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Sample records for atmospheric oxygen concentration

  1. Effects of oxygen concentration on atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge in Argon-Oxygen Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuechun; Li, Dian; Wang, Younian

    2016-09-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can generate a low-temperature plasma easily at atmospheric pressure and has been investigated for applications in trials in cancer therapy, sterilization, air pollution control, etc. It has been confirmed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in the processes. In this work, we use a fluid model to simulate the plasma characteristics for DBD in argon-oxygen mixture. The effects of oxygen concentration on the plasma characteristics have been discussed. The evolution mechanism of ROS has been systematically analyzed. It was found that the ground state oxygen atoms and oxygen molecular ions are the dominated oxygen species under the considered oxygen concentrations. With the oxygen concentration increasing, the densities of electrons, argon atomic ions, resonance state argon atoms, metastable state argon atoms and excited state argon atoms all show a trend of decline. The oxygen molecular ions density is high and little influenced by the oxygen concentration. Ground state oxygen atoms density tends to increase before falling. The ozone density increases significantly. Increasing the oxygen concentration, the discharge mode begins to change gradually from the glow discharge mode to Townsend discharge mode. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11175034).

  2. Proterozoic atmospheric oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2014-01-01

    This article is concerned with the evolution of atmospheric oxygen concentrations through the Proterozoic Eon. In particular, this article will seek to place the history of atmospheric oxygenation through the Proterozoic Eon in the context of the evolving physical environment including the history...

  3. The diversification of Paleozoic fire systems and fluctuations in atmospheric oxygen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew C; Glasspool, Ian J

    2006-07-18

    By comparing Silurian through end Permian [approximately 250 million years (Myr)] charcoal abundance with contemporaneous macroecological changes in vegetation and climate we aim to demonstrate that long-term variations in fire occurrence and fire system diversification are related to fluctuations in Late Paleozoic atmospheric oxygen concentration. Charcoal, a proxy for fire, occurs in the fossil record from the Late Silurian (approximately 420 Myr) to the present. Its presence at any interval in the fossil record is already taken to constrain atmospheric oxygen within the range of 13% to 35% (the "fire window"). Herein, we observe that, as predicted, atmospheric oxygen levels rise from approximately 13% in the Late Devonian to approximately 30% in the Late Permian so, too, fires progressively occur in an increasing diversity of ecosystems. Sequentially, data of note include: the occurrence of charcoal in the Late Silurian/Early Devonian, indicating the burning of a diminutive, dominantly rhyniophytoid vegetation; an apparent paucity of charcoal in the Middle to Late Devonian that coincides with a predicted atmospheric oxygen low; and the subsequent diversification of fire systems throughout the remainder of the Late Paleozoic. First, fires become widespread during the Early Mississippian, they then become commonplace in mire systems in the Middle Mississippian; in the Pennsylvanian they are first recorded in upland settings and finally, based on coal petrology, become extremely important in many Permian mire settings. These trends conform well to changes in atmospheric oxygen concentration, as predicted by modeling, and indicate oxygen levels are a significant control on long-term fire occurrence.

  4. Late Proterozoic rise in atmospheric oxygen concentration inferred from phylogenetic and sulphur-isotope studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, D. E.; Teske, A.

    1996-01-01

    The evolution of non-photosynthetic sulphide-oxidizing bacteria was contemporaneous with a large shift in the isotopic composition of biogenic sedimentary sulphides between 0.64 and 1.05 billion years ago. Both events were probably driven by a rise in atmospheric oxygen concentrations to greater than 5-18% of present levels--a change that may also have triggered the evolution of animals.

  5. Sensitivity of Oxygen Isotopes of Sulfate in Ice Cores to Past Changes in Atmospheric Oxidant Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofen, E. D.; Alexander, B.; Kunasek, S. A.; Mickley, L.; Murray, L. T.; Kaplan, J. O.

    2009-12-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O) of sulfate from ice cores allows for a quantitative assessment of the past oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, which has implications for the lifetime of pollutants (e.g. CO) and greenhouse gases (e.g. CH4), and changes in the sulfur budget on various timescales. Using Δ17O of sulfate measurements from the WAIS-Divide, Antarctica and Site-A, Greenland ice cores as constraints, we use the GEOS-Chem global three-dimensional chemical transport model to study changes in the concentrations of OH, O3, and H2O2 and their impact on sulfate Δ17O between the preindustrial and present-day. The Greenland ice core sulfate oxygen isotope observations are insensitive to changes in oxidant concentrations on the preindustrial-industrial timescale due to the rising importance of metal catalyzed S(IV) oxidation in mid- to high-northern latitudes resulting from anthropogenic metal emissions. The small change in Antarctic ice core sulfate Δ17O observations on this timescale is consistent with simultaneous increases in boundary layer O3 (32%) and H2O2 (49%) concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere, which have opposing effects on the sulfate O-isotope anomaly. Sulfate Δ17O is insensitive to the relatively small (-12%) decrease in Southern Hemisphere OH concentrations on this timescale due to the dominance of in-cloud versus gas-phase formation of sulfate in the mid-to-high southern latitudes. We find that the fraction of sulfate formed globally through gas-phase oxidation has not changed substantially between preindustrial and present times, however the total amount of sulfate formed in the gas-phase has nearly quadrupled due to rising anthropogenic emissions of sulfur dioxide. Measurements over a glacial-interglacial cycle from the Vostok core indicate dramatic changes in the Δ17O of sulfate on this timescale, which provide a strong constraint for glacial-era atmospheric chemistry modeling efforts. We will present preliminary results of

  6. Effect of oxygen concentration in modified atmosphere packaging on color and texture of beef patties cooked to different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yulong; Puolanne, Eero; Ertbjerg, Per

    2016-11-01

    Patties were made from raw minced beef after storage for 6days in modified atmosphere (0, 20, 40, 60, and 80% oxygen) to study the combined effect of oxygen concentration and cooking temperature on hardness and color. Increased oxygen concentrations generally led to larger (P<0.01) thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) values, greater (P<0.01) loss of free thiols and more formation of cross-linked myosin heavy chain. Hardness of cooked patties was generally lower (P<0.01) without oxygen. Premature browning of cooked patties was observed already at a relative low oxygen concentration of 20%. The internal redness of cooked patties decreased (P<0.05) with increasing oxygen concentrations and increasing cooking temperatures. Mean particle size (D(3,2)) of homogenized cooked meat generally increased (P<0.05) with increasing cooking temperatures and increasing oxygen concentrations, and particle size was correlated (r=0.80) with hardness of cooked patties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Chasing Neoproterozoic Atmospheric Oxygen Ghosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerrum, C. J.; Canfield, D. E.; Dahl, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric oxygen has been considered a necessary condition for the evolution of animal life for over half a century. While direct proxies for atmospheric oxygen are difficult to obtain, a number of indirect proxies have been giving us a ghost image of rising atmospheric oxygen at the close of the Precambrian. In this context, redox sensitive elements and isotopes represent the hallmark for a significant reduction in anoxic areas of the world ocean, implicating a significant rise of atmospheric oxygen during the Neoproterozoic. Here, we test to what degree redox sensitive elements in ancient marine sediments are proxies of atmospheric oxygen. We model the redox-chemical evolution of the shelf seas and ocean using a combination of 3D high resolution shelf sea models and a simpler global ocean biogeochemical model including climate weathering feedbacks, a free sea level and parameterized icecaps. We find that ecosystem evolution would have resulted in reorganization of the nutrient and redox balance of the shelf-ocean system causing a significant increase in oxygenated areas that permitted a boosting of trace metal concentrations in the remaining anoxic areas. While this reorganization takes place there is limited net change in the modelled atmospheric oxygen, warning us against interpreting changing trace metal concentrations and isotopes as reflecting a rise in atmospheric oxygen.

  8. Periodontal Wound Healing Responses to Varying Oxygen Concentrations and Atmospheric Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    ranging from diabetes mellitus to syphilis. The first such chamber was built in the United States by Corning in 1891. In the 1930s, the American Medical...uniformly predictable goal (Stahl, 1975, 1977b). In a recent overview on peridontal attachment, Stahl (1985) described a possible sequence of...with neutrophil defects may benefit from hyperbaric oxygen’s ability to enhance host response, as seen in the treatment of diabetic leg ulcerations

  9. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebabian, Paul

    1997-01-01

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

  10. A theory of atmospheric oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, T A; Schrag, D P

    2017-05-01

    Geological records of atmospheric oxygen suggest that pO 2 was less than 0.001% of present atmospheric levels (PAL) during the Archean, increasing abruptly to a Proterozoic value between 0.1% and 10% PAL, and rising quickly to modern levels in the Phanerozoic. Using a simple model of the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, oxygen, sulfur, hydrogen, iron, and phosphorous, we demonstrate that there are three stable states for atmospheric oxygen, roughly corresponding to levels observed in the geological record. These stable states arise from a series of specific positive and negative feedbacks, requiring a large geochemical perturbation to the redox state to transition from one to another. In particular, we show that a very low oxygen level in the Archean (i.e., 10 -7 PAL) is consistent with the presence of oxygenic photosynthesis and a robust organic carbon cycle. We show that the Snowball Earth glaciations, which immediately precede both transitions, provide an appropriate transient increase in atmospheric oxygen to drive the atmosphere either from its Archean state to its Proterozoic state, or from its Proterozoic state to its Phanerozoic state. This hypothesis provides a mechanistic explanation for the apparent synchronicity of the Proterozoic Snowball Earth events with both the Great Oxidation Event, and the Neoproterozoic oxidation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration estimates through the PETM using triple oxygen isotope analysis of mammalian bioapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehler, Alexander; Gingerich, Philip D; Pack, Andreas

    2016-07-12

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is a remarkable climatic and environmental event that occurred 56 Ma ago and has importance for understanding possible future climate change. The Paleocene-Eocene transition is marked by a rapid temperature rise contemporaneous with a large negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). Both the temperature and the isotopic excursion are well-documented by terrestrial and marine proxies. The CIE was the result of a massive release of carbon into the atmosphere. However, the carbon source and quantities of CO2 and CH4 greenhouse gases that contributed to global warming are poorly constrained and highly debated. Here we combine an established oxygen isotope paleothermometer with a newly developed triple oxygen isotope paleo-CO2 barometer. We attempt to quantify the source of greenhouse gases released during the Paleocene-Eocene transition by analyzing bioapatite of terrestrial mammals. Our results are consistent with previous estimates of PETM temperature change and suggest that not only CO2 but also massive release of seabed methane was the driver for CIE and PETM.

  12. Estimation of α-tocopherol concentration necessary to optimise lamb meat quality stability during storage in high-oxygen modified atmosphere using broken-line regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, I; De la Fuente, J; Díaz, M T; Lauzurica, S; Pérez, C; Cañeque, V

    2008-09-01

    The research was carried out to evaluate the effect of different α-tocopherol concentrations in lamb meat on oxidative stability during storage in high-oxygen atmosphere. Thirty-six lambs were randomly distributed to four groups and given diets containing four levels of vitamin E (20, 270, 520 and 1020 mg vitamin E/kg feed) from an initial weight of 13.2 ± 0.5 kg to a slaughter weight of 26.2 ± 0.3 kg. Supplementation of the diet with vitamin E increased (P meat and concentrations were obtained in the 0.46 to 4.14 mg/kg meat range. Broken-line analysis of data indicated a target dietary vitamin E supplementation of 287 mg/kg feed, which corresponded with a concentration of 2.26 mg α-tocopherol/kg meat. α-Tocopherol in meat was highly correlated with the oxidation of lipids and pigments. Broken-line analysis of data indicated the target α-tocopherol concentration in lamb for improved protection against lipid and pigment oxidation during 14, 21 and 28 days of storage in high-oxygen atmosphere was in the range 1.87 to 2.37 mg/kg meat. These concentrations of α-tocopherol in the meat made it possible to maintain the indicator values of lipid and pigment oxidation below the values considered in the bibliography as unacceptable to the consumer.

  13. Atmospheric Oxygen Concentrations for the Past 350 Myr Modeled from the δ13C of C3 Land Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordt, L.; Breecker, D.

    2016-12-01

    Numerous studies have focused on the systematic collection of long-term d13C records from marine sediments, but no such isotopic compilation exists for C3 land plants. Consequently, we gathered a meta-data base of 8003 plant-derived δ13C values (ISOORG) from various carbon sources binned into 5 myr time steps. The results of this investigation were reported in a recent publication showing that most δ13C sources co-vary with ten CIEs during the last 400 myr. For this paper we culled ISOORG to produce ISOORG16-H that contains 7025 plant-derived δ13C values from paleo-moist environments to reflect secular controls on the δ13C of C3 plants. We then constructed atmospheric pO2 curves for the past 350 myr using prior experimental work showing a direct relationship between the ∆13C of C3 plants and pO2 concentration. Periods of hyperoxia (25-30% pO2) were identified from 300-250, 225-190, and 110-105 myr, and intervals of hypoxia (10-15% pO2) from 350-345, 245-230, and 185-115 myr. During the last 150 myr, pO2 stabilized at 17-24% except for a notable positive excursion from 110-105 myr. Hyperoxia, apparently from widespread carbon burial, supports the notion of insect gigantism during the Late Paleozoic. Hypoxia during the early Triassic correlates with the coal gap following the collapse of Paleozoic ecosystems. Rising pO2 in the late Triassic seems to reflect renewed carbon burial from reorganization of Mesozoic ecosystems. The middle Mesozoic is characterized by low pO2 during an intense greenhouse interval, with ambient conditions ensuing thereafter possibly linked to carbon burial from the radiation of angiosperms. pO2 concentrations >14% suggest wildfires persisted through the study interval except possibly at 160 and 140 myr. Intervals of low pO2 concentration were likely accompanied by lower atmospheric pressure and higher temperatures, particularly from 245-230 myr and 180-120 myr. Our O2 reconstructions conform with GEOCARBSULF, but not with proxy

  14. Metabolic profiling and flux analysis of MEL-2 human embryonic stem cells during exponential growth at physiological and atmospheric oxygen concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Turner

    Full Text Available As human embryonic stem cells (hESCs steadily progress towards regenerative medicine applications there is an increasing emphasis on the development of bioreactor platforms that enable expansion of these cells to clinically relevant numbers. Surprisingly little is known about the metabolic requirements of hESCs, precluding the rational design and optimisation of such platforms. In this study, we undertook an in-depth characterisation of MEL-2 hESC metabolic behaviour during the exponential growth phase, combining metabolic profiling and flux analysis tools at physiological (hypoxic and atmospheric (normoxic oxygen concentrations. To overcome variability in growth profiles and the problem of closing mass balances in a complex environment, we developed protocols to accurately measure uptake and production rates of metabolites, cell density, growth rate and biomass composition, and designed a metabolic flux analysis model for estimating internal rates. hESCs are commonly considered to be highly glycolytic with inactive or immature mitochondria, however, whilst the results of this study confirmed that glycolysis is indeed highly active, we show that at least in MEL-2 hESC, it is supported by the use of oxidative phosphorylation within the mitochondria utilising carbon sources, such as glutamine to maximise ATP production. Under both conditions, glycolysis was disconnected from the mitochondria with all of the glucose being converted to lactate. No difference in the growth rates of cells cultured under physiological or atmospheric oxygen concentrations was observed nor did this cause differences in fluxes through the majority of the internal metabolic pathways associated with biogenesis. These results suggest that hESCs display the conventional Warburg effect, with high aerobic activity despite high lactate production, challenging the idea of an anaerobic metabolism with low mitochondrial activity. The results of this study provide new insight that

  15. Combining tree-ring metal concentrations and lead, carbon and oxygen isotopes to reconstruct peri-urban atmospheric pollution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doucet, A; Savard, M M; Bégin, C; Marion, J; Smirnoff, A; Ouarda, T B M J

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we analysed the tree-ring metal concentrations and isotope ratios of five stands located in three contrasted settings to infer the diffuse air pollution history of the northern part of the Windsor...

  16. Effect of reduction of oxygen concentration in modified atmosphere packaging on bovine M. longissimus lumborum and M. gluteus medius quality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łopacka, Joanna; Półtorak, Andrzej; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports the impact of modified atmosphere gas compositions with different concentrations of CO2/O2/N2 on physicochemical traits of beef steaks from M. longissimus lumborum and M. gluteus medius. Samples were stored at +2°C for 12days. The gas compositions were as follows: (i) 50% O2/20% CO2/30% N2 (MAP1), (ii) 65% O2/20% CO2/15% N2 (MAP2) and (iii) 80% O2/20% CO2 (MAP3). Packaging atmosphere did not affect CIEL*a*b* colour coordinates, which were affected by storage time and by muscle type. Lipid oxidation in M. longissimus lumborum was affected by packaging treatment; however packaging treatment×storage time interaction affected lipid oxidation significantly. Results showed that reduction of oxygen from the commercially used 80% to 50% does not negatively impact colour properties and state of myoglobin, but significantly lowers oxidative deterioration of M. longissimus lumborum at the end of storage. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Combining tree-ring metal concentrations and lead, carbon and oxygen isotopes to reconstruct peri-urban atmospheric pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Doucet, Annick; Savard, Martine M.; Bégin, Christian; Marion, Joëlle; Smirnoff, Anna; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we analysed the tree-ring metal concentrations and isotope ratios of five stands located in three contrasted settings to infer the diffuse air pollution history of the northern part of the Windsor–Québec City Corridor in eastern Canada. Tree-ring series show that the Cd and Zn accumulation rates were higher between 1960 and 1986 and that the long-term acidification of the soil (Ca/Al series) was likely induced by NOx and SOx deposition (δ15N and δ13C trends as proxy). The Pb ...

  18. Combining tree-ring metal concentrations and lead, carbon and oxygen isotopes to reconstruct peri-urban atmospheric pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annick Doucet

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analysed the tree-ring metal concentrations and isotope ratios of five stands located in three contrasted settings to infer the diffuse air pollution history of the northern part of the Windsor–Québec City Corridor in eastern Canada. Tree-ring series show that the Cd and Zn accumulation rates were higher between 1960 and 1986 and that the long-term acidification of the soil (Ca/Al series was likely induced by NOx and SOx deposition (δ15N and δ13C trends as proxy. The Pb concentrations and 206Pb/207Pb ratios indicate that the dominant source of lead from 1880 to the 1920s was the combustion of north-eastern American coal, which was succeeded by the combustion of leaded gasoline from the 1920s to the end of the 1980s. Our modelling approach allows separating the climatic and anthropogenic effects on the tree-ring δ13C and δ18O responses. Diffuse air pollution caused an enrichment in 13C in all stands and a decrease of the δ18O values only in three of the stands. This study indicates that dendrogeochemistry can show contrasted responses to environmental changes and that the combination of several independent indicators constitutes a powerful tool to reconstruct the air pollution history in the complex context of peri-urban regions.

  19. Proposed reference models for atomic oxygen in the terrestrial atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, E. J.; Mcdade, I. C.; Lockerbie, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    A provisional Atomic Oxygen Reference model was derived from average monthly ozone profiles and the MSIS-86 reference model atmosphere. The concentrations are presented in tabular form for the altitude range 40 to 130 km.

  20. The origin and evolution of atmospheric oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the chemical processes involved in the evolution of the earth's atmospheric oxygen and ozone, as well as the sources, sinks, and transfer rates of oxygen in the present atmosphere. Special attention is given the evolution of atmospheric O3 as a function of the buildup of O2, with the results of calculations presented as the vertical profiles of O3, in terms of the present atmospheric level (PAL) oxygen values. Calculations show that the total O3 column density that is approximately half of the present level was reached when atmospheric oxygen level reached 0.1 PAL. At this level of ozone, the biological shielding of the earth's surface from the UV radiation is believed to have been achieved.

  1. High-Pressure Oxygen Concentrator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA desires to generate and store gases including oxygen and nitrogen at sub-critical conditions as a part of its lunar and spacecraft atmospheric systems. Oxygen...

  2. Medical Oxygen Concentrator for Microgravity Operation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have all seen people carrying portable oxygen tanks or concentrators to provide critical life support respiratory oxygen. Heavy, bulky, and for O2 concentrators,...

  3. Atmospheric oxygenation three billion years ago

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crowe, Sean; Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Beukes, Nicolas J.

    2013-01-01

    the GreatOxidation Event2,3.Geochemical indications of transient atmospheric oxygenation, however, date back to 2.6–2.7 billion years ago4–6. Here we examine the distribution of chromium isotopes and redox-sensitive metals in the approximately 3-billionyear- old Nsuze palaeosol and in the near...

  4. Ancient atmospheres and the evolution of oxygen sensing via the hypoxia-inducible factor in metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cormac T; McElwain, Jennifer C

    2010-10-01

    Metazoan diversification occurred during a time when atmospheric oxygen levels fluctuated between 15 and 30%. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a primary regulator of the adaptive transcriptional response to hypoxia. Although the HIF pathway is highly conserved, its complexity increased during periods when atmospheric oxygen concentrations were increasing. Thus atmospheric oxygen levels may have provided a selection force on the development of cellular oxygen-sensing pathways.

  5. Origin of oxygen species in Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörst, S. M.; Vuitton, V.; Yelle, R. V.

    2008-10-01

    The detection of O+ precipitating into Titan's atmosphere by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) represents the discovery of a previously unknown source of oxygen in Titan's atmosphere. The photochemical model presented here shows that those oxygen ions are incorporated into CO and CO2. We show that the observed abundances of CO, CO2 and H2O can be simultaneously reproduced using an oxygen flux consistent with the CAPS observations and an OH flux consistent with predicted production from micrometeorite ablation. It is therefore unnecessary to assume that the observed CO abundance is the remnant of a larger primordial CO abundance or to invoke outgassing of CO from Titan's interior as a source of CO.

  6. Evolution, atmospheric oxygen, and complex disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Lauren Gerard; Britton, Steven L

    2007-08-20

    If evolution is an accurate statement of our biology, then disease must be tightly associated with its patterns. We considered selection for more optimal capacity for energy transfer as the most general pattern of evolution. From this, we propose that the etiology of complex disease is linked tightly to the evolutionary transition to cellular complexity that was afforded by the steep thermodynamic gradient of an oxygen atmosphere. In accord with this thesis, clinical studies reveal a strong statistical link between low aerobic capacity and all-cause mortality. In addition, large-scale unbiased network analyses demonstrate the pivotal role of oxygen metabolism in cellular function. The demonstration that multiple disease risks segregated during two-way artificial selection for low and high aerobic capacity in rats provides a remote test of these possible connections between evolution, oxygen metabolism, and complex disease. Even more broadly, an atmosphere with oxygen may be uniquely essential for development of complex life anywhere because oxygen is stable as a diatomic gas, is easily transported, and has a high electronegativity for participation in energy transfer via redox reactions.

  7. Investigating Factors that Affect Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzen, Paul G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes activities that demonstrate the effects of factors such as wind velocity, water temperature, convection currents, intensity of light, rate of photosynthesis, atmospheric pressure, humidity, numbers of decomposers, presence of oxidizable ions, and respiration by plants and animals on the dissolved oxygen concentration in water. (MA)

  8. Aerobic growth at nanomolar oxygen concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolper, Daniel Aaron; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2010-01-01

    known. These capabilities also provide a framework for reconstructing a critical period in the history of life, because low, but not negligible, atmospheric oxygen levels could have persisted before the “Great Oxidation” of the Earth’s surface about 2.3 to 2.4 billion years ago. Here, we show...... that Escherichia coli K-12, chosen for its well-understood biochemistry, rapid growth rate, and low-oxygen-affinity terminal oxidase, grows at oxygen levels of ≤ 3 nM, two to three orders of magnitude lower than previously observed for aerobes. Our study expands both the environmental range and temporal history...

  9. Aerobic growth at nanomolar oxygen concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolper, Daniel; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2010-01-01

    known. These capabilities also provide a framework for reconstructing a critical period in the history of life, because low, but not negligible, atmospheric oxygen levels could have persisted before the "Great Oxidation" of the Earth's surface about 2.3 to 2.4 billion years ago. Here, we show...... that Escherichia coli K-12, chosen for its well-understood biochemistry, rapid growth rate, and low-oxygen-affinity terminal oxidase, grows at oxygen levels of ≤ 3 nM, two to three orders of magnitude lower than previously observed for aerobes. Our study expands both the environmental range and temporal history...

  10. Single and multigenerational responses of body mass to atmospheric oxygen concentrations in Drosophila melanogaster : evidence for roles of plasticity and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, C J; Hubb, A J; Harrison, J F

    2009-12-01

    Greater oxygen availability has been hypothesized to be important in allowing the evolution of larger invertebrates during the Earth's history, and across aquatic environments. We tested for evolutionary and developmental responses of adult body size of Drosophila melanogaster to hypoxia and hyperoxia. Individually reared flies were smaller in hypoxia, but hyperoxia had no effect. In each of three oxygen treatments (hypoxia, normoxia or hyperoxia) we reared three replicate lines of flies for seven generations, followed by four generations in normoxia. In hypoxia, responses were due primarily to developmental plasticity, as average body size fell in one generation and returned to control values after one to two generations of normoxia. In hyperoxia, flies evolved larger body sizes. Maximal fly mass was reached during the first generation of return from hyperoxia to normoxia. Our results suggest that higher oxygen levels could cause invertebrate species to evolve larger average sizes, rather than simply permitting evolution of giant species.

  11. Dynamic oxygenation of the early atmosphere and oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Timothy W.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Reinhard, Christopher T.

    2014-05-01

    The traditional view of the oxygenation of the early atmosphere and oceans depicts irreversibly rising abundances in two large steps: one at the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) ca. 2.3-2.4 billion years ago (Ga) and another near the end of the Neoproterozoic. This talk will explore how the latest data challenge this paradigm. Recent results reveal a far more dynamic history of early oxygenation, one with both rising and falling levels, long periods of sustained low concentrations even after the GOE, complex feedback relationships that likely coupled nutrients and ocean redox, and dramatic changes tied through still-emerging cause-and-effect relationships to first-order tectonic, climatic, and evolutionary events. In the face of increasing doubt about the robustness of organic biomarker records from the Archean, researchers are increasingly reliant on inorganic geochemical proxies for the earliest records of oxygenic photosynthesis. Proxy data now suggest oxygenesis at ca. 3.0 Ga with a likelihood of local oxygen build up in the surface ocean long before the GOE, as well as low (and perhaps transient) accumulation in the atmosphere against a backdrop of mostly less than ca. 0.001% of the present atmospheric concentration. By the GOE, the balance between oxygen sources and sinks shifted in favor of persistent accumulation, although sedimentary recycling of non-mass-dependent sulfur isotope signatures allows for the possibility of rising and falling atmospheric oxygen before the GOE as traditionally defined by the sulfur isotope record. Recycling may also hinder our ability to precisely date the transition to permanent oxygen accumulation beyond trace levels. Diverse data point to a dramatic increase in biospheric oxygen following the GOE, coincident with the largest positive carbon isotope excursion in Earth history, followed by an equally dramatic drop. This decline in Earth surface redox potential ushered in more than a billion years of dominantly low oxygen levels in

  12. Acceptability of oxygen concentrators: the patient's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, J P; Higgs, C M; Jones, P A; White, R J

    1990-10-01

    The impact of the installation of an oxygen concentrator on the lifestyle of 30 patients in two health districts has been investigated using a questionnaire. Marked improvements in general well-being (83% of respondents), breathing (82%), mobility (62%) and sleep pattern (52%) were reported. The long term nature of the aims of treatment were understood by 83% of the respondents and the mean period of time the patients used the concentrator was satisfactory. However, 34% of respondents had a concentrator with only one outlet and 70% had the concentrator situated in a commonly used room with the possibility of problems with noise. Thirty one percent of the respondents were still smoking. The recommendations given to patients for the sitting of the concentrator and the number of outlets should be improved. However, the oxygen concentrator was found to be generally well tolerated and this refutes criticism that patients may find it restricting.

  13. Earliest land plants created modern levels of atmospheric oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenton, Timothy M.; Dahl, Tais Wittchen; Daines, Stuart J.

    2016-01-01

    The progressive oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere was pivotal to the evolution of life, but the puzzle of when and how atmospheric oxygen (O2) first approached modern levels (∼21%) remains unresolved. Redox proxy data indicate the deep oceans were oxygenated during 435-392 Ma, and the appeara...

  14. Devonian rise in atmospheric oxygen correlated to the radiations of terrestrial plants and large predatory fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Tais W.; Hammarlund, Emma U.; Anbar, Ariel D.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of Earth’s biota is intimately linked to the oxygenation of the oceans and atmosphere. We use the isotopic composition and concentration of molybdenum (Mo) in sedimentary rocks to explore this relationship. Our results indicate two episodes of global ocean oxygenation. The first coi...... in sediments. It also correlates with a pronounced radiation of large predatory fish, animals with high oxygen demand. We thereby couple the redox history of the atmosphere and oceans to major events in animal evolution....

  15. ISLSCP II Globalview: Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GlobalView Carbon Dioxide (CO2) data product contains synchronized and smoothed time series of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected sites that were created...

  16. ISLSCP II Globalview: Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The GlobalView Carbon Dioxide (CO2) data product contains synchronized and smoothed time series of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected sites that...

  17. Atmospheric oxygen levels affect mudskipper terrestrial performance: implications for early tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jew, Corey J; Wegner, Nicholas C; Yanagitsuru, Yuzo; Tresguerres, Martin; Graham, Jeffrey B

    2013-08-01

    The Japanese mudskipper (Periophthalmus modestus), an amphibious fish that possesses many respiratory and locomotive specializations for sojourns onto land, was used as a model to study how changing atmospheric oxygen concentrations during the middle and late Paleozoic Era (400-250 million years ago) may have influenced the emergence and subsequent radiation of the first tetrapods. The effects of different atmospheric oxygen concentrations (hyperoxia = 35%, normoxia = 21%, and hypoxia = 7% O2) on terrestrial performance were tested during exercise on a terrestrial treadmill and during recovery from exhaustive exercise. Endurance and elevated post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC; the immediate O2 debt repaid post-exercise) correlated with atmospheric oxygen concentration indicating that when additional oxygen is available P. modestus can increase oxygen utilization both during and following exercise. The time required post-exercise for mudskippers to return to a resting metabolic rate did not differ between treatments. However, in normoxia, oxygen consumption increased above hyperoxic values 13-20 h post-exercise suggesting a delayed repayment of the incurred oxygen debt. Finally, following exercise, ventilatory movements associated with buccopharyngeal aerial respiration returned to their rest-like pattern more quickly at higher concentrations of oxygen. Taken together, the results of this study show that P. modestus can exercise longer and recover quicker under higher oxygen concentrations. Similarities between P. modestus and early tetrapods suggest that increasing atmospheric oxygen levels during the middle and late Paleozoic allowed for elevated aerobic capacity and improved terrestrial performance, and likely led to an accelerated diversification and expansion of vertebrate life into the terrestrial biosphere.

  18. Plasma Catalytic Extraction of Oxygen from the Martian Atmosphere Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Plasma catalytic techniques are proposed for the extraction of oxygen from the abundant carbon dioxide contained in the Martian atmosphere (95% CO2).. The Phase I...

  19. Plasma Extraction of Oxygen from Martian Atmosphere Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Plasma techniques are proposed for the extraction of oxygen from the abundant carbon dioxide contained in the Martian atmosphere (96 % CO2). In this process, CO2 is...

  20. Oxygen and animal evolution: did a rise of atmospheric oxygen "trigger" the origin of animals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Daniel B; Canfield, Donald E

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies challenge the classical view that the origin of animal life was primarily controlled by atmospheric oxygen levels. For example, some modern sponges, representing early-branching animals, can live under 200 times less oxygen than currently present in the atmosphere - levels commonly thought to have been maintained prior to their origination. Furthermore, it is increasingly argued that the earliest animals, which likely lived in low oxygen environments, played an active role in constructing the well-oxygenated conditions typical of the modern oceans. Therefore, while oxygen is still relevant to understanding early animal evolution, the relationships between the two might be less straightforward than previously thought. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Oxygen and animal evolution: Did a rise of atmospheric oxygen trigger the origin of animals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, Daniel Brady; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies challenge the classical view that the origin of animal life was primarily controlled by atmospheric oxygen levels. For example, some modern sponges, representing early-branching animals, can live under 200 times less oxygen than currently present in the atmosphere - levels commonly...... thought to have been maintained prior to their origination. Furthermore, it is increasingly argued that the earliest animals, which likely lived in low oxygen environments, played an active role in constructing the well-oxygenated conditions typical of the modern oceans. Therefore, while oxygen is still...

  2. The ancient oxygen exosphere of Mars - Implications for atmosphere evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Bougher, S. W.; Nagy, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    The paper considers absorption of oxygen (atoms and ions) by the surface as a mechanism for the early Martian atmosphere escape, due to the effect of high EUV flux of the ancient sun. Hot oxygen exosphere densities in ancient atmosphere and ionosphere are calculated for different EUV fluxes and the escape fluxes associated with these exposures. Using these densities, the ion production rate above the ionopause is calculated for different epochs including photoionization, charge exchange, and solar wind electron impact. It is found that, when the inferred high solar EUV fluxes of the past are taken into account, oxygen equivalent to that in several tens of meters of water, planet-wide, should have escaped Martian atmosphere to space over the last 3 Gyr.

  3. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Contrasting characteristics of sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air and atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J. L.; Liu, D. X.; Iza, F.; Rong, M. Z.; Kong, M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Glow discharges in air are often considered to be the ultimate low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas for numerous chamber-free applications. This is due to the ubiquitous presence of air and the perceived abundance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in air plasmas. In this paper, sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air plasmas are shown to produce a low concentration of excited oxygen atoms but an abundance of excited nitrogen species, UV photons and ozone molecules. This contrasts sharply with the efficient production of excited oxygen atoms in comparable helium-oxygen discharges. Relevant reaction chemistry analysed with a global model suggests that collisional excitation of O2 by helium metastables is significantly more efficient than electron dissociative excitation of O2, electron excitation of O and ion-ion recombination. These results suggest different practical uses of the two oxygen-containing atmospheric discharges, with air plasmas being well suited for nitrogen and UV based chemistry and He-O2 plasmas for excited atomic oxygen based chemistry.

  4. Titania may produce abiotic oxygen atmospheres on habitable exoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    Norio Narita; Takafumi Enomoto; Shigeyuki Masaoka; Nobuhiko Kusakabe

    2015-01-01

    The search for habitable exoplanets in the Universe is actively ongoing in the field of astronomy. The biggest future milestone is to determine whether life exists on such habitable exoplanets. In that context, oxygen in the atmosphere has been considered strong evidence for the presence of photosynthetic organisms. In this paper, we show that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium (IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet ...

  5. Box models for the evolution of atmospheric oxygen: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    A simple 3-box model of the atmosphere/ocean system is used to describe the various stages in the evolution of atmospheric oxygen. In Stage I, which probably lasted until redbeds began to form about 2.0 Ga ago, the Earth's surface environment was generally devoid of free O2, except possibly in localized regions of high productivity in the surface ocean. In Stage II, which may have lasted for less than 150 Ma, the atmosphere and surface ocean were oxidizing, while the deep ocean remained anoxic. In Stage III, which commenced with the disappearance of banded iron formations around 1.85 Ga ago and has lasted until the present, all three surface reservoirs contained appreciable amounts of free O2. Recent and not-so-recent controversies regarding the abundance of oxygen in the Archean atmosphere are identified and discussed. The rate of O2 increase during the Middle and Late Proterozoic is identified as another outstanding question.

  6. A Solar Powered, Ceramic Oxygen Concentrator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Oxygen is an essential treatment for several life-threatening conditions including pneumonia, the single biggest cause of death in children less than five years of...

  7. Burning of forest materials under late Paleozoic high atmospheric oxygen levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard A., Jr. Wildman; Leo J. Hickey; Matthew B. Dickinson; Robert A. Berner; Jennifer M. Robinson; Michael Dietrich; Robert H. Essenhigh; Craig B. Wildman

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical models suggest that atmospheric oxygen reached concentrations as high as 35% O2 during the past 550 m.y. Previous burning experiments using strips of paper have challenged this idea, concluding that ancient wildfires would have decimated plant life if O2 significantly exceeded its present level of 21%. New...

  8. Titania may produce abiotic oxygen atmospheres on habitable exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Norio; Enomoto, Takafumi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2015-09-10

    The search for habitable exoplanets in the Universe is actively ongoing in the field of astronomy. The biggest future milestone is to determine whether life exists on such habitable exoplanets. In that context, oxygen in the atmosphere has been considered strong evidence for the presence of photosynthetic organisms. In this paper, we show that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium (IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet (NUV) lights on the surface of exoplanets. Titania works as a photocatalyst to dissociate liquid water in this process. This mechanism offers a different source of a possibility of abiotic oxygen in atmospheres of exoplanets from previously considered photodissociation of water vapor in upper atmospheres by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light. Our order-of-magnitude estimation shows that possible amounts of oxygen produced by this abiotic mechanism can be comparable with or even more than that in the atmosphere of the current Earth, depending on the amount of active surface area for this mechanism. We conclude that titania may act as a potential source of false signs of life on habitable exoplanets.

  9. ABIOTIC OXYGEN-DOMINATED ATMOSPHERES ON TERRESTRIAL HABITABLE ZONE PLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wordsworth, Robin; Pierrehumbert, Raymond [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60622 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Detection of life on other planets requires identification of biosignatures, i.e., observable planetary properties that robustly indicate the presence of a biosphere. One of the most widely accepted biosignatures for an Earth-like planet is an atmosphere where oxygen is a major constituent. Here we show that lifeless habitable zone terrestrial planets around any star type may develop oxygen-dominated atmospheres as a result of water photolysis, because the cold trap mechanism that protects H{sub 2}O on Earth is ineffective when the atmospheric inventory of non-condensing gases (e.g., N{sub 2}, Ar) is low. Hence the spectral features of O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} alone cannot be regarded as robust signs of extraterrestrial life.

  10. Effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) with low and superatmospheric oxygen on the quality and antioxidant enzyme system of golden needle mushrooms (Flammulina velutipes) during postharvest storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Cheng T.; Wang, Chang T.; Cao, Y.P.; Nout, M.J.R.; Sun, B.G.; Liu, L.

    2011-01-01

    To quantify the effect of oxygen concentrations on the quality and antioxidant enzyme system of stored golden needle mushroom, modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) with low and initial superatmospheric oxygen was applied during mushroom storage, and physiological changes associated with postharvest

  11. Diagnostics of atmospheric pressure capillary DBD oxygen plasma jet

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, N C; Pramanik, B K

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure capillary dielectric barrier oxygen discharge plasma jet is developed to generate non-thermal plasma using unipolar positive pulse power supply. Both optical and electrical techniques are used to investigate the characteristics of the produced plasma as function of applied voltage and gas flow rate. Analytical results obtained from the optical emission spectroscopic data reveal the gas temperature, rotational temperature, excitation temperature and electron density. Gas temperature and rotational temperature are found to decrease with increasing oxygen flow rate but increase linearly with applied voltage. It is exposed that the electron density is boosting up with enhanced applied voltage and oxygen flow rate, while the electron excitation temperature is reducing with rising oxygen flow rate. Electrical characterization demonstrates that the discharge frequency is falling with flow rate but increasing with voltage. The produced plasma is applied preliminarily to study the inactivation yie...

  12. Oxidant abundances in rainwater and the evolution of atmospheric oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.; Holland, H. D.; Pinto, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    H2O2 is probably the dominant oxidant in rainwater at O2 levels lower than 0.01-0.001 present atmospheric levels (PAL), and the magnitude of its dissolved flux is sensitive to the concentration of the trace gases NO, CO, and CH4 in the atmosphere, as well as to the partial pressure of atmospheric CO2. The earlier interpretation of the paleosol data in terms of the ratio of p-O2/p-CO2 in the atmosphere must be modified by taking into account the effects of photochemically produced oxidants and reactants at p-O2 of les than 0.01 PAL.

  13. Atmospheric oxygen level and the evolution of insect body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jon F; Kaiser, Alexander; VandenBrooks, John M

    2010-07-07

    Insects are small relative to vertebrates, possibly owing to limitations or costs associated with their blind-ended tracheal respiratory system. The giant insects of the late Palaeozoic occurred when atmospheric PO(2) (aPO(2)) was hyperoxic, supporting a role for oxygen in the evolution of insect body size. The paucity of the insect fossil record and the complex interactions between atmospheric oxygen level, organisms and their communities makes it impossible to definitively accept or reject the historical oxygen-size link, and multiple alternative hypotheses exist. However, a variety of recent empirical findings support a link between oxygen and insect size, including: (i) most insects develop smaller body sizes in hypoxia, and some develop and evolve larger sizes in hyperoxia; (ii) insects developmentally and evolutionarily reduce their proportional investment in the tracheal system when living in higher aPO(2), suggesting that there are significant costs associated with tracheal system structure and function; and (iii) larger insects invest more of their body in the tracheal system, potentially leading to greater effects of aPO(2) on larger insects. Together, these provide a wealth of plausible mechanisms by which tracheal oxygen delivery may be centrally involved in setting the relatively small size of insects and for hyperoxia-enabled Palaeozoic gigantism.

  14. The oxygen and carbon dioxide balance in the earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, F. S.

    1975-01-01

    The oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle is described in detail, and steps which are sensitive to perturbation or instability are identified. About half of the carbon dioxide consumption each year in photosynthesis occurs in the oceans. Phytoplankton, which are the primary producers, have been shown to assimilate insecticides and herbicides. The impact of such materials on phytoplankton photosynthesis, both direct and as the indirect result of detrimental effects higher up in the food chain, cannot be assessed. Net oxygen production is very small in comparison with the total production and occurs almost exclusively in a few ocean areas with anoxic bottom conditions and in peat-forming marshes which are sensitive to anthropogenic disturbances. The carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere is increasing at a relatively rapid rate as the result of fossil fuel combustion. Increases in photosynthesis as the result of the hothouse effect may in turn reduce the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere, leading to global cooling.

  15. Formation of oxygen complexes in controlled atmosphere at surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 29; Issue 5. Formation of oxygen complexes in controlled atmosphere at surface of doped glassy carbon. Aleksandra A Perić-Grujić Tatjana M Vasiljević Olivera M Nešković Miomir V Veljković Zoran V Laušević Mila D Laušević. Ceramics and Glasses Volume 29 Issue ...

  16. Earliest land plants created modern levels of atmospheric oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Timothy M.; Dahl, Tais W.; Daines, Stuart J.; Mills, Benjamin J. W.; Ozaki, Kazumi; Saltzman, Matthew R.; Porada, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The progressive oxygenation of the Earth’s atmosphere was pivotal to the evolution of life, but the puzzle of when and how atmospheric oxygen (O2) first approached modern levels (∼21%) remains unresolved. Redox proxy data indicate the deep oceans were oxygenated during 435–392 Ma, and the appearance of fossil charcoal indicates O2 >15–17% by 420–400 Ma. However, existing models have failed to predict oxygenation at this time. Here we show that the earliest plants, which colonized the land surface from ∼470 Ma onward, were responsible for this mid-Paleozoic oxygenation event, through greatly increasing global organic carbon burial—the net long-term source of O2. We use a trait-based ecophysiological model to predict that cryptogamic vegetation cover could have achieved ∼30% of today’s global terrestrial net primary productivity by ∼445 Ma. Data from modern bryophytes suggests this plentiful early plant material had a much higher molar C:P ratio (∼2,000) than marine biomass (∼100), such that a given weathering flux of phosphorus could support more organic carbon burial. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that early plants selectively increased the flux of phosphorus (relative to alkalinity) weathered from rocks. Combining these effects in a model of long-term biogeochemical cycling, we reproduce a sustained +2‰ increase in the carbonate carbon isotope (δ13C) record by ∼445 Ma, and predict a corresponding rise in O2 to present levels by 420–400 Ma, consistent with geochemical data. This oxygen rise represents a permanent shift in regulatory regime to one where fire-mediated negative feedbacks stabilize high O2 levels. PMID:27528678

  17. Effect of high-oxygen atmosphere packaging on oxidative stability and sensory quality of two chicken muscles during chill storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongberg, Sisse; Wen, Jinzhu; Tørngren, Mari Ann

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative stability and sensory quality of chicken breast (m. pectoralis) and thigh (m. peroneus longus) stored in high-oxygen modified atmosphere (MAP-O), non-oxygen modified atmosphere (MAP-N), or vacuum for up to 9 days at 5°C were investigated. Protein thiol concentration in breasts...... in MAP-O than breast, indicating that the negative effect MAP-O may have on the oxidative stability and sensory quality of meat varies between different muscles....

  18. Paleosols and the evolution of atmospheric oxygen: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, R.; Holland, H. D.

    1998-01-01

    A number of investigators have used chemical profiles of paleosols to reconstruct the evolution of atmospheric oxygen levels during the course of Earth history (Holland, 1984, 1994; Kirkham and Roscoe, 1993; Ohmoto, 1996). Over the past decade Holland and his co-workers have examined reported paleosols from six localities that formed between 2.75 and 0.45 Ga. They have found that the chemical profiles of these paleosols are consistent with a dramatic change in atmospheric PO2 between 2.2 and 2.0 Ga from or = 0.03 atm (Holland, 1994). Ohmoto (1996) examined chemical data from twelve reported paleosols ranging in age from 2.9 to 1.8 Ga. He concluded that these chemical profiles indicate that atmospheric PO2 has not changed significantly during the past 3.0 Ga. We seek to resolve the conflict between these reconstructions through a broader examination of the paleosol literature, both to determine which reported paleosols can be definitively identified as such and to determine what these definite paleosols tell us about atmospheric evolution. We here review reports describing over 50 proposed paleosols, all but two are older than 1.7 Ga. Our review indicates that 15 of these reported paleosols can be definitively identified as ancient soils. The behavior of iron uring the formation of these 15 paleosols provides both qualitative and semiquantitative information about the evolution of the redox state of the atmosphere. Every definitely identified pre-2.44 Ga paleosol suffered significant Fe loss during weathering. This loss indicates that atmospheric PO2 was always less than about 5 x l0(-4) atm prior to 2.44 Ga. Analysis of the Hokkalampi paleosol (2.44-2.2 Ga) (Marmo, 1992) and the Ville Marie paleosol (2.38-2.215 Ga) (Rainbird, Nesbitt, and Donaldson, 1990) yield ambiguous results regarding atmospheric PO2. Loss of Fe during the weathering of the 2.245 to 2.203 Ga Hekpoort paleosol (Button, 1979) indicates that atmospheric PO2 was less than 8 x 10(-4) atm shortly

  19. Earth history. Low mid-Proterozoic atmospheric oxygen levels and the delayed rise of animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planavsky, Noah J; Reinhard, Christopher T; Wang, Xiangli; Thomson, Danielle; McGoldrick, Peter; Rainbird, Robert H; Johnson, Thomas; Fischer, Woodward W; Lyons, Timothy W

    2014-10-31

    The oxygenation of Earth's surface fundamentally altered global biogeochemical cycles and ultimately paved the way for the rise of metazoans at the end of the Proterozoic. However, current estimates for atmospheric oxygen (O2) levels during the billion years leading up to this time vary widely. On the basis of chromium (Cr) isotope data from a suite of Proterozoic sediments from China, Australia, and North America, interpreted in the context of data from similar depositional environments from Phanerozoic time, we find evidence for inhibited oxidation of Cr at Earth's surface in the mid-Proterozoic (1.8 to 0.8 billion years ago). These data suggest that atmospheric O2 levels were at most 0.1% of present atmospheric levels. Direct evidence for such low O2 concentrations in the Proterozoic helps explain the late emergence and diversification of metazoans. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Operational Considerations for Oxygen Flammability Risks: Concentrated Oxygen Diffusion and Permeation Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Susana; Smith, Sarah; Juarez, Alfredo; Hirsch, David

    2010-01-01

    Increased human spaceflight operations utilize oxygen concentrations that are frequently varied with use of concentrations up to 100 percent oxygen. Even after exiting a higher percentage oxygen environment, high oxygen concentrations can still be maintained due to material saturation and oxygen entrapment between barrier materials. This paper examines the material flammability concerns that arise from changing oxygen environments during spaceflight operations. We examine the time required for common spacecraft and spacesuit materials exposed to oxygen to return to reduced ignitability and flammability once removed from the increased concentration. Various common spacecraft materials were considered: spacecraft cabin environment foams, Extra Vehicular Mobility Unit materials and foams, Advanced Crew Escape Suit materials, and other materials of interest such as Cotton, Nomex^ HT90-40, and Tiburon Surgical Drape. This paper presents calculated diffusion coefficients derived from experimentally obtained oxygen transmission rates for the tested materials and the analytically derived times necessary for reduced flammability to be achieved based on NASA flammability criteria. Oxygen material saturation and entrapment scenarios are examined. Experimental verification data on oxygen diffusion in saturation scenarios are also presented and discussed. We examine how to use obtained data to address flammability concerns during operational planning to reduce the likelihood of fires while improving efficiency for procedures.

  1. The balance model of oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The study of turnover of carbon and oxygen is an important line of scientific investigation. This line takes on special significance in conditions of soil degradation, which leads to the excess content of carbon dioxide and, as result, decrease of oxygen in the atmosphere. The aim of this article is a statement the balance model of oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air (ratio O/C) depending on consumption and assimilation by plants of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the value of the oxidation-reduction potential (Eh). Basis of model was the following: green vascular plants are facultative heterotrophic organisms with symbiotic digestion and nutrition. According to the trophology viewpoint, the plant consumption of organic compounds broadens greatly a notion about the plant nutrition and ways of its regulation. In particular, beside the main known cycle of carbon: plant - litter - humus - carbon dioxide - plant, there is the second carbon cycle (turnover of organic compounds): plant - litter - humus - DOM - plant. The biogeochemical meaning of consumption of organic compounds by plants is that plants build the structural and functional blocks of biological macromolecules in their bodies. It provides receiving of a certain "energy payoff" by plants, which leads to increase of plant biomass by both an inclusion of allochthonous organic molecules in plant tissues, and positive effect of organic compounds on plant metabolic processes. One more of powerful ecological consequence of a heterotrophic nutrition of green plants is oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air. As the organic molecules in the second biological cycle of carbon are built in plants without considerable chemical change, the atmospheric air is enriched on that amount of oxygen, which would be required on oxidation of the organic molecules absorbed by plants, in result. It was accepted that: plant-soil system was climax, the plant community was grassy, initial contents of carbon in phytomass was accepted

  2. A new model for atmospheric oxygen over Phanerozoic time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, R A; Canfield, D E

    1989-04-01

    A mathematical model has been constructed that enables calculation of the level of atmospheric O2 over the past 570 my from rates of burial and weathering of organic carbon (C) and pyrite sulfur (S). Burial rates as a function of time are calculated from an assumed constant worldwide clastic sedimentation rate and the relative abundance, and C and S contents, of the three rock types: marine sandstones and shales, coal basin sediments, and other non-marine clastics (red beds, arkoses). By our model, values of O2 versus time, using a constant total sedimentation rate, agree with those for variable sedimentation derived from present-day rock abundances and estimates of erosional losses since deposition. This agreement is the result of our reliance on the idea that any increase in total worldwide sediment burial, with consequently faster burial of C and S and greater O2 production, must be accompanied by a corresponding increase in erosion and increased exposure of C and S on the continents to O2 consumption via weathering. It is the redistribution of sediment between the three different rock types, and not total sedimentation rate, that is important in O2 control. To add stability to the system, negative feedback against excessive O2 fluctuation was provided in the modeling by the geologically reasonable assignment of higher weathering rates to younger rocks, resulting in rapid recycling of C and S. We did not use direct O2 negative feedback on either weathering of C and S or burial of C because weathering rates are assumed to be limited by uplift and erosion, and the burial rate of C limited by the rate of sediment deposition. The latter assumption is the result of modern sediment studies which show that marine organic matter burial occurs mainly in oxygenated shallow water and is limited by the rate of supply of nutrients to the oceans by rivers. Results of the modeling indicate that atmospheric O2 probably has varied appreciably over Phanerozoic time. During the

  3. Atmospheric Airborne Pressure Measurements Using the Oxygen A Band for the ASCENDS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riris, Haris; Rodriguez, Mike; Stephen, Mark; Hasselbrack, William; Allan, Graham; Mao, Jiamping,; Kawa, Stephan R.; Weaver, Clark J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne atmospheric pressure measurements using new fiber-based laser technology and the oxygen A-band at 765 nm. Remote measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure are required for a number of NASA Earth science missions and specifically for the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions Over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. Accurate measurements of tropospheric CO2 on a global scale are very important in order to better understand its sources and sinks and to improve predictions on any future climate change. The ultimate goal of a CO2 remote sensing mission, such as ASCENDS, is to derive the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere in terms of mole fraction in unit of parts-per-million (ppmv) with regard to dry air. Therefore, both CO2 and the dry air number of molecules in the atmosphere are needed in deriving this quantity. O2 is a stable molecule and uniformly mixed in the atmosphere. Measuring the O2 absorption in the atmosphere can thus be used to infer the dry air number of molecules and then used to calculate CO2 concentration. With the knowledge of atmospheric water vapor, we can then estimate the total surface pressure needed for CO2 retrievals. Our work, funded by the ESTO IIP program, uses fiber optic technology and non-linear optics to generate 765 nm laser radiation coincident with the Oxygen A-band. Our pulsed, time gated technique uses several on- and off-line wavelengths tuned to the O2 absorption line. The choice of wavelengths allows us to measure the pressure by using two adjacent O2 absorptions in the Oxygen A-band. Our retrieval algorithm fits the O2 lineshapes and derives the pressure. Our measurements compare favorably with a local weather monitor mounted outside our laboratory and a local weather station.

  4. Atmospheric relative concentrations in building wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Simonen, C.A.; Smyth, S.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This report documents the ARCON95 computer code developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research for use in control room habitability assessments. The document includes a user`s guide to the code, a description of the technical basis for the code, and a programmer`s guide to the code. The ARCON95 code uses hourly meteorological data and recently developed methods for estimating dispersion in the vicinity of buildings to calculate relative concentrations at control room air intakes that would be exceeded no more five percent of the time. These concentrations are calculated for averaging periods ranging from one hour to 30 days in duration. Relative concentrations calculated by ARCON95 are significantly lower than concentrations calculated using the currently accepted procedure when winds are less than two meters per second. For higher wind speeds, ARCON95 calculates about the same concentrations as the current procedure.

  5. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheard, Michael A., E-mail: msheard@chla.usc.edu [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Ghent, Matthew V., E-mail: mattghent@gmail.com [Department of Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Health Sciences Campus, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Cabral, Daniel J., E-mail: dcabral14@gmail.com [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Lee, Joanne C., E-mail: joannebarnhart@gmail.com [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Khankaldyyan, Vazgen, E-mail: khangaldian@yahoo.com [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Ji, Lingyun, E-mail: lingyun.ji@med.usc.edu [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Wu, Samuel Q., E-mail: swu@chla.usc.edu [Medical Genetics, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Kang, Min H., E-mail: min.kang@ttuhsc.edu [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo. - Highlights: • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher glycolytic expression and function. • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher proliferation and lower cell death. • The divergent metabolic phenotypes selected in 5% and 20% oxygen are semi-permanent.

  6. The ancient oxygen exosphere of Mars: Implications for atmosphere evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Nagy, A. F.; Bougher, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    This study involves the calculation, by the 2-stream method of Nagy and Cravens, of 'hot' oxygen exosphere density profiles for 'ancient' atmospheres and ionospheres (e.g., different extreme ultraviolet fluxes) and the associated escaping fluxes. We computed the total production rates above different 'nominal' ionopause altitudes (not taking into account the fact that some will reenter the atmosphere). We do not consider the additional neutral escape due to the sputtering process described by Luhmann and Kozyra. The results presented here thus represent conservative estimations of the neutral escape fluxes, but generous estimates of ion loss rates (except that here we do not consider charge exchange and impact ionization ion production processes). Further work along the lines of Luhmann and Kozyra can lead to estimates of sputtering losses over time and the roles played by impact ionization and charge exchange.

  7. Changes in thyroid hormone concentrations during neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, L.; Heijst, A.F.J. van; Rosmalen, J. van; Rijke, Y.B. de; Beurskens, L.; Tibboel, D.; Akker, E.L. van den; H, I.J.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Thyroid hormone concentrations can be disturbed during critical illness. Our aim was to determine changes in thyroid hormone concentrations during neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). STUDY DESIGN: We included 21 ECMO-treated neonates. Age-specific s.d. scores (SDS) of

  8. Atmospheric relative concentrations in building wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Simonen, C.A.

    1997-05-01

    This report documents the ARCON96 computer code developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation for potential use in control room habitability assessments. It includes a user`s guide to the code, a description of the technical basis for the code, and a programmer`s guide to the code. The ARCON96 code uses hourly meteorological data and recently developed methods for estimating dispersion in the vicinity of buildings to calculate relative concentrations at control room air intakes that would be exceeded no more than five percent of the time. The concentrations are calculated for averaging periods ranging from one hour to 30 days in duration. ARCON96 is a revised version of ARCON95, which was developed for the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Changes in the code permit users to simulate releases from area sources as well as point sources. The method of averaging concentrations for periods longer than 2 hours has also been changed. The change in averaging procedures increases relative concentrations for these averaging periods. In general, the increase in concentrations is less than a factor of two. The increase is greatest for relatively short averaging periods, for example 0 to 8 hours and diminishes as the duration of the averaging period increases.

  9. Application of Nanosize Zeolite Molecular Sieves for Medical Oxygen Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Mingfei; Omar, Hecham M; Rohani, Sohrab

    2017-07-25

    The development of a portable oxygen concentrator is of prime significance for patients with respiratory problems. This paper presents a portable concentrator prototype design using the pressure/vacuum swing adsorption (PVSA) cycle with a deep evacuation step (-0.82 barg) instead of desorption with purge flow to simplify the oxygen production process. The output of the oxygen concentrator is a ~90 vol % enriched oxygen stream in a continuous adsorption and desorption cycle (cycle time ~90 s). The size of the adsorption column is 3 cm in diameter and 20 cm in length. A Li⁺ exchanged 13X nanosize zeolite is used as the adsorbent to selectively adsorb nitrogen from air. A dynamic model of the pressure and vacuum swing adsorption units was developed to study the pressurization and depressurization process inside the microporous area of nanosized zeolites. The describing equations were solved using COMSOL Multiphysics Chemical Engineering module. The output flow rate and oxygen concentration results from the simulation model were compared with the experimental data. Velocity and concentration profiles were obtained to study the adsorption process and optimize the operational parameters.

  10. Application of Nanosize Zeolite Molecular Sieves for Medical Oxygen Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingfei Pan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of a portable oxygen concentrator is of prime significance for patients with respiratory problems. This paper presents a portable concentrator prototype design using the pressure/vacuum swing adsorption (PVSA cycle with a deep evacuation step (−0.82 barg instead of desorption with purge flow to simplify the oxygen production process. The output of the oxygen concentrator is a ~90 vol % enriched oxygen stream in a continuous adsorption and desorption cycle (cycle time ~90 s. The size of the adsorption column is 3 cm in diameter and 20 cm in length. A Li+ exchanged 13X nanosize zeolite is used as the adsorbent to selectively adsorb nitrogen from air. A dynamic model of the pressure and vacuum swing adsorption units was developed to study the pressurization and depressurization process inside the microporous area of nanosized zeolites. The describing equations were solved using COMSOL Multiphysics Chemical Engineering module. The output flow rate and oxygen concentration results from the simulation model were compared with the experimental data. Velocity and concentration profiles were obtained to study the adsorption process and optimize the operational parameters.

  11. Greenhouse Gases Concentrations in the Atmosphere Along ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated effect of vehicular emission on greenhouse gases concentrations along selected roads of different traffic densities in Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria. Nine roads comprised highway, commercial and residential were selected. Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) were determined from both sides of the roads by ...

  12. Atmospheric Concentrations of Organochlorine Pesticides in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... y-HCH, total chlordane, and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) concentrations for Kakira were lower than those reported for Brazzaville, Lake Baikal in Russia, Southern Ontario. ln comparison with data from Senga Bay, Lake Malawi in Malawi, average DDT (total), p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDT, lindane (y-HCH) and LHCH levels ...

  13. Radon concentration levels in dwellings and mine atmospheres in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segovia, N.; Pena, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Mexico City (Mexico); Mireles, F.; Davila, I.; Quirino, L. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas (Mexico). Centro Regional de Estudios Nucleares

    1993-12-31

    Atmospheric radon surveys have been conducted in dwellings and mine atmospheres from the city of Zacatecas and single family homes in Mexico City. The monitoring was performed with track detectors, LR115 type II. The radon concentration values in most of the atmospheres studied were less than 150 Bq/m{sup 3}; the maximum value at the top soil in mines reached 1200 Bq/m{sup 3}. (author).

  14. Light, heat, nutrients and oxygen concentrations vary with depth in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    1995-02-19

    Feb 19, 1995 ... All zoo- plankton samples were preserved in 4% buffered saline formalin. Temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and chloro- phyll concentration were measured (over depth) at regular times (04:00, 09:00, 18:00 and 22:00) through- ..... Villefranche Bay, France. Palma (1985). Leuckartiara octona. DVM.

  15. The oxic degradation of sedimentary organic matter 1400 Ma constrains atmospheric oxygen levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuichang; Wang, Xiaomei; Wang, Huajian; Hammarlund, Emma U.; Su, Jin; Wang, Yu; Canfield, Donald E.

    2017-04-01

    We studied sediments from the ca. 1400 million-year-old Xiamaling Formation from the North China block. The upper unit of this formation (unit 1) deposited mostly below storm wave base and contains alternating black and green-gray shales with very distinct geochemical characteristics. The black shales are enriched in redox-sensitive trace metals, have high concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC), high hydrogen index (HI) and iron speciation indicating deposition under anoxic conditions. In contrast, the green-gray shales show no trace metal enrichments, have low TOC, low HI and iron speciation consistent with an oxygenated depositional setting. Altogether, unit 1 displays alternations between oxic and anoxic depositional environments, driving differences in carbon preservation consistent with observations from the modern ocean. We combined our TOC and HI results to calculate the differences in carbon mineralization and carbon preservation by comparing the oxygenated and anoxic depositional environments. Through comparisons of these results with modern sedimentary environments, and by use of a simple diagenetic model, we conclude that the enhanced carbon mineralization under oxygenated conditions in unit 1 of the Xiamaling Formation required a minimum of 4 to 8 % of present-day atmospheric levels (PAL) of oxygen. These oxygen levels are higher than estimates based on chromium isotopes and reinforce the idea that the environment contained enough oxygen for animals long before their evolution.

  16. Laser spectroscopy for totally non-intrusive detection of oxygen in modified atmosphere food packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocola, L.; Fedel, M.; Poletto, L.; Tondello, G.

    2015-04-01

    A device for measuring the oxygen concentration inside packages in modified atmosphere working in a completely non-intrusive way has been developed and tested. The device uses tunable diode laser spectroscopy in a geometry similar to a short distance LIDAR: A laser beam is sent through the top film of a food package, and the absorption is measured by detecting the light scattered by the bottom of the container or by a portion of the food herein contained. The device can operate completely in a contactless way from the package, and the distances of absorption both outside and inside the package are measured with a triangulation system. The performances of the device have been tested for various types of containers, and absolute values for the oxygen concentration have been compared with standard albeit destructive measurements.

  17. Atmospheric oxygen regulation at low Proterozoic levels by incomplete oxidative weathering of sedimentary organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daines, Stuart J; Mills, Benjamin J W; Lenton, Timothy M

    2017-02-02

    It is unclear why atmospheric oxygen remained trapped at low levels for more than 1.5 billion years following the Paleoproterozoic Great Oxidation Event. Here, we use models for erosion, weathering and biogeochemical cycling to show that this can be explained by the tectonic recycling of previously accumulated sedimentary organic carbon, combined with the oxygen sensitivity of oxidative weathering. Our results indicate a strong negative feedback regime when atmospheric oxygen concentration is of order pO 2 ∼0.1 PAL (present atmospheric level), but that stability is lost at pO 2 <0.01 PAL. Within these limits, the carbonate carbon isotope (δ 13 C) record becomes insensitive to changes in organic carbon burial rate, due to counterbalancing changes in the weathering of isotopically light organic carbon. This can explain the lack of secular trend in the Precambrian δ 13 C record, and reopens the possibility that increased biological productivity and resultant organic carbon burial drove the Great Oxidation Event.

  18. Abiotic ozone and oxygen in atmospheres similar to prebiotic Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D. [Planetary Environments Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Segura, Antígona; Claire, Mark W.; Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria S., E-mail: shawn.goldman@nasa.gov [NASA Astrobiology Institute—Virtual Planetary Laboratory (United States)

    2014-09-10

    The search for life on planets outside our solar system will use spectroscopic identification of atmospheric biosignatures. The most robust remotely detectable potential biosignature is considered to be the detection of oxygen (O{sub 2}) or ozone (O{sub 3}) simultaneous to methane (CH{sub 4}) at levels indicating fluxes from the planetary surface in excess of those that could be produced abiotically. Here we use an altitude-dependent photochemical model with the enhanced lower boundary conditions necessary to carefully explore abiotic O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} production on lifeless planets with a wide variety of volcanic gas fluxes and stellar energy distributions. On some of these worlds, we predict limited O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} buildup, caused by fast chemical production of these gases. This results in detectable abiotic O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} features in the UV-visible, but no detectable abiotic O{sub 2} features. Thus, simultaneous detection of O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} by a UV-visible mission is not a strong biosignature without proper contextual information. Discrimination between biological and abiotic sources of O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} is possible through analysis of the stellar and atmospheric context—particularly redox state and O atom inventory—of the planet in question. Specifically, understanding the spectral characteristics of the star and obtaining a broad wavelength range for planetary spectra should allow more robust identification of false positives for life. This highlights the importance of wide spectral coverage for future exoplanet characterization missions. Specifically, discrimination between true and false positives may require spectral observations that extend into infrared wavelengths and provide contextual information on the planet's atmospheric chemistry.

  19. Atmospheric radionuclide concentrations measured by Pacific Northwest Laboratory since 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.A.; Thomas, C.W.

