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Sample records for atmospheric muon flux

  1. Atmospheric neutrino flux and muon data

    OpenAIRE

    G. FiorentiniU & INFN, Ferrara; Naumov, V A.; Villante, F. L.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new one-dimensional calculation of low and intermediate energy atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes, using up-to-date data on primary cosmic rays and hadronic interactions. The existing agreement between calculated muon fluxes and the data of the CAPRICE 94 muon experiment provides an evidence in favor of the validity of our description of hadronic interactions and shower development. This also supports our neutrino fluxes which are essentially lower than those used for the stand...

  2. Atmospheric neutrino flux and muon data

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorentini, G; Villante, F L

    2001-01-01

    We present a new one-dimensional calculation of low and intermediate energy atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes, using up-to-date data on primary cosmic rays and hadronic interactions. The existing agreement between calculated muon fluxes and the data of the CAPRICE 94 muon experiment provides an evidence in favor of the validity of our description of hadronic interactions and shower development. This also supports our neutrino fluxes which are essentially lower than those used for the standard analyses of the sub-GeV and multi-GeV neutrino induced events in underground detectors.

  3. Simulation of atmospheric temperature effects on cosmic ray muon flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tognini, Stefano Castro; Gomes, Ricardo Avelino [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, CP 131, 74001-970, Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2015-05-15

    The collision between a cosmic ray and an atmosphere nucleus produces a set of secondary particles, which will decay or interact with other atmosphere elements. This set of events produced a primary particle is known as an extensive air shower (EAS) and is composed by a muonic, a hadronic and an electromagnetic component. The muonic flux, produced mainly by pions and kaons decays, has a dependency with the atmosphere’s effective temperature: an increase in the effective temperature results in a lower density profile, which decreases the probability of pions and kaons to interact with the atmosphere and, consequently, resulting in a major number of meson decays. Such correlation between the muon flux and the atmosphere’s effective temperature was measured by a set of experiments, such as AMANDA, Borexino, MACRO and MINOS. This phenomena can be investigated by simulating the final muon flux produced by two different parameterizations of the isothermal atmospheric model in CORSIKA, where each parameterization is described by a depth function which can be related to the muon flux in the same way that the muon flux is related to the temperature. This research checks the agreement among different high energy hadronic interactions models and the physical expected behavior of the atmosphere temperature effect by analyzing a set of variables, such as the height of the primary interaction and the difference in the muon flux.

  4. Atmospheric neutrino flux supported by recent muon experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorentini, G; Villante, F L

    2001-01-01

    We present a new one-dimensional calculation of low and intermediate energy atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes, using up-to-date data on primary cosmic rays and hadronic interactions. We study several sources of uncertainties relevant to our calculations. A comparison with the muon fluxes and charge ratios measured in several modern balloon-borne experiments suggests that the atmospheric neutrino flux is essentially lower than one used for the standard analyses of the sub-GeV and multi-GeV neutrino induced events in underground detectors.

  5. Atmospheric neutrino flux supported by recent muon experiments

    OpenAIRE

    G. FiorentiniU & INFN, Ferrara; Naumov, V A.; Villante, F. L.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new one-dimensional calculation of low and intermediate energy atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes, using up-to-date data on primary cosmic rays and hadronic interactions. We study several sources of uncertainties relevant to our calculations. A comparison with the muon fluxes and charge ratios measured in several modern balloon-borne experiments suggests that the atmospheric neutrino flux is essentially lower than one used for the standard analyses of the sub-GeV and multi-GeV ...

  6. Characterization of the atmospheric muon flux in IceCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Archinger, M.; Argüelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fuchs, T.; Glagla, M.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hellwig, D.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Koob, A.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Middlemas, E.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Santen, J.; Vanheule, S.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wichary, C.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yáñez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.

    2016-05-01

    Muons produced in atmospheric cosmic ray showers account for the by far dominant part of the event yield in large-volume underground particle detectors. The IceCube detector, with an instrumented volume of about a cubic kilometer, has the potential to conduct unique investigations on atmospheric muons by exploiting the large collection area and the possibility to track particles over a long distance. Through detailed reconstruction of energy deposition along the tracks, the characteristics of muon bundles can be quantified, and individual particles of exceptionally high energy identified. The data can then be used to constrain the cosmic ray primary flux and the contribution to atmospheric lepton fluxes from prompt decays of short-lived hadrons. In this paper, techniques for the extraction of physical measurements from atmospheric muon events are described and first results are presented. The multiplicity spectrum of TeV muons in cosmic ray air showers for primaries in the energy range from the knee to the ankle is derived and found to be consistent with recent results from surface detectors. The single muon energy spectrum is determined up to PeV energies and shows a clear indication for the emergence of a distinct spectral component from prompt decays of short-lived hadrons. The magnitude of the prompt flux, which should include a substantial contribution from light vector meson di-muon decays, is consistent with current theoretical predictions. The variety of measurements and high event statistics can also be exploited for the evaluation of systematic effects. In the course of this study, internal inconsistencies in the zenith angle distribution of events were found which indicate the presence of an unexplained effect outside the currently applied range of detector systematics. The underlying cause could be related to the hadronic interaction models used to describe muon production in air showers.

  7. Characterization of the Atmospheric Muon Flux in IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Archinger, M; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Beiser, E; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Börner, M; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; Rosendo, E del Pino; Dembinski, H; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de Wasseige, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; di Lorenzo, V; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fahey, S; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Fösig, C -C; Fuchs, T; Glagla, M; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Ghorbani, K; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hansmann, B; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hignight, J; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Holzapfe, K; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huber, M; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; In, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, J; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Kohnen, G; Koirala, R; Kolanoski, H; Konietz, R; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leuner, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Mahn, K B M; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Menne, T; Merino, G; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Pandya, H; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Richter, S; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sabbatini, L; Sander, H -G; Sandrock, A; Sandroos, J; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schimp, M; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Seckel, D; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stahlberg, M; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Sutherland, M; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Turcati, A; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vanheule, S; Veenkamp, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Wandkowsky, N; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wille, L; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Zoll, M

    2015-01-01

    Muons produced in atmospheric cosmic ray showers account for the by far dominant part of the event yield in large-volume underground particle detectors. The IceCube detector, with an instrumented volume of about a cubic kilometer, has the potential to conduct unique investigations on atmospheric muons by exploiting the large collection area and the possibility to track particles over a long distance. Through detailed reconstruction of energy deposition along the tracks, the characteristics of muon bundles can be quantified, and individual particles of exceptionally high energy identified. The data can then be used to constrain the cosmic ray primary flux and the contribution to atmospheric lepton fluxes from prompt decays of short-lived hadrons. In this paper, techniques for the extraction of physical measurements from atmospheric muon events are described and first results are presented. The multiplicity spectrum of TeV muons in cosmic ray air showers for primaries in the energy range from the knee to the an...

  8. Atmospheric muons: experimental aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Cecchini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    We present a review of atmospheric muon flux and energy spectrum measurements over almost six decades of muon momentum. Sea-level and underground/water/ice experiments are considered. Possible sources of systematic errors in the measurements are examinated. The characteristics of underground/water muons (muons in bundle, lateral distribution, energy spectrum) are discussed. The connection between the atmospheric muon and neutrino measurements are also reported.

  9. Tidal Frequencies in the Time Series Measurements of Atmospheric Muon Flux from Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Takai, H; Minelli, M; Sundermier, J; Winters, G; Russ, M K; Dodaro, J; Varshney, A; McIlwaine, C J; Tomaszewski, T; Tomaszewski, J; Warasila, W; McDermott, J; Khan, U; Chaves, K; Kassim, O; Ripka, J

    2016-01-01

    Tidal frequencies are detected in time series muon flux measurements performed over a period of eight years. Meson production and subsequent decay produce the muons that are observed at ground level. We interpret the periodic behavior as a consequence of high altitude density variations at the point of meson production. These variations are driven by solar thermal cycles. The detected frequencies are in good agreement with published tidal frequencies and suggest that muons can be a complementary probe to the study of atmospheric tides at altitudes between 20 to 60 km.

  10. Atmospheric muons and neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Naumov, V A

    2002-01-01

    This paper is a mini-review of the atmospheric muon and neutrino flux calculations based upon a recent version of CORT code and up-to-date data on primary cosmic rays and hadronic interactions. A comparison of calculations with a representative set of atmospheric muon data for momenta below 1 TeV/c is presented. The overall agreement between the calculated muon fluxes and the data provides an evidence in favor of the validity of adopted description of hadronic interactions and shower development. In particular, this supports the low-energy atmospheric neutrino fluxes predicted with CORT which are essentially lower than those used in current analyses of the sub-GeV and multi-GeV neutrino induced events in underground neutrino detectors.

  11. Differential flux measurement of atmospheric pion, muon, electron and positron energy spectra at balloon altitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C.; Brunetti, M.T.; Codino, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); Papini, P.; Massimo Brancaccio, F.; Finetti, N. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Researc, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements); Basini, G.; Bongiorno, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ. Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.

    1995-09-01

    The fluxes of atmospheric electrons, positrons, positive and negative muons and negative pions have been determined using the NMSU Wizard-MASS2 balloons-borne instrument. The instrument was launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico, (geomagnetic cut-off about 4.5 GV/c) on september 23, 1991. The flight lasted 9.8 hours and remained above 100.000 ft. Muons and negative pions were observed and their momenta were determined. Since these particles are not a part of the primary component, the measurement of their fluxes provides information regarding production and propagation of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Similarly, observations of electrons and positrons well below the geomagnetic cut-off provides insight into electromagnetic cascade processes in the upper atmosphere. In addition, the determination of the energy spectra of rare particles such as positrons can be used for background subtraction for cosmic ray experiments gathering data below a few g/cm{sup 2} of overlying atmosphere.

