. This system successfully recorded O2 absorption spectra during two airborne campaigns aboard a NASA DC-8. Airborne data has been analyzed and fitted to HITRAN reference spectra based upon aircraft meteorological data. Our algorithm linearly scales the HITRAN reference until measurement errors are minimized. Atmospheric pressure changes are estimated by comparing the differential optical depth of the optimum scaled HITRAN spectra to the differential optical depth of the nominal HITRAN spectra. On flights over gradually sloping terrain, these results compare favorably with ground-based observations and predictions from computer models. Measurement uncertainty is commensurate with photon counting noise. We plan to reduce measurement uncertainty in future campaigns by improving transmitter pulse energy and increasing wavelength sweep frequency.

  19. Analytical instruments, ionization sources, and ionization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, David A.; Mottishaw, Paul

    2006-04-11

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous vaporization and ionization of a sample in a spectrometer prior to introducing the sample into the drift tube of the analyzer are disclosed. The apparatus includes a vaporization/ionization source having an electrically conductive conduit configured to receive sample particulate which is conveyed to a discharge end of the conduit. Positioned proximate to the discharge end of the conduit is an electrically conductive reference device. The conduit and the reference device act as electrodes and have an electrical potential maintained between them sufficient to cause a corona effect, which will cause at least partial simultaneous ionization and vaporization of the sample particulate. The electrical potential can be maintained to establish a continuous corona, or can be held slightly below the breakdown potential such that arrival of particulate at the point of proximity of the electrodes disrupts the potential, causing arcing and the corona effect. The electrical potential can also be varied to cause periodic arcing between the electrodes such that particulate passing through the arc is simultaneously vaporized and ionized. The invention further includes a spectrometer containing the source. The invention is particularly useful for ion mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometers.

  20. Decontamination of a rotating cutting tool during operation by means of atmospheric pressure plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipold, Frank; Kusano, Yukihiro; Hansen, F.;

    2010-01-01

    The decontamination of a rotating cutting tool used for slicing in the meat industry by means of atmospheric pressure plasmas is investigated. The target is Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterium which causes listeriosis and can be found in plants and food. The non-pathogenic species, Listeria innocua......, is used for the experiments. A rotating knife was inoculated with L. innocua. The surface of the rotating knife was partly exposed to an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge operated in air, where the knife itself served as a ground electrode. The rotation of the knife ensures a...

  1. Relation among Summer Rainfall in South Shandong and High Pressure in South Asia and Atmospheric Circulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the relation among summer rainfall in south Shandong and high pressure in South Asia and atmospheric circulation.[Method] Taking the precipitation in south Shandong along the Yellow River and Huaihe River,using the NCEP/NCAR data and summer rainfall data in south Shandong in summer from 1961 to 2005,the characteristics of high pressure in South Asia and atmospheric circulation in drought year and flood year in summer in south Shandong Province were expounded.The mechanism of...

  2. Effects of initiating anaerobic digestion of layer-hen poultry dung at sub-atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Chima C. Ngumah; Jude N. Ogbulie; Justina C. Orji; Ekperechi S. Amadi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of initiating anaerobic digestion (AD) of dry layer-hen poultry dung at the sub-atmospheric pressure of -30 cmHg on biodegradation, biogasification, and biomethanation. The setup was performed as a batch process at an average ambient temperature of 29±2 0C and a retention time of 15 days. Comparisons were made with two other experiments which were both begun at ambient atmospheric pressure; one was inoculated with digestate from a previous layer-hen dung AD...