    1981-03-01

    The atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, radon and thoron decay and the SNAP-9A burn-up ({sup 238}Pu) have been measured at Richland, Washington, since 1961; at Barrow, Alaska, since 1964; and at other stations for shorter periods of time. There has been considerable concern over the health hazard presented by these radionuclides, but it has also been recognized that atmospheric mixing and deposition rates can be determined from their measurement. Therefore, Pacific Northwest Laboratory began the continuous measurement of the atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, and radon and thoron decay. This report will discuss the concentrations of the longer-lived radionuclides (T 1/2 > 12 days). The concentrations of shorter-lived radionuclides measured following Chinese nuclear tests since 1972 are discussed in another report.

  20. Atmospheric radionuclide concentrations measured by Pacific Northwest Laboratory since 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.A.; Thomas, C.W.

    1981-03-01

    The atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, radon and thoron decay and the SNAP-9A burn-up ([sup 238]Pu) have been measured at Richland, Washington, since 1961; at Barrow, Alaska, since 1964; and at other stations for shorter periods of time. There has been considerable concern over the health hazard presented by these radionuclides, but it has also been recognized that atmospheric mixing and deposition rates can be determined from their measurement. Therefore, Pacific Northwest Laboratory began the continuous measurement of the atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, and radon and thoron decay. This report will discuss the concentrations of the longer-lived radionuclides (T 1/2 > 12 days). The concentrations of shorter-lived radionuclides measured following Chinese nuclear tests since 1972 are discussed in another report.

  1. Dust explosion hazard in ITER: limiting oxygen concentration measurements of ITER-relevant dusts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denkevits, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The work aim is to support inert-gas dilution mitigation methods proposed recently to prevent accidental explosions of dusts accumulated inside the ITER vacuum vessel during the machine operation. A standard method of 20-l-sphere is used to test 4 micron graphite dust and 1 micron tungsten dust to measure their Limiting Oxygen Concentration (LOC) values, below which no self-sustained flame propagation is possible in the dust cloud at any dust concentrations. The tested dust clouds are formed inside the 20-l spherical explosion bomb in nitrogen-diluted air atmospheres at normal initial conditions. The oxygen content in the pre-explosion atmospheres is varied from normal (about 21 vol. %) down to 9 vol. %. The tested dust cloud concentrations are 150-300 g/m{sup 3} of the graphite dust and 3000 g/m3 of the tungsten dust. The dust clouds are ignited with 2, 5, or 10 kJ igniters. The dependences of maximum overpressures and maximum rates of pressure rise generated in course of the dust cloud explosions are measured as functions of oxygen content in the pre-explosion atmospheres. The maximum overpressure generated by the graphite dust clouds ignited with 2 kJ reduces from 4 bar at normal oxygen content to 0.5 bar at 17 vol. % O2. In case of a stronger 10 kJ ignition the maximum overpressure is higher 0.5 bar down to 11 vol. % oxygen. The tungsten dust ignited by 5 kJ generate 4 bar overpressure in normal air. With reducing oxygen content the overpressure decreases to 0.5 bar at 13 vol. % oxygen. However, the observed regimes of the tungsten dust explosions seem to be overdriven under the tested conditions because of too high ignition energy (5 kJ) for rather a small combustion volume (20 l). Even the value of 15 vol. % oxygen can be considered as a conservative estimate of LOC for 1 micron tungsten dust. The results obtained indicate that only a weak dilution of accidental atmosphere in ITER vacuum vessel can suppress the dust explosions in case of severe accident

  2. Supplementary Material for: Measurements of Positively Charged Ions in Premixed Methane-Oxygen Atmospheric Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad B. S.

    2017-01-01

    Cations and anions are formed as a result of chemi-ionization processes in combustion systems. Electric fields can be applied to reduce emissions and improve combustion efficiency by active control of the combustion process. Detailed flame ion chemistry models are needed to understand and predict the effect of external electric fields on combustion plasmas. In this work, a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) is utilized to measure ion concentration profiles in premixed methane–oxygen argon burner-stabilized atmospheric flames. Lean and stoichiometric flames are considered to assess the dependence of ion chemistry on flame stoichiometry. Relative ion concentration profiles are compared with numerical simulations using various temperature profiles, and good qualitative agreement was observed for the stoichiometric flame. However, for the lean flame, numerical simulations misrepresent the spatial distribution of selected ions greatly. Three modifications are suggested to enhance the ion mechanism and improve the agreement between experiments and simulations. The first two modifications comprise the addition of anion detachment reactions to increase anion recombination at low temperatures. The third modification involves restoring a detachment reaction to its original irreversible form. To our knowledge, this work presents the first detailed measurements of cations and flame temperature in canonical methane–oxygen-argon atmospheric flat flames. The positive ion profiles reported here may be useful to validate and improve ion chemistry models for methane-oxygen flames.

  3. Measurements of Positively Charged Ions in Premixed Methane-Oxygen Atmospheric Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad

    2016-08-22

    Cations and anions are formed as a result of chemi-ionization processes in combustion systems. Electric fields can be applied to reduce emissions and improve combustion efficiency by active control of the combustion process. Detailed flame ion chemistry models are needed to understand and predict the effect of external electric fields on combustion plasmas. In this work, a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) is utilized to measure ion concentration profiles in premixed methane–oxygen argon burner-stabilized atmospheric flames. Lean and stoichiometric flames are considered to assess the dependence of ion chemistry on flame stoichiometry. Relative ion concentration profiles are compared with numerical simulations using various temperature profiles, and good qualitative agreement was observed for the stoichiometric flame. However, for the lean flame, numerical simulations misrepresent the spatial distribution of selected ions greatly. Three modifications are suggested to enhance the ion mechanism and improve the agreement between experiments and simulations. The first two modifications comprise the addition of anion detachment reactions to increase anion recombination at low temperatures. The third modification involves restoring a detachment reaction to its original irreversible form. To our knowledge, this work presents the first detailed measurements of cations and flame temperature in canonical methane–oxygen-argon atmospheric flat flames. The positive ion profiles reported here may be useful to validate and improve ion chemistry models for methane-oxygen flames.

  4. Effects of ambient oxygen concentration on soot temperature and concentration for biodiesel and diesel spray combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ji

    2015-06-01

    Ambient oxygen concentration, a key variable directly related to exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) levels in diesel engines, plays a significant role in particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions. The utilization of biodiesel in diesel engines has been investigated over the last decades for its renewable characteristics and lower emissions compared to diesel. In an earlier work, we demonstrated that the soot temperature and concentration of biodiesel were lower than diesel under regular diesel engine conditions without EGR. Soot concentration was quantified by a parameter called KL factor. As a continuous effort, this paper presents an experimental investigation of the ambient oxygen concentration on soot temperature and KL factor during biodiesel and diesel spray combustion. The experiment was implemented in a constant volume chamber system, where the ambient oxygen concentration varied from 21 to 10% and the ambient temperature was kept to 1,000 K. A high speed two-color pyrometry technique was used to measure transient soot temperature and the KL factor of the spray flame. The soot temperature of biodiesel is found to be lower than that of diesel under the same conditions, which follows the same trend from our previous results found when the ambient temperature changes to 21% oxygen conditions. A reduction in ambient oxygen concentration generally reduces the soot temperature for both fuels. However, this is a complicated effect on soot processes as the change of oxygen concentration greatly affects the balance between soot formation and oxidation. The KL factor is observed to be the highest at 12% O2 for diesel and 18% O2 for biodiesel, respectively. On the other hand, the 10% O2 condition shows the lowest KL factor for both fuels. These results can provide quantitative experimental evidences to optimize the ambient oxygen concentration for diesel engines using different fuels for better emissions characteristics. © 2014 American Society of

  5. Comparison of portable oxygen concentrators in a simulated airplane environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Rainald; Wanka, Eva R; Einhaeupl, Franziska; Voll, Klaus; Schiffl, Helmut; Lang, Susanne M; Gruss, Martin; Ferrari, Uta

    2013-01-01

    Portable oxygen concentrators (POC) are highly desirable for patients with lung disease traveling by airplane, as these devices allow theoretically much higher travel times if additional batteries can be used. However, it is unclear whether POCs produce enough oxygen in airplanes at cruising altitude, even if complying with aviation regulations. We evaluated five frequently used POCs (XPO2 (Invacare, USA), Freestyle (AirSep C., USA), Evergo (Philipps Healthcare, Germany), Inogen One (Inogen, USA), Eclipse 3 (Sequal, USA)) at an altitude of 2650 m (as simulated airplane environment) in 11 patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and compared theses POCs with the standard oxygen system (WS120, EMS Ltd., Germany) used by Lufthansa. Oxygen was delivered by each POC for 30 min to each patient at rest, blood gases were then drawn from the arterialized ear lobe. All POCs were able to deliver enough oxygen to increase the PaO(2) of our subjects by at least 1.40 kPa (10 mmHg). However, to achieve this increase, the two most lightweight POCs (Freestyle and Invacare XPO2) had to be run at their maximum level. This causes a significant reduction of battery life. The three other POCs (EverGo, Inogen One, Eclipse 3) and the WS120 were able to increase the PaO(2) by more than 2.55 kPa (20 mmHg), which provides extra safety for patients with more severe basal hypoxemia. When choosing the right oxygen system for air travel in patients in COPD, not only weight, but also battery life and maximum possible oxygen output must be considered carefully. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiocarbon tracer measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl radical concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M. J.; Farmer, J. C.; Fitzner, C. A.; Henry, M. N.; Sheppard, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    The usefulness of the C-14 tracer in measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl radical concentration is discussed. The apparatus and the experimental conditions of three variations of a radiochemical method of atmosphere analysis are described and analyzed: the Teflon bag static reactor, the flow reactor (used in the Wallops Island tests), and the aircraft OH titration reactor. The procedure for reduction of the aircraft reactor instrument data is outlined. The problems connected with the measurement of hydroxyl radicals are discussed. It is suggested that the gas-phase radioisotope methods have considerable potential in measuring tropospheric impurities present in very low concentrations.

  7. Low oxygen and argon in the Neoproterozoic atmosphere at 815 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Laurence Y.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of Earth's atmosphere on >106-yr timescales is tied to that of the deep Earth. Volcanic degassing, weathering, and burial of volatile elements regulates their abundance at the surface, setting a boundary condition for the biogeochemical cycles that modulate Earth's atmosphere and climate. The atmosphere expresses this interaction through its composition; however, direct measurements of the ancient atmosphere's composition more than a million years ago are notoriously difficult to obtain. Gases trapped in ancient minerals represent a potential archive of the ancient atmosphere, but their fidelity has not been thoroughly evaluated. Both trapping and preservation artifacts may be relevant. Here, I use a multi-element approach to reanalyze recently collected fluid-inclusion data from halites purportedly containing snapshots of the ancient atmosphere as old as 815 Ma. I argue that those samples were affected by the concomitant trapping of air dissolved in brines and contaminations associated with modern air. These artifacts lead to an apparent excess in O2 and Ar. The samples may also contain signals of mass-dependent fractionation and biogeochemical cycling within the fluid inclusions. After consideration of these artifacts, this new analysis suggests that the Tonian atmosphere was likely low in O2, containing ≤10% present atmospheric levels (PAL), not ∼50% PAL as the data would suggest at face value. Low concentrations of O2 are consistent with other geochemical constraints for this time period and further imply that the majority of Neoproterozoic atmospheric oxygenation occurred after 815 Ma. In addition, the analysis reveals a surprisingly low Tonian Ar inventory-≤60% PAL-which, if accurate, challenges our understanding of the solid Earth's degassing history. When placed in context with other empirical estimates of paleo-atmospheric Ar, the data imply a period of relatively slow atmospheric Ar accumulation in the Paleo- and Meso

  8. Nitrogen and Triple Oxygen Isotopic Analyses of Atmospheric Particulate Nitrate over the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamezaki, Kazuki; Hattori, Shohei; Iwamoto, Yoko; Ishino, Sakiko; Furutani, Hiroshi; Miki, Yusuke; Miura, Kazuhiko; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2017-04-01

    Nitrate plays a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle. Atmospheric nitrate (NO3- and HNO3) are produced by reaction precursor as NOx (NO and NO2) emitted by combustion, biomass burning, lightning, and soil emission, with atmospheric oxidants like ozone (O3), hydroxyl radical (OH), peroxy radical and halogen oxides. Recently, industrial activity lead to increases in the concentrations of nitrogen species (NOx and NHy) throughout the environment. Because of the increase of the amount of atmospheric nitrogen deposition, the oceanic biogeochemical cycle are changed (Galloway et al., 2004; Kim et al., 2011). However, the sources and formation pathways of atmospheric nitrate are still uncertain over the Pacific Ocean because the long-term observation is limited. Stable isotope analysis is useful tool to gain information of sources, sinks and formation pathways. The nitrogen stable isotopic composition (δ15N) of atmospheric particulate NO3- can be used to posses information of its nitrogen sources (Elliott et al., 2007). Triple oxygen isotopic compositions (Δ17O = δ17O - 0.52 ×δ18O) of atmospheric particulate NO3- can be used as tracer of the relative importance of mass-independent oxygen bearing species (e.g. O3, BrO; Δ17O ≠ 0 ‰) and mass-dependent oxygen bearing species (e.g. OH radical; Δ17O ≈ 0 ‰) through the formation processes from NOx to NO3- in the atmosphere (Michalski et al., 2003; Thiemens, 2006). Here, we present the isotopic compositions of atmospheric particulate NO3- samples collected over the Pacific Ocean from 40˚ S to 68˚ N. We observed significantly low δ15N values for atmospheric particulate NO3- on equatorial Pacific Ocean during both cruises. Although the data is limited, combination analysis of δ15N and Δ17O values for atmospheric particulate NO3- showed the possibility of the main nitrogen source of atmospheric particulate NO3- on equatorial Pacific Ocean is ammonia oxidation in troposphere. Furthermore, the Δ17O values

  9. Daytime atmospheric sulphur dioxide concentrations in Ibadan city ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atmospheric sulphur dioxide concentrations were determined at 27 locations in the city of Ibadan, Nigeria, during May-June 1997. The locations were chosen from zones of high and low traffic densities, residential areas, industrial areas, and remote (control) areas. Sulphur dioxide levels did not significantly vary with the ...

  10. The origin of atmospheric oxygen on Earth: the innovation of oxygenic photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dismukes, G C; Klimov, V V; Baranov, S V; Kozlov, Y N; DasGupta, J; Tyryshkin, A

    2001-02-27

    The evolution of O(2)-producing cyanobacteria that use water as terminal reductant transformed Earth's atmosphere to one suitable for the evolution of aerobic metabolism and complex life. The innovation of water oxidation freed photosynthesis to invade new environments and visibly changed the face of the Earth. We offer a new hypothesis for how this process evolved, which identifies two critical roles for carbon dioxide in the Archean period. First, we present a thermodynamic analysis showing that bicarbonate (formed by dissolution of CO(2)) is a more efficient alternative substrate than water for O(2) production by oxygenic phototrophs. This analysis clarifies the origin of the long debated "bicarbonate effect" on photosynthetic O(2) production. We propose that bicarbonate was the thermodynamically preferred reductant before water in the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Second, we have examined the speciation of manganese(II) and bicarbonate in water, and find that they form Mn-bicarbonate clusters as the major species under conditions that model the chemistry of the Archean sea. These clusters have been found to be highly efficient precursors for the assembly of the tetramanganese-oxide core of the water-oxidizing enzyme during biogenesis. We show that these clusters can be oxidized at electrochemical potentials that are accessible to anoxygenic phototrophs and thus the most likely building blocks for assembly of the first O(2) evolving photoreaction center, most likely originating from green nonsulfur bacteria before the evolution of cyanobacteria.

  11. Dynamic model constraints on oxygen-17 depletion in atmospheric O2 after a snowball Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaobin; Bao, Huiming

    2013-09-03

    A large perturbation in atmospheric CO2 and O2 or bioproductivity will result in a drastic pulse of (17)O change in atmospheric O2, as seen in the Marinoan Oxygen-17 Depletion (MOSD) event in the immediate aftermath of a global deglaciation 635 Mya. The exact nature of the perturbation, however, is debated. Here we constructed a coupled, four-box, and quick-response biosphere-atmosphere model to examine both the steady state and dynamics of the MOSD event. Our model shows that the ultra-high CO2 concentrations proposed by the "snowball' Earth hypothesis produce a typical MOSD duration of less than 10(6) y and a magnitude of (17)O depletion reaching approximately -35‰. Both numbers are in remarkable agreement with geological constraints from South China and Svalbard. Moderate CO2 and low O2 concentration (e.g., 3,200 parts per million by volume and 0.01 bar, respectively) could produce distinct sulfate (17)O depletion only if postglacial marine bioproductivity was impossibly low. Our dynamic model also suggests that a snowball in which the ocean is isolated from the atmosphere by a continuous ice cover may be distinguished from one in which cracks in the ice permit ocean-atmosphere exchange only if partial pressure of atmospheric O2 is larger than 0.02 bar during the snowball period and records of weathering-derived sulfate are available for the very first few tens of thousands of years after the onset of the meltdown. In any case, a snowball Earth is a precondition for the observed MOSD event.

  12. Effect Of Dissolved Oxygen Concentration On Activated Sludge Settleability In Sequencing Batch Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Engin Gürtekin

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of dissolved oxygen concentration and sudden decrease and increase in dissolved oxygen concentration on the settleability of activated sludge was examined in lab-scale Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR). Higher dissolved oxygen concentrations (2-5 mg/L) produced sludge with lower sludge volume index, lower turbidity of effluent and higher sedimentation velocity than lower dissolved oxygen concentrations (0.5-1 mg/L). The sudden increase and decrease in dissolved oxygen ...

  13. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-16

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  14. Continuous measurements of greenhouse gases and atmospheric oxygen at the Namib Desert Atmospheric Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, E. J.; Lavrič, J. V.; Seifert, T.; Chicoine, T.; Day, A.; Gomez, J.; Logan, R.; Sack, J.; Shuuya, T.; Uushona, E. G.; Vincent, K.; Schultz, U.; Brunke, E.-G.; Labuschagne, C.; Thompson, R. L.; Schmidt, S.; Manning, A. C.; Heimann, M.

    2015-06-01

    A new coastal background site has been established for observations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the central Namib Desert at Gobabeb, Namibia. The location of the site was chosen to provide observations for a data-poor region in the global sampling network for GHGs. Semi-automated continuous measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, atmospheric oxygen, and basic meteorology are made at a height of 21 m a.g.l., 50 km from the coast at the northern border of the Namib Sand Sea. Atmospheric oxygen is measured with a differential fuel cell analyzer (DFCA). Carbon dioxide and methane are measured with an early-model cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS); nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide are measured with an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer (OA-ICOS). Instrument-specific water corrections are employed for both the CRDS and OA-ICOS instruments in lieu of drying. The performance and measurement uncertainties are discussed in detail. As the station is located in a remote desert environment, there are some particular challenges, namely fine dust, high diurnal temperature variability, and minimal infrastructure. The gas handling system and calibration scheme were tailored to best fit the conditions of the site. The CRDS and DFCA provide data of acceptable quality when base requirements for operation are met, specifically adequate temperature control in the laboratory and regular supply of electricity. In the case of the OA-ICOS instrument, performance is significantly improved through the implementation of a drift correction through frequent measurements of a reference cylinder.

  15. Seasonal variation in diurnal atmospheric grass pollen concentration profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peel, Robert George; Ørby, Pia Viuf; Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the diurnal atmospheric grass pollen concentration profile within the Danish city of Aarhus was shown to change in a systematic manner as the pollen season progressed. Although diurnal grass pollen profiles can differ greatly from day-to-day, it is common practice to establish...... the time of day when peak concentrations are most likely to occur using seasonally averaged diurnal profiles. Atmospheric pollen loads are highly dependent upon emissions, and different species of grass are known to flower and emit pollen at different times of the day and during different periods...... of the pollen season. Pollen concentrations are also influenced by meteorological factors - directly through those parameters that govern pollen dispersion and transport, and indirectly through the weather-driven flowering process. We found that three different profiles dominated the grass pollen season...

  16. Influence of emissions on regional atmospheric mercury concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieser J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is a global pollutant that is rapidly transported in the atmosphere. Unlike the majority of air pollutants the background concentrations of mercury play a major role for the atmospheric concentrations on a hemispheric scale. In this study the influence of regional anthropogenic emissions in comparison to the global emissions on mercury concentrations over Europe are investigated. For this purpose an advanced threedimensional model system is used that consists of three components. The emission model SMOKE-EU, the meteorological model COSMO-CLM, and the chemistry transport model (CTM CMAQ. A variety of sensitivity runs is performed in order to determine the influence of different driving factors (i.e. boundary conditions, anthropogenic and natural emissions, emission factors, meteorological fields on the atmoshperic concentrations of different mercury species. This study is part of the European FP7 project GMOS (Global Mercury Observation System. The aim is to identify the most important drivers for atmospheric mercury in order to optimize future regional modelling studies in the course of the GMOS project. Moreover, the model results are used to determine areas of interest for air-plane based in-situ measurements which are also part of GMOS.

  17. Plants, Weathering, and the Evolution of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berner, Robert A

    2008-02-05

    Over the past six years we have published 24 papers that can be divided into three sections: (1) Study of plants and weathering, (2) modeling the evolution of atmospheric CO2 over Phanerozoic time (past 550 million years). (3) Modeling of atmospheric O2 over Phanerozoic time. References to papers published acknowledging this grant can be found at the end of this report and almost all are supplied in pdf form. (1) In the temperate forests of the Cascade Mountains, USA, calcium and magnesium meet vastly different fates beneath angiosperms vs gymnosperms. Calcium is leached beneath both groves of trees, but leached 20-40% more beneath the angiosperms. Magnesium is retained in the forest system beneath the angiosperms and leached from beneath the gymnosperms. (2) We have shown that climate and CO2, based on both carbon cycle modeling and hundreds of independent proxies for paleo-CO2, correlate very well over the past 550 million year. In a recent paper we use this correlation to deduce the sensitivity of global mean temperature to a doubling of atmospheric CO2, and results are in excellent agreement with the results of climatologists based on the historical record and on theoretical climate models (GCM’s).(3) We have shown that concentrations of atmospheric oxygen, calculated by a combined carbon-sulfur cycle model, over the past 550 million years have varied with and influenced biological evolution.

  18. Effect of high-oxygen and oxygen-free modified atmosphere packaging on the spoilage process of poultry breast fillets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossaint, Sonja; Klausmann, Sonja; Kreyenschmidt, Judith

    2015-01-01

    A comparison was made of the effect of atmospheres containing high oxygen (70% O2 and 30% CO2) or high nitrogen (70% N2 and 30% CO2) on the spoilage process during storage (at 4°C) of poultry fillets. Four samples of each gas atmosphere were analyzed at 7 sample points during storage. For this analysis, the growth of typical spoilage organisms (Brochothrix thermosphacta, Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, and Lactobacilli spp.) and total viable count (TVC) were analyzed and modeled by using the Gompertz function. Sensory analyses of the poultry samples were carried out by trained sensory panelists to analyze color, odor, texture, drip loss, and general appearance. The composition of the spoilage flora differed between the oxygen-free atmosphere and the high-oxygen atmosphere. Anaerobic conditions favored the growth of Lactobacilli spp., whereas aerobic gas composition favored the growth of B. thermosphacta. However, no significant difference (Patmosphere in comparison to a high-nitrogen atmosphere. These results indicate that high-oxygen packaging has no additional beneficial effect on the quality maintenance and shelf life of fresh poultry fillets. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  19. Land plants equilibrate O2 and CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Lea, Peter J

    2006-02-01

    The role of land plants in establishing our present day atmosphere is analysed. Before the evolution of land plants, photosynthesis by marine and fresh water organisms was not intensive enough to deplete CO(2) from the atmosphere, the concentration of which was more than the order of magnitude higher than present. With the appearance of land plants, the exudation of organic acids by roots, following respiratory and photorespiratory metabolism, led to phosphate weathering from rocks thus increasing aquatic productivity. Weathering also replaced silicates by carbonates, thus decreasing the atmospheric CO(2) concentration. As a result of both intensive photosynthesis and weathering, CO(2 )was depleted from the atmosphere down to low values approaching the compensation point of land plants. During the same time period, the atmospheric O(2) concentration increased to maximum levels about 300 million years ago (Permo-Carboniferous boundary), establishing an O(2)/CO(2) ratio above 1000. At this point, land plant productivity and weathering strongly decreased, exerting negative feedback on aquatic productivity. Increased CO(2) concentrations were triggered by asteroid impacts and volcanic activity and in the Mesozoic era could be related to the gymnosperm flora with lower metabolic and weathering rates. A high O(2)/CO(2) ratio is metabolically linked to the formation of citrate and oxalate, the main factors causing weathering, and to the production of reactive oxygen species, which triggered mutations and stimulated the evolution of land plants. The development of angiosperms resulted in a decrease in CO(2) concentration during the Cenozoic era, which finally led to the glacial-interglacial oscillations in the Pleistocene epoch. Photorespiration, the rate of which is directly related to the O(2)/CO(2) ratio, due to the dual function of Rubisco, may be an important mechanism in maintaining the limits of O(2) and CO(2) concentrations by restricting land plant productivity

  20. Suprathermal oxygen atoms in the Martian upper atmosphere: Contribution of the proton and hydrogen atom precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shematovich, V. I.

    2017-07-01

    This is a study of the kinetics and transport of hot oxygen atoms in the transition region (from the thermosphere to the exosphere) of the Martian upper atmosphere. It is assumed that the source of the hot oxygen atoms is the transfer of momentum and energy in elastic collisions between thermal atmospheric oxygen atoms and the high-energy protons and hydrogen atoms precipitating onto the Martian upper atmosphere from the solar-wind plasma. The distribution functions of suprathermal oxygen atoms by the kinetic energy are calculated. It is shown that the exosphere is populated by a large number of suprathermal oxygen atoms with kinetic energies up to the escape energy 2 eV; i.e., a hot oxygen corona is formed around Mars. The transfer of energy from the precipitating solar-wind plasma protons and hydrogen atoms to the thermal oxygen atoms leads to the formation of an additional nonthermal escape flux of atomic oxygen from the Martian atmosphere. The precipitation-induced escape flux of hot oxygen atoms may become dominant under the conditions of extreme solar events, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, as shown by recent observations onboard NASA's MAVEN spacecraft (Jakosky et al., 2015).

  1. High Precision Continuous and Real-Time Measurement of Atmospheric Oxygen Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Hak, David; Leuenberger, Markus; Berhanu, Tesfaye; Nyfeler, Peter; Hoffnagle, John; Sun, Minghua

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen (O2) is a major and vital component of the Earth atmosphere representing about 21% of its composition. It is consumed or produced through biochemical processes such as combustion, respiration, and photosynthesis and can be used as a top-down constraint on the carbon cycle. The observed variations of oxygen in the atmosphere are relatively small, in the order of a few ppm's. This presents the main technical challenge for the measurement since a very high level of precision on a large background is required. Only few analytical methods including mass spectrometry, fuel, ultraviolet[1] and paramagnetic cells are capable of achieving it. Here we present new developments of a high-precision gas analyzer that utilizes the technique of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy to measure oxygen concentration and its oxygen isotope ratio 18O/16O. Its compact and ruggedness design combined with high precision and long-term stability allows the user to deploy the instrument in the field for continuous monitoring of atmospheric oxygen level. Measurements have a 1-σ 5-minute averaging precision of 1-2 ppm for O2 over a dynamic range of 0-50%. We will present comparative test results of this instrument against the incumbent technologies such as the mass spectrometer and the paramagnetic cell. In addition, we will demonstrate its long-term stability from a field deployment in Switzerland.

  2. LBA-ECO CD-02 Oxygen Isotopes of Plant Tissue Water and Atmospheric Water Vapor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports the oxygen isotope signatures of water extracted from plant tissue (xylem from the stems and leaf tissue) and of atmospheric water...

  3. LBA-ECO CD-02 Oxygen Isotopes of Plant Tissue Water and Atmospheric Water Vapor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports the oxygen isotope signatures of water extracted from plant tissue (xylem from the stems and leaf tissue) and of atmospheric water vapor from...

  4. Temporal variation in atmospheric ammonia concentrations above seabird colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackall, T. D.; Wilson, L. J.; Bull, J.; Theobald, M. R.; Bacon, P. J.; Hamer, K. C.; Wanless, S.; Sutton, M. A.

    Recent studies have shown that seabirds are an important source of ammonia (NH 3) emissions in remote coastal ecosystems. Nesting behaviour, which varies between seabird species, is likely to be a major factor in determining the proportion of excreted nitrogen (N) volatilised to the atmosphere as NH 3. A long-term NH 3 monitoring programme was implemented at a Scottish seabird colony with a range of species and associated nesting behaviours. The average monthly NH 3 concentration was measured at 12 locations over a 14-month period, to infer spatial (i.e. species-specific) and temporal (seasonal) changes in NH 3 emissions from different seabird species. An emissions model of seabird NH 3, based on species-specific bioenergetics and behaviour, was applied to produce spatial estimates for input to a dispersion model. Atmospheric NH 3 concentrations demonstrated spatial variability as a result of differing local populations of breeding seabirds, with the highest concentrations measured above cliff nesting species such as Common guillemot Uria aalge, Razorbill Alca torda and Black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla. NH 3 concentrations above a colony of burrow nesting Atlantic puffin Fratercula arctica were low, considering the high number of birds. Emission of NH 3 from excreted N exhibits a time lag of approximately a month. It is likely that all excreted N is lost from the colony by volatilisation as NH 3 or surface run-off between breeding seasons. Modelled NH 3 emissions and concentrations correlated with measured concentrations, but were much higher, reflecting uncertainties in the local turbulent characteristics. The results allow multi-species seabird population data to be used for the calculation of regional and global NH 3 emission inventories, whilst improving understanding of N budgets of remote coastal ecosystems.

  5. Regulation of Respiration and Fermentation to Control the Plant Internal Oxygen Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Zabalza, A.; van Dongen, J; Froehlich, A.; Oliver, S.; Faix, B.; Gupta, K; Schmalzlin, E.; Igal, M.; Orcaray, L.; Royuela, M.; Geigenberger, P

    2009-01-01

    Plant internal oxygen concentrations can drop well below ambient even when the plant grows under optimal conditions. Using pea (Pisum sativum) roots, we show how amenable respiration adapts to hypoxia to save oxygen when the oxygen availability decreases. The data cannot simply be explained by oxygen being limiting as substrate but indicate the existence of a regulatory mechanism, because the oxygen concentration at which the adaptive response is initiated is independent of the actual respira...

  6. Oxygen dynamics in the aftermath of the Great Oxidation of Earth’s atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Ngombi-Pemba, Lauriss; Hammarlund, Emma

    2013-01-01

    The oxygen content of Earth’s atmosphere has varied greatly through time, progressing from exceptionally low levels before about 2.3 billion years ago, to much higher levels afterward. In the absence of better information, we usually view the progress in Earth’s oxygenation as a series of steps f...

  7. Mapping Global Atmospheric CO2 Concentration at High Spatiotemporal Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Jing

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Satellite measurements of the spatiotemporal distributions of atmospheric CO2 concentrations are a key component for better understanding global carbon cycle characteristics. Currently, several satellite instruments such as the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT, SCanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY, and Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 can be used to measure CO2 column-averaged dry air mole fractions. However, because of cloud effects, a single satellite can only provide limited CO2 data, resulting in significant uncertainty in the characterization of the spatiotemporal distribution of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. In this study, a new physical data fusion technique is proposed to combine the GOSAT and SCIAMACHY measurements. On the basis of the fused dataset, a gap-filling method developed by modeling the spatial correlation structures of CO2 concentrations is presented with the goal of generating global land CO2 distribution maps with high spatiotemporal resolution. The results show that, compared with the single satellite dataset (i.e., GOSAT or SCIAMACHY, the global spatial coverage of the fused dataset is significantly increased (reaching up to approximately 20%, and the temporal resolution is improved by two or three times. The spatial coverage and monthly variations of the generated global CO2 distributions are also investigated. Comparisons with ground-based Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON measurements reveal that CO2 distributions based on the gap-filling method show good agreement with TCCON records despite some biases. These results demonstrate that the fused dataset as well as the gap-filling method are rather effective to generate global CO2 distribution with high accuracies and high spatiotemporal resolution.

  8. Effect Of Dissolved Oxygen Concentration On Activated Sludge Settleability In Sequencing Batch Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Gürtekin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of dissolved oxygen concentration and sudden decrease and increase in dissolved oxygen concentration on the settleability of activated sludge was examined in lab-scale Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR. Higher dissolved oxygen concentrations (2-5 mg/L produced sludge with lower sludge volume index, lower turbidity of effluent and higher sedimentation velocity than lower dissolved oxygen concentrations (0.5-1 mg/L. The sudden increase and decrease in dissolved oxygen concentration caused higher sludge volume index.

  9. Characterization of in vitro chlamydial cultures in low-oxygen atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Nicolai Stefan; Jensen, Helene; Hvid, Malene

    2007-01-01

    To mimic in vivo conditions during chlamydial infections, Chlamydia trachomatis serovar D and Chlamydia pneumoniae CWL029 were cultured in low-oxygen atmospheres containing 4% O(2), with parallel controls cultured in atmospheric air. Both were enriched with 5% CO(2). The results showed a dramatic...

  10. Variations of radon concentration in the atmosphere. Gamma dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchorz-Trzeciakiewicz, D. E.; Solecki, A. T.

    2018-02-01

    The purposes of research were following: observation and interpretation of variations of radon concentration in the atmosphere - vertical, seasonal, spatial and analysis of relation between average annual radon concentration and ground natural radiation and gamma dose rate. Moreover we wanted to check the occurrence of radon density currents and the possibility of radon accumulation at the foot of the spoil tip. The surveys were carried out in Okrzeszyn (SW Poland) in the area of the spoil tip formed during uranium mining that took place in 60's of 20th century. The measurements were carried out in 20 measurements points at three heights: 0.2 m, 1 m and 2 m a.g.l. using SSNTD LR-115. The survey lasted one year and detectors were exchanged at the beginning of every season. Uranium eU (ppm), thorium eTh (ppm) and potassium K (%) contents were measured using gamma ray spectrometer Exploranium RS-230, ambient gamma dose rate using radiometer RK-100. The average radon concentration on this area was 52.8 Bq m-3. The highest radon concentrations were noted during autumn and the lowest during winter. We observed vertical variations of radon concentration. Radon concentrations decreased with increase of height above ground level. The decrease of radon with increase of height a.g.l. had logarithmic character. Spatial variations of radon concentrations did not indicate the occurrence of radon density currents and accumulation of radon at the foot of the spoil tip. The analysis of relation between average radon concentrations and ground natural radiation (uranium and thorium content) or gamma dose rate revealed positive relation between those parameters. On the base of results mentioned above we suggested that gamma spectrometry measurements or even cheaper and simpler ambient gamma dose rate measurements can be a useful tool in determining radon prone areas. This should be confirmed by additional research.

  11. Consolidation mechanism of gold concentrates containing sulfur and carbon during oxygen-enriched air roasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Ji, Fang-zhou; Xu, Bin; Hu, Jian-jun; Yang, Yong-bin; Jiang, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Consolidation in calcines is a common problem in the oxygen-enriched air roasting of refractory gold concentrates containing sulfur and carbon when the initial temperature is greater than 600°C. To determine the phases that caused consolidation, gold concentrates were roasted under different conditions and the calcines were mainly detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The possible underlying mechanism was then studied through comparisons of the XRD patterns of different calcines. The results indicated that the generation of calcium magnesium silicate, iron-doped calcium aluminosilicate, and calcium aluminate caused the consolidation. Furthermore, an enriched oxygen atmosphere accelerated the oxidation reaction and the emitted heat increased the local temperature in calcines. The local temperature was inferred to have increased to the generation temperature zone of the corresponding liquid phases. Oxidation of the pyrite and decomposition of the dolomite and muscovite mainly occurred at the initial stage of oxygen-enriched air roasting. Calcium was confirmed to be essential to the consolidation process.

  12. Formation of oxygen complexes in controlled atmosphere at surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cleaned under vacuum up to 1273 K. Specific functional groups, subsequently formed under dry CO2 or O2 atmosphere on the surface of boron-doped and phosphorus-doped glassy carbon samples, were examined using the temperature-programmed desorption method combined with mass spectrometric analysis.

  13. The development of history of the earth atmosphere and its content of oxygen; Die Entwicklungsgeschichte der Erdatmosphaere und ihres Sauerstoffgehaltes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ries, Gunnar

    2010-03-15

    If one approaches our native planet from space, one sees it immediately. Our native planet completely is a special place in our solar system. If visitors from the depths of our space would make a superficial spectrographic analysis of the atmosphere of our planet, the planet Earth is shown as an interesting place at which life is more than probable. Thus, the terrestrial atmosphere differs remarkably in its composition, its redox potential and its luminosity from the atmosphere of the other terrestrial planets and from the atmosphere of gas planets. Thus, to a large extent the atmosphere of the neighbouring planets Mars and Venus consist of carbon dioxide. In comparison to this, the atmosphere of our native planet consists to 99 Vol.-% of nitrogen and oxygen. At these planets, the concentration of carbon dioxide amounts to only about 0.033 Vol.-%. This unusual atmosphere of our native planet is quite stable during geological periods. The planet Earth is the only planet in our solar system at which life is possible. Thus, a further connection can be assumed. If the composition of an atmosphere is known, one can draw conclusions on the biological activities on the surface of a planet.

  14. End expiratory oxygen concentrations to predict central venous oxygen saturation: an observational pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steuerwald Michael

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A non-invasive surrogate measurement for central venous oxygen saturation (ScVO2 would be useful in the ED for assessing therapeutic interventions in critically ill patients. We hypothesized that either linear or nonlinear mathematical manipulation of the partial pressure of oxygen in breath at end expiration (EtO2 would accurately predict ScVO2. Methods Prospective observational study of a convenience sample of hemodialysis patients age > 17 years with existing upper extremity central venous catheters were enrolled. Using a portable respiratory device, we collected both tidal breathing and end expiratory oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations, volume and flow on each patient. Simultaneous ScVO2 measurements were obtained via blood samples collected from the hemodialysis catheter. Two models were used to predict ScVO2: 1 Best-fit multivariate linear regression equation incorporating all respiratory variables; 2 MathCAD to model the decay curve of EtO2 versus expiratory volume using the least squares method to estimate the pO2 that would occur at Results From 21 patients, the correlation between EtO2 and measured ScVO2 yielded R2 = 0.11. The best fit multivariate equation included EtCO2 and EtO2 and when solved for ScVO2, the equation yielded a mean absolute difference from the measured ScVO2 of 8 ± 6% (range -18 to +17%. The predicted ScVO2 value was within 10% of the actual value for 57% of the patients. Modeling of the EtO2 curve did not accurately predict ScVO2 at any lung volume. Conclusion We found no significant correlation between EtO2 and ScVO2. A linear equation incorporating EtCO2 and EtO2 had at best modest predictive accuracy for ScVO2.

  15. End expiratory oxygen concentrations to predict central venous oxygen saturation: an observational pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alan E; Kuehne, Karl; Steuerwald, Michael; Kline, Jeffrey A

    2006-09-20

    A non-invasive surrogate measurement for central venous oxygen saturation (ScVO2) would be useful in the ED for assessing therapeutic interventions in critically ill patients. We hypothesized that either linear or nonlinear mathematical manipulation of the partial pressure of oxygen in breath at end expiration (EtO2) would accurately predict ScVO2. Prospective observational study of a convenience sample of hemodialysis patients age > 17 years with existing upper extremity central venous catheters were enrolled. Using a portable respiratory device, we collected both tidal breathing and end expiratory oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations, volume and flow on each patient. Simultaneous ScVO2 measurements were obtained via blood samples collected from the hemodialysis catheter. Two models were used to predict ScVO2: 1) Best-fit multivariate linear regression equation incorporating all respiratory variables; 2) MathCAD to model the decay curve of EtO2 versus expiratory volume using the least squares method to estimate the pO2 that would occur at <20% of total lung capacity. From 21 patients, the correlation between EtO2 and measured ScVO2 yielded R2 = 0.11. The best fit multivariate equation included EtCO2 and EtO2 and when solved for ScVO2, the equation yielded a mean absolute difference from the measured ScVO2 of 8 +/- 6% (range -18 to +17%). The predicted ScVO2 value was within 10% of the actual value for 57% of the patients. Modeling of the EtO2 curve did not accurately predict ScVO2 at any lung volume. We found no significant correlation between EtO2 and ScVO2. A linear equation incorporating EtCO2 and EtO2 had at best modest predictive accuracy for ScVO2.

  16. Influence of oxygen concentration on ethylene removal using dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Motodate, Takuma; Takaki, Koichi; Koide, Shoji

    2018-01-01

    Ethylene gas is decomposed using a dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor for long-period preservation of fruits and vegetables. The oxygen concentration in ambient gas is varied from 2 to 20% to simulate the fruit and vegetable transport container. The experimental results show that the efficiency of ethylene gas decomposition increases with decreasing oxygen concentration. The reactions of ethylene molecules with ozone are analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The analysis results show that the oxidization process by ozone is later than that by oxygen atoms. The amount of oxygen atoms that contribute to ethylene removal increases with decreasing oxygen concentration because the reaction between oxygen radicals and oxygen molecules is suppressed at low oxygen concentrations. Ozone is completely removed and the energy efficiency of C2H4 removal is increased using manganese dioxide as a catalyst.

  17. Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and perfluorinated compounds in the atmosphere of North Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossi, Rossana; Vorkamp, Katrin; Skov, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and neutral per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have been measured at Villum Research Station, Station Nord (North Greenland) in the period 2008–2013. Atmospheric concentrations of OCPs...

  18. Are there ecological implications for the proposed energetic restrictions on photosynthetic oxygen evolution at high oxygen concentrations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, J A; Larkum, A W D

    2007-10-01

    It has recently been shown that, in subthylakoid particles prepared using detergent, there is inhibition of oxygen production reactions in photosynthesis by thermodynamic feedback from oxygen build-up, with 50% inhibition at 230 kPa partial pressure of oxygen. This article presents a comprehensive analysis of laboratory data on the effects of high oxygen partial pressures on photosynthesis, and on photo-lithotrophic and chemo-organotrophic growth, of oxygen-producing organisms. The article also contains an analysis of the extent to which high oxygen concentrations occur at the site of photosystem II (PSII) activity under natural conditions today and in the past. The conclusion is that the oxygen concentrations found in nature are very unlikely to reach that needed to cause 50% inhibition of the photosynthetic oxygen production reaction in subthylakoid particles, but that it is just possible that a small part of the inhibition of photosynthesis and of photo-lithotrophic growth by oxygen can be attributed to inhibition of oxygen production by PSII.

  19. Evaluation of the Oxygen Concentrator Prototypes: Pressure Swing Adsorption Prototype and Electrochemical Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkey, Kelly M.; Olson, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    An oxygen concentrator is needed to provide enriched oxygen in support of medical contingency operations for future exploration human spaceflight programs. It would provide continuous oxygen to an ill or injured crew member in a closed cabin environment. Oxygen concentration technology is being pursued to concentrate oxygen from the ambient environment so oxygen as a consumable resource can be reduced. Because oxygen is a critical resource in manned spaceflight, using an oxygen concentrator to pull oxygen out of the ambient environment instead of using compressed oxygen can provide better optimization of resources. The overall goal of this project is to develop an oxygen concentrator module that minimizes the hardware mass, volume, and power footprint while still performing at the required clinical capabilities. Should a medical event occur that requires patient oxygenation, the release of 100 percent oxygen into a small closed cabin environment can rapidly raise oxygen levels to the vehicles fire limit. The use of an oxygen concentrator to enrich oxygen from the ambient air and concentrate it to the point where it can be used for medical purposes means no oxygen is needed from the ultra-high purity (99.5+% O2) oxygen reserve tanks. By not adding oxygen from compressed tanks to the cabin environment, oxygen levels can be kept below the vehicle fire limit thereby extending the duration of care provided to an oxygenated patient without environmental control system intervention to keep the cabin oxygen levels below the fire limits. The oxygen concentrator will be a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearable device. A demonstration unit for the International Space Station (ISS) is planned to verify the technology and provide oxygen capability. For the ISS, the demonstration unit should not exceed 10 kg (approximately 22 lb), which is the soft stowage mass limit for launch on resupply vehicles for the ISS. The unit's size should allow for transport within the

  20. High concentrations and photochemical fate of oxygenated hydrocarbons in the global troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Kanakidou, M.; Crutzen, P. J.; Jacob, D. J.

    1995-11-01

    OXYGENATED species in the atmosphere are important sources of free radicals and are intricately linked with the fate of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), which are themselves necessary for tropospheric ozone formation1,2. With the exception of formaldehyde, oxygenated hydrocarbons have rarely been measured in the free troposphere. Here we report airborne measurements indicating the presence of high concentrations (compared to those of routinely measured C2-C6 tropospheric hydrocarbons3,4) of acetone and methanol. We use a three-dimensional model to show that acetone photochemistry provides a quantitatively significant (up to 50%) pathway for sequestering NO x in the form of peroxyacetylnitrate, a relatively unreactive temporary reservoir of NO x . Furthermore, in the dry regions of the upper troposphere, acetone can provide a large primary source of HOx (OH + HO2) radicals, resulting in increased ozone production. This surprisingly significant contribution of such oxygenated hydrocarbons to tropospheric NOx, HO x and ozone cycling is likely to be affected by their changing natural and anthropogenic emissions due to land-use change, biomass burning and alcohol-based biofuel use.

  1. [Formation of superoxide radicals in isolated cardiac mitochondria: effect of low oxygen concentration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviriaeva, I V; Mertsalova, A S; Ruuge, E K

    2010-01-01

    The formation of superoxide radical in isolated rat heart mitochondria under conditions of variable oxygen concentration has been studied by the spin trapping technique and EPR oximetry. Lithium phthalocyanine and TEMPONE-D-15 N16 were used to determine the oxygen concentration. TIRON was used as a spin trap. By varying the oxygen content in reaction medium, it was shown that isolated heart mitochondria can produce superoxide even at an oxygen partial pressure of 17.5 mmHg. However, the rate of superoxide generation was considerably lower than in control. It was found that increasing the oxygen concentration leads to an increase in the rate of superoxide generation.

  2. Relationship between oxygen concentration, respiration and filtration rate in blue mussel Mytilus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Baojun; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2017-06-01

    The large water-pumping and particle-capturing gills of the filter-feeding blue mussel Mytilus edulis are oversized for respiratory purposes. Consequently, the oxygen uptake rate of the mussel has been suggested to be rather insensitive to decreasing oxygen concentrations in the ambient water, since the diffusion rate of oxygen from water flowing through the mussel determines oxygen uptake. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the oxygen uptake in mussels exposed to various oxygen concentrations. These concentrations were established via N2-bubbling of the water in a respiration chamber with mussels fed algal cells to stimulate fully opening of the valves. It was found that mussels exposed to oxygen concentrations decreasing from 9 to 2 mg O2 /L resulted in a slow but significant reduction in the respiration rate, while the filtration rate remained high and constant. Thus, a decrease of oxygen concentration by 78% only resulted in a 25% decrease in respiration rate. However, at oxygen concentrations below 2 mg O2 /L M. edulis responded by gradually closing its valves, resulting in a rapid decrease of filtration rate, concurrent with a rapid reduction of respiration rate. These observations indicated that M. edulis is no longer able to maintain its normal aerobic metabolism at oxygen concentration below 2 mg O2/L, and there seems to be an energy-saving mechanism in bivalve molluscs to strongly reduce their activity when exposed to low oxygen conditions.

  3. Comparison of domiciliary oxygen using liquid oxygen and concentrator in northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Ling Su

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Patients in the LOG used oxygen for longer hours, went on more outings, and were more likely to travel with oxygen than patients in the OCG. Being ambulatory with liquid oxygen might enable patients with COPD to walk more effectively.

  4. Oxygen concentrators performance with nitrous oxide at 50:50 volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Jorge Ronaldo; Vieira, Joaquim Edson; Gozzani, Judymara Lauzi; Mathias, Lígia Andrade Silva Telles

    2014-01-01

    Few investigations have addressed the safety of oxygen from concentrators for use in anesthesia in association with nitrous oxide. This study evaluated the percent of oxygen from a concentrator in association with nitrous oxide in a semi-closed rebreathing circuit. Adult patients undergoing low risk surgery were randomly allocated into two groups, receiving a fresh gas flow of oxygen from concentrators (O293) or of oxygen from concentrators and nitrous oxide (O293N2O). The fraction of inspired oxygen and the percentage of oxygen from fresh gas flow were measured every 10 min. The ratio of FiO2/oxygen concentration delivered was compared at various time intervals and between the groups. Thirty patients were studied in each group. There was no difference in oxygen from concentrators over time for both groups, but there was a significant improvement in the FiO2 (pnitrous oxide fell during the observation period although oxygen saturation was higher than 98.5% throughout the study. Concentrators can be considered a stable source of oxygen for use during short anesthetic procedures, either pure or in association with nitrous oxide at 50:50 volume. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. First whiffs of atmospheric oxygen triggered onset of crustal gold cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimmel, Hartwig E.; Hennigh, Quinton

    2015-01-01

    Lack of a suitable gold source has long been regarded as a major argument against a palaeoplacer model for the exceptionally well-endowed Witwatersrand gold province. By comparing worldwide Witwatersrand-type deposits/occurrences, ranging in age from 3.1 to 1.8 Ga, we propose that the primary concentration of gold in the continental crust resulted from atmospheric and biological evolution in the Mesoarchaean. A high Au flux off the Archaean land surface (orders of magnitude greater than today's) was a consequence of the chemistry of the Mesoarchaean atmosphere and hydrosphere. When early life gradually changed from anaerobic anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesizers at around 3.0 Ga, the first `whiffs' of free oxygen produced by photosynthesis under an overall reducing atmosphere provided the ideal trap for Au dissolved in the huge reservoir in meteoric and shallow sea water. Oxidative precipitation of gold on the surface of the O2-producing microbes, probably cyanobacteria, could fix huge amounts of gold over large areas. Some of this microbially mediated gold is still preserved in thin kerogen layers ("carbon seams") that typically developed on erosional unconformities, scour surfaces and bedding planes in near-shore environments at around 2.9 Ga. This gold provided the principal source for the very rich placer deposits that formed by the subsequent sedimentary reworking of the delicate microbial mats on aeolian deflation surfaces, into fluvial channels and delta deposits, represented by Meso- to Neoarchaean auriferous conglomerates. Tectonic reworking of these first gold-rich sediments by orogenic processes explains the temporal peak of orogenic-type gold formation at around 2.7 to 2.4 Ga. With time, the strongly gold-enriched Archaean sediments became progressively eroded, covered or tectonically reworked, and their role as potential source of younger placer deposits diminished. This explains why Witwatersrand-type deposits younger than 2.4 Ga are rare and far

  6. Predictive Control of Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in Cynoglossus Semilaevis Industrial Aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjing LIU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved oxygen is an important factor that influences cynoglossus semilaevis’ growth. Keeping the stability of its concentration is beneficial for cynoglossus semilaevis’ healthy growth. The changing process of dissolved oxygen concentration contains nonlinearities and big time- delay because it is restricted by multiple factors, so traditional control methods are difficult to control it effectively or keep its concentration stable. This paper proposes a predictive control model for dissolved oxygen based on DMC algorithm. Firstly, it adopts DMC’s predictive model to predict the dissolved oxygen concentration’s variation trend. Secondly, it gives the calculated optimal control to aerators. Using DMC predictive model, it has better solved the nonlinear prediction problem of dissolved oxygen. Using DMC rolling optimization, it has better solved the optimal control problem of dissolved oxygen. System simulation results have shown that the model this paper proposed has a good performance in terms of rapidity, disturbances and errors in dissolved oxygen control.

  7. Vibrationally excited oxygen in the middle atmosphere. Evaluation of its potential as an additional source of ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppers, G.A.A.

    1996-11-01

    Ozone is `the` most important trace gas in the middle atmosphere. Despite the large efforts that have been made to calculate its concentration in the middle atmosphere there is long standing discrepancy between in-situ and remote sensing measurements on one hand and model results on the other. The latter tend to be about 30% too low in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere. One of the photolysis products of ozone itself, O2({upsilon}) - an oxygen molecule with extra vibrational energy, has been suggested as an intermediate in a reaction sequence that possibly could represent the missing ozone source. A key point in model calculations that estimate the magnitude of the proposed extra ozone source is the fractional population distribution of O2({upsilon}) after ozone photodissociation. Recent statistical calculations supply the vibrational distribution of O2({upsilon}) as a function of the wavelength at which ozone is dissociated. Based on these results a 2D chemical model that includes O2({upsilon}) chemistry has been used to investigate the importance of this mechanism. The extra ozone production by this mechanism has been compared for several other vibrational distributions taken from literature, different collisional deactivation rates of the excited oxygen fragments, and including a reaction between high vibrational excited oxygen with ground state oxygen producing two odd oxygen molecules. Our results indicate that regardless of whether the high vibrational reaction is included, alternatively the deactivation rates are decreased or not, the vibrational excited oxygen mechanism can not simultaneously match the absolute amount of the difference between the model results and SAGE II data and the height distribution of this difference. 23 refs, 17 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Effect of Oxygen Concentration on Autogenous Ignition Temperature and Pneumatic Impact Ignitability of Nonmetallic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Extensive test data exist on the ignitability of nonmetallic materials in pure oxygen, but these characteristics are not as well understood for lesser oxygen concentrations. In this study, autogenous ignition temperature testing and pneumatic impact testing were used to better understand the effects of oxygen concentration on ignition of nonmetallic materials. Tests were performed using oxygen concentrations of 21, 34, 45, and 100 %. The following materials were tested: PTFE Teflon(Registered Trademark), Buna-N, Silicone, Zytel(Registered Trademark) 42, Viton(registered Trademark) A, and Vespel(Registered Trademark) SP-21.

  9. The origin of atmospheric oxygen on Earth: The innovation of oxygenic photosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Dismukes, G C; V. V. Klimov; Baranov, S.V; Kozlov, Yu. N.; Dasgupta, J.; Tyryshkin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The evolution of O2-producing cyanobacteria that use water as terminal reductant transformed Earth's atmosphere to one suitable for the evolution of aerobic metabolism and complex life. The innovation of water oxidation freed photosynthesis to invade new environments and visibly changed the face of the Earth. We offer a new hypothesis for how this process evolved, which identifies two critical roles for carbon dioxide in the Archean period. First, we present a ther...

  10. The dynamics of dissolved oxygen concentration for water quality monitoring and assessment in polder ditches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeningen, R.

    1983-01-01

    This study deals with the use of the dynamics of dissolved oxygen concentration for water quality assessment in polder ditches. The dynamics of the dissolved oxygen concentration, i.e. the temporal and spatial variations in a few polder ditches under a range of natural, pollution and management

  11. Quantification of environmentally persistent free radicals and reactive oxygen species in atmospheric aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arangio, Andrea M.; Tong, Haijie; Socorro, Joanna; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-10-01

    Fine particulate matter plays a central role in the adverse health effects of air pollution. Inhalation and deposition of aerosol particles in the respiratory tract can lead to the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may cause oxidative stress. In this study, we have detected and quantified a wide range of particle-associated radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Ambient particle samples were collected using a cascade impactor at a semi-urban site in central Europe, Mainz, Germany, in May-June 2015. Concentrations of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR), most likely semiquinone radicals, were found to be in the range of (1-7) × 1011 spins µg-1 for particles in the accumulation mode, whereas coarse particles with a diameter larger than 1 µm did not contain substantial amounts of EPFR. Using a spin trapping technique followed by deconvolution of EPR spectra, we have also characterized and quantified ROS, including OH, superoxide (O2-) and carbon- and oxygen-centered organic radicals, which were formed upon extraction of the particle samples in water. Total ROS amounts of (0.1-3) × 1011 spins µg-1 were released by submicron particle samples and the relative contributions of OH, O2-, C-centered and O-centered organic radicals were ˜ 11-31, ˜ 2-8, ˜ 41-72 and ˜ 0-25 %, respectively, depending on particle sizes. OH was the dominant species for coarse particles. Based on comparisons of the EPR spectra of ambient particulate matter with those of mixtures of organic hydroperoxides, quinones and iron ions followed by chemical analysis using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we suggest that the particle-associated ROS were formed by decomposition of organic hydroperoxides interacting with transition metal ions and quinones contained in atmospheric humic-like substances (HULIS).

  12. Monitor hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in living mouse tail using photoacoustic CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Kruger, Robert; Reinecke, Daniel; Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to use PCT spectroscopy scanner to monitor the hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation change of living mouse by imaging the artery and veins in a mouse tail. Materials and Methods: One mouse tail was scanned using the PCT small animal scanner at the isosbestic wavelength (796nm) to obtain its hemoglobin concentration. Immediately after the scan, the mouse was euthanized and its blood was extracted from the heart. The true hemoglobin concentration was measured using a co-oximeter. Reconstruction correction algorithm to compensate the acoustic signal loss due to the existence of bone structure in the mouse tail was developed. After the correction, the hemoglobin concentration was calculated from the PCT images and compared with co-oximeter result. Next, one mouse were immobilized in the PCT scanner. Gas with different concentrations of oxygen was given to mouse to change the oxygen saturation. PCT tail vessel spectroscopy scans were performed 15 minutes after the introduction of gas. The oxygen saturation values were then calculated to monitor the oxygen saturation change of mouse. Results: The systematic error for hemoglobin concentration measurement was less than 5% based on preliminary analysis. Same correction technique was used for oxygen saturation calculation. After correction, the oxygen saturation level change matches the oxygen volume ratio change of the introduced gas. Conclusion: This living mouse tail experiment has shown that NIR PCT-spectroscopy can be used to monitor the oxygen saturation status in living small animals.

  13. Reduced atmospheric pressure in Radish: Alteration of NCER and transpiration at decreased oxygen partial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Stasiak, Michael; Wheeler, Raymond; Dixon, Mike

    Fundamental to the future of space exploration is the development of advanced life support systems capable of maintaining crews for significant periods without re-supply from Earth. Significant research is focused on the development of bioregenerative life support systems to be used in conjunction with the current physico-chemical methods. These bioregenerative life support systems harness natural ecosystem processes and employ plant photosynthesis and transpiration to produce food, oxygen and regenerate water while consuming carbon dioxide. The forthcoming exploration of the Moon and Mars has prompted interest into the effects of hypobaria on plant development. Reduced atmospheric pressures will lessen the pressure gradient between the structure and the local environment thereby decreasing gas leakage and possibly the structural mass of the plant growth facility. In order to establish the optimal specifications for reduced pressure plant growth structures it is essential to determine the atmospheric pressure limits required for conventional plant development and growth. Due to its physiological importance, oxygen will compose a significant portion of these minimal environments. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that reduced atmospheric pressure and decreased oxygen partial pressures had no effect on radish productivity. Radishes (Raphanus sativa L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) were grown from seed in the University of Guelph's Hypobaric Plant Growth Chambers for a period of 21 days. Treatments included total pressures of 10, 33, 66 and 96 kPa and oxygen partial pressures of 2, 7, 14 and 20 kPa. Experiments demonstrated that reduced partial pressures of oxygen had a greater effect on radish growth than hypobaria. Results showed a reduction in net carbon exchange rate and transpiration with decreasing oxygen partial pressures leading to diminished productivity. Keywords: hypobaric, radish, oxygen partial pressure, variable pressure chamber

  14. Growth under elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration accelerates leaf senescence in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Mata, Lourdes; Cabello, Purificación; de la Haba, Purificación; Agüera, Eloísa

    2012-09-15

    Some morphogenetic and metabolic processes were sensitive to a high atmospheric CO(2) concentration during sunflower primary leaf ontogeny. Young leaves of sunflower plants growing under elevated CO(2) concentration exhibited increased growth, as reflected by the high specific leaf mass referred to as dry weight in young leaves (16 days). The content of photosynthetic pigments decreased with leaf development, especially in plants grown under elevated CO(2) concentrations, suggesting that high CO(2) accelerates chlorophyll degradation, and also possibly leaf senescence. Elevated CO(2) concentration increased the oxidative stress in sunflower plants by increasing H(2)O(2) levels and decreasing activity of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and ascorbate peroxidase. The loss of plant defenses probably increases the concentration of reactive oxygen species in the chloroplast, decreasing the photosynthetic pigment content as a result. Elevated CO(2) concentration was found to boost photosynthetic CO(2) fixation, especially in young leaves. High CO(2) also increased the starch and soluble sugar contents (glucose and fructose) and the C/N ratio during sunflower primary leaf development. At the beginning of senescence, we observed a strong increase in the hexoses to sucrose ratio that was especially marked at high CO(2) concentration. These results indicate that elevated CO(2) concentration could promote leaf senescence in sunflower plants by affecting the soluble sugar levels, the C/N ratio and the oxidative status during leaf ontogeny. It is likely that systemic signals produced in plants grown with elevated CO(2), lead to early senescence and a higher oxidation state of the cells of these plant leaves. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Ground Based Observation of Isotopic Oxygen in the Martian Atmosphere Using Infrared Heterodyne Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. L.; Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Fast, K. E.; Hewagama, T.; Delgado, J. D.; Sonnabend, G.

    2010-01-01

    Infrared heterodyne spectra of isotopic CO2 in the Martian atmosphere were obtained using the Goddard Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind and Composition, HIPWAC, which was interfaced with the 3-meter telescope at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility- Spectra were colle cted at a resolution of lambda/delta lambda=10(exp 7). Absorption fea tures of the CO2 isotopologues have been identified from which isotop ic ratios of oxygen have been determined. The isotopic ratios O-17/O -16 and O-18/O-16 in the Martian atmosphere can be related to Martian atmospheric evolution and can be compared to isotopic ratios of oxyg en in the Earth's atmosphere. Isotopic carbon and oxygen are importa nt constraints on any theory for the erosion of the Martian primordia l atmosphere and the interaction between the atmosphere and surface o r subsurface chemical reservoirs. This investigation explored the pr esent abundance of the stable isotopes of oxygen in Mars' atmospheric carbon dioxide by measuring rovibrational line absorption in isotop ic species of CO2 using groundbased infrared heterodyne spectroscopy in the vicinity of the 9.6 micron and 10.6 micron CO2 lasing bands. T he target transitions during this observation were O-18 C-12 O-16 as well as O-178 C-12 O-16 and O-16 C-113 O-16 at higher resolving power of lambda/delta lambda=10(exp 7) and with high signal-to-noise ratio (longer integration time) in order to fully characterize the absorpt ion line profiles. The fully-resolved lineshape of both the strong n ormal-isotope and the weak isotopic CO2 lines were measured simultane ously in a single spectrum.

  16. Gas exchange and the coagulation system of the blood during the effect on the body of high concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosh, L.; Agadzhanyan, N. A.; Davydov, G. A.; Rybakov, B. K.; Sergiyenko, A. S.

    1974-01-01

    Maximum permissible concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide in a controlled atmosphere were determined by evaluating their effects on human gas exchange, blood coagulation, and tolerances to acute hypoxia, acceleration, and physical loads. It was found that functional disturbances depend on the concentration of respiratory gases and the length of stay in an altered atmosphere. By changing the atmospheric composition and by bringing the gaseous environment into accordance with the work and rest regimen and energy expenditures, the general reactivity of the body changes favorably.

  17. [Effects of nitrogen fertilization on wheat leaf photosynthesis under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xian-feng; Zhang, Xu-cheng; Guo, Tian-wen; Yu, Jia

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, the effects of nitrogen (N) fertilization on the wheat leaf photosynthesis under long-term elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (760 micromol x mol(-1)) was studied, based on the measurements of photosynthetic gas exchange parameters and light intensity-photosynthetic rate response curves at jointing stage. Under the long-term elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, applying sufficient N could increase the wheat leaf photosynthetic rate (Pn), transpiration rate (Tr), and instantaneous water use efficiency (WUEi). Comparing with those under ambient atmospheric CO2 concentration, the Po and WUEi under the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration increased, while the stomatal conductance (Gs) and intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) decreased. With the increase of light flux intensity, the Pn and WUEi under the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were higher those under ambient atmospheric CO2 concentration, Gs was in adverse, while Ci and Tr had less change. At high fertilization rate of N, the Gs was linearly positively correlated with Pn, Tr, and WUEi, and the Gs and Ci had no correlation with each other under the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration but negatively correlated under ambient atmospheric CO2 concentration. At low fertilization rate of N, the Gs had no correlations with Pn and WUEi but linearly positively correlated with Ci and Tr. It was suggested that under the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, the wheat leaf Pn at low N fertilization rate was limited by non-stomatal factor.

  18. A Theoretical Basis for the Transition to Denitrification at Nanomolar Oxygen Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakem, E.; Follows, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Current climate change is likely to expand the size and intensity of marine oxygen minimum zones. How will this affect denitrification rates? Current global biogeochemical models typically prescribe a critical oxygen concentration below which anaerobic activity occurs, rather than resolve the underlying microbial processes. Here, we explore the dynamics of an idealized, simulated anoxic zone in which multiple prokaryotic metabolisms are resolved mechanistically, defined by redox chemistry and biophysical constraints. We first ask, what controls the critical oxygen concentration governing the favorability of aerobic or anaerobic respiration? The predicted threshold oxygen concentration varies as a function of the environment as well as of cell physiology, and lies within the nanomolar range. The model thus provides a theoretical underpinning for the recent observations of nanomolar oxygen concentrations in oxygen minimum zones. In the context of an idealized, two-dimensional intensified upwelling simulation, we also predict denitrification at oxygen concentrations orders of magnitude higher due to physical mixing, reconciling observations of denitrification over a similar range and demonstrating a decoupling of denitrification from the local oxygen concentration. In a sensitivity study with the idealized ocean model, we comment upon the relationship between the volume of anoxic waters and total denitrification.

  19. Oxygen concentrators performance with nitrous oxide at 50:50 volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ronaldo Moll

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Few investigations have addressed the safety of oxygen from concentrators for use in anesthesia in association with nitrous oxide. This study evaluated the percent of oxygen from a concentrator in association with nitrous oxide in a semi-closed rebreathing circuit. Methods: Adult patients undergoing low risk surgery were randomly allocated into two groups, receiving a fresh gas flow of oxygen from concentrators (O293 or of oxygen from concentrators and nitrous oxide (O293N2O. The fraction of inspired oxygen and the percentage of oxygen from fresh gas flow were measured every 10 min. The ratio of FiO2/oxygen concentration delivered was compared at various time intervals and between the groups. Results: Thirty patients were studied in each group. There was no difference in oxygen from concentrators over time for both groups, but there was a significant improvement in the FiO2 (p < 0.001 for O293 group while a significant decline (p < 0.001 for O293N2O. The FiO2/oxygen ratio varied in both groups, reaching a plateau in the O293 group. Pulse oximetry did not fall below 98.5% in either group. Conclusion: The FiO2 in the mixture of O293 and nitrous oxide fell during the observation period although oxygen saturation was higher than 98.5% throughout the study. Concentrators can be considered a stable source of oxygen for use during short anesthetic procedures, either pure or in association with nitrous oxide at 50:50 volume.