  12. Zenith distribution and flux of atmospheric muons measured with the 5-line ANTARES detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, J.A. [Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, CSIC - Univ. de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Albert, A. [GRPHE - Inst. univ. de technologie de Colmar, Colmar (France); Anton, G. [Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Anvar, S.; Lamare, P.; Lo Presti, D. [Direction des Sciences de la Matiere - Inst. de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers - Service d' Electronique des Detecteurs et d' Informatique, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ardid, M. [Univ. Politecnica de Valencia, Gandia (Spain); Assis Jesus, A.C. [FOM Inst. voor Subatomaire Fysica Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aubert, J.J.; Brown, A.M.; Brunner, J.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Lambard, G.; Lelaizant, G.; Melissas, M.; Payre, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Reed, C.; Zaborov, D. [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3 et Univ. de la Mediterranee, Marseille (France); Kouchner, A.; Moscoso, L.; Van Elewyck, V. [Lab. AstroParticule et Cosmologie, UMR 7164, CNRS, Univ. Paris 7 Diderot, CEA, Observatoire de Paris, Paris (France); Tasca, L. [Lab. d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille (France); Charvis, Ph.; Pillet, R. [Geoazur - Univ. de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS/INSU, IRD, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur and Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Villefranche-sur-mer (France); Cottini, N.; Loucatos, S.; Maurin, G.; Naumann, C.; Picq, C.; Schuller, J.P.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Vallage, B.; Vernin, P. [Inst. de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers, Service de Physique des Particules, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dekeyser, I.; Lefevre, D.; Tamburini, C. [Centre d' Oceanologie de Marseille, CNRS/INSU et Universite de la Mediterranee, Marseille (France); Univ. Paris-Sud 11, Dept. de Physique, Orsay (France); Guillard, G.; Lyons, K.; Pradier, T. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Univ. de Strasbourg et CNRS/IN2P3, Strasbourg (France)

    2010-07-01

    The ANTARES high-energy neutrino telescope is a three-dimensional array of about 900 photomultipliers distributed over 12 mooring lines installed in the Mediterranean Sea. Between February and November 2007 it acquired data in a 5-line configuration. The zenith angular distribution of the atmospheric muon flux and the associated depth-intensity relation are measured and compared with previous measurements and Monte Carlo expectations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is presented. (authors)

  13. Zenith distribution and flux of atmospheric muons measured with the 5-line ANTARES detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ANTARES high-energy neutrino telescope is a three-dimensional array of about 900 photomultipliers distributed over 12 mooring lines installed in the Mediterranean Sea. Between February and November 2007 it acquired data in a 5-line configuration. The zenith angular distribution of the atmospheric muon flux and the associated depth-intensity relation are measured and compared with previous measurements and Monte Carlo expectations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is presented. (authors)

  14. Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux at 3500 m depth with the NEMO Phase-2 detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, C.; Aiello, S.; Ameli, F.; Anghinolfi, M.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Bouhadef, B.; Bozza, C.; Cacopardo, G.; Calamai, M.; Calì, C.; Capone, A.; Caruso, F.; Ceres, A.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Cocimano, R.; Coniglione, R.; Costa, M.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amico, A.; De Bonis, G.; De Luca, V.; Deniskina, N.; De Rosa, G.; Di Capua, F.; Fermani, P.; Flaminio, V.; Fusco, L. A.; Garufi, F.; Giordano, V.; Gmerk, A.; Grasso, R.; Grella, G.; Hugon, C.; Imbesi, M.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Leismueller, K. P.; Leonora, E.; Litrico, P.; Lonardo, A.; Longhitano, F.; Lo Presti, D.; Maccioni, E.; Margiotta, A.; Martini, A.; Masullo, R.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C. M.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Nicolau, C. A.; Orlando, A.; Papaleo, R.; Pellegrino, C.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pugliatti, C.; Pulvirenti, S.; Orselli, A.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Riccobene, G.; Rovelli, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Sciacca, V.; Sgura, I.; Simeone, F.; Sipala, V.; Speziale, F.; Spina, M.; Spitaleri, A.; Spurio, M.; Stellacci, S. M.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Trasatti, L.; Trovato, A.; Ventura, C.; Vicini, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.

    2016-07-01

    In March 2013, the Nemo Phase-2 tower was successfully deployed at 80 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy) at 3500 m depth. The tower operated continuously until August 2014. We present the results of the atmospheric muon analysis from the data collected in 411 days of live time. The zenith-angle distribution of atmospheric muons was measured and results compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The associated depth intensity relation was then measured and compared with previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

  15. The atmospheric muon flux in correlation with temperature variations in the low stratosphere (50-200 mb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaina, M.; Briatore, L.; Longhetto, A.; Navarra, G.; EAS-TOP collaboraiton

    The dependence of the muon flux from the atmospheric parameters (pressure and temperature) is a well known effect since long time ago, that is usually corrected for in cosmic ray measurements. We have correlated at EAS-TOP (LNGS) the muon flux detected by the EMD detector (29 stations, 10m2 each, E_thr>3MeV) with the atmospheric temperature (10-1000mb levels) monitored by the radio-soundings of the Aeronautica Militare at Pratica di Mare (Rome). A significant effect has been observed when the muon flux is correlated with the atmospheric temperature in the region 50-200mb (50-200gr/cm2), as expected, since this is the region where the mesons of first generation are produced. The effect becomes even larger (K_T=-9.5+/-1.1)x10-4 K-1) when the variations of the cosmic ray primary flux is taken into account (Neutron Monitor, Rome). Then, the technique has been used to monitor strong temperature variations in the low stratosphere through the muon flux in two periods, showing that the average temperature variations in the low stratosphere are reproduced with a ~2K uncertainty. The main results of this analysis will be presented.

  16. A mobile detector for measurements of the atmospheric muon flux in underground sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrica, Bogdan, E-mail: mitrica@nipne.ro [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Margineanu, Romul; Stoica, Sabin; Petcu, Mirel; Brancus, Iliana [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Jipa, Alexandru; Lazanu, Ionel; Sima, Octavian [Department of Physics, University of Bucharest, P.O.B. MG-11 (Romania); Haungs, Andreas; Rebel, Heinigerd [Institut fur Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - Campus North, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Petre, Marian; Toma, Gabriel; Saftoiu, Alexandra; Stanca, Denis; Apostu, Ana; Gomoiu, Claudia [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Romania)

    2011-10-21

    Muons comprise an important contribution of the natural radiation dose in air (approx. 30 nSv/h of a total dose rate of 65-130 nSv/h), as well as in underground sites even when the flux and relative contribution are significantly reduced. The flux of muons observed underground can be used as an estimator for the depth in mwe (meter water equivalent) of the underground site. The water equivalent depth is important information to devise physics experiments feasible for a specific site. A mobile detector for performing measurements of the muon flux was developed in IFIN-HH, Bucharest. Consisting of two scintillator plates (approx. 0.9 m{sup 2}) which measure in coincidence, the detector is installed on a van which facilitates measurements at different locations at the surface or underground. The detector was used to determine muon fluxes at different sites in Romania. In particular, data were taken and the values of meter water equivalents were assessed for several locations at the salt mine in Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The measurements have been performed in two different galleries of the Slanic mine at different depths. In order to test the stability of the method, also measurements of the muon flux at the surface at different elevations were performed. The results were compared with predictions of Monte-Carlo simulations using the CORSIKA and MUSIC codes.

  17. Muon Fluxes From Dark Matter Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Erkoca, Arif Emre; Sarcevic, Ina

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the muon flux from annihilation of the dark matter in the core of the Sun, in the core of the Earth and from cosmic diffuse neutrinos produced in dark matter annihilation in the halos. We consider model-independent direct neutrino production and secondary neutrino production from the decay of taus produced in the annihilation of dark matter. We illustrate how muon energy distribution from dark matter annihilation has a very different shape than muon flux from atmospheric neutrinos. We consider both the upward muon flux, when muons are created in the rock below the detector, and the contained flux when muons are created in the (ice) detector. We contrast our results to the ones previously obtained in the literature, illustrating the importance of properly treating muon propagation and energy loss. We comment on neutrino flavor dependence and their detection.

  18. Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with the NEMO Phase-1 detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aiello, S; Amore, I; Anghinolfi, M; Anzalone, A; Barbarino, G; Battaglieri, M; Bazzotti, M; Bersani, A; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Bonori, M; Bouhadef, B; Brunoldi, M; Cacopardo, G; Capone, A; Caponetto, L; Carminati, G; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Cocimano, R; Coniglione, R; Cordelli, M; Costa, M; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Marzo, C; 1,; De Rosa, G; De Ruvo, G; De Vita, R; Distefano, C; Falchini, E; Flaminio, V; Fratini, K; Gabrielli, A; Galatà, S; Gandolfi, E; Giacomelli, G; Giorgi, F; Giovanetti, G; Grimaldi, A; Habel, R; Imbesi, M; Kulikovsky, V; Lattuada, D; Leonora, E; Lonardo, A; Presti, D Lo; Lucarelli, F; Marinelli, A; Margiotta, A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Migneco, E; Minutoli, S; Morganti, M; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Osipenko, M; Papaleo, R; Pappalardo, V; Piattelli, P; Piombo, D; Raia, G; Randazzo, N; Reito, S; Ricco, G; Riccobene, G; Ripani, M; Rovelli, A; Ruppi, M; Russo, G V; Russo, S; Sapienza, P; Sciliberto, D; Sedita, M; Shirokov, E; Simeone, F; Sipala, V; Spurio, M; Taiuti, M; Trasatti, L; Urso, S; Vecchi, M; Vicini, P; Wischnewski, R

    2009-01-01

    The NEMO Collaboration installed and operated an underwater detector including prototypes of the critical elements of a possible underwater km3 neutrino telescope: a four-floor tower (called Mini-Tower) and a Junction Box. The detector was developed to test some of the main systems of the km3 detector, including the data transmission, the power distribution, the timing calibration and the acoustic positioning systems as well as to verify the capabilities of a single tridimensional detection structure to reconstruct muon tracks. We present results of the analysis of the data collected with the NEMO Mini-Tower. The position of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) is determined through the acoustic position system. Signals detected with PMTs are used to reconstruct the tracks of atmospheric muons. The angular distribution of atmospheric muons was measured and results compared with Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with the NEMO Phase-1 detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, S.; Ameli, F.; Amore, I.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anzalone, A.; Barbarino, G.; Battaglieri, M.; Bazzotti, M.; Bersani, A.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Bonori, M.; Bouhadef, B.; Brunoldi, M.; Cacopardo, G.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Carminati, G.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Cocimano, R.; Coniglione, R.; Cordelli, M.; Costa, M.; D'Amico, A.; De Bonis, G.; De Marzo, C.; De Rosa, G.; De Ruvo, G.; De Vita, R.; Distefano, C.; Falchini, E.; Flaminio, V.; Fratini, K.; Gabrielli, A.; Galatà, S.; Gandolfi, E.; Giacomelli, G.; Giorgi, F.; Giovanetti, G.; Grimaldi, A.; Habel, R.; Imbesi, M.; Kulikovsky, V.; Lattuada, D.; Leonora, E.; Lonardo, A.; Lo Presti, D.; Lucarelli, F.; Marinelli, A.; Margiotta, A.; Martini, A.; Masullo, R.; Migneco, E.; Minutoli, S.; Morganti, M.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Nicolau, C. A.; Orlando, A.; Osipenko, M.; Papaleo, R.; Pappalardo, V.; Piattelli, P.; Piombo, D.; Raia, G.; Randazzo, N.; Reito, S.; Ricco, G.; Riccobene, G.; Ripani, M.; Rovelli, A.; Ruppi, M.; Russo, G. V.; Russo, S.; Sapienza, P.; Sciliberto, D.; Sedita, M.; Shirokov, E.; Simeone, F.; Sipala, V.; Spurio, M.; Taiuti, M.; Trasatti, L.; Urso, S.; Vecchi, M.; Vicini, P.; Wischnewski, R.