  3. Spectral measurement of atmospheric pressure plasma by means of digital camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A digital camera measuring system has been used successfully to measure the space fluctuation behaviors of Induced Dielectric Barrier Discharge (IDBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure. The experimental results showed that: (1) The uniformity of electron temperature in space depends on discharge condition and structure of web electrode. For a certain web electrode the higher the discharge voltage is, the more uniform distribution of electron temperature in space will be. For a certain discharge the finer and denser the holes on web electrode are, the more uniform distribution of electron temperature in space will be. (2) Digital camera is an available equipment to measure some behaviors of the plasma working at atmospheric pressure

  4. [Determination of electron density in atmospheric pressure radio frequency dielectric barrier discharges by Stark broadening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sen; Liu, Zhong-wei; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Fu-ping; Wang, Zheng-duo; Yang, Li-zhen

    2012-01-01

    The use of high frequency power to generate plasma at atmospheric pressure is a relatively new development. An apparatus of atmospheric pressure radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge was constructed. Plasma emission based measurement of electron density in discharge columns from Stark broadening Ar is discribed. The spacial profile of electron density was studied. In the middle of the discharge column, as the input power increases from 138 to 248 W, the electron density rises from 4.038 x 10(21) m(-3) to 4.75 x 10(21) m(-3). PMID:22497121

  5. Generations and applications of atmospheric pressure glow discharge by integration of microplasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, O; Tachibana, K [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto-daigaku Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2007-10-15

    Integration of microplasmas enables us to obtain atmospheric pressure discharges with good macroscopic uniformity and various functions. We demonstrate two specific electrodes of microplasmas for generations of dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure, and integrated microplasmas on large two-dimensional area are sustained with electron density more than 10{sup 12}cm{sup -3}. Especially 'fabric' type electrode has a promising structure to provide various flexible discharge space and plasma processing on winding surface. Integrated microplasmas in array structure will serve as electromagnetic-wave control devices as well as processing tools, and two aspects are discussed in terms of equivalent dielectrics and metals.

  6. Translational, rotational and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc discharge at atmospheric pressure air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Li, Zhongshan; Aldén, Marcus; Salewski, Mirko; Leipold, Frank; Kusano, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Gliding arc discharges have generally been used to generate non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure. Temperature distributions of a gliding arc are of great interest both for fundamental plasma research and for practical applications. In the presented studies, translational, rotational and...... vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc generated at atmospheric pressure air are investigated. Translational temperatures (about 1100 K) were measured by laser-induced Rayleigh scattering, and two-dimensional temperature imaging was performed. Rotational and vibrational temperatures (about 3600 K and 6700...

  7. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  8. Scaling laws for gas breakdown for nanoscale to microscale gaps at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Amanda M.; Garner, Allen L.

    2016-06-01

    Electronics miniaturization motivates gas breakdown predictions for microscale and smaller gaps, since traditional breakdown theory fails when gap size, d, is smaller than ˜15 μm at atmospheric pressure, patm. We perform a matched asymptotic analysis to derive analytic expressions for breakdown voltage, Vb, at patm for 1 nm ≤ d ≤ 35 μm. We obtain excellent agreement between numerical, analytic, and particle-in-cell simulations for argon, and show Vb decreasing as d → 0, instead of increasing as predicted by Paschen's law. This work provides an analytic framework for determining Vb at atmospheric pressure for various gap distances that may be extended to other gases.

  9. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel ionization detector for use in X-ray tomography is described in detail. To achieve the ultimate resolution, the use of small detectors is necessary and, for ionization detectors, this implies using xenon gas at high pressure. Conventional small detectors can suffer from ''bowing'' but the present design overcomes their problems. (U.K.)

  10. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental study of the effect of atmospheric pressure on the ice point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, A. H.; McLinden, M. O.; Tew, W. L.

    2013-09-01

    We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of the temperature of the ice point as a function of atmospheric pressure. This analysis makes use of accurate international standards for the properties of water and ice, and of available high-accuracy data for the Henry's constants of atmospheric gases in liquid water. The result is an ice point of 273.150 019(5) K at standard atmospheric pressure, with higher ice-point temperatures (varying nearly linearly with pressure) at lower pressures. The effect of varying ambient CO2 concentration is analyzed and found to be significant in comparison to other uncertainties in the model. The thermodynamic analysis is compared with experimental measurements of the temperature difference between the ice point and the triple point of water performed at elevations ranging from 145 m to 4302 m, with atmospheric pressures from 101 kPa to 60 kPa. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor the above article has been replaced with a corrected version. The original PDF file supplied to AIP Publishing contained several equations with incorrect/missing characters resulting from processes used to create the PDF file. The article has been replaced and the equations now display correctly.