  20. Predictive Control of Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in Cynoglossus Semilaevis Industrial Aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Hongjing LIU; Wei, Yaoguang; Liu, Chunhong; Yingyi CHEN

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen is an important factor that influences cynoglossus semilaevis’ growth. Keeping the stability of its concentration is beneficial for cynoglossus semilaevis’ healthy growth. The changing process of dissolved oxygen concentration contains nonlinearities and big time- delay because it is restricted by multiple factors, so traditional control methods are difficult to control it effectively or keep its concentration stable. This paper proposes a predictive control model for dissolv...

  1. Cassini finds an oxygen-carbon dioxide atmosphere at Saturn's icy moon Rhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teolis, B D; Jones, G H; Miles, P F; Tokar, R L; Magee, B A; Waite, J H; Roussos, E; Young, D T; Crary, F J; Coates, A J; Johnson, R E; Tseng, W-L; Baragiola, R A

    2010-12-24

    The flyby measurements of the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn's moon Rhea reveal a tenuous oxygen (O(2))-carbon dioxide (CO(2)) atmosphere. The atmosphere appears to be sustained by chemical decomposition of the surface water ice under irradiation from Saturn's magnetospheric plasma. This in situ detection of an oxidizing atmosphere is consistent with remote observations of other icy bodies, such as Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede, and suggestive of a reservoir of radiolytic O(2) locked within Rhea's ice. The presence of CO(2) suggests radiolysis reactions between surface oxidants and organics or sputtering and/or outgassing of CO(2) endogenic to Rhea's ice. Observations of outflowing positive and negative ions give evidence for pickup ionization as a major atmospheric loss mechanism.

  2. Oxygen spectral line synthesis: 3D non-LTE with CO5BOLD hydrodynamical model atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakapavičius, D.; Steffen, M.; Kučinskas, A.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Freytag, B.; Caffau, E.; Cayrel, R.

    In this work we present first results of our current project aimed at combining the 3D hydrodynamical stellar atmosphere approach with non-LTE (NLTE) spectral line synthesis for a number of key chemical species. We carried out a full 3D-NLTE spectrum synthesis of the oxygen IR 777 nm triplet, using a modified and improved version of our NLTE3D package to calculate departure coefficients for the atomic levels of oxygen in a CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamical solar model atmosphere. Spectral line synthesis was subsequently performed with the Linfor3D code. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the lines of the oxygen triplet produce deeper cores under NLTE conditions, due to the diminished line source function in the line forming region. This means that the solar oxygen IR 777 nm lines should be stronger in NLTE, leading to negative 3D NLTE-LTE abundance corrections. Qualitatively this result would support previous claims for a relatively low solar oxygen abundance. Finally, we outline several further steps that need to be taken in order to improve the physical realism and numerical accuracy of our current 3D-NLTE calculations.

  3. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy combined with autologous platelet concentrate applied in rabbit fibula fraction healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cesar Fagundes Neves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose is to study the effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy and autologous platelet concentrates in healing the fibula bone of rabbits after induced fractures. METHODS: A total of 128 male New Zealand albino rabbits, between 6-8 months old, were subjected to a total osteotomy of the proximal portion of the right fibula. After surgery, the animals were divided into four groups (n = 32 each: control group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy; autologous platelet concentrate group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy and autologous platelet concentrate applied at the fracture site; hyperbaric oxygen group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy and 9 consecutive daily hyperbaric oxygen therapy sessions; and autologous platelet concentrate and hyperbaric oxygen group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy, autologous platelet concentrate applied at the fracture site, and 9 consecutive daily hyperbaric oxygen therapy sessions. Each group was divided into 4 subgroups according to a pre-determined euthanasia time points: 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postoperative. After euthanasia at a specific time point, the fibula containing the osseous callus was prepared histologically and stained with hematoxylin and eosin or picrosirius red. RESULTS: Autologous platelet concentrates and hyperbaric oxygen therapy, applied together or separately, increased the rate of bone healing compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and autologous platelet concentrate combined increased the rate of bone healing in this experimental model.

  4. The Effects of Oxygen Concentration on Benthic Foraminiferal Growth and Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, B.; Keating-Bitonti, C.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    Many organisms use oxygen through cellular respiration in order to gain energy. For this reason, oxygen has a significant influence on organism size and growth. The amount of oxygen an organism needs depends on its metabolic demand, which is partially a function organism size (i.e., mass). The Santa Monica Basin (SMB) is an oxygen minimum zone located off the southern coast of California that maintains a steep oxygen gradient and is thus an ideal location for conducting research on how oxygen influences organism size. Here we use benthic foraminifera, widespread single-celled protists that produce shells (tests), to study the controls of oxygen on organism size. Because cell mass and cell volume are correlated, we study trends in the log test volume of four abundant species from SMB: Uvigerina peregrina, Bolivina spissa, B. argentea, Loxostomum pseudobeyrichi. These foraminifera make multi-chambered tests, thus we also count the number of chambers per specimen in order to further assess their growth under varying oxygen concentrations. We analyzed the data using quantile regressions to determine trends in not only median values of the log test volume and number of chambers as a function of oxygen concentrations, but also in the 10th, 25th, 75th, and 90th percentiles because oxygen availability often constrains the maximum and minimum size of organisms. Our results show a positive correlation between oxygen concentration and the maximum log test volumes of L. pseudobeyrichi and B. argentea, supporting our hypothesis. However, we observed a negative correlation between oxygen concentration and the maximum percentiles of log test volume in U. peregrina. Nevertheless, U. peregrina still displays a positive correlation between chamber number and oxygen concentrations in line with our hypothesis. The preponderance of trends supporting a direct correlation between log test volume or chamber number and oxygen concentration suggest that oxygen limits the maximum obtainable

  5. Effect of oxygen level on the oxidative stability of two different retail pork products stored using modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanos, Dimitrios; Ann Tørngren, Mari; Christensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics and the oxidative stability of pork steaks and of pork mince were investigated during 2, 5 and 7 days of refrigerated storage using oxygen (O2) levels of 0%, 20%, 50% and 80% in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). Steaks stored during 7 days were not affected by an increase i......%) O2 MAP. The results show that fresh pork products are affected differently by the MAP O2 concentration and strongly indicate that optimisation of MAP based on the retail product type would be of considerable benefit to their oxidative stability....... in O2 concentration, as revealed by lipid and protein oxidation markers. In contrast, the mince was characterised by an altered protein profile, loss of free thiol groups and increased protein oxidation, early during storage. The oxidative stability of pork mince was improved by using intermediate (50......The characteristics and the oxidative stability of pork steaks and of pork mince were investigated during 2, 5 and 7 days of refrigerated storage using oxygen (O2) levels of 0%, 20%, 50% and 80% in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). Steaks stored during 7 days were not affected by an increase...

  6. Measurement and modeling of ozone and nitrogen oxides produced by laser breakdown in oxygen-nitrogen atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornushkin, Igor B; Stevenson, Chris L; Galbács, Gábor; Smith, Ben W; Winefordner, James D

    2003-11-01

    The production of ozone nad nitrogen oxides was studied during multiple laser breakdown in oxygen-nitrogen mixtures at atmospheric pressure. About 2000 laser shots at 10(10) W cm-2 were delivered into a sealed reaction chamber. The chamber with a long capillary was designed to measure absorption of O3, NO, and NO2 as a function of the number of laser shots. The light source for absorption measurements was the continuum radiation emitted by the plasma during the first 0.2 microsecond of its evolution. A kinetic model was developed that encompassed the principal chemical reactions between the major atmospheric components and the products of laser breakdown. In the model, the laser plasma was treated as a source of nitric oxide and atomic oxygen, whose rates of production were calculated using measured absorption by NO, NO2, and O3. The calculated concentration profiles for NO, NO2, and O3 were in good agreement with measured profiles over a time scale of 0-200 s. The steady-state concentration of ozone was measured in a flow cell in air. For a single breakdown in air, the estimated steady-state yield of ozone was 2 x 10(12) molecules, which agreed with the model prediction. This study can be of importance for general understanding of laser plasma chemistry and for elucidating the nature of spectral interferences and matrix effects that may take place in applied spectrochemical analysis.

  7. Evaluation of Oxygen Concentrators and Chemical Oxygen Generators at Altitude and Temperature Extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-22

    device is $895 each. 3.2.3 BOB. The BOB system requires the user to add ingredients to a plastic bag to initiate oxygen production. The...Pacific Precision Products, Irvine, CA), TraumAid-26 (HABCO Industries, Blastonbury, CT), and BUDI Oxygen Bag (BOB) (Green Dot Systems, Miami, FL)—in a...FiO2 range was 90% ± 3% for the Eclipse, 91% ± 3% with the iGo, and 93% ± 3% with the SAROS. Additionally, battery life of the POCs was evaluated at

  8. The Effect of Acceptor and Donor Doping on Oxygen Vacancy Concentrations in Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Slouka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The different properties of acceptor-doped (hard and donor-doped (soft lead zirconate titanate (PZT ceramics are often attributed to different amounts of oxygen vacancies introduced by the dopant. Acceptor doping is believed to cause high oxygen vacancy concentrations, while donors are expected to strongly suppress their amount. In this study, La3+ donor-doped, Fe3+ acceptor-doped and La3+/Fe3+-co-doped PZT samples were investigated by oxygen tracer exchange and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in order to analyse the effect of doping on oxygen vacancy concentrations. Relative changes in the tracer diffusion coefficients for different doping and quantitative relations between defect concentrations allowed estimates of oxygen vacancy concentrations. Donor doping does not completely suppress the formation of oxygen vacancies; rather, it concentrates them in the grain boundary region. Acceptor doping enhances the amount of oxygen vacancies but estimates suggest that bulk concentrations are still in the ppm range, even for 1% acceptor doping. Trapped holes might thus considerably contribute to the charge balancing of the acceptor dopants. This could also be of relevance in understanding the properties of hard and soft PZT.

  9. Detection of ultra-low oxygen concentration based on the fluorescence blinking dynamics of single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ruixiang; Chen, Ruiyun; Zhou, Haitao; Qin, Yaqiang; Zhang, Guofeng; Qin, Chengbing; Gao, Yan; Gao, Yajun; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2018-01-01

    We present a sensitive method for detection of ultra-low oxygen concentrations based on the fluorescence blinking dynamics of single molecules. The relationship between the oxygen concentration and the fraction of time spent in the off-state, stemming from the population and depopulation of triplet states and radical cationic states, can be fitted with a two-site quenching model in the Stern-Volmer plot. The oxygen sensitivity is up to 43.42 kPa-1 in the oxygen partial pressure region as low as 0.01-0.25 kPa, which is seven times higher than that of the fluorescence intensity indicator. This method avoids the limitation of the sharp and non-ignorable fluctuations that occur during the measurement of fluorescence intensity, providing potential applications in the field of low oxygen-concentration monitoring in life science and industry.

  10. Microbial mats, stromatolites and the rise of oxygen in the Precambrian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Microbial mats are stratified communities that develop within the environmental microgradients established at the interfaces of water and solid substrates (Cohen, 1989). Stromatolites, the lithified remains of layered accumulations of microbial mats, occur in rocks as old as 3.5 Ga (Lowe, 1980; Walter et al., 1980). These lithified microbial communities represent the most ancient, widespread ecosystems known, and it is useful to explore their role in the accumulation of free oxygen in the ancient atmosphere.

  11. Effect of oxygen level on the oxidative stability of two different retail pork products stored using modified atmosphere packaging (MAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, Dimitrios; Tørngren, Mari Ann; Christensen, Mette; Baron, Caroline P

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics and the oxidative stability of pork steaks and of pork mince were investigated during 2, 5 and 7days of refrigerated storage using oxygen (O2) levels of 0%, 20%, 50% and 80% in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). Steaks stored during 7days were not affected by an increase in O2 concentration, as revealed by lipid and protein oxidation markers. In contrast, the mince was characterised by an altered protein profile, loss of free thiol groups and increased protein oxidation, early during storage. The oxidative stability of pork mince was improved by using intermediate (50%) O2 MAP. The results show that fresh pork products are affected differently by the MAP O2 concentration and strongly indicate that optimisation of MAP based on the retail product type would be of considerable benefit to their oxidative stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Digitized Onondaga Lake Dissolved Oxygen Concentrations and Model Simulated Values using Bayesian Monte Carlo Methods

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The dataset is lake dissolved oxygen concentrations obtained form plots published by Gelda et al. (1996) and lake reaeration model simulated values using Bayesian...

  13. Indirect estimation of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis biomass concentration using oxygen balance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Silveira

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti growth is often hindered by the impossibility of using conventional methods to measure biomass concentration in natural raw-material-based media, which normally have a high content of insoluble solids. In this work, application of a mathematical model based on respiratory parameters in the estimation of Bti biomass concentration was evaluated. The values obtained for the respiratory parameters true cell yield from oxygen consumption and maintenance coefficient for oxygen (mO were 0.091 g cell/mmol O2 and 2.1 mmol O2/g cell/hour, respectively. With these constants and the oxygen uptake rates obtained from oxygen balance calculations, cell concentrations of Bti were estimated in batch runs with initial glucose concentrations from 10 to 80 g/L and were found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  14. Assessing the Atmospheric Oxygen Balance in a Region of Rapid Urbanization: A Case Study in the Pearl River Delta, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Peng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen is a product of photosynthesis and is essential for human survival. It also has a profound effect on ecosystems as the atmospheric oxygen balance is the basis for regional ecological sustainability. The Pearl River Delta (PRD has experienced rapid urbanization and has become one of China’s three major urban agglomerations. This study focused on the oxygen balance of the PRD in 2011, and established a model to calculate the oxygen balance that was suitable for a region of rapid urbanization by applying remote sensing gross primary production data via the C-Fix model. The influencing factors for the oxygen imbalance were analyzed and it was suggested that more attention be paid to the management of oxygen emissions than oxygen consumption. The results indicated that the oxygen balance capacity of the PRD was weak, with an oxygen consumption 9.37 times that of its oxygen emission. Zhaoqing and Huizhou are the main sources of oxygen in the PRD, with an oxygen emission density more than 4.67 times that of Dongguan or Zhuhai. Guangzhou and Shenzhen are the main oxygen sinks, with a total oxygen consumption more than 5.49 times that of Zhaoqing. Moreover, the oxygen balance of the PRD is more sensitive to oxygen emissions than consumption. Therefore, it could be inferred that the land urbanization has a stronger influence on the oxygen balance than the population urbanization.

  15. Prevention of airway fires: do not overlook the expired oxygen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remz, Matthew; Luria, Isaac; Gravenstein, Michael; Rice, Scott D; Morey, Timothy E; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Rice, Mark J

    2013-11-01

    It is generally accepted that when an ignition source is used the inspired oxygen concentration (FIO2) should be Avance S/5 anesthesia machine to reach an FIO2 of 30% for a considerable time after the FIO2 is in a "safe" range. An increased expired oxygen concentration should also be considered an airway fire risk, and patient care protocols may need to be modified based on future studies.

  16. Oxygenated volatile organic carbon in the western Pacific convective center: ocean cycling, air-sea gas exchange and atmospheric transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlundt, Cathleen; Tegtmeier, Susann; Lennartz, Sinikka T.; Bracher, Astrid; Cheah, Wee; Krüger, Kirstin; Quack, Birgit; Marandino, Christa A.

    2017-09-01

    A suite of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs - acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, butanal and butanone) were measured concurrently in the surface water and atmosphere of the South China Sea and Sulu Sea in November 2011. A strong correlation was observed between all OVOC concentrations in the surface seawater along the entire cruise track, except for acetaldehyde, suggesting similar sources and sinks in the surface ocean. Additionally, several phytoplankton groups, such as haptophytes or pelagophytes, were also correlated to all OVOCs, indicating that phytoplankton may be an important source of marine OVOCs in the South China and Sulu seas. Humic- and protein-like fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) components seemed to be additional precursors for butanone and acetaldehyde. The measurement-inferred OVOC fluxes generally showed an uptake of atmospheric OVOCs by the ocean for all gases, except for butanal. A few important exceptions were found along the Borneo coast, where OVOC fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere were inferred. The atmospheric OVOC mixing ratios over the northern coast of Borneo were relatively high compared with literature values, suggesting that this coastal region is a local hotspot for atmospheric OVOCs. The calculated amount of OVOCs entrained into the ocean seemed to be an important source of OVOCs to the surface ocean. When the fluxes were out of the ocean, marine OVOCs were found to be enough to control the locally measured OVOC distribution in the atmosphere. Based on our model calculations, at least 0.4 ppb of marine-derived acetone and butanone can reach the upper troposphere, where they may have an important influence on hydrogen oxide radical formation over the western Pacific Ocean.

  17. Oxygenated volatile organic carbon in the western Pacific convective center: ocean cycling, air–sea gas exchange and atmospheric transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schlundt

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A suite of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs – acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, butanal and butanone were measured concurrently in the surface water and atmosphere of the South China Sea and Sulu Sea in November 2011. A strong correlation was observed between all OVOC concentrations in the surface seawater along the entire cruise track, except for acetaldehyde, suggesting similar sources and sinks in the surface ocean. Additionally, several phytoplankton groups, such as haptophytes or pelagophytes, were also correlated to all OVOCs, indicating that phytoplankton may be an important source of marine OVOCs in the South China and Sulu seas. Humic- and protein-like fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM components seemed to be additional precursors for butanone and acetaldehyde. The measurement-inferred OVOC fluxes generally showed an uptake of atmospheric OVOCs by the ocean for all gases, except for butanal. A few important exceptions were found along the Borneo coast, where OVOC fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere were inferred. The atmospheric OVOC mixing ratios over the northern coast of Borneo were relatively high compared with literature values, suggesting that this coastal region is a local hotspot for atmospheric OVOCs. The calculated amount of OVOCs entrained into the ocean seemed to be an important source of OVOCs to the surface ocean. When the fluxes were out of the ocean, marine OVOCs were found to be enough to control the locally measured OVOC distribution in the atmosphere. Based on our model calculations, at least 0.4 ppb of marine-derived acetone and butanone can reach the upper troposphere, where they may have an important influence on hydrogen oxide radical formation over the western Pacific Ocean.

  18. Comparison of on-line and off-line methods to quantify reactive oxygen species (ROS) in atmospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, S. J.; Wragg, F. P. H.; Nutter, J.; Kalberer, M.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particle concentrations have been linked with a wide range of pulmonary and cardio-vascular diseases but the particle properties responsible for these negative health effects are largely unknown. It is often speculated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) present in atmospheric particles lead to oxidative stress in, and ultimately disease of, the human lung. The quantification of ROS is highly challenging because some ROS components such as radicals are highly reactive and therefore short-lived. Thus, fast analysis methods are likely advantageous over methods with a long delay between aerosol sampling and ROS analysis. We present for the first time a detailed comparison of conventional off-line and fast on-line methods to quantify ROS in organic aerosols. For this comparison a new and fast on-line instrument was built and characterized to quantify ROS in aerosol particles with high sensitivity and a limit of detection of 4 nmol H2O2 equivalents per m3 air. ROS concentrations are measured with a time resolution of approximately 15 min, which allows the tracking of fast changing atmospheric conditions. The comparison of the off-line and on-line method shows that, in oxidized organic model aerosol particles, the majority of ROS have a very short lifetime of a few minutes whereas a small fraction is stable for a day or longer. This indicates that off-line techniques, where there is often a delay of hours to days between particle collection and ROS analysis, may severely underestimate true ROS concentrations and that fast on-line techniques are necessary for a reliable ROS quantification in atmospheric aerosol particles and a meaningful correlation with health outcomes.

  19. A Global Perspective of Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, William M.; Ott, Lesley; Darmenov, Anton; daSilva, Arlindo

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most important greenhouse gas affected by human activity. About half of the CO2 emitted from fossil fuel combustion remains in the atmosphere, contributing to rising temperatures, while the other half is absorbed by natural land and ocean carbon reservoirs. Despite the importance of CO2, many questions remain regarding the processes that control these fluxes and how they may change in response to a changing climate. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), launched on July 2, 2014, is NASA's first satellite mission designed to provide the global view of atmospheric CO2 needed to better understand both human emissions and natural fluxes. This visualization shows how column CO2 mixing ratio, the quantity observed by OCO-2, varies throughout the year. By observing spatial and temporal gradients in CO2 like those shown, OCO-2 data will improve our understanding of carbon flux estimates. But, CO2 observations can't do that alone. This visualization also shows that column CO2 mixing ratios are strongly affected by large-scale weather systems. In order to fully understand carbon flux processes, OCO-2 observations and atmospheric models will work closely together to determine when and where observed CO2 came from. Together, the combination of high-resolution data and models will guide climate models towards more reliable predictions of future conditions.

  20. Microbial respiration and gene expression as a function of very low oxygen concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiano, Laura

    cruises allowed us to support distribution studies of iron species in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ water column, and to gain evidences that this OMZ is characterized by a functionally anoxic core (Anoxic Marine Zone, AMZ) (Manuscript II, VI). Subsequently we applied our low-O2 method...... recently, due to the lack of high-resolution methods for O2 concentration determination, several oxygen-related processes, such as aerobic respiration in pelagic aquatic ecosystems and in naturally oxygen poor waters (e.g. Oxygen Minimum Zones, OMZs), or the oxygen regulation of nitrification......-sensitive method to assess O2 respiration rates, using of the ultrasensitive Switchable Trace amount Oxygen (STOX) sensor, ii) apply the method to investigate the O2 uptake kinetics of natural planktonic communities from OMZs, iii) investigate the influence of low O2 concentration on nitrification, in particular...

  1. Trough Concentrations of Vancomycin in Patients Undergoing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Jin Park

    Full Text Available To investigate the appropriateness of the current vancomycin dosing strategy in adult patients with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, between March 2013 and November 2013, patients who were treated with vancomycin while on ECMO were enrolled. Control group consisted of 60 patients on vancomycin without ECMO, stayed in medical intensive care unit during the same study period and with the same exclusion criteria. Early trough levels were obtained within the fourth dosing, and maintenance levels were measured at steady state. A total of 20 patients were included in the analysis in ECMO group. Sixteen patients received an initial intravenous dose of 1.0 g vancomycin followed by 1.0 g every 12 hours. The non-steady state trough level of vancomycin after starting administration was subtherapeutic in 19 patients (95.00% in ECMO group as compared with 40 patients (66.67% in the control group (p = 0.013. Vancomycin clearance was 1.27±0.51 mL/min/kg, vancomycin clearance/creatinine clearance ratio was 0.90 ± 0.37, and elimination rate constant was 0.12 ± 0.04 h-1. Vancomycin dosingfrequency and total daily dose were significantly increased after clinical pharmacokinetic services of the pharmacist based on calculated pharmacokinetic parameters (from 2.10 ± 0.72 to 2.90 ± 0.97 times/day, p = 0.002 and from 32.54 ± 8.43 to 42.24 ± 14.62mg/kg, p = 0.014 in ECMO group in contrast with those (from 2.11 ± 0.69 to 2.37 ± 0.86 times/day, p = 0.071 and from 33.91 ± 11.85 to 31.61 ± 17.50 mg/kg, p = 0.350 in the control group.Although the elimination rate for vancomycin was similar with population parameter of non ECMO patients, the current dosing strategy of our institution for vancomycinin our ICU was not sufficient to achieve the target trough in the initial period in most patients receiving ECMO.

  2. Aeration optimization through operation at low dissolved oxygen concentrations: Evaluation of oxygen mass transfer dynamics in different activated sludge systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Haitao; Qi, Lu; Liu, Guoqiang; Zhang, Yuankai; Fan, Qiang; Wang, Hongchen

    2017-05-01

    In wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) using the activated sludge process, two methods are widely used to improve aeration efficiency - use of high-efficiency aeration devices and optimizing the aeration control strategy. Aeration efficiency is closely linked to sludge characteristics (such as concentrations of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) and microbial communities) and operating conditions (such as air flow rate and operational dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations). Moreover, operational DO is closely linked to effluent quality. This study, which is in reference to WWTP discharge class A Chinese standard effluent criteria, determined the growth kinetics parameters of nitrifiers at different DO levels in small-scale tests. Results showed that the activated sludge system could meet effluent criteria when DO was as low as 0.3mg/L, and that nitrifier communities cultivated under low DO conditions had higher oxygen affinity than those cultivated under high DO conditions, as indicated by the oxygen half-saturation constant and nitrification ability. Based on nitrifier growth kinetics and on the oxygen mass transfer dynamic model (determined using different air flow rate (Q' air ) and mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS) values), theoretical analysis indicated limited potential for energy saving by improving aeration diffuser performance when the activated sludge system had low oxygen consumption; however, operating at low DO and low MLVSS could significantly reduce energy consumption. Finally, a control strategy coupling sludge retention time and MLVSS to minimize the DO level was discussed, which is critical to appropriate setting of the oxygen point and to the operation of low DO treatment technology. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Rapid oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere 2.33 billion years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Genming; Ono, Shuhei; Beukes, Nicolas J; Wang, David T; Xie, Shucheng; Summons, Roger E

    2016-05-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) is, and has been, a primary driver of biological evolution and shapes the contemporary landscape of Earth's biogeochemical cycles. Although "whiffs" of oxygen have been documented in the Archean atmosphere, substantial O2 did not accumulate irreversibly until the Early Paleoproterozoic, during what has been termed the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE). The timing of the GOE and the rate at which this oxygenation took place have been poorly constrained until now. We report the transition (that is, from being mass-independent to becoming mass-dependent) in multiple sulfur isotope signals of diagenetic pyrite in a continuous sedimentary sequence in three coeval drill cores in the Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa. These data precisely constrain the GOE to 2.33 billion years ago. The new data suggest that the oxygenation occurred rapidly-within 1 to 10 million years-and was followed by a slower rise in the ocean sulfate inventory. Our data indicate that a climate perturbation predated the GOE, whereas the relationships among GOE, "Snowball Earth" glaciation, and biogeochemical cycling will require further stratigraphic correlation supported with precise chronologies and paleolatitude reconstructions.

  4. Rapid oxygenation of Earth’s atmosphere 2.33 billion years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Genming; Ono, Shuhei; Beukes, Nicolas J.; Wang, David T.; Xie, Shucheng; Summons, Roger E.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) is, and has been, a primary driver of biological evolution and shapes the contemporary landscape of Earth’s biogeochemical cycles. Although “whiffs” of oxygen have been documented in the Archean atmosphere, substantial O2 did not accumulate irreversibly until the Early Paleoproterozoic, during what has been termed the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE). The timing of the GOE and the rate at which this oxygenation took place have been poorly constrained until now. We report the transition (that is, from being mass-independent to becoming mass-dependent) in multiple sulfur isotope signals of diagenetic pyrite in a continuous sedimentary sequence in three coeval drill cores in the Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa. These data precisely constrain the GOE to 2.33 billion years ago. The new data suggest that the oxygenation occurred rapidly—within 1 to 10 million years—and was followed by a slower rise in the ocean sulfate inventory. Our data indicate that a climate perturbation predated the GOE, whereas the relationships among GOE, “Snowball Earth” glaciation, and biogeochemical cycling will require further stratigraphic correlation supported with precise chronologies and paleolatitude reconstructions. PMID:27386544

  5. Effects of ambient oxygen concentration on biodiesel and diesel spray combustion under simulated engine conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ji

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the effect of ambient oxygen concentration on biodiesel and diesel spray combustion under simulated compression-ignition engine conditions in a constant-volume chamber. The apparent heat release rate (AHRR) is calculated based on the measured pressure. High-speed imaging of OH* chemiluminescence and natural luminosity (NL) is employed to visualize the combustion process. Temporally and spatially resolved NL and OH* contour plots are obtained. The result indicates that AHRR depends monotonically on the ambient oxygen concentration for both fuels. A lower oxygen concentration yields a slower AHRR increase rate, a lower peak AHRR value, but a higher AHRR value during the burn-out stage when compared with higher ambient oxygen concentration conditions. OH* chemiluminescence and NL contours indicate that biodiesel may experience a longer premixed-combustion duration. The 18% ambient O2 condition works better for biodiesel than diesel in reducing soot luminosity. With 12% O2, diesel combustion is significantly degraded. However, both fuels experience low temperature combustion at 10% O2. These results may imply that biodiesel is able to achieve the desired lower soot production under a moderate oxygen level with higher combustion efficiency, while diesel needs to be burned under very low ambient oxygen concentration for low soot production. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. A simple empirical model estimating atmospheric CO2 background concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, M.; Buchwitz, M.; Schneising, O.; Heymann, J.; Guerlet, S.; Cogan, A. J.; Bovensmann, H.; Burrows, J. P.

    2012-02-01

    A simple empirical CO2 model (SECM) is presented to estimate column-average dry-air mole fractions of atmospheric CO2 (XCO2) as well as mixing ratio profiles. SECM is based on a simple equation depending on 17 empirical parameters, latitude, and date. The empirical parameters have been determined by least squares fitting to NOAA's (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) assimilation system CarbonTracker version 2010 (CT2010). Comparisons with TCCON (total column carbon observing network) FTS (Fourier transform spectrometer) measurements show that SECM XCO2 agrees quite well with reality. The synthetic XCO2 values have a standard error of 1.39 ppm and systematic station-to-station biases of 0.46 ppm. Typical column averaging kernels of the TCCON FTS, a SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY), and two GOSAT (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite) XCO2 retrieval algorithms have been used to assess the smoothing error introduced by using SECM profiles instead of CT2010 profiles as a priori. The additional smoothing error amounts to 0.17 ppm for a typical SCIAMACHY averaging kernel and is most times much smaller for the other instruments (e.g. 0.05 ppm for a typical TCCON FTS averaging kernel). Therefore, SECM is well-suited to provide a priori information for state of the art ground-based (FTS) and satellite-based (GOSAT, SCIAMACHY) XCO2 retrievals. Other potential applications are: (i) quick check for obvious retrieval errors (by monitoring the difference to SECM), (ii) near real time processing systems (that cannot make use of models like CT2010 operated in delayed mode), (iii) "CO2 proxy" methods for XCH4 retrievals (as correction for the XCO2 background), (iv) observing system simulation experiments especially for future satellite missions.

  7. LBA-ECO CD-02 Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric CO2 in the Amazon: 1999-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) collected at several forest and pasture sites and in the...

  8. LBA-ECO CD-02 Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric CO2 in the Amazon: 1999-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) collected at several forest and pasture sites and in the free...

  9. In situ TEM studies of the shape evolution of Pd nanocrystals under oxygen and hydrogen environments at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xun; Meng, Jun; Zhu, Beien; Yu, Jian; Zou, Shihui; Zhang, Ze; Gao, Yi; Wang, Yong

    2017-12-12

    We demonstrate an atomic scale TEM observation of shape evolutions of Pd nanocrystals under oxygen and hydrogen environments at atmospheric pressure. Combined with multi-scale structure reconstruction model calculations, the reshaping mechanism is fully understood.

  10. Dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium during cell culture: Defects and improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuan; Zhao, Tong; Huang, Xin; He, Yunlin; Zhou, Yanzhao; Wu, Liying; Wu, Kuiwu; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Lingling

    2016-03-01

    In vitro cell culture has provided a useful model to study the effects of oxygen on cellular behavior. However, it remains unknown whether the in vitro operations themselves affect the medium oxygen levels and the living states of cells. In addition, a prevailing controversy is whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is induced by continuous hypoxia or reoxygenation. In this study, we have measured the effects of different types of cell culture containers and the oxygen environment where medium replacement takes place on the actual oxygen tension in the medium. We found that the deviations of oxygen concentrations in the medium are much greater in 25-cm(2) flasks than in 24-well plates and 35-mm dishes. The dissolved oxygen concentrations in the medium were increased after medium replacement in normoxia, but remained unchanged in glove boxes in which the oxygen tension remained at a low level (11.4, 5.7, and 0.5% O2 ). We also found that medium replacement in normoxia increased the number of ROS-positive cells and reduced the cell viability; meanwhile, medium replacement in a glove box did not produce the above effects. Therefore, we conclude that the use of 25-cm(2) flasks should be avoided and demonstrate that continuous hypoxia does not produce ROS, whereas the reoxygenation that occurs during the harvesting of cells leads to ROS and induces cell death. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  11. Predicting oxygen vacancy non-stoichiometric concentration in perovskites from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Heng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Shin, Yongwoo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, Brookline, MA 02446 (United States); Yu, Yang; Cetin, Deniz [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, Brookline, MA 02446 (United States); Ludwig, Karl [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, Brookline, MA 02446 (United States); Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Pal, Uday; Basu, Soumendra N.; Gopalan, Srikanth [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, Brookline, MA 02446 (United States); Lin, Xi, E-mail: linx@bu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, Brookline, MA 02446 (United States)

    2014-12-30

    Highlights: • Prediction of materials properties from first principles. • Oxygen vacancy non-stoichiometric concentration transition between the surface and bulk phases. • Controlled defect concentrations via materials design. - Abstract: Formation of oxygen vacancies by introducing various mixed-valent cation dopants is a common practice to improve the cathode performance in solid oxide fuel cells. A computational procedure is developed in this work to predict the equilibrium oxygen vacancy non-stoichiometric concentrations at experimentally relevant temperatures and oxygen partial pressures for both bulk and surface oxide phases. The calculations are based on the first-principles density functional theory and a constrained free-energy functional. Quantitative agreements are found by direct comparisons to the thermogravimetry and solid electrolyte coulometry measurements for the strontium-doped lanthanum cobalt iron oxides at different compositions. Our results indicate that the oxygen vacancies are energetically stabilized at surfaces for all temperatures and all oxygen partial pressures, while such surface stabilization effects become stronger at higher temperatures and lower oxygen partial pressures.

  12. [Influence of the Concentration of Dissolved Oxygen on Embryonic Development of the Common Toad (Bufo bufo)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrieva, E V

    2015-01-01

    Several series of experiments investigating the influence of dissolved oxygen concentrations on the growth rates and mortality in the embryogenesis of the common toad Bufo bufo were carried out. The experiments showed that, when the eggs develop singly, the lack of oxygen does not lead to an increase in mortality by the time of hatching and results only in a change in the dynamics of mortality: mortality occurs at an earlier stage of development than in the conditions of normal access to oxygen. Taking into account the combined effect of the density of eggs and the dissolved oxygen concentration, we increase the accuracy of analysis of the experimental results and improve the interpretation of the results. In the conditions of different initial density of eggs, the impact of the concentration of dissolved oxygen on mortality and rates of development of the common toad embryos is manifested in different ways. At high density, only a small percentage of embryos survives by the time of hatching, and the embryos are significantly behind in their development compared with the individuals that developed in normal oxygen conditions. The lack of oxygen dissolved in the water slows down the development of embryos of the common toad.

  13. A Pleistocene ice core record of atmospheric O2 concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D A; Bender, M L; Dreyfus, G B; Yan, Y; Higgins, J A

    2016-09-23

    The history of atmospheric O2 partial pressures (Po2) is inextricably linked to the coevolution of life and Earth's biogeochemical cycles. Reconstructions of past Po2 rely on models and proxies but often markedly disagree. We present a record of Po2 reconstructed using O2/N2 ratios from ancient air trapped in ice. This record indicates that Po2 declined by 7 per mil (0.7%) over the past 800,000 years, requiring that O2 sinks were ~2% larger than sources. This decline is consistent with changes in burial and weathering fluxes of organic carbon and pyrite driven by either Neogene cooling or increasing Pleistocene erosion rates. The 800,000-year record of steady average carbon dioxide partial pressures (Pco2) but declining Po2 provides distinctive evidence that a silicate weathering feedback stabilizes Pco2 on million-year time scales. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Afterglow chemistry of atmospheric-pressure helium-oxygen plasmas with humid air impurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Niemi, Kari; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah; Graham, William G.

    2014-04-01

    The formation of reactive species in the afterglow of a radio-frequency-driven atmospheric-pressure plasma in a fixed helium-oxygen feed gas mixture (He+0.5%O2) with humid air impurity (a few hundred ppm) is investigated by means of an extensive global plasma chemical kinetics model. As an original objective, we explore the effects of humid air impurity on the biologically relevant reactive species in an oxygen-dependent system. After a few milliseconds in the afterglow environment, the densities of atomic oxygen (O) decreases from 1015 to 1013 cm-3 and singlet delta molecular oxygen (O2(1D)) of the order of 1015 cm-3 decreases by a factor of two, while the ozone (O3) density increases from 1014 to 1015 cm-3. Electrons and oxygen ionic species, initially of the order of 1011 cm-3, recombine much faster on the time scale of some microseconds. The formation of atomic hydrogen (H), hydroxyl radical (OH), hydroperoxyl (HO2), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitric acid (HNO3) resulting from the humid air impurity as well as the influence on the afterglow chemistry is clarified with particular emphasis on the formation of dominant reactive oxygen species (ROS). The model suggests that the reactive species predominantly formed in the afterglow are major ROS O2(1D) and O3 (of the order of 1015 cm-3) and rather minor hydrogen- and nitrogen-based reactive species OH, H2O2, HNO3 and NO2/NO3, of which densities are comparable to the O-atom density (of the order of 1013 cm-3). Furthermore, the model quantitatively reproduces the experimental results of independent O and O3 density measurements.

  15. Production of Energetic Active-Oxygen Species at Atmospheric Pressure by Linear Microplasma Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, Wilson; Galbally-Kinney, Kristin; Davis, Steven; Hoskinson, Alan; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    Linear arrays of stripline resonators operated at microwave frequencies and low powers provide spatially and temporally continuous micro-discharges with high E/N at atmospheric pressure. When implemented in a discharge-flow reactor, these microplasmas excite metastable singlet molecular oxygen and dissociate oxygen molecules to produce atomic oxygen, with efficiencies comparable to conventional microwave resonant cavities at low pressures. At elevated pressure, production of atomic oxygen leads to prompt formation of ozone immediately downstream of the discharge exit. We have observed and quantified the production of O2(a 1 Δ) metastables and O3 in the effluent of linear microplasma arrays for O2/He, O2/Ar, O2/N2/He,andO2/N2/Ar mixtures as functions of pressure, gas flow rate, and species mixing ratio. We compare results for single-array microplasmas, where the discharge products are formed in a small volume and entrained into the bulk flow, and overlapping dual-array microplasmas which process larger gas flow volumes. Supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory and Department of Energy.

  16. Generation and characterization of OH and O radicals by atmospheric pressure steam/oxygen plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, N C; Alam, M K; Talukder, M R

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure steam/oxygen plasma is generated by a 88 Hz, 6kV AC power supply. The properties of the produced plasma are investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The relative intensity, rotational, vibrational, excitation temperatures and electron density are studied as function of applied voltage, electrode spacing and oxygen flow rate. The rotational and vibrational temperatures are determined simulating the bands with the aid of LIFBASE simulation software. The excitation temperature is obtained from the CuI transition taking non-thermal equilibrium condition into account employing intensity ratio method. The electron density is approximated from the H_{\\alpha} Stark broadening using the Voigt profile fitting method. It is observed that the rotational and vibrational temperatures are decreased with increasing electrode spacing and O2 flow rate, but increased with the applied voltage. The excitation temperature is found to increase with increasing applied voltage and O2 flow rate, but de...

  17. Oxygen transfer dynamics and activated sludge floc structure under different sludge retention times at low dissolved oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Haitao; Liu, Xiuhong; Wang, Hao; Han, Yunping; Qi, Lu; Wang, Hongchen

    2017-02-01

    In activated sludge systems, the aeration process consumes the most energy. The energy cost can be dramatically reduced by decreasing the operating dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. However, low DO may lead to incomplete nitrification and poor settling performance of activated sludge flocs (ASFs). This study investigates oxygen transfer dynamics and settling performances of activated sludge under different sludge retention times (SRTs) and DO conditions using microelectrodes and microscopic techniques. Our experimental results showed that with longer SRTs, treatment capacity and settling performances of activated sludge improved due to smaller floc size and less extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Long-term low DO conditions produced larger flocs and more EPS per unit sludge, which produced a more extensive anoxic area and led to low oxygen diffusion performance in flocs. Long SRTs mitigated the adverse effects of low DO. According to the microelectrode analysis and fractal dimension determination, smaller floc size and less EPS in the long SRT system led to high oxygen diffusion property and more compact floc structure that caused a drop in the sludge volume index (SVI). In summary, our results suggested that long SRTs of activated sludge can improve the operating performance under low DO conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oxygen isotopes in the Martian atmosphere - Implications for the evolution of volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, M. B.; Yung, Y. L.

    1976-01-01

    Nonthermal escape of oxygen by recombination of exospheric O2(+) combined with diffusive separation of gases at lower altitude provides a mechanism through which the Martian atmosphere may be enriched in O-18 relative to O-16. Measurement of the abundance of O-18 relative to O-16 together with a determination of the turbopause may be used to develop important constraints on the history of Martian volatiles. Models for the interpretation of these data are developed and discussed in light of present information.

  19. Use of an Atmospheric Atomic Oxygen Beam for Restoration of Defaced Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Karla, Margaret; Norris, Mary Jo; Real, William A.; Haytas, Christy A.

    1999-01-01

    An atmospheric atomic oxygen beam has been found to be effective in removing organic materials through oxidation that are typical of graffiti or other contaminant defacements which may occur to the surfaces of paintings. The technique, developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is portable and was successfully used at the Carnegie Museum of Art to remove a lipstick smudge from the surface of porous paint on the Andy Warhol painting "Bathtub." This process was also evaluated for suitability to remove felt tip and ball point ink graffiti from paper, gesso on canvas and cotton canvas.

  20. Atmospheric plasma generates oxygen atoms as oxidizing species in aqueous solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hefny, M.M.; Pattyn, C.; Lukeš, Petr; Benedikt, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 40 (2016), s. 404002 ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14080 Grant - others:European Cooperation in Science and Technology(XE) COST TD1208 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : atmospheric pressure plasma * transport of reactive species * reactive oxygen species * aqueous phase chemistry * plasma and liquids * phenol aqueous chemistry Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.588, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0022-3727/49/40/404002

  1. Treatment of enterococcus faecalis bacteria by a helium atmospheric cold plasma brush with oxygen addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Wei; Huang Jun; Wang Xingquan; Lv Guohua; Zhang Guoping [Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Physics, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, 100190 Beijing (China); Du Ning; Liu Xiaodi; Guo Lihong [Department of Oral Biology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 100080 Beijing (China); Yang Size [Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Physics, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, 100190 Beijing (China); Fujian Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Aeronautics, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2012-07-01

    An atmospheric cold plasma brush suitable for large area and low-temperature plasma-based sterilization is designed. Results demonstrate that the He/O{sub 2} plasma more effectively kills Enterococcus faecalis than the pure He plasma. In addition, the sterilization efficiency values of the He/O{sub 2} plasma depend on the oxygen fraction in Helium gas. The atmospheric cold plasma brush using a proper ratio of He/O{sub 2} (2.5%) reaches the optimum sterilization efficiency. After plasma treatment, the cell structure and morphology changes can be observed by the scanning electron microscopy. Optical emission measurements indicate that reactive species such as O and OH play a significant role in the sterilization process.

  2. Treatment of enterococcus faecalis bacteria by a helium atmospheric cold plasma brush with oxygen addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Huang, Jun; Du, Ning; Liu, Xiao-Di; Wang, Xing-Quan; Lv, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Guo-Ping; Guo, Li-Hong; Yang, Si-Ze

    2012-07-01

    An atmospheric cold plasma brush suitable for large area and low-temperature plasma-based sterilization is designed. Results demonstrate that the He/O2 plasma more effectively kills Enterococcus faecalis than the pure He plasma. In addition, the sterilization efficiency values of the He/O2 plasma depend on the oxygen fraction in Helium gas. The atmospheric cold plasma brush using a proper ratio of He/O2 (2.5%) reaches the optimum sterilization efficiency. After plasma treatment, the cell structure and morphology changes can be observed by the scanning electron microscopy. Optical emission measurements indicate that reactive species such as O and OH play a significant role in the sterilization process.

  3. Tritium concentration analysis in atmospheric precipitation in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Marija M; Janković, Bojan Ž; Todorović, Dragana J; Ignjatović, Ljubiša M

    2012-01-01

    Tritium activity concentration were monitored in monthly precipitation at five locations in Serbia (Meteorological Station of Belgrade at Zeleno Brdo, Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Smederevska Palanka, Kraljevo and Niš) over 2005, using electrolytic enrichment and liquid scintillation counting. The obtained concentrations ranged from 3.36 to 127.02 TU. The activity values obtained in samples collected at Zeleno Brdo were lower or close to the minimum detectable activity (MDA), which has a value of 3.36 TU. Significantly higher tritium levels were obtained in samples collected in Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences compared with samples from the other investigated locations. Amount of precipitation were also recorded. A good linear correlation (r = 0.75) for Zeleno Brdo and VINS between their tritium activity was obtained. It was found that the value of the symmetrical index n (which indicates the magnitude of tritium content changes with time (months) through its second derivative) is the highest for Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences compared to other locations, which is in accordance with the fact that the highest concentrations of tritium were obtained in the samples from the cited place.

  4. Behaviors of trace elements in Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic paleosols: Implications for atmospheric oxygen evolution and continental oxidative weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Matsuura, Kei; Kanzaki, Yoshiki

    2016-11-01

    The behaviors of redox-sensitive and/or bio-essential trace elements in Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic paleosols (ancient weathering profiles) were investigated to better understand atmospheric oxygen evolution. The loss or retention of individual trace elements in the paleosols can show how continental oxidative weathering, and thus atmospheric oxygen evolution, took place against age mainly due to their various redox potentials. The V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mo concentrations of two Paleoproterozoic paleosols were measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry, and those, as well as Co, W and U concentrations, of nine Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic paleosols were obtained from the literature. The trace element behaviors were constrained by their degrees of loss or retention in the paleosols. We applied two methods to the estimation: (i) retention fraction of element M (a mass ratio of element M of paleosol to parent rock using immobile elements such as Ti) and (ii) element-element (in particular, Si-element) correlations at different profile depths of a paleosol. There are two distinct groups in trace element behavior in the Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic paleosols: Co, Ni, Zn and W were lost from weathering profiles until the early Paleoproterozoic but retained in the middle and late Paleoproterozoic, while V, Cr, Cu, Mo and U were retained in the profiles until the early Paleoproterozoic or slightly later but lost from the profiles in the middle and late Paleoproterozoic. More precisely, the timings of such loss and retention were different between trace elements during the Paleoproterozoic. The characteristics of these changes from retention to loss or from loss to retention indicate that the changes occurred and lasted throughout the Paleoproterozoic. The trace element behaviors, accordingly, suggest that continental weathering became oxidative progressively with age during almost the whole Paleoproterozoic, and thus

  5. Towards a new proxy of continental atmospheric humidity: the triple oxygen isotopic composition of plant biosilica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, A. E.; Pauchet, S.; Landais, A.; Piel, C.; Devidal, S.; Roy, J.; Vallet-Coulomb, C.; Sonzogni, C.; Pasturel, M.; Cornuault, P.; Xin, J.; Mazur, J. C.; Prie, F.; Bentaleb, I.

    2016-12-01

    There is a serious lack of proxy suitable for reconstructing, in a quantitative way, past changes of continental atmospheric humidity. This reduces the possibility to make model-data comparisons necessary for the implementation of climate models. Over the past 10 years, analytical developments have enabled a few laboratories to reach sufficient precision for measuring the triple oxygen isotopes, expressed by the 17O-excess, in water, water vapor, atmospheric oxygen, and minerals. The 17O-excess represents an alternative to d-excess for investigating relative humidity conditions that prevail during water evaporation. The 17O-excess of water results from the increase of kinetic isotopic fractionation at evaporative sites as a function of decreasing relative humidity. This mechanism occurs at large scales, i.e. during seawater evaporation or during plant canopies transpiration. Unlike deuterium-excess, 17O-excess is supposed to be insensitive to temperature and less sensitive than δD and δ18O to equilibrium fractionation during transport and precipitation. Additionally, the 17O-excess is recorded in biogenic minerals less prone to weathering than organic compounds. Here, we calibrate the 17O-excess of plant biosilica as a new air humidity proxy. First, we examined the behavior of the 17O-excess in soil water, leaf water and phytoliths in growth chambers in response to changes in relative humidity. Second, we measured the 17O-excess of soil phytolith assemblages from inter-tropical savannas and forests distributed along humidity transects. Both approaches show similar dependency of phytolith 17O-excess to relative humidity. The results allow to discuss future calibration directions aimed at estimating the precision of the obtained relationship and at quantifying the successive isotopic fractionations in play at the soil-plant-atmosphere interface, to provide a strong proxy of past atmospheric relative humidity.

  6. Vapor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes reflect water of combustion in the urban atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Galen; Strong, Courtenay; Good, Stephen P; Bares, Ryan; Ehleringer, James R; Bowen, Gabriel J

    2015-03-17

    Anthropogenic modification of the water cycle involves a diversity of processes, many of which have been studied intensively using models and observations. Effective tools for measuring the contribution and fate of combustion-derived water vapor in the atmosphere are lacking, however, and this flux has received relatively little attention. We provide theoretical estimates and a first set of measurements demonstrating that water of combustion is characterized by a distinctive combination of H and O isotope ratios. We show that during periods of relatively low humidity and/or atmospheric stagnation, this isotopic signature can be used to quantify the concentration of water of combustion in the atmospheric boundary layer over Salt Lake City. Combustion-derived vapor concentrations vary between periods of atmospheric stratification and mixing, both on multiday and diurnal timescales, and respond over periods of hours to variations in surface emissions. Our estimates suggest that up to 13% of the boundary layer vapor during the period of study was derived from combustion sources, and both the temporal pattern and magnitude of this contribution were closely reproduced by an independent atmospheric model forced with a fossil fuel emissions data product. Our findings suggest potential for water vapor isotope ratio measurements to be used in conjunction with other tracers to refine the apportionment of urban emissions, and imply that water vapor emissions associated with combustion may be a significant component of the water budget of the urban boundary layer, with potential implications for urban climate, ecohydrology, and photochemistry.

  7. Microfabricated Collector-Generator Electrode Sensor for Measuring Absolute pH and Oxygen Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, Adam K; Wightman, R Mark; McCarty, Gregory S

    2015-10-20

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) has attracted attention for studying in vivo neurotransmission due to its subsecond temporal resolution, selectivity, and sensitivity. Traditional FSCV measurements use background subtraction to isolate changes in the local electrochemical environment, providing detailed information on fluctuations in the concentration of electroactive species. This background subtraction removes information about constant or slowly changing concentrations. However, determination of background concentrations is still important for understanding functioning brain tissue. For example, neural activity is known to consume oxygen and produce carbon dioxide which affects local levels of oxygen and pH. Here, we present a microfabricated microelectrode array which uses FSCV to detect the absolute levels of oxygen and pH in vitro. The sensor is a collector-generator electrode array with carbon microelectrodes spaced 5 μm apart. In this work, a periodic potential step is applied at the generator producing transient local changes in the electrochemical environment. The collector electrode continuously performs FSCV enabling these induced changes in concentration to be recorded with the sensitivity and selectivity of FSCV. A negative potential step applied at the generator produces a transient local pH shift at the collector. The generator-induced pH signal is detected using FSCV at the collector and correlated to absolute solution pH by postcalibration of the anodic peak position. In addition, in oxygenated solutions a negative potential step at the generator produces hydrogen peroxide by reducing oxygen. Hydrogen peroxide is detected with FSCV at the collector electrode, and the magnitude of the oxidative peak is proportional to absolute oxygen concentrations. Oxygen interference on the pH signal is minimal and can be accounted for with a postcalibration.

  8. The bi-directional exchange of oxygenated VOCs between a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda plantation and the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Karl

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Using new in-situ field observations of the most abundant oxygenated VOCs (methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, C3/C4 carbonyls, MVK+MAC and acetic acid we were able to constrain emission and deposition patterns above and within a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda plantation with a sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua understory. During the day canopy scale measurements showed significant emission of methanol and acetone, while methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, acetaldehyde and acetic acid were mainly deposited during the day. All oxygenated compounds exhibited strong losses during the night that could not be explained by conventional dry deposition parameterizations. Accompanying leaf level measurements indicated substantial methanol and acetone emissions from loblolly pine. The exchange of acetaldehyde was more complex. Laboratory measurements made on loblolly pine needles indicated that acetaldehyde may be either emitted or taken up depending on ambient concentrations, with the compensation point increasing exponentially with temperature, and that mature needles tended to emit more acetaldehyde than younger needles. Canopy scale measurements suggested mostly deposition. Short-term (approx. 2 h ozone fumigation in the laboratory had no detectable impact on post-exposure emissions of methanol and acetone, but decreased the exchange rates of acetaldehyde. The emission of a variety of oxygenated compounds (e.g. carbonyls and alcohols was triggered or significantly enhanced during laboratory ozone fumigation experiments. These results suggest that higher ambient ozone levels in the future might enhance the biogenic contribution of some oxygenated compounds. Those with sufficiently low vapor pressures may potentially influence secondary organic aerosol growth. Compounds recently hypothesized to be primarily produced in the canopy atmosphere via ozone plus terpenoid-type reactions can also originate from the oxidation reaction of ozone with leaf surfaces

  9. Decreasing particle number concentrations in a warming atmosphere and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available New particle formation contributes significantly to the number concentration of condensation nuclei (CN as well as cloud CN (CCN, a key factor determining aerosol indirect radiative forcing of the climate system. Using a physics-based nucleation mechanism that is consistent with a range of field observations of aerosol formation, it is shown that projected increases in global temperatures could significantly inhibit new particle, and CCN, formation rates worldwide. An analysis of CN concentrations observed at four NOAA ESRL/GMD baseline stations since the 1970s and two other sites since 1990s reveals long-term decreasing trends that are consistent in sign with, but are larger in magnitude than, the predicted temperature effects. The possible reasons for larger observed long-term CN reductions at remote sites are discussed. The combined effects of rising temperatures on aerosol nucleation rates and other chemical and microphysical processes may imply substantial decreases in future tropospheric particle abundances associated with global warming, delineating a potentially significant feedback mechanism that increases Earth's climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. Further research is needed to quantify the magnitude of such a feedback process.

  10. Direct measurement of local dissolved oxygen concentration spatial profiles in a cell culture environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Yuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Controlling local dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) in media is critical for cell or tissue cultures. Various biomaterials and culture methods have been developed to modulate DO. Direct measurement of local DO in cultures has not been validated as a method to test DO modulation. In the present study we developed a DO measurement system equipped with a Clark-type oxygen microelectrode manipulated with 1 μm precision in three-dimensional space to explore potential applications for tissue engineering. By determining the microelectrode tip position precisely against the bottom plane of culture dishes with rat or human cardiac cells in static monolayer culture, we successfully obtained spatial distributions of DO in the medium. Theoretical quantitative predictions fit the obtained data well. Based on analyses of the variance between samples, we found the data reflected "local" oxygen consumption in the vicinity of the microelectrode and the detection of temporal changes in oxygen consumption rates of cultured cells was limited by the diffusion rate of oxygen in the medium. This oxygen measuring system monitors local oxygen consumption and production with high spatial resolution, and can potentially be used with recently developed oxygen modulating biomaterials to design microenvironments and non-invasively monitor local DO dynamics during culture. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. CMS: Atmospheric Methane Concentrations and Prior Emissions, Boston, MA, 2012-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides average hourly measured, modeled enhancements, and background methane (CH4) concentrations, atmospheric ethane (C2H6) measurements, prior CH4...

  12. CARVE: CH4, CO2, and CO Atmospheric Concentrations, CARVE Tower, Alaska, 2012-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides hourly atmospheric concentrations of methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and carbon monoxide (CO) as mole fractions, from January 2012 to...

  13. CARVE: Monthly Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations (2009-2013) and Modeled Fluxes, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports monthly averages of atmospheric CO2 concentration from satellite and airborne observations between 2009 and 2013 and simulated present and...

  14. Free atmospheric phosphine concentrations and fluxes in different wetland ecosystems, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Chao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Geng Jinju, E-mail: jjgeng@nju.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Hong Yuning [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Zhang Rui [School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Gu Xueyuan; Wang Xiaorong; Gao Shixiang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Glindemann, Dietmar [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Atmospheric phosphine (PH{sub 3}) fluxes from typical types of wetlands and PH{sub 3} concentrations in adjacent atmospheric air were measured. The seasonal distribution of PH{sub 3} in marsh and paddy fields were observed. Positive PH{sub 3} fluxes are significantly related to high air temperature (summer season) and increased vegetation. It is concluded that vegetation speeds up the liberation of PH{sub 3} from soils, while water coverage might function as a diffusion barrier from soils or sediments to the atmosphere. The concentrations of atmospheric PH{sub 3} (ng m{sup -3}) above different wetlands decrease in the order of paddy fields (51.8 {+-} 3.1) > marsh (46.5 {+-} 20.5) > lake (37.0 {+-} 22.7) > coastal wetland (1.71 {+-} 0.73). Highest atmospheric PH{sub 3} levels in marsh are found in summer. In paddy fields, atmospheric PH{sub 3} concentrations in flourishing stages are higher than those in slowly growing stages. - Research highlights: P could migrate as PH{sub 3} gas in different wetland ecosystems. Wetlands act as a source and sink of atmospheric PH{sub 3}. Positive PH{sub 3} fluxes are significantly related to high temperature and increased vegetation. Environmental PH{sub 3} concentrations in China are generally higher. - Environmental PH{sub 3} concentrations in China are generally higher compared to other parts of the world.

  15. A 2-Micron Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development For Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Reithmaier, Karl; Bai, Yingxin; Trieu, Bo C.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2012-01-01

    A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  16. Oxygenation level and hemoglobin concentration in experimental tumor estimated by diffuse optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, A. G.; Kirillin, M. Yu.; Volovetsky, A. B.; Shilyagina, N. Yu.; Sergeeva, E. A.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu.; Turchin, I. V.

    2017-07-01

    Using diffuse optical spectroscopy the level of oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration in experimental tumor in comparison with normal muscle tissue of mice have been studied. Subcutaneously growing SKBR-3 was used as a tumor model. Continuous wave fiber probe diffuse optical spectroscopy system was employed. Optical properties extraction approach was based on diffusion approximation. Decreased blood oxygen saturation level and increased total hemoglobin content were demonstrated in the neoplasm. The main reason of such differences between tumor and norm was significant elevation of deoxyhemoglobin concentration in SKBR-3. The method can be useful for diagnosis of tumors as well as for study of blood flow parameters of tumor models with different angiogenic properties.

  17. Sulfide-inhibition of mitochondrial respiration at very low oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matallo, J; Vogt, J; McCook, O; Wachter, U; Tillmans, F; Groeger, M; Szabo, C; Georgieff, M; Radermacher, P; Calzia, E

    2014-09-15

    Our aim was to study the ability of an immortalized cell line (AMJ2-C11) to sustain aerobic cell respiration at decreasing oxygen concentrations under continuous sulfide exposure. We assumed that the rate of elimination of sulfide through the pathway linked to the mitochondrial respiratory chain and therefore operating under aerobic conditions, should decrease with limiting oxygen concentrations. Thus, sulfide's inhibition of cellular respiration would occur faster under continuous sulfide exposure when the oxygen concentration is in the very low range. The experiments were performed with an O2K-oxygraph (Oroboros Instruments) by suspending 0.5-1×10(6) cells in 2 ml of continuously stirred respiration medium at 37 °C and calculating the oxygen flux (JO2) as the negative derivative of the oxygen concentration in the medium. The cells were studied in two different metabolic states, namely under normal physiologic respiration (1) and after uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration (2). Oxygen concentration was controlled by means of a titration-injection pump, resulting in average concentration values of 0.73±0.05 μM, 3.1±0.2 μM, and 6.2±0.2 μM. Simultaneously we injected a 2 mM Na2S solution at a continuous rate of 10 μl/s in order to quantify the titration-time required to reduce the JO2 to 50% of the initial respiratory activity. Under the lowest oxygen concentration this effect was achieved after 3.5 [0.3;3.5] and 11.7 [6.2;21.2]min in the uncoupled and coupled state, respectively. This time was statistically significantly shorter when compared to the intermediate and the highest O2 concentrations tested, which yielded values of 24.6 [15.5;28.1]min (coupled) and 35.9 [27.4;59.2]min (uncoupled), as well as 42.4 [27.5;42.4]min (coupled) and 51.5 [46.4;51.7]min (uncoupled). All data are medians [25%, and 75% percentiles]. Our results confirm that the onset of inhibition of cell respiration by sulfide occurs earlier under a continuous exposure when approaching

  18. Hyperspectral microscopy can detect metabolic heterogeneity within bovine post-compaction embryos incubated under two oxygen concentrations (7% versus 20%).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Gosnell, Martin; Anwer, Ayad G; White, Melissa; Purdey, Malcolm; Abell, Andrew D; Goldys, Ewa M; Thompson, Jeremy G

    2017-10-01

    Can we separate embryos cultured under either 7% or 20% oxygen atmospheres by measuring their metabolic heterogeneity? Metabolic heterogeneity and changes in metabolic profiles in morula exposed to two different oxygen concentrations were not detectable using traditional fluorophore and two-channel autofluorescence but were detectable using hyperspectral microscopy. Increased genetic and morphological blastomere heterogeneity is associated with compromised developmental competence of embryos and currently forms the basis for embryo scoring within the clinic. However, there remains uncertainty over the accuracy of current techniques, such as PGS and time-lapse microscopy, to predict subsequent pregnancy establishment. The impact of two oxygen concentrations (7% = optimal and 20% = stressed) during post-fertilisation embryo culture was assessed. Cattle embryos were exposed to the different oxygen concentrations for 8 days (D8; embryo developmental competence) or 5 days (D5; metabolism measurements). Between 3 and 4 experimental replicates were performed, with 40-50 embryos per replicate used for the developmental competency experiment, 10-20 embryos per replicate for the fluorophore and two-channel autofluorescence experiments and a total of 21-22 embryos used for the hyperspectral microscopy study. In-vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos were utilised for this study. Post-fertilisation, embryos were exposed to 7% or 20% oxygen. To determine impact of oxygen concentrations on embryo viability, blastocyst development was assessed on D8. On D5, metabolic heterogeneity was assessed in morula (on-time) embryos using fluorophores probes (active mitochondria, hydrogen peroxide and reduced glutathione), two-channel autofluorescence (FAD and NAD(P)H) and 18-channel hyperspectral microscopy. Exposure to 20% oxygen following fertilisation significantly reduced total blastocyst, expanded and hatched blastocyst rates by 1.4-, 1.9- and 2.8-fold, respectively, compared to 7% oxygen

  19. The Sensitivity of Future Ocean Oxygen Concentrations to Changes in Ocean Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trossman, D. S.; Palter, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    One expected consequence of anthropogenically forced climate change is a general decrease in oceanic oxygen concentrations. The volume of hypoxic ocean waters is of particular interest, as fish and other organisms become physiologically stressed at low oxygen concentrations. Solubility decline, changes in the wind-driven circulation, and modification of the convective renewal of deep water have each been implicated as important physical controls on the oceanic oxygen concentrations in a warming world. Biological changes, such as those tied to export production and respiration may also play a critical role. The importance of large-scale ocean circulation changes in setting oxygen concentrations relative to other physical factors, such as changes in stratification and mixing, is unclear, with implications for the uncertainty in predicting future hypoxia. By comparing oxygen budgets in a suite of fully coupled climate change simulations to identical simulations in which the ocean circulation is held constant (Trossman et al., 2016), we address this challenge. Under a 1% to doubling of carbon dioxide scenario, our simulations predict a 25% decline in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. However, this decline plays a relatively minor role in setting the spatial patterns of total ocean oxygen on a multi-decadal time scale. On the other hand, the ocean circulation perturbation due to climate change substantially slows the expansion of the tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), due to a future weakening of the Walker circulation. A weaker Walker circulation reduces the upwelling of old, nutrient rich waters, suppressing export production and associated subsurface respiration. In the absence of this dynamic ocean response, the expansion of the Pacific OMZ would be much more dramatic.

  20. Interactions among temperature, moisture, and oxygen concentrations in controlling decomposition rates in a boreal forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos A.; Malghani, Saadatullah; Loescher, Henry W.

    2017-02-01

    Determining environmental controls on soil organic matter decomposition is of importance for developing models that predict the effects of environmental change on global soil carbon stocks. There is uncertainty about the environmental controls on decomposition rates at temperature and moisture extremes, particularly at high water content levels and high temperatures. It is uncertain whether observed declines in decomposition rates at high temperatures are due to declines in the heat capacity of extracellular enzymes as predicted by thermodynamic theory, or due to simultaneous declines in soil moisture. It is also uncertain whether oxygen limits decomposition rates at high water contents. Here we present the results of a full factorial experiment using organic soils from a boreal forest incubated at high temperatures (25 and 35 °C), a wide range of water-filled pore space (WFPS; 15, 30, 60, 90 %), and contrasting oxygen concentrations (1 and 20 %). We found support for the hypothesis that decomposition rates are high at high temperatures, provided that enough moisture and oxygen are available for decomposition. Furthermore, we found that decomposition rates are mostly limited by oxygen concentrations at high moisture levels; even at 90 % WFPS, decomposition proceeded at high rates in the presence of oxygen. Our results suggest an important degree of interaction among temperature, moisture, and oxygen in determining decomposition rates at the soil core scale.