    2010-05-01

    The NEMO Collaboration installed and operated an underwater detector including prototypes of the critical elements of a possible underwater km 3 neutrino telescope: a four-floor tower (called Mini-Tower) and a Junction Box. The detector was developed to test some of the main systems of the km 3 detector, including the data transmission, the power distribution, the timing calibration and the acoustic positioning systems as well as to verify the capabilities of a single tridimensional detection structure to reconstruct muon tracks. We present results of the analysis of the data collected with the NEMO Mini-Tower. The position of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) is determined through the acoustic position system. Signals detected with PMTs are used to reconstruct the tracks of atmospheric muons. The angular distribution of atmospheric muons was measured and results compared to Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. Flux Variation of Cosmic Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Ramesh, Nepal; Martin, Clayton; Bachri, Abdel

    2012-01-01

    In the current paper, we analyzed the variation of cosmic radiation flux with elevation, time of the year and ambient temperature with the help of a portable cosmic muon detector, the construction of which was completed by a team from Southern Arkansas University (SAU) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Cosmic muons and gamma rays traverse two synchronized scintillators connected to two photomultiplier tubes (PMT) via light guides, and generate electronic pulses which we counted using a Data Acquisition Board (DAQ). Because muons are the product of collisions between high-energy cosmic rays and atmospheric nuclei, and therefore shower onto earth, the scintillators were arranged horizontally for detection. The elevation measurements were recorded at different locations, starting from 60 feet below sea-level at the Underground Radiation Counting Laboratory at Johnson Space Center, TX, to 4200 feet at Mt. Hamilton, CA. Intermediate locations included sea-level Galveston Bay, TX, and Mt. Magazine, A...

  1. Albedo muons in upper layers of the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The albedo muon fluxes are calculated in the energy range 50≤E≤1000 MeV in the upper atmospheric layers. It is shown that the anisotropy degree of albedo muon flux in the stratosphere increases with the muon energy increase, and according to the absolute values the albedo muon flux becomes comparable with the direct albedo proton fluxes at energies > 200 MeV. 8 refs.; 2 figs

  2. Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with a 4 GeV threshold in the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Jesus, A. C. Assis; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J. -J.; Auer, R.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Carloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Sen, N. Chon; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehr, F.; Flaminio, V.; Fratini, K.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J. -L.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; de Jong, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Laschinsky, H.; Lefevre, D.; Lelaizant, G.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Mazure, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Ostasch, R.; Palioselitis, G.; Pavalas, G. E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Pillet, R.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Radu, A.; Reed, C.; Richardt, C.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienza, P.; Schoeck, F.; Schuller, J. -P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.

    2010-01-01

    A new method for the measurement of the muon flux in the deep-sea ANTARES neutrino telescope and its dependence on the depth is presented. The method is based oil the observation of coincidence signals in adjacent storeys of the detector. This yields an energy threshold of about 4 GeV. The main sour

  3. Densitometric tomography using the measurement of muon flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hivert, F.; Busto, J.; Brunner, J.; Salin, P.; Gaffet, S.

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge of the subsurface properties is essentially obtained by geophysical methods, e.g. seismic imaging, electric prospection or gravimetry. The present work develops a recent method to investigate the in situ density of rocks using atmospheric the muon flux measurement , its attenuation depending on the rock density and thickness. This new geophysical technique have been mainly applied in volcanology (Lesparre N., 2011) using scintillator detectors. The present project (T2DM2) aims to realize underground muons flux measurements in order to characterizing the rock massif density variations above the LSBB underground research facility in Rustrel (France). The muon flux will be measure with a new Muon telescope instrumentation using Micromegas detectors in Time Projection Chambers (TPC) configuration. The first step of the work presented considers the muon flux simulation using the Gaisser model, for the interactions between muons and atmospheric particles, and the MUSIC code (Kudryavtsev V. A., 2008) for the muons/rock interactions. The results show that the muon flux attenuation caused by density variations are enough significant to be observed until around 500 m depth and for period of time in the order of one month. Such a duration scale and depth of investigation is compatible with the duration of the water transfer processes involved within the Karst unsaturated zone where LSBB is located. Our work now concentrates on the optimization of the spatial distribution of detectors that will be deployed in future.

  4. Atmospheric lepton fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaisser Thomas K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric νμ and νe are discussed, along with the implications of the muon charge ratio for the νµ / ν̅µ ratio. Methods to account for effects of the knee in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum and the energy-dependence of hadronic interactions on the neutrino fluxes are discussed and illustrated in the context of recent results from IceCube. A simple numerical/analytic method is proposed for systematic investigation of uncertainties in neutrino fluxes arising from uncertainties in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum/composition and hadronic interactions.

  5. Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with a 4 GeV threshold in the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, J A

    2009-01-01

    A new method for the measurement of the muon flux in the deep-sea ANTARES neutrino telescope and its dependence on the depth is presented. The method is based on the observation of coincidence signals in adjacent storeys of the detector. This yields an energy threshold of about 4 GeV. The main sources of optical background are the decay of 40K and the bioluminescence in the sea water. The 40K background is used to calibrate the efficiency of the photo-multiplier tubes.

  6. Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with a 4 GeV threshold in the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for the measurement of the muon flux in the deep-sea ANTARES neutrino telescope and its dependence on the depth is presented. The method is based oil the observation of coincidence signals in adjacent storeys of the detector. This yields an energy threshold of about 4 GeV. The main sources of optical background are the decay of 40K and the bioluminescence in the sea water. The 40K background is used to calibrate the efficiency of the photo-multiplier tubes. (authors)

  7. Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with a 4 GeV threshold in the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, J.A. [IFIC - Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, CSIC - Universitat de Valencia, Apdo. de Correos 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Al Samarai, I. [CPPM - Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 Avenue de Luminy, Case 902, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (FR); Albert, A. [GRPHE - Institut Universitaire de Technologie de Colmar, 34 Rue du Grillenbreit, BP 50568, 68008 Colmar (FR); Anghinolfi, M. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Anton, G. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Anvar, S. [Direction des Sciences de la Matiere - Institut de Recherche sur les lois Fondamentales de l' Univers - Service d' Electronique des Detecteurs et d' Informatique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (FR); Baret, B.; Donzaud, C.; Kouchner, A.; Moscoso, L.; Van Elewyck, V. [APC - Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie, UMR 7164, CNRS, Universite Paris 7 Diderot, CEA, Observatoire de Paris, 10, Rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (FR); Basa, S.; Marcelin, M.; Mazure, A.; Tasca, L. [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Pole de l' Etoile Site de Chateau-Gombert, Marseille (FR); Carloganu, C.; Gay, P. [Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand (FR); Charvis, Ph.; Deschamps, A.; Hello, Y.; Pillet, R. [Geoazur - Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS/INSU, IRD, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, BP 48, F-06235 Villefranche-sur-mer (FR); Cottini, N.; Loucatos, S.; Moscoso, L.; Naumann, C.; Picq, C.; Schuller, J.P.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Vallage, B.; Vernin, P. [Direction des Sciences de la Matiere - Institut de Recherche sur les lois Fondamentales de l' Univers - Service de Physique des Particules, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (FR)

    2010-07-01

    A new method for the measurement of the muon flux in the deep-sea ANTARES neutrino telescope and its dependence on the depth is presented. The method is based oil the observation of coincidence signals in adjacent storeys of the detector. This yields an energy threshold of about 4 GeV. The main sources of optical background are the decay of {sup 40}K and the bioluminescence in the sea water. The {sup 40}K background is used to calibrate the efficiency of the photo-multiplier tubes. (authors)

  8. Atmospheric muons reconstruction with Antares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ANTARES collaboration is building a neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. This detector contains 900 photomultiplier tubes, dispatched on 12 lines, in order to detect Cerenkov light from muon induced by neutrino interactions in the the vicinity of the detector. Currently the first 5 lines have been deployed. A first task consists in studying the stability of the detector calibration, which is a necessary step to understand the detector response. Then we studied optical properties of water, for this we developed a reconstruction method dedicated to LED Beacon. The extracted parameters are compatible with earlier measurements. A quality criteria to reject badly reconstructed track has been developed based on the likelihood of the tracks fit versus point fit. This has been applied to real data and a preliminary analysis of atmospheric muons with a 5-lines detector is performed. (author)

  9. Atmospheric Lepton Fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric $\

  10. Detection of atmospheric muons with ALICE detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessandro, B. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Dep. di Fisica Universita di Torino, Torino (Italy); Cortes Maldonado, I. [Fac. Ciencias Fisico Mat. and Fac. Ciencias Electronica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Cuautle, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Fernandez Tellez, A. [Fac. Ciencias Fisico Mat. and Fac. Ciencias Electronica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Gomez Jimenez, R. [Dpto. de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados (Mexico); Gonzalez Santos, H. [Fac. Ciencias Fisico Mat. and Fac. Ciencias Electronica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Herrera Corral, G. [Escuela de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan, Sinaloa (Mexico); Leon, I. [Dpto. de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados (Mexico); Martinez, M.I.; Munoz Mata, J.L. [Fac. Ciencias Fisico Mat. and Fac. Ciencias Electronica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Podesta, P. [Dpto. de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados (Mexico); Ramirez Reyes, A. [Escuela de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan, Sinaloa (Mexico); Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M., E-mail: mrodrigu@mail.cern.c [Fac. Ciencias Fisico Mat. and Fac. Ciencias Electronica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Sitta, M. [Universita Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria (Italy); Subieta, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Dep. di Fisica Universita di Torino, Torino (Italy); Tejeda Munoz, G.; Vargas, A.; Vergara, S. [Fac. Ciencias Fisico Mat. and Fac. Ciencias Electronica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico)

    2010-05-21

    The calibration, alignment and commissioning of most of the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment at the CERN LHC) detectors have required a large amount of cosmic events during 2008. In particular two types of cosmic triggers have been implemented to record the atmospheric muons passing through ALICE. The first trigger, called ACORDE trigger, is performed by 60 scintillators located on the top of three sides of the large L3 magnet surrounding the central detectors, and selects atmospheric muons. The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) installed on the first two layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) gives the second trigger, called SPD trigger. This trigger selects mainly events with a single atmospheric muon crossing the SPD. Some particular events, in which the atmospheric muon interacts with the iron of the L3 magnet and creates a shower of particles crossing the SPD, are also selected. In this work the reconstruction of events with these two triggers will be presented. In particular, the performance of the ACORDE detector will be discussed by the analysis of multi-muon events. Some physical distributions are also shown.

  11. Cosmic muon flux measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ∼ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC

  12. Cosmic muon flux measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalousis, L. N.; Guarnaccia, E.; Link, J. M.; Mariani, C.; Pelkey, R.

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ~ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC.

  13. Cosmic Muon Flux Measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kalousis, L N; Link, J M; Mariani, C; Pelkey, R

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ~ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC.

  14. Horizontal muon flux measured with the LVD detector at LNGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbini, Marco, E-mail: garbini@bo.infn.it [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' Roma and INFN Bologna (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    We report the measure of underground horizontal (cos({theta})<0.3) muon flux with the Large Volume Detector (LVD) at the I.N.F.N. Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The analysis is based on the whole muon data collected by LVD since start of data taking in 1992.

  15. Variations of cosmic ray muon flux during thunderstorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variations of the intensity of cosmic ray muons during thunderstorms are investigated. Linear and quadratic coefficients of regression of the muon flux with near-ground electric field are calculated and compared to the experimental data obtained with the Carpet air shower array in the Baksan Valley, North Caucasus. Based on correlations with the near-ground field, estimates are made of regression coefficients with the mean potential difference in the stratosphere, between the effective level of muon production and the ionosphere. It is shown that maximum observable muon effects (variations with amplitudes of 1%) correspond to a mean potential difference in the stratosphere of about 200 MV.