  11. Using Dimers to Measure Biosignatures and Atmospheric Pressure for Terrestrial Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Amit; Claire, Mark; Crisp, Dave

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method to probe atmospheric pressure on Earthlike planets using (O2-O2) dimers in the near-infrared. We also show that dimer features could be the most readily detectable biosignatures for Earthlike atmospheres, and may even be detectable in transit transmission with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The absorption by dimers changes more rapidly with pressure and density than that of monomers, and can therefore provide additional information about atmospheric pressures. By comparing the absorption strengths of rotational and vibrational features to the absorption strengths of dimer features, we show that in some cases it may be possible to estimate the pressure at the reflecting surface of a planet. This method is demonstrated by using the O2 A band and the 1.06 $\\mu$m dimer feature, either in transmission or reflected spectra. It works best for planets around M dwarfs with atmospheric pressures between 0.1 and 10 bars, and for O2 volume mixing ratios above 50% of Earth's present day lev...

  12. Plasma density enhancements created by the ionization of the Earth's upper atmosphere by artificial electron beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neubert, Torsten; Banks, P.M.

    We present analytical calculations and experimental observations relating to the interaction with the Earth's upper atmosphere of electron beams emitted from low altitude spacecraft. The problem is described by two coupled non-linear differential equations in the up-going (along a magnetic field...

  13. Surface atmospheric pressure excitation of the translational mode of the inner core

    CERN Document Server

    Rosat, Séverine; Rogister, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Using hourly atmospheric surface pressure field from ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) and from NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) models, we show that atmospheric pressure fluctuations excite the translational oscillation of the inner core, the so-called Slichter mode, to the sub-nanogal level at the Earth surface. The computation is performed using a normal-mode formalism for a spherical, self-gravitating anelastic PREM-like Earth model. We determine the statistical response in the form of power spectral densities of the degree-one spherical harmonic components of the observed pressure field. Both hypotheses of inverted and non-inverted barometer for the ocean response to pressure forcing are considered. Based on previously computed noise levels, we show that the surface excitation amplitude is below the limit of detection of the superconducting gravimeters, making the Slichter mode detection a challenging instrumental task...

  14. Prediction of Atmospheric Pressure at Ground Level using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angshuman Ray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of Atmospheric Pressure is one important and challenging task that needs lot of attention and study for analyzing atmospheric conditions. Advent of digital computers and development of data driven artificial intelligence approaches like Artificial Neural Networks (ANN have helped in numerical prediction of pressure. However, very few works have been done till now in this area. The present study developed an ANN model based on the past observations of several meteorological parameters like temperature, humidity, air pressure and vapour pressure as an input for training the model. The novel architecture of the proposed model contains several multilayer perceptron network (MLP to realize better performance. The model is enriched by analysis of alternative hybrid model of k-means clustering and MLP. The improvement of the performance in the prediction accuracy has been demonstrated by the automatic selection of the appropriate cluster

  15. Analytical Approach to Cosmic Ray Ionization by Nuclei with Charge Z in the Middle Atmosphere - Distribution of Galactic / Solar CR and SEP Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velinov, P.; Ruder, H.; Mateev, L.

    The effects of galactic and solar cosmic rays CR in the middle atmosphere are considered in this work The solar energetic particles SEP effects are important in the upper stratosphere mesosphere and lower thermosphere In fact CR determine the electric conductivity in the middle atmosphere and influence on this way on the electric processes in it CR introduce the solar variability in the middle atmosphere - because they are modulated by solar wind A new analytical approach for CR ionization by protons and nuclei with charge Z in the lower ionosphere and middle atmosphere is developed in this paper For this purpose the ionization losses dE dh according to the Bohr-Bethe-Bloch formula for the energetic charged particles are approximated in five different energy intervals similarly to Dorman Cosmic Rays in the Earth s Atmosphere and Underground Kluwer Academic Publishers Dordrecht 2004 but a few precision corrections are involved More accurate expressions for energy decrease E h and electron production rate profiles q h are derived The obtained formulas allow comparatively easy computer programming The integrand in q h gives the possibility for application of adequate numerical methods - such as Romberg method or Gauss quadrature for the solution of the mathematical problem On this way the process of interaction of cosmic ray particles with the upper middle and lower atmosphere will be described much more realistically Computations for cosmic ray ionization in the middle atmosphere are made The full CR composition is taken into account protons