  1. Ground Ammonia Concentrations over China Derived from Satellite and Atmospheric Transport Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As a primary basic gas in the atmosphere, atmospheric ammonia (NH3 plays an important role in determining air quality, environmental degradation, and climate change. However, the limited ground observation currently presents a barrier to estimating ground NH3 concentrations on a regional scale, thus preventing a full understanding of the atmospheric processes in which this trace gas is involved. This study estimated the ground NH3 concentrations over China, combining the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI satellite NH3 columns and NH3 profiles from an atmospheric chemistry transport model (CTM. The estimated ground NH3 concentrations showed agreement with the variability in annual ground NH3 measurements from the Chinese Nationwide Nitrogen Deposition Monitoring Network (NNDMN. Great spatial heterogeneity of ground NH3 concentrations was found across China, and high ground NH3 concentrations were found in Northern China, Southeastern China, and some areas in Xinjiang Province. The maximum ground NH3 concentrations over China occurred in summer, followed by spring, autumn, and winter seasons, which were in agreement with the seasonal patterns of NH3 emissions in China. This study suggested that a combination of NH3 profiles from CTMs and NH3 columns from satellite obtained reliable ground NH3 concentrations over China.

  2. Addition of oxygen to and distribution of oxides in tantalum alloy T-111 at low concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1975-01-01

    Oxygen was added at 820 and 990 C at an oxygen pressure of about .0003 torr. The technique permitted predetermined and reproducible oxygen doping of the tantalum alloy (T-111). Based on the temperature dependency of the doping reaction, it was concluded that the initial rates of oxygen pickup are probably controlled by solution of oxygen into the T-111 lattice. Although hafnium oxides are more stable than those of tantalum or tungsten, analyses of extracted residues indicate that the tantalum and tungsten oxides predominate in the as-doped specimens, presumably because of the higher concentrations of tantalum and tungsten in the alloy. However, high-temperature annealing promotes gettering of dissolved oxygen and oxygen from other oxides to form hafnium oxides. Small amounts of tantalum and tungsten oxides were still present after high temperature annealing. Tungsten oxide (WO3) volatilizes slightly from the surface of T-111 at 990 C but not at 820 C. The vaporization of WO3 has no apparent effect on the doping reaction.

  3. Linear Active Disturbance Rejection Control of Dissolved Oxygen Concentration Based on Benchmark Simulation Model Number 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs, the dissolved oxygen is the key variable to be controlled in bioreactors. In this paper, linear active disturbance rejection control (LADRC is utilized to track the dissolved oxygen concentration based on benchmark simulation model number 1 (BSM1. Optimal LADRC parameters tuning approach for wastewater treatment processes is obtained by analyzing and simulations on BSM1. Moreover, by analyzing the estimation capacity of linear extended state observer (LESO in the control of dissolved oxygen, the parameter range of LESO is acquired, which is a valuable guidance for parameter tuning in simulation and even in practice. The simulation results show that LADRC can overcome the disturbance existing in the control of wastewater and improve the tracking accuracy of dissolved oxygen. LADRC provides another practical solution to the control of WWTPs.

  4. The oxygen content of ocean bottom waters, the burial efficiency of organic carbon, and the regulation of atmospheric oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, J. N.; Holland, H. D.

    1991-01-01

    Data for the burial efficiency of organic carbon with marine sediments have been compiled for 69 locations. The burial efficiency as here defined is the ratio of the quantity of organic carbon which is ultimately buried to that which reaches the sediment-water interface. As noted previously, the sedimentation rate exerts a dominant influence on the burial efficiency. The logarithm of the burial efficiency is linearly related to the logarithm of the sedimentation rate at low sedimentation rates. At high sedimentation rates the burial efficiency can exceed 50% and becomes nearly independent of the sedimentation rate. The residual of the burial efficiency after the effect of the sedimentation rate has been subtracted is a weak function of the O2 concentration in bottom waters. The scatter is sufficiently large, so that the effect of the O2 concentration in bottom waters on the burial efficiency of organic matter could be either negligible or a minor but significant part of the mechanism that controls the level of O2 in the atmosphere.

  5. Exclusion of oxygen from modified atmosphere packages limits beef rib and lumbar vertebrae marrow discoloration during display and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, R A; Hunt, M C; Hachmeister, K A; Kropf, D H; Johnson, D E

    2005-03-01

    Visual and instrumental color (L*a*b* and reflectance from 400 to 700 nm) were used to evaluate packaging atmosphere as a way of minimizing beef marrow discoloration. In experiment 1, rib ends (n=24) packaged in 80% O(2)/20% CO(2) discolored more than ribs packaged in 100% N(2), which resulted in a relatively stable purplish marrow color through a 7-day display at 1 °C. In experiment 2, lumbar vertebrae (n=10) packaged in 80% O(2)/20% CO(2) had a rapid and significant discoloration within 24 h after packaging, likely because of the formation of methemoglobin. Conversely, vertebrae packaged in 80% N(2)/20% CO(2) and 0.4% CO/30% CO(2)/69.6% N(2) remained color stable during 2 and 6 weeks of storage at 4 °C, respectively. Exclusion of oxygen from MAP packages and the addition of low concentrations of CO minimized beef rib and lumbar vertebrae discoloration compared with high-oxygen MAP.

  6. Analysis of High Frequency Site-Specific Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide at Mace Head, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, M. J.; Harris, E. J.; Olszewski, W.; Ono, S.; Prinn, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) significantly impacts Earth's climate due to its dual role as an inert potent greenhouse gas in the troposphere and as a reactive source of ozone-destroying nitrogen oxides in the stratosphere. However, there remain significant uncertainties in the global budget of this gas. The marked spatial divide in its reactivity means that all stages in the N2O life cycle—emission, transport, and destruction—must be examined to understand the overall effect of N2O on climate. Source and sink processes of N2O lead to varying concentrations of N2O isotopologues (14N14N16O, 14N15N16O, 15N14N16O, and 14N14N18O being measured) due to preferential isotopic production and elimination in different environments. Estimation of source and sink fluxes can be improved by combining isotopically resolved N2O observations with simulations using a chemical transport model with reanalysis meteorology and treatments of isotopic signatures of specific surface sources and stratospheric intrusions. We present the first few months of site-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition data from the Stheno-TILDAS instrument (Harris et al, 2013) at Mace Head, Ireland and compare these to results from MOZART-4 (Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4) chemical transport model runs including N2O isotopic fractionation processes and reanalysis meterological fields (NCEP/NCAR, MERRA, and GEOS-5). This study forms the basis for future inverse modeling experiments that will improve the accuracy of isotopically differentiated N2O emission and loss estimates. Ref: Harris, E., D. Nelson, W. Olszewski, M. Zahniser, K. Potter, B. McManus, A. Whitehill, R. Prinn, and S. Ono, Development of a spectroscopic technique for continuous online monitoring of oxygen and site-specific nitrogen isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrous oxide, Analytical Chemistry, 2013; DOI: 10.1021/ac403606u.

  7. Integrated testing of an electrochemical depolarized CO2 concentrator /EDC/ and a Bosch CO2 reduction subsystem /BRS/. [in spaceborne oxygen reclamation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, F. H.; Clark, D. C.; Quattrone, P. D.

    1976-01-01

    An oxygen reclamation system (ORS) in a spacecraft has the task to revitalize the spacecraft atmosphere by recovering the elementary oxygen from metabolically produced carbon dioxide and water vapor. Life support subsystems which can form such an ORS are an electrochemical depolarized carbon dioxide concentrator (EDC), a Bosch carbon dioxide reduction subsystem (BRS), and an oxygen generation subsystem (OGS). A total recovery of the oxygen from metabolically generated carbon dioxide can be obtained with the aid of system composed of the considered three subsystems. Attention is given to the control concept which assures an integrated operation of the EDC, BRS, and OGS. A description is presented of the test results obtained during 86 days of testing.

  8. Investigation on the improved radiation hardness of silicon detectors with high oxygen concentration

    CERN Document Server

    Moll, Michael; Lindström, G

    2000-01-01

    We present an investigation on the influence of the oxygen concentration on radiation-induced changes in the effective doping concentration of silicon detectors. Diodes fabricated from silicon with interstitial oxygen content ranging from below 2*10/sup 14/ to 9*10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/ have been irradiated with fast neutrons up to a fluence of 2*10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/. Our main interest focused on the so-called stable damage component in the change of the effective doping concentration being of prime importance for the application of silicon detectors in high-energy physics experiments. We demonstrate, that with a high oxygen enrichment the donor removal is appreciably reduced, reaching a value of only 10601130f the initial doping concentration for [O/sub i/]=9*10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/, while for normal detector grade material with [O/sub i/] below 5*10/sup 16/ cm /sup -3/ that value is 60-90Furthermore, we show that the fluence proportional introduction of stable acceptors is independent of the oxygen concentratio...

  9. Dependence of Initial Oxygen Concentration on Ozone Yield Using Inductive Energy Storage System Pulsed Power Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Tomio; Tanaka, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Nobuyuki; Mukaigawa, Seiji; Takaki, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    Dependence of initial oxygen concentration on ozone yield using streamer discharge reactor driven by an inductive energy storage system pulsed power generator is described in this paper. Fast recovery type diodes were employed as semiconductor opening switch to interrupt a circuit current within 100 ns. This rapid current change produced high-voltage short pulse between a secondary energy storage inductor. The repetitive high-voltage short pulse was applied to a 1 mm diameter center wire electrode placed in a cylindrical pulse corona reactor. The streamer discharge successfully occurred between the center wire electrode and an outer cylinder ground electrode of 2 cm inner diameter. The ozone was produced with the streamer discharge and increased with increasing pulse repetition rate. The ozone yield changed in proportion to initial oxygen concentration contained in the injected gas mixture at 800 ns forward pumping time of the current. However, the decrease of the ozone yield by decreasing oxygen concentration in the gas mixture at 180 ns forward pumping time of the current was lower than the decrease at 800 ns forward pumping time of the current. This dependence of the initial oxygen concentration on ozone yield at 180 ns forward pumping time is similar to that of dielectric barrier discharge reactor.

  10. The Relationship between Mollusks and Oxygen Concentrations in Todos Santos Bay, Baja California, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gabriel Kuk-Dzul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the relationship between mollusks, physicochemical properties of seawater, and sediments under natural conditions of low impact. Thirty-nine stations were sampled in October 1994 using a Van Veen grab (0.1 m−2. Temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen (DO concentrations of bottom water were obtained with a CTD. Organic matter content and sediment grain analysis were determined. A total of 836 mollusks were collected. Gastropoda was the most abundant (52% and diverse class with 27 genera, followed by Bivalvia with eight genera and Scaphopoda with only one genus. According to CCA analysis, dominant mollusks were significantly related with high DO concentrations. Donax, Natica, Acteocina, Bulla, Anachis, Odostomia, and Crucibulum can be classified as sensitive genera because they were found mainly in high oxygen concentrations (3.1–5.6 mL L−1; on the other hand, Cardiomya, Nuculana, Laevicardium, Chione, Truncatella, and Dentalium can be classified as tolerant genera (1.0–5.6 mL L−1. Todos Santos Bay hosts a diverse malacological fauna (36 genera; our results show that the dominant genera were mainly related to high dissolved oxygen concentrations. Mollusks can be a useful tool in environmental monitoring programs related with oxygen depletion in coastal areas.

  11. High-concentration oxygen and surgical site infections in abdominal surgery: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunil V; Coughlin, Shaun C; Malthaner, Richard A

    2013-08-01

    There has been recent interest in using high-concentration oxygen to prevent surgical site infections (SSIs). Previous meta-analyses in this area have produced conflicting results. With the publication of 2 new randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that were not included in previous meta-analyses, an updated review is warranted. Our objective was to perform a meta-analysis on RCTs comparing high- and low- concentration oxygen in adults undergoing open abdominal surgery. We completed independent literature reviews using electronic databases, bibliographies and other sources of grey literature to identify relevant studies. We assessed the overall quality of evidence using grade guidelines. Statistical analysis was performed on pooled data from included studies. A priori subgroup analyses were planned to explain statistical and clinical heterogeneity. Overall, 6 studies involving a total of 2585 patients met the inclusion criteria. There was no evidence of a reduction in SSIs with high-concentration oxygen (risk ratio 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.50-1.19, p = 0.24). We observed substantial heterogeneity among studies. There is moderate evidence that high-concentration oxygen does not reduce SSIs in adults undergoing open abdominal surgery.

  12. Feed intake, growth and metabolism of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in relation to dissolved oxygen concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran-Duy, A.; Dam, van A.A.; Schrama, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine, for Nile tilapia of different body weights and fed to satiation, (1) the incipient dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration at which feed intake starts to level off and (2) the effect of DO on nitrogen and energy balances. Two successive experiments

  13. Mathematical modeling of MSW combustion and SNCR in a full-scale municipal incinerator and effects of grate speed and oxygen-enriched atmospheres on operating conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zengying; Ma, Xiaoqian

    2010-12-01

    The rising popularity of incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) calls for detailed mathematical modeling and accurate prediction of pollutant emissions. In this paper, mathematical modeling methods for both solid and gaseous phases were employed to simulate the operation of a 450 t/d MSW-burning incinerator to obtain detailed information on the flow and combustion characteristics in the furnace and to predict the amount of pollutant emissions. The predicted data were compared to on-site measurements of gas temperature, gas composition and SNCR de-NO(X) system. The major operating conditions considered in this paper were grate speed and oxygen concentration. A suitable grate speed ensures complete waste combustion. The predictions are as follows: volatile release increases with increasing grate speed, and the maximal value is within the range of 700-800 kg/m(2)h; slow grate speeds result in incomplete combustion of fixed carbon; the gas temperature at slow grate speeds is higher due to adequate oxygenation for fixed carbon combustion, and the deviation reaches 200K; NO(X) emission decreases, but CO emission and O(2) concentrations increase, and the deviation is 63%, 34% and 35%, respectively. Oxygen-enriched atmospheres promote the destruction of most pollutants due to the high oxygen partial pressure and temperature. The furnace temperature, NO production and CO emission increase as the oxygen concentration increases, and the deviation of furnace exit temperature, NO and CO concentration is 38.26%, 58.43% and 86.67%, respectively. Finally, oxygen concentration is limited to below 35% to prevent excessive CO and NO(X) emission without compromising plant performance. The current work greatly helps to understand the operating characteristics of large-scale MSW-burning plants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Electron spin resonance microscopic imaging of oxygen concentration in cancer spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Mada; Weiler-Sagie, Michal; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Neufeld, Gera; Neeman, Michal; Blank, Aharon

    2015-07-01

    Oxygen (O2) plays a central role in most living organisms. The concentration of O2 is important in physiology and pathology. Despite the importance of accurate knowledge of the O2 levels, there is very limited capability to measure with high spatial resolution its distribution in millimeter-scale live biological samples. Many of the current oximetric methods, such as oxygen microelectrodes and fluorescence lifetime imaging, are compromised by O2 consumption, sample destruction, invasiveness, and difficulty to calibrate. Here, we present a new method, based on the use of the pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) microimaging technique to obtain a 3D mapping of oxygen concentration in millimeter-scale biological samples. ESR imaging requires the incorporation of a suitable stable and inert paramagnetic spin probe into the desirable object. In this work, we use microcrystals of a paramagnetic spin probe in a new crystallographic packing form (denoted tg-LiNc-BuO). These paramagnetic species interact with paramagnetic oxygen molecules, causing a spectral line broadening that is linearly proportional to the oxygen concentration. Typical ESR results include 4D spatial-spectral images that give an indication about the oxygen concentration in different regions of the sample. This new oximetry microimaging method addresses all the problems mentioned above. It is noninvasive, sensitive to physiological oxygen levels, and easy to calibrate. Furthermore, in principle, it can be used for repetitive measurements without causing cell damage. The tissue model used in this research is spheroids of Human Colorectal carcinoma cell line (HCT-116) with a typical diameter of ∼600 μm. Most studies of the microenvironmental O2 conditions inside such viable spheroids carried out in the past used microelectrodes, which require an invasive puncturing of the spheroid and are also not applicable to 3D O2 imaging. High resolution 3D oxygen maps could make it possible to evaluate the

  15. The sensitivity of the oxygen isotopes of ice core sulfate to changing oxidant concentrations since the preindustrial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofen, E. D.; Alexander, B.; Kunasek, S. A.

    2010-08-01

    Changes in tropospheric oxidant concentrations since preindustrial times have implications for the ozone radiative forcing, lifetimes of reduced trace gases, aerosol formation, and human health but are highly uncertain. Measurements of the triple oxygen isotopes of sulfate in ice cores (described by Δ17OSO4 = δ17O - 0.52 × δ18O) provide one of the few constraints on paleo-oxidants. We use the GEOS-Chem global atmospheric chemical transport model to simulate changes in oxidant concentrations and the Δ17OSO4 between 1850 and 1990 to assess the sensitivity of Δ17OSO4 measurements in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores to changing tropospheric oxidant concentrations. The model indicates a 42% increase in the concentration of global mean tropospheric O3, a 10% decrease in OH, and a 58% increase in H2O2 between the preindustrial and present. Modeled Δ17OSO4 is consistent with measurements from ice core and aerosol samples. Model results indicate that the observed decrease in the Arctic Δ17OSO4 in spite of increasing O3 is due to the combined effects of increased sulfate formation by O2 catalyzed by anthropogenic transition metals and increased cloud water acidity. In Antarctica, the Δ17OSO4 is sensitive to relative changes of oxidant concentrations, but in a nonlinear fashion. Sensitivity studies explore the uncertainties in preindustrial emissions of oxidant precursors.

  16. Effect of Different Silage Storing Conditions on the Oxygen Concentration in the Silo and Fermentation Quality of Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uegaki, Ryuichi; Kawano, Kazuo; Ohsawa, Ryo; Kimura, Toshiyuki; Yamamura, Kohji

    2017-06-21

    We investigated the effects of different silage storing conditions on the oxygen concentration in the silo and fermentation quality of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Forage rice was ensiled in bottles (with or without space at the bottlemouth, with solid or pinhole cap, and with oxygen scavenger, ethanol transpiration agent, oxygen scavenger and ethanol transpiration agent, or no adjuvant) and stored for 57 days. The oxygen concentration decreased with the addition of the oxygen scavenger and increased with that of the ethanol transpiration agent. The oxygen scavenger facilitated silage fermentation and fungus generation, whereas the ethanol transpiration agent suppressed silage fermentation and fungus generation. However, the combined use of the oxygen scavenger and ethanol transpiration agent facilitated silage fermentation and also suppressed fungus generation. Overall, this study revealed the negative effects of oxygen on the internal silo and the positive effects of the combined use of the oxygen scavenger and ethanol transpiration agent on silage fermentation quality.

  17. Startup and oxygen concentration effects in a continuous granular mixed flow autotrophic nitrogen removal reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas, Rodrigo; Guzmán-Fierro, Víctor; Giustinianovich, Elisa; Behar, Jack; Fernández, Katherina; Roeckel, Marlene

    2015-08-01

    The startup and performance of the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process was tested in a continuously fed granular bubble column reactor (BCR) with two different aeration strategies: controlling the oxygen volumetric flow and oxygen concentration. During the startup with the control of oxygen volumetric flow, the air volume was adjusted to 60mL/h and the CANON reactor had volumetric N loadings ranging from 7.35 to 100.90mgN/Ld with 36-71% total nitrogen removal and high instability. In the second stage, the reactor was operated at oxygen concentrations of 0.6, 0.4 and 0.2mg/L. The best condition was 0.2 mgO2/L with a total nitrogen removal of 75.36% with a CANON reactor activity of 0.1149gN/gVVSd and high stability. The feasibility and effectiveness of CANON processes with oxygen control was demonstrated, showing an alternative design tool for efficiently removing nitrogen species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles in oxygen atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, S., E-mail: sfuentes@ucn.c [Departamento de Quimica y Farmacia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile); Zarate, R.A.; Chavez, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Munoz, P. [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile); Ayala, M. [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Espinoza-Gonzalez, R. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Tupper 2069, Santiago (Chile); Leyton, P. [Laboratorio de Fotofisica y Espectroscopia Molecular, Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Av. Brasil 2950, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2010-09-03

    A new synthesis route to obtain high-purity barium titanate, BaTiO{sub 3}, using the sol-gel-hydrothermal reaction of TiCl{sub 4} and a BaCl{sub 2} solution in an oxygen atmosphere has been developed. The synthesized BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles are nearly spherical. Their grain sizes are determined by the reaction temperature, reaching values as low as 50 nm when the particles are synthesized at 200 {sup o}C; interestingly even those particles with the smallest grain sizes displayed a ferroelectric behavior as characterized by a polarization hysteresis loop. The microstructure and composition of the as-synthesized samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS).

  19. Thermoplastic Elastomer Part Color as Function of Temperature Histories and Oxygen Atmosphere During Selective Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummert, C.; Josupeit, S.; Schmid, H.-J.

    2017-11-01

    The influence of selective laser sintering (SLS) parameters on PA12 part properties is well known, but research on other materials is rare. One alternative material is a thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) called PrimePart ST that is more elastic and shows a distinct SLS processing behavior. It undergoes a three-dimensional temperature distribution during the SLS process within the TPE part cake. To examine this further, a temperature measurement system that allows temperature measurements inside the part cake is applied to TPE in the present work. Position-dependent temperature histories are directly correlated with the color and mechanical properties of built parts and are in very good agreement with artificial heat treatment in a furnace. Furthermore, it is clearly shown that the yellowish discoloration of parts in different intensities is not only temperature dependent but also influenced by the residual oxygen content in the process atmosphere. Nevertheless, the discoloration has no influence on the mechanical part properties.

  20. Impact of the Projected Future Sea Ice Concentrations on the Atmospheric Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, J.; Seierstad, I.

    2007-12-01

    The observed decline of Arctic sea ice cover and the projected future reduction raise the question of how reduced Artic sea ice will influence/feed back on the climate. Using the projected future sea ice concentration by the coupled atmosphere ocean sea ice model ECHAM5/MPI, we investigate the impact of the changed sea ice cover on the atmospheric circulation by conducting atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) experiments. We force the AGCM ECHAM5 by the current seasonal cycle of arctic sea ice and the projected future arctic seasonal cycle. The goal of this experiment is to determine the impact of the Artic sea ice reduction - that is projected in the next 100 years - on the atmospheric circulation. We find a significant reduction in storminess. The response to sea ice concentration changes differs strongly even on intraseasonal time scales.

  1. Detection of Molecular Oxygen at Low Concentrations Using Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Pohlkötter

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS. With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules.

  2. Detection of molecular oxygen at low concentrations using quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Köhring, Michael; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules.

  3. The optimal atmospheric CO2 concentration for the growth of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming

    2015-07-20

    This study examined the optimal atmospheric CO2 concentration of the CO2 fertilization effect on the growth of winter wheat with growth chambers where the CO2 concentration was controlled at 400, 600, 800, 1000, and 1200 ppm respectively. I found that initial increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration dramatically enhanced winter wheat growth through the CO2 fertilization effect. However, this CO2 fertilization effect was substantially compromised with further increase in CO2 concentration, demonstrating an optimal CO2 concentration of 889.6, 909.4, and 894.2 ppm for aboveground, belowground, and total biomass, respectively, and 967.8 ppm for leaf photosynthesis. Also, high CO2 concentrations exceeding the optima not only reduced leaf stomatal density, length and conductance, but also changed the spatial distribution pattern of stomata on leaves. In addition, high CO2 concentration also decreased the maximum carboxylation rate (Vc(max)) and the maximum electron transport rate (J(max)) of leaf photosynthesis. However, the high CO2 concentration had little effect on leaf length and plant height. The optimal CO2 fertilization effect found in this study can be used as an indicator in selecting and breeding new wheat strains in adapting to future high atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate change. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  4. Detection of reactive oxygen species supplied into the water bottom by atmospheric non-thermal plasma jet using iodine-starch reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Eto, Wataru; Hamada, Masaki; Wakabayashi, Yasutaka; Abe, Yasufumi; Kihara, Keisuke

    2015-08-01

    The supply of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to a target through liquid by plasma jet should be clarified. In this study, a non-thermal plasma jet was irradiated onto the water surface in atmospheric air, and the ROS reaching the water bottom were detected using a gel reagent with iodine-starch reactions. As a result, two-dimensional ROS distributions were visually obtained at the bottom, and the relative ROS concentration was obtained by absorbance measurement. Oxygen addition to helium led to a higher ROS supply into the bottom than helium plasma jet and ozone exposure. A doughnut-shaped ROS distribution was clearly observed at the bottom under certain conditions. The ROS concentration at the bottom significantly depended on irradiation distance and water layer thickness. It is observed from the results obtained using a liquid reagent that the plasma-jet-induced flow and the mixing effect play an important role in ROS supply into the bottom.

  5. Effect of Oxygen-Reducing Atmospheres on the Safety of Packaged Shelled Brazil Nuts during Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vildes Maria Scussel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the application of oxygen-(O2- reducing atmosphere methods on stored shelled Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K. packs aiming to evaluate the degree of aflatoxin degradation, nuts lipid oxidative stability, fungi control, and hygienic conditions improvement. The methods applied were (a ozone: O3, (b carbon dioxide: CO2, and (c O2 absorber pads with and without vacuum. From all modified atmospheres evaluated, the best performance was obtained with O3, either with or without vacuum. It was the only nut treatment that was able to degrade aflatoxins. None of the spiked (AFLs: 15 μg·kg−1 nut samples O3- treated had aflatoxins detected up to the LC-MS/MS method LOQ (0.36 μg·kg−1 for total AFLs, thus producing safer nuts. Also it kept the fatty acid oxidation indicator—malondialdehyde stable and improved the sensory attributes for consumer acceptance. In addition, the destruction of fungi and yeast was observed since the O3 application (from 1.8×104 cfu/g to NG = no growth. All other treatments stabilized and/or inhibited microorganisms' growth only. By adding CO2 gas also played an important role in the nut quality. Regarding cost, gaseous O3 showed to be of low cost for application in the nut packs.

  6. Effects of oxygen concentration and body weight on maximum feed intake, growth and hematological parameters of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran Duy, A.; Schrama, J.W.; Dam, van A.A.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Feed intake and satiation in fish are regulated by a number of factors, of which dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) is important. Since fish take up oxygen through the limited gill surface area, all processes that need energy, including food processing, depend on their maximum oxygen uptake

  7. Transcript and metabolite profiling of the adaptive response to mild decreases in oxygen concentration in the roots of arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Joost T; Fröhlich, Anja; Ramírez-Aguilar, Santiago J; Schauer, Nicolas; Fernie, Alisdair R; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Clark, Jeremy; Langer, Anke; Geigenberger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen can fall to low concentrations within plant tissues, either because of environmental factors that decrease the external oxygen concentration or because the movement of oxygen through the plant tissues cannot keep pace with the rate of oxygen consumption. Recent studies document that plants can decrease their oxygen consumption in response to relatively small changes in oxygen concentrations to avoid internal anoxia. The molecular mechanisms underlying this response have not been identified yet. The aim of this study was to use transcript and metabolite profiling to investigate the genomic response of arabidopsis roots to a mild decrease in oxygen concentrations. Arabidopsis seedlings were grown on vertical agar plates at 21, 8, 4 and 1 % (v/v) external oxygen for 0.5, 2 and 48 h. Roots were analysed for changes in transcript levels using Affymetrix whole genome DNA microarrays, and for changes in metabolite levels using routine GC-MS based metabolite profiling. Root extension rates were monitored in parallel to investigate adaptive changes in growth. The results show that root growth was inhibited and transcript and metabolite profiles were significantly altered in response to a moderate decrease in oxygen concentrations. Low oxygen leads to a preferential up-regulation of genes that might be important to trigger adaptive responses in the plant. A small but highly specific set of genes is induced very early in response to a moderate decrease in oxygen concentrations. Genes that were down-regulated mainly encoded proteins involved in energy-consuming processes. In line with this, root extension growth was significantly decreased which will ultimately save ATP and decrease oxygen consumption. This was accompanied by a differential regulation of metabolite levels at short- and long-term incubation at low oxygen. The results show that there are adaptive changes in root extension involving large-scale reprogramming of gene expression and metabolism when oxygen

  8. Experimental and Temporal Observations on the Occurrence and Abundance of Pyrogenic PAH Relative to Atmospheric Oxygen Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuneman, P. J.; Uhle, M. E.

    2004-12-01

    The Phanerozoic record of atmospheric O2 is based on a global mass balance of several dynamic geochemical cycles, with error margins reflecting such complexity. The potential for accurately determining the record of atmospheric O2 may significantly improve with the proposed method, which relies on a direct relationship between atmospheric oxygen, fuels, and fire products. The interaction between combustion and atmospheric-oxygen level during biomass burning events is investigated by comparing the occurrence and abundance of pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from experimentally-produced, modern, Triassic, and Carboniferous chars. The combustion process consumes O2 directly from the atmosphere and thermally alters organic matter to produce chars. PAH that develop through combustion, and are preserved within chars, are expected to be more abundant at times of elevated atmospheric O2, which facilitates biomass burning efficiency. To investigate the hypothesized relationship in the geologic record, PAH have been extracted from chars of three periods - modern, Triassic, and Carboniferous - relating to 21%, 15%, and 35% atmospheric O2, respectively (Berner and Canfield, 1989). Surface samples of modern chars that developed in controlled burns set by National Park Service personnel in a mixed conifer-deciduous forest were collected at Zion National Park, Utah. Triassic fusain from Petrified Forest National Park, AZ, and Carboniferous fusain from Joggins Fossil Cliffs, Nova Scotia, were collected from floodplain- and coastal plain-deposited mudstone and sandstone. Target PAH shown to be uniquely pyrogenic include: phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, and benzo(ghi)perylene. The abundance of PAH from modern chars at Zion National Park, Triassic fusain from Petrified Forest National Park, and Carboniferous fusain from Joggins Fossil Cliffs

  9. Effects of oxygen concentration and pressure on Drosophila melanogaster: oxidative stress, mitochondrial activity, and survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Gerardo; Clamer, Martina; Messulam, Elisa; Dare, Cristina; Yang, Zhongjin; Zordan, Mauro; Reggiani, Carlo; Hu, Qinggang; Megighian, Aram

    2015-04-01

    Organisms are known to be equipped with an adaptive plasticity as the phenotype of traits in response to the imposed environmental challenges as they grow and develop. In this study, the effects of extreme changes in oxygen availability and atmospheric pressure on physiological phenotypes of Drosophila melanogaster were investigated to explore adaptation mechanisms. The changes in citrate synthase activity (CSA), lifespan, and behavioral function in different atmospheric conditions were evaluated. In the CAS test, hyperoxia significantly increased CSA; both hypoxia and hyperbaric conditions caused a significant decrease in CSA. In the survivorship test, all changed atmospheric conditions caused a significant reduction in lifespan. The lifespan reduced more after hypoxia exposure than after hyperbaria exposure. In behavioral function test, when mechanical agitation was conducted, bang-sensitive flies showed a stereotypical sequence of initial muscle spasm, paralysis, and recovery. The percentage of individuals that displayed paralysis or seizure was measured on the following day and after 2 weeks from each exposure. The majority of flies showed seizure behavior 15 days after exposure, especially after 3 h of exposure. The percentage of individuals that did not undergo paralysis or seizure and was able to move in the vial, was also tested. The number of flies that moved and raised the higher level of the vial decreased after exposure. Animal's speed decreased significantly 15 days after exposure to extreme environmental conditions. In summary, the alteration of oxygen availability and atmospheric pressure may lead to significant changes in mitochondria mass, lifespan, and behavioral function in D. melanogaster. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Reconstruction of Holocene and LGM atmospheric dust aerosol concentrations from paleoclimatic archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, F.; Kug, J. S.; Park, R. J.; Mahowald, N.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; O'Ishi, R.; Winckler, G.; Takemura, T.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust aerosols affect the global climate by scattering and absorbing solar and thermal radiation, as well as providing micronutrients to primary production regions. Present and past global atmospheric dust concentrations have so far been deduced from model simulations. We present a new estimate of atmospheric dust concentrations and dust aerosol radiative forcing based on measurements of dust deposition in paleoclimate archives (mainly the DIRTMAP 3 dataset). Using a kriging technique, the dust deposition data from terrestrial, marine, and ice core records was interpolated to a global grid for both average Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum climatic conditions. By combining the data with some parameters from dust models we reconstructed Holocene and LGM surface and atmospheric dust concentrations. This new dataset's dust concentrations and radiative forcing is compared to the results from dust model simulations. We show how this new dataset can be used by calculating dust radiative forcing in polar areas. Dust appears to play an important role in the polar amplification phenomenon during dusty times by cooling down the surface and heating the upper atmospheric layers.

  11. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemi, K.; O' Connell, D.; Gans, T. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L. [Synchrotron Soleil, l' Orme des Merisiers, St. Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Booth, J. P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-07-15

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

  12. The variation of atmospheric particulate matter concentration in the suburb areas over Fuzhou city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Weicong; Chen, Ziru; Zhu, Zhipeng; Huang, Shuping; Dong, Jianwen; Ding, Guochang

    2017-05-01

    The atmospheric particulate matter concentration (APMC) and meteorological factor were supervised and analyze the variation and characteristics in Fuzhou National Forest Park. The result showed that: 1) the atmospheric particulate matter concentration is generally low in summer and high in winter, while in spring and autumn, the APMC with different diameters changed between summer and winter. 2) The daily variation of APMC in different seasons has different characteristics; 3) maximum wind speed, average wind speed, air pressure, wet bulb index, thermal index, humidity and temperature were the meteorological factors that affect APMC. Improving the site condition play a positive role on reducing the APMC and enhancing environmental functions.

  13. Long-term simulations of dissolved oxygen concentrations in Lake Trout lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, A.; Boegman, L.; MacKay, M.; Hadley, K.; Paterson, A.; Jeziorski, A.; Nelligan, C.; Smol, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Lake Trout are a rare and valuable natural resource that are threatened by multiple environmental stressors. With the added threat of climate warming, there is growing concern among resource managers that increased thermal stratification will reduce the habitat quality of deep-water Lake Trout lakes through enhanced oxygen depletion. To address this issue, a three-part study is underway, which aims to: analyze sediment cores to understand the past, develop empirical formulae to model the present and apply computational models to forecast the future. This presentation reports on the computational modeling efforts. To this end, a simple dissolved oxygen sub-model has been embedded in the one-dimensional bulk mixed-layer thermodynamic Canadian Small Lake Model (CSLM). This model is currently being incorporated into the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS), the primary land surface component of Environment Canada's global and regional climate modelling systems. The oxygen model was calibrated and validated by hind-casting temperature and dissolved oxygen profiles from two Lake Trout lakes on the Canadian Shield. These data sets include 5 years of high-frequency (10 s to 10 min) data from Eagle Lake and 30 years of bi-weekly data from Harp Lake. Initial results show temperature and dissolved oxygen was predicted with root mean square error climate-change relevant timescales, against dissolved oxygen reconstructions from the sediment cores and predicting future deep-water temperature and dissolved oxygen concentrations in Canadian Lake Trout lakes under future climate change scenarios. This model will provide a useful tool for managers to ensure sustainable fishery resources for future generations.

  14. Temperature, DOC level and basin interactions explain the declining oxygen concentrations in the Bothnian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgren, Joakim; Grimvall, Anders; Omstedt, Anders; Rolff, Carl; Wikner, Johan

    2017-06-01

    Hypoxia and oxygen deficient zones are expanding worldwide. To properly manage this deterioration of the marine environment, it is important to identify the causes of oxygen declines and the influence of anthropogenic activities. Here, we provide a study aiming to explain the declining oxygen levels in the deep waters of the Bothnian Sea over the past 20 years by investigating data from environmental monitoring programmes. The observed decline in oxygen concentrations in deep waters was found to be primarily a consequence of water temperature increase and partly caused by an increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the seawater (R2Adj. = 0.83) as well as inflow from the adjacent sea basin. As none of the tested eutrophication-related predictors were significant according to a stepwise multiple regression, a regional increase in nutrient inputs to the area is unlikely to explain a significant portion of the oxygen decline. Based on the findings of this study, preventing the development of anoxia in the deep water of the Bothnian Sea is dependent on the large-scale measures taken to reduce climate change. In addition, the reduction of the nutrient load to the Baltic Proper is required to counteract the development of hypoxic and phosphate-rich water in the Baltic Proper, which can form deep water in the Bothnian Sea. The relative importance of these sources to oxygen consumption is difficult to determine from the available data, but the results clearly demonstrate the importance of climate related factors such as temperature, DOC and inflow from adjacent basins for the oxygen status of the sea.

  15. Increasing atmospheric humidity and CO2 concentration alleviate forest hydraulic failure risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Parolari, A.; Kumar, M.; Porporato, A. M.; Katul, G. G.

    2016-12-01

    Climate-induced forest mortality is being observed throughout the globe and has the potential to alter ecosystem services provided by forests. Recent studies suggest that forest mortality is expected to be exacerbated under climate change due to intensified water and heat stress. While few dispute the claim that the compound effect of reduced soil water and increased heat stress increases the probability of forest mortality, impacts of other aspects of climate change have not been explored. Specifically, the impacts of concurrent changes in atmospheric humidity and atmospheric CO2 concentration, which may influence stomatal kinetics in ways that allow plants to operate despite reduced plant hydraulic capacity, remain unaddressed. Here, the risk of hydraulic failure (HFR), one of the key factors contributing to forest mortality is investigated by setting up a dynamic soil-plant-atmospheric model. The coupled and isolated responses of HFR to changes in precipitation amount and seasonality, air temperature, atmospheric humidity, and atmospheric CO2 concentration are analyzed. By incorporating CMIP5 climate projections, the synthetic future responses of HFR for 13 forest biomes across the globe are examined. The results indicate that while HFR is predicted to increase under shifting precipitation patterns and elevated air temperature, the increasing risks may be partly compensated by increases in atmospheric humidity and CO2 concentration. The alleviating effects are likely to be more significant for broadleaf forests than those for needleleaf forests. Our findings suggest that contributions of atmospheric humidity and CO2 concentration on HFR, independently of other effects such as seed production, germination, spread, disease outbreak, and resource competition at the community level, may lead to lower risks of forest mortality than previously thought.

  16. Using sulfate oxygen isotopes to quantify sulfate formation pathways in the atmosphere: Lessons learned and open questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, B.

    2012-12-01

    The abundance of sulfate aerosol in the troposphere has implications for climate, air pollution, acid rain, and pH-dependent chemical reactions. The chemical formation mechanism of sulfate aerosol influences its abundance and its number and size distribution, with implications for both its direct and indirect climate impacts. Sulfate is mainly produced within the atmosphere by oxidation of its precursor, SO2. The oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O = δ17O - 0.52 x δ18O) of sulfate (Δ17O(SO42-)) reflects the relative importance of different oxidants in the production of sulfate because the oxidants transfer unique oxygen isotope signatures to the oxidation product. Unlike δ18O, processes such as emissions, transport, and deposition do not directly impact the Δ17O value of sulfate. Comparison of observed and modeled Δ17O(SO42-) thus provides a unique means to assess a model's representation of the chemistry of sulfate formation. Large-scale models tend to produce reasonable agreement with observations of sulfate concentrations, but tend to overestimate observations of SO2. These models include gas-phase oxidation of SO2 by the hydroxyl radical, and in-cloud oxidation by hydrogen peroxide and ozone, while neglecting other, potentially important oxidation pathways. Comparison of modeled and observed Δ17O(SO42-) in the Arctic have shown that metal-catalyzed oxidation of SO2 in clouds is the dominant sulfate formation pathway in the northern mid- to high-latitudes during winter. Additional comparisons of modeled and observed Δ17O(SO42-) in the marine boundary layer (MBL) have enabled quantification of the role of sea salt aerosol for sulfate formation rates. These processes tend to increase sulfate formation rates while decreasing modeled concentrations of SO2, and tend to decrease the importance of sulfate formation in the gas-phase which is a prerequisite for new particle formation in the atmosphere. Halogen-containing oxidants such as HOBr have also been

  17. Effect of wind speed and relative humidity on atmospheric dust concentrations in semi-arid climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csavina, Janae; Field, Jason; Félix, Omar; Corral-Avitia, Alba Y; Sáez, A Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A

    2014-07-15

    Atmospheric particulate have deleterious impacts on human health. Predicting dust and aerosol emission and transport would be helpful to reduce harmful impacts but, despite numerous studies, prediction of dust events and contaminant transport in dust remains challenging. In this work, we show that relative humidity and wind speed are both determinants in atmospheric dust concentration. Observations of atmospheric dust concentrations in Green Valley, AZ, USA, and Juárez, Chihuahua, México, show that PM10 concentrations are not directly correlated with wind speed or relative humidity separately. However, selecting the data for high wind speeds (>4m/s at 10 m elevation), a definite trend is observed between dust concentration and relative humidity: dust concentration increases with relative humidity, reaching a maximum around 25% and it subsequently decreases with relative humidity. Models for dust storm forecasting may be improved by utilizing atmospheric humidity and wind speed as main drivers for dust generation and transport. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Diurnal and seasonal variations of surface atmospheric CO2 concentration in the river estuarine marsh].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin-Hai; Tong, Chuan; Zeng, Cong-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    Characteristics of diurnal and seasonal variations of surface atmospheric CO2 concentration were analyzed in the Minjiang River estuarine marsh from December 2011 to November 2012. The results revealed that both the diurnal and seasonal variation of surface atmospheric CO2 concentration showed single-peak patterns, with the valley in the daytime and the peak value at night for the diurnal variations, and the maxima in winter and minima in summer for the seasonal variation. Diurnal amplitude of CO2 concentration varied from 16.96 micromol x mol(-1) to 38.30 micromol x mol(-1). The seasonal averages of CO2 concentration in spring, summer, autumn and winter were (353.74 +/- 18.35), (327.28 +/- 8.58), (354.78 +/- 14.76) and (392.82 +/- 9.71) micromol x mol(-1), respectively, and the annual mean CO2 concentration was (357.16 +/- 26.89) micromol x mol(-1). The diurnal CO2 concentration of surface atmospheric was strongly negatively correlated with temperature, wind speed, photosynthetically active radiation and total solar radiation (P < 0.05). The diurnal concentration of CO2 was negatively related with tidal level in January, but significantly positively related in July.

  19. Detection of Molecular Oxygen at Low Concentrations Using Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Pohlkötter; Michael Köhring; Ulrike Willer; Wolfgang Schade

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sa...

  20. The physiological response of the marine platyhelminth Macrostomum lignano to different environmental oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Ingraham, G A; Bickmeyer, U; Abele, D

    2013-07-15

    The respiration rate of meiofauna is difficult to measure, and the response to variations in the environmental oxygen concentration has so far been mainly addressed through behavioral investigation. We investigated the effect of different oxygen concentrations on the physiology of the marine platyhelminth Macrostomum lignano. Respiration was measured using batches of 20 animals in a glass microtiter plate equipped with optical oxygen sensor spots. At higher oxygen saturations (>12 kPa), the animals showed a clear oxyconforming behavior. However, below this value, the flatworms kept respiration rates constant at 0.064±0.001 nmol O2 l(-1) h(-1) individual(-1) down to 3 kPa PO2, and this rate was increased by 30% in animals that were reoxygenated after enduring a period of 1.5 h in anoxia. Physiological changes related to tissue oxygenation were assessed using live imaging techniques with different fluorophores in animals maintained in normoxic (21 kPa), hyperoxic (40 kPa) or near-anoxic (~0 kPa) conditions and subjected to anoxia-reoxygenation. The pH-sensitive dyes Ageladine-A and BCECF both indicated that pHi under near-anoxia increases by about 0.07-0.10 units. Mitochondrial membrane potential, Δψm, was higher in anoxic and hyperoxic than in normoxic conditions (JC1 dye data). Staining with ROS-sensitive dyes - DHE for detection of superoxide anion (O2•(-)) formation and C-H DFFDA for other ROS species aside from O2•(-) (H2O2, HOO• and ONOO) - showed increased ROS formation following anoxia-reoxygenation treatment. Animals exposed to hyperoxic, normoxic and anoxic treatments displayed no significant differences in O2•(-) formation, whereas mitochondrial ROS formation as detected by C-H2DFFDA was higher after hyperoxic exposure and lowest under near-anoxia conditions compared with the normoxic control group. Macrostomum lignano seems to be a species that is tolerant of a wide range of oxygen concentrations (being able to maintain aerobic metabolism from

  1. A new method combining soil oxygen concentration measurements with the quantification of gross nitrogen turnover rates and associated formation of N2O and N2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gütlein, Adrian; Dannenmann, Michael; Sörgel, Christoph; Meier, Rudi; Meyer, Astrid; Kiese, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Climate change and the expansion of land use have led to significant changes in terrestrial ecosystems. These include changes in the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen and therewith implications for biodiversity, water cycle and pedosphere-atmosphere exchange. To understand these impacts detailed research on nitrogen turnover and fluxes are conducted at various (semi-) natural and managed ecosystems in the Mt. Kilimanjaro region. In this context, we execute 15N tracing analyses on soil samples in our stable isotope laboratory including a new experimental setup. The soils were sampled from different forest ecosystems of Mt. Kilimanjaro varying in altitude (1600 - 4500 m) and will be analyzed for gross rates of ammonification and nitrification, gross rates of microbial inorganic N uptake as well as for the gaseous losses of ^15N2 and ^15N2O using ^15NH4+ and ^15NO3- tracing and pool dilution approaches. Since nitrogen turnover of nitrification and denitrification is dependent on soil oxygen concentrations we developed an incubation method which allows to adjust soil samples to different oxygen concentrations. For this purpose, soil is incubated in glass bottles with side tubes to ensure a constant gas flow over the whole incubation time. To adjust the oxygen levels in the laboratory experiment as close as possible to the natural conditions, we started to monitor soil oxygen concentrations with a FirestingO2 Sensor (Pyroscience) connected to a timer and a datalogger (MSR 145 IP 60 E3333) at a Mt. Kilimanjaro rainforest site. The equipment is complemented with soil temperature, moisture and pressure sensors (MSR 145 IP 60). A solar panel connected to an energy source guarantees a working time for over 2 years by a measuring frequency of 20 seconds each 30 minutes. The new laboratory incubation method together with in-situ oxygen concentration measurements in soils will facilitate laboratory incubations with realistic oxygen concentrations and thus will allow for a better

  2. Water cycle dynamic increases resilience of vegetation under higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemordant, L. A.; Gentine, P.; Stéfanon, M.; Drobinski, P. J.; Fatichi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plant stomata couple the energy, water and carbon cycles. Photosynthesis requires stomata to open to take up carbon dioxide. In the process water vapor is released as transpiration. As atmospheric CO2 concentration rises, for the same amount of CO2 uptake, less water vapor is transpired, translating into higher water use efficiency. Reduced water vapor losses will increase soil water storage if the leaf area coverage remains similar. This will in turn alter the surface energy partitioning: more heat will be dissipated as sensible heat flux, resulting in possibly higher surface temperatures. In contrast with this common hypothesis, our study shows that the water saved during the growing season by increased WUE can be mobilized by the vegetation and help reduce the maximum temperature of mid-latitude heat waves. The large scale meteorological conditions of 2003 are the basis of four regional model simulations coupling an atmospheric model to a surface model. We performed two simulations with respectively 2003 (CTL) and 2100 (FUT) atmospheric CO2 applied to both the atmospheric and surface models. A third (RAD) and a fourth (FER) simulations are run with 2100 CO2 concentration applied to respectively the atmospheric model only and the surface model only. RAD investigates the impact of the radiative forcing, and FER the response to vegetation CO2 fertilization. Our results show that the water saved through higher water use efficiency during the growing season enabled by higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations helps the vegetation to cope during severe heat and dryness conditions in the summer of mid-latitude climate. These results demonstrate that consideration of the vegetation carbon cycle is essential to model the seasonal water cycle dynamic and land-atmosphere interactions, and enhance the accuracy of the model outputs especially for extreme events. They also have important implications for the future of agriculture, water resources management, ecosystems

  3. Tracing the Impact of Aviation on the Atmospheric Nitrate With Oxygen Triple Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, R.; Jackson, T. L.; Chan, S.; Hill, A.; Chakraborty, S.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    The aviation industry is responsible for ~ 5% of anthropogenic climate change. Jet emission affects ~ in 25 mile radii from airports produce fine particles and concomitant pulmonary and cardio-vascular diseases. These unregulated emissions are of particular concerns for the health of local residents and environment in general due to rapid increase in worldwide air travel in 21st century. The accurate measurement of emissions from airports therefore requires development of new tools that quantification of aviation related emissions against other road traffic and hence to assess its local and global impacts and provide deeper understanding of nitrate in the environment in general, including the stratosphere where contrails are inadequately detailed Triple oxygen isotopic analysis of particulate nitrate from a DC 8 engine during a controlled experiment in Palmdale, CA documented the emission of nitric acid (~31 ng.m-3) at ~ 1m. The oxygen triple isotopic composition of nitrate emitted directly from the jet had δ18O values (22±1‰) identical to air O2 (δ18O = 23.5‰) with a mass dependent isotopic signature (Δ17O = 0), thus providing a unique isotopic signature of jet nitrate. A year long sampling campaign at one of the world's busiest airports, the Los Angeles International airport showed the contribution of NO3 varies from 60 to 90% in summer and winter with variations largely attributed to the change in road traffic as air traffic remains fairly constant throughout the year at LAX. The next step in this is to detect these contributions at distal sites and use this as a signal carrier of atmospheric nitrate and its transport in general in the global biogeochemical system. These aspects will be discussed in the presentation.

  4. Effect of low oxygen concentrations on trophoblast-like cell line invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lash, G E; Hornbuckle, J; Brunt, A; Kirkley, M; Searle, R F; Robson, S C; Bulmer, J N

    2007-01-01

    The applicability of trophoblast-like cell lines to the study of trophoblast function has been widely debated. The present study investigated the effect of oxygen on the invasiveness, apoptosis, proliferation and secreted proteases of four different trophoblast cell lines; HTR-8/SVneo, SGHPL-4, JEG3 and JAR. All experiments were performed at 20% and 3% oxygen for 24, 48 and 72h. Immunostaining for integrins alpha1, alpha6 and beta3, cytokeratin 7 and HLA-G was used to determine the phenotype of the different cell lines. Invasion was assessed using the Matrigel invasion assay. Immunostaining for M30 and Ki67 determined levels of apoptosis and proliferation, respectively. Gelatin and casein/plasminogen zymography were performed on conditioned media to determine levels of secreted matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and MMP9 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), respectively. None of the cell lines immunostained for all markers normally expressed by extravillous trophoblast cells. Invasiveness of HTR-8/SVneo and JEG3 cells cultured in 3% oxygen was increased after 24h but was inhibited by 72h in culture. Invasion of SGHPL-4 cells was inhibited after culture in 3% oxygen for 24h. Invasion by JAR cells was not affected by changes in oxygen concentration. The different cell lines also displayed different responses to culture period in 3% oxygen with respect to apoptosis, proliferation and secreted proteases. Care should be taken before results obtained using cell lines as a model for EVT are extrapolated to extravillous trophoblast cell behaviour in vivo.

  5. Rising global atmospheric CO2 concentration and implications for crop productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is incontestable evidence that the concentration of atmospheric CO2 is increasing. Regardless of the potential impact of this increase on climate change, CO2 will have a direct effect on plants since it is a primary input for growth. Herein, we discuss relative CO2 responses of C3 and C4 plant...

  6. Estimating Terrestrial Wood Biomass from Observed Concentrations of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, K. M.; Peters, W.; Carvalhais, N.; van der Werf, G.; Miller, J.

    2008-01-01

    We estimate terrestrial disequilibrium state and wood biomass from observed concentrations of atmospheric CO2 using the CarbonTracker system coupled to the SiBCASA biophysical model. Starting with a priori estimates of carbon flux from the land, ocean, and fossil fuels, CarbonTracker estimates net

  7. Future atmospheric CO2 concentration and environmental consequences for the feed market: a consequential LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxe, Henrik; Hamelin, Lorie; Hinrichsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    With the rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration [CO2], crops will assimilate more carbon. This will increase yields in terms of carbohydrates but dilute the content of protein and minerals in crops. This consequential life cycle assessment study modelled the environmental consequences...

  8. Rising atmospheric CO2 lowers food zinc, iron, and protein concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary deficiencies of zinc and iron are a major global public health problem. Most people who experience these deficiencies depend on agricultural crops for zinc and iron. In this context, the influence of rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 on the availability of these nutrients from crops i...

  9. An approach for verifying biogenic greenhouse gas emissions inventories with atmospheric CO2 concentration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen M Ogle; Kenneth Davis; Thomas Lauvaux; Andrew Schuh; Dan Cooley; Tristram O West; Linda S Heath; Natasha L Miles; Scott Richardson; F Jay Breidt; James E Smith; Jessica L McCarty; Kevin R Gurney; Pieter Tans; A Scott. Denning

    2015-01-01

    Verifying national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories is a critical step to ensure that reported emissions data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are accurate and representative of a country's contribution to GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Furthermore, verifying biogenic fluxes provides a check on estimated...

  10. Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in the Atmosphere of Underground Environments as Tracers of Climatic Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonia, P.; di Pietro, R.; Francofonte, V.

    2004-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is often observed in concentrations much higher than in external atmosphere inside underground environments, both of natural (caves) and artificial (galleries) origin. With the aim of evaluating the possible use as a tracer of climatic changes, CO2 static concentrations have been discontinuously monitored since the year 2000 in the atmosphere of the Carburangeli and Santa Ninfa Caves, located in a limestone karst areas near the city of Palermo and in a gypsum karst area in the Belice Valley (Sicily, Italy) respectively. The measurements have been acquired with a portable 0-9999 ppm infrared spectrometer, together with dripping waters rate, air temperature and relative humidity (both continuous and discontinuous measures); free CO2 contents of dripping waters have been determined with titration method. Highest values were recorded in Carburangeli cave, when underground air temperature is colder than external atmosphere: in this case air circulation is blocked and carbon dioxide concentration arises. Very high concentrations of carbon dioxide were recorded also in winter, when hot winds blew from SE. The main source for carbon dioxide has been individuated in the dripping waters, which rate depends on the dynamic of rainfall events. These preliminary data suggests that carbon dioxide concentrations in the underground atmosphere of Carburangeli cave strongly depend on the delicate equilibria between internal and external air temperatures and dripping waters rate, being all these parameters affected by possible climate changes. Atmospheric warming and intensification of rainfalls rate might be traced by variations in the space-time dynamic of carbon dioxide inside the cave.

  11. Relationships between Atmospheric Transport Regimes and PCB Concentrations in the Air at Zeppelin, Spitsbergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubl, Sandy; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2017-09-05

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent hazardous chemicals that are still detected in the atmosphere and other environmental media, although their production has been banned for several decades. At the long-term monitoring site, Zeppelin at Spitsbergen, different PCB congeners have been continuously measured for more than a decade. However, it is not clear what factors determine the seasonal and interannual variability of different (lighter versus heavier) PCB congeners. To investigate the influence of atmospheric transport patterns on PCB-28 and PCB-101 concentrations at Zeppelin, we applied the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART and calculated "footprints" that indicate the potential source regions of air arriving at Zeppelin. By means of a cluster analysis, we assigned groups of similar footprints to different transport regimes and analyzed the PCB concentrations according to the transport regimes. The concentrations of both PCB congeners are affected by the different transport regimes. For PCB-101, the origin of air masses from the European continent is primarily related to high concentrations; elevated PCB-101 concentrations in winter can be explained by the high frequency of this transport regime in winter, whereas PCB-101 concentrations are low when air is arriving from the oceans. For PCB-28, in contrast, concentrations are high during summer when air is mainly arriving from the oceans but low when air is arriving from the continents. The most likely explanation of this finding is that local emissions of PCB-28 mask the effect of long-range transport and determine the concentrations measured at Zeppelin.

  12. The oxic degradation of sedimentary organic matter 1400 Ma constrains atmospheric oxygen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuichang; Wang, Xiaomei; Wang, Huajian

    2017-01-01

    speciation consistent with an oxygenated depositional setting. Altogether, unit 1 displays alternations between oxic and anoxic depositional environments, driving differences in carbon preservation consistent with observations from the modern ocean. We combined our TOC and HI results to calculate......We studied sediments from the ca. 1400 million-year-old Xiamaling Formation from the North China block. The upper unit of this formation (unit 1) deposited mostly below storm wave base and contains alternating black and green-gray shales with very distinct geochemical characteristics. The black...... shales are enriched in redox-sensitive trace metals, have high concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC), high hydrogen index (HI) and iron speciation indicating deposition under anoxic conditions. In contrast, the green-gray shales show no trace metal enrichments, have low TOC, low HI and iron...

  13. An atmospheric-pressure cold plasma leads to apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by accumulating intracellular reactive oxygen species and calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, R. N.; Feng, H. Q.; Liang, Y. D.; Zhang, Q.; Tian, Y.; Su, B.; Zhang, J.; Fang, J.

    2013-07-01

    A non-thermal plasma is known to induce apoptosis of various cells but the mechanism is not yet clear. A eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiaewas used to investigate the cellular and biochemical regulations of cell apoptosis and cell cycle after an atmospheric-pressure cold plasma treatment. More importantly, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) was first involved in monitoring the process of plasma-induced apoptosis in this study. We analysed the cell apoptosis and cell cycle by flow cytometry and observed the changes in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca2+ concentration, cell mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) as well as nuclear DNA morphology via fluorescence staining assay. All experimental results indicated that plasma-generated ROS leads to the accumulation of intracellular ROS and Ca2+ that ultimately contribute to apoptosis associated with cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through depolarization of Δψm and fragmenting nuclear DNA. This work provides a novel insight into the physical and biological mechanism of apoptosis induced by a plasma which could benefit for promoting the development of plasmas applied to cancer therapy.

  14. Were kinetics of Archean calcium carbonate precipitation related to oxygen concentration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, D. Y.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Archean carbonates commonly contain decimetre- to metre-thick beds consisting entirely of fibrous calcite and neomorphosed fibrous aragonite that precipitated in situ on the sea floor. The fact that such thick accumulations of precipitated carbonate are rare in younger marine carbonates suggests an important change in the modes of calcium carbonate precipitation through time. Kinetics of carbonate precipitation depend on the concentration of inhibitors to precipitation that reduce crystallization rates and crystal nuclei formation, leading to kinetic maintenance of supersaturated solutions. Inhibitors also affect carbonate textures by limiting micrite precipitation and promoting growth of older carbonate crystals on the sea floor. Fe2+, a strong calcite-precipitation inhibitor, is thought to have been present at relatively high concentrations in Archean seawater because oxygen concentrations were low. The rise in oxygen concentration at 2.2-1.9 Ga led to the removal of Fe2+ from seawater and resulted in a shift from Archean facies, which commonly include precipitated beds, to Proterozoic facies, which contain more micritic sediment and only rare precipitated beds.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical formation in anaerobic broth media exposed to atmospheric oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, J; Nyberg, G; Wrethén, J

    1978-08-01

    Fourteen different broth media were autoclaved under anaerobic conditions and then exposed to atmospheric oxygen. The hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical formation as well as the bactericidal effect of the media were studied. The rate of killing of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius VPI 4330-1 was high in media that rapidly autoxidized and accumulated hydrogen peroxide. In actinomyces broth (BBL), 50% of the cells were killed within 2 min, and in Brewer thioglycolate medium (Difco), 50% were killed within 11 min, whereas more than 50% of the cells survived for more than 2 h in Clausen medium (Oxoid), fluid thioglycolate medium (BBL), and thioglycolate medium without dextrose or indicator (Difco). Only media that contained phosphate and glucose had a tendency to accumulate hydrogen peroxide. A solution of phosphate and glucose autoxidized when it had been heated to 120 degrees C for at least 5 min and when the pH of the solution was higher than 6.5. Transitional metal ions catalyzed the autoxidation, but they were not necessary for the reaction to occur. Of the other substances heated in phosphate buffer, only alpha-hydroxycarbonyl compounds autoxidized with accumulation of hydrogen peroxide. Superoxide dismutase decreased the autoxidation rate of most of the broth media. This indicated that superoxide radicals were generated in these media.

  16. Variations in atmospheric N2O concentration during abrupt climatic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluckiger; Dallenbach; Blunier; Stauffer; Stocker; Raynaud; Barnola

    1999-07-09

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas that is presently increasing at a rate of 0.25 percent per year. Records measured along two ice cores from Summit in Central Greenland provide information about variations in atmospheric N2O concentration in the past. The record covering the past millennium reduces the uncertainty regarding the preindustrial concentration. Records covering the last glacial-interglacial transition and a fast climatic change during the last ice age show that the N2O concentration changed in parallel with fast temperature variations in the Northern Hemisphere. This provides important information about the response of the environment to global climatic changes.

  17. Increasing atmospheric humidity and CO2 concentration alleviate forest mortality risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanlan; Parolari, Anthony J; Kumar, Mukesh; Huang, Cheng-Wei; Katul, Gabriel G; Porporato, Amilcare

    2017-09-12

    Climate-induced forest mortality is being increasingly observed throughout the globe. Alarmingly, it is expected to exacerbate under climate change due to shifting precipitation patterns and rising air temperature. However, the impact of concomitant changes in atmospheric humidity and CO2 concentration through their influence on stomatal kinetics remains a subject of debate and inquiry. By using a dynamic soil-plant-atmosphere model, mortality risks associated with hydraulic failure and stomatal closure for 13 temperate and tropical forest biomes across the globe are analyzed. The mortality risk is evaluated in response to both individual and combined changes in precipitation amounts and their seasonal distribution, mean air temperature, specific humidity, and atmospheric CO2 concentration. Model results show that the risk is predicted to significantly increase due to changes in precipitation and air temperature regime for the period 2050-2069. However, this increase may largely get alleviated by concurrent increases in atmospheric specific humidity and CO2 concentration. The increase in mortality risk is expected to be higher for needleleaf forests than for broadleaf forests, as a result of disparity in hydraulic traits. These findings will facilitate decisions about intervention and management of different forest types under changing climate.

  18. Influence of argon/oxygen atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge treatment on desizing and scouring of poly (vinyl alcohol) on cotton fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shujing; Gao, Zhiqiang; Sun, Jie; Yao, Lan; Qiu, Yiping

    2009-09-01

    The effect of argon/oxygen atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) treatment on desizing and scouring of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) on cotton fabric was studied with respect to the treatment duration of 1, 2, 4 and 6 min. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated that oxygen concentration increased for the plasma treated PVA film. Solubility measurement revealed that plasma treatment increased PVA solubility in hot washing but less effective in cold washing. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the fiber surfaces were as clean as unsized fibers after 6 min treatment followed by hot washing. Wickability analysis indicated that the capillary heights of plasma treated fabrics increased significantly as the plasma treatment duration increased. The results of the yarn tensile strength test showed that the plasma treatment did not have a negative effect on fabric tensile strength.

  19. Tuning the surface oxygen concentration of {111} surrounded ceria nanocrystals for enhanced photocatalytic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Adnan; Chu, Dewei; Kaneti, Yusuf Valentino; Li, Sean

    2015-12-01

    For oxide semiconductors, the morphology, particle size and oxygen vacancies are usually considered as key influential parameters for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants/dyes. It is widely accepted that cation doping not only modifies their phase and microstructures but also introduces variations in oxygen vacancy concentration. Herein, we report the fabrication of sub-10 nm sized pure and indium doped CeO2 nanocrystals (NCs) via a facile, green hydrothermal method for the investigation of photocatalytic activities. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were employed to examine the crystal phase and morphology of the as-prepared nanocrystals. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques were implemented to investigate the presence and variations in oxygen vacancy concentration in un-doped and indium doped CeO2 nanocrystals. The photocatalytic activity results revealed that 10 at% doping is the optimal indium doping level to demonstrate superior dye removal efficiency (~40%) over un-doped and doped CeO2 NCs. Moreover, the 10% In-doped CeO2 nanocrystals expressed excellent cycling stability and superior photocatalytic performance toward other dye pollutants. Finally, on the basis of our findings, a possible photocatalytic mechanism in which indium doping can generate more surface oxygen vacancies in the ceria lattice which delay the electron-hole recombination rates, thus increasing the lifetime of electron-hole separation for enhanced photocatalytic performances was proposed.For oxide semiconductors, the morphology, particle size and oxygen vacancies are usually considered as key influential parameters for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants/dyes. It is widely accepted that cation doping not only modifies their phase and microstructures but also introduces variations in oxygen vacancy concentration. Herein, we report the fabrication of sub-10 nm sized pure and indium doped CeO2 nanocrystals (NCs) via a facile

  20. The effect of dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) on oxygen diffusion and bacterial community structure in moving bed sequencing batch reactor (MBSBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yongfeng; Zhang, Chaosheng; Rong, Hongwei; Zheng, Guilin; Zhao, Limin

    2017-01-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) on simultaneous nitrification and denitrification was studied in a moving bed sequencing batch reactor (MBSBR) by microelectrode measurements and by real-time PCR. In this system, the biofilm grew on polyurethane foam carriers used to treat municipal sewage at five DO concentrations (1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5 and 5.5 mg/L). The results indicated that the MBSBR exhibited good removal of chemical oxygen demand (92.43%) and nitrogen (83.73%) when DO concentration was 2.5 mg/L. Increasing the oxygen concentration in the reactor was inhibitory to denitrification. Microelectrode measurements showed that the thickness of oxygen penetration increased from 1.2 to 2.6 mm when the DO concentration (from 1.5 mg/L to 5.5 mg/L) in the system increased. Oxygen diffusion was not significantly limited by the boundary layer surrounding the carrier and had the largest slope when DO concentration was 2.5 mg/L. The real-time PCR analysis indicated that the amount of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria increased slowly as DO concentration increased. The proportions of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, as a percentage of the total bacteria, were low with average values of 0.063% and 0.67%, respectively. When the DO concentration was 2.5 mg/L, oxygen diffusion was optimal and ensured the optimal bacterial community structure and activity; under these conditions, the MBSBR was efficient for total inorganic nitrogen removal. Changing the DO concentration could alter the aerobic zone and the bacterial community structure in the biofilm, directly influencing the simultaneous nitrification and denitrification activity in MBSBRs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Atmospheric oxidants. [ozone concentration and combustion product aspects in spacecraft design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The ingredients which cause the air pollution are a mixture of oxides of organic matter (mostly nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons) and ozone. Ozone, although considered one of the rare atmospheric gases, needs consideration in spacecraft design because of its chemical reaction (oxidation) with organic materials, especially rubber, which becomes hard and brittle under tension in a few minutes time. At the earth surface, a maximum of 60 parts per hundred million of oxidants composed of nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, sulphur dioxide, sulphur trioxides, peroxides, and ozone can be expected for 72 hours when smog occurs. A table representing distribution of ozone concentration with atmospheric altitude is included.