  16. Observation of high energy atmospheric neutrinos with antarctic muon and neutrino detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.; Andres, E.; Bai, X.; Barouch, G.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.C.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Bertrand, D.; Binon, F.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Bouhali, O.; Boyce, M.M.; Carius, S.; Chen, A.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Costa, C.G.S.; Cowen, D.F.; Dalberg, E.; De Clercq, C.; DeYoung, T.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Doksus, P.; Edsjo, J.; Ekstrom, P.; Feser, T.; Frere, J.-M.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gaug, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hellwig, M.; Heukenkamp, H.; Hill, G.C.; Hulth, P.O.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Koci, B.; Kopke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Loaiza, P.; Lowder, D.M.; Madsen, J.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.S.; McParland, C.P.; Miller, T.C.; Minaeva, Y.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.C.; Morse, R.; Neunhoffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Ogelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pohl, A.C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.B.; Przybylski, G.T.; Rawlins, K.; Reed, C.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Starinsky, N.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Streicher, O.; Sudhoff, P.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Vander Donckt, M.; Walck, C.; Weinheimer, C.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Wiedeman, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S.

    2002-05-07

    The Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) began collecting data with ten strings in 1997. Results from the first year of operation are presented. Neutrinos coming through the Earth from the Northern Hemisphere are identified by secondary muons moving upward through the array. Cosmic rays in the atmosphere generate a background of downward moving muons, which are about 10{sup 6} times more abundant than the upward moving muons. Over 130 days of exposure, we observed a total of about 300 neutrino events. In the same period, a background of 1.05 x 10{sup 9} cosmic ray muon events was recorded. The observed neutrino flux is consistent with atmospheric neutrino predictions. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that 90 percent of these events lie in the energy range 66 GeV to 3.4 TeV. The observation of atmospheric neutrinos consistent with expectations establishes AMANDA-B10 as a working neutrino telescope.

  17. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S.N.; Andersen, T.C.; Anthony, A.E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E.W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S.D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M.G.; Burritt, T.H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M.C.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P.J.; Dosanjh, R.S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J.TM.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Harvey, P.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hemingway, R.J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Klein, J.R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A.B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M.L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A.J.; Oblath, N.S.; Okada, C.E.; O?Keeffe, H.M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Oser, S.M.; Ott, R.A.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Secrest, J.A.; Seibert, S.R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J.J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M.W.E.; Sonley, T.J.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill, L.C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R.G.; VanDevender, B.A.; Virtue, C.J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C.E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D.L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wilson, J.R.; Wouters, J.M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

    2009-02-16

    Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

  18. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S. N.; Andersen, T. C.; Anthony, A. E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E. W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S. D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M. G.; Burritt, T. H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y. D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M. C.; Cleveland, B. T.; Cox-Mobrand, G. A.; Currat, C. A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P. J.; Dosanjh, R. S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R. J.; Formaggio, J. A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J. TM.; Grant, D. R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R. L.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Hargrove, C. K.; Harvey, P. J.; Harvey, P. J.; Heeger, K. M.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Hemingway, R. J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M. A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N. A.; Klein, J. R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C. B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C. M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J. C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A. D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A. B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M. L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A. J.; Oblath, N. S.; Okada, C. E.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G. D.; Oser, S. M.; Ott, R. A.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M. H.; Secrest, J. A.; Seibert, S. R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J. J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M. W. E.; Sonley, T. J.; Steiger, T. D.; Stonehill, L. C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R. G.; VanDevender, B. A.; Virtue, C. J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C. E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D. L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wouters, J. M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

    2009-07-10

    Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

  19. Cosmic rays muon flux measurements at Belgrade shallow underground laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Belgrade underground laboratory is a shallow underground one, at 25 meters of water equivalent. It is dedicated to low-background spectroscopy and cosmic rays measurement. Its uniqueness is that it is composed of two parts, one above ground, the other bellow with identical sets of detectors and analyzing electronics thus creating opportunity to monitor simultaneously muon flux and ambient radiation. We investigate the possibility of utilizing measurements at the shallow depth for the study of muons, processes to which these muons are sensitive and processes induced by cosmic rays muons. For this purpose a series of simulations of muon generation and propagation is done, based on the CORSIKA air shower simulation package and GEANT4. Results show good agreement with other laboratories and cosmic rays stations

  20. Simulations of Muon Flux in Slanic Salt Mine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Bektasoglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Geant4 simulation package was used to simulate muon fluxes at different locations, the floor of UNIREA mine and two levels of CANTACUZINO mine, of Slanic Prahova site in Romania. This site is specially important since it is one of the seven sites in Europe that are under consideration of housing large detector components of Large Apparatus studying Grand Unification and Neutrino Astrophysics (LAGUNA project. Simulations were performed for vertical muons and for muons with a zenith angle θ≤60°. Primary muon flux and energies at ground level were obtained from previous measurements. Results of the simulations are in general agreement with previous simulations made using MUSIC simulation program and with the measurements made using a mobile detector.

  1. Energy and angular distributions of atmospheric muons at the Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    A fair knowledge of the atmospheric muon distributions at Earth is a prerequisite for the simulations of cosmic ray setups and rare event search detectors. A modified power law is proposed for atmospheric muon energy distribution which gives good description of the cosmic muon data in low as well as high energy regime. Using this distribution, analytical forms for zenith angle ($\\theta$) distribution are obtained. Assuming a flat Earth, it leads to the $\\cos^{n-1}\\theta$ form where it is show...

  2. Tidal frequencies in the spectral analysis of time series muon flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Catherine; Takai, Helio

    2016-03-01

    Tidal frequencies are observed in the spectral analysis of time series muon flux measurements performed by the MARIACHI experiment over a period of seven years. The prominent peaks from the frequency spectrum correspond to tidal frequencies S1,S2,S3,K1,P1 and Ψ1 . We will present these results and compare them to the regular density oscillations from balloon sounding data. We interpret the observed data as being the effect of regular atmospheric density oscillations induced by the thermal heating of layers in Earth's atmosphere. As the density of the atmosphere varies, the altitude where particles are produced varies accordingly. As a consequence, the muon decay path elongates or contracts, modulating the number of muons detected at ground level. The role of other tidal effects, including geomagnetic tides, will also be discussed.

  3. Flux Modulations seen by the Muon Veto of the GERDA Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agostini, M; Bakalyarov, A M; Balata, M; Barabanov, I; Barros, N; Baudis, L; Bauer, C; Becerici-Schmidt, N; Bellotti, E; Belogurov, S; Belyaev, S T; Benato, G; Bettini, A; Bezrukov, L; Bode, T; Borowicz, D; Brudanin, V; Brugnera, R; Caldwell, A; Cattadori, C; Chernogorov, A; D'Andrea, V; Demidova, E V; di Vacri, A; Domula, A; Doroshkevich, E; Egorov, V; Falkenstein, R; Fedorova, O; Freund, K; Frodyma, N; Gangapshev, A; Garfagnini, A; Grabmayr, P; Gurentsov, V; Gusev, K; Hegai, A; Heisel, M; Hemmer, S; Hofmann, W; Hult, M; Inzhechik, L V; Ioannucci, L; Csáthy, J Janicskó; Jochum, J; Junker, M; Kazalov, V; Kihm, T; Kirpichnikov, I V; Kirsch, A; Klimenko, A; Knapp, M; Knöpfle, K T; Kochetov, O; Kornoukhov, V N; Kuzminov, V V; Laubenstein, M; Lazzaro, A; Lebedev, V I; Lehnert, B; Liao, H Y; Lindner, M; Lippi, I; Lubashevskiy, A; Lubsandorzhiev, B; Lutter, G; Macolino, C; Majorovits, B; Maneschg, W; Medinaceli, E; Misiaszek, M; Moseev, P; Nemchenok, I; Palioselitis, D; Panas, K; Pandola, L; Pelczar, K; Pullia, A; Riboldi, S; Ritter, F; Rumyantseva, N; Sada, C; Salathe, M; Schmitt, C; Schneider, B; Schönert, S; Schreiner, J; Schütz, A -K; Schulz, O; Schwingenheuer, B; Selivanenko, O; Shevchik, E; Shirchenko, M; Simgen, H; Smolnikov, A; Stanco, L; Stepaniuk, M; Strecker, H; Vanhoefer, L; Vasenko, A A; Veresnikova, A; vonSturm, K; Wagner, V; Walter, M; Wegmann, A; Wester, T; Wilsenach, H; Wojcik, M; Yanovich, E; Zhitnikov, I; Zhukov, S V; Zinatulina, D; Zuber, K; Zuzel, G

    2016-01-01

    The GERDA experiment at LNGS of INFN is equipped with an active muon veto. The main part of the system is a water Cherenkov veto with 66~PMTs in the water tank surrounding the GERDA cryostat. The muon flux recorded by this veto shows a seasonal modulation. Two effects have been identified which are caused by secondary muons from the CNGS neutrino beam (2.2 %) and a temperature modulation of the atmosphere (1.4 %). A mean cosmic muon rate of $I^0_{\\mu} = (3.477 \\pm 0.002_{\\textrm{stat}} \\pm 0.067_{\\textrm{sys}}) \\times 10^{-4}$/(s$\\cdot$m$^2$) was found in good agreement with other experiments at LNGS at a depth of 3500~meter water equivalent.

  4. Experimental study of the atmospheric neutrino flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed 277 fully contained events in the KAMIOKANDE detector. The number of electron-like single prong events is in good agreement with the predictions of a Monte Carlo calculation based on atmospheric neutrino interactions in the detector. On the other hand, the number of muon-like single prong events is 59 ± 7 %(statistical error) of the predicted number of the Monte Carlo calculation. We are unable to explain the data as the result of systematic detector effects or uncertainties in the atmospheric neutrino fluxes. (author)

  5. Energy and angular distributions of atmospheric muons at the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    A fair knowledge of the atmospheric muon distributions at Earth is a prerequisite for the simulations of cosmic ray setups and rare event search detectors. A modified power law is proposed for atmospheric muon energy distribution which gives good description of the cosmic muon data in low as well as high energy regime. Using this distribution, analytical forms for zenith angle ($\\theta$) distribution are obtained. Assuming a flat Earth, it leads to the $\\cos^{n-1}\\theta$ form where it is shown that the parameter $n$ is nothing but the power of the energy distribution. A new analytical form for zenith angle distribution is obtained without assuming a flat Earth which gives an improved description of the data at all angles even above $70^o$. These distributions are tested with the available atmospheric muon data of energy and angular distributions. The parameters of these distributions can be used to characterize the cosmic muon data as a function of energy, angle and altitude.