  16. Atmospheric pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy apparatus: Bridging the pressure gap

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco-Vélez, J.; Pfeifer, V.; Hävecker, M.; R. Wang; Centeno, A.; Zurutuza, A.; Algara-Siller, G.; Stotz, E.; Skorupska, K.; Teschner, D; Kube, P.; Braeuninger-Weimer, P.; Hofmann, S.; Schlögl, R.; Knop-Gericke, A.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main goals in catalysis is the characterization of solid/gas interfaces in a reaction environment. The electronic structure and chemical composition of surfaces become heavily influenced by the surrounding environment. However, the lack of surface sensitive techniques that are able to monitor these modifications under high pressure conditions hinders the understanding of such processes. This limitation is known throughout the community as the “pressure gap”. We have developed a nov...

  17. Development of a high-pressure xenon ionization chamber gamma-ray spectrometer for field deployment in cone penetrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is sometimes necessary to measure gamma-ray spectra under difficult circumstances such as those encountered during in situ characterization of radioactive soils. For some classes of soil, various measurement instruments can be inserted to depths of 100 feet or more using the cone penetrometer technique. The problems for gamma-ray spectroscopy in this application include size limitations, elevated and/or variable temperature environment, vibration and shock, and remote operation. Measurement of gamma-ray spectra under these conditions has been done using scintillation detectors such as NaI(Tl) or BGO. However, these instruments suffer from poor energy resolution (ca. 8-10%), temperature sensitivity and, in the case of NaI(Tl), activation by neutrons. Sentor Technologies, Inc., working under Department of Energy sponsorship and in conjunction with Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of California, San Diego, has developed a high-pressure xenon ionization chamber spectrometer that is specifically designed for use in cone penetrometers. Key features of the detector design include a 29 mm O.D. cylindrical geometry with concentric cathode, Frisch grid, and anode, and ultra-purified (ca. ppb) xenon pressurized to a density of 0.6 g x cm-3. Utility of high-pressure xenon ionization spectrometers for field use in cone penetrometers or similar applications including borehole logging was demonstrated. (author)

  18. Time Invariant Surface Roughness Evolution during Atmospheric Pressure Thin Film Depositions

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Merkh; Robert Spivey; Toh Ming Lu

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of thin film morphology during atmospheric pressure deposition has been studied utilizing Monte Carlo methods. Time invariant root-mean-squared roughness and local roughness morphology were both observed when employing a novel simulation parameter, modeling the effect of the experimental high pressure condition. This growth regime, where the surface roughness remains invariant after reaching a critical value, has not been classified by any existing universality class. An anti-sh...

  19. Melt-vapor phase transition in the lead-selenium system at atmospheric and low pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodin, V. N.; Burabaeva, N. M.; Trebukhov, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    The boiling temperature and the corresponding vapor phase composition in the existence domain of liquid solutions were calculated from the partial pressures of saturated vapor of the components and lead selenide over liquid melts in the lead-selenium system. The phase diagram was complemented with the liquid-vapor phase transition at atmospheric pressure and in vacuum of 100 Pa, which allowed us to judge the behavior of the components during the distillation separation.

  20. The electromagnetic effect on the critical ionization velocity process. [in earth atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Goertz, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Electromagnetic effects on the critical ionization velocity (CIV) process become important when the neutral gas velocity V(n) exceeds the local Alfven speed V(A). The electron heating due to unstable lower hybrid waves necessary for CIV still occurs, but the efficiency of the electron heating is significantly reduced when the electromagnetic effect comes into play. This is verified by a series of simulation runs using two-dimensional electromagnetic particle code combined with PANIC. The significance of the electromagnetic effects for the occurrence of CIV in the comet-solar wind interaction and other space phenomena is briefly discussed. It is found that the comet environment is marginal for the excitation of CIV.