  2. Development of modified poly(perfluoropropyleneoxide) urethane systems for use in liquid oxygen and in enriched 100 percent oxygen atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, E. S.

    1973-01-01

    This program consisted of two separate though related phases. The initial phase was directed toward improving the mechanical and adhesive properties of the very highly fluorinated-polyurethane resin system derived from the hydroxyl-terminated polyperfluoropropylene oxide and 6-chloro-2,4,5-trifluoro-m-phenylene diisocyanate. Various new curing agents for this system were investigated, with the goal of providing a more thermally stable crosslink (cure) mechanism to provide wider applicability and fuller utilization of the outstanding oxygen resistance of the PFPO system. Complete resistance to liquid- and gaseous-oxygen impact at presures as high as 1035 N/sq cm were attained with the use of the PFPO resin castings. The second corollary phase was directed toward investigating the feasibility and optimization of the allophanate cured, urethane extended polymer derived from hydroxyl-terminated polyperfluoropropyleneoxide and 6-chloro-2,4,5-trifluoro-m-phenylene diisocyanate, as the adhesive system for use in a weld-bond configuration for liquid oxygen tankage. The synthesis and application procedures of the adhesive system to insure liquid oxygen compatibility (under 10 kg-m loading), and the development of procedures and techniques to provide high quality weld-bonded joint configurations were studied.

  3. Frequency-duration analysis of dissolved-oxygen concentrations in two southwestern Wisconsin streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greb, Steven R.; Graczyk, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Historically, dissolved-oxygen (DO) data have been collected in the same manner as other water-quality constituents, typically at infrequent intervals as a grab sample or an instantaneous meter reading. Recent years have seen an increase in continuous water-quality monitoring with electronic dataloggers. This new technique requires new approaches in the statistical analysis of the continuous record. This paper presents an application of frequency-duration analysis to the continuous DO records of a cold and a warm water stream in rural southwestern Wisconsin. This method offers a quick, concise way to summarize large time-series data bases in an easily interpretable manner. Even though the two streams had similar mean DO concentrations, frequency-duration analyses showed distinct differences in their DO-concentration regime. This type of analysis also may be useful in relating DO concentrations to biological effects and in predicting low DO occurrences.

  4. Oxygen dynamics in photosynthetic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savikhin, Sergei; Kihara, Shigeharu

    2008-03-01

    Production of oxygen by oxygenic photosynthetic organisms is expected to raise oxygen concentration within their photosynthetic membranes above normal aerobic values. These raised levels of oxygen may affect function of many proteins within photosynthetic cells. However, experiments on proteins in vitro are usually performed in aerobic (or anaerobic) conditions since the oxygen content of a membrane is not known. Using theory of diffusion and measured oxygen production rates we estimated the excess levels of oxygen in functioning photosynthetic cells. We show that for an individual photosynthetic cell suspended in water oxygen level is essentially the same as that for a non-photosynthetic sell. These data suggest that oxygen protection mechanisms may have evolved after the development of oxygenic photosynthesis in primitive bacteria and was driven by the overall rise of oxygen concentration in the atmosphere. Substantially higher levels of oxygen are estimated to occur in closely packed colonies of photosynthetic bacteria and in green leafs.

  5. An approach for verifying biogenic greenhouse gas emissions inventories with atmospheric CO2 concentration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Stephen M.; Davis, Kenneth; Lauvaux, Thomas; Schuh, Andrew; Cooley, Dan; West, Tristram O.; Heath, Linda S.; Miles, Natasha L.; Richardson, Scott; Breidt, F. Jay; Smith, James E.; McCarty, Jessica L.; Gurney, Kevin R.; Tans, Pieter; Denning, A. Scott

    2015-03-01

    Verifying national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories is a critical step to ensure that reported emissions data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are accurate and representative of a country’s contribution to GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Furthermore, verifying biogenic fluxes provides a check on estimated emissions associated with managing lands for carbon sequestration and other activities, which often have large uncertainties. We report here on the challenges and results associated with a case study using atmospheric measurements of CO2 concentrations and inverse modeling to verify nationally-reported biogenic CO2 emissions. The biogenic CO2 emissions inventory was compiled for the Mid-Continent region of United States based on methods and data used by the US government for reporting to the UNFCCC, along with additional sources and sinks to produce a full carbon balance. The biogenic emissions inventory produced an estimated flux of -408 ± 136 Tg CO2 for the entire study region, which was not statistically different from the biogenic flux of -478 ± 146 Tg CO2 that was estimated using the atmospheric CO2 concentration data. At sub-regional scales, the spatial density of atmospheric observations did not appear sufficient to verify emissions in general. However, a difference between the inventory and inversion results was found in one isolated area of West-central Wisconsin. This part of the region is dominated by forestlands, suggesting that further investigation may be warranted into the forest C stock or harvested wood product data from this portion of the study area. The results suggest that observations of atmospheric CO2 concentration data and inverse modeling could be used to verify biogenic emissions, and provide more confidence in biogenic GHG emissions reporting to the UNFCCC.

  6. Modeling of Nonlinear Dynamics and Synchronized Oscillations of Microbial Populations, Carbon and Oxygen Concentrations, Induced by Root Exudation in the Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molz, F. J.; Faybishenko, B.; Jenkins, E. W.

    2012-12-01

    Mass and energy fluxes within the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum are highly coupled and inherently nonlinear. The main focus of this presentation is to demonstrate the results of numerical modeling of a system of 4 coupled, nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs), which are used to describe the long-term, rhizosphere processes of soil microbial dynamics, including the competition between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and those unable to fix nitrogen, along with substrate concentration (nutrient supply) and oxygen concentration. Modeling results demonstrate the synchronized patterns of temporal oscillations of competing microbial populations, which are affected by carbon and oxygen concentrations. The temporal dynamics and amplitude of the root exudation process serve as a driving force for microbial and geochemical phenomena, and lead to the development of the Gompetzian dynamics, synchronized oscillations, and phase-space attractors of microbial populations and carbon and oxygen concentrations. The nonlinear dynamic analysis of time series concentrations from the solution of the ODEs was used to identify several types of phase-space attractors, which appear to be dependent on the parameters of the exudation function and Monod kinetic parameters. This phase space analysis was conducted by means of assessing the global and local embedding dimensions, correlation time, capacity and correlation dimensions, and Lyapunov exponents of the calculated model variables defining the phase space. Such results can be used for planning experimental and theoretical studies of biogeochemical processes in the fields of plant nutrition, phyto- and bio-remediation, and other ecological areas.

  7. Effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen at 1.25 Atmospheres Absolute with Normal Air on Macrophage Number and Infiltration during Rat Skeletal Muscle Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Naoto; Ono, Miharu; Tomioka, Tomoka; Deie, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Use of mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute (2026.54 hPa) with normal air is emerging as a common complementary treatment for severe muscle injury. Although hyperbaric oxygen at over 2 atmospheres absolute with 100% O2 promotes healing of skeletal muscle injury, it is not clear whether mild hyperbaric oxygen is equally effective. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute (1266.59 hPa) with normal air on ...

  8. The Paleoproterozoic Snowball as the Trigger for Atmospheric Oxygen and the Evolution of Eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschvink, J. L.

    2001-05-01

    Major biological innovations follow the intense glaciations in both Paleoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic time. However, it has been difficult to identify a specific mechanism that would foster biological innovation. Reduction in ocean-to-atmosphere exchange, and blocking the ocean from sunlight, will lead to a severe collapse in biological productivity and ecospace, but it is not clear how that alone would stimulate major evolutionary innovation. In our study of the Palaeoproterozoic Snowball episode (2.3-2.4 Byr) in the Transvaal Supergroup of Southern Africa (Kirschvink et al. PNAS 97:1400-1405, 2000), we noticed that the post-snowball sedimentary package of the Hotazel Formation contained the world's largest deposit of BIF-associated sedimentary manganese ore, nearly 80% of the world's economic reserves. Similar but smaller deposits are also found associated with Neoproterozoic banded iron stones associated with low-latitude glaciation (Kirschvink, 1992). The stratigraphic context of these deposits implies deposition from large, open bodies of water in a shallow continental shelf environment. In turn, this demands that the manganese was initially in the soluble Mn+2 form and was oxidized subsequently to the insoluble Mn+4 form, followed by partial re-reduction to a variety of mixed-valence manganese minerals. Electrochemically, this oxidation could only have been accomplished by the reduction of either nitrate or molecular oxygen, but because nitrate formation requires oxygen, large amounts of free O2 must have been available. The cyanobacterial photosystem II which releases O2 must therefore have been in full operation immediately after melting of the Paleoproterozoic Snowball. Although biochemical markers of cyanobacteria extend to earlier times, we know of no earlier constraint on the existence of photosystem II. The wide-spread existence of detrital pyrite, uraninite, and reducing paleosols in stratigraphically older sediments suggests that the

  9. Response of export production and dissolved oxygen concentrations in oxygen minimum zones to pCO2 and temperature stabilization scenarios in the biogeochemical model HAMOCC 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Teresa; Heinze, Christoph; Hughlett, Taylor; Winguth, Arne M. E.

    2017-02-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the ocean is an important component of marine biogeochemical cycles and will be greatly altered as climate change persists. In this study a global oceanic carbon cycle model (HAMOCC 2.0) is used to address how mechanisms of oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) expansion respond to changes in CO2 radiative forcing. Atmospheric pCO2 is increased at a rate of 1 % annually and the model is stabilized at 2 ×, 4 ×, 6 ×, and 8 × preindustrial pCO2 levels. With an increase in CO2 radiative forcing, the OMZ in the Pacific Ocean is controlled largely by changes in particulate organic carbon (POC) export, resulting in increased remineralization and thus expanding the OMZs within the tropical Pacific Ocean. A potential decline in primary producers in the future as a result of environmental stress due to ocean warming and acidification could lead to a substantial reduction in POC export production, vertical POC flux, and thus increased DO concentration particularly in the Pacific Ocean at a depth of 600-800 m. In contrast, the vertical expansion of the OMZs within the Atlantic is linked to increases POC flux as well as changes in oxygen solubility with increasing seawater temperature. Changes in total organic carbon and increase sea surface temperature (SST) also lead to the formation of a new OMZ in the western subtropical Pacific Ocean. The development of the new OMZ results in dissolved oxygen concentration of ≤ 50 µmol kg-1 throughout the equatorial Pacific Ocean at 4 times preindustrial pCO2. Total ocean volume with dissolved oxygen concentrations of ≤ 50 µmol kg-1 increases by 2.4, 5.0, and 10.5 % for the 2 ×, 4 ×, and 8 × CO2 simulations, respectively.

  10. Effects of polyvinyl chloride overwrap film, high-oxygen modified atmosphere packaging, or ultra-low-oxygen modified atmosphere packaging on bone marrow discoloration in beef humerus, rib, thoracic vertebra, and scapula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobbel, J P; Dikeman, M E; Smith, J S; Kropf, D H; Milliken, G A

    2006-03-01

    Meat retailers have reported bone marrow discoloration to be a problem, especially in modified atmosphere packages (MAP). Therefore, it is important to determine the prevalence and cause(s) of bone marrow discoloration in different beef bones and packaging systems. Thirty-six beef humeri, ribs, scapulas, and thoracic vertebrae from USDA Select and Choice carcasses were obtained from a commercial abattoir, cut into 2.54-cm-thick sections at 4 d postmortem, and packaged into 1 of 3 systems: 1) polyvinyl chloride film (PVC) overwrap; 2) high-oxygen (80% O2, 20% CO2) MAP; and 3) ultra-low-oxygen (70% N2, 30% CO2) MAP. Instrumental reflectance and visual color scores were taken on d 0, 2, and 4, and on d 0 to 4 of display, respectively. Bone marrow was extracted from humeri, ribs, and thoracic vertebrae for analysis but not from scapulas. Ribs, scapulas, and thoracic vertebrae packaged in PVC and high-oxygen MAP developed undesirable gray or black discoloration. In ultra-low-oxygen MAP, mean visual color scores were acceptable throughout the entire display period. Discoloration (darkening) was more extensive for ribs, scapulas, and thoracic vertebrae than for humeri, especially for bones packaged in PVC and high-oxygen MAP. Humeri had lower (P packaged in ultra-low-oxygen MAP and for humeri in PVC and high-oxygen MAP. Humeri marrow had lower (P packaging systems. Myoglobin was undetectable in humeri marrow. The much larger amounts of Fe and hemoglobin in ribs and thoracic vertebrae likely contribute to marrow discoloration. Bone marrow discoloration was distinct in ribs, scapulas, and thoracic vertebrae packaged in PVC or high-oxygen MAP. Bones packaged in ultra-low-oxygen MAP had minimal discoloration.

  11. Plasma ATP concentration and venous oxygen content in the forearm during dynamic handgrip exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askew Christopher D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that adenosine triphosphate (ATP released from red blood cells (RBCs may contribute to the tight coupling between blood flow and oxygen demand in contracting skeletal muscle. To determine whether ATP may contribute to the vasodilatory response to exercise in the forearm, we measured arterialised and venous plasma ATP concentration and venous oxygen content in 10 healthy young males at rest, and at 30 and 180 seconds during dynamic handgrip exercise at 45% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC. Results Venous plasma ATP concentration was elevated above rest after 30 seconds of exercise (P Conclusions Collectively these results indicate that ATP in the plasma originated from the muscle microcirculation, and are consistent with the notion that deoxygenation of the blood perfusing the muscle acts as a stimulus for ATP release. That ATP concentration was elevated just 30 seconds after the onset of exercise also suggests that ATP may be a contributing factor to the blood flow response in the transition from rest to steady state exercise.

  12. Metal concentrations in homing pigeon lung tissue as a biomonitor of atmospheric pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jia; Halbrook, Richard S; Zang, Shuying; Han, Shuang; Li, Xinyu

    2017-12-22

    Atmospheric pollution in urban areas is a major worldwide concern with potential adverse impacts on wildlife and humans. Biomonitoring can provide direct evidence of the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of toxic metals in the environment that is not available with mechanical air monitoring. The current study continues our evaluation of the usefulness of homing pigeon lung tissue as a biomonitor of atmospheric pollution. Homing pigeons (1-2, 5-6, and 9-10+ year old (yo)) collected from Guangzhou during 2015 were necropsied and concentrations of cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg) were measured in lung tissue. Lung Cd and Pb concentrations were significantly greater in 9-10+-year-old pigeons compared with those in other age groups, indicating their bioavailability and bioaccumulation. Lung Pb and Cd concentrations measured in 5-yo pigeons collected from Guangzhou during 2015 were significantly lower than concentrations reported in 5-yo homing pigeons collected from Guangzhou during 2011 and correlated with concentrations measured using mechanical air monitoring. In addition to temporal differences, spatial differences in concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Hg reported in ambient air samples and in pigeon lung tissues collected from Beijing and Guangzhou are discussed.

  13. Catalyst evaluation for oxygen reduction reaction in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jiang, Yiliang; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2018-01-01

    temperatures and hence is not suitable for catalyst evaluation for HT-PEMFCs. In this study, we have designed and constructed a half-cell setup to measure the intrinsic activities of catalysts towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in conditions close to HT-PEMFC cathodes. By optimization...... of the hydrophobic characteristics of electrodes and the catalyst layer thickness, ORR activities of typical Pt/C catalysts are successfully measured in concentrated phosphoric acid at temperatures above 100 °C. In terms of mass-specific activities, the catalyst exhibits about two times higher activity in the half...

  14. An Assessment of the Influence of the Industry Distribution Chain on the Oxygen Levels in Commercial Modified Atmosphere Packaged Cheddar Cheese Using Non-Destructive Oxygen Sensor Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Callaghan, Karen A M; Papkovsky, Dmitri B; Kerry, Joseph P

    2016-06-20

    The establishment and control of oxygen levels in packs of oxygen-sensitive food products such as cheese is imperative in order to maintain product quality over a determined shelf life. Oxygen sensors quantify oxygen concentrations within packaging using a reversible optical measurement process, and this non-destructive nature ensures the entire supply chain can be monitored and can assist in pinpointing negative issues pertaining to product packaging. This study was carried out in a commercial cheese packaging plant and involved the insertion of 768 sensors into 384 flow-wrapped cheese packs (two sensors per pack) that were flushed with 100% carbon dioxide prior to sealing. The cheese blocks were randomly assigned to two different storage groups to assess the effects of package quality, packaging process efficiency, and handling and distribution on package containment. Results demonstrated that oxygen levels increased in both experimental groups examined over the 30-day assessment period. The group subjected to a simulated industrial distribution route and handling procedures of commercial retailed cheese exhibited the highest level of oxygen detected on every day examined and experienced the highest rate of package failure. The study concluded that fluctuating storage conditions, product movement associated with distribution activities, and the possible presence of cheese-derived contaminants such as calcium lactate crystals were chief contributors to package failure.

  15. The Relationship between Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentration and Global Temperature for the Last 425 Million Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jackson Davis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Assessing human impacts on climate and biodiversity requires an understanding of the relationship between the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere and global temperature (T. Here I explore this relationship empirically using comprehensive, recently-compiled databases of stable-isotope proxies from the Phanerozoic Eon (~540 to 0 years before the present and through complementary modeling using the atmospheric absorption/transmittance code MODTRAN. Atmospheric CO2 concentration is correlated weakly but negatively with linearly-detrended T proxies over the last 425 million years. Of 68 correlation coefficients (half non-parametric between CO2 and T proxies encompassing all known major Phanerozoic climate transitions, 77.9% are non-discernible (p > 0.05 and 60.0% of discernible correlations are negative. Marginal radiative forcing (ΔRFCO2, the change in forcing at the top of the troposphere associated with a unit increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration, was computed using MODTRAN. The correlation between ΔRFCO2 and linearly-detrended T across the Phanerozoic Eon is positive and discernible, but only 2.6% of variance in T is attributable to variance in ΔRFCO2. Of 68 correlation coefficients (half non-parametric between ΔRFCO2 and T proxies encompassing all known major Phanerozoic climate transitions, 75.0% are non-discernible and 41.2% of discernible correlations are negative. Spectral analysis, auto- and cross-correlation show that proxies for T, atmospheric CO2 concentration and ΔRFCO2 oscillate across the Phanerozoic, and cycles of CO2 and ΔRFCO2 are antiphasic. A prominent 15 million-year CO2 cycle coincides closely with identified mass extinctions of the past, suggesting a pressing need for research on the relationship between CO2, biodiversity extinction, and related carbon policies. This study demonstrates that changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration did not cause temperature change in the ancient climate.

  16. FiO2 delivered by a turbine portable ventilator with an oxygen concentrator in an Austere environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, Julien; Erwan d'Aranda; Savoie, Pierre-Henry; Montcriol, Ambroise; Goutorbe, Philippe; Kaiser, Eric

    2014-09-01

    Management of critically ill patients in austere environments is a logistic challenge. Availability of oxygen cylinders for the mechanically ventilated patient may be difficult in such a context. A solution is to use a ventilator able to function with an oxygen concentrator. We tested the SeQual Integra™ (SeQual, San Diego, CA) 10-OM oxygen concentrator paired with the Pulmonetic System(®) LTV 1000 ventilator (Pulmonetic Systems, Minneapolis, MN) and evaluated the delivered fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) across a range of minute volumes and combinations of ventilator settings. Two LTV 1000 ventilators were tested. The ventilators were attached to a test lung and FiO2 was measured by a gas analyzer. Continuous-flow oxygen was generated by the OC from 0.5 L/min to 10 L/min and injected into the oxygen inlet port of the LTV 1000. Several combinations of ventilator settings were evaluated to determine the factors affecting the delivered FiO2. The LTV 1000 ventilator is a turbine ventilator that is able to deliver high FiO2 when functioning with an oxygen concentrator. However, modifications of the ventilator settings such as increase in minute ventilation affect delivered FiO2 even if oxygen flow is constant on the oxygen concentrator. The ability of an oxygen concentrator to deliver high FiO2 when used with a turbine ventilator makes this method of oxygen delivery a viable alternative to cylinders in austere environments when used with a turbine ventilator. However, FiO2 has to be monitored continuously because delivered FiO2 decreases when minute ventilation is increased. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Relative effects of climate and source strength on atmospheric lead concentrations in Auckland, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, H. C.; de Freitas, C. R.; Hay, J. E.

    1992-06-01

    Atmospheric lead levels were examined to assess the consequences of the 46 percent reduction in the lead content of premium grade petrol in New Zealand. Since this change was implemented in July 1986 observed levels of atmospheric lead decreased by 38 percent, but all or part of this reduction may have been due to factors other than fluctuations in lead emissions, notably variations in climate. Analysis of detailed atmospheric lead, meteorological and traffic data measured contemporaneously provided insight into the atmospheric processes influencing lead levels in Auckland and formed the basis of a statistical model capable of predicting monthly lead concentrations. The model was used to predict lead levels in Auckland for the period July 1986 through to July 1989 in the absence of any reduction in the lead content of petrol. Comparison with values observed for the same period showed that all of the reduction in atmospheric lead levels since July 1986 can be attributed to the reduction in the lead content of petrol. Policy planning implications of such a finding are considered.

  18. Effect of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration on the protein composition of cereal grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewitz, Stefanie; Hüther, Liane; Manderscheid, Remy; Weigel, Hans-Joachim; Wätzig, Hermann; Dänicke, Sven

    2014-07-16

    The present study investigates effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration on protein composition of maize, wheat, and barley grain, especially on the fractions prolamins and glutelins. Cereals were grown at different atmospheric CO2 concentrations to simulate future climate conditions. Influences of two nitrogen fertilization levels were studied for wheat and barley. Enriched CO2 caused an increase of globulin and B-hordein of barley. In maize, the content of globulin, α-zein, and LMW polymers decreased, whereas total glutelin, zein, δ-zein, and HMW polymers rose. Different N supplies resulted in variations of barley subfractions and wheat globulin. Other environmental influences showed effects on the content of nearly all fractions and subfractions. Variations in starch-protein bodies caused by different CO2 treatments could be visualized by scanning electron microscopy. In conclusion, climate change would have impacts on structural composition of proteins and, consequently, on the nutritional value of cereals.

  19. Analysis of Co, Cr and Mn Concentrations in Atmospheric Dry Deposition in Hamadan City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Shokri Ragheb

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Heavy metals are major pollutants that can spread in the atmosphere with particulate matter and dust and because of the toxic and carcinogenic effects, their meas-urement and control is very important. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess Co, Cr and Mn concentration in the atmospheric dry deposition collected from Hamadan city in 2014. Materials & Methods: After collection of 12 dust samples from 3 sampling stations and their laboratory preparation, metals concentrations were determined using ICP–OES. All statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical package. Results: The results showed that the minimum and maximum mean concentrations of Co were 0.19 and 0.29 mg/kg for high and low traffic intensity sampling stations, respectively. The min and max mean concentrations of Cr were 0.65and 1.02 mg/kg for high traffic intensity and suburb sampling stations, respectively and the min and max mean concentrations of Mn were 7.23and 8.82 mg/kg for high and low traffic intensity sampling stations , respectively. Also comparing the mean concentrations of assessed metals with WHO permissible limits showed a significant difference (P< 0.05. The mean concentrations of metals were signifi-cantly lower than the maximum permissible limits. Conclusion: Although the mean concentrations of Co, Cr and Mn are lower than the standard levels, lack of continuous monitoring of heavy metals concentrations in the dust and particu-late matters in the air can lead to the entrance of various types of toxic pollutants such as heavy metals into the air and result in adverse health effects. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2016; 23 (2:149-156

  20. Evidence in pre-2.2 Ga paleosols for the early evolution of atmospheric oxygen and terrestrial biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmoto, H

    1996-12-01

    The loss of Fe from some pre-2.2 Ga paleosols has been considered by previous investigators as the best evidence for a reduced atmosphere prior to 2.2 Ga. I have examined the behavior of Fe in both pre- and post-2.2 Ga paleosols from depth profiles of Fe3+/Ti, Fe2+/Ti, and sigma Fe/Ti ratios, and Fe3+/Ti vs. Fe2+/Ti plots. This new approach reveals a previously unrecognized history of paleosols. Essentially all paleosols, regardless of age, retain some characteristics of soils formed under an oxic atmosphere, such as increased Fe3+/Ti ratios from their parental rocks. The minimum oxygen pressure (PO2) for the 3.0-2.2 Ga atmosphere is calculated to be about 1.5% of the present atmospheric level, which is the same as that for the post-1.9 Ga atmosphere. The loss of sigma Fe, common in paleosol sections of all ages, was not due to a reducing atmosphere, but to reductive dissolution of ferric hydroxides formed under an oxic atmosphere. This reductive dissolution of ferric hydroxides occurred either (1) after soil formation by hydrothermal fluids or (2) during and/or after soil formation by organic acids generated from the decay of terrestrial organic matter. Terrestrial biomass on the early continents may have been more extensive than previously recognized.

  1. Monitoring of 7Be atmospheric activity concentration using short term measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Papandreou Sotiria M.A.; Savva Marilia I.; Karfopoulos Konstantinos L.; Karangelos Dimitrios J.; Anagnostakis Marios J.; Simopoulos Simos E.

    2011-01-01

    The activity concentration of 7Be in atmospheric aerosol can exhibit seasonal variations due to various physical processes taking place in the troposphere and stratosphere, as well as due to solar activity. An investigation of these variations has been carried out at the Nuclear Engineering Department of the National Technical University of Athens over a two year period (3/2008-4/2010). In the framework of this study, sampling and analysis methods were appropriately selected to allow fo...

  2. The role of sequestration costs with a ceiling on atmospheric carbon concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Rickels, Wilfried

    2011-01-01

    I investigate the optimal role of carbon sequestration for mitigation in the presence of a ceiling on atmospheric carbon concentration and consider aspects that have so far only been analyzed in the context of a damage function to measure the consequences of climate change for society. I assume extraction costs to be stock-dependent, replace the proportional decay description of the global carbon cycle by a two-box model, investigate the differences resulting from linear versus convex sequest...

  3. Temporal variations of concentrations of currently used pesticides in the atmosphere of Strasbourg, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schummer, Claude [Laboratoire des Materiaux, Surfaces et Procedes pour la Catalyse, Equipe de Physico-Chimie de l' Atmosphere (UMR 7515 CNRS-Universite de Strasbourg), 1, rue Blessig, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherche Public, Sante/Laboratoire National de Sante, Universite du Luxembourg, Campus Limpertsberg, 162A, avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Mothiron, Elodie [Laboratoire des Materiaux, Surfaces et Procedes pour la Catalyse, Equipe de Physico-Chimie de l' Atmosphere (UMR 7515 CNRS-Universite de Strasbourg), 1, rue Blessig, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Appenzeller, Brice M.R. [Laboratoire de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherche Public, Sante/Laboratoire National de Sante, Universite du Luxembourg, Campus Limpertsberg, 162A, avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Rizet, Anne-Laure [Laboratoire des Materiaux, Surfaces et Procedes pour la Catalyse, Equipe de Physico-Chimie de l' Atmosphere (UMR 7515 CNRS-Universite de Strasbourg), 1, rue Blessig, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Wennig, Robert [Laboratoire de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherche Public, Sante/Laboratoire National de Sante, Universite du Luxembourg, Campus Limpertsberg, 162A, avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Millet, Maurice, E-mail: millet@illite.u-strasbg.f [Laboratoire des Materiaux, Surfaces et Procedes pour la Catalyse, Equipe de Physico-Chimie de l' Atmosphere (UMR 7515 CNRS-Universite de Strasbourg), 1, rue Blessig, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2010-02-15

    Atmospheric samples have been collected in Strasbourg between April 18 and May 29, 2007 and were analyzed for 71 current-use pesticides, of which 38 were detected. Average concentrations ranged from 0.09 ng m{sup -3} for Fenarimol to 110.42 ng m{sup -3} for Dimethachlor, which was slightly higher than the concentrations reported from other, comparable agricultural regions. Significant temporal variations were observed for 30 pesticides, and for most of them it could be shown that these were linked to time, temperature or atmospheric pressure. In several cases this helped to identify pesticide application just before or at the beginning of the sampling period, or ongoing treatment. Humidity, in contrast to previous reports, could not be linked to these variations. For the other 8 pesticides, only very little temporal variations were observed. Generally, these concentrations were low (less than 1 ng m{sup -3}), and it was assumed that they are not in use in Alsace at present. - The paper describes the temporal variations of current-use pesticides in the atmosphere of Strasbourg during pesticide application.

  4. Multiple oxygen and sulfur isotope compositions of secondary atmospheric sulfate in the city of Wuhan, central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Bao, H.; Zhou, A.; Wang, D.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary atmospheric sulfate (SAS) is the oxidation product and sink for sulfur gases of biological, volcanic, and anthropogenic origins on Earth. SAS can be produced from gas-phase OH-radical oxidation and five aqueous-phase chemical reactions including aqueous-phase S (IV) oxidation reactions by H2O2, O3, oxygen catalyzed by Fe3+ and Mn2+, and methyle hydrogen peroxide and peroxyacetic acid. The tropospheric sulfur oxidation pathway is therefore determined by cloud-water pH, dissolved [Fe2+] or [Mn2+] content, S emission rate, meteorological condition, and other factors. The S isotope composition is a good tracer for the source while the O isotopes, especially the triple O isotope compositions are a good tracer for S oxidation pathway. Jerkins and Bao (2006) provided the first set of multiple stable isotope compositions (δ34S, δ18O and Δ17O) for SAS collected from bulk atmosphere in Baton Rouge in the relatively rural southern USA. Their study revealed a long-tern average Δ17O value of ~+0.7‰ for SAS, and speculated that much of the Earth mid-latitudes may have a similar average SAS Δ17O value. Additional sampling campaign at different sites is necessarily for constructing and testing models on sulfur oxidation and transport in the troposphere. A total of 33 sulfate samples were collected from bulk atmospheric deposition over a 950-day period from May 2009 to December 2011 in the city of Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. Differing from Baton Rouge, Wuhan is an industrial metropolis with a population of 9.8 million and a high particulate matter content (115 μg/m3). It also has a subtropical monsoon climate, with rainwater pH at ~5.3 year-around. The rainwater ion concentrations have seasonal variations, typically low in summer and high in winter. The anions are dominated by SO42-, at an average concentration of 8.5 mg/L. There is little sulfate contribution from sea-salt (SS) sulfate or dusts in Wuhan. The isotopic compositions for bulk atmospheric sulfate

  5. Meltdown and gasification of waste in an oxygen atmosphere; Sauerstoff-Schmelz-Vergasung zur Verwertung von Abfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitsche, R. [MFU Mitteldeutsche Feuerungs- und Umwelttechnik GmbH, Leipzig-Holzhausen (Germany); Mallon, J. [ingitec GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Scheidig, K. [VTI Verfahrenstechnisches Inst. fuer Energie und Umwelt e.V., Saalfeld (Austria)

    2001-06-01

    Meltdown and gasification of waste in an oxygen atmosphere ('2sv' process) is an economically efficient alternative to energetic and thermal utilisation of biomass. Organic pollutants are split at temperatures up to 2000 C in a reducing atmosphere. The process uses elements of the oxygen cupola furnace for melting and gasification of many different waste fractions, e.g. polluted waste wood, household refuse and bulk waste, old tyres, light shredder fractions, sewage sludge, etc. [German] Die Sauerstoff-Schmelz-Vergasung ('2sv') stellt eine wirtschaftliche Alternative zur energetischen Nutzung von Biomassen wie auch zur thermischen Abfallverwertung dar. Organische Schadstoffe werden bei diesem neuen Verfahren bei Temperaturen bis zu 2000 C unter reduzierenden Bedingungen aufgespalten. Das Verfahren nutzt Elemente des Sauerstoff-Kupolofens fuer die Schmelzvergasung und eignet sich fuer zahlreiche Abfallarten wie z.B. belastetes Altholz, Haus- und Sperrmuell, Altreifen, Shredderleichtfraktion, Klaerschlamm u.s.w. (orig.)

  6. A new highly sensitive method to assess respiration rates and kinetics of natural planktonic communities by use of the switchable trace oxygen sensor and reduced oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Laura; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen respiration rates in pelagic environments are often difficult to quantify as the resolutions of our methods for O2 concentration determination are marginal for observing significant decreases during bottle incubations of less than 24 hours. Here we present the assessment of a new highly sensitive method, that combine Switchable Trace Oxygen (STOX) sensors and all-glass bottle incubations, where the O2 concentration was artificially lowered. The detection limit of respiration rate by this method is inversely proportional to the O2 concentration, down to water with an initial O2 concentration of 500 nmol L(-1). The method was tested in Danish coastal waters and in oceanic hypoxic waters. It proved to give precise measurements also with low oxygen consumption rates (∼7 nmol L(-1) h(-1)), and to significantly decrease the time required for incubations (≤14 hours) compared to traditional methods. This method provides continuous real time measurements, allowing for a number of diverse possibilities, such as modeling the rate of oxygen decrease to obtain kinetic parameters. Our data revealed apparent half-saturation concentrations (Km values) one order of magnitude lower than previously reported for marine bacteria, varying between 66 and 234 nmol L(-1) O2. Km values vary between different microbial planktonic communities, but our data show that it is possible to measure reliable respiration rates at concentrations ∼0.5-1 µmol L(-1) O2 that are comparable to the ones measured at full air saturation.

  7. Technical Note: Long-term memory effect in the atmospheric CO2 concentration at Mauna Loa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Varotsos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The monthly mean values of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration derived from in-situ air samples collected at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, USA during 1958–2004 (the longest continuous record available in the world are analyzed by employing the detrended fluctuation analysis to detect scaling behavior in this time series. The main result is that the fluctuations of carbon dioxide concentrations exhibit long-range power-law correlations (long memory with lag times ranging from four months to eleven years, which correspond to 1/f noise. This result indicates that random perturbations in the carbon dioxide concentrations give rise to noise, characterized by a frequency spectrum following a power-law with exponent that approaches to one; the latter shows that the correlation times grow strongly. This feature is pointing out that a correctly rescaled subset of the original time series of the carbon dioxide concentrations resembles the original time series. Finally, the power-law relationship derived from the real measurements of the carbon dioxide concentrations could also serve as a tool to improve the confidence of the atmospheric chemistry-transport and global climate models.

  8. Short-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins in Zurich, Switzerland--Atmospheric Concentrations and Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbacher, Pascal S; Bogdal, Christian; Gerecke, Andreas C; Glüge, Juliane; Schmid, Peter; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2015-08-18

    Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are of concern due to their potential for adverse health effects, bioaccumulation, persistence, and long-range transport. Data on concentrations of SCCPs in urban areas and underlying emissions are still scarce. In this study, we investigated the levels and spatial distribution of SCCPs in air, based on two separate, spatially resolved sampling campaigns in the city of Zurich, Switzerland. SCCP concentrations in air ranged from 1.8 to 17 ng·m(-3) (spring 2011) and 1.1 to 42 ng·m(-3) (spring 2013) with medians of 4.3 and 2.7 ng·m(-3), respectively. Both data sets show that atmospheric SCCP levels in Zurich can vary substantially and may be influenced by a number of localized sources within this urban area. Additionally, continuous measurements of atmospheric concentrations performed at one representative sampling site in the city center from 2011 to 2013 showed strong seasonal variations with high SCCP concentrations in summer and lower levels in winter. A long-term dynamic multimedia environmental fate model was parametrized to simulate the seasonal trends of SCCP concentrations in air and to back-calculate urban emissions. Resulting annual SCCP emissions in the city of Zurich accounted for 218-321 kg, which indicates that large SCCP stocks are present in urban areas of industrialized countries.

  9. Use of sodar data for analysis of relations between concentrations of minor atmospheric gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokoshchenko, M. A.; Elansky, N. F.

    2008-05-01

    The statistical relations between surface concentrations of minor atmospheric gases have been studied. As it was found a relation between concentrations of gases having the same sources (e.g., fuel burning for NO and CO) is close to linear trend. On the other hand, two species which are both a source and a sink to each other (e.g., O3 and NO) demonstrate hyperbolical regression line. Finally, concentrations of two species one of which is partially a source for another (e.g., NO and NO2) demonstrate exponential (logarithmic) type of trend. However, real relations between concentrations of two minor gases for any day represent non-homogeneous and complicated closed graphs like Carno cycle. As it was found a structure of these graphs during a day may be successfully explained by dynamics of the thermal stratification with the use of sodar data. Two examples of this analysis have been demonstrated.

  10. Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on iron efficiency: Removal of three chloroacetic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shun; Wang, Xiao-mao; Mao, Yu-qin; Zhao, Yu; Yang, Hong-wei; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2015-04-15

    The monochloroacetic, dichloroacetic and trichloroacetic acid (MCAA, DCAA and TCAA) removed by metallic iron under controlled dissolved oxygen conditions (0, 0.75, 1.52, 2.59, 3.47 or 7.09 mg/L DO) was investigated in well-mixed batch systems. The removal of CAAs increased first and then decreased with increasing DO concentration. Compared with anoxic condition, the reduction of MCAA and DCAA was substantially enhanced in the presence of O2, while TCAA reduction was significantly inhibited above 2.59 mg/L. The 1.52 mg/L DO was optimum for the formation of final product, acetic acid. Chlorine mass balances were 69-102%, and carbon mass balances were 92-105%. With sufficient mass transfer from bulk to the particle surface, the degradation of CAAs was limited by their reduction or migration rate within iron particles, which were dependent on the change of reducing agents and corrosion coatings. Under anoxic conditions, the reduction of CAAs was mainly inhibited by the available reducing agents in the conductive layer. Under low oxic conditions, the increasing reducing agents and thin lepidocrocite layer were favorable for CAA dechlorination. Under high oxic conditions, the redundant oxygen competing for reducing agents and significant lepidocrocite growth became the major restricting factors. Various CAA removal mechanisms could be potentially applied to explaining the effect of DO concentration on iron efficiency for contaminant reduction in water and wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nitrogen concentrations in mosses indicate the spatial distribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmens, H., E-mail: hh@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Norris, D.A., E-mail: danor@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Cooper, D.M., E-mail: cooper@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Mills, G., E-mail: gmi@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Steinnes, E., E-mail: Eiliv.Steinnes@chem.ntnu.no [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Kubin, E., E-mail: Eero.Kubin@metla.fi [Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kirkkosaarentie 7, 91500 Muhos (Finland); Thoeni, L., E-mail: lotti.thoeni@fub-ag.ch [FUB-Research Group for Environmental Monitoring, Alte Jonastrasse 83, 8640 Rapperswil (Switzerland); Aboal, J.R., E-mail: jesusramon.aboal@usc.es [University of Santiago de Compostela, Faculty of Biology, Department of Ecology, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alber, R., E-mail: Renate.Alber@provinz.bz.it [Environmental Agency of Bolzano, 39055 Laives (Italy); Carballeira, A., E-mail: alejo.carballeira@usc.es [University of Santiago de Compostela, Faculty of Biology, Department of Ecology, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Coskun, M., E-mail: coskunafm@yahoo.com [Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biology, 17100 Canakkale (Turkey); De Temmerman, L., E-mail: ludet@var.fgov.be [Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Centre, Tervuren (Belgium); Frolova, M., E-mail: marina.frolova@lvgma.gov.lv [Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Agency, Riga (Latvia); Gonzalez-Miqueo, L., E-mail: lgonzale2@alumni.unav.es [Univ. of Navarra, Irunlarrea No 1, 31008 Pamplona (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    In 2005/6, nearly 3000 moss samples from (semi-)natural location across 16 European countries were collected for nitrogen analysis. The lowest total nitrogen concentrations in mosses (<0.8%) were observed in northern Finland and northern UK. The highest concentrations ({>=}1.6%) were found in parts of Belgium, France, Germany, Slovakia, Slovenia and Bulgaria. The asymptotic relationship between the nitrogen concentrations in mosses and EMEP modelled nitrogen deposition (averaged per 50 km x 50 km grid) across Europe showed less scatter when there were at least five moss sampling sites per grid. Factors potentially contributing to the scatter are discussed. In Switzerland, a strong (r{sup 2} = 0.91) linear relationship was found between the total nitrogen concentration in mosses and measured site-specific bulk nitrogen deposition rates. The total nitrogen concentrations in mosses complement deposition measurements, helping to identify areas in Europe at risk from high nitrogen deposition at a high spatial resolution. - Highlights: > Nitrogen concentrations in mosses were determined at ca. 3000 sites across Europe. > Moss concentrations were compared with EMEP modelled nitrogen deposition. > The asymptotic relationship for Europe showed saturation at ca. 15 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}. > Linear relationships were found with measured nitrogen deposition in some countries. > Moss concentrations complement deposition measurements at high spatial resolution. - Mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe.

  12. Mercury concentrations of the Mazama ash : implications for the atmospheric mercury budget

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, A.K.; Telmer, K.; Spence, J. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada). School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

    2005-07-01

    This study examined the mercury concentrations found in the large quantity of ash that was produced when Mount Mazama erupted. The objective was to better quantify volcanic emissions of mercury in terms of the global mercury budget. The ash plume included a proximal consolidated facies that contained much lower mercury concentrations than the distal unconsolidated facies. Two possible reasons for this were suggested. First, it was suggested that mercury's low volatilization temperature resulted in its thermal release during the volcanic eruption, thereby accounting for the low values of mercury observed within the proximal unit due to its high temperature at the time of deposition. A portion of the thermally released mercury (Hg0) would have been oxidized in the atmosphere to Hg{sup 2+}, rendering it more reactive. Ash particles traveling with the eruption plume would have cooled enough to allow for readsorption of the oxidized mercury. The deposited cooled particles within the distal facies would therefore have contained higher mercury levels compared to the proximal facies. The second possibility was that thermal release occurred for both facies and that the low concentrations found within the proximal unit represent the original concentrations of the whole ash deposit. Concentrations in the distal facies were increased due to postdepositional processes that left the proximal facies unchanged due to buffering by its consolidated nature and its thickness. Mercury mass calculations gave values of 6 megagrams (Mg) of mercury for the consolidated facies and 924 Mg for the unconsolidated facies, for a total of 930 Mg for the whole deposit. The volcano was estimated to contain 12392 Mg of mercury, with 11462 Mg released to the atmosphere. On average, volcanic eruptions around the world account for 70 Mg of mercury/year which is currently unaccounted for in the global mercury budgets. This study demonstrated the mobile nature of the global mercury cycle and showed

  13. Impact of oxygen atmosphere on piezoelectric properties of CaBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoes, A.Z. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar em Ceramica, Departamento de Fi' sico-Qui' mica, Instituto de Qui' mica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Francisco Degni, P.O. Box 355, 14801-907, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Riccardi, C.S. [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 901 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (United States); Cavalcante, L.S. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Longo, E. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar em Ceramica, Departamento de Fi' sico-Qui' mica, Instituto de Qui' mica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Francisco Degni, P.O. Box 355, 14801-907, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: elson@iq.unesp.br; Varela, J.A. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar em Ceramica, Departamento de Fi' sico-Qui' mica, Instituto de Qui' mica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Francisco Degni, P.O. Box 355, 14801-907, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Mizaikoff, B. [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 901 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    CaBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} (CBNO) thin films were deposited on platinum-coated silicon substrates by the polymeric precursor method, and were annealed in air and in an oxygen atmosphere. The structure, surface morphology and electrical properties of CBNO thin films have been investigated. The presence of an oxygen atmosphere during crystallization of the films affected the structure perfection and morphology, as well as ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties. A reduction in P {sub r} and piezoelectric coefficient, an increase of V {sub c} and displacement of the Curie point is evident in the films crystallized in an oxygen atmosphere. The impact of exposure to the oxygen atmosphere on the creation of defects caused by bismuth and oxygen vacancies between layers was also investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  14. Plasma concentrations of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate in critically ill children on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enno D Wildschut

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To evaluate the effect of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO support on pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate (OC in children. METHODOLOGY: Steady state 0-12 hour pharmacokinetic sampling was performed in new influenza A (H1N1 infected children treated with oseltamivir while on ECMO support. Cmax, Cmin and AUC(0-12 h were calculated. The age-specific oseltamivir dosage was doubled to counter expected decreased plasma drug concentrations due to increased volume of distribution on ECMO support. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three patients were enrolled aged 15, 6 and 14 years in this pharmacokinetic case series. For two children the OC plasma concentrations were higher than those found in children and adults not on ECMO. These increased plasma concentrations related to the increased oseltamivir dosage and decreased kidney function. In one patient suboptimal plasma concentrations coincided with a decreased gastric motility. CONCLUSION: Oseltamivir pharmacokinetics do not appear to be significantly influenced by ECMO support. Caution is required in case of nasogastric administration and decreased gastric motility. Due to the limited number of (paediatric patients available further multicenter studies are warranted.

  15. Development of spoilage bacterial community and volatile compounds in chilled beef under vacuum or high oxygen atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Elina; Hultman, Jenni; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa; Björkroth, Johanna

    2016-04-16

    Research into microbial community development and metabolism is essential to understand meat spoilage. Recent years have seen the emergence of powerful molecular techniques that are being used alongside conventional microbiology approaches. This enables more accurate studies on meat spoilage. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of packaging (under vacuum and in high oxygen atmosphere) on the development of microbial communities and metabolic activities at 6 °C by using culture-dependent (cultivation, ribotyping) and culture-independent (amplicon sequencing) methods. At the beginning of shelf life, the microbial community mostly consisted of Carnobacterium and Lactobacillus. After two weeks of storage, Lactococcus and Lactobacillus were the dominant genera under vacuum and Leuconostoc in high oxygen meat packages. This indicates that oxygen favoured the genus Leuconostoc comprising only heterofermentative species and hence potential producers of undesirable compounds. Also the number of volatile compounds, such as diacetyl, 1-octen-3-ol and hexanoic acids, was higher in high oxygen packages than under vacuum packages. The beef in high oxygen atmosphere packaging was detected as spoiled in sensory evaluation over 10 days earlier than beef under vacuum packaging. Leuconostoc gelidum, Lactococcus piscium, Lactobacillus sakei and Lactobacillus algidus were the most common species of bacteria. The results obtained from identification of the isolates using ribotyping and amplicon sequencing correlated, except for L. algidus, which was detected in both types of packaging by amplicon sequencing, but only in vacuum packaged samples using the culture-based technique. This indicates that L. algidus grew, but was not cultivable in high oxygen beef using the Nordic Committee on Food Analysis standard method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Association between the concentration of fine particles in the atmosphere and acute respiratory diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Paula Nascimento

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the association between fine particulate matter concentration in the atmosphere and hospital care by acute respiratory diseases in children. METHODS Ecological study, carried out in the region of Grande Vitória, Espírito Santo, in the winter (June 21 to September 21, 2013 and summer (December 21, 2013 to March 19, 2014. We assessed data of daily count for outpatient care and hospitalization by respiratory diseases (ICD-10 in children from zero to 12 years in three hospitals in the Region of Grande Vitória. For collecting fine particulate matter, we used portable samplers of particles installed in six locations in the studied region. The Generalized Additive Model with Poisson distribution, fitted for the effects of predictor covariates, was used to evaluate the relationship between respiratory outcomes and concentration of fine particulate matter. RESULTS The increase of 4.2 µg/m3 (interquartile range in the concentration of fine particulate matter increased in 3.8% and 5.6% the risk of medical care or hospitalization, respectively, on the same day and with six-day lag from the exposure. CONCLUSIONS We identified positive association between outpatient care and hospitalizations of children under 12 years due to acute respiratory diseases and the concentration of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere.

  17. The role and importance of ozone for atmospheric chemistry and methods for measuring its concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Dragan M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Depending on where ozone resides, it can protect or harm life on Earth. The thin layer of ozone that surrounds Earth acts as a shield protecting the planet from irradiation by UV light. When it is close to the planet's surface, ozone is a powerful photochemical oxidant that damage, icons frescos, museum exhibits, rubber, plastic and all plant and animal life. Besides the basic properties of some methods for determining the ozone concentration in working and living conditions, this paper presents a detailed description of the electrochemical method. The basic properties of the electrochemical method are used in the construction of mobile equipment for determining the sum of oxidants in the atmosphere. The equipment was used for testing the determination of the ozone concentration in working rooms, where the concentration was at a high level and caused by UV radiation or electrostatic discharge. According to the obtained results, it can be concluded that this equipment for determining the ozone concentration in the atmosphere is very powerful and reproducible in measurements.

  18. The addition of pure oxygen to reduce sulphide concentration; La adicion oxigeno puro para disminuir la concentracion de sulfuro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Castillo, M.C.; Ortiz Alemany, F. [EMARASA, aLICANTE (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    The effect of using oxygen in order to reducing problems caused by the presence of hydrogen sulfide in wastewater has been studied in the wastewater treatment plant of Alicante ``Monte Orgegia``. Oxygen was injected in the sewage system before the wastewater treatment plant. The effect of different doses of Oxygen over the values of electrode potential of wastewater was studied and so the concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the air of the pretreatment building. A decreasing in the hydrogen sulfide concentration due to the modification of the usual values of electrode potential in wastewater was observed. (Author) 7 refs.

  19. A soil actinobacterium scavenges atmospheric H2 using two membrane-associated, oxygen-dependent [NiFe] hydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, Chris; Berney, Michael; Hards, Kiel; Cook, Gregory M; Conrad, Ralf

    2014-03-18

    In the Earth's lower atmosphere, H2 is maintained at trace concentrations (0.53 ppmv/0.40 nM) and rapidly turned over (lifetime ≤ 2.1 y(-1)). It is thought that soil microbes, likely actinomycetes, serve as the main global sink for tropospheric H2. However, no study has ever unambiguously proven that a hydrogenase can oxidize this trace gas. In this work, we demonstrate, by using genetic dissection and sensitive GC measurements, that the soil actinomycete Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155 constitutively oxidizes subtropospheric concentrations of H2. We show that two membrane-associated, oxygen-dependent [NiFe] hydrogenases mediate this process. Hydrogenase-1 (Hyd1) (MSMEG_2262-2263) is well-adapted to rapidly oxidize H2 at a range of concentrations [Vmax(app) = 12 nmol⋅g⋅dw(-1)⋅min(-1); Km(app) = 180 nM; threshold = 130 pM in the Δhyd23 (Hyd1 only) strain], whereas Hyd2 (MSMEG_2719-2720) catalyzes a slower-acting, higher-affinity process [Vmax(app) = 2.5 nmol⋅g⋅dw(-1)⋅min(-1); Km(app) = 50 nM; threshold = 50 pM in the Δhyd13 (Hyd2 only) strain]. These observations strongly support previous studies that have linked group 5 [NiFe] hydrogenases (e.g., Hyd2) to the oxidation of tropospheric H2 in soil ecosystems. We further reveal that group 2a [NiFe] hydrogenases (e.g., Hyd1) can contribute to this process. Hydrogenase expression and activity increases in carbon-limited cells, suggesting that scavenging of trace H2 helps to sustain dormancy. Distinct physiological roles for Hyd1 and Hyd2 during the adaptation to this condition are proposed. Soil organisms harboring high-affinity hydrogenases may be especially competitive, given that they harness a highly dependable fuel source in otherwise unstable environments.

  20. Possible future scenarios for atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases. A simplified thermodynamic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo-Brown, F.; Sanchez-Salas, N. [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, del IPN Edif. 9, U.P. Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Barranco-Jimenez, M.A. [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Escuela Superior de Computo, del IPN Av., Miguel Bernard s/n., Esq. Juan de Dios Batiz, U.P. Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rosales, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad de las Americas Puebla, Exhacienda Sta., Catarina Martir, Cholula 72820, Puebla (Mexico)

    2009-11-15

    Most of the increase in concentrations of greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere is mainly due to anthropogenic activities. This is particularly significant in the case of CO{sub 2}. The atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2} has systematically increased since the Industrial Revolution (260 ppm), with a remarkable raise after the 1970s until the present day (380 ppm). If this increasing tendency is maintained, the last report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates that, for the year 2100, the CO{sub 2} concentration can augment up to approximately 675 ppm. In this work it is assumed that the quantity of anthropogenic greenhouse gases emitted to the Earth's atmosphere is proportional to the quantity of heat rejected to the environment by internal combustion heat engines. It is also assumed that this increasing tendency of CO{sub 2} due to men's activity stems from a mode of energy production mainly based on a maximum-power output paradigm. With these hypotheses, a thermoeconomic optimization of a thermal engine model under two regimes of performance: the maximum-power regime and the so-called ecological function criterion is presented. This last regime consists in maximizing a function that represents a good compromise between high power output and low entropy production. It is showed that, under maximum ecological conditions, the emissions of thermal energy to the environment are reduced approximately up to 50%. Thus working under this mode of performance the slope of the curves of CO{sub 2} concentration, for instance, drastically diminishes. A simple qualitative criterion to design ecological taxes is also suggested. (author)

  1. The Influence of High Aerosol Concentration on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Temperature Stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaykin, M.N.; Kadygrove, E.N.; Golitsyn, G.S.

    2005-03-18

    Investigations of the changing in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) radiation balance as cased by natural and anthropogenic reasons is an important topic of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The influence of aerosol on temperature stratification of ABL while its concentration was extremely high within a long period of time was studied experimentally. The case was observed in Moscow region (Russia) with the transport of combustion products from peat-bog and forest fires in July-September, 2002. At this time the visibility was some times at about 100-300 m. Aerosol concentration measured by Moscow University Observatory and A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics field station in Zvenigorod (55.7 N; 36.6 E) for several days was in 50-100 times more than background one (Gorchakov at al 2003). The high aerosol concentration can change the radiation balance at ABL, and so to change thermal stratification in ABL above the mega lopolis. For the analysis the data were used of synchronous measurements by MTP-5 (Microwave Temperature Profiler operating at wavelength 5 mm) in two locations, namely: downtown Moscow and country-side which is 50 km apart to the West (Zvenigorod station). (Kadygrov and Pick 1998; Westwater at al 1999; Kadygrov at al 2002). Zvenigorod station is located in strongly continental climate zone which is in between of the climates of ARM sites (NSANorth Slope of Alaska and SGP-Southern Great Plains). The town of Zvenigorod has little industry, small traffic volume and topography conductive to a good air ventilation of the town. For these reasons Zvenigorod can be considered as an undisturbed rural site. For the analysis some days were chosen with close meteorological parameters (average temperature, humidity, wind, pressure and cloud form) but strongly differing in aerosol concentration level.

  2. Relationship between atmospheric ammonia concentration and nitrogen content in terricolous lichen (Cladonia portentosa)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Knud Erik; Andersen, Helle Vibeke; Strandberg, Morten Tune

    2014-01-01

    From April 2006 to April 2007, the geographical and seasonal variation in nitrogen content in terricolous lichen (Cladonia portentosa) and atmospheric ammonia concentrations were measured at five heathland sites. The seasonal variation in the nitrogen content of the lichen was small, even though...... there was a large seasonal variation in the air concentration of ammonia. A sizable local variation in the nitrogen content of the lichen was found even at the scale of a few kilometres. The nitrogen content in the lichen showed a high correlation to the yearly mean value of the measured ammonia concentration...... in air at the different locations. This investigation is part of a larger attempt to incorporate effects of nitrogen in the conservation status of terrestrial habitat types....

  3. Effect of low oxygen tension on tissue-engineered cartilage construct development in the concentric cylinder bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Sunil; Wick, Timothy M

    2004-01-01

    Cartilage is exposed to low oxygen tension in vivo, suggesting culture in a low-oxygen environment as a strategy to enhance matrix deposition in tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro. To assess the effects of oxygen tension on cartilage matrix accumulation, porous polylactic acid constructs were dynamically seeded in a concentric cylinder bioreactor with bovine chondrocytes and cultured for 3 weeks at either 20 or 5% oxygen tension. Robust chondrocyte proliferation and matrix deposition were achieved. After 22 days in culture, constructs from bioreactors operated at either 20 or 5% oxygen saturation had similar chondrocyte densities and collagen content. During the first 12 days of culture, the matrix glycosaminoglycan (GAG) deposition rate was 19.5 x 10(-9) mg/cell per day at 5% oxygen tension and 65% greater than the matrix GAG deposition rate at 20% oxygen tension. After 22 days of bioreactor culture, constructs at 5% oxygen contained 4.5 +/- 0.3 mg of GAG per construct, nearly double the 2.5 +/- 0.2 mg of GAG per construct at 20% oxygen tension. These data demonstrate that culture in bioreactors at low oxygen tension favors the production and retention of GAG within cartilage matrix without adversely affecting chondrocyte proliferation or collagen deposition. Bioreactor studies such as these can identify conditions that enhance matrix accumulation and construct development for cartilage tissue engineering.

  4. Influences of dissolved oxygen concentration on biocathodic microbial communities in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Laura; Cristiani, Pierangela; Villa, Federica; Zecchin, Sarah; Colombo, Alessandra; Cavalca, Lucia; Schievano, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) at cathodic interface is a critical factor influencing microbial fuel cells (MFC) performance. In this work, three MFCs were operated with cathode under different DO conditions: i) air-breathing (A-MFC); ii) water-submerged (W-MFC) and iii) assisted by photosynthetic microorganisms (P-MFC). A plateau of maximum current was reached at 1.06±0.03mA, 1.48±0.06mA and 1.66±0.04mA, increasing respectively for W-MFC, P-MFC and A-MFC. Electrochemical and microbiological tools (Illumina sequencing, confocal microscopy and biofilm cryosectioning) were used to explore anodic and cathodic biofilm in each MFC type. In all cases, biocathodes improved oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as compared to abiotic condition and A-MFC was the best performing system. Photosynthetic cultures in the cathodic chamber supplied high DO level, up to 16mg O2 L -1 , which sustained aerobic microbial community in P-MFC biocathode. Halomonas, Pseudomonas and other microaerophilic genera reached >50% of the total OTUs. The presence of sulfur reducing bacteria (Desulfuromonas) and purple non-sulfur bacteria in A-MFC biocathode suggested that the recirculation of sulfur compounds could shuttle electrons to sustain the reduction of oxygen as final electron acceptor. The low DO concentration limited the cathode in W-MFC. A model of two different possible microbial mechanisms is proposed which can drive predominantly cathodic ORR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Potential ocean–atmosphere preconditioning of late autumn Barents-Kara sea ice concentration anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin P. King

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many recent studies have revealed the importance of the climatic state in November on the seasonal climate of the subsequent winter. In particular, it has been shown that interannual variability of sea ice concentration (SIC over the Barents-Kara (BK seas in November is linked to winter atmospheric circulation anomaly that projects on the North Atlantic Oscillation. Understanding the lead–lag processes involving the different components of the climate system from autumn to winter is therefore important. This note presents dynamical interpretation for the ice-ocean–atmosphere relationships that can affect the BK SIC anomaly in late autumn. It is found that cyclonic (anticyclonic wind anomaly over the Arctic in October, by Ekman drift, can be responsible for positive (negative SIC in the BK seas in November. The results also suggest that ocean heat transport via the Barents Sea Opening in September and October can contribute to BK SIC anomaly in November.

  6. Modeling of recovery mechanism of ozone zero phenomenaby adding small amount of nitrogen in atmospheric pressure oxygen dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Haruaki; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu

    2013-09-01

    Ozone zero phenomena in an atmospheric pressure oxygen dielectric barrier discharges have been one of the major problems during a long time operation of ozone generators. But it is also known that the adding a small amount of nitrogen makes the recover from the ozone zero phenomena. To make clear the mechanism of recovery, authors have been simulated the discharges with using the results of Ref. 3. As a result, the recovery process can be seen and ozone density increased. It is found that the most important species would be nitrogen atoms. The reaction of nitrogen atoms and oxygen molecules makes oxygen atoms which is main precursor species of ozone. This generation of oxygen atoms is effective to increase ozone. The dependence of oxygen atom density (nO) and nitrogen atom density (nN) ratio was examined in this paper. In the condition of low nN/nO ratio case, generation of nitrogen oxide is low, and the quenching of ozone by the nitrogen oxide would be low. But in the high ratio condition, the quenching of ozone by nitrogen oxide would significant. This work was supported by KAKENHI(23560352).

  7. Numerical study on characteristics of radio-frequency discharge at atmospheric pressure in argon with small admixtures of oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinan; Liu, Yue

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a 1D fluid model is developed to study the characteristics of a discharge in argon with small admixtures of oxygen at atmospheric pressure. This model consists of a series of equations, including continuity equations for electrons, positive ions, negative ions and neutral particles, the energy equation, and the Poisson equation for electric potential. Special attention has been paid to the electron energy dissipation and the mechanisms of electron heating, while the admixture of oxygen is in the range of 0.1%-0.6%. It is found that when the oxygen-to-argon ratio grows, the discharge is obviously divided into three stages: electron growth, electron reduction and the electron remaining unchanged. Furthermore, the cycle-averaged electric field, electron temperature, electron Ohmic heating, electron collisionless heating, electron energy dissipation and the net electron production are also studied in detail, and when the oxygen-to-argon ratio is relatively larger (R = 0.6%), double value peaks of electron Ohmic heating appear in the sheath. According to the results of the numerical simulation, various oxygen-to-argon ratios result in different amounts of electron energy dissipation and electron heating.

  8. Staphylococcus epidermidis: metabolic adaptation and biofilm formation in response to different oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe-Alvarez, Cristina; Chiquete-Félix, Natalia; Contreras-Zentella, Martha; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Peña, Antonio; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis has become a major health hazard. It is necessary to study its metabolism and hopefully uncover therapeutic targets. Cultivating S. epidermidis at increasing oxygen concentration [O2] enhanced growth, while inhibiting biofilm formation. Respiratory oxidoreductases were differentially expressed, probably to prevent reactive oxygen species formation. Under aerobiosis, S. epidermidis expressed high oxidoreductase activities, including glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, ethanol dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase, as well as cytochromes bo and aa3; while little tendency to form biofilms was observed. Under microaerobiosis, pyruvate dehydrogenase and ethanol dehydrogenase decreased while glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase nearly disappeared; cytochrome bo was present; anaerobic nitrate reductase activity was observed; biofilm formation increased slightly. Under anaerobiosis, biofilms grew; low ethanol dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase and cytochrome bo were still present; nitrate dehydrogenase was the main terminal electron acceptor. KCN inhibited the aerobic respiratory chain and increased biofilm formation. In contrast, methylamine inhibited both nitrate reductase and biofilm formation. The correlation between the expression and/or activity or redox enzymes and biofilm-formation activities suggests that these are possible therapeutic targets to erradicate S. epidermidis. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The Effect of Various Concentrations of Nitrous Oxide and Oxygen on the Hypersensitive Gag Reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Veaux, Candace K E; Montagnese, Thomas A; Heima, Masahiro; Aminoshariae, Anita; Mickel, Andre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of various concentrations of N2O/O2 on obtunding a hypersensitive gag reflex. We hypothesized that the administration of nitrous oxide and oxygen would obtund a hypersensitive gag reflex enough to allow a patient to tolerate the placement and holding of a digital x-ray sensor long enough to obtain a dental radiograph. Volunteers claiming to have a hypersensitive gag reflex were first screened to validate their claim and then tested by placing a size 2 digital x-ray sensor in the position for a periapical radiograph of the right mandibular molar area and holding it in place for 10 seconds. Subjects were first tested using room air only, then 30%, 50%, or 70% nitrous oxide until they were able to tolerate the sensor without gagging or discomfort. A visual analog scale was used for subjective responses, and other statistical tests were used to analyze the results. We found that for some subjects, 30% nitrous oxide was sufficient; for others, 50% was needed; and for the remainder of the subjects, 70% was sufficient to tolerate the test. Using a combination of 70% nitrous oxide and 30% oxygen allowed all patients claiming to have a hypersensitive gag reflex to tolerate the placement and holding of a digital x-ray sensor long enough to take a periapical radiograph.

  10. Effect of oxygen concentration on resistive switching behavior in silicon oxynitride film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da; Huang, Shihua; He, Lü

    2017-04-01

    SiO{}xN{}y films with different oxygen concentrations were fabricated by reactive magnetron sputtering, and the resistive switching characteristics and conduction mechanism of Cu/SiO{}xN{}y/ITO devices were investigated. The Cu/SiO{}xN{}y/ITO device with SiO{}xN{}y deposited in 0.8-sccm O{}2 flow shows a reliable resistive switching behavior, including good endurance and retention properties. As the conductivity of SiO{}xN{}y increases with the increase of the oxygen content dynamical electron trapping and detrapping is suggested to be the conduction mechanism. The temperature dependent I-V measurement indicates that the carrier transport can be ascribed to the hopping conduction rather than the metallic conductive filament. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province (No. LY17F040001), the Open Project Program of Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory) of Fudan University (No. KF2015_02), the Open Project Program of National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. M201503), the Zhejiang Provincial Science and Technology Key Innovation Team (No. 2011R50012), and the Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory (No. 2013E10022).

  11. High-concentration versus titrated oxygen therapy in ST-elevation myocardial infarction: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchord, Anil M; Argyle, Rachel; Beynon, Rhys; Perrin, Kyle; Sharma, Vishal; Weatherall, Mark; Simmonds, Mark; Heatlie, Grant; Brooks, Nicholas; Beasley, Richard

    2012-02-01

    The optimal approach to oxygen therapy in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is uncertain. A randomized controlled trial was undertaken in which 136 patients presenting with their first STEMI uncomplicated by cardiogenic shock or marked hypoxia were randomized to receive high-concentration (6 L/min via medium concentration mask) or titrated oxygen (to achieve oxygen saturation 93%-96%) for 6 hours after presentation. The main outcome variables were 30-day mortality and infarct size assessed by troponin T level at 72 hours. Secondary outcomes included a meta-analysis of mortality data from this study and previous randomized controlled trials, and infarct size was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging at 4 to 6 weeks. There were 1 of 68 and 2 of 68 deaths in the high-concentration and titrated oxygen groups, respectively; a meta-analysis including these data with those from the 2 previous studies showed an odds ratio for mortality of high-concentration oxygen compared with room air or titrated oxygen of 2.2 (95% CI 0.8-6.0). There was no significant difference between high-concentration versus titrated oxygen in troponin T (ratio of mean levels 0.74, 95% CI 0.50-1.1, P = .14), infarct mass (mean difference -0.8 g, 95% CI -7.6 to 6.1, P = .82), or percent infarct mass (mean difference -0.6%, 95% CI -5.6 to 4.5, P = .83). This study found no evidence of benefit or harm from high-concentration compared with titrated oxygen in initially uncomplicated STEMI. However, our estimates have wide CIs, and as a result, large randomized controlled trials are required to resolve the clinical uncertainty. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on red pigment and citrinin production by Monascus purpureus ATCC 36928

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Pereira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effects of agitation speed, N (200, 500, 600 or 700 rpm, and dissolved oxygen concentration, C (120, >70, 70, 60, 10 or < 10%, on red pigment and citrinin production by Monascus purpureus ATCC 36928, cultivated in liquid medium by a batch process. The gas flow rate was the same for all runs with C controlled by means of the incoming gas composition control (air/N2 or air/O2. From the response surface plots it can be verified that the effect of C was greater than that of N on the production of both metabolites. The absorbance for red pigments varied from 1.6 U (C< 10%; N=200 rpm up to 3.3 U (C=60%; N=600 rpm, an increase of 106%, while citrinin concentration increased 257%, from 14.2 to 50.7 mg.L-1. The most appropriate conditions were C=60% and N=600rpm, under which the highest red pigment absorbance (3.3U and half of the highest citrinin concentration were obtained.