  6. Calculation of characteristics of the albedo muon flux in the stratosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problem of albedo muon flux formation in the stratosphere is considered. Calculation of energy and angular characteristics of albedo muon flux by geomagnetic cut-off rigidity R=1; 4.5; 15 GV within the altitude range of 20≤hμ≤50 km is carried out. Comparison of experimental and calculational results indicates their fair agreement. The calculation shows that degree of albedo muon flux anisotropy increases with muon energy increase and the flux value is comparable with direct albedo proton flux in the energy area exceeding 200 MeV. The maximum in the integral albedo muon flux is achieved at altitudes hμ ≅30 km

  7. The WiZard Collaboration cosmic ray muon measurements in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Circella, M. E-mail: marco.circella@ba.infn.it; Ambriola, M.L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bartalucci, S.; Bellotti, R.; Bergstroem, D.; Bidoli, V.; Boezio, M.; Bravar, U.; Cafagna, F.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Ciacio, F.; Circella, M.; De Marzo, C.N.; De Pascale, M.P.; Finetti, N.; Francke, T.; Grinstein, S.; Hof, M.; Khalchukov, F.; Kremer, J.; Menn, W.; Mitchell, J.W.; Morselli, A.; Ormes, J.F.; Papini, P.; Piccardi, S.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Schiavon, P.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stephens, S.A.; Stochaj, S.J.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Suffert, M.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, N

    2000-05-01

    Balloon-borne experiments allow cosmic ray measurements to be performed over large ranges of atmospheric depths. The WiZard Collaboration is involved in a long-range investigation of the cosmic ray muon fluxes in the atmosphere. In this paper, we will discuss the relevance of such measurements to the atmospheric neutrino calculations and will review the results reported by the Collaboration, with particular emphasis on those coming from the latest flight CAPRICE98.

  8. Annual modulation of the muon flux in the GERDA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gerda collaboration aims to determine the half life of the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of 76Ge. In Phase I, the experimental background was reduced to 10-2 cts/(keV.kg.yr) in the region around Qββ. For Phase II we want to reduce the background contribution by one order of magnitude. Cosmic muons induce part of this dangerous background and must be vetoed. The muon veto consists of a water Cherenkov detector with 66 PMTs in the water tank surrounding the Gerda cryostat which contains the germanium crystals. The muon veto operated stably for 806 days where only 2 PMTs were lost. The rate however is modulated by the Cngs neutrino beam and the atmospheric temperature effect, both will be presented in this talk.

  9. Annual modulation of the muon flux in the GERDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenstein, Raphael; Freund, Kai; Grabmayr, Peter; Hegai, Alexander; Jochum, Josef; Schmitt, Christopher; Schuetz, Ann-Kathrin [Eberhard Karls Univeritaet Tuebingen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Gerda collaboration aims to determine the half life of the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. In Phase I, the experimental background was reduced to 10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.yr) in the region around Q{sub ββ}. For Phase II we want to reduce the background contribution by one order of magnitude. Cosmic muons induce part of this dangerous background and must be vetoed. The muon veto consists of a water Cherenkov detector with 66 PMTs in the water tank surrounding the Gerda cryostat which contains the germanium crystals. The muon veto operated stably for 806 days where only 2 PMTs were lost. The rate however is modulated by the Cngs neutrino beam and the atmospheric temperature effect, both will be presented in this talk.

  10. Observation of the moon shadow in deep underground muon flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A shadow of the moon, with a statistical significance of 5σ, has been observed in the underground muon flux at a depth of 2090 mwe using the Soudan 2 detector. The angular resolution of the detector is well described by a Gaussian with σ le0.3degree. The position of the shadow confirms the alignment of the detector to better than 0.15degree. This alignment has remained stable during 10 years of data taking from 1989 through 1998

  11. Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial muon flux: A lookup table

    CERN Document Server

    Atri, Dimitra

    2010-01-01

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to an increased flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. Typical cosmic ray energies may be much higher than the ~ 1 GeV flux which normally dominates. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the radiation dose. Muons contribute 85% to the radiation dose from cosmic rays. This enhanced dose could be potentially harmful to the biosphere. This mechanism has been discussed extensively in literature but has never been quantified. Here, we have developed a lookup table that can be used to quantify this effect by modeling terrestrial muon flux from any arbitrary cosmic ra...

  12. Measurement of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons with the CMS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, Vardan [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2010-08-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of positive to negative muon fluxes from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, using data collected by the CMS detector both at ground level and in the underground experimental cavern at the CERN LHC. Muons were detected in the momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The surface flux ratio is measured to be 1.2766 \\pm 0.0032(stat.) \\pm 0.0032 (syst.), independent of the muon momentum, below 100 GeV/c. This is the most precise measurement to date. At higher momenta the data are consistent with an increase of the charge ratio, in agreement with cosmic ray shower models and compatible with previous measurements by deep-underground experiments.

  13. Measurement of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons with the CMS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A.M.; Tumasyan, A. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Eroe, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Fruehwirth, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Hammer, J.; Haensel, S.; Hoch, M.; Hoermann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kasieczka, G.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der OeAW, Wien (Austria)

    2010-08-23

    We present a measurement of the ratio of positive to negative muon fluxes from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, using data collected by the CMS detector both at ground level and in the underground experimental cavern at the CERN LHC. Muons were detected in the momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The surface flux ratio is measured to be 1.2766{+-}0.0032(stat.){+-}0.0032(syst.), independent of the muon momentum, below 100 GeV/c. This is the most precise measurement to date. At higher momenta the data are consistent with an increase of the charge ratio, in agreement with cosmic ray shower models and compatible with previous measurements by deep-underground experiments.

  14. Measurement of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons with the CMS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a measurement of the ratio of positive to negative muon fluxes from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, using data collected by the CMS detector both at ground level and in the underground experimental cavern at the CERN LHC. Muons were detected in the momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The surface flux ratio is measured to be 1.2766±0.0032(stat.)±0.0032(syst.), independent of the muon momentum, below 100 GeV/c. This is the most precise measurement to date. At higher momenta the data are consistent with an increase of the charge ratio, in agreement with cosmic ray shower models and compatible with previous measurements by deep-underground experiments.

  15. Momentum spectra of atmospheric pions, muons, electrons and positrons at balloon altitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momentum spectra of pions, muons, electrons and secondary positrons have been measured at an atmospheric depth of 5.8 g cm-2 with the same instrument. Data was collected by the Matter Antimatter Space Spectrometer of the New Mexico State University in a balloon flight in September 1991 at the rigidity cut-off of 4.5 GV c-1 in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The first measurement of the positive muon spectrum in the range 0.15 GeV c-1 to 2 GeV c-1 is reported in this paper. The spectral index above 3 GeV c-1 of the negative muon momentum spectrum of this measurement is -2.39±0.05 in agreement with analytical cascade calculations which assume a primary proton kinetic energy spectrum with a slope of -2.74±0.02 in the corresponding kinetic energy range. In the momentum interval 300-700 MeV c-1, both negative and positive muon fluxes turn out to be larger than calculated fluxes by a factor of about 1.4. The measurement of the secondary electron and positron energy spectra allows a reliable subtraction of the atmospheric background from the primary electron and positron fluxes which are affected by large uncertainties in most of the experiments. The energy spectra of the secondary particles reported here have the same systematic errors implying a higher relative accuracy with respect to those measurements made in different flights. (author)

  16. Cosmic ray sun shadow in Soudan 2 underground muon flux.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, W. W. M.; Alner, G. J.; Ayres, D. S.; Barrett, W. L.; Bode, C.; Fields, T. H.; Goodman, M. C.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Price, L. E.; Seidlein, R.; Soudan 2 Collaboration; Thron, J. L.

    1999-06-23

    The absorption of cosmic rays by the sun produces a shadow at the earth. The angular offset and broadening of the shadow are determined by the magnitude and structure of the interplanetary magnetic field (IPMF) in the inner solar system. The authors report the first measurement of the solar cosmic ray shadow by detection of deep underground muon flux in observations made during the entire ten-year interval 1989 to 1998. The sun shadow varies significantly during this time, with a 3.3{sigma} shadow observed during the years 1995 to 1998.

  17. Search for a diffuse flux of astrophysical muon neutrinos with the IceCube 59-string configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grandmont, D T; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Macías, O; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Reimann, R; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Toscano, S; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zoll, M

    2013-01-01

    A search for high-energy neutrinos was performed using data collected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory from May 2009 to May 2010, when the array was running in its 59-string configuration. The data sample was optimized to contain muon neutrino induced events with a background contamination of atmospheric muons of less than 1%. These data, which are dominated by atmospheric neutrinos, are analyzed with a global likelihood fit to search for possible contributions of prompt atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos, neither of which have yet been identified. Such signals are expected to follow a harder energy spectrum than conventional atmospheric neutrinos. In addition, the zenith angle distribution differs for astrophysical and atmospheric signals. A global fit of the reconstructed energies and directions of observed events is performed, including possible neutrino flux contributions for an astrophysical signal and atmospheric backgrounds as well as systematic uncertainties of the experiment and theoretical p...

  18. Multiyear search for a diffuse flux of muon neutrinos with AMANDA-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, A.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Ahrens, J.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baret, B.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Beattie, K.; Becka, T.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bolmont, J.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Braun, J.; Burgess, T.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Davour, A.; Day, C. T.; de Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; De Young, T.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Duvoort, M. R.; Edwards, W. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geenen, H.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Gozzini, R.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, D.; Hardtke, R.; Hart, J. E.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hauschildt, T.; Hays, D.; Heise, J.; Helbing, K.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hill, G. C.; Hodges, J.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hommez, B.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Hughey, B.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hundertmark, S.; Inaba, M.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Jones, A.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kawai, H.; Kelley, J. L.; Kislat, F.; Kitamura, N.; Klein, S. R.; Klepser, S.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Kuehn, K.; Labare, M.; Landsman, H.; Lauer, R.; Leich, H.; Leier, D.; Liubarsky, I.; Lundberg, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McCauley, T.; McParland, C. P.; Meli, A.; Messarius, T.; Mészáros, P.; Miyamoto, H.; Mokhtarani, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morey, A.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Münich, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Ögelman, H.; Olivas, A.; Patton, S.; Peña-Garay, C.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Pohl, A. C.; Porrata, R.; Pretz, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Razzaque, S.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Robbins, S.; Roth, P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Rutledge, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Smith, A. J.; Solarz, M.; Song, C.; Sopher, J. E.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoufer, M. C.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sumner, T. J.; Taboada, I.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Tluczykont, M.; Toale, P. A.; Tosi, D.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; Viscomi, V.; Voigt, B.; Wagner, W.; Walck, C.; Waldmann, H.; Walter, M.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wendt, C.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wiedemann, C.; Wikström, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, X. W.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zornoza, J. D.

    2007-08-01

    A search for TeV-PeV muon neutrinos from unresolved sources was performed on AMANDA-II data collected between 2000 and 2003 with an equivalent live time of 807 days. This diffuse analysis sought to find an extraterrestrial neutrino flux from sources with nonthermal components. The signal is expected to have a harder spectrum than the atmospheric muon and neutrino backgrounds. Since no excess of events was seen in the data over the expected background, an upper limit of E2Φ90%C.L.<7.4×10-8GeVcm-2s-1sr-1 is placed on the diffuse flux of muon neutrinos with a Φ∝E-2 spectrum in the energy range 16 TeV to 2.5 PeV. This is currently the most sensitive Φ∝E-2 diffuse astrophysical neutrino limit. We also set upper limits for astrophysical and prompt neutrino models, all of which have spectra different from Φ∝E-2.