  13. Liquid products from oxidative thermal treatment of oil sludge with different oxygen concentrations of air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, J L; Chang, C Y; Lin, J P; Le, D J; Wu, C H

    2001-01-01

    Oxidative thermal treatment of oil sludge with different oxygen concentrations of air by using a dynamic thermogravimetric (TG) reaction system is investigated. The experimental conditions employed are: gas flow rate of 50 cm3/min (value at 298 K) for 300 mg dry waste, a constant heating rate of 5.2 K/min, the oxygen concentrations in air of 1.09, 8.62 and 20.95 vol. % O2, and the temperature (T) range of 378-873 K. From the experimental results, the residual mass fractions (M) are about 78.95, 28.49, 8.77 and 4.13 wt. % at the oxidative T of 563, 713, 763 and 873 K for the case with 20.95 vol. % O2, respectively. The values of M with 8.62 and 1.09 vol. % O2 at T of 873 K are 4.87 and 9.44 wt. %, respectively. The distillation characteristics of the oil portion of liquid products (condensates of gas at 298 K) from the oxidative thermal treatment of oil sludge with 20.95 vol. % O2 at T of 378-873 K is close to those of commercial gasoline. Nevertheless, the liquid product contains a large amount of water. The distillation characteristics of the oil portions of liquid products with 8.62 and 1.09 vol. % O2 at T of 378-873 K are close to those of diesel and fuel oils, respectively. The oil quality with 8.62 vol. % O2 is better than that with 1.09 vol. % O2. However, the liquid product with 8.62 vol. % O2 still contains a large amount of water; nonetheless, that with 1.09 vol. % O2 is with negligible water. Compared with the oil product of nitrogen pyrolysis, the oil quality with 1.09 vol. % O2 is better. Certainly, low oxygen conditions (i.e. 1.09 vol. % O2) not only accelerate the thermal reaction of oil sludge, but also at the same time avoid or reduce the production of water. Further, from the analysis of benzene (B), ethylbenzene (E), toluene (T) and iso-xylene (X) concentrations of the oil portion of liquid products, the BETX concentrations of oil with 20.95 vol. % O2 are higher than those with 8.62 and 1.09 vol. % O2. The yields of liquid products with 20.95, 8

  14. Joint Application of Concentration and δ18O to Investigate the Global Atmospheric CO Budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyhong Park

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Most previous top-down global carbon monoxide (CO budget estimates have used only concentration information and shown large differences in individual source estimates. Since CO from certain sources has a specific isotopic signature, coupling the concentration and isotope fraction information can provide a better constraint on CO source strength estimates. We simulate both CO concentration and its oxygen isotopologue C18O in the 3-D global chemical transport model MOZART-4 and compare the results with observations. We then used a Bayesian inversion to calculate the most probable global CO budget. In the analysis, δ18O information is jointly applied with concentration. The joint inversion results should provide more accurate and precise inversion results in comparison with CO-only inversion. Various methods combining the concentration and isotope ratios were tested to maximize the benefit of including isotope information. The joint inversion of CO and δ18O estimated total global CO production at 2951 Tg-CO/yr in 1997, 3084 Tg-CO/yr in 1998, and 2583 Tg-CO/yr in 2004. The updated CO budget improved both the modeled CO and δ18O. The clear improvement shown in the δ18O implies that more accurate source strengths are estimated. Thus, we confirmed that the observation of CO isotopes provide further substantial information for estimating a global CO budget.

  15. Suspended Particulates Concentration (PM10 under Unstable Atmospheric Conditions over Subtropical Urban Area (Qena, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El-Nouby Adam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the suspended particulates (PM10 in the atmosphere under unstable atmospheric conditions. The variation of PM10 was investigated and primary statistics were employed. The results show that, the PM10 concentrations values ranged from 6.00 to 646.74 μg m−3. The average value of PM10 is equal to 114.32 μg m−3. The high values were recorded in April and May (155.17 μg m−3 and 171.82 μg m−3, respectively and the low values were noted in February and December (73.86 μg m−3 and 74.05 μg m−3, respectively. The average value of PM10 of the hot season (125.35 × 10−6 g m−3 was higher than its value for the cold season (89.27 μg m−3. In addition, the effect of weather elements (air temperature, humidity and wind on the concentration of PM10 was determined. The multiple R between PM10 and these elements ranged from 0.05 to 0.47 and its value increased to reach 0.73 for the monthly average of the database used. Finally, the PM10 concentrations were grouped depending on their associated atmospheric stability class. These average values were equal to 122.80 ± 9 μg m−3 (highly unstable or convective, 109.37 ± 12 μg m−3 (moderately unstable and 104.42 ± 15 μg m−3 (slightly unstable.

  16. Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Measurements of Martian Atmospheric CO2 by the Phoenix Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Paul B.; Boynton, W. V.; Hoffman, J. H.; Ming, D. W.; Hamara, D.

    2010-01-01

    Precise stable isotope measurements of the CO2 in the martian atmosphere have the potential to provide important constraints for our understanding of the history of volatiles, the carbon cycle, current atmospheric processes, and the degree of water/rock interaction on Mars [1]. The isotopic composition of the martian atmosphere has been measured using a number of different methods (Table 1), however a precise value (<1%) has yet to be achieved. Given the elevated Delta(sup 13)C values measured in carbonates in martian meteorites [2-4] it has been proposed that the martian atmosphere was enriched in 13C [8]. This was supported by measurements of trapped CO2 gas in EETA 79001[2] which showed elevated Delta(sup 13)C values (Table 1). More recently, Earth-based spectroscopic measurements of the martian atmosphere have measured the martian CO2 to be depleted in C-13 relative to CO2 in the terrestrial atmosphere[ 7, 9-11]. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument on the Mars Phoenix Lander [12] included a magnetic-sector mass spectrometer (EGA) [13] which had the goal of measuring the isotopic composition of martian atmospheric CO2 to within 0.5%. The mass spectrometer is a miniature instrument intended to measure both the martian atmosphere as well as gases evolved from heating martian soils.

  17. Hyperosmotic Agents and Antibiotics Affect Dissolved Oxygen and pH Concentration Gradients in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiamco, Mia Mae; Atci, Erhan; Mohamed, Abdelrhman; Call, Douglas R; Beyenal, Haluk

    2017-03-15

    Biofilms on wound surfaces are treated topically with hyperosmotic agents, such as medical-grade honey and cadexomer iodine; in some cases, these treatments are combined with antibiotics. Tissue repair requires oxygen, and a low pH is conducive to oxygen release from red blood cells and epithelialization. We investigated the variation of dissolved oxygen concentration and pH with biofilm depth and the variation in oxygen consumption rates when biofilms are challenged with medical-grade honey or cadexomer iodine combined with vancomycin or ciprofloxacin. Dissolved oxygen and pH depth profiles in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms were measured using microelectrodes. The presence of cadexomer iodine with vancomycin or ciprofloxacin on the surface of the biofilm permitted a measurable concentration of oxygen at greater biofilm depths (101.6 ± 27.3 μm, P = 0.02; and 155.5 ± 27.9 μm, P = 0.016, respectively) than in untreated controls (30.1 μm). Decreases in pH of ∼0.6 and ∼0.4 units were observed in biofilms challenged with medical-grade honey alone and combined with ciprofloxacin, respectively ( P dissolved oxygen concentration and penetration depth into the biofilm, while medical-grade honey was associated with a lower pH; not all treatments established a bactericidal effect in the time frame used in the experiments. IMPORTANCE Reports about using hyperosmotic agents and antibiotics against wound biofilms focus mostly on killing bacteria, but the results of these treatments should additionally be considered in the context of how they affect physiologically important parameters, such as oxygen concentration and pH. We confirmed that the combination of a hyperosmotic agent and an antibiotic results in greater dissolved oxygen and reduced pH within an S. aureus biofilm. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Atmospheric CO{sub 2}, trace gas and CN concentrations in Vaerrioe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahonen, T.; Aalto, P.; Kulmala, M.; Rannik, U.; Vesala, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Hari, P.; Pohja, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    1995-12-31

    The Vaerrioe environmental measurement station is founded in 1991. The aim of the station is to obtain more information on air quality influenced by Kola industrial areas and effects of pollutants on photosynthesis in subarctic climate. In the station air quality and meteorological quantities are measured together with photosynthesis, which makes it quite unique in comparison with other measurement stations located in northern Finland. The measurements also provide information of aerosol and trace gas concentrations in order to study the direct and indirect aerosol effects on climate. These measurements also increase the knowledge of atmospheric chemistry and deposition in subarctic conditions

  19. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations the CSIRO (Australia) monitoring program from aircraft 1972 - 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beardsmore, D.J.; Pearman, G.I. [Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Victoria (Australia). Division of Atmospheric Research

    1984-09-01

    Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations were measured in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over the Australia-New Zealand region and as far south as Antarctica for the period 1972-1981. The samples were collected from aircraft over a large range of latitudes and altitudes. The sampling program has been based on the cooperation of the Australia Department of Transport, Quantas Airways, Trans Australia Airlines, the United States, New Zealand and Australian Air Forces and occasional chartering of light aircraft for special purposes.

  20. CONCENTRATION OF HARMFUL SUBSTANCES REDUCING IN SURFACE LAYER OF ATMOSPHERE AT RHEOSTAT LOCOMOTIVE TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Bondar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that at present an acceptable way of reducing the concentration of harmful substances in the surface layer of the atmosphere at rheostat tests of locomotives is their dispersion in a large volume of air. Channels, installed above an exhaust pipe of diesel locomotive with a break at the gas flow, work as ejectors. We have solved jointly the equation of aerodynamic characteristics of the ejector device and the equation of diffusion of gases; as a result the calculated dependence for determining the necessary height of ejector device has been obtained.

  1. Real time continuous oxygen concentration monitoring system during malaxation for the production of Virgin Olive Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiello, G.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During the mechanical extraction process of Virgin Olive Oil (VOO some important physical phenomena and enzymatic transformations occur which influence the quality of the final product. The control of process parameters is crucial to ensure the quality of VOO, therefore process monitoring and control is a fundamental requirement in the modern VOO processing industry. The present work proposes an innovative Real-Time Monitoring System (RTMS aimed at continuously measuring the oxygen concentration during the malaxation process in order to establish a correlation with the quality of the final product obtained. This monitoring system is based on an oxygen concentration sensor directly connected to the malaxation chamber and a data acquisition system to analyze and store the measured values in a process database. The experimental results obtained show that the use of oxygen during malaxation improves some qualitative parameters of VOO such as free fatty acids and total polyphenols while others (peroxide values and spectrophotometric indexes worsen. These results are similar to those obtained by employing nitrogen, which is the traditional technique to avoid the wellknown oxidation processes studied by several researchers, thus demonstrating that the presence of oxygen during the malaxation process can have beneficial effects on the quality of VOO when its concentration is properly controlled.

    Durante el proceso de extracción mecánica del aceite de oliva virgen ocurren importantes fenómenos físicos y transformaciones enzimáticas que influyen en la calidad del producto final. El control de los parámetros del proceso es crucial para garantizar la calidad del aceite de oliva virgen, por tanto la monitorización y el control del proceso son requisitos fundamentales en el moderno tratamiento industrial del aceite de oliva virgen. El presente trabajo propone un sistema de monitorización innovador en tiempo real dirigido a medir continuamente

  2. Monitoring of 7Be atmospheric activity concentration using short term measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papandreou Sotiria M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The activity concentration of 7Be in atmospheric aerosol can exhibit seasonal variations due to various physical processes taking place in the troposphere and stratosphere, as well as due to solar activity. An investigation of these variations has been carried out at the Nuclear Engineering Department of the National Technical University of Athens over a two year period (3/2008-4/2010. In the framework of this study, sampling and analysis methods were appropriately selected to allow for the observation of short-term 7Be air activity concentration variations, using a 4-hour sampling interval, while taking in consideration type A and type B uncertainties introduced in the measurements. In order to study the role of precipitation in surface air 7Be activity concentration variations, a procedure for collecting and analyzing rainwater was developed. The techniques used in the present study allowed for the observation of seasonal and diurnal 7Be concentration variations, as well as correlations between 7Be activity concentration and the meteorological parameters of air temperature and relative humidity.

  3. Mercury Concentrations in Bulk Atmospheric Deposition over the Coast of Rio de Janeiro, Southeast, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacerda Luiz D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Total Hg concentrations were measured in bulk atmospheric deposition from three sampling stations along the Rio de Janeiro State coast, Southeast, Brazil, from October 1998 to December 1999. Samples were collected at Campos dos Goytacazes, an agriculture center at the North coast; Niterói, an industrialized metropolitan area and at Itacuruçá, a tourist town at the South. Concentrations at Campos average 0.51 ng L-1, ranging from 0.07 to 1.01 ng L-1, and showed a seasonal trend, probably affected by burning of sugar cane plantations in winter. At Niterói, concentrations were highest, averaging 0.73 ng L-1 andranging from 0.06 to 2.95 ng L-1. No pattern of temporal variation was observed and concentration peaks are probably related to industrial emissions. At Itacuruçá, Hg concentrations were below the detection limit of the method (0.02 ng L-1 in 35% of the samples, with an average of 0.24 ng L-1 and ranging from <0.02 to 1.04 ng L-1.

  4. Variation of atmospheric tritium concentration in three chemical forms at Toki, Japan: 2004-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M; Uda, T

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric tritium concentrations of HTO, HT and CH3T have been measured at Toki, Japan, for the environmental impact assessment of tritium for a fusion test facility. According to the data from 2004 to 2012, the concentrations of HT and HTO in water vapour tend to increase in spring. The seasonal variation in HT concentration at Toki was compared with the H2 concentration between 1990 and 2005 at Tae-ahn Peninsula, Republic of Korea, which is at approximately the same latitude as Toki. The monthly average of HT-specific activity varied from 1.24 × 10(5) to 1.76 × 10(5) TU. The peak of the monthly average H2 concentration did not match that of HT. This indicates that the mechanism of the production or the source of HT might be different from the production mechanism of H2. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute with normal air on macrophage number and infiltration during rat skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Naoto; Ono, Miharu; Tomioka, Tomoka; Deie, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Use of mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute (2026.54 hPa) with normal air is emerging as a common complementary treatment for severe muscle injury. Although hyperbaric oxygen at over 2 atmospheres absolute with 100% O2 promotes healing of skeletal muscle injury, it is not clear whether mild hyperbaric oxygen is equally effective. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute (1266.59 hPa) with normal air on muscle regeneration. The tibialis anterior muscle of male Wistar rats was injured by injection of bupivacaine hydrochloride, and rats were randomly assigned to a hyperbaric oxygen experimental group or to a non-hyperbaric oxygen control group. Immediately after the injection, rats were exposed to hyperbaric oxygen, and the treatment was continued for 28 days. The cross-sectional area of centrally nucleated muscle fibers was significantly larger in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 and 7 days after injury. The number of CD68- or CD68- and CD206-positive cells was significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. Additionally, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. The number of Pax7- and MyoD- or MyoD- and myogenin-positive nuclei per mm2 and the expression levels of these proteins were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 days after injury. These results suggest that mild hyperbaric oxygen promotes skeletal muscle regeneration in the early phase after injury, possibly due to reduced hypoxic conditions leading to accelerated macrophage infiltration and phenotype transition. In conclusion, mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute with normal air is an appropriate support therapy for severe muscle injuries.

  6. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute with normal air on macrophage number and infiltration during rat skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Fujita

    Full Text Available Use of mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute (2026.54 hPa with normal air is emerging as a common complementary treatment for severe muscle injury. Although hyperbaric oxygen at over 2 atmospheres absolute with 100% O2 promotes healing of skeletal muscle injury, it is not clear whether mild hyperbaric oxygen is equally effective. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute (1266.59 hPa with normal air on muscle regeneration. The tibialis anterior muscle of male Wistar rats was injured by injection of bupivacaine hydrochloride, and rats were randomly assigned to a hyperbaric oxygen experimental group or to a non-hyperbaric oxygen control group. Immediately after the injection, rats were exposed to hyperbaric oxygen, and the treatment was continued for 28 days. The cross-sectional area of centrally nucleated muscle fibers was significantly larger in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 and 7 days after injury. The number of CD68- or CD68- and CD206-positive cells was significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. Additionally, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. The number of Pax7- and MyoD- or MyoD- and myogenin-positive nuclei per mm2 and the expression levels of these proteins were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 days after injury. These results suggest that mild hyperbaric oxygen promotes skeletal muscle regeneration in the early phase after injury, possibly due to reduced hypoxic conditions leading to accelerated macrophage infiltration and phenotype transition. In conclusion, mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute with normal air is an appropriate support therapy for severe muscle injuries.

  7. A new highly sensitive method to assess respiration rates and kinetics of natural planktonic communities by use of the switchable trace oxygen sensor and reduced oxygen concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Tiano

    Full Text Available Oxygen respiration rates in pelagic environments are often difficult to quantify as the resolutions of our methods for O2 concentration determination are marginal for observing significant decreases during bottle incubations of less than 24 hours. Here we present the assessment of a new highly sensitive method, that combine Switchable Trace Oxygen (STOX sensors and all-glass bottle incubations, where the O2 concentration was artificially lowered. The detection limit of respiration rate by this method is inversely proportional to the O2 concentration, down to <2 nmol L(-1 h(-1 for water with an initial O2 concentration of 500 nmol L(-1. The method was tested in Danish coastal waters and in oceanic hypoxic waters. It proved to give precise measurements also with low oxygen consumption rates (∼7 nmol L(-1 h(-1, and to significantly decrease the time required for incubations (≤14 hours compared to traditional methods. This method provides continuous real time measurements, allowing for a number of diverse possibilities, such as modeling the rate of oxygen decrease to obtain kinetic parameters. Our data revealed apparent half-saturation concentrations (Km values one order of magnitude lower than previously reported for marine bacteria, varying between 66 and 234 nmol L(-1 O2. Km values vary between different microbial planktonic communities, but our data show that it is possible to measure reliable respiration rates at concentrations ∼0.5-1 µmol L(-1 O2 that are comparable to the ones measured at full air saturation.

  8. Assessment of GFP fluorescence in cells of Streptococcus gordonii under conditions of low pH and low oxygen concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.C.; Palmer, R.J.; Udsen, C.

    2001-01-01

    . A lower limit of oxygen concentration for maturation of the GFP fluorophore was determined: fluorescence was emitted at 0.1 p.p.m. dissolved oxygen (in conventionally prepared anaerobic media lacking reducing agents), whereas no fluorescence was detected in the presence of 0.025 p.p.m. dissolved oxygen......Use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a molecular reporter is restricted by several environmental factors, such as its requirement for oxygen in the development of the fluorophore, and its poor fluorescence at low pH. There are conflicting data on these limitations, however, and systematic...... (lateral or vertical) within the >50 mum thick biofilm, and fluorescence development after the shift to aerobic conditions occurred throughout the biofilm (even at the substratum). This suggests that oxygen gradients, which might result in reduced GFP fluorescence, did not exist in the >50 mum thick...

  9. Phytochemical changes in leaves of subtropical grasses and fynbos shrubs at elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattas, D.; Stock, W. D.; Mabusela, W. T.; Green, I. R.

    2005-07-01

    The effects of elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations on plant polyphenolic, tannin, nitrogen, phosphorus and total nonstructural carbohydrate concentrations were investigated in leaves of subtropical grass and fynbos shrub species. The hypothesis tested was that carbon-based secondary compounds would increase when carbon gain is in excess of growth requirements. This premise was tested in two ecosystems involving plants with different photosynthetic mechanisms and growth strategies. The first ecosystem comprised grasses from a C 4-dominated, subtropical grassland, where three plots were subjected to three different free air CO 2 enrichment treatments, i.e., elevated (600 to 800 μmol mol -1), intermediate (400 μmol mol -1) and ambient atmospheric CO 2. One of the seven grass species, Alloteropsis semialata, had a C 3 photosynthetic pathway while the other grasses were all C 4. The second ecosystem was simulated in a microcosm experiment where three fynbos species were grown in open-top chambers at ambient and 700 μmol mol -1 atmospheric CO 2 in low nutrient acid sands typical of south western coastal and mountain fynbos ecosystems. Results showed that polyphenolics and tannins did not increase in the grass species under elevated CO 2 and only in Leucadendron laureolum among the fynbos species. Similarly, foliar nitrogen content of grasses was largely unaffected by elevated CO 2, and among the fynbos species, only L. laureolum and Leucadendron xanthoconus showed changes in foliar nitrogen content under elevated CO 2, but these were of different magnitude. The overall decrease in nitrogen and phosphorus and consequent increase in C:N and C:P ratio in both ecosystems, along with the increase in polyphenolics and tannins in L. laureolum in the fynbos ecosystem, may negatively affect forage quality and decomposition rates. It is concluded that fast growing grasses do not experience sink limitation and invest extra carbon into growth rather than polyphenolics and

  10. Methanol resistant ruthenium electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction synthesized by pyrolysis of Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12} in different atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altamirano-Gutierrez, A.; Jimenez-Sandoval, O.; Uribe-Godinez, J.; Borja-Arco, E. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional (Cinvestav), Unidad Queretaro, Apartado Postal 1-798, Queretaro, Qro. 76001 (Mexico); Castellanos, R.H. [Universidad del Papaloapan, Campus Tuxtepec, Circuito Central No. 200, Col. Parque Industrial, Tuxtepec, Oax. 68301 (Mexico); Olivares-Ramirez, J.M. [Universidad Tecnologica de San Juan del Rio, Av. La Palma No. 125, Col. Vista Hermosa, San Juan del Rio, Qro. 76800 (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    Novel ruthenium electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared by pyrolysis of Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12} in three atmospheres: neutral (N{sub 2}), partially oxidative (air) and partially reductive (70:30 N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}), at temperatures in the 80-700 C range. The materials were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. A thermogravimetric analysis of the Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12} precursor in the three atmospheres was also performed. The electrocatalytic properties of the materials were evaluated by rotating disk electrode measurements in 0.5 mol L{sup -1} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The kinetic parameters, such as the Tafel slope, exchange current density and charge transfer coefficient, are reported. The catalysts prepared in N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}, in general, show a higher performance than those synthesized in air. In the two nitrogen containing atmospheres, a pyrolysis temperature of 360 C seems to lead to better electrocatalytic properties for the ORR. The new electrocatalysts are also tolerant to methanol concentrations as high as 2.0 mol L{sup -1}. (author)

  11. Oceanic and terrestrial biospheric CO2 uptake estimated from atmospheric potential oxygen observed at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, and Syowa, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyuki Ishidoya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous measurements of the atmospheric O2/N2 ratio and CO2 concentration were made at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, and Syowa, Antarctica for the period 2001–2009. Based on these measurements, the observed atmospheric potential oxygen (APO values were calculated. The APO variations produced by changes in the oceanic heat content were estimated using an atmospheric transport model and heat-driven air–sea O2 (N2 fluxes, and then subtracted from observed interannual variations of APO. The oceanic CO2 uptake derived from the resulting ‘corrected’ secular trend of APO showed interannual variability of less than ±0.6 GtC yr−1, significantly smaller than that derived from the ‘uncorrected’ trend of APO (±0.9 GtC yr−1. The average CO2 uptake during the period 2001–2009 was estimated to be 2.9±0.7 and 0.8±0.9 GtC yr−1 for the ocean and terrestrial biosphere, respectively. By excluding the influence of El Niño around 2002–2003, the terrestrial biospheric CO2 uptake for the period 2004–2009 increased to 1.5±0.9 GtC yr−1, while the oceanic uptake decreased slightly to 2.8±0.8 GtC yr−1.

  12. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) uptake by vegetation controlled by atmospheric concentrations and plant stomatal aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro-Suarez, I. G.; Meixner, F. X.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2011-10-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exchange between the atmosphere and five European tree species was investigated in the laboratory using a dynamic branch enclosure system (consisting of two cuvettes) and a highly specific NO2 analyzer. NO2 measurements were performed with a sensitive gas phase chemiluminescence NO detector combined with a NO2 specific (photolytic) converter, both from Eco-Physics (Switzerland). This highly specific detection system excluded bias from other nitrogen compounds. Investigations were performed at two light intensities (Photosynthetic Active Radiation, PAR, 450 and 900 μmol m-2 s-1) and NO2 concentrations between 0 and 5 ppb. Ambient parameters (air temperature and relative humidity) were held constant. The data showed dominant NO2 uptake by the respective tree species under all conditions. The results did not confirm the existence of a compensation point within a 95% confidence level, though we cannot completely exclude emission of NO2 under very low atmospheric concentrations. Induced stomatal stricture, or total closure, by changing light conditions, as well as by application of the plant hormone ABA (Abscisic Acid) caused a corresponding decrease of NO2 uptake. No loss of NO2 to plant surfaces was observed under stomatal closure and species dependent differences in uptake rates could be clearly related to stomatal behavior.

  13. An fMRI study on variation of visuospatial cognitive performance of young male due to highly concentrated oxygen administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Soon Cheol; Kim, Ik Hyeon; Tack, Gye Rae; Sohn, Jin Hun

    2004-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of 30% oxygen administration on the visuospatial cognitive performance using fMRI. Eight college students (right-handed, average age 23.5) were selected as subjects for this study. Oxygen supply equipment which gives 21% and 30% oxygen at a constant rate of 8L/min was developed for this study. To measure the performance of visuospatial cognition, two questionnaires with similar difficulty containing 20 questions each were also developed. Experiment was designed as two runs: run for visuospatial cognition test with normal air (21% of oxygen) and run for visuospatial cognition test with highly concentrated air (30% of oxygen). Run consists of 4 blocks and each block has 8 control problems and 5 visuospatial problems. Functional brain images were taken from 3T MRI using single-shot EPI method. Activities of neural network due to performing visuospatial cognition test were identified using subtraction procedure, and activation areas while performing visuospatial cognition test were extracted using double subtraction procedure. Activities were observed at occipital lobe, parietal lobe, and frontal lobe when performing visuospatial cognition test following both 21% and 30% oxygen administration. But in case of only 30% oxygen administration there were more activities at left precuneus, left cuneus, right postcentral gyrus, bilateral middle frontal gyri, right inferior frontal gyrus, left superior frontal gyrus, bilateral uvula, bilateral pyramis, and nodule compared with 21% oxygen administration. From results of visuospatial cognition test, accuracy rate increased in case of 30% oxygen administration. Thus it could be concluded that highly concentrated oxygen administration has positive effects on the visuospatial cognitive performance.

  14. Biotic enhancement of weathering, atmospheric oxygen and carbon dioxide in the Neoproterozoic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Timothy M. Lenton; Andrew J. Watson

    2004-01-01

    .... We show that two recent models, despite differences in the feedback mechanisms represented, predict that an increase in the weathering flux of P to the ocean would have caused a rise in atmospheric O...

  15. The role of atomic oxygen concentration in the ionization balance of the lower ionosphere during solar proton events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osepian, A.; Tereschenko, V. [Polar Geophysical Institute, Murmansk (Russian Federation); Dalin, P.; Kirkwood, S. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    The influence of atomic oxygen concentration on the height distribution of the main positive and negative ions and on electron density in the mesosphere is studied for the conditions prevailing during the solar proton event on 17 January 2005. It is shown by numerical modeling that the electron and ion density profiles are strongly dependent on the choice of the atomic oxygen profile. Experimental measurements of the electron density are used as the criterion for choosing the atomic oxygen profile in the mesosphere. With the help of modeling, the atomic oxygen profile in the daytime in the winter mesosphere is found to lead to a model electron density profile best matching the electron density profile obtained experimentally. As a result, with the help of modeling, we find the atomic oxygen profiles at various solar zenith angles in the winter mesosphere which lead to model electron density profiles matching the electron density profiles obtained experimentally. Alteration of the atomic oxygen concentration leads to a redistribution of the abundance of both positive and negative ion constituents, with changes in their total concentrations and transition heights. In consequence this results in changes of the electron density and effective recombination coefficient. For conditions of low concentration of atomic oxygen (during a solar proton event), the formation of cluster ions is the key process determining electron and ion densities at altitudes up to 77 km. The complex negative CO{sub 3}{sup -} ion is formed up to about 74 km and the final NO{sub 3}{sup -} ion, which is stable in relation to the atomic oxygen, is the dominant negative ion up to 74 km. As a result the transition heights between cluster ions and molecular ions and between negative ions and electron density are located at 77 km and 66 km, respectively. (orig.)

  16. Limits to Creation of Oxygen-Rich Atmospheres on Planets in the Outer Reaches of the Conventional Habitable Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    2017-10-01

    Abundant free oxygen appears to be a requirement for macroflora and macrofauna. To the best of our knowledge, a general discussion of which habitable planets are conducive to oxygen has not taken place. Theories for the rise of oxygen fall into 4 categories: (i) It is governed by an intrinsic rate of biological innovation, independent of environmental factors. (ii) It is caused by mantle evolution, probably consequent to secular cooling. (iii) It is caused by hydrogen escape, which irreversibly oxidizes the Earth. (iv) It is Gaia’s response to the brightening Sun, its rise prevented until reduced greenhouse gases were no longer needed to maintain a clement climate. All but the first of these make implicit astronomical predictions that can be quantified and made explicit.Here we address the third hypothesis. In this hypothesis hydrogen escape acts like an hourglass that continues until all relevant reduced mineral buffers have been oxidized (titrated, as it were) and the surface made safe for O2. The hypothesis predicts that abundant free O2 will be absent from habitable planets that have not experienced significant hydrogen escape. Where hydrogen escape is modest or insignificant, the atmosphere can be approximated as hydrostatic, which makes assessing radiative cooling by embedded molecules, atoms, and ions such as CO2 and H3+ straightforward. In particular, H2 is efficient at exciting non-LTE CO2 15 micron emission, which makes radiative cooling very effective when H2 is abundant. We can therefore map out the region of phase space in which habitable planets do not lose hydrogen, and therefore do not develop O2 atmospheres.A related matter is the power of radiative cooling by embedded molecules to enforce the diffusion limit to hydrogen escape. This matter in particular is relevant to addressing the empirical observation that rocky planets with thin or negligible atmospheres are rarely or never bigger than ~1.6 Earth radii.

  17. NIRS-Derived Tissue Oxygen Saturation and Hydrogen Ion Concentration Following Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. M. C.; Everett, M. E.; Crowell, J. B.; Westby, C. M.; Soller, B. R.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term bed rest (BR), a model of spaceflight, results in a decrease in aerobic capacity and altered submaximal exercise responses. The strongest BR-induced effects on exercise appear to be centrally-mediated, but longer BR durations may result in peripheral adaptations (e.g., decreased mitochondrial and capillary density) which are likely to influence exercise responses. PURPOSE: To measure tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) and hydrogen ion concentration ([H+]) in the vastus lateralis (VL) using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during cycle ergometry before and after . 30 d of BR. METHODS: Eight subjects performed a graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer to volitional fatigue 7 d before (pre-BR) and at the end or 1 day after BR (post-BR). NIRS spectra were collected from a sensor adhered to the skin overlying the VL. Oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured by open circuit spirometry. Blood volume (BV) was measured before and after BR using the carbon monoxide rebreathing technique. Changes in pre- and post-BR SO2 and [H+] data were compared using mixed model analyses. BV and peak exercise data were compared using paired t-tests. RESULTS: BV (pre-BR: 4.3+/-0.3, post-BR: 3.7+/-0.2 L, mean+/-SE, p=.01) and peak VO2 (pre-BR: 1.98+/-0.24, post-BR: 1.48 +/-0.21 L/min, p<.01) were reduced after BR. As expected, SO2 decreased with exercise before and after BR. However, SO2 was lower post compared with pre-BR throughout exercise, including at peak exercise (pre-BR: 50+/-3, post-BR: 43+/-4%, p=.01). After BR, [H+] was higher at the start of exercise and did not increase at the same rate as pre-BR. Peak [H+] was not different from pre to post-BR (pre-BR: 36+/-2; post-BR: 38+/-2 nmol/L). CONCLUSIONS: Lower SO2 during exercise suggests that oxygen extraction in the VL is higher after BR, perhaps due to lower circulating blood volume. The higher [H+] after BR suggests a greater reliance upon glycolysis during submaximal exercise, although [H+] at peak exercise was unchanged

  18. Oxygen source-oriented control of atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of VO2 for capacitive applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Vernardou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium dioxides of different crystalline orientation planes have successfully been fabricated by chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure using propanol, ethanol and O2 gas as oxygen sources. The thick a-axis textured monoclinic vanadium dioxide obtained through propanol presented the best electrochemical response in terms of the highest specific discharge capacity of 459 mAh g-1 with a capacitance retention of 97 % after 1000 scans under constant specific current of 2 A g-1. Finally, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy indicated that the charge transfer of Li+ through the vanadium dioxide / electrolyte interface was easier for this sample enhancing significantly its capacitance performance.

  19. ACT-America: L2 In Situ Atmospheric CO2, CO, CH4, and O3 Concentrations, Eastern USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), and ozone (O3) concentrations collected during airborne campaigns...

  20. CARVE: L2 Atmospheric CO2, CO and CH4 Concentrations, Harvard CRDS, Alaska, 2012-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations from airborne campaigns over the Alaskan and Canadian...

  1. CARVE: L2 Merged Atmospheric CO2, CO, O3 and CH4 Concentrations, Alaska, 2012-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), and water vapor (H2O) concentrations from airborne...

  2. CARVE: L2 Atmospheric CO2, CO and CH4 Concentrations, NOAA CRDS, Alaska, 2012-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and water vapor (H2O) concentrations from airborne campaigns over the...

  3. A Semi-Empirical Formula of the Dependence of the Fluorescence Intensity of Naphthalene on Temperature and the Oxygen Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, B.; Wang, Z.-G.; Yang, L.-C.; Li, X.-P.

    2017-09-01

    Two-ring aromatics, such as naphthalene, are important fluorescent components of kerosene in the planar laser-induced fluorescent (PLIF) technique. Quantifying measurements of kerosene vapor concentrations by PLIF require a prior knowledge of the fluorescence intensity of naphthalene over a wide temperature and oxygen concentration range. To promote the application of PLIF, a semi-empirical formula based on the collision theory and experimental data at the laser wavelength of 266 nm and a pressure of 0.1 MPa is established to predict the fluorescence intensity of naphthalene at different temperatures and oxygen concentrations. This formula takes vibrational states, temperature, and oxygen quenching into account. Verified by published experimental data, the formula can predict the fluorescence intensity of naphthalene with an error less than 9%.

  4. Atmospheric concentrations, occurrence and deposition of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in a Mediterranean coastal site (Etang de Thau, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro-Jimenez, J., E-mail: javier.castro-jimenez@idaea.csic.es [European Commission-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, via E. Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy); Mariani, G.; Vives, I.; Skejo, H.; Umlauf, G. [European Commission-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, via E. Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy); Zaldivar, J.M. [European Commission-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, via E. Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy); Dueri, S. [CRH, UMR 212 EME, Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement, Avenue Jean Monnet BP 171, 34203 Sete Cedex (France); Messiaen, G.; Laugier, T. [Ifremer, Environment and Resources Laboratory, Avenue Jean Monnet BP 171, 34203 Sete Cedex (France)

    2011-07-15

    Atmospheric concentrations and deposition fluxes of PCDD/F and PCB have been evaluated over a 1-year period in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon (Etang de Thau, France). Indicative PBDE air concentrations in the hot season are also reported in this work. {Sigma}2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs and {Sigma}18PCBs (gas + particulate) air concentrations ranged from 67 to 1700 fg m{sup -3} and from 13 to 95 pg m{sup -3}, respectively whereas {Sigma}8PBDEs (gas + particulate) summer time levels varied from 158 to 230 pg m{sup -3}. The PCDD/F and PCB atmospheric occurrence over Thau lagoon and subsequent inputs to the surface waters are determined by an assemble of factors, being the seasonality of atmospheric concentration, the air mass origin and meteorological conditions important drivers. Total (wet + dry) {Sigma}2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs and {Sigma}18PCBs deposition fluxes to Thau Lagoon waters are 117 and 715 pg m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, respectively. - Highlights: > PCDD/F and PCB atmospheric concentrations in Thau lagoon are typical from rural/semi-rural areas. > PBDE atmospheric concentrations in Thau lagoon are typical from urban/industrial sites. > PCDD/F and PCB atmospheric concentrations over Thau lagoon and inputs to surface waters are very variable, even changing between the same week of the month in two consecutive years. > Metallurgical industry may be a possible local source of PCDD/Fs in the Thau lagoon basin. > Annual PCBs and PCDD/Fs atmospheric inputs are dominated by dry deposition - PCDD/F and PCB atmospheric concentrations over Thau lagoon and inputs to surface waters are very variable, even changing between the same week of the month in two consecutive years.

  5. Glucose concentration alters dissolved oxygen levels in liquid cultures of Beauveria bassiana and affects formation and bioefficacy of blastospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarin, Gabriel Moura; Jackson, Mark A; Kobori, Nilce Naomi; Behle, Robert W; Dunlap, Christopher A; Delalibera Júnior, Ítalo

    2015-08-01

    The filamentous fungus Beauveria bassiana is an economically important pathogen of numerous arthropod pests and is able to grow in submerged culture as filaments (mycelia) or as budding yeast-like blastospores. In this study, we evaluated the effect of dissolved oxygen and high glucose concentrations on blastospore production by submerged cultures of two isolates of B. bassiana, ESALQ1432 and GHA. Results showed that maintaining adequate dissolved oxygen levels coupled with high glucose concentrations enhanced blastospore yields by both isolates. High glucose concentrations increased the osmotic pressure of the media and coincided with higher dissolved oxygen levels and increased production of significantly smaller blastospores compared with blastospores produced in media with lower concentrations of glucose. The desiccation tolerance of blastospores dried to less than 2.6 % moisture was not affected by the glucose concentration of the medium but was isolate dependent. Blastospores of isolate ESALQ1432 produced in media containing 140 g glucose L(-1) showed greater virulence toward whitefly nymphs (Bemisia tabaci) as compared with blastospores produced in media containing 40 g glucose L(-1). These results suggest a synergistic effect between glucose concentration and oxygen availability on changing morphology and enhancing the yield and efficacy of blastospores of B. bassiana, thereby facilitating the development of a cost-effective production method for this blastospore-based bioinsecticide.

  6. Exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) between soils and atmosphere under various CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Behrendt, Thomas; Yi, Zhigang; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    A new continuous integrated cavity output spectroscopy analyzer and an automated soil chamber system were used to investigate the exchange processes of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) between soils and the atmosphere under laboratory conditions. The exchange patterns of OCS between soils and the atmosphere were found to be highly dependent on soil moisture and ambient CO2 concentration. With increasing soil moisture, OCS exchange ranged from emission under dry conditions to an uptake within an optimum moisture range, followed again by emission at high soil moisture. Elevated CO2 was found to have a significant impact on the exchange rate and direction as tested with several soils. There is a clear tendency toward a release of OCS at higher CO2 levels (up to 7600 ppm), which are typical for the upper few centimeters within soils. At high soil moisture, the release of OCS increased sharply. Measurements after chloroform vapor application show that there is a biotic component to the observed OCS exchange. Furthermore, soil treatment with the fungi inhibitor nystatin showed that fungi might be the dominant OCS consumers in the soils we examined. We discuss the influence of soil moisture and elevated CO2 on the OCS exchange as a change in the activity of microbial communities. Physical factors such as diffusivity that are governed by soil moisture also play a role. Comparing KM values of the enzymes to projected soil water CO2 concentrations showed that competitive inhibition is unlikely for carbonic anhydrase and PEPCO but might occur for RubisCO at higher CO2 concentrations.

  7. Diurnal changes of arterial oxygen saturation and erythropoietin concentration in male and female highlanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Edgar; Riveros, Alain; Sánchez, Armando; Peñuela, Oscar; Böning, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    In Caucasians and Native Americans living at altitude, hemoglobin mass is increased in spite of erythropoietin concentrations ([Epo]) not markedly differing from sea level values. We hypothesized that a nocturnal decrease of arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) causes a temporary rise of [Epo] not detected by morning measurements. SaO2 (continuous, finger oximeter) and [Epo] (ELISA, every 4 h) were determined in young highlanders (altitude 2600 m) during 24 h of usual daily activity. In Series I (six male, nine female students), SaO2 fell during the night with the nadir occurring between 01:00 and 03:00; daily means (range 92.4-95.2%) were higher in females (+1.7%, P < 0.01). [Epo] showed opposite changes with zenith occurring at 04:00 without a sex difference. Mean daily values (22.9 ± 10.7SD U/L) were higher than values obtained at 08:00 (17.2 ± 9.5 U/L, P < 0.05). In Series II (seven females), only SaO2 was measured. During follicular and luteal phases, SaO2 variation was similar to Series I, but the rhythm was disturbed during menstruation. While daily [Epo] variations at sea level are not homogeneous, there is a diurnal variation at altitude following changes in SaO2 Larger hypoventilation-dependent decreases of alveolar PO2 decreases during the night probably cause a stronger reduction of SaO2 in highlanders compared to lowlanders. This variation might be enlarged by a diurnal fluctuation of Hb concentration. In spite of a lower [Hb], the higher SaO2 in women compared to men led to a similar arterial oxygen content, likely explaining the absence of differences in [Epo] between sexes. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  8. Intercomparison study of atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide concentrations measured at the Ebre River Delta Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhipinti, Paola; Morguí, Josep Anton; Àgueda, Alba; Batet, Oscar; Borràs, Sílvia; Cañas, Lídia; Curcoll, Roger; Grossi, Claudia; Nofuentes, Manel; Vazquez, Eusebi; Rodó, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the ClimaDat project, IC3 has established a network of eight monitoring stations across the Iberian Peninsula and the Canarian Archipelago with the aim of studying climate processes. The monitoring station at the Ebre River Delta (DEC3) is located in the Ebre River Delta Natural Park (40° 44' N; 0° 47' E) and it is characterized by the typical North-Western Mediterranean climate. Since 2013, atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHG) and 222Rn tracer gas together with the meteorological parameters are continuously measured from a 10 m a.g.l. height tower. Atmospheric GHG (CO2, CH4, CO and N2O) concentrations are determined using a Picarro analyzer G2301 (CO2 and CH4) and a modified gas chromatograph (GC) Agilent 6890N (CO2, CH4, CO and N2O). Open data access is available from the www.climadat.es website. Data collected at the DEC3 station are also submitted to the InGOS platform since this station is part of the InGOS European infrastructure project. Researchers from the Laboratory of the Atmosphere and the Oceans (LAO) at IC3 have performed an intercomparison study at the DEC3 site between three different Picarro analyzers (two Picarro G2301 and one Picarro G2301M), a Los Gatos Research (LGR) analyzer and the GC system already installed at the station. The aim of this study is to compare and assess the measuring agreement between the four optical gas analyzers and the GC. In the first part of the experiment, all instruments have been calibrated using NOAA gases as primary standards analyzing five Praxair provided targets to evaluate the precision of the measuring instruments. Max Plank Institute (MPI) gases have been used as secondary standards for the GC whereas Praxair provided tanks are used as secondary standards for the Picarro and the LGR analyzers. In the second part of the experiment, atmospheric GHG were measured from natural atmospheric air taken from a 10 m a.g.l. inlet. Daily cycles of GHG measurements were carried out using different

  9. Effect of Low-Oxygen Conditions Created by Modified Atmosphere Packaging on Radiation Tolerance in Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in Sweet Cherries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, Peter A; Swedman, Allison; Mackey, Bruce

    2017-12-18

    Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) creates a low-oxygen (O2) environment that can increase the shelf life of fresh produce by decreasing respiration and the growth of pathogens. Low oxygen may also increase insect tolerance to irradiation (IR), and the use of MAP with products treated by IR to control quarantine pests before export may inadvertently compromise treatment efficacy. Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) is a quarantine pest of stone and small fruits and a potential target for postharvest IR treatment. The effect of low oxygen generated by MAP at ambient temperatures on the radiation tolerance of D. suzukii infesting sweet cherries was examined. Early pupal stage D. suzukii were inserted into ripe sweet cherries and treated by 1) MAP + IR, 2) IR alone, 3) MAP alone, or 4) no MAP and no IR and held for adult emergence. Three types of commercially available MAP products were tested that produced different oxygen concentrations between 3 and 15%, and a sublethal radiation dose (60 Gy) was used to allow comparisons between the treatments. Xtend PP61 bags (3.2-4.8% O2), Xtend PP71 bags (5.4-8.6% O2), and Xtend PP53 bags (13.6-15.4% O2) did not enhance survivorship to the adult stage in D. suzukii pupae irradiated at 60 Gy in sweet cherries. MAP use should not compromise phytosanitary IR treatment against D. suzukii in exported sweet cherries or other fruit. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Optical remote sensing of properties and concentrations of atmospheric trace constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladutescu, Daniela Viviana

    The effect of human activities on the global climate may lead to large disturbances of the economic, social and political circumstances in the middle and long term. Understanding the dynamics of the Earth's climate is therefore of high importance and one of the major scientific challenges of our time. The estimation of the contribution of the Earth's climate system components needs observation and continuous monitoring of various atmospheric physical and chemical parameters. Temperature, water vapor and greenhouse gases concentration, aerosol and clouds loads, and atmospheric dynamics are parameters of particular importance in this respect. The quantification of the anthropogenic influence on the dynamics of these above-mentioned parameters is of crucial importance nowadays but still affected by significant uncertainties. In the present context of these huge uncertainties in our understanding of how these different atmospheric compounds contribute to the radiative forcing, a significant part of my research interest is related to the following topics: (1) Development of lidar (Light Detection and Ranging)-based remote sensing techniques for monitoring atmospheric compounds and processes; (2) Aerosols hygroscopic properties and atmospheric modeling; (3) Water vapor mixing ratio and relative humidity estimation in the troposphere; (4) Characterization of the long-range transported aerosols; (5) Ambient gases detection using Fourier Transform Interferometers (FTIR); (6) Design of inexpensive Fabry Perot Interferometer for visible and near infrared for land and ocean surface remote sensing applications. The lidar-based remote sensing measurement techniques for the monitoring of climate change parameters where implemented at the City College of the City University of New York (CCNY/CUNY) LIDAR station and are presented in the second section of the paper. The geographical location of the CCNY lidar station is 40.86N, -73.86W. Among the lidar retrievals one important

  11. Study of the superficial ozone concentrations in the atmosphere of Comunidad de Madrid using passive samplers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Galán Madruga

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The ozone is a secondary atmospheric pollutant which is generated for photochemical reactions of volatil organic compounds (VOC’s and nitrogen oxides (NOx. In Spain the ozone is a big problem as a consequence of the solar radiation to reach high levels. Exposure over a period of time to elevated ozone concentrations can cause damage in the public health and alterations in the vegetation.The aim of this study is to carry out the development and validation of a measurement method to let asses the superficial ozone levels in the Comunidad de Madrid, by identifing the zones more significants, where to measure with UV photometric monitors (automatics methods this pollutant and where the health and the vegetation can be affected. To such effect, passive samplers are used, which have glass fiber filters coated with a solution of sodium nitrite, potassium carbonate, glycerol and water. The nitrite ion in the presence of ozone is oxidized to nitrato ion, which it is extrated with ultrapure water and analyzed for ion chromatography, by seen proportional to the concentration existing in the sampling point.The results of validation from field tests indicate a excellent correlation between the passive and the automatic method.The higher superficial ozone concentrations are placed in rural zones, distanced of emission focus of primary pollutants (nitrogen oxides and volatil organic compounds... principally in direction soutwest and northwest of the Comunidad of Madrid.

  12. Precision of cerebral oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration measurements in neonates measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arri, Sandra Jasminder; Muehlemann, Thomas; Biallas, Martin; Bucher, Hans Ulrich; Wolf, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Background and aim: One source of error with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is the assumption that the measured tissue is optically homogeneous. This is not always the case. Our aim is to assess the impact of tissue homogeneity (TH) on the precision of NIRS measurements in neonates. Methods: On 36 term and 27 preterm neonates at least five 1-min measurements are performed on each subject using the OxiplexTS. The sensor position is slightly changed before each measurement while assessing TH. The precision for cerebral tissue oxygenation saturation (StO2) and total hemoglobin concentration (tHb) are calculated by repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: The mean StO2 is not significantly different between term and preterm infants. The mean tHb is significantly lower in preterm infants (p preterm and from 11.0 to 2.0% for term infants; the precision of tHb increases from 10.1 to 7.5μM for preterm and from 16.4 to 3.5μM for term infants. The precision for StO2 is higher in term than in preterm infants. The precision for tHb shows no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions: The precision of NIRS measurements correlates with tissue homogeneity.

  13. Catalyst evaluation for oxygen reduction reaction in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Jiang, Yiliang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Cleemann, Lars N.; Li, Qingfeng

    2018-01-01

    Phosphoric acid is the common electrolyte for high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) that have advantages such as enhanced CO tolerance and simplified heat and water management. The currently used rotating disk electrode technique is limited to tests in dilute solutions at low temperatures and hence is not suitable for catalyst evaluation for HT-PEMFCs. In this study, we have designed and constructed a half-cell setup to measure the intrinsic activities of catalysts towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in conditions close to HT-PEMFC cathodes. By optimization of the hydrophobic characteristics of electrodes and the catalyst layer thickness, ORR activities of typical Pt/C catalysts are successfully measured in concentrated phosphoric acid at temperatures above 100 °C. In terms of mass-specific activities, the catalyst exhibits about two times higher activity in the half-cell electrode than that observed in fuel cells, indicating the feasibility of the technique as well as the potential for further improvement of fuel cell electrode performance.

  14. Simultaneous measurements of total hemoglobin concentration and blood oxygenation with laser diode-based optoacoustic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Henkel, S. Nan; Seeton, Roger; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2017-03-01

    Noninvasive, accurate, continuous monitoring of multiple variables, including blood oxygenation, i.e. oxyhemoglobin saturation (SO2) and total hemoglobin concentration (THb) in both high acuity and low acuity environments would greatly facilitate prompt diagnosis and treatment of physiologic derangements. However, most of the existing techniques for patient monitoring are invasive, while noninvasive techniques often fail to provide accurate measurements. We built a compact, multi-wavelength, nanosecond, fiber-coupled laser diode-based optoacoustic system for noninvasive, accurate monitoring of blood SO2 and THb in veins and arteries. We tested the system by probing the radial artery of healthy volunteers. Using blood samples obtained by venipuncture, we also measured a reference THb for each volunteer. Moreover, the optoacoustic data were compared with that obtained from a commercially available noninvasive monitor for measurements of these variables. The optoacoustic system provided rapid, simultaneous, and continuous measurement of THb and SO2 with high precision. The obtained results are promising and we plan to further test the system in clinical studies and at conditions simulating circulatory shock.

  15. Microscopic Study of the Phase Transformation During the Oxygen-Enriched Direct Smelting of Jamesonite Concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Dai, Xi

    2017-11-01

    Samples of partially oxidized jamesonite particles and crude lead-antimony alloy from oxygen-enriched direct smelting of jamesonite concentrate have been characterized by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). It was shown that the Fe diffused outward from the center of the jamesonite to the outermost layer forming an iron-riched sulfide coat, while the behaviors of Pb, Sb, and Cu were contrary to that of Fe. The formation of FexSbyS impeded the oxidation and volatilization of antimony compounds. As a result, more antimony was retained in the grain during the oxidation process and then transformed into the crude lead-antimony alloy. The microprobe analysis of the metallic core of the partially oxidized jamesonite grain revealed that the PbS was preferentially oxidized to give metals. Investigations on crude lead-antimony alloy indicated that impurities of iron and copper presented as FeSb2, FeSb, and Cu2Sb forms.

  16. Observations of the uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS by trees under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sandoval-Soto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Global change forces ecosystems to adapt to elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2. We understand that carbonyl sulfide (COS, a trace gas which is involved in building up the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer, is taken up by vegetation with the same triad of the enzymes which are metabolizing CO2, i.e. ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP-Co and carbonic anhydrase (CA. Therefore, we discuss a physiological/biochemical acclimation of these enzymes affecting the sink strength of vegetation for COS. We investigated the acclimation of two European tree species, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus ilex, grown inside chambers under elevated CO2, and determined the exchange characteristics and the content of CA after a 1–2 yr period of acclimation from 350 ppm to 800 ppm CO2. We demonstrate that a compensation point, by definition, does not exist. Instead, we propose to discuss a point of uptake affinity (PUA. The results indicate that such a PUA, the CA activity and the deposition velocities may change and may cause a decrease of the COS uptake by plant ecosystems, at least as long as the enzyme acclimation to CO2 is not surpassed by an increase of atmospheric COS. As a consequence, the atmospheric COS level may rise causing an increase of the radiative forcing in the troposphere. However, this increase is counterbalanced by the stronger input of this trace gas into the stratosphere causing a stronger energy reflection by the stratospheric sulfur aerosol into space (Brühl et al., 2012. These data are very preliminary but may trigger a discussion on COS uptake acclimation to foster measurements with modern analytical instruments.

  17. ALTIUS, a future small mission for O3 and other atmospheric trace species concentration profiles retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekemper, Emmanuel; Fussen, Didier; Vanhellemont, Filip; Pieroux, Didier; Mateshvili, Nina; Franssens, Ghislain; Errera, Quentin; Vanhamel, Jurgen; Neefs, Eddy; De Vos, Lieve; Aballea, Ludovic

    2016-04-01

    The ALTIUS (Atmospheric Limb Tracker for the Investigation of the Upcoming Stratosphere) mission aims at the retrieval of atmospheric trace species concentration profiles with a good vertical resolution and a global coverage. It will be flown on a PROBA-type platform on a Sun-synchronous orbit with a 10:00 AM typical local time. The instrument exploits the concept of hyperspectral imaging of different light sources: limb-scattered radiance, Sun, Moon, stars, planets. These sources are observed sequentially, depending on their availability and good positioning. This multi-mode observation capability enables measurements in both bright and dark side of the orbit, extending the coverage to virtually all latitudes and different illumination conditions (including polar night). The instrument concept relies on three independent spectral channels: UV, VIS and NIR. The imaging technique alleviates the need for scanning systems as the field of view will capture the atmosphere from cloud top to the lower thermosphere at once. It also makes the pointing calibration more easy and robust, an important feature knowing that tangent altitude misregistration is one of the major sources of bias in the retrieved products. In each channel, the wavelength selection for each image will be performed by a tunable filter: an AOTF (Acousto-Optical Tunable Filter) for the VIS and NIR, and a FPI (Fabry-Perot Interferometer) in the UV. ALTIUS has recently completed a phase B1 under ESA supervision. The next milestone will be the preliminary design review (PDR) that will take place within a few months from now. Launch is expected for 2020 with a 3-5 years design lifetime. We will present the scientific objectives of the mission, and the current status of the payload and platform concepts. An overview of the main in-flight calibration strategies will be given, and the expected performance of the O3 level-2 product for the different modes of observation will be shown.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of the local concentration and structure in multicomponent aerosol nanoparticles under atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadima, Katerina S; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G; Pandis, Spyros N

    2017-06-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the local structure and local concentration in atmospheric nanoparticles consisting of an organic compound (cis-pinonic acid or n-C30H62), sulfate and ammonium ions, and water. Simulations in the isothermal-isobaric (NPT) statistical ensemble under atmospheric conditions with a prespecified number of molecules of the abovementioned compounds led to the formation of a nanoparticle. Calculations of the density profiles of all the chemical species in the nanoparticle, the corresponding radial pair distribution functions, and their mobility inside the nanoparticle revealed strong interactions developing between sulfate and ammonium ions. However, sulfate and ammonium ions prefer to populate the central part of the nanoparticle under the simulated conditions, whereas organic molecules like to reside at its outer surface. Sulfate and ammonium ions were practically immobile; in contrast, the organic molecules exhibited appreciable mobility at the outer surface of the nanoparticle. When the organic compound was a normal alkane (e.g. n-C30H62), a well-organized (crystalline-like) phase was rapidly formed at the free surface of the nanoparticle and remained separate from the rest of the species.

  19. A First Look at Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Measurements of Martian Atmospheric C02 by the Phoenix Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, P.B.; Ming, D.W.; Boynton, W.V.; Hamara, D.; Hoffman, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Precise stable isotope measurements of the CO2 in the martian atmosphere have the potential to provide important constraints for our understanding of the history of volatiles, the carbon cycle, current atmospheric processes, and the degree of water/rock interaction on Mars. The isotopic composition of the martian atmosphere has been measured using a number of different methods (Table 1), however a precise value (<1%) has yet to be achieved. Given the elevated 13C values measured in carbonates in martian meteorites it has been supposed that the martian atmosphere was enriched in delta(sup 13)C. This was supported by measurements of trapped CO2 gas in EETA 79001[2] which showed elevated delta(sup 13)C values (Table 1). More recently, Earth-based spectroscopic measurements of the martian atmosphere have measured the martian CO2 to be depleted in delta(sup 13)C relative to CO2 in the terrestrial atmosphere. The spectroscopic measurements performed by Krasnopolsky et al. were reported with approx.2% uncertainties which are much smaller than the Viking measurements, but still remain very large in comparison to the magnitude of carbon and oxygen isotope fractionations under martian surface conditions. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument on the Mars Phoenix Lander included a magnetic sector mass spectrometer (EGA) which had the goal of measuring the isotopic composition of martian atmospheric CO2 to within 0.5%. The mass spectrometer is a miniature magnetic sector instrument intended to measure both the martian atmosphere as well as gases evolved from heating martian soils. Ions produced in the ion source are drawn out by a high voltage and focused by a magnetic field onto a set of collector slits. Four specific trajectories are selected to cover the mass ranges, 0.7 - 4, 7 - 35, 14 - 70, and 28 - 140 Da. Using four channels reduces the magnitude of the mass scan and provides simultaneous coverage of the mass ranges. Channel electron multiplier (CEM

  20. Oxygen Plasma Treatment of Rubber Surface by the Atmospheric Pressure Cold Plasma Torch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Bong-ju; Kusano, Yukihiro; Kato, Nobuko

    1997-01-01

    A new application of the atmospheric cold plasma torch has been investigated. Namely, the surface treatment of an air-exposed vulcanized rubber compound. The effect of plasma treatment was evaluated by the bondability of the treated rubber compound with another rubber compound using a polyurethane...

  1. The Effects of Differing Oxygen Concentrations on Reaction Time Performance at Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-04

    technology employed in modern air platforms. In OBOGS, engine bleed air is passed through a molecular sieve where harmful gasses such as carbon ...would be decreased, which in 2 turn would result in a decline in the ability to exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide through the alveoli... carbon dioxide in the blood by oxygen. The abundance of oxygen and the lack of carbon dioxide have been thought to cause vasoconstriction in the

  2. Metabolism of benthic octopods (Cephalopoda) as a function of habitat depth and oxygen concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Brad A.; Childress, James J.

    2000-07-01

    The oxygen consumption rates and activities of key metabolic enzymes were measured and analyzed as a function of habitat depth for several species of benthic octopod (Cephalopoda: Octopoda) including a recently described hydrothermal vent endemic species. Oxygen consumption rates and citrate synthase activity, an indicator of aerobic metabolic potential, did not vary significantly with increasing habitat depth. Anaerobic metabolic potential, as evidenced by octopine dehydrogenase activity, declined significantly with increasing habitat depth. It is suggested that burst swimming abilities, and hence glycolytic potential, are not strongly selected for in the deep-sea, where visual predator-prey interactions are reduced because of light-limitation. Oxygen consumption rates for Octopus californicus and O. bimaculoides were analyzed as a function of oxygen partial pressure as well. O. californicus, which lives in the hypoxic Santa Barbara basin at 500 m depth, was able to regulate its oxygen consumption to the limit of detectable oxygen partial pressures. O. bimaculoides, an intertidal species, had a minimum critical oxygen partial pressure of 16 mmHg. It is also shown that oxygen consumption rates and oxygen consumption regulation are strongly affected by individual experiment duration (either handling stress or food deprivation). O. californicus appears to be much more strongly affected by experiment duration than is O. bimaculoides.

  3. Controlled production of atomic oxygen and nitrogen in a pulsed radio-frequency atmospheric-pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedrick, J.; Schröter, S.; Niemi, K.; Wijaikhum, A.; Wagenaars, E.; de Oliveira, N.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.; O’Connell, D.; Gans, T.

    2017-11-01

    Radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas are efficient sources for the production of reactive species at ambient pressure and close to room temperature. Pulsing the radio-frequency power input provides additional control over species production and gas temperature. Here, we demonstrate the controlled production of highly reactive atomic oxygen and nitrogen in a pulsed radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) atmospheric-pressure plasma, operated with a small 0.1 % air-like admixture (N2 /O2 at 4:1 ) through variations in the duty cycle. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and nitrogen are determined through vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy using the DESIRS beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron coupled with a high resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer. The neutral-gas temperature is measured using nitrogen molecular optical emission spectroscopy. For a fixed applied-voltage amplitude (234 V), varying the pulse duty cycle from 10% to 100% at a fixed 10 kHz pulse frequency enables us to regulate the densities of atomic oxygen and nitrogen over the ranges of (0.18+/-0.03) –(3.7+/-0.1)× 1020 m-3 and (0.2+/-0.06) –(4.4+/-0.8) × 1019 m-3 , respectively. The corresponding 11 K increase in the neutral-gas temperature with increased duty cycle, up to a maximum of (314+/-4) K, is relatively small. This additional degree of control, achieved through regulation of the pulse duty cycle and time-averaged power, could be of particular interest for prospective biomedical applications.

  4. Dependence of Ozone Generation on Gas Temperature Distribution in AC Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Go; Akashi, Haruaki

    AC atmospheric pressure multi-filament dielectric barrier discharge in oxygen has been simulated using two dimensional fluid model. In the discharge, three kinds of streamers have been obtained. They are primary streamers, small scale streamers and secondary streamers. The primary streamers are main streamers in the discharge and the small scale streamers are formed after the ceasing of the primary streamers. And the secondary streamers are formed on the trace of the primary streamers. In these streamers, the primary and the small scale streamers are very effective to generate O(3P) oxygen atoms which are precursor of ozone. And the ozone is generated mainly in the vicinity of the dielectrics. In high gas temperature region, ozone generation decreases in general. However, increase of the O(3P) oxygen atom density in high gas temperature region compensates decrease of ozone generation rate coefficient. As a result, amount of ozone generation has not changed. But if the effect of gas temperature was neglected, amount of ozone generation increases 10%.

  5. Planetary fertility during the past 400 ka based on the triple isotope composition of atmospheric oxygen in trapped gases from the Vostok ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunier, T.; Bender, M. L.; Barnett, B.; von Fisher, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    The productivity of the biosphere leaves its imprint on the isotopic composition of atmospheric oxygen. Ultimately atmospheric oxygen, through photosynthesis, originates from seawater. Fractionations during the passage from seawater to atmospheric O2 and during respiration are mass dependent, affecting δ17O about half as much as δ18O. An "anomalous" (also termed mass independent) fractionation process changes δ17O about 1.7 times as much as δ18O during isotope exchange between O2 and CO2 in the stratosphere. The relative rates of biological O2 production and stratospheric processing determine the relationship between δ17O and δ18O of O2 in the atmosphere. Variations of this relationship thus allow us to estimate changes in the rate of mass dependent O2 production by photosynthesis versus the rate of mass independent O2-CO2 exchange in the stratosphere. However, the analysis of the 17O anomaly is complicated because each hydrological and biological process influencing δ17O and δ18O fractionates 17O and 18O in slightly different proportions. In this study we present oxygen data covering the last 400 kyr from the Vostok ice core. We reconstruct oxygen productivities from the triple isotope composition of atmospheric oxygen with a box model. Our steady state model for the oxygen cycle takes into account fractionation during photosynthesis and respiration of the land and ocean biosphere as well as fractionation when oxygen passes through the stratosphere. We consider changes of fractionation factors linked to climate variations taking into account the span of estimates of the main factors affecting our calculations. We find that ocean oxygen productivity was likely elevated relative to modern during glacials. However, this increase probably did not fully compensate for a reduction in land ocean productivity resulting in a slight reduction in total oxygen production during glacials.

  6. Whitings as a Potential Mechanism for Controlling Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations – Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady D. Lee; William A. Apel; Michelle R. Walton

    2006-03-01

    Species of cyanobacteria in the genera Synechococcus and Synechocystis are known to be the catalysts of a phenomenon called "whitings", which is the formation and precipitation of fine-grained CaCO3 particles. Whitings occur when the cyanobacteria fix atmospheric CO2 through the formation of CaCO3 on their cell surfaces which leads to precipitation to the ocean floor and subsequent entombment in mud. Whitings represent one potential mechanism for CO2 sequestration. Research was performed to determine the ability of various strains of Synechocystis and Synechococcus to calcify when grown in microcosms amended with 2.5 mM HCO3- and 3.4 mM Ca2+. Results indicated that while all strains tested have the ability to calcify, only two, Synechococcus species, strains PCC 8806 and PCC 8807, were able to calcify to the extent that CaCO3 was precipitated. Enumeration of the cyanobacterial cultures during testing indicated that cell density did not appear to have an effect on calcification. Factors that had the greatest effect on calcification were CO2 removal and subsequent generation of alkaline pH. As CO2 was removed, growth medium pH increased and soluble Ca2+ was removed from solution. The largest increases in growth medium pH occurred when CO2 levels dropped below 400 ppmv. Precipitation of CaCO3 catalyzed by the growth and physiology of cyanobacteria in the Genus Synechococcus represents a potential mechanism for sequestration of atmospheric CO2 produced during the burning of coal for power generation. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 were tested in microcosm experiments for their ability to calcify when exposed to a fixed calcium concentration of 3.4 mM and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations of 0.5, 1.25 and 2.5 mM. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 removed calcium continuously over the duration of the experiment producing approximately 18.6 mg of solid-phase calcium. Calcium removal occurred over a two-day time period when

  7. Association of atmospheric concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with their urinary metabolites in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poursafa, Parinaz; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Mansourian, Marjan; Pourzamani, Hamidreza; Ebrahim, Karim; Sadeghian, Babak; Kelishadi, Roya

    2017-07-01

    This study aims to determine the atmospheric concentrations of particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5)-bounded polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their association with their urinary metabolites in children and adolescents. This study was conducted from October 2014 to March 2016 in Isfahan, Iran. We measured 16 species of PAHs bounded to PM2.5 by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) from 7 parts of the city. Moreover, PAH urinary metabolites were measured in 186 children and adolescents, randomly selected from households. Urinary metabolites consisted of 1-hydroxy naphthalene (1-naphthol), 2-hydroxy naphthalene (2-naphthol), 9-hydroxy phenanthrene (9-phenanthrol), and 1-hydroxy pyrene using GC/MS. Considering the short half-lives of PAHs, we measured the metabolites twice with 4 to 6 months of time interval. We found that the ambient concentrations of PAHs were significantly associated with their urinary metabolites. 1-hydroxy naphthalene and 2-hydroxy naphthalene concentrations showed an increase of 1.049 (95% CI: 1.030, 1.069) and 1.047 (95% CI: 1.025, 1.066) for each unit increase (1 ng/m3) in ambient naphthalene. Similarly, 1-hydroxy pyrene showed an increase of 1.009 (95% CI: 1.006-1.011) for each unit increase (1 ng/m3) in ambient pyrene concentration after adjustment for body mass index, physical activity level, urinary creatinine, age, and sex. The association of urinary 9-hydroxyphenanthrene and ambient phenantherene was significant in the crude model; however after adjustment for the abovementioned covariates, it was no more significant. We found significant correlations between exposure to ambient PM2.5-bounded PAHs and their urinary excretion. Considering the adverse health effects of PAHs in the pediatric age group, biomonitoring of PAHs should be underscored; preventive measures need to be intensified.

  8. Adrenal Demedullation and Oxygen Supplementation Independently Increase Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Concentrations in Fetal Sheep With Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Macko, Antoni R.; Yates, Dustin T.; Chen, Xiaochuan; Shelton, Leslie A.; Kelly, Amy C.; Davis, Melissa A.; Camacho, Leticia E.; Anderson, Miranda J.; Limesand, Sean W.

    2016-01-01

    In pregnancies complicated by placental insufficiency and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), fetal glucose and oxygen concentrations are reduced, whereas plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations are elevated throughout the final third of gestation. Here we study the effects of chronic hypoxemia and hypercatecholaminemia on β-cell function in fetal sheep with placental insufficiency-induced IUGR that is produced by maternal hyperthermia. IUGR and control fetuses underwent a sh...

  9. Adrenal Demedullation and Oxygen Supplementation Independently Increase Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Concentrations in Fetal Sheep With Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macko, Antoni R.; Yates, Dustin T.; Chen, Xiaochuan; Shelton, Leslie A.; Kelly, Amy C.; Davis, Melissa A.; Camacho, Leticia E.; Anderson, Miranda J.

    2016-01-01

    In pregnancies complicated by placental insufficiency and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), fetal glucose and oxygen concentrations are reduced, whereas plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations are elevated throughout the final third of gestation. Here we study the effects of chronic hypoxemia and hypercatecholaminemia on β-cell function in fetal sheep with placental insufficiency-induced IUGR that is produced by maternal hyperthermia. IUGR and control fetuses underwent a sham (intact) or bilateral adrenal demedullation (AD) surgical procedure at 0.65 gestation. As expected, AD-IUGR fetuses had lower norepinephrine concentrations than intact-IUGR fetuses despite being hypoxemic and hypoglycemic. Placental insufficiency reduced fetal weights, but the severity of IUGR was less with AD. Although basal plasma insulin concentrations were lower in intact-IUGR and AD-IUGR fetuses compared with intact-controls, glucose-stimulated insulin concentrations were greater in AD-IUGR fetuses compared with intact-IUGR fetuses. Interestingly, AD-controls had lower glucose- and arginine-stimulated insulin concentrations than intact-controls, but AD-IUGR and AD-control insulin responses were not different. To investigate chronic hypoxemia in the IUGR fetus, arterial oxygen tension was increased to normal levels by increasing the maternal inspired oxygen fraction. Oxygenation of IUGR fetuses enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin concentrations 3.3-fold in intact-IUGR and 1.7-fold in AD-IUGR fetuses but did not lower norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations. Together these findings show that chronic hypoxemia and hypercatecholaminemia have distinct but complementary roles in the suppression of β-cell responsiveness in IUGR fetuses. PMID:26937714

  10. Influence of the dissolved oxygen concentration on the penicillin biosynthetic pathway in steady-state cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Claus Maxel; Nielsen, Jens Bredal; Villadsen, John

    1997-01-01

    The influence the of dissolved oxygen concentration on penicillin biosynthesis was studied in steady-state continuous cultures of a high-yielding strain of Penicillium chrysogenum operated at a dilution rate of 0.05 h-l. The dissolved oxygen concentration was varied between 0.019 and 0.344 m...... recovered to its maximum value when the dissolved oxygen concentration was reset to a value above 0.08 mM. The specific formation rates of a number of typical byproducts of the penicillin production, i.e., delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine, isopenicillin N, 6-aminopenicillanic acid, 8......-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine and glutathione is suggested. The intracellular pools of the pathway intermediates delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine and isopenicillin N increased respectively 2- and 3-fold when the dissolved oxygen concentration was lowered from 0.344 to 0.042 mM, whereas the intracellular pools of glutathione...

  11. Analysis of atmospheric concentrations of quinones and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in vapour and particulate phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Saborit, Juana Maria; Alam, Mohammed S.; Godri Pollitt, Krystal J.; Stark, Christopher; Harrison, Roy M.

    2013-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are often measured in studies of atmospheric chemistry or health effects of air pollution, due to their known human carcinogenicity. In recent years, PAH quinone derivatives have also become a focus of interest, primarily because they can contribute to oxidative stress. This work reports concentrations of 17 PAH and 15 quinones measured in air samples collected at a trafficked roadside. Data are presented for four compounds not previously reported in ambient air: 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone, methyl-1,4-benzoquinone and 2,3-dimethylanthraquinone, and a large vapour phase component is measured, not analysed in most earlier studies. Analyses are reported also for SRM 1649a and 1649b, including many compounds (8 for SRM 1649a and 12 for SRM 1649b) for which concentrations have not previously been reported. This work assesses the vapour/particle phase distribution of PAHs and quinones in relation to their molecular weight, vapour pressure, polarity and Henry's Law constant, finding that both molecular weight and vapour pressure (which are correlated) are good predictors of the partitioning.

  12. Atmospheric pitting corrosion of 304L stainless steel: the role of highly concentrated chloride solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Steven R; Mi, Na; Cook, Angus J M C; Mohammed-Ali, Haval B; Guo, Liya; Rayment, Trevor; Davenport, Alison J

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of atmospheric pitting corrosion in 304L stainless steel plate was analysed using MgCl(2) droplets in relation to changes in relative humidity (RH) and chloride deposition density (CDD). It was found that highly reproducible morphologies occur that are distinct at different RH. Pitting at higher concentrations, i.e. lower RH, resulted in satellite pits forming around the perimeter of wide shallow dish regions. At higher RH, these satellite pits did not form and instead spiral attack into the shallow region was observed. Increasing CDD at saturation resulted in a very broad-mouthed pitting attack within the shallow dish region. Large data sets were used to find trends in pit size and morphology in what is essentially a heterogeneous alloy. Electrochemical experiments on 304 stainless steel wires in highly saturated solutions showed that the passive current density increased significantly above 3 M MgCl(2) and the breakdown pitting potential dropped as the concentration increased. It is proposed that the shallow dish regions grow via enhanced dissolution of the passive film, whereas satellite pits and a spiral attack take place with active dissolution of bare metal surfaces.

  13. On the coupled evolution of inflation, wealth and atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    Garrett, Timothy J

    2010-01-01

    In a prior study (Garrett, 2009), a thermodynamically-based economic growth model was introduced that was based on the finding that the rate of consumption of energy by civilization has been related to its historical accumulation of inflation-adjusted Gross World Product (GWP), or its ``wealth'', through a constant value {\\lambda} of 9.7 {\\pm} 0.3 milliwatts per 1990 US dollar. Here, this simple model is extended to describe, first, a thermodynamically-based theory for economic inflation and, second, a prognostic model for the coupled multi-decadal evolution of CO2 concentrations and GWP. Multi-decadal hindcasts of GWP and CO2 concentrations made with this model are shown to be accurate. Applied to coming decades, the model implies that, like a long-term natural disaster, future greenhouse warming will accelerate economic inflation. Such inflation will slow growth of not just inflation-adjusted economic wealth, but also CO2 emission rates because the two are coupled through {\\lambda}. Maintaining atmospheric ...

  14. Effect of reduced hemoglobin concentration on leg oxygen uptake during maximal exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffartzik, W; Barton, E D; Poole, D C; Tsukimoto, K; Hogan, M C; Bebout, D E; Wagner, P D

    1993-08-01

    Maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) is affected by hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]). Whether this is simply due to altered convection of O2 into the muscle microcirculation or also to [Hb]-dependent diffusive transport of O2 out of the muscle capillary is unknown in humans. To examine this, seven healthy volunteers performed four maximal cycle exercise bouts at sea level immediately after 8 wk at altitude (3,801 m, barometric pressure 485 Torr), a sojourn designed to increase [Hb]. The first two bouts were at ambient [Hb] of 15.9 +/- 0.7 g/100 ml breathing 21 or 12% O2 in random order. [Hb] was then decreased to a prealtitude level of 13.8 +/- 0.6 g/100 ml by venesection and isovolemic replacement with 5% albumin in 0.9% saline, and the exercise bouts were repeated. At whole body VO2max, PO2, PCO2, pH, and O2 saturation were measured in radial arterial and femoral venous blood. Femoral venous thermodilution blood flow was determined for calculation of leg VO2. Mean muscle capillary PO2 and muscle diffusing capacity (DO2) were computed by Bohr integration between measured arterial and femoral venous PO2. Averaged over both fractional concentrations of inspired O2, leg VO2 at maximum decreased by 17.7 +/- 4.3% as [Hb] was lowered while leg O2 delivery decreased by 17.5 +/- 2.6% and DO2 decreased by 10.7 +/- 2.7% (all P < 0.05). The relative contributions of decreases in leg O2 delivery and DO2 to the decrease in VO2max were computed to be 64 and 36%, respectively. These findings suggest that [Hb] is an important determinant of O2 diffusion rates into working muscle in humans. Possible mechanisms include 1) dependence of DO2 on intracapillary red blood cell spacing, 2) changes in the total rate of dissociation of O2 from [Hb], and 3) increased red blood cell flow heterogeneity as [Hb] is reduced.

  15. [Effects of atmospheric CO2 concentration enhancement and nitrogen application rate on wheat grain yield and quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hao; Shi, Zu-liang; Cai, Jian; Jiang, Dong; Cao, Wei-xing; Dai, Ting-bo

    2011-04-01

    FACE platform was applied to study the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on wheat grain yield and quality under two nitrogen (N) application rates. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and applying N increased the grain yield, spike number, grain number per spike, and biomass significantly, but elevated CO2 concentration had no significant effects on harvest index (HI). Under elevated CO2 concentration, there was a significant decrease in the protein, gliadin, gluteinin, and glutein contents of the grain and the sedimentation value of the flour, and a significant increase in the starch and its components contents of the grain; under N application, an inverse was observed. The dough stability time and the dough viscosity characteristics, such as peak viscosity, final viscosity, and setback value, increased significantly under elevated CO2 concentration and high N application rate. The interaction of atmospheric CO2 concentration and N application rate had significantly positive effects on wheat grain yield and biomass, but less effect on grain quality. Therefore, with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration in the future, maintaining a higher N application level would benefit wheat grain yield and paste characteristics, and mitigate the decline of grain quality.

  16. Atmospheric BTEX concentrations in the vicinity of the crude oil refinery of the Baltic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrėnas, Pranas; Baltrėnaitė, Edita; Serevičienė, Vaida; Pereira, Paulo

    2011-11-01

    Among chemical industries, petroleum refineries have been identified as large emitters of a wide variety of pollutants. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) form an important group of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) because of their role in the troposphere chemistry and the risk posed to human health. A very large crude oil refinery of the Baltic States (200,000 bbl/day) is situated in the northern, rural part of Lithuania, 10 km from the town of Mažeikiai (Lithuania). The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine of atmospheric levels of BTEX in the region rural and urban parts at the vicinity of the crude oil refinery; and (2) to investigate the effect of meteorological parameters (wind speed, wind direction, temperature, pressure, humidity) on the concentrations measured. The averaged concentration of benzene varied from 2.12 ppbv in the rural areas to 2.75 ppbv in the urban areas where the traffic was determined to be a dominant source of BTEX emissions. Our study showed that concentration of benzene, as strictly regulated air pollutant by EU Directive 2008/50/EC, did not exceed the limit of 5 ppbv in the region in the vicinity of the crude oil refinery during the investigated period. No significant change in air quality in the vicinity of the oil refinery was discovered, however, an impact of the industry on the background air quality was detected. The T/B ratio (0.50-0.81) that was much lower than 2.0, identified other sources of pollution than traffic.

  17. Effects of dissolved oxygen concentration and iron addition on immediate-early gene expression of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Shiwen; Anyaogu, Diana Chinyere; Kasama, Takeshi; Workman, Mhairi; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Hobley, Timothy John

    2017-06-15

    We report the effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and iron addition on gene expression of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 cells during fermentations, focusing on 0.25-24 h after iron addition. The DO was strictly controlled at 0.5% or 5% O2, and compared with aerobic condition. Uptake of iron (and formation of magnetosomes) was only observed in the 0.5% O2 condition where there was little difference in cell growth and carbon consumption compared to the 5% O2 condition. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis showed a rapid (within 0.25 h) genetic response of MSR-1 cells after iron addition for all the genes studied, except for MgFnr (oxygen sensor gene) and fur (ferric uptake regulator family gene), and which in some cases was oxygen dependent. In particular, expression of sodB1 (superoxide dismutase gene) and feoB1 (ferrous transport protein B1 gene) was markedly reduced in cultures at 0.5% O2 compared to those at higher oxygen tensions. Moreover, expression of katG (catalase-peroxidase gene) and feoB2 (ferrous transport protein B2 gene) was reduced markedly by iron addition, regardless of oxygen conditions. These data provide a greater understanding of molecular response of MSR-1 cells to environmental conditions associated with oxygen and iron metabolisms, especially relevant to immediate-early stage of fermentation. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Investigations into formation of atmospheric sulfate under high PM 10 concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukesh; Kiran, Y. N. V. M.; Shandilya, Kaushik K.

    This study was primarily initiated to understand the consistently low levels of SO 2 in cities in India in spite of rising SO 2 emissions. A literature review suggested the possibility of chemical transformation of SO 2 to SO 4. Thus, the objective of research was to understand the formation of SO 4 as a function of SO 2, and other constituents of atmosphere such as PM 10, water content, Ca (in aerosol) and pH (of aerosol). For this purpose, air quality monitoring was conducted at five locations in the city of Kanpur, India (during October 1999-April 2000) representing various land-use patterns. It was found that the SO 4 levels were considerably high (2.8-43.6 μg m -3) compared to levels in cities in the US (1.9-3.6 μg m -3, Sandberg et al. (J. Air Pollut. Control Assoc. 26 (1976) 559; 15.7-18.4 μg m -3, Altshuller (J. Air Pollut. Control Assoc. 26 (1976) 318; 4.0-14.0 μg m -3 Dockery et al. (J. Med. 329 (1993) 1753), UK (3.2-9.0 μg m -3, QUARG, 1996 http://www.environment.detr.gov.uk/airq/consult/naqs/index.htm), and 25 locations in Europe (0.34-1.68 μg m -3 (1991-1999), EMEP website), but were comparable to the levels observed at Agra (14.67 μg m -3, Kulshrestha et al. Indian J. Radio Space Phys. 24 (1995) 178) and at New Delhi (12.9-27.5 μg m -3, Shandilya, M.E. Thesis, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur, India, 2000). The high SO 4 levels could provide a plausible explanation for low SO 2 concentration levels in the city of Kanpur. It was concluded that high levels of PM 10, Ca and high pH of aerosols in atmosphere provide a conducive environment for conversion of SO 2 to SO 4. It was also concluded that the important migration pathway in study area for the transformation of SO 2 to SO 4 appears to be oxidation of SO 2 on the surfaces (of particulate) available in the ambient atmosphere.

  19. Effects of fulvic acid concentration and origin on photodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous solution: Importance of active oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Xinghui [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)], E-mail: xiaxh@bnu.edu.cn; Li Gongchen [Faculty of Engineering, University of Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada); Yang Zhifeng [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Chen Yumin; Huang, Gordon H. [Faculty of Engineering, University of Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada)

    2009-04-15

    With an Xe arc lamp house as simulated sunlight, the influences of fulvic acid (FA) concentration and origins on photodegradation of acenaphthene, fluorine, phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene in aqueous solution have been studied. Similar effects of FAs, collected from five places around China, on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) photodegradation have been observed. Active oxygen was of significance in PAH photodegradation with the presence of FAs. For systems with 1.25 mg L{sup -1} FAs, the contributions of {center_dot}OH to PAH photodegradation rates were from 33% to 69%. FAs had two opposite effects, i.e., stimulating the generation of active oxygen and advancing PAH photodegradation; competing with PAHs for energy and photons and restraining PAH photodegradation. Generally, photodegradation rates of the 5 PAHs decreased with the increase of FAs concentration; except fluoranthene and pyrene were advanced in solutions with low FA concentration. The influences of FA concentration on PAH photodegradation were more significant than FA origin. - Influences of fulvic acid (FA) concentration on PAH photodegradation were more significant than FA origin, and active oxygen played an important role in PAH photodegradation.

  20. The effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration on carbon isotope fractionation in C3 land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Brian A.; Jahren, A. Hope

    2012-11-01

    Because atmospheric carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of all land-plant carbon, workers have suggested that pCO2 level may exert control over the amount of 13C incorporated into plant tissues. However, experiments growing plants under elevated pCO2 in both chamber and field settings, as well as meta-analyses of ecological and agricultural data, have yielded a wide range of estimates for the effect of pCO2 on the net isotopic discrimination (Δδ13Cp) between plant tissue (δ13Cp) and atmospheric CO2 (δ13CCO2). Because plant stomata respond sensitively to plant water status and simultaneously alter the concentration of pCO2 inside the plant (ci) relative to outside the plant (ca), any experiment that lacks environmental control over water availability across treatments could result in additional isotopic variation sufficient to mask or cancel the direct influence of pCO2 on Δδ13Cp. We present new data from plant growth chambers featuring enhanced dynamic stabilization of moisture availability and relative humidity, in addition to providing constant light, nutrient, δ13CCO2, and pCO2 level for up to four weeks of plant growth. Within these chambers, we grew a total of 191 C3 plants (128 Raphanus sativus plants and 63 Arabidopsis thaliana) across fifteen levels of pCO2 ranging from 370 to 4200 ppm. Three types of plant tissue were harvested and analyzed for carbon isotope value: above-ground tissues, below-ground tissues, and leaf-extracted nC31-alkanes. We observed strong hyperbolic correlations (R ⩾ 0.94) between the pCO2 level and Δδ13Cp for each type of plant tissue analyzed; furthermore the linear relationships previously suggested by experiments across small (10-350 ppm) changes in pCO2 (e.g., 300-310 ppm or 350-700 ppm) closely agree with the amount of fractionation per ppm increase in pCO2 calculated from our hyperbolic relationship. In this way, our work is consistent with, and provides a unifying relationship for, previous work on carbon isotopes

  1. Changes in concentration, composition and source contribution of atmospheric organic aerosols by shifting coal to natural gas in Urumqi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Gehui; Wu, Can; Wang, Jiayuan; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Lu; Han, Yanni; Liu, Lang; Cao, Cong; Cao, Junji; He, Qing; Liu, Xinchun

    2017-01-01

    Size-segregated aerosols were collected in Urumqi, a megacity in northwest China, during two heating seasons, i.e., before (heating season І: January-March 2012) and after (heating season II: January-March 2014) the project "shifting coal to natural gas", and determined for n-alkanes, PAHs and oxygenated PAHs to investigate the impact of replacement of coal by natural gas on organic aerosols in the urban atmosphere. Our results showed that compared to those in heating season I concentrations of n-alkanes, PAHs and OPAHs decreased by 74%, 74% and 82% in heating season II, respectively. Source apportionment analysis suggested that coal combustion, traffic emission and biomass burning are the major sources of the determined organics during the heating seasons in Urumqi. Traffic emission is the main source for n-alkanes in the city. Coal combustion is the dominant source of PAHs and OPAHs in heating season І, but traffic emission becomes their major source in heating season ІI. Relative contributions of coal combustion to n-alkanes, PAHs and OPAHs in Urumqi decreased from 21 to 75% in heating season I to 4.0-21% in heating season II due to the replacement of coal with natural gas for house heating. Health risk assessment further indicated that compared with that in heating season I the number of lung cancer related to PAHs exposure in Urumqi decreased by 73% during heating season II due to the project implementation. Our results suggest that replacing coal by clean energy sources for house heating will significantly mitigate air pollution and improve human health in China.

  2. Variation of Atmospheric Oxygen in the Phanerozoic Recorded By δ13c of Terrestrial Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenbachs, K.; Tappert, R.; McKellar, R. C.; Wolfe, A. P.; Tappert, M.; Schoell, M.

    2014-12-01

    One important factor controlling the δ13C of C3 plants is pO2 and thus δ13C of fossil terrestrial organic matter is a proxy for ancient pO2 once variations of δ13C of the atmosphere and paleo pCO2 are corrected for. We reconstructed pO2 since the emergence of land plants in the Ordovician following the approach of Tappert et al. [1], and using the published δ13C record of fossil resins (amber), coals and dispersed terrestrial organic matter. For most of this time, atmospheric pO2 was considerably lower (pO2 ~ 10-21%) compared to today (pO2 = 21%). Secular variations in pO2 must reflect changing amounts of burial of organic matter and sulfides. We observe a strong correlation between pO2 calculated from land plants, and the strontium and lithium isotopic compositions of marine carbonates. The marine Sr isotope record reflects secular changes of continental weathering and climate driven by tectonic activity. Synchronicity of pO2 with the marine strontium isotope record implies that tectonic processes, including orogeneses and the formation of associated sedimentary basins, not only control the rate of weathering and volume of sedimentation, but also the amount and proportion of the biomass that is buried on geological timescales.

  3. Portable Cathode-Air-Vapor-Feed Electrochemical Medical Oxygen Concentrator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future space exploration missions present significant new challenges to crew health care capabilities, particularly in the efficient utilization of on-board oxygen...

  4. Facile and efficient one-pot synthesis of 2-arylbenzoxazoles using hydrogen tetrachloroaurate as catalyst under oxygen atmosphere*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-kui; Mao, Da-jie; Lou, Shao-jie; Qian, Jian-qiang; Xu, Zhen-yuan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we presented a novel method for the facile and efficient one-pot synthesis of 2-arylbenzoxazoles, which were directly synthesized from 2-aminophenol and aldehydes catalyzed by hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl4·4H2O) under an oxygen atmosphere with anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (THF) as solvent or in solvent-free condition. The results show that this method could bring excellent yields as high as 96%. THF was proven to be the best choice among several solvents screened and the reaction was tolerated with a variety of aromatic aldehydes possessing electron-donating or withdrawing groups. The advantages of the present method lie in catalytic process using economic and environmentally benign dioxygen as oxidant. PMID:19489113

  5. Influence of gamma radiation for controlling Brevipalpus phoenicis (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) (Geijskes, 1939) in oxygen atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machi, Andre R., E-mail: rica_machi@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN- SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Valter, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Brevipalpus phoenicis mite are controlled across of solutions acaricides, which are chemicals and leave residues in addition there is the difficulty of an effective pulverization due to the small size of the mite, the objective of this study was to evaluate of the influence of oxygen combined with gamma radiation on B.phoenicis as alternative control. Were used 70 mites per arena in 9 reps on 3 treatments at doses of 0 (control), 200 and 300 Gy. For irradiation, the leaves containing the mites, were cut and placed on bottles with bladder tied with ribbons and strings, before was put pure oxygen and the bottle was then sealed, these were taken to a gamma irradiator of Cobalt 60-type Gammacell 220, under a dose rate of 0.381 kGy/hour located in the CENA/USP. Was evaluated daily (eggs, nymphs and adults) of the mites observed viability, fertility and mortality across of the analysis of variance design with completely randomized design using the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) version 9.2® and by the Tukey test, the verification of means. After 22 days of irradiation the hatchability in 200 Gy dose was 41% after 3 days and 57% in control dose, this differed statistically of the other doses, where the nymphs arrived to the adult stage, which did not occurred in the 200 Gy dose and higher due to mutations, generated by the gamma radiation. In 300 Gy not was observed the presence of nymphs and eggs, being the sterilizing dose for all stages of the B.phoenicis. (author)

  6. Changing atmospheric CO2 concentration was the primary driver of early Cenozoic climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Eleni; John, Eleanor H.; Edgar, Kirsty M.; Foster, Gavin L.; Ridgwell, Andy; Inglis, Gordon N.; Pancost, Richard D.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Pearson, Paul N.

    2016-05-01

    The Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO, which occurred about 51 to 53 million years ago), was the warmest interval of the past 65 million years, with mean annual surface air temperature over ten degrees Celsius warmer than during the pre-industrial period. Subsequent global cooling in the middle and late Eocene epoch, especially at high latitudes, eventually led to continental ice sheet development in Antarctica in the early Oligocene epoch (about 33.6 million years ago). However, existing estimates place atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels during the Eocene at 500-3,000 parts per million, and in the absence of tighter constraints carbon-climate interactions over this interval remain uncertain. Here we use recent analytical and methodological developments to generate a new high-fidelity record of CO2 concentrations using the boron isotope (δ11B) composition of well preserved planktonic foraminifera from the Tanzania Drilling Project, revising previous estimates. Although species-level uncertainties make absolute values difficult to constrain, CO2 concentrations during the EECO were around 1,400 parts per million. The relative decline in CO2 concentration through the Eocene is more robustly constrained at about fifty per cent, with a further decline into the Oligocene. Provided the latitudinal dependency of sea surface temperature change for a given climate forcing in the Eocene was similar to that of the late Quaternary period, this CO2 decline was sufficient to drive the well documented high- and low-latitude cooling that occurred through the Eocene. Once the change in global temperature between the pre-industrial period and the Eocene caused by the action of all known slow feedbacks (apart from those associated with the carbon cycle) is removed, both the EECO and the late Eocene exhibit an equilibrium climate sensitivity relative to the pre-industrial period of 2.1 to 4.6 degrees Celsius per CO2 doubling (66 per cent confidence), which is similar to the

  7. Changing atmospheric CO2 concentration was the primary driver of early Cenozoic climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Eleni; John, Eleanor H; Edgar, Kirsty M; Foster, Gavin L; Ridgwell, Andy; Inglis, Gordon N; Pancost, Richard D; Lunt, Daniel J; Pearson, Paul N

    2016-05-19

    The Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO, which occurred about 51 to 53 million years ago), was the warmest interval of the past 65 million years, with mean annual surface air temperature over ten degrees Celsius warmer than during the pre-industrial period. Subsequent global cooling in the middle and late Eocene epoch, especially at high latitudes, eventually led to continental ice sheet development in Antarctica in the early Oligocene epoch (about 33.6 million years ago). However, existing estimates place atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels during the Eocene at 500-3,000 parts per million, and in the absence of tighter constraints carbon-climate interactions over this interval remain uncertain. Here we use recent analytical and methodological developments to generate a new high-fidelity record of CO2 concentrations using the boron isotope (δ(11)B) composition of well preserved planktonic foraminifera from the Tanzania Drilling Project, revising previous estimates. Although species-level uncertainties make absolute values difficult to constrain, CO2 concentrations during the EECO were around 1,400 parts per million. The relative decline in CO2 concentration through the Eocene is more robustly constrained at about fifty per cent, with a further decline into the Oligocene. Provided the latitudinal dependency of sea surface temperature change for a given climate forcing in the Eocene was similar to that of the late Quaternary period, this CO2 decline was sufficient to drive the well documented high- and low-latitude cooling that occurred through the Eocene. Once the change in global temperature between the pre-industrial period and the Eocene caused by the action of all known slow feedbacks (apart from those associated with the carbon cycle) is removed, both the EECO and the late Eocene exhibit an equilibrium climate sensitivity relative to the pre-industrial period of 2.1 to 4.6 degrees Celsius per CO2 doubling (66 per cent confidence), which is similar to the

  8. Association between the concentration of fine particles in the atmosphere and acute respiratory diseases in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Antônio Paula; Santos, Jane Meri; Mill, José Geraldo; Souza, Juliana Bottoni de; Reis, Neyval Costa; Reisen, Valdério Anselmo

    2017-01-12

    To analyze the association between fine particulate matter concentration in the atmosphere and hospital care by acute respiratory diseases in children. Ecological study, carried out in the region of Grande Vitória, Espírito Santo, in the winter (June 21 to September 21, 2013) and summer (December 21, 2013 to March 19, 2014). We assessed data of daily count for outpatient care and hospitalization by respiratory diseases (ICD-10) in children from zero to 12 years in three hospitals in the Region of Grande Vitória. For collecting fine particulate matter, we used portable samplers of particles installed in six locations in the studied region. The Generalized Additive Model with Poisson distribution, fitted for the effects of predictor covariates, was used to evaluate the relationship between respiratory outcomes and concentration of fine particulate matter. The increase of 4.2 µg/m3 (interquartile range) in the concentration of fine particulate matter increased in 3.8% and 5.6% the risk of medical care or hospitalization, respectively, on the same day and with six-day lag from the exposure. We identified positive association between outpatient care and hospitalizations of children under 12 years due to acute respiratory diseases and the concentration of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere. Analisar a associação entre a concentração de material particulado fino na atmosfera e atendimento hospitalar por doenças respiratórias agudas em crianças. Estudo ecológico, realizado na Região da Grande Vitória, ES, no inverno (21 de junho a 21 de setembro de 2013) e no verão (21 de dezembro de 2013 a 19 de março de 2014). Foram avaliados dados de contagem diária de atendimentos ambulatoriais e hospitalizações por doenças respiratórias (CID-10) em crianças de zero a 12 anos em três hospitais da Região da Grande Vitoria. Para a coleta de material particulado fino foram utilizados amostradores portáteis de partículas instalados em seis locais na regi

  9. IR and UV laser-induced morphological changes in silicon surface under oxygen atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Jarquin, J.; Fernandez-Guasti, M.; Haro-Poniatowski, E.; Hernandez-Pozos, J.L. [Laboratorio de Optica Cuantica, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, C.P. 09340, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-08-01

    We irradiated silicon (100) wafers with IR (1064 nm) and UV (355 nm) nanosecond laser pulses with energy densities within the ablation regime and used scanning electron microscopy to analyze the morphological changes induced on the Si surface. The changes in the wafer morphology depend both on the incident radiation wavelength and the environmental atmosphere. We have patterned Si surfaces with a single focused laser spot and, in doing the experiments with IR or UV this reveals significant differences in the initial surface cracking and pattern formation, however if the experiment is carried out in O{sub 2} the final result is an array of microcones. We also employed a random scanning technique to irradiate the silicon wafer over large areas, in this case the microstructure patterns consist of a ''semi-ordered'' array of micron-sized cones. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. The gas conversion of methane with oxygen at atmospheric pressure using a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Tom; Petrovic, Dragana; de Bie, Christophe; Bogaerts, Annemie; Brok, Wouter; van Dijk, Jan

    2008-10-01

    The conversion of methane to useful chemicals and liquid fuels currently requires steam reforming, which requires great amounts of energy input. We are currently investigating the possibilities of using a plasma activated system for this gas conversion. Due to the pulsed nature and the low operating temperature capabilities, we have chosen the atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge as a setup to investigate whether it can be used as a more efficient gas conversion reactor. For this purpose we have developed a CH4/O2 chemical reaction set and used it in a 2D fluid model of a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge, in which we also incorporate the influence of the gas flow. In this way we investigate whether we can optimize the production of methanol or formaldehyde. The parameters under study are the CH4/O2 ratio, the applied voltage characteristics, the gap width and the gas flow rate.

  11. PM₂.₅-bound oxygenated PAHs, nitro-PAHs and parent-PAHs from the atmosphere of a Chinese megacity: seasonal variation, sources and cancer risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandowe, Benjamin A Musa; Meusel, Hannah; Huang, Ru-Jin; Ho, Kinfai; Cao, Junji; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in air particulate matter contribute considerably to the health risk of air pollution. The objectives of this study were to assess the occurrence and variation in concentrations and sources of PM2.5-bound PACs [Oxygenated PAHs (OPAHs), nitro-PAHs and parent-PAHs] sampled from the atmosphere of a typical Chinese megacity (Xi'an), to study the influence of meteorological conditions on PACs and to estimate the lifetime excess cancer risk to the residents of Xi'an (from inhalation of PM2.5-bound PACs). To achieve these objectives, we sampled 24-h PM2.5 aerosols (once in every 6 days, from 5 July 2008 to 8 August 2009) from the atmosphere of Xi'an and measured the concentrations of PACs in them. The PM2.5-bound concentrations of Σcarbonyl-OPAHs, ∑hydroxyl+carboxyl-OPAHs, Σnitro-PAHs and Σalkyl+parent-PAHs ranged between 5-22, 0.2-13, 0.3-7, and 7-387 ng m(-3), respectively, being markedly higher than in most western cities. This represented a range of 0.01-0.4% and 0.002-0.06% of the mass of organic C in PM2.5 and the total mass of PM2.5, respectively. The sums of the concentrations of each compound group had winter-to-summer ratios ranging from 3 to 8 and most individual OPAHs and nitro-PAHs had higher concentrations in winter than in summer, suggesting a dominant influence of emissions from household heating and winter meteorological conditions. Ambient temperature, air pressure, and wind speed explained a large part of the temporal variation in PACs concentrations. The lifetime excess cancer risk from inhalation (attributable to selected PAHs and nitro-PAHs) was six fold higher in winter (averaging 1450 persons per million residents of Xi'an) than in summer. Our results call for the development of emission control measures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Acclimation of nitrogen uptake capacity of rice to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimono, Hiroyuki; Bunce, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Nitrogen (N) is a major factor affecting yield gain of crops under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations [CO2]. It is well established that elevated [CO2] increases root mass, but there are inconsistent reports on the effects on N uptake capacity per root mass. In the present study, it was hypothesized that the responses of N uptake capacity would change with the duration of exposure to elevated [CO2]. Methods The hypothesis was tested by measuring N uptake capacity in rice plants exposed to long-term and short-term [CO2] treatments at different growth stages in plants grown under non-limiting N conditions in hydroponic culture. Seasonal changes in photosynthesis rate and transpiration rate were also measured. Key Results In the long-term [CO2] study, leaf photosynthetic responses to intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) were not affected by elevated [CO2] before the heading stage, but the initial slope in this response was decreased by elevated [CO2] at the grain-filling stage. Nitrate and ammonium uptake capacities per root dry weight were not affected by elevated [CO2] at panicle initiation, but thereafter they were reduced by elevated [CO2] by 31–41 % at the full heading and mid-ripening growth stages. In the short-term study (24 h exposures), elevated [CO2] enhanced nitrate and ammonium uptake capacities at the early vegetative growth stage, but elevated [CO2] decreased the uptake capacities at the mid-reproductive stage. Conclusions This study showed that N uptake capacity was downregulated under long-term exposure to elevated [CO2] and its response to elevated [CO2] varied greatly with growth stage. PMID:18952623

  13. Stability of a NDIR analyser for CO2 at atmospheric concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sega, Michela; Amico Di Meane, Elena; Plassa, Margherita

    2002-09-01

    Carbon dioxide monitoring is significant in the environmental field since this gas plays an important role in the greenhouse effect. In order to determine CO2 concentration and to develop simulation models, it is necessary to carry out measurements which are accurate and comparable in time and space, i.e. SI-traceable. Non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) analysers are employed for CO2 measurements, as they are precise and stable. In order to achieve traceability, such instruments have to be characterized and calibrated. At the Istituto di Metrologia "G. Colonnetti"--CNR, a procedure for calibrating NDIR analysers for CO2 at atmospheric level was developed, which enables to calculate a correction for the analyser output. In addition, a complete uncertainty analysis was carried out and a correct traceability chain was established. The goal of the present work is the study of the stability of a NDIR analyser by repeating calibrations during three years and comparing the correction curves obtained to identify a proper re-calibration interval for such analysers. The investigated instrument has good repeatability and reproducibility, hence satisfactory stability during time, as shown by the short-term and long-term compatibility of calibration curves.

  14. Interactive effects of seasonal drought and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration on prokaryotic rhizosphere communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drigo, Barbara; Nielsen, Uffe N; Jeffries, Thomas C; Curlevski, Nathalie J A; Singh, Brajesh K; Duursma, Remko A; Anderson, Ian C

    2017-08-01

    Global change models indicate that rainfall patterns are likely to shift towards more extreme events concurrent with increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO 2 ]). Both changes in [CO 2 ] and rainfall regime are known to impact above- and belowground communities, but the interactive effects of these global change drivers have not been well explored, particularly belowground. In this experimental study, we examined the effects of elevated [CO 2 ] (ambient + 240 ppm; [eCO 2 ]) and changes in rainfall patterns (seasonal drought) on soil microbial communities associated with forest ecosystems. Our results show that bacterial and archaeal communities are highly resistant to seasonal drought under ambient [CO 2 ]. However, substantial taxa specific responses to seasonal drought were observed at [eCO 2 ], suggesting that [eCO 2 ] compromise the resistance of microbial communities to extreme events. Within the microbial community we were able to identify three types of taxa specific responses to drought: tolerance, resilience and sensitivity that contributed to this pattern. All taxa were tolerant to seasonal drought at [aCO 2 ], whereas resilience and sensitivity to seasonal drought were much greater in [eCO 2 ]. These results provide strong evidence that [eCO 2 ] moderates soil microbial community responses to drought in forests, with potential implications for their long-term persistence and ecosystem functioning. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations on Pinus ponderosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surano, K.A.; Kercher, J.R. [eds.

    1993-10-01

    This report details the results from an experiment of the effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) saplings and seedlings. The study began in 1983 as a pilot study designed to explore the feasibility of using open-top chambers for continuous multi-year exposures on sapling-sized trees and to examine possible CO{sub 2} responses so that future research could be adequately designed. however, following the first year of exposure, preliminary results from the study indicated that measurements of CO{sub 2} responses should be intensified. Open-top chambers proved suitable for use in multiyear exposures of mature trees. With respect to the preliminary examination of CO{sub 2} responses, many interesting observations were made. The nature of the preliminary results suggests that future long-term field CO{sub 2} exposures on perennial species may be critical to the understanding and preparation for future environments. Other research reported here attempted to adapt an existing western coniferous forest growth and succession model for use in elevated CO{sub 2} scenarios using differential species responses, and assessed the usefulness of the model in that regard. Seven papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  16. Isothermal reduction kinetics of Panzhihua ilmenite concentrate under 30vol% CO-70vol% N2 atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-yi; Lü, Wei; Lü, Xue-wei; Li, Sheng-ping; Bai, Chen-guang; Song, Bing; Han, Ke-xi

    2017-03-01

    The reduction of ilmenite concentrate in 30vol% CO-70vol% N2 atmosphere was characterized by thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric (TG-DTG) analysis methods at temperatures from 1073 to 1223 K. The isothermal reduction results show that the reduction process comprised two stages; the corresponding apparent activation energy was obtained by the iso-conversional and model-fitting methods. For the first stage, the effect of temperature on the conversion degree was not obvious, the phase boundary chemical reaction was the controlling step, with an apparent activation energy of 15.55-40.71 kJ·mol-1. For the second stage, when the temperatures was greater than 1123 K, the reaction rate and the conversion degree increased sharply with increasing temperature, and random nucleation and subsequent growth were the controlling steps, with an apparent activation energy ranging from 182.33 to 195.95 kJ·mol-1. For the whole reduction process, the average activation energy and pre-exponential factor were 98.94-118.33 kJ·mol-1 and 1.820-1.816 min-1, respectively.

  17. Trend and seasonal variation of atmospheric mercury concentrations at the Cape Point GAW observatory, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunke E.-G.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM has been measured at the WMO Global Atmospheric Watch station at Cape Point, South Africa since September 1995. Two techniques were used: a low resolution manual technique till the end of 2004 and a high resolution automated technique since March 2007. The GEM measurements at Cape Point constitute only one component of the GAW monitoring program consisting of continuous measurements of CO, CH4, CO2, O3, N2O, and since March 1999 also of 222Rn. The seasonality and trend of GEM concentrations from the low resolution data was analyzed by Slemr et al. (2008 and the trend of the combined low and high resolution data until the end of 2009 by Slemr et al. (2011. In this paper we will present an updated analysis of the trend and seasonality of GEM data until the end of 2011 and compare these to measurements made at Troll, a Norwegian research station in Antarctica (Pfaffhuber et al., 2012.

  18. An exploratory analysis of long-term trends in atmospheric CO sub 2 concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonovsky, M.Ya. (International Inst. for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (AT)); Buchstaber, V.M. (All-Union Research Inst. of Physiotechnical and Radiotechnical Measurements, Moscow (SU))

    1991-01-01

    A new methodological approach for the analysis of monitoring data is discussed. The main ideas are illustrated for the example of the CO{sub 2} problem. The analysis of CO{sub 2} concentrations obtained from a global network of monitoring stations permitted us to construct a nonparametric evaluation of the spatial-temporal distribution of this field. We propose a parabolic parameterization of the long-term tendency of this field as a function of time (in one-year time steps). A function of the predictive ability of a model is defined on a basis of the technique of 'supervised training'. This function is computed for a parabolic model and it is shown that this model constructed for the first 15 years of observations evaluated the tendency for the next 15 years quite well. The main problem that we solve in this paper is how to correlate the projections of different models for the carbon cycle and different scenarios of the annual release of carbon into the atmosphere with the projections that reflect parameterization of the trends of CO{sub 2}-monitoring data. (orig.) (24 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.).

  19. An exploratory analysis of long-term trends in atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonovsky, M.Y.; Buchstaber, V.M.

    1991-07-01

    A new methodological approach for the analysis of monitoring data is discussed. The main ideas are illustrated for the example of the CO[sub 2] problem. The analysis of CO[sub 2] concentrations obtained from a global network of monitoring stations permitted construction of a nonparametric evaluation of the spatial-temporal distribution of this field. Proposes a parabolic parameterization of the long-term tendency of this field as a function of time (in one-year time steps). A function of the predictive ability of a model is defined on the basis of the technique of 'supervised training'. This function is computed for a parabolic model and it is shown that this model constructed for the first 15 years of observations evaluates the tendency for the next 15 years quite well. The main problem solved in this paper is how to correlate the projections of different models for the carbon cycle and different scenarios of the annual release of carbon into the atmosphere with the projections that reflect parameterization of the trends of CO[sub 2]-monitoring data. 24 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Formation of Pyrylium from Aromatic Systems with a Helium:Oxygen Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Plasma Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal, Sunil P.; Ratcliff, Tyree D.; You, Yi; Breneman, Curt M.; Shelley, Jacob T.

    2017-06-01

    The effects of oxygen addition on a helium-based flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source are explored. Small amounts of oxygen doped into the helium discharge gas resulted in an increase in abundance of protonated water clusters by at least three times. A corresponding increase in protonated analyte signal was also observed for small polar analytes, such as methanol and acetone. Meanwhile, most other reagent ions (e.g., O2 +·, NO+, etc.) significantly decrease in abundance with even 0.1% v/v oxygen in the discharge gas. Interestingly, when analytes that contained aromatic constituents were subjected to a He:O2-FAPA, a unique (M + 3)+ ion resulted, while molecular or protonated molecular ions were rarely detected. Exact-mass measurements revealed that these (M + 3)+ ions correspond to (M - CH + O)+, with the most likely structure being pyrylium. Presence of pyrylium-based ions was further confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry of the (M + 3)+ ion compared with that of a commercially available salt. Lastly, rapid and efficient production of pyrylium in the gas phase was used to convert benzene into pyridine. Though this pyrylium-formation reaction has not been shown before, the reaction is rapid and efficient. Potential reactant species, which could lead to pyrylium formation, were determined from reagent-ion mass spectra. Thermodynamic evaluation of reaction pathways was aided by calculation of the formation enthalpy for pyrylium, which was found to be 689.8 kJ/mol. Based on these results, we propose that this reaction is initiated by ionized ozone (O3 +·), proceeds similarly to ozonolysis, and results in the neutral loss of the stable CHO2 · radical. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Formation of Pyrylium from Aromatic Systems with a Helium:Oxygen Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Plasma Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal, Sunil P; Ratcliff, Tyree D; You, Yi; Breneman, Curt M; Shelley, Jacob T

    2017-06-01

    The effects of oxygen addition on a helium-based flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source are explored. Small amounts of oxygen doped into the helium discharge gas resulted in an increase in abundance of protonated water clusters by at least three times. A corresponding increase in protonated analyte signal was also observed for small polar analytes, such as methanol and acetone. Meanwhile, most other reagent ions (e.g., O 2 +· , NO + , etc.) significantly decrease in abundance with even 0.1% v/v oxygen in the discharge gas. Interestingly, when analytes that contained aromatic constituents were subjected to a He:O 2 -FAPA, a unique (M + 3) + ion resulted, while molecular or protonated molecular ions were rarely detected. Exact-mass measurements revealed that these (M + 3) + ions correspond to (M - CH + O) + , with the most likely structure being pyrylium. Presence of pyrylium-based ions was further confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry of the (M + 3) + ion compared with that of a commercially available salt. Lastly, rapid and efficient production of pyrylium in the gas phase was used to convert benzene into pyridine. Though this pyrylium-formation reaction has not been shown before, the reaction is rapid and efficient. Potential reactant species, which could lead to pyrylium formation, were determined from reagent-ion mass spectra. Thermodynamic evaluation of reaction pathways was aided by calculation of the formation enthalpy for pyrylium, which was found to be 689.8 kJ/mol. Based on these results, we propose that this reaction is initiated by ionized ozone (O 3 +· ), proceeds similarly to ozonolysis, and results in the neutral loss of the stable CHO 2 · radical. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  2. Seasonal variations in the concentration and solubility of elements in atmospheric particulate matter: a case study in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canepari S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric particulate matter is characterized by a variety of chemical components, generally produced by different sources. Chemical fractionation of elements, namely the determination of their extractable and residual fractions, may reliably increase the selectivity of some elements as tracers of specific PM sources. Seasonal variations of atmospheric particulate matter concentration in PM10 and PM2.5, of elemental concentration in PM10 and PM2.5, of the extractable and residual fraction of elements in different size fractions in the range 0.18 – 18 μm are reported in this paper. The effect of the ageing of the air masses is discussed.

  3. [Effect of reduced oxygen concentrations and hydrogen sulfide on the amino acid metabolism and mesenchymal cells proliferation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, L N; Berezovskii, V A; Veselskii, S P

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of hydrogen sulfide donor (10(-12) mol/l NaHS--I group) alone and together with the reduced oxygen concentrations (5% O2--II group, 3% O2--III group, 24 h) on the biological processes of human stem cells culture. It was shown that the cells proliferation by the third day of cultivation in I, II and III group decreased 1,7; 2,8 and 4,2 times. On the 4th day of culture proliferation inhibited in I, II and III group by 29; 33 and 54% compared to the control. Thus, adverse effects NaHS enhanced by reducing the oxygen concentration. It was established that in all experimental versions rapidly absorbed from the culture medium amino acids: cysteine and cystine, serine and aspartic acid, valine and tryptophan, proline and hydroxyproline, which are involved in the synthesis of proteins, in particular collagen. In the culture medium increased the concentration of free amino acids of the three factions: arginine, histidine and taurine; glycine and methionine; alanine and glutamine. We believe that in the applied concentration of hydrogen sulfide donor in conditions of low oxygen in a gaseous medium incubation inhibits the proliferation and alters the amino acid metabolism of human cells line 4BL.

  4. Eukaryotic stromatolite builders in acid mine drainage: Implications for Precambrian iron formations and oxygenation of the atmosphere?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Hasiotis, S.T.; Dannelly, H.K.; Connors, K.A. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States). Dept. of Geography, Geology & Anthropology

    2002-07-01

    Biological activity of Euglena mutabilis, an acidophilic, photosynthetic protozoan, contributes to the formation of Fe-rich stromatolites in acid mine drainage systems. E. mutabilis is the dominant microbe in bright green benthic mats (biofilm), coating drainage channels at abandoned coal mine sites in Indiana. It builds biolaminates through phototactic and aerotactic behavior, similar to prokaryotes, by moving through precipitates that periodically cover the mats. E. mutabilis also contributes to formation of Fe-rich stromatolites by (1) intracellularly storing Fe compounds released after death, contributing to the solid material of stromatolites and acting as nucleation sites for precipitation of authigenic Fe minerals, and (2) generating 02 via photosynthesis that further facilitates precipitation of reduced Fe, any excess 02 not consumed by Fe precipitation being released to the atmosphere. Recognition of E. mutabilis-dominated biofilm in acidic systems raises a provocative hypothesis relating processes involved in formation of Fe-rich stromatolites by E. mutabilis to those responsible for development of Precambrian stromatolitic Fe formations and oxygenation of the early atmosphere.

  5. An in silico analysis of oxygen uptake of a mild COPD patient during rest and exercise using a portable oxygen concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz I

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ira Katz,1,2 Marine Pichelin,1 Spyridon Montesantos,1 Min-Yeong Kang,3 Bernard Sapoval,3,4 Kaixian Zhu,5 Charles-Philippe Thevenin,5 Robert McCoy,6 Andrew R Martin,7 Georges Caillibotte1 1Medical R&D, Air Liquide Santé International, Centre de Recherche Paris-Saclay, Les Loges-en-Josas, France; 2Department of Mechanical Engineering, Lafayette College, Easton, PA, USA; 3Physique de la Matière Condensée, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, 4Centre de Mathématiques et de leurs Applications, CNRS, UniverSud, Cachan, 5Centre Explor!, Air Liquide Healthcare, Gentilly, France; 6Valley Inspired Products, Inc, Apple Valley, MN, USA; 7Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Oxygen treatment based on intermittent-flow devices with pulse delivery modes available from portable oxygen concentrators (POCs depends on the characteristics of the delivered pulse such as volume, pulse width (the time of the pulse to be delivered, and pulse delay (the time for the pulse to be initiated from the start of inhalation as well as a patient’s breathing characteristics, disease state, and respiratory morphology. This article presents a physiological-based analysis of the performance, in terms of blood oxygenation, of a commercial POC at different settings using an in silico model of a COPD patient at rest and during exercise. The analysis encompasses experimental measurements of pulse volume, width, and time delay of the POC at three different settings and two breathing rates related to rest and exercise. These experimental data of device performance are inputs to a physiological-based model of oxygen uptake that takes into account the real dynamic nature of gas exchange to illustrate how device- and patient-specific factors can affect patient oxygenation. This type of physiological analysis that considers the true effectiveness of oxygen transfer to the blood, as opposed to delivery to the nose (or mouth, can be

  6. Technical Update: Johnson Space Center system using a solid electrolytic cell in a remote location to measure oxygen fugacities in CO/CO2 controlled-atmosphere furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Williams, R. J.; Le, L.; Wagstaff, J.; Lofgren, G.; Lanier, A.; Carter, W.; Roshko, A.

    1993-01-01

    Details are given for the design and application of a (one atmosphere) redox-control system. This system differs from that given in NASA Technical Memorandum 58234 in that it uses a single solid-electrolytic cell in a remote location to measure the oxygen fugacities of multiple CO/CO2 controlled-atmosphere furnaces. This remote measurement extends the range of sample-furnace conditions that can be measured using a solid-electrolytic cell, and cuts costs by extending the life of the sensors and by minimizing the number of sensors in use. The system consists of a reference furnace and an exhaust-gas manifold. The reference furnace is designed according to the redox control system of NASA Technical Memorandum 58234, and any number of CO/CO2 controlled-atmosphere furnaces can be attached to the exhaust-gas manifold. Using the manifold, the exhaust gas from individual CO/CO2 controlled atmosphere furnaces can be diverted through the reference furnace, where a solid-electrolyte cell is used to read the ambient oxygen fugacity. The oxygen fugacity measured in the reference furnace can then be used to calculate the oxygen fugacity in the individual CO/CO2 controlled-atmosphere furnace. A BASIC computer program was developed to expedite this calculation.

  7. Analysis of environmental issues related to small-scale hydroelectric development. VI. Dissolved oxygen concentrations below operating dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cada, G.F.; Kumar, K.D.; Solomon, J.A.; Hildebrand, S.G.

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of an effort aimed at determining whether or not water quality degradation, as exemplified by dissolved oxygen concentrations, is a potentially significant issue affecting small-scale hydropower development in the US. The approach was to pair operating hydroelectric sites of all sizes with dissolved oxygen measurements from nearby downstream US Geological Survey water quality stations (acquired from the WATSTORE data base). The USGS data were used to calculate probabilities of non-compliance (PNCs), i.e., the probabilities that dissolved oxygen concentrations in the discharge waters of operating hydroelectric dams will drop below 5 mg/l. PNCs were estimated for each site, season (summer vs remaining months), and capacity category (less than or equal to 30 MW vs >30 MW). Because of the low numbers of usable sites in many states, much of the subsequent analysis was conducted on a regional basis. During the winter months (November through June) all regions had low mean PNCs regardless of capacity. Most regions had higher mean PNCs in summer than in winter, and summer PNCs were greater for large-scale than for small-scale sites. Among regions, the highest mean summer PNCs were found in the Great Basin, the Southeast, and the Ohio Valley. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the effects of season and capacity on potential dissolved oxygen problems, cumulative probability distributions of PNC were developed for selected regions. This analysis indicates that low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the tailwaters below operating hydroelectric projects are a problem largely confined to large-scale facilities.

  8. Effect of Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation on maximal oxygen uptake and serum vitamin B2 concentration in young men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempo-Miyaki, Asako; Maeda, Seiji; Otsuki, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Chlorella is a unicellular green alga that contains high levels of proteins, vitamins and minerals. The present study investigated the effects of a 4-week Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation on maximal oxygen uptake and circulating vitamin B2 levels in healthy men. Thirty-four participants were randomly divided into two groups: placebo or Chlorella. Prior to the intervention, we observed that the intake of several minerals and soluble vitamins did not satisfy the nutrient requirements of either group by assessing the frequency of daily food intake. There was a significant negative relationship between the pre-intervention maximal oxygen uptake and serum vitamin B2 concentrations in all subjects (r = −0.372). Maximal oxygen uptake significantly increased after Chlorella supplementation (before vs after, 42.1 ± 1.5 vs 44.9 ± 1.6 ml/kg/min), while serum vitamin B2 concentrations did not (14.6 ± 0.9 vs 14.0 ± 0.9 µg/L). In conclusion, Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation increases maximal oxygen uptake in individuals with an insufficient micronutrient status, although there was no association between the increase in aerobic capacity and serum levels of vitamin B2. PMID:28955131

  9. Stable carbon isotopes of C3 plant resins and ambers record changes in atmospheric oxygen since the Triassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappert, Ralf; McKellar, Ryan C.; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Tappert, Michelle C.; Ortega-Blanco, Jaime; Muehlenbachs, Karlis

    2013-11-01

    Estimating the partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen (pO2) in the geological past has been challenging because of the lack of reliable proxies. Here we develop a technique to estimate paleo-pO2 using the stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of plant resins-including amber, copal, and resinite-from a wide range of localities and ages (Triassic to modern). Plant resins are particularly suitable as proxies because their highly cross-linked terpenoid structures allow the preservation of pristine δ13C signatures over geological timescales. The distribution of δ13C values of modern resins (n = 126) indicates that (a) resin-producing plant families generally have a similar fractionation behavior during resin biosynthesis, and (b) the fractionation observed in resins is similar to that of bulk plant matter. Resins exhibit a natural variability in δ13C of around 8‰ (δ13C range: -31‰ to -23‰, mean: -27‰), which is caused by local environmental and ecological factors (e.g., water availability, water composition, light exposure, temperature, nutrient availability). To minimize the effects of local conditions and to determine long-term changes in the δ13C of resins, we used mean δ13C values (δ13Cmeanresin) for each geological resin deposit. Fossil resins (n = 412) are generally enriched in 13C compared to their modern counterparts, with shifts in δ13Cmeanresin of up to 6‰. These isotopic shifts follow distinctive trends through time, which are unrelated to post-depositional processes including polymerization and diagenesis. The most enriched fossil resin samples, with a δ13Cmeanresin between -22‰ and -21‰, formed during the Triassic, the mid-Cretaceous, and the early Eocene. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations suggest that neither change in pCO2 nor in the δ13C of atmospheric CO2 can account for the observed shifts in δ13Cmeanresin. The fractionation of 13C in resin-producing plants (Δ13C), instead, is primarily influenced by

  10. Atmospheric mercury concentration and chemical speciation at a rural site in Beijing, China: implications of mercury emission sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurements of atmospheric mercury concentration and speciation play a key role in identifying mercury sources and its behavior in the atmosphere. In this study, speciated atmospheric mercury including gaseous elemental mercury (GEM, reactive gaseous mercury (RGM and particle-bound mercury (PBM were continuously measured at Miyun, a rural site in Beijing, China, from December 2008 to November 2009. The average GEM, RGM and PBM concentrations were found to be 3.22 ± 1.74, 10.1 ± 18.8 and 98.2 ± 112.7 pg m−3, respectively, about 2–20 times higher than the background concentration of the Northern Hemisphere. The results indicated that atmospheric mercury concentrations in northern China were highly affected by anthropogenic emissions. The atmospheric mercury showed obvious seasonal variations, with the highest seasonal average GEM concentration in summer (3.48 ng m−3 and the lowest value in winter (2.66 ng m−3. In autumn and winter a diurnal variation of GEM was observed, with peak levels in the late afternoon till midnight. Most of the high RGM concentration values occurred in the afternoon of all seasons due to the higher oxidation. The PBM concentration was higher in early morning of all seasons because of the the temperature inversion that increases in depth as the night proceeds. The ratio of GEM to CO indicates that residential boilers play an important role in the elevation of GEM in winter. The ratio of RGM to O3 could be an indicator of the contribution of local primary sources. The ratio of PBM to PM2.5 reveals that the air mass from the east and southwest of the site in spring and summer carries more atmospheric mercury. The HYSPLIT back-trajectory analysis indicated that the monitoring site is affected by local, regional and interregional sources simultaneously during heavy pollution episodes. The results from the potential source contribution function (PSCF model indicate that the atmospheric transport

  11. Atmospheric non-thermal argon–oxygen plasma for sunflower seedling growth improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matra, Khanit

    2018-01-01

    Seedling growth enhancement of sunflower seeds by DC atmospheric non-thermal Ar–O2 plasma has been proposed. The plasma reactor was simply designed by the composition of multi-pin electrodes bonded on a solderable printed circuit board (PCB) anode. A stable plasma was exhibited in the non-periodical self-pulsing discharge mode during the seed treatment. The experimental results showed that non-thermal plasma treatment had a significant positive effect on the sunflower seeds. Ar–O2 mixed gas ratio, treatment time and power source voltage are the important parameters affecting growth stimulation of sunflower sprouts. In this research, the sunflower seeds treated with 3:3 liters per minute (LPM) of Ar–O2 plasma at a source voltage of 8 kV for 1 min showed the best results in stimulating the seedling growth. The results in this case showed that the dry weight and average shoot length of the sunflower sprouts were 1.79 and 2.69 times higher and heavier than those of the untreated seeds, respectively.

  12. Effect of 50% and maximal inspired oxygen concentrations on respiratory variables in isoflurane-anesthetized horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerche Phillip

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 0.5 fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2 and >0.95 FiO2 on pulmonary gas exchange, shunt fraction and oxygen delivery (DO2 in dorsally recumbent horses during inhalant anesthesia. The use of 0.5 FiO2 has the potential to reduce absorption atelectasis (compared to maximal FiO2 and augment alveolar oxygen (O2 tensions (compared to ambient air thereby improving gas exchange and DO2. Our hypothesis was that 0.5 FiO2 would reduce ventilation-perfusion mismatching and increase the fraction of pulmonary blood flow that is oxygenated, thus improving arterial oxygen content and DO2. Results Arterial partial pressures of O2 were significantly higher than preanesthetic levels at all times during anesthesia in the >0.95 FiO2 group. Arterial partial pressures of O2 did not change from preanesthetic levels in the 0.5 FiO2 group but were significantly lower than in the >0.95 FiO2 group from 15 to 90 min of anesthesia. Alveolar to arterial O2 tension difference was increased significantly in both groups during anesthesia compared to preanesthetic values. The alveolar to arterial O2 tension difference was significantly higher at all times in the >0.95 FiO2 group compared to the 0.5 FiO2 group. Oxygen delivery did not change from preanesthetic values in either group during anesthesia but was significantly lower than preanesthetic values 10 min after anesthesia in the 0.5 FiO2 group. Shunt fraction increased in both groups during anesthesia attaining statistical significance at varying times. Shunt fraction was significantly increased in both groups 10 min after anesthesia but was not different between groups. Alveolar dead space ventilation increased after 3 hr of anesthesia in both groups. Conclusions Reducing FiO2 did not change alveolar dead space ventilation or shunt fraction in dorsally recumbent, mechanically ventilated horses during 3 hr of isoflurane anesthesia. Reducing FiO2 in

  13. CARVE: L2 Atmospheric Gas Concentrations, Tower-based Flasks, Alaska, 2012-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides atmospheric carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, molecular hydrogen, nitrous oxide, sulfur hexafluoride, and other trace gas mole...

  14. Distribution of atmospheric CH4 concentration in eastern margin of Japan Sea from 7K14 cruises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, S.; Komiya, S.; Noborio, K.; Matsumoto, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrate of natural gas is widely distributed in marine sediments in the eastern margin of Japan Sea. Active gas vents from the seafloor have previously been reported worldwide at gas hydrate fields. Atmospheric methane (CH4), a major component of seep gases, is an important short-lived climate pollutant. Gas seeps may contribute to increase atmospheric gas concentration above the sea surface. Our objectives were to continuously measure and investigate the distribution of the atmospheric CH4 concentration over the sea surface at the gas hydrate fields along the eastern margin of Japan Sea. We used the R/V Kaiyo-Maru No.7 (Kaiyo Engineering Co., Ltd., Japan) for the survey in Japan Sea from mid April to early June 2014. Continuous measurement of atmospheric CH4 was performed on the ship using a wave-length-scanned cavity ring-down spectrometer (WS-CRDS) (model G2201-i, Picarro Inc., USA). Air sample was collected from an air intake at the top deck (approximately 8 m above sea level) of the ship using an air pump placed in the observation room. To our experience, the ship sailed at approximately 6 knot. Location data were obtained with the nautical GPS. Observed atmospheric CH4 concentration over the sea surface was approximately between 1.8-1.9 ppm in most sea areas, but exceeds 2.0 ppm in some areas. This study was conducted as a part of the METI's shallow gas hydrate exploration project.

  15. Tritium concentrations in the atmospheric environment at Rokkasho, Japan before the final testing of the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akata, Naofumi; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Shima, Nagayoshi; Iyogi, Takashi; Momoshima, Noriyuki; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed at obtaining background tritium concentrations in precipitation and air at Rokkasho where the first commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Japan has been under construction. Tritium concentration in monthly precipitation during fiscal years 2001-2005 had a seasonal variation pattern which was high in spring and low in summer. The tritium concentration was higher than that observed at Chiba City as a whole. The seasonal peak concentration at Rokkasho was generally higher than that at Chiba City, while the baseline concentrations of both were similar. The reason for the difference may be the effect of air mass from the Asian continent which is considered to have high tritium concentration. Atmospheric tritium was operationally separated into HTO, HT and hydrocarbon (CH(3)T) fractions, and the samples collected every 3 d-14 d during fiscal year 2005 were analyzed for these fractions. The HTO concentration as radioactivity in water correlated well with that in the precipitation samples. The HT concentration was the highest among the chemical forms analyzed, followed by the HTO and CH(3)T concentrations. The HT and CH(3)T concentrations did not have clear seasonal variation patterns. The HT concentration followed the decline previously reported by Mason and Östlund with an apparent half-life of 4.8 y. The apparent and environmental half-lives of CH(3)T were estimated as 9.2 y and 36.5 y, respectively, by combining the present data with literature data. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change used the atmospheric lifetime of 12 y for CH(4) to estimate global warming in its 2007 report. The longer environmental half-life of CH(3)T suggested its supply from other sources than past nuclear weapon testing in the atmosphere. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Relating Nimbus-7 37 GHz data to global land-surface evaporation, primary productivity and the atmospheric CO2 concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1988-01-01

    Global observations at 37 GHz by the Nimbus-7 SMMR are related to zonal variations of land surface evaporation and primary productivity, as well as to temporal variations of atmospheric CO2 concentration. The temporal variation of CO2 concentration and the zonal variations of evaporation and primary productivity are shown to be highly correlated with the satellite sensor data. The potential usefulness of the 37-GHz data for global biospheric and climate studies is noted.

  17. Routine Metabolic Rate and Limiting Oxygen Concentration of Freshwater Prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaysian prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, are hatched and raised indoors in small tanks. Prawns may be raised and shipped at high densities which could result in low dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions. Because DO may play an important role in prawn development and survival, we measured routine me...