  19. Modeled Differential Muon Flux Measurements for Monitoring Geological Storage of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M. L.; Naudet, C. J.; Gluyas, J.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, we published the first, theoretical feasibility study of the use of muon tomography to monitor injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into a geological storage reservoir for carbon storage (Kudryavtsev et al., 2012). Our initial concept showed that attenuation of the total muon downward flux, which is controlled effectively by its path-length and the density of the material through which it passes, could quantify the replacement in a porous sandstone reservoir of relatively dense aqueous brine by less dense supercritical carbon dioxide (specific gravity, 0.75). Our model examined the change in the muon flux over periods of about one year. However, certainly, in the initial stages of carbon dioxide injection it would be valuable to examine its emplacement over much shorter periods of time. Over a year there are small fluctuations of about 2% in the flux of high energy cosmic ray muons, because of changes in pressure and temperature, and therefore density, of the upper atmosphere (Ambrosio, 1997). To improve precision, we developed the concept of differential muon monitoring. The muon flux at the bottom of the reservoir is compared with the incident flux at its top. In this paper we present the results of three simulations. In all of them, as in our previous modeling exercise, we assume a 1000 sq. m total area of muon detectors, but in this case both above and below a 300 m thick sandstone bed, with 35% porosity, capped by shale and filled initially with a dense brine (specific gravity, 1.112). We assume high sweep efficiency, since supercritical CO2 and water are miscible, and therefore that 80% of the water will be replaced over a period of injection spanning 10 years. In the first two cases the top of the reservoir is at 1200 m and the overburden is either continuous shale or a 100m shale horizon beneath a sandstone aquifer, respectively. In the third case, which is somewhat analogous to the FutureGen 2.0 site in Illinois (FutureGen Industrial

  20. Atmospheric muons reconstruction with Antares; Reconstruction de muons atmospheriques avec ANTARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melissas, M

    2007-09-15

    The ANTARES collaboration is building a neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. This detector contains 900 photomultiplier tubes, dispatched on 12 lines, in order to detect Cerenkov light from muon induced by neutrino interactions in the the vicinity of the detector. Currently the first 5 lines have been deployed. A first task consists in studying the stability of the detector calibration, which is a necessary step to understand the detector response. Then we studied optical properties of water, for this we developed a reconstruction method dedicated to LED Beacon. The extracted parameters are compatible with earlier measurements. A quality criteria to reject badly reconstructed track has been developed based on the likelihood of the tracks fit versus point fit. This has been applied to real data and a preliminary analysis of atmospheric muons with a 5-lines detector is performed. (author)

  1. A parametrization of the cosmic-ray muon flux at sea-level

    CERN Document Server

    Guan, Mengyun; Cao, Jun; Luk, Kam-Biu; Yang, Changgen

    2015-01-01

    Based on the standard Gaisser's formula, a modified parametrization for the sea-level cosmic-ray muon flux is introduced. The modification is verified against experimental results. The average vertical cosmic-ray muon intensity as a function of depth of standard rock is simulated using the modified formula as input to the MUSIC code. The calculated muon intensities is consistent with the experimental measurements.

  2. Momentum spectra of atmospheric pions, muons, electrons and positrons at balloon altitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Codino, A.; Brunetti, M.T.; Federico, C.; Grimani, C.; Lanfranchi, M.; Menichelli, M.; Miozza, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and Sezione INFN di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Stochaj, S.J. [Particle Astrophysics Laboratory, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (India); Mitchell, J.W.; Ormes, J.F.; Streitmatter, R.E. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Hof, M.; Pfeifer, C.; Menn, W.; Simon, M. [Universitaet Siegen, Siegen (Germany); Basini, G.; Ricci, M. [Laboratori Nazionale INFN di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Brancaccio, F.M.; Papini, P.; Piccardi, S.; Spillantini, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and Sezione INFN di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); De Pascale, M.P.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita Tor Vergata and Sezione INFN di Roma II, Roma (Italy)

    1997-11-01

    Momentum spectra of pions, muons, electrons and secondary positrons have been measured at an atmospheric depth of 5.8 g cm{sup -2} with the same instrument. Data was collected by the Matter Antimatter Space Spectrometer of the New Mexico State University in a balloon flight in September 1991 at the rigidity cut-off of 4.5 GV c{sup -1} in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The first measurement of the positive muon spectrum in the range 0.15 GeV c{sup -1} to 2 GeV c{sup -1} is reported in this paper. The spectral index above 3 GeV c{sup -1} of the negative muon momentum spectrum of this measurement is -2.39{+-}0.05 in agreement with analytical cascade calculations which assume a primary proton kinetic energy spectrum with a slope of -2.74{+-}0.02 in the corresponding kinetic energy range. In the momentum interval 300-700 MeV c{sup -1}, both negative and positive muon fluxes turn out to be larger than calculated fluxes by a factor of about 1.4. The measurement of the secondary electron and positron energy spectra allows a reliable subtraction of the atmospheric background from the primary electron and positron fluxes which are affected by large uncertainties in most of the experiments. The energy spectra of the secondary particles reported here have the same systematic errors implying a higher relative accuracy with respect to those measurements made in different flights. (author)

  3. Measurement of the muon beam direction and muon flux for the T2K neutrino experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, K; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Bay, F; Bronner, C; Ereditato, A; Friend, M; Hartz, M; Hiraki, T; Ichikawa, A K; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Juget, F; Kikawa, T; Kobayashi, T; Kubo, H; Matsuoka, K; Maruyama, T; Minamino, A; Murakami, A; Nakadaira, T; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Oyama, Y; Pistillo, C; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Suzuki, S Y; Tada, S; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yokoyama, M

    2014-01-01

    The Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) neutrino experiment measures neutrino oscillations by using an almost pure muon neutrino beam produced at the J-PARC accelerator facility. The T2K muon monitor was installed to measure the direction and stability of the muon beam which is produced together with the muon neutrino beam. The systematic error in the muon beam direction measurement was estimated, using data and MC simulation, to be 0.28 mrad. During beam operation, the proton beam has been controlled using measurements from the muon monitor and the direction of the neutrino beam has been tuned to within 0.3 mrad with respect to the designed beam-axis. In order to understand the muon beam properties,measurement of the absolute muon yield at the muon monitor was conducted with an emulsion detector. The number of muon tracks was measured to be $(4.06\\pm0.05)\\times10^4$ cm$^{-2}$ normalized with $4\\times10^{11}$ protons on target with 250 kA horn operation. The result is in agreement with the prediction which is corrected ba...

  4. Search for a diffuse flux of astrophysical muon neutrinos with the IceCube 59-string configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Abbasi, R.; Ackermann, M.;

    2014-01-01

    of atmospheric muons of less than 1%. These data, which are dominated by atmospheric neutrinos, are analyzed with a global likelihood fit to search for possible contributions of prompt atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos, neither of which have yet been identified. Such signals are expected to follow a harder...... energy spectrum than conventional atmospheric neutrinos. In addition, the zenith angle distribution differs for astrophysical and atmospheric signals. A global fit of the reconstructed energies and directions of observed events is performed, including possible neutrino flux contributions...... for an astrophysical signal and atmospheric backgrounds as well as systematic uncertainties of the experiment and theoretical predictions. The best fit yields an astrophysical signal flux for ν_μ+ν¯_μ of E^2⋅Φ(E) = 0.25x10^−8 GeV cm^−2 s^−1 sr^−1, and a zero prompt component. Although the sensitivity of this analysis...

  5. Measurement of the cosmic ray muon spectrum and charge ratio in the atmosphere from ground level to balloon altitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, G.; Bongiorno, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Circella, M.; De Cataldo, G.; De Marzo, C.N. [Bari Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Bari (Italy); Brunetti, M.T.; Codini, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy)]|[INFN, Rome (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    A measurement of the cosmic ray muon flux in the atmosphere has been carried out from the data collected by the MASS2 (Matter Antimatter Spectrometer System) apparatus during the ascent of the 1991 flight. The experiment was performed on September 23, 1991 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico (USA) at a geomagnetic cutoff of about 4.5 GV/c. The negative muon spectrum has been determined in different depth ranges in the momentum interval 0.33-40 GeV/c with higher statistics and better background rejection than reported before. Taking advantage of the high geomagnetic cutoff and of the high performances of the instrument, the positive muon spectrum has also been determined and the altitude dependence of the muon charge ratio has been investigated in the 0.33-1.5 GeV/c momentum range.

  6. High-energy fluxes of atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovskaya, T S; Sinegovsky, S I

    2013-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos from decays of mesons, produced in collisions of cosmic ray particles with air nuclei, form unavoidable background for detection of astrophysical neutrinos. More precise calculations of the high-energy neutrino spectrum are required since measurements in the IceCube experiment reach the intriguing energy region where a contribution of the prompt neutrinos and/or astrophysical ones should be discovered. Basing on the referent hadronic models QGSJET II-03, SIBYLL 2.1, we calculate high-energy spectra, both of the muon and electron atmospheric neutrinos, averaged over zenith-angles. The computation is made using three parameterizations of cosmic ray spectra which include the knee region. All calculations are compared with the atmospheric neutrino measurements by Frejus and IceCube. The prompt neutrino flux predictions obtained with thequark-gluon string model (QGSM) for the charm production by Kaidalov & Piskunova do not contradict to the IceCube measurements and upper limit on the astr...

  7. Calibrating the SHiP muon-flux using NA61/SHINE

    CERN Document Server

    Van Herwijnen, Eric; Korzenev, Alexander; Mermod, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    A major concern for the design of the SHiP experiment is the lack of a precise knowledge of the muon flux. This is a proposal to measure the expected muon flux in the SHiP experiment by installing a replica of the SHiP target in a 400 GeV proton beam in front of the NA61/SHINE spectrometer. We propose to do a first measurement in 2017.

  8. Limits on the muon flux from neutralino annihilations at the center of the Earth with AMANDA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, A; Duvoort, M.R.; Heise, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    A search has been performed for nearly vertically upgoing neutrino-induced muons with the Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA), using data taken over the three year period 1997–99. No excess above the expected atmospheric neutrino background has been found. Upper limits at 90% confide

  9. Muon flux measurement with silicon detectors in the CERN neutrino beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work mainly describes the 'Neutrino Flux Monitoring' system (NFM), which has been built for the 400-GeV Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) neutrino beams. A treatment is given of some general subjects related to the utilization of silicon detectors and the properties of high-energy muons. Energy loss of minimal-ionizing particles, which has to be distinguished from energy deposition in the detector, is considered. Secondary radiation, also called 'spray', consisting of 'delta rays' and other cascade products, is shown to play an important role in the muon flux measurement inside a shield, especially for muons of high energy (> 100 GeV). Radiation induced damage in the detectors, which determines the long term performance, is discussed. The relation between the detector response and the real muon flux is determined. The use of NFM system for on-line beam monitoring is described. (Auth.)

  10. On the Charm Contribution to the Atmospheric Neutrino Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Halzen, Francis

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the estimate of the charm particle contribution to the atmospheric neutrino flux that is expected to dominate at high energies because long-lived high-energy pions and kaons interact in the atmosphere before decaying into neutrinos. We focus on the production of forward charm particles which carry a large fraction of the momentum of the incident proton. In the case of strange particles, such a component is familiar from the abundant production of $K^{+} \\Lambda$ pairs. These forward charm particles can dominate the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux in underground experiments. Modern collider experiments have no coverage in the very large rapidity region where charm forward pair production dominates. Using archival accelerator data as well as IceCube measurements of atmospheric electron and muon neutrino fluxes, we obtain an upper limit on forward $\\bar{D}^0 \\Lambda_c$ pair production and on the associated flux of high-energy atmospheric neutrinos. We conclude that the prompt flux may dominate t...