  18. Effect of oxygen concentration on the growth of Nannochloropsis sp. at low light intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raso, S.; Genugten, van B.; Vermuë, M.H.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2012-01-01

    In large-scale microalgal production in tubular photobioreactors, the build-up of O2 along the tubes is one of the major bottlenecks to obtain high productivities. Oxygen inhibits the growth, since it competes with carbon dioxide for the Rubisco enzyme involved in the CO2 fixation to generate

  19. Effect of oxygen concentration on fire growth of various types of cable bending in horizontal and vertical orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangaribuan, Adrianus; Dhiputra, I. M. K.; Nugroho, Yulianto S.

    2017-03-01

    Electrical cable is a whole of the material including metal (cooper) conductor and its insulation, when an electrical cable is flowed by electric current, based on its own capacity, the temperature of cable conductor increases gradually. If the current flows above the cable carrying capacity, then an extreme temperature rises are expected. When temperature increase, the electric current flow inside cable conductor will decrease gradually related to the resistance and could occur repeatedly in a period. Since electrical faults on electrical cable system are often suspected as the cause of fires, thus this research aims to investigate measures of preventing the fire to start by means of controlling oxygen concentration in a cable compartment. The experimental work was conducted in laboratory by using electrical power cable of 1.5 mm2 size. Two transparent chambers were applied for studying the effect of vertical and horizontal orientations on the cable temperature rise, under various oxygen concentration of the gas streams. In the present work, the electrical was maintained at a constant level during a typical test run. Parametric studies reported in the paper include the use of a bare and insulated cables as well as the bending shape of the cable lines of a straight cable, coiled cable and randomly bent cable which were loaded with the same electric load and oxygen concentration in the gas supply.

  20. A reduced order model to analytically infer atmospheric CO2 concentration from stomatal and climate data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Wilfried; Katul, Gabriel; Roth-Nebelsick, Anita; Grein, Michaela

    2017-06-01

    To address questions related to the acceleration or deceleration of the global hydrological cycle or links between the carbon and water cycles over land, reliable data for past climatic conditions based on proxies are required. In particular, the reconstruction of palaeoatmospheric CO2 content (Ca) is needed to assist the separation of natural from anthropogenic Ca variability and to explore phase relations between Ca and air temperature Ta time series. Both Ta and Ca are needed to fingerprint anthropogenic signatures in vapor pressure deficit, a major driver used to explain acceleration or deceleration phases in the global hydrological cycle. Current approaches to Ca reconstruction rely on a robust inverse correlation between measured stomatal density in leaves (ν) of many plant taxa and Ca. There are two methods that exploit this correlation: The first uses calibration curves obtained from extant species assumed to represent the fossil taxa, thereby restricting the suitable taxa to those existing today. The second is a hybrid eco-hydrological/physiological approach that determines Ca with the aid of systems of equations based on quasi-instantaneous leaf-gas exchange theories and fossil stomatal data collected along with other measured leaf anatomical traits and parameters. In this contribution, a reduced order model (ROM) is proposed that derives Ca from a single equation incorporating the aforementioned stomatal data, basic climate (e.g. temperature), estimated biochemical parameters of assimilation and isotope data. The usage of the ROM is then illustrated by applying it to isotopic and anatomical measurements from three extant species. The ROM derivation is based on a balance between the biochemical demand and atmospheric supply of CO2 that leads to an explicit expression linking stomatal conductance to internal CO2 concentration (Ci) and Ca. The resulting expression of stomatal conductance from the carbon economy of the leaf is then equated to another

  1. Factors influencing the atmospheric concentrations of PCBs at an abandoned e-waste recycling site in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wu, Xiaowei; Hou, Minmin; Zhao, Hongxia; Chen, Ruize; Luo, Chunling; Zhang, Gan

    2017-02-01

    The diurnal atmospheric concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were investigated at an abandoned e-waste recycling site in South China during winter and summer. Total PCB concentrations during winter and summer were 27.6-212 and 368-1704pg/m 3 in the particulate phase and 270-697 and 3000-15,500pg/m 3 in the gaseous phase, respectively. Both gaseous and particulate PCB concentrations and compositions exhibited significant difference between winter and summer samples, but no diurnal variations during the measurement period. The correlation analysis between PCB concentrations and meteorological conditions, including atmospheric temperature, humidity, and mixing layer height, suggested that the seasonal variability of atmospheric PCB concentrations was strongly temperature-dependent, while the diurnal variability was probably source-dependent. The temperature-driven variations can also be proved by the significant linear correlation between ln P and 1/T in the Clausius-Clapeyron plot. Although government has implemented controls to reduce e-waste pollution, both the relatively high concentrations of PCBs and the diurnal variation in the air suggested that emissions from occasional e-waste recycling activities may still exist in this recycling area. These results underline the importance of continuing e-waste recycling site management long after abandonment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration: effects of increased carbon input in a Lolium perenne soil on microorganisms and decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van J.H.; Gorissen, A.; Polci, D.

    2000-01-01

    Effects of ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (350 and 700 μl l-1) on net carbon input into soil, the production of root-derived material and the subsequent microbial transformation were investigated. Perennial ryegrass plants (L. perenne L.) were labelled in a continuously labelled

  3. Modeling concentrations and fluxes of atmospheric CO2 in the North East Atlantic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geels, C.; Christensen, J.H.; Hansen, A.W.

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Danish NEAREX project a three-dimensional Eulerian hemispheric air pollution model is used to study the transport and concentrations of atmospheric CO2 in the North East Atlantic region. The model domain covers the major part of the Northern Hemisphere and currently the model inclu...

  4. Future Atmospheric CO2 Concentration and Environmental Consequences for the Feed Market: a Consequential LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxe, Henrik; Hamelin, Lorie; Hinrichsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    With the rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration [CO2], crops will assimilate more carbon. This will increase yields in terms of carbohydrates but dilute the content of protein and minerals in crops. This consequential life cycle assessment study modelled the environmental consequences...

  5. Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration may imply higher risk of Fusarium mycotoxin contamination of wheat grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencze, Szilvia; Puskás, Katalin; Vida, Gyula; Karsai, Ildikó; Balla, Krisztina; Komáromi, Judit; Veisz, Ottó

    2017-08-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration not only has a direct impact on plants but also affects plant-pathogen interactions. Due to economic and health-related problems, special concern was given thus in the present work to the effect of elevated CO2 (750 μmol mol(-1)) level on the Fusarium culmorum infection and mycotoxin contamination of wheat. Despite the fact that disease severity was found to be not or little affected by elevated CO2 in most varieties, as the spread of Fusarium increased only in one variety, spike grain number and/or grain weight decreased significantly at elevated CO2 in all the varieties, indicating that Fusarium infection generally had a more dramatic impact on the grain yield at elevated CO2 than at the ambient level. Likewise, grain deoxynivalenol (DON) content was usually considerably higher at elevated CO2 than at the ambient level in the single-floret inoculation treatment, suggesting that the toxin content is not in direct relation to the level of Fusarium infection. In the whole-spike inoculation, DON production did not change, decreased or increased depending on the variety × experiment interaction. Cooler (18 °C) conditions delayed rachis penetration while 20 °C maximum temperature caused striking increases in the mycotoxin contents, resulting in extremely high DON values and also in a dramatic triggering of the grain zearalenone contamination at elevated CO2. The results indicate that future environmental conditions, such as rising CO2 levels, may increase the threat of grain mycotoxin contamination.

  6. Modelling the concentration of atmospheric CO2 during the Younger Dryas climate event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, O.; Stocker, T. F.; Joos, F.; Indermühle, A.; Blunier, T.; Tschumi, J.

    The Younger Dryas (YD, dated between 12.7-11.6 ky BP in the GRIP ice core, Central Greenland) is a distinct cold period in the North Atlantic region during the last deglaciation. A popular, but controversial hypothesis to explain the cooling is a reduction of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC) and associated northward heat flux as triggered by glacial meltwater. Recently, a CH4-based synchronization of GRIP δ18O and Byrd CO2 records (West Antarctica) indicated that the concentration of atmospheric CO2 (COatm2) rose steadily during the YD, suggesting a minor influence of the THC on COatm2 at that time. Here we show that the COatm2 change in a zonally averaged, circulation-biogeochemistry ocean model when THC is collapsed by freshwater flux anomaly is consistent with the Byrd record. Cooling in the North Atlantic has a small effect on COatm2 in this model, because it is spatially limited and compensated by far-field changes such as a warming in the Southern Ocean. The modelled Southern Ocean warming is in agreement with the anti-phase evolution of isotopic temperature records from GRIP (Northern Hemisphere) and from Byrd and Vostok (East Antarctica) during the YD. δ13C depletion and PO4 enrichment are predicted at depth in the North Atlantic, but not in the Southern Ocean. This could explain a part of the controversy about the intensity of the THC during the YD. Potential weaknesses in our interpretation of the Byrd CO2 record in terms of THC changes are discussed.

  7. Modelling the concentration of atmospheric CO[sub 2] during the Younger Dryas climate event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchal, O.; Stocker, T.F.; Joos, F.; Indermuehle, A.; Blunier, T.; Tschumi, J. (Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik)

    1999-05-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD, dated between 12.7-11.6 ky BP in the GRIP ice core, Central Greenland) is a distinct cold period in the North Atlantic region during the last deglaciation. A popular, but controversial hypothesis to explain the cooling is a reduction of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC) and associated northward heat flux as triggered by glacial meltwater. Recently, a CH[sub 4]-based synchronization of GRIP [delta][sup 18]O and Byrd CO[sub 2] records (West Antarctica) indicated that the concentration of atmospheric CO[sub 2] (CO[sup atm][sub 2]) rose steadily during the YD, suggesting a minor influence of the THC on CO[sup atm][sub 2] at that time. Here we show that the CO[sup atm][sub 2] change in a zonally averaged, circulation-biogeochemistry ocean model when THC is collapsed by freshwater flux anomaly is consistent with the Byrd record. Cooling in the North Atlantic has a small effect on CO[sup atm][sub 2] in this model, because it is spatially limited and compensated by far-field changes such as a warming in the Southern Ocean. The modelled Southern Ocean warming is in agreement with the antiphase evolution of isotopic temperature records from GRIP (Northern Hemisphere) and from Byrd and Vostok (East Antarctica) during the YD. [delta][sup 13]C depletion and PO[sub 4] enrichment are predicted at depth in the North Atlantic, but not in the Southern Ocean. This could explain a part of the controversy about the intensity of the THC during the YD. Potential weaknesses in our interpretation of the Byrd CO[sub 2] record in terms of THC changes are discussed. (orig.) With 5 figs., 1 tab., 91 refs.

  8. Phenotypic Plasticity Conditions the Response of Soybean Seed Yield to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Etsushi; Aoki, Naohiro; Masuya, Yusuke; Shimono, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Selection for cultivars with superior responsiveness to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) is a powerful option for boosting crop productivity under future eCO2. However, neither criteria for eCO2 responsiveness nor prescreening methods have been established. The purpose of this study was to identify traits responsible for eCO2 responsiveness of soybean (Glycine max). We grew 12 Japanese and U.S. soybean cultivars that differed in their maturity group and determinacy under ambient CO2 and eCO2 for 2 years in temperature gradient chambers. CO2 elevation significantly increased seed yield per plant, and the magnitude varied widely among the cultivars (from 0% to 62%). The yield increase was best explained by increased aboveground biomass and pod number per plant. These results suggest that the plasticity of pod production under eCO2 results from biomass enhancement, and would therefore be a key factor in the yield response to eCO2, a resource-rich environment. To test this hypothesis, we grew the same cultivars at low planting density, a resource-rich environment that improved the light and nutrient supplies by minimizing competition. Low planting density significantly increased seed yield per plant, and the magnitude ranged from 5% to 105% among the cultivars owing to increased biomass and pod number per plant. The yield increase due to low-density planting was significantly positively correlated with the eCO2 response in both years. These results confirm our hypothesis and suggest that high plasticity of biomass and pod production at a low planting density reveals suitable parameters for breeding to maximize soybean yield under eCO2. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Two-wavelength pyrometry study of the combustion of sulfide minerals: Part III. The influence of oxygen concentration on pyrite combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffrey, N. E.; Richards, G. G.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1995-10-01

    The strong influence of oxygen concentration on the combustion of pyrite at a furnace temperature of 1130 K has been investigated by pyrometer measurements of the temperature of individual particles and by morphological examination of the reaction products. Three distinct types of behavior were identified depending on the oxygen concentration. With oxygen levels between 10 and 40 pct, the maximum temperature of the pyrite particles increased linearly from about 2000 to over 3000 K while heating rates also climbed. The characteristics of the combustion pulses from the pyrometer revealed that cenosphere inflation occurred at the maximum particle temperature and that the freezing of a magnetite shell is subsequent to, not associated with, sudden expansion of the particles. For oxygen concentrations between 40 and 80 pct, the maximum particle temperature was independent of oxygen concentration, remaining constant at 3000 to 3400 K; however, heating rates were some-what variable. The combustion pulse characteristics again suggested that particles inflate into cenospheres but there was an increased tendency for them to rupture. At oxygen concentrations of 80 pct and greater, higher heating rates were measured but the maximum particle temperatures were limited to 3200 to 3500 K. The combustion pulse characteristics in oxygen suggested that the termination of reactions is consistent with material ejection or particle disintegration as opposed to cenosphere inflation. The results generally were consistent with the reaction rate being governed by oxygen transport in the gas phase, although at higher oxygen concentrations evaporation of the iron species and other physical phenomena limited the particle temperature.

  10. Effect of commercial rosemary oleoresin preparations on ground chicken thigh meat quality packaged in a high-oxygen atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keokamnerd, T; Acton, J C; Han, I Y; Dawson, P L

    2008-01-01

    Four commercial rosemary oleoresin preparations were added to ground chicken thigh meat at the recommended levels of the manufacturer then packaged in 80% O(2)-20% CO(2) modified atmosphere trays. The rosemary preparations differed in oil and water solubility, dispersion properties, or both. Addition of rosemary to ground chicken had an overall positive effect on raw meat appearance during storage and cooked meat flavor. No effect on bacterial growth was observed due to rosemary addition. However, oxidation was slowed in meat with added rosemary as indicated by lower TBA values, lower hexanal concentrations, and sensory scores. Color (redness) was more stable in meat with added rosemary compared with meat without rosemary, as reflected in redness (a*) values, hue angles, and visual scores. Of the 4 rosemary preparations tested, the oil-soluble, most concentrated preparation (HT-O) was most effective in maintaining meat quality compared with the other 3 types tested.

  11. Oxygen deficiency and salinity affect cell-specific ion concentrations in adventitious roots of barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotula, Lukasz; Clode, Peta L; Striker, Gustavo G; Pedersen, Ole; Läuchli, André; Shabala, Sergey; Colmer, Timothy D

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen deficiency associated with soil waterlogging adversely impacts root respiration and nutrient acquisition. We investigated the effects of O2 deficiency and salinity (100 mM NaCl) on radial O2 concentrations and cell-specific ion distributions in adventitious roots of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Microelectrode profiling measured O2 concentrations across roots in aerated, aerated saline, stagnant or stagnant saline media. X-ray microanalysis at two positions behind the apex determined the cell-specific elemental concentrations of potassium (K), sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl) across roots. Severe O2 deficiency occurred in the stele and apical regions of roots in stagnant solutions. O2 deficiency in the stele reduced the concentrations of K, Na and Cl in the pericycle and xylem parenchyma cells at the subapical region. Near the root apex, Na declined across the cortex in roots from the aerated saline solution but was relatively high in all cell types in roots from the stagnant saline solution. Oxygen deficiency has a substantial impact on cellular ion concentrations in roots. Both pericycle and xylem parenchyma cells are involved in energy-dependent K loading into the xylem and in controlling radial Na and Cl transport. At root tips, accumulation of Na in the outer cell layers likely contributed to reduction of Na in inner cells of the tips. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Atmospheric CO2 concentration effects on rice water use and biomass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Uttam; Quick, William Paul; Barrios, Marilou; Sta Cruz, Pompe C; Dingkuhn, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have addressed effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration on rice biomass production and yield but effects on crop water use are less well understood. Irrigated rice evapotranspiration (ET) is composed of floodwater evaporation and canopy transpiration. Crop coefficient Kc (ET over potential ET, or ETo) is crop specific according to FAO, but may decrease as CO2 concentration rises. A sunlit growth chamber experiment was conducted in the Philippines, exposing 1.44-m2 canopies of IR72 rice to four constant CO2 levels (195, 390, 780 and 1560 ppmv). Crop geometry and management emulated field conditions. In two wet (WS) and two dry (DS) seasons, final aboveground dry weight (agdw) was measured. At 390 ppmv [CO2] (current ambient level), agdw averaged 1744 g m-2, similar to field although solar radiation was only 61% of ambient. Reduction to 195 ppmv [CO2] reduced agdw to 56±5% (SE), increase to 780 ppmv increased agdw to 128±8%, and 1560 ppmv increased agdw to 142±5%. In 2013WS, crop ET was measured by weighing the water extracted daily from the chambers by the air conditioners controlling air humidity. Chamber ETo was calculated according to FAO and empirically corrected via observed pan evaporation in chamber vs. field. For 390 ppmv [CO2], Kc was about 1 during crop establishment but increased to about 3 at flowering. 195 ppmv CO2 reduced Kc, 780 ppmv increased it, but at 1560 ppmv it declined. Whole-season crop water use was 564 mm (195 ppmv), 719 mm (390 ppmv), 928 mm (780 ppmv) and 803 mm (1560 ppmv). With increasing [CO2], crop water use efficiency (WUE) gradually increased from 1.59 g kg-1 (195 ppmv) to 2.88 g kg-1 (1560 ppmv). Transpiration efficiency (TE) measured on flag leaves responded more strongly to [CO2] than WUE. Responses of some morphological traits are also reported. In conclusion, increased CO2 promotes biomass more than water use of irrigated rice, causing increased WUE, but it does not help saving water. Comparability

  13. Atmospheric CO2 concentration effects on rice water use and biomass production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam Kumar

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have addressed effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration on rice biomass production and yield but effects on crop water use are less well understood. Irrigated rice evapotranspiration (ET is composed of floodwater evaporation and canopy transpiration. Crop coefficient Kc (ET over potential ET, or ETo is crop specific according to FAO, but may decrease as CO2 concentration rises. A sunlit growth chamber experiment was conducted in the Philippines, exposing 1.44-m2 canopies of IR72 rice to four constant CO2 levels (195, 390, 780 and 1560 ppmv. Crop geometry and management emulated field conditions. In two wet (WS and two dry (DS seasons, final aboveground dry weight (agdw was measured. At 390 ppmv [CO2] (current ambient level, agdw averaged 1744 g m-2, similar to field although solar radiation was only 61% of ambient. Reduction to 195 ppmv [CO2] reduced agdw to 56±5% (SE, increase to 780 ppmv increased agdw to 128±8%, and 1560 ppmv increased agdw to 142±5%. In 2013WS, crop ET was measured by weighing the water extracted daily from the chambers by the air conditioners controlling air humidity. Chamber ETo was calculated according to FAO and empirically corrected via observed pan evaporation in chamber vs. field. For 390 ppmv [CO2], Kc was about 1 during crop establishment but increased to about 3 at flowering. 195 ppmv CO2 reduced Kc, 780 ppmv increased it, but at 1560 ppmv it declined. Whole-season crop water use was 564 mm (195 ppmv, 719 mm (390 ppmv, 928 mm (780 ppmv and 803 mm (1560 ppmv. With increasing [CO2], crop water use efficiency (WUE gradually increased from 1.59 g kg-1 (195 ppmv to 2.88 g kg-1 (1560 ppmv. Transpiration efficiency (TE measured on flag leaves responded more strongly to [CO2] than WUE. Responses of some morphological traits are also reported. In conclusion, increased CO2 promotes biomass more than water use of irrigated rice, causing increased WUE, but it does not help saving water. Comparability

  14. Nondestructive and continuous monitoring of oxygen levels in modified atmosphere packaged ready-to-eat mixed salad products using optical oxygen sensors, and its effects on sensory and microbiological counts during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, A; O'Sullivan, M G; Papkovsky, D B; Kerry, J P

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the percentage oxygen consumption of fresh, respiring ready-to-eat (RTE) mixed leaf salad products (Iceberg salad leaf, Caesar salad leaf, and Italian salad leaf). These were held under different modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) conditions (5% O2 , 5% CO2 , 90% N2 (MAPC-commercial control), 21% O2 , 5% CO2 , 74% N2 (MAP 1), 45% O2 , 5% CO2 , 50% N2 (MAP 2), and 60% O2 , 5% CO2 , 35% N2 (MAP 3)) and 4 °C for up to 10 d. The quality and shelf-life stability of all packaged salad products were evaluated using sensory, physiochemical, and microbial assessment. Oxygen levels in all MAP packs were measured on each day of analysis using optical oxygen sensors allowing for nondestructive assessment of packs. Analysis showed that with the exception of control packs, oxygen levels for all MAP treatments decreased by approximately 10% after 7 d of storage. Oxygen levels in control packs were depleted after 7 d of storage. This appears to have had no detrimental effect on either the sensory quality or shelf-life stability of any of the salad products investigated. Additionally, the presence of higher levels of oxygen in modified atmosphere packs did not significantly improve product quality or shelf-life stability; however, these additional levels of oxygen were freely available to fresh respiring produce if required. This study shows that the application of optical sensors in MAP packs was successful in nondestructively monitoring oxygen level, or changes in oxygen level, during refrigerated storage of RTE salad products. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. Element- and charge-state-resolved ion energies in the cathodic arc plasma from composite AlCr cathodes in argon, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Robert; Polcik, Peter; Anders, André

    2015-06-25

    The energy distribution functions of ions in the cathodic arc plasma using composite AlCr cathodes were measured as a function of the background gas pressure in the range 0.5 to 3.5 Pa for different cathode compositions and gas atmospheres. The most abundant aluminium ions were Al+ regardless of the background gas species, whereas Cr2+ ions were dominating in Ar and N2 and Cr+ in O2 atmospheres. The energy distributions of the aluminium and chromium ions typically consisted of a high-energy fraction due to acceleration in the expanding plasma plume from the cathode spot and thermalised ions that were subjected to collisions in the plasma cloud. The fraction of the latter increased with increasing background gas pressure. Atomic nitrogen and oxygen ions showed similar energy distributions as the aluminium and chromium ions, whereas the argon and molecular nitrogen and oxygen ions were formed at greater distance from the cathode spot and thus less subject to accelerating gradients. In addition to the positively charged metal and gas ions, negatively charged oxygen and oxygen-containing ions were observed in O2 atmosphere. The obtained results are intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the ion energies and charge states in the arc plasma of AlCr composite cathodes in different gas atmospheres as such plasmas are frequently used to deposit thin films and coatings.

  16. Fine-Structure Measurements of Oxygen A Band Absorbance for Estimating the Thermodynamic Average Temperature of the Earth's Atmosphere: An Experiment in Physical and Environmental Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrick, M. L.; Greer, A. E.; Nieuwland, A.; Priore, R. J.; Scaffidi, J.; Andreatta, Daniele; Colavita, Paula

    2006-01-01

    The experiment describe the measures of the A band transitions of atmospheric oxygen, a rich series of rotation-electronic absorption lines falling in the deep red portion of the optical spectrum and clearly visible owing to attenuation of solar radiation. It combines pure physical chemistry with analytical and environmental science and provides a…

  17. Technical Note: Particulate reactive oxygen species concentrations and their association with environmental conditions in an urban, subtropical climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, S. S.; Siegel, J. A.; Kinney, K. A.

    2014-07-01

    Reactions between hydrocarbons and ozone or hydroxyl radicals lead to the formation of oxidized species, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the troposphere. ROS can be carried deep into the lungs by small aerodynamic particles where they can cause oxidative stress and cell damage. While environmental studies have focused on ROS in the gas phase and rainwater, it is also important to determine concentrations of ROS on respirable particles. Samples of PM2.5 collected over 3 h at midday on 40 days during November 2011 and September 2012 show that the particulate ROS concentration in Austin, Texas, ranged from a minimum value of 0.02 nmoles H2O2 m-3 air in December to 3.81 nmoles H2O2 m-3 air in September. Results from correlation tests and linear regression analysis on particulate ROS concentrations and environmental conditions (which included ozone and PM2.5 concentrations, temperature, relative humidity, precipitation and solar radiation) indicate that ambient particulate ROS is significantly influenced by the ambient ozone concentration, temperature and incident solar radiation. Particulate ROS concentrations measured in this study were in the range reported by other studies in the US, Taiwan and Singapore. This study is one of the first to assess seasonal variations in particulate ROS concentrations and helps explain the influence of environmental conditions on particulate ROS concentrations.

  18. Effect of reduced light and low oxygen concentration on germination, growth and establishment of some plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yasin, Muhammad

    Many abiotic factors effect plants germination, growth, and development. This Ph.D. study elucidates the effect of reduced light, low oxygen and seed dormancy on germination and growth of some weed species, field crops and vegetables. One study describes the growth and developmental responses of ...... improved the germination of the problematic invader Alliaria petiolate of North American forests. A method was developed to break seed dormancy of the herb garlic mustard using chemicals....

  19. Multiphase composition changes and reactive oxygen species formation during limonene oxidation in the new Cambridge Atmospheric Simulation Chamber (CASC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Peter J.; Mahon, Brendan M.; Wragg, Francis P. H.; Fuller, Stephen J.; Giorio, Chiara; Kourtchev, Ivan; Kalberer, Markus

    2017-08-01

    The chemical composition of organic aerosols influences their impacts on human health and the climate system. Aerosol formation from gas-to-particle conversion and in-particle reaction was studied for the oxidation of limonene in a new facility, the Cambridge Atmospheric Simulation Chamber (CASC). Health-relevant oxidising organic species produced during secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation were quantified in real time using an Online Particle-bound Reactive Oxygen Species Instrument (OPROSI). Two categories of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were identified based on time series analysis: a short-lived component produced during precursor ozonolysis with a lifetime of the order of minutes, and a stable component that was long-lived on the experiment timescale (˜ 4 h). Individual organic species were monitored continuously over this time using Extractive Electrospray Ionisation (EESI) Mass Spectrometry (MS) for the particle phase and Proton Transfer Reaction (PTR) MS for the gas phase. Many first-generation oxidation products are unsaturated, and we observed multiphase aging via further ozonolysis reactions. Volatile products such as C9H14O (limonaketone) and C10H16O2 (limonaldehyde) were observed in the gas phase early in the experiment, before reacting again with ozone. Loss of C10H16O4 (7-hydroxy limononic acid) from the particle phase was surprisingly slow. A combination of reduced C = C reactivity and viscous particle formation (relative to other SOA systems) may explain this, and both scenarios were tested in the Pretty Good Aerosol Model (PG-AM). A range of characterisation measurements were also carried out to benchmark the chamber against existing facilities. This work demonstrates the utility of CASC, particularly for understanding the reactivity and health-relevant properties of organic aerosols using novel, highly time-resolved techniques.

  20. Ruthenium nanoparticles for oxygen reduction and/or hydrogen oxidation, prepared by pyrolysis in a reducing atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altamirano-Gutierrez, A.; Villagran-Naredo, J.L.A.; Jimenez-Sandoval, O. [Inst. Politecnico Nacional (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados; Hernandez-Castellanos, R. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Technologic en Electroquimica (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    An investigation of the synthesis, structural and electrochemical characterization of ruthenium-based materials prepared by pyrolysis was presented. Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12} materials were pyrolized in a hydrogen atmosphere at 80, 140, 360 and 460 degrees C. The materials were then characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy; X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) and hydrogen oxidation reactions (HOR) were evaluated through the use of rotating disk electrode measurements in a 0.5 M hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) electrolyte at room temperature. Results of the investigation indicated that the Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12} precursor was completely decarbonylated in H{sub 2} at 140 degrees C. Carbonyl group bands were observed when the materials were prepared at 80 degrees C due to the formation of an inactive Ru cluster resulting from a structural rearrangement of the cluster. Polarization curves indicated that the materials prepared at 140 degrees C were able to perform the ORR and HOR in an acid medium similar to the medium present in proton exchange (PE) fuel cells. The electrokinetic parameters indicated that the exchange current densities were of the same order as platinum (Pt) current densities, and that the ORR occurred via 4 electrons due to the direct formation of water. Tafel slope values for the HOR suggested that the mechanism of the reaction was related to Herovsky/Volmer types. It was concluded that the use of a reductive atmosphere in the preparation process of ruthenium-based materials prevents the formation of undesirable ruthenium oxides. The nano-sized materials prepared during the experiment did not exhibit loss of their catalytic properties after being exposed to air for several weeks. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Stimulation of growth of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori by atmospheric level of oxygen under high carbon dioxide tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Na

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori (Hp, a human pathogen that is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer, has been considered a microaerophile, but there is no general consensus about its specific O2 requirements. A clear understanding of Hp physiology is needed to elucidate the pathogenic mechanism(s of Hp infection. Results We cultured Hp under a range of O2 levels with or without 10% CO2 and evaluated growth profiles, morphology, intracellular pH, and energy metabolism. We found that, in the presence of 10% CO2, the normal atmospheric level of O2 inhibited Hp growth at low density but stimulated growth at a higher density. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy of Hp cells cultured under 20% O2 tension revealed live spiral-shaped bacteria with outer membrane vesicles on a rugged cell surface, which became smooth during the stationary phase. Fermentation products including acetate, lactate, and succinate were detected in cell culture media grown under microaerobic conditions, but not under the aerobic condition. CO2 deprivation for less than 24 h did not markedly change cytoplasmic or periplasmic pH, suggesting that cellular pH homeostasis alone cannot account for the capnophilic nature of Hp. Further, CO2 deprivation significantly increased intracellular levels of ppGpp and ATP but significantly decreased cellular mRNA levels, suggesting induction of the stringent response. Conclusions We conclude, unlike previous reports, that H. pylori may be a capnophilic aerobe whose growth is promoted by atmospheric oxygen levels in the presence of 10% CO2. Our data also suggest that buffering of intracellular pH alone cannot account for the CO2 requirement of H. pylori and that CO2 deprivation initiates the stringent response in H. pylori. Our findings may provide new insight into the physiology of this fastidious human pathogen.

  2. CARVE: L2 Atmospheric Gas Concentrations, Airborne Flasks, Alaska, 2012-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), molecular hydrogen (H2), nitrous oxide (N2O), sulfur hexafluoride...

  3. SHOULD LATITUDINAL ATMOSPHERIC TRACE VAPOR CONCENTRATIONS BE REPORTED ON A MASS DENSITY BASIS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the past several decades the issue of global atmospheric trace vapor migration has been of concern to environmental professionals concerned with global distillation/cold condensation of toxic compounds, contamination of remote ecosystems, global climate change and stratospher...

  4. NACP MCI: Tower Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations, Upper Midwest Region, USA, 2007-2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides high precision and high accuracy atmospheric CO2 data from seven instrumented communication towers located in the U.S. Upper Midwest. The...

  5. Effect of low dissolved oxygen concentration on planktonic foraminifera: results from laboratory culture experiments and implications for oceanic anoxic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, A.; da Rocha, R. E.; Bijma, J.; Spero, H. J.; Russell, A. D.; Eggins, S. M.; Kawahata, H.

    2013-12-01

    During Cretaceous oceanic anoxic events (OAEs), substantial turnover of planktonic foraminiferal species occurred, however, the direct effects of the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on planktonic foraminifera remain obscure. Althogh culture experiments conducted under controlled conditions can quantify the relationships between foraminiferal ecology and environmental parameters, experiments controlling DO have yet to be conducted because it is difficult to maintain a stable oxygen concentration. In this study, we cultured two subtropical-transitional planktonic foraminifer species (one symbiotic species, Orbulina universa, and one nonsymbiotic species, Globigerina bulloides) under six different DO conditions (between 10% and 100% saturation). In both species, the gametogenesis rate was more than 60% even at a DO of 10%, suggesting that at least 'dysoxic' conditions (~0.7 mg O2 L-1) could not have directly caused the extinction of planktonic foraminifera during OAEs. Planktonic foraminifera originated from benthic lineages, and this origin is one possible explanation for their high tolerance to extremely low DO levels. Although the number of days to gametogenesis did not differ significantly among treatments in either species, final shell weight increased with increasing DO, suggesting that fossil foraminiferal shell weight could vary with past DO conditions. Our results suggest that the extinction of many planktonic foraminiferal species during OAEs may have been due to anoxic or euxinic conditions in the euphotic zone. The occurrence of these conditions can be explained either by the oxygen minimum layer model or by the stagnant ocean model combined with elevated riverine P input.

  6. Evaluation of simulated biospheric carbon dioxide fluxes and atmospheric concentrations using global in situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, S.; Johnson, M. S.; Potter, C. S.; Genovese, V. B.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric mixing ratios of carbon dioxide (CO2) are largely controlled by anthropogenic emission sources and biospheric sources/sinks. Global biospheric fluxes of CO2 are controlled by complex processes facilitating the exchange of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. These processes which play a key role in these terrestrial ecosystem-atmosphere carbon exchanges are currently not fully understood, resulting in large uncertainties in the quantification of biospheric CO2 fluxes. Current models with these inherent deficiencies have difficulties simulating the global carbon cycle with high accuracy. We are developing a new modeling platform, GEOS-Chem-CASA by integrating the year-specific NASA-CASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach) biosphere model with the GEOS-Chem (Goddard Earth Observation System-Chemistry) chemical transport model to improve the simulation of atmosphere-terrestrial ecosystem carbon exchange. We use NASA-CASA to explicitly represent the exchange of CO2 between terrestrial ecosystem and atmosphere by replacing the baseline GEOS-Chem land net CO2 flux and forest biomass burning CO2 emissions. We will present the estimation and evaluation of these "bottom-up" land CO2 fluxes, simulated atmospheric mixing ratios, and forest disturbance changes over the last decade. In addition, we will present our initial comparison of atmospheric column-mean dry air mole fraction of CO2 predicted by the model and those retrieved from NASA's OCO-2 (Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2) satellite instrument and model-predicted surface CO2 mixing ratios with global in situ observations. This evaluation is the first step necessary for our future work planned to constrain the estimates of biospheric carbon fluxes through "top-down" inverse modeling, which will improve our understanding of the processes controlling atmosphere-terrestrial ecosystem greenhouse gas exchanges, especially over regions which lack in

  7. Hemispheric average Cl atom concentration from 13C/12C ratios in atmospheric methane

    OpenAIRE

    Platt, U.; Allan, W.; Lowe, D.

    2004-01-01

    Methane is a significant atmospheric trace gas in the context of greenhouse warming and climate change. The dominant sink of atmospheric methane is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Recently, a mechanism for production of chlorine radicals (Cl) in the marine boundary layer (MBL) via bromine autocatalysis has been proposed. The importance of this mechanism in producing a methane sink is not clear at present because of the difficulty of in-situ direct measurement of Cl. However, the ...

  8. Numerical and experimental investigation of light emissions of a planar nitrogen atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge due to addition of ammonia considering oxygen impurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.-L.; Hung, C.-T.; Lin, K.-M.; Wei, T.-C.; Wu, J.-S.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the mechanisms of light emissions, including NO-γ, NO-β and N2-SPS, produced in a N2/NH3 atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge considering realistic oxygen impurity (30 ppm) are investigated numerically and experimentally. Self-consistent, one-dimensional fluid modeling is used to numerically simulate the discharge process with 48 species and 235 reaction channels. An optical emission spectrometer (OES) is used to measure the relative intensities of the light emission. The simulations of the light emission intensities for the above-mentioned OES lines generally reproduce the trends observed in the experiments caused by changes in the NH3 concentration. All of the predicted intensities of NO-γ, NO-β and N2-SPS decrease with increasing amount of NH3 caused by various reaction mechanisms. The former is due to the loss of N2(A) and NO(A) by the reaction of NH3 with N2(A) and NO(A), respectively. The decrease in NO-β is due to the depletion of N and O because of NH3, and the decrease in N2-SPS is due to electron attachment to NH3 and a weaker metastable-metastable associative ionization of N2. All of the simulated results demonstrate that the discharges are typically Townsend-like because the ions outnumber the electrons and the electric field across the gap is distorted only slightly by the charged particles during the breakdown. Finally, a reduced chemical kinetics model for a planar atmospheric-pressure N2/O2/NH3 dielectric barrier discharge is proposed and validated by benchmarking against the above complete chemical kinetics. This results in a reduced chemical kinetics consisting of 33 species and 87 reactions with a very limited loss of accuracy of discharge properties, while it is 2.1 times faster in computational time as compared with the complete version.

  9. Ship-board report on atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations recorded on continuous from Mediterranean sea to Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenaz, R.; Ori, C. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Bologna (Italy). Ist. di Geologia Marina; Giovanelli, G.; Ravegnani, F.; Bonasoni, P. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Bologna (Italy). Ist. di Scienze dell' Atmosfera e dell' Oceano; Colombo, T. [Italian Air Force, Sestola, MO (Italy). Meterorological Service; Masarie, K. [National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States); Ciattaglia, L. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome (Italy). Ist. di Fisica dell' Atmosfera

    2000-10-01

    The paper presents the results obtained from continuous measurements performed during two cruises with hemispherical courses. In this way, it has been obtained the latitudinal trend of CO{sub 2} in continuity of space and time along two hemispheric courses in 1994-95 and 1996-97 from Europe to Antarctica. The results are compared with measurements from the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory (CMDL) cooperative air sampling network. The fitting of data recorded on board with the historical data sets recorded at Palmer Station is also presented, highlighting the current annual increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations.

  10. Long-term decline of global atmospheric ethane concentrations and implications for methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Isobel J; Sulbaek Andersen, Mads P; Meinardi, Simone; Bruhwiler, Lori; Blake, Nicola J; Helmig, Detlev; Rowland, F Sherwood; Blake, Donald R

    2012-08-23

    After methane, ethane is the most abundant hydrocarbon in the remote atmosphere. It is a precursor to tropospheric ozone and it influences the atmosphere's oxidative capacity through its reaction with the hydroxyl radical, ethane's primary atmospheric sink. Here we present the longest continuous record of global atmospheric ethane levels. We show that global ethane emission rates decreased from 14.3 to 11.3 teragrams per year, or by 21 per cent, from 1984 to 2010. We attribute this to decreasing fugitive emissions from ethane's fossil fuel source--most probably decreased venting and flaring of natural gas in oil fields--rather than a decline in its other major sources, biofuel use and biomass burning. Ethane's major emission sources are shared with methane, and recent studies have disagreed on whether reduced fossil fuel or microbial emissions have caused methane's atmospheric growth rate to slow. Our findings suggest that reduced fugitive fossil fuel emissions account for at least 10-21 teragrams per year (30-70 per cent) of the decrease in methane's global emissions, significantly contributing to methane's slowing atmospheric growth rate since the mid-1980s.

  11. Rocket observation of atomic oxygen and night airglow: Measurement of concentration with an improved resonance fluorescence technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kita

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available An improved resonant fluorescence instrument for measuring atomic oxygen concentration was developed to avoid the Doppler effect and the aerodynamic shock effect due to the supersonic motion of a rocket. The shock effect is reduced by adopting a sharp wedge-shaped housing and by scanning of the detector field of view to change the distance between the scattering volume and the surface of the housing. The scanning enables us to determine absolute values of atomic oxygen concentration from relative variation of the scattered light signal due to the self-absorption. The instrument was calibrated in the laboratory, and the numerical simulation reproduced the calibration result. Using the instrument, the altitude profile of atomic oxygen concentration was observed by a rocket experiment at Uchinoura (31°N on 28 January 1992. The data obtained from the rocket experiment were not perfectly free from the shock effect, but errors due to the effect were reduced by the data analysis procedure. The observed maximum concentration was 3.8× 1011 cm–3 at altitudes around 94 km. The systematic error is estimated to be less than ±0.7×1011 cm–3 and the relative random error is less than±0.07× 1011 cm–3at the same altitudes. The altitude profile of the OI 557.7-nm airglow was also observed in the same rocket experiment. The maximum volume emission rate was found to be 150 photons cm–3 s–1 at 94 km. The observed altitude profiles are compared with the MSIS model and other in situ observations.

  12. Concentration fields near air-water interfaces during interfacial mass transport: oxygen transport and random square wave analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Schulz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Mass transfer across a gas-liquid interface was studied theoretically and experimentally, using transfer of oxygen into water as the gas-liquid system. The experimental results support the conclusions of a theoretical description of the concentration field that uses random square waves approximations. The effect of diffusion over the concentration records was quantified. It is shown that the peak of the normalized rms concentration fluctuation profiles must be lower than 0.5, and that the position of the peak of the rms value is an adequate measure of the thickness of the diffusive layer. The position of the peak is the boundary between the regions more subject to molecular diffusion or to turbulent transport of dissolved mass.

  13. Detection of atmospheric tritium by scintillation. Variations in its concentration in France; Detection du tritium atmospherique par scintillation. Evolution de sa concentration en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibron, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-06-01

    The tritium released into the atmosphere as a result of the explosion of thermonuclear devices is a useful radioactive tracer for the study of certain geophysical problems. The low concentrations found however call for the use of extremely sensitive detectors. Two detection methods using liquid scintillators are described. In the first method, the sample is introduced into the scintillator in liquid form, after prior concentration of the tritium by electrolysis. In the second method the tritium is incorporated into the scintillator solvent molecule by chemical synthesis. In the last part of the report are examined the variations in the tritium concentration in rain-water and of the free hydrogen in the air in France. A discussion is then made of the seasonal variations in the case of rain-water and these are compared to the variations in the strontium-90 concentrations. (author) [French] Le tritium introduit dans l'atmosphere par les explosions d'armes thermonucleaires est un traceur radioactif Interessant pour l'etude de certains problemes de geophysique. Les faibles concentrations rencontrees obligent toutefois a utiliser des detecteurs extremement sensibles. On decrit deux methodes de detection utilisant des scintillateurs liquides. Dans la premiere methode, l'echantillon est introduit dans le scintillateur, sous forme aqueuse, apres une concentration prealable du tritium par electrolyse. Dans la seconde methode, le tritium est incorpore a la molecule du solvant du scintillateur par synthese chimique. Dans la derniere partie du rapport, on examine l'evolution de la concentration du tritium dans les eaux de precipitation et l'hydrogene libre de l'air en France. On discute ensuite les variations saisonnieres dans le cas des eaux de precipitation et on les compare aux variations du strontium 90. (auteur)

  14. Prepolymerization of Lacquer Sap under Pure Oxygen Atmosphere and Its Effects on the Properties of Lacquer Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of lacquer saps were prepared by prepolymerization under oxygen atmosphere. The prepolymerization process was investigated by GPC, UV-Vis, FT-IR, NMR, and microscope. The results showed that the polymerization of urushiol monomer was accelerated. The content of monomer in the lacquer sap swiftly decreased from 82.68% to 47.75% in 0.5 h. The mechanism of polymerization was complex and was involved in the coupling reaction of phenyl ring, the addition reaction of the unsaturated carbon-carbon double bond groups with urushiol hydroxyl groups, and other reactions that occurred on the side chains. In addition, the prepolymerization also improved significantly the drying property of lacquer film, especially at low relative humidity. At the same time, the sizes of the water drops in the lacquer saps significantly decreased with increasing the stirring time and the surface of lacquer film became smoother, which resulted in its excellent gloss (109–125. Due to the prepolymerization, the pencil hardness and the thermal stability of lacquer film were slightly improved as well.

  15. Three years (2008-2010) of measurements of atmospheric concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) at Station Nord, North East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossi, Rossana; Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Skov, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) have been measured for the first time at Station Nord, North-East Greenland, from 2008 to 2010. The data obtained are reported here. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB), endosulfan I and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) were the predominant compounds...... mechanism for these compounds. A significant correlation with temperature was found for all the other studied pesticides and pesticide degradation products, which indicates that re-emission of these compounds from previously contaminated surfaces is an important factor for the observed variation...... in concentrations. Pesticide concentrations were also correlated with sea ice cover. Concentrations of the compounds that have not been in use for decades correlated with temperature and ice cover, while concentrations of compounds still in use did not correlate with either of these parameters. These observations...

  16. Regression model analysis of the decreasing trend of cesium-137 concentration in the atmosphere since the Fukushima accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Kyo; Ohse, Kenji; Shima, Nagayoshi; Kawatsu, Kencho; Tsukada, Hirofumi

    2016-11-01

    The decreasing trend of the atmospheric 137Cs concentration in two cities in Fukushima prefecture was analyzed by a regression model to clarify the relation between the parameter of the decrease in the model and the trend and to compare the trend with that after the Chernobyl accident. The 137Cs particle concentration measurements were conducted in urban Fukushima and rural Date sites from September 2012 to June 2015. The 137Cs particle concentrations were separated in two groups: particles of more than 1.1 μm aerodynamic diameters (coarse particles) and particles with aerodynamic diameter lower than 1.1 μm (fine particles). The averages of the measured concentrations were 0.1 mBq m-3 in Fukushima and Date sites. The measured concentrations were applied in the regression model which decomposed them into two components: trend and seasonal variation. The trend concentration included the parameters for the constant and the exponential decrease. The parameter for the constant was slightly different between the Fukushima and Date sites. The parameter for the exponential decrease was similar for all the cases, and much higher than the value of the physical radioactive decay except for the concentration in the fine particles at the Date site. The annual decreasing rates of the 137Cs concentration evaluated by the trend concentration ranged from 44 to 53% y-1 with average and standard deviation of 49 ± 8% y-1 for all the cases in 2013. In the other years, the decreasing rates also varied slightly for all cases. These indicated that the decreasing trend of the 137Cs concentration was nearly unchanged for the location and ground contamination level in the three years after the accident. The 137Cs activity per aerosol particle mass also decreased with the same trend as the 137Cs concentration in the atmosphere. The results indicated that the decreasing trend of the atmospheric 137Cs concentration was related with the reduction of the 137Cs concentration in

  17. [Characteristics of atmospheric CO2 concentration and variation of carbon source & sink at Lin'an regional background station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jing-Jiao; Xu, Hong-Hui; Kang, Li-Li; Ma, Qian-Li

    2011-08-01

    Characteristics of Atmospheric CO2 concentration obtained by Flask measurements were analyzed at Lin'an regional background station from August 2006 to July 2009. According to the simulation results of carbon tracking model, the impact of carbon sources and sinks on CO2 concentration was evaluated in Yangtze River Delta. The results revealed that atmospheric CO2 concentrations at Lin'an regional background station were between 368.3 x 10(-6) and 414.8 x 10(-6). The CO2 concentration varied as seasons change, with maximum in winter and minimum in summer; the annual difference was about 20.5 x 10(-6). The long-term trend of CO2 concentration showed rapid growth year by year; the average growth rate was about 3.2 x 10(-6)/a. CO2 flux of Yangtze River Delta was mainly contributed by fossil fuel burning, terrestrial biosphere exchange and ocean exchange, while the contribution of fire emission was small. CO2 flux from fossil fuel burning played an important role in carbon source; terrestrial biosphere and ocean were important carbon sinks in this area. Seasonal variations of CO2 concentration at Lin'an regional background station were consistent with CO2 fluxes from fossil fuel burning and terrestrial biosphere exchange.

  18. Optical noninvasive calculation of hemoglobin components concentrations and fractional oxygen saturation using a ring-scattering pulse oximeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Omar; Stork, Wilhelm; Muller-Glaser, Klaus

    2004-06-01

    The deficiencies of the currently used pulse oximeter are discussed in diverse literature. A hazardous pitfalls of this method is that the pulse oximeter will not detect carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and methemoglobin (metHb) concentrations. This leads to incorrect measurement of oxygen saturation by carbon monoxide poisoning and methemoglobinemia. Also the total hemoglobin concentration will not be considered and can only be measured in-vitro up to now. A second pitfall of the standard pulse oximetry is that it will not be able to show a result by low perfusion of tissues. This case is available inter alia when the patient is under shock or has a low blood pressure. The new non-invasive system we designed measures the actual (fractional) oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration. It will enable us also to measure COHb and metHb. The measurement can be applied at better perfused body central parts. Four or more light emitting diodes (LEDs) or laser diodes (LDs) and five photodiodes (PDs) are used. The reflected light signal detected by photodiodes is processed using a modified Lambert-Beer law (I=I0×e-α.d ). According to this law, when a non scattering probe is irradiated with light having the incident intensity I0, the intensity of transmitted light I decays exponentially with the absorption coefficient a of that probe and its thickness d. Modifications of this law have been performed following the theoretical developed models in literature, Monte Carlo simulation and experimental measurement.

  19. Maximizing biomass concentration in baker's yeast process by using a decoupled geometric controller for substrate and dissolved oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopda, Viki R; Rathore, Anurag S; Gomes, James

    2015-11-01

    Biomass production by baker's yeast in a fed-batch reactor depends on the metabolic regime determined by the concentration of glucose and dissolved oxygen in the reactor. Achieving high biomass concentration in turn is dependent on the dynamic interaction between the glucose and dissolved oxygen concentration. Taking this into account, we present in this paper the implementation of a decoupled input-output linearizing controller (DIOLC) for maximizing biomass in a fed-batch yeast process. The decoupling is based on the inversion of 2×2 input-output matrix resulting from global linearization. The DIOLC was implemented online using a platform created in LabVIEW employing a TCP/IP protocol via the reactor's built-in electronic system. An improvement in biomass yield by 23% was obtained compared to that using a PID controller. The results demonstrate superior capability of the DIOLC and that the cumulative effect of smoother control action contributes to biomass maximization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Study on the output current for electrochemical low-energy neutrino detector with regards to oxygen concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suda, Shoya; Ishibashi, Kenji; Riyana, Eka Sapta [Dept. of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Aida, Yani Nur [SyarifHidatatullah State Islamic University, Jakarta (Indonesia); Nakamura, Shohei [Infrastructure System Company, Hitachi, Tokyo (Japan); Imahayashi, Yoichi [Mitsubishi Electric, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Experiments with small electrochemical apparatus were previously carried out for detecting low-energy neutrinos under irradiation of reactor neutrinos and under natural neutrino environment. The experimental result indicated that the output current of reactor-neutrino irradiated detector was appreciably larger than that of natural environmental one. Usual interaction cross-sections of neutrinos are quite small, so that they do not explain the experimental result at all. To understand the experimental data, we propose that some biological products may generate AV-type scalar field B0, leading to a large interaction cross-section. The output current generation is ascribed to an electrochemical process that may be assisted by weak interaction phenomena. Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the detector solution were measured in this study, for the purpose of understanding the mechanism of the detector output current generation. It was found that the time evolution of experimental output current was mostly reproduced in simulation calculation on the basis of the measured dissolved oxygen concentration. We mostly explained the variation of experimental data by using the electrochemical half-cell analysis model based on the DO concentration that is consistent to the experiment.

  1. Nutrient and oxygen concentrations within the sediments of an Alaskan beach polluted with the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufadel, Michel C; Sharifi, Youness; Van Aken, Benoit; Wrenn, Brian A; Lee, Kenneth

    2010-10-01

    Measurements of the background concentrations of nutrients, dissolved oxygen (DO), and salinity were obtained from a beach that has oil from the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989. Two transects were set across the beach, one passed through an oil patch while the other transect was clean. Three pits were dug in each transect, and they ranged in depth from 0.9 to 1.5 m. The DO was around 1.0 mg L(-1) at oiled pits and larger than 5 mg L(-1) at clean pits. The average nutrient concentrations in the beach were 0.39 mg-N L(-1) and 0.020 mg-P L(-1). Both concentrations are lower than optimal values for oil biodegradation (2 to 10 mg-N L(-1) and 0.40 to 2.0 mg-P L(-1)), which suggests that they are both limiting factors for biodegradation. The lowest nitrate and DO values were found in the oiled pits, leading to the conclusion that microbial oil consumption was probably occurring under anoxic conditions and was associated to denitrification. We present evidence that the oxygen level may be a major factor limiting oil biodegradation in the beaches.

  2. Atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (GEM concentrations and mercury depositions at a high-altitude mountain peak in south China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. W. Fu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available China is regarded as the largest contributor of mercury (Hg to the global atmospheric Hg budget. However, concentration levels and depositions of atmospheric Hg in China are poorly known. Continuous measurements of atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (GEM were carried out from May 2008 to May 2009 at the summit of Mt. Leigong in south China. Simultaneously, deposition fluxes of THg and MeHg in precipitation, throughfall and litterfall were also studied. Atmospheric GEM concentrations averaged 2.80±1.51 ng m−3, which was highly elevated compared to global background values but much lower than semi-rural and industrial/urban areas in China. Sources identification indicates that both regional industrial emissions and long range transport of Hg from central, south and southwest China were corresponded to the elevated GEM level. Seasonal and diurnal variations of GEM were observed, which reflected variations in source intensity, deposition processes and meteorological factors. Precipitation and throughfall deposition fluxes of THg and MeHg in Mt. Leigong were comparable or lower compared to those reported in Europe and North America, whereas litterfall deposition fluxes of THg and MeHg were higher compared to Europe and North America. This highlights the importance of vegetation to Hg atmospheric cycling. In th remote forest ecosystem of China, deposition of GEM via uptake of foliage followed by litterfall was very important for the depletion of atmospheric Hg. Elevated GEM level in ambient air may accelerate the foliar uptake of Hg through air which may partly explain the elevated litterfall deposition fluxes of Hg observed in Mt. Leigong.

  3. Measurements of Oxygenated Organic Chemicals In the Pacific Troposphere During TRACE-P: Higher Aldehydes (less than C(sub 1)), Their Sources, and Potential Role In Atmospheric Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Salas, L.; Herlth, D.; Viezee, W.; Fried, A.; Jackob, D.; Blake, D.; Heikes, B.; Talbot, R.; Sachse, G.; hide

    2002-01-01

    Airborne measurements of a large number of oxygenated organics were carried out in the Pacific troposphere (to 12 km) in the Spring of 2001 (Feb. 24-April 10). Specifically these measurements included acetaldehyde, propanaldehyde, acetone, methylethyl ketone, methanol, ethanol, PAM and organic nitrates. Independent measurements of formaldehyde, peroxides, and tracers were also available. Highly polluted as well as pristine air masses were sampled. Oxygenated organics were abundant in the clean In troposphere and were greatly enhanced in the outflow regions from Asia. Extremely high concentrations of aldehydes could be measured in the troposphere. It is not possible to explain the large abundances of aldehydes in the background troposphere without invoking significant oceanic sources. A strong correlation between the observed mixing ratios of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde is present. We infer that higher aldehydes (such as acetaldehyde and propanaldehyde) may provide a large source of formaldehyde and sequester Cox throughout the troposphere. The atmospheric behavior of acetone, methylethyl ketone, and methanol is generally indicative of their common terrestrial sources with a Image contribution from biomass/biofuel burning. A vast body of data has been collected and it is being analyzed both statistically and with the help of models to better understand the role that oxygenated organics play in the atmosphere and to unravel their sources and sinks. These results will be presented.

  4. Investigation into the Effect of Atmospheric Particulate Matter (PM2.5 and PM10 Concentrations on GPS Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Lau

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Global Positioning System (GPS has been widely used in navigation, surveying, geophysical and geodynamic studies, machine guidance, etc. High-precision GPS applications such as geodetic surveying need millimeter and centimeter level accuracy. Since GPS signals are affected by atmospheric effects, methods of correcting or eliminating ionospheric and tropospheric bias are needed in GPS data processing. Relative positioning can be used to mitigate the atmospheric effect, but its efficiency depends on the baseline lengths. Air pollution is a serious problem globally, especially in developing countries that causes health problems to humans and damage to the ecosystem. Respirable suspended particles are coarse particles with a diameter of 10 micrometers or less, also known as PM10. Moreover, fine particles with a diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less are known as PM2.5. GPS signals travel through the atmosphere before arriving at receivers on the Earth’s surface, and the research question posed in this paper is: are GPS signals affected by the increased concentration of the PM2.5/PM10 particles? There is no standard model of the effect of PM2.5/PM10 particles on GPS signals in GPS data processing, although an approximate generic model of non-gaseous atmospheric constituents (<1 mm can be found in the literature. This paper investigates the effect of the concentration of PM2.5/PM10 particles on GPS signals and validates the aforementioned approximate model with a carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR-based empirical method. Both the approximate model and the empirical results show that the atmospheric PM2.5/PM10 particles and their concentrations have a negligible effect on GPS signals and the effect is comparable with the noise level of GPS measurements.

  5. The polar ocean and glacial cycles in atmospheric CO(2) concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, Daniel M; Hain, Mathis P; Haug, Gerald H

    2010-07-01

    Global climate and the atmospheric partial pressure of carbon dioxide () are correlated over recent glacial cycles, with lower during ice ages, but the causes of the changes are unknown. The modern Southern Ocean releases deeply sequestered CO(2) to the atmosphere. Growing evidence suggests that the Southern Ocean CO(2) 'leak' was stemmed during ice ages, increasing ocean CO(2) storage. Such a change would also have made the global ocean more alkaline, driving additional ocean CO(2) uptake. This explanation for lower ice-age , if correct, has much to teach us about the controls on current ocean processes.

  6. Effect of Meteorology on the Atmospheric Concentrations of Traffic-Related Pollutants in Erzurum, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    , Sevda Ocak; , F. Sezer Turalioglu

    2016-01-01

    The studies of the relationship between air pollutants and meteorological factors can provide important information about air pollution. According to proposed statistical model in this study, daily traffic-related pollutant concentrations are not only inşuenced by daily meteorological parameters but also by the pollutant concentration of previous day. In this study, the relationship between daily CO (carbon monoxide), NOX (nitrogen oxides), O3 (ozone) concentration with the pollutant concentr...

  7. Laser Sounder Approach for Measuring Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations for the ASCENDS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Sun, X.; Wilson, E.; Stephen, M. A.; Weaver, C.

    2008-12-01

    Accurate measurements of tropospheric CO2 abundances with global-coverage and monthly temporal resolution are needed to quantify processes that regulate CO2 exchange with the land and oceans. To meet this need, the 2007 Decadal Survey for Earth Science by the US National Research Council recommended a laser-based CO2 measuring mission called ASCENDS. In July 2008 NASA convened a science definition workshop for ASCENDS, which helped better define the mission and measurement requirements. We have been developing a technique for the remote measurement of tropospheric CO2 concentrations from aircraft and spacecraft. Our immediate goal is to develop and demonstrate the lidar technique and technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance over horizontal paths and from aircraft at the few-ppmv level. Our longer-term goal is to demonstrate the capabilities of the technique and instrument design needed for an ASCENDS-type mission. Our approach uses the 1570-nm band and a dual channel laser absorption spectrometer (ie DIAL used in altimeter mode). It uses several tunable fiber laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of the absorption from a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the oxygen A-band, and surface height and aerosol backscatter in the same path. It directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams toward nadir, and measures the energy of the laser echoes reflected from land and water surfaces. The lasers are tuned on and off the sides of CO2 line and an O2 line (near 765 nm) at kHz rates. The receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on and off line signals via the DIAL technique. We use pulsed laser signals and time gating to isolate the laser echo signals from the

  8. Contribution of Changing Sources and Sinks to the Growth Rate of Atmospheric Methane Concentrations for the Last Two Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Elaine; Walter, B.; Bogner, J.; Sarma, D.; Portmey, G.; Travis, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In situ measurements of atmospheric methane concentrations begun in the early 1980s show decadal trends, as well as large interannual variations, in growth rate. Recent research indicates that while wetlands can explain several of the large growth anomalies for individual years, the decadal trend may be the combined effect of increasing sinks, due to increases in tropospheric OH, and stabilizing sources. We discuss new 20-year histories of annual, global source strengths for all major methane sources, i.e., natural wetlands, rice cultivation, ruminant animals, landfills, fossil fuels, and biomass burning. We also present estimates of the temporal pattern of the sink required to reconcile these sources and atmospheric concentrations over this time period. Analysis of the individual emission sources, together with model-derived estimates of the OH sink strength, indicates that the growth rate of atmospheric methane observed over the last 20 years can only be explained by a combination of changes in source emissions and an increasing tropospheric sink. Direct validation of the global sources and the terrestrial sink is not straightforward, in part because some sources/sinks are relatively small and diffuse (e.g., landfills and soil consumption), as well as because the atmospheric record integrates multiple and substantial sources and tropospheric sinks in regions such as the tropics. We discuss ways to develop and test criteria for rejecting and/or accepting a suite of scenarios for the methane budget.

  9. In situ laser measurement of oxygen concentration and flue gas temperature utilizing chemical reaction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljanen, J; Sorvajärvi, T; Toivonen, J

    2017-12-01

    Combustion research requires detailed localized information on the dynamic combustion conditions to improve the accuracy of the simulations and, hence, improve the performance of the combustion processes. We have applied chemical reaction kinetics of potassium to measure the local temperature and O 2 concentration in flue gas. An excess of free atomic potassium is created in the measurement volume by a photofragmenting precursor molecule such as potassium chloride or KOH which are widely released from solid fuels. The decay of the induced potassium concentration is followed with an absorption measurement using a narrow-linewidth diode laser. The temperature and O 2 concentration are solved from the decay curve features using equations obtained from calibration measurements in a temperature range of 800°C-1000°C and in O 2 concentrations of 0.1%-21%. The local flue gas temperature and O 2 concentration were recorded in real time during devolatilization, char burning, and ash cooking phases of combustion in a single-particle reactor with a 5 Hz repetition rate. The method can be further extended to other target species and applications where the chemical dynamics can be disturbed with photofragmentation.

  10. How do changes in dissolved oxygen concentration influence microbially-controlled phosphorus cycling in stream biofilms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saia, S. M.; Locke, N. A.; Regan, J. M.; Carrick, H. J.; Buda, A. R.; Walter, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Advances in molecular microbiology techniques (e.g. epi-fluorescent microscopy and PCR) are making it easier to study the influence of specific microorganisms on nutrient transport. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) are commonly used in wastewater treatment plants to remove excess phosphorus (P) from effluent water. PAOs have also been identified in natural settings but their ecological function is not well known. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that PAOs in natural environments would release and accumulate P during anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. We placed stream biofilms in sealed, covered tubs and subjected them to alternating air (aerobic conditions) and N2 gas (anaerobic condition) bubbling for 12 hours each. Four treatments investigated the influence of changing dissolved oxygen on micribially-controlled P cycling: (1) biofilms bubbled continuously with air, (2) biofilms bubbled alternatively with air and N2, (3) biocide treated biofilms bubbled continuously with air, and (4) biocide treated biofilms bubbled alternatively with air and N2. Treatments 3 and 4 serve as abiotic controls to treatments 1 and 2. We analyzed samples every 12 hours for soluble reactive P (SRP), temperature, dissolved oxygen, and pH. We also used fluorescent microscopy (i.e. DAPI staining) and PCR to verify the presence of PAOs in the stream biofilms. SRP results over the course of the experiment support our hypothesis that anaerobic and aerobic stream conditions may impact PAO mediated P release and uptake, respectively in natural environments. The results of these experiments draw attention to the importance of microbiological controls on P mobility in freshwater ecosystems.

  11. Effects of Changes in Colored Light on Brain and Calf Muscle Blood Concentration and Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Weinzirl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Color light therapy is a therapeutic method in complementary medicine. In color therapy, light of two contrasting colors is often applied in a sequential order. The aim of this study was to investigate possible physiological effects, i.e., changes in the blood volume and oxygenation in the brain and calf muscle of healthy subjects who were exposed to red and blue light in sequential order. The hypothesis was that if a subject is first exposed to blue and then red light, the effect of the red light will be enhanced due to the contrastingly different characteristics of the two colors. The same was expected for blue light, if first exposing a subject to red and then to blue light. Twelve healthy volunteers (six male, six female were measured twice on two different days by near-infrared spectroscopy during exposure to colored light. Two sequences of colored light were applied in a controlled, randomized, crossover design: first blue, then red, and vice versa. For the brain and muscle, the results showed no significant differences in blood volume and oxygenation between the two sequences, and a high interindividual physiological variability. Thus, the hypothesis had to be rejected. Comparing these data to results from a previous study, where subjects were exposed to blue and red light without sequential color changes, shows that the results of the current study appear to be similar to those of red light exposure. This may indicate that the exposure to red light was preponderant and thus effects of blue light were outweighed.

  12. Numerical simulation of physicochemical interactions between oxygen atom and phosphatidylcholine due to direct irradiation of atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma to biological membrane with quantum mechanical molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Satoshi; Yoshida, Taketo; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    2017-10-01

    Plasma medicine is one of the most attractive applications using atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma. With respect to direct contact of the discharge plasma with a biological membrane, reactive oxygen species play an important role in induction of medical effects. However, complicated interactions between the plasma radicals and membrane have not been understood well. In the present work, we simulated elemental processes at the first stage of physicochemical interactions between oxygen atom and phosphatidylcholine using the quantum mechanical molecular dynamics code in a general software AMBER. The change in the above processes was classified according to the incident energy of oxygen atom. At an energy of 1 eV, the abstraction of a hydrogen atom and recombination to phosphatidylcholine were simultaneously occurred in chemical attachment of incident oxygen atom. The exothermal energy of the reaction was about 80% of estimated one based on the bond energies of ethane. An oxygen atom over 10 eV separated phosphatidylcholine partially. The behaviour became increasingly similar to physical sputtering. The reaction probability of oxygen atom was remarkably high in comparison with that of hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that we can uniformly estimate various physicochemical dynamics of reactive oxygen species against membrane lipids.

  13. Methyl hydroperoxide (CH3OOH in urban, suburban and rural atmosphere: ambient concentration, budget, and contribution to the atmospheric oxidizing capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Methyl hydroperoxide (MHP, one of the most important organic peroxides in the atmosphere, contributes to the tropospheric oxidizing capacity either directly as an oxidant or indirectly as a free radical precursor. In this study we report measurements of MHP from seven field campaigns at urban, suburban and rural sites in China in winter 2007 and summer 2006/2007/2008. MHP was usually present in the order of several hundreds of pptv level, but the average mixing ratios have shown a wide range depending on the season and measuring site. Primary sources and sinks of MHP are investigated to understand the impact of meteorological and chemical parameters on the atmospheric MHP budget. The MHP/(MHP+H2O2 ratio is also presented here to examine different sensitivities of MHP and H2O2 to certain atmospheric processes. The diurnal cycle of MHP/(MHP+H2O2, which is out of phase with that of both H2O2 and MHP, could imply that MHP production is more sensitive to the ambie