  11. First Observations of Separated Atmospheric Muon Neutrino and Muon Anti-Neutrino Events in the MINOS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, P; Allison, W W M; Alner, G J; Anderson, K; Andreopoulos, C; Andrews, M; Andrews, R; Arroyo, C; Avvakumov, S; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barish, B; Barker, M A; Barnes, P D; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Beall, E; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bergfeld, T; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bocean, V; Bock, B; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Border, P M; Bower, C; Boyd, S; Buckley-Geer, E; Byon-Wagner, A; Böhm, J; Böhnlein, D J; Cabrera, A; Chapman, J D; Chase, T R; Chernichenko, S K; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Cossairt, J D; Courant, H; Crane, D A; Culling, A J; Dawson, J W; De Muth, D M; De Santo, A; Dierckxsens, M; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Drake, G; Ducar, R; Durkin, T; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J; Fackler, O D; Falk-Harris, E; Feldman, G J; Felt, N; Fields, T H; Ford, R; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gebhard, M; Godley, A; Gogos, J; Goodman, M C; Gornushkin, Yu; Gouffon, P; Grashorn, E; Grossman, N; Grudzinski, J J; Grzelak, K; Guarino, V; Habig, A; Halsall, R; Hanson, J; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hartouni, E P; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Hill, N; Ho, Y; Howcroft, C; Hylen, J; Ignatenko, M A; Indurthy, D; Irwin, G M; James, C; Jenner, L; Jensen, D; Joffe-Minor, T M; Kafka, T; Kang, H J; Kasahara, S M; Kilmer, J; Kim, H; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kostin, M; Krakauer, D A; Kumaratunga, S; Ladran, A S; Lang, K; Laughton, C; Lebedev, A; Lee, R; Lee, W Y; Libkind, M A; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Liu, J; Longley, N P; Lucas, P; Luebke, W; Madani, S; Maher, E; Makeev, V; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marino, A D; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; McDonald, J; McGowan, A; Meier, J R; Merzon, G I; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Milburn, R H; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Miyagawa, P S; Moore, Cristopher; Morf, J; Morse, R; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Murtagh, M J; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, C; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nezrick, F A; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, J; Oliver, W P; Onuchin, V A; Osiecki, T; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlovich, Z; Pearce, G F; Pearson, N; Peck, C W; Perry, C; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Ping, H; Piteira, R; Pla-Dalmau, A; Plunkett, R K; Price, L E; Proga, M; Pushka, D R; Rahman, D; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Read, A L; Rebel, B; Reyna, D E; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ruddick, K; Ryabov, V A; Saakyan, R; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schoessow, P V; Schreiner, P; Schwienhorst, R; Semenov, V K; Seun, S M; Shanahan, P; Shield, P D; Smart, W; Smirnitsky, A V; Smith, C; Smith, P N; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Stefanik, A; Sullivan, P; Swan, J M; Symes, P A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tetteh-Lartey, E; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Trendler, R; Trevor, J; Trostin, I; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G S; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Vakili, M; Vaziri, K; Velissaris, C; Verebryusov, V; Viren, B; Wai, L; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Webb, R C; Weber, A; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; White, R F; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Wu, Q K; Yan, W G; Yang, T; Yumiceva, F X; Yun, J C; Zheng, H; Zois, M; Zwaska, R

    2006-01-01

    The complete 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking data since the beginning of August 2003 at a depth of 2070 meters water-equivalent in the Soudan mine, Minnesota. This paper presents the first MINOS observations of muon neutrino and muon anti-neutrino charged-current atmospheric neutrino interactions based on an exposure of 418 days. The ratio of upward to downward-going events in the data is compared to the Monte Carlo expectation in the absence of neutrino oscillations giving: R_data(up/down)/R_MC(up/down) = 0.62^{+0.19}_{-0.14} (stat.) +- 0.02 (sys.). An extended maximum likelihood analysis of the observed L/E distributions excludes the null hypothesis of no neutrino oscillations at the 98 % confidence level. Using the curvature of the observed muons in the 1.3 T MINOS magnetic field muon neutrino and muon anti-neutrino interactions are separated. The ratio of muon neutrino to muon anti-neutrino events in the data is compared to the Monte Carlo expectation assuming neutrinos and anti-neutrinos osci...

  12. Atmospheric Neutrino Induced Muons in the MINOS Far Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Dipu; /Minnesota U.

    2007-02-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The MINOS Far Detector, located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Soudan MN, has been collecting data since August 2003. The scope of this dissertation involves identifying the atmospheric neutrino induced muons that are created by the neutrinos interacting with the rock surrounding the detector cavern, performing a neutrino oscillation search by measuring the oscillation parameter values of {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23}, and searching for CPT violation by measuring the charge ratio for the atmospheric neutrino induced muons. A series of selection cuts are applied to the data set in order to extract the neutrino induced muons. As a result, a total of 148 candidate events are selected. The oscillation search is performed by measuring the low to high muon momentum ratio in the data sample and comparing it to the same ratio in the Monte Carlo simulation in the absence of neutrino oscillation. The measured double ratios for the ''all events'' (A) and high resolution (HR) samples are R{sub A} = R{sub low/high}{sup data}/R{sub low/high}{sup MC} = 0.60{sub -0.10}{sup +0.11}(stat) {+-} 0.08(syst) and R{sub HR} = R{sub low/high}{sup data}/R{sub low/high}{sup MC} = 0.58{sub -0.11}{sup +0.14}(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst), respectively. Both event samples show a significant deviation from unity giving a strong indication of neutrino oscillation. A combined momentum and zenith angle oscillation fit is performed using the method of maximum log-likelihood with a grid search in the parameter space of {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}. The best fit point for both event samples occurs at {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = 1.3 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} = 1. This result is compatible with previous measurements from the Super Kamiokande experiment and Soudan 2 experiments. The MINOS Far Detector is the first

  13. Atmospheric Neutrino Induced Muons in the MINOS Far Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Aftabur Dipu [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2007-02-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The MINOS Far Detector, located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Soudan MN, has been collecting data since August 2003. The scope of this dissertation involves identifying the atmospheric neutrino induced muons that are created by the neutrinos interacting with the rock surrounding the detector cavern, performing a neutrino oscillation search by measuring the oscillation parameter values of Δm$2\\atop{23}$ and sin223, and searching for CPT violation by measuring the charge ratio for the atmospheric neutrino induced muons. A series of selection cuts are applied to the data set in order to extract the neutrino induced muons. As a result, a total of 148 candidate events are selected. The oscillation search is performed by measuring the low to high muon momentum ratio in the data sample and comparing it to the same ratio in the Monte Carlo simulation in the absence of neutrino oscillation. The measured double ratios for the ''all events'' (A) and high resolution (HR) samples are RA = R$data\\atop{low/high}$/R$MC\\atop{low/high}$ = 0.60$+0.11\\atop{-0.10}$(stat) ± 0.08(syst) and RHR = R$data\\atop{low/high}$/R$MC\\atop{low/high}$ = 0.58$+0.14\\atop{-0.11}$(stat) ± 0.05(syst), respectively. Both event samples show a significant deviation from unity giving a strong indication of neutrino oscillation. A combined momentum and zenith angle oscillation fit is performed using the method of maximum log-likelihood with a grid search in the parameter space of Δm2 and sin2 2θ. The best fit point for both event samples occurs at Δm$2\\atop{23}$ = 1.3 x 10-3 eV2, and sin223 = 1. This result is compatible with previous measurements from the Super Kamiokande experiment and Soudan 2 experiments. The MINOS Far Detector is the first

  14. High Energy Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes From a Realistic Primary Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Penha, Felipe; Dembinski, Hans; Gaisser, Thomas K.; Tilav, Serap

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric neutrino fluxes depend on the energy spectrum of primary nucleons entering the top of the atmosphere. Before the advent of AMANDA and the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, measurements of the neutrino fluxes were generally below ~ 1TeV , a regime in which a simple energy power law sufficed to describe the primary spectrum. Now, IceCube's muon neutrino data extends beyond 1PeV , including a combination of neutrinos from astrophysical sources with background from atmospheric neutrinos. At such high energies, the steepening at the knee of the primary spectrum must be accounted for. Here, we describe a semi-analytical approach for calculating the atmospheric differential neutrino fluxes at high energies. The input is a realistic primary spectrum consisting of 4 populations with distinct energy cutoffs, each with up to 7 representative nuclei, where the parameters were extracted from a global fit. We show the effect of each component on the atmospheric neutrino spectra, above 10TeV . The resulting features follow directly from recent air shower measurements included in the fit. Felipe Campos Penha gratefully acknowledges financial support from CAPES (Processo BEX 5348/14-5), CNPq (Processo 142180/2012-2), and the Bartol Research Institute.

  15. Density Imaging of Puy de Dôme Volcano with Atmospheric Muons in French Massif Central as a Case Study for Volcano Muography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carloganu, Cristina; Le Ménédeu, Eve

    2016-04-01

    High energy atmospheric muons have high penetration power that renders them appropriate for geophysical studies. Provided the topography is known, the measurement of the muon flux transmittance leads in an univoque way to 2D density mapping (so called radiographic images) revealing spatial and possibly also temporal variations. Obviously, several radiographic images could be combined into 3D tomographies, though the inverse 3D problem is generally ill-posed. The muography has a high potential for imaging remotely (from kilometers away) and with high resolution (better than 100 mrad2) volcanoes. The experimental and methodological task is however not straightforward since atmospheric muons have non trivial spectra that fall rapidly with muon energy. As shown in [Ambrosino 2015] successfully imaging km-scale volcanoes remotely requires state-of-the art, high-resolution and large-scale muon detectors. This contribution presents the geophysical motivation for muon imaging as well as the first quantitative density radiographies of Puy de Dôme volcano obtained by the TOMUVOL collaboration using a highly segmented muon telescope based on Glass Resistive Plate Chambers. In parallel with the muographic studies, the volcano was imaged through standard geophysical methods (gravimetry, electrical resistivity) [Portal 2013] allowing in depth comparisons of the different methods. Ambrosino, F., et al. (2015), Joint measurement of the atmospheric muon flux through the Puy de Dôme volcano with plastic scintillators and Resistive Plate Chambers detectors, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 120, doi:10.1002/2015JB011969 A. Portal et al (2013) , "Inner structure of the Puy de Dme volcano: cross-comparison of geophysical models (ERT, gravimetry, muon imaging)", Geosci. Instrum. Method. Data Syst., 2, 47-54, 2013

  16. Atmospheric MUons from PArametric formulas: a fast GEnerator for neutrino telescopes (MUPAGE)

    OpenAIRE

    Carminati, G.; Margiotta, A; Spurio, M

    2008-01-01

    Neutrino telescopes will open, in the next years, new opportunities in observational high energy astrophysics. For these experiments, atmospheric muons from primary cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere play an important role, because they provide the most abundant source of events for calibration and test. On the other side, they represent the major background source. In this paper a fast Monte Carlo generator (called MUPAGE) of bundles of atmospheric muons for underwater/ice neutrino te...

  17. Muon Flux Measurements at the Davis Campus of the Sanford Underground Research Facility with the {\\sc Majorana Demonstrator} Veto System

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, N; Avignone, F T; Barabash, A S; Bertrand, F E; Bradley, A W; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Buuck, M; Byram, D; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Chu, P -H; Cuesta, C; Detwiler, J A; Dunagan, C; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilliss, T; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guinn, I S; Guiseppe, V E; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Jasinski, B R; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J; Lopez, A M; MacMullin, J; Martin, R D; Massarczyk, R; Meijer, S J; Mertens, S; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Overman, N R; Poon, A W P; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Ronquest, M C; Schmitt, C; Shanks, B; Shirchenko, M; Snyder, N; Suriano, A M; Tedeschi, D; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Yu, C -H; Yumatov, V; Zhitnikov, I

    2016-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the total MUON flux underground at the Davis Campus of the Sanford Underground Research Facility at the 4850 ft level. Measurements were done with the Majorana Demonstrator veto system arranged in two different configurations. The measured total flux is (5.04+/-0.16) x 10^-9 muons/s/cm^2.

  18. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio with the OPERA detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OPERA detector at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) was used to measure the atmospheric muon charge ratio Rμ=Nμ+/Nμ- in the TeV energy region. We analyzed 403069 atmospheric muons corresponding to 113.4 days of lifetime during the 2008 CNGS run. We computed separately the muon charge ratio for single and for multiple muon events in order to select different energy regions of the primary cosmic ray spectrum and to test the Rμ dependence on the primary composition. The measured Rμ values were corrected taking into account the charge-misidentification errors. Data have also been grouped in five bins of the ''vertical surface energy'' Eμ cos θ. A fit to a simplified model of muon production in the atmosphere allowed the determination of the pion and kaon charge ratios weighted by the cosmic ray energy spectrum. (orig.)

  19. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio with the OPERA detector

    CERN Document Server

    Agafonova, N; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Autiero, D; Badertscher, A; Bagulya, A; Bertolin, A; Besnier, M; Bick, D; Boyarkin, V; Bozza, C; Brugière, T; Brugnera, R; Brunetti, G; Buontempo, S; Cazes, A; Chaussard, L; Chernyavsky, M; Chiarella, V; Chon-Sen, N; Chukanov, A; Cozzi, M; D'Amato, G; Corso, F Dal; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; D'eclais, Y; De Serio, M; Di Capua, F; Di Ferdinando, D; Di Giovanni, A; Di Marco, N; Dmitrievski, S; Dracos, M; Duchesneau, D; Dusini, S; Ebert, J; Egorov, O; Enikeev, R; Ereditato, A; Esposito, L S; Favier, J; Felici, G; Ferber, T; Fini, R; Frekers, D; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, C; Galkin, V I; Garfagnini, A; Giacomelli, G; Giorgini, M; Goellnitz, C; Goldberg, J; Golubkov, D; Goncharova, L; Gornushkin, Y; Grella, G; Grianti, F; Guler, M; Gustavino, C; Hagner, C; Hamada, K; Hara, T; Hierholzer, M; Hoshino, K; Ieva, M; Jakovcic, K; Jollet, C; Juget, F; Kazuyama, M; Kim, S H; Kimura, M; Klicek, B; Knuesel, J; Kodama, K; Komatsu, M; Kose, U; Kreslo, I; Kubota, H; Lazzaro, C; Lenkeit, J; Ljubicic, A; Longhin, A; Lutter, G; Malgin, A; Mandrioli, G; Marotta, A; Marteau, J; Matsuo, T; Matveev, V; Mauri, N; Medinaceli, E; Meisel, F; Meregaglia, A; Migliozzi, P; Mikado, S; Miyamoto, S; Monacelli, P; Morishima, K; Moser, U; Muciaccia, M T; Naganawa, N; Naka, T; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Naumov, D; Nikitina, V; Niwa, K; Nonoyama, Y; Ogawa, S; Olchevski, A; Oldorf, C; Orlova, G; Osedlo, V; Paniccia, M; Paoloni, A; Park, B D; Park, I G; Pastore, A; Patrizii, L; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Pilipenko, V; Pistillo, C; Policastro, G; Polukhina, N; Pozzato, M; Pretzl, K; Publichenko, P; Pupilli, F; Rescigno, R; Roganova, T; Rokujo, H; Romano, G; Rosa, G; Rostovtseva, I; Rubbia, A; Russo, A; Ryasny, V; Ryazhskaya, O; Sato, O; Sato, Y; Schembri, A; Parzefall, W Schmidt; Schroeder, H; Lavina, L Scotto; Sheshukov, A; Shibuya, H; Simone, S; Sioli, M; Sirignano, C; Sirri, G; Song, J S; Spinetti, M; Stanco, L; Starkov, N; Stipcevic, M; Strauss, T; Strolin, P; Takahashi, S; Tenti, M; Terranova, F; Tezuka, I; Tioukov, V; Tolun, P; Tran, T; Tufanli, S; Vilain, P; Vladimirov, M; Votano, L; Vuilleumier, J L; Wilquet, G; Wonsak, B; Yakushev, V; Yoon, C S; Yoshioka, T; Yoshida, J; Zaitsev, Y; Zemskova, S; Zghiche, A; Zimmermann, R

    2010-01-01

    The OPERA detector at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) was used to measure the atmospheric muon charge ratio in the TeV energy region. We analyzed 403069 atmospheric muons corresponding to 113.4 days of livetime during the 2008 CNGS run. We computed separately the muon charge ratio for single and for multiple muon events in order to select different energy regions of the primary cosmic ray spectrum and to test the charge ratio dependence on the primary composition. The measured charge ratio values were corrected taking into account the charge-misidentification errors. Data have also been grouped in five bins of the "vertical surface energy". A fit to a simplified model of muon production in the atmosphere allowed the determination of the pion and kaon charge ratios weighted by the cosmic ray energy spectrum.

  20. Biological implications of high-energy cosmic ray induced muon flux in the extragalactic shock model

    CERN Document Server

    Atri, Dimitra

    2011-01-01

    A ~ 62 My periodicity in fossil biodiversity has been observed in independent studies of paleobiology databases going back 542 My. The period and phase of this biodiversity cycle coincides with the motion of our solar system in the galactic disk that oscillates perpendicular to the galactic plane with an amplitude of about 70 parsecs and a period of 63.6 My. Our Galaxy is falling toward the Virgo cluster due to its gravitational pull, forming a galactic shock at the north end of our galaxy due to this motion, capable of accelerating particles and exposing our galaxy's northern side to a higher flux of cosmic rays. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating extensive air showers, ionizing the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Secondary particles such as muons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the biological radiation dose, causing DNA damage and increasing mutation rates, which can have serious biological implicatio...

  1. Determination of the Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes from Atmospheric Neutrino Data

    CERN Document Server

    González-Garciá, M C; Rojo, J

    2006-01-01

    The precise knowledge of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes is a key ingredient in the interpretation of the results from any atmospheric neutrino experiment. In the standard atmospheric neutrino data analysis, these fluxes are theoretical inputs obtained from sophisticated numerical calculations based on the convolution of the primary cosmic ray spectrum with the expected yield of neutrinos per incident cosmic ray. In this work we present an alternative approach to the determination of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes based on the direct extraction from the experimental data on neutrino event rates. The extraction is achieved by means of a combination of artificial neural networks as interpolants and Monte Carlo methods for faithful error estimation

  2. Measurement of Neutron and Muon Fluxes 100~m Underground with the SciBath Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, Lance [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The SciBath detector is an 80 liter liquid scintillator detector read out by a three dimensional grid of 768 wavelength-shifting fibers. Initially conceived as a fine-grained charged particle detector for neutrino studies that could image charged particle tracks in all directions, it is also sensitive to fast neutrons (15-200 MeV). In fall of 2011 the apparatus performed a three month run to measure cosmic-induced muons and neutrons 100~meters underground in the FNAL MINOS near-detector area. Data from this run has been analyzed and resulted in measurements of the cosmic muon flux as \

  3. Muon flux measurement with silicon detectors in the CERN neutrino beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutrino beam installations at the CERN SPS accelerator are described, with emphasis on the beam monitoring systems. Especially the muon flux measurement system is considered in detail, and the calibration procedure and systematic aspects of the measurements are discussed. An introduction is given to the use of silicon semiconductor detectors and their related electronics. Other special chapters concern non-linear phenomena in the silicon detectors, radiation damage in silicon detectors, energy loss and energy deposition in silicon and a review of energy loss phenomena for high energy muons in matter. (orig.)

  4. Measurement of the Atmospheric Muon Spectrum from 20 to 3000 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Van den Ancker, M E; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bähr, J; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chiarusi, T; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Ding, L K; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Durán, I; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Faber, G; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grabosch, H J; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Groenstege, H L; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; Guo, Y N; Gupta, S; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Haller, C; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, Y; He, Z X; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hoferjun, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Huo, A X; Hu, Y; Ito, N; Jin, B N; Jing, C L; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kantserov, V A; Kaur, M; Kawakami, S; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kok, E; Korn, A J; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Kuang Hao Huai; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kuijpers, J; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Lei, Y; Leich, H; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Li, L; Li, Z C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Ma, X H; Ma, Y Q; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Meng, X W; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Monteleoni, B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Nahnhauer, R; Naumov, V A; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Parriaud, J F; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Qing, C R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Ravindran, K C; Razis, P; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Rewiersma, P A M; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Rojkov, A; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Saidi, R; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmitt, V; Schöneich, B; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shen, C Q; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sulanke, H; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Trowitzsch, G; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Unger, M; Valente, E; Verkooijen, H; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, R G; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, X W; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Van Wijk, R F; Wijnen, T A M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Y P; Xu, J S; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yang, X F; Yao, Z G; Yeh, S C; Yu, Z Q; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, C; Zhang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhou, S J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zhu, Q Q; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M; Zwart, A N M

    2004-01-01

    The absolute muon flux between 20 GeV and 300 GeV is measured with the L3 magnetic muon spectrometer for zenith angles ranging from 0 degree to 58 degrees. Due to the large exposure of about 150 m2 sr d, and the excellent momentum resolution of the L3 muon chambers, a precision of 2.3% at 150 GeV in the vertical direction is achieved. The ratio of positive to negative muons is studied between 20 GeV and 500 GeV, and the average vertical muon charge ratio is found to be 1.285 +- 0.003 (stat.)+- 0.019 (syst.).

  5. Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at Homestake

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, F E; Totushek, J; Mei, D -M; Thomas, K; Zhang, C

    2010-01-01

    Measuring the muon flux is important to the Sanford Underground Laboratory at Homestake, for which several low background experiments are being planned. The cosmic ray muon flux was measured in three locations at this laboratory: on the surface ($1.149\\pm0.017 \\times 10^{-2}~\\rm{s}^{-1}~\\rm{cm}^{-2}~\\rm{sr}^{-1}$), at the 800-ft level ($2.67\\pm0.06 \\times 10^{-6}~\\rm{s}^{-1}~\\rm{cm}^{-2}~\\rm{sr}^{-1}$), and at the 2000-ft level ($2.51\\pm0.25 \\times 10^{-7}~\\rm{s}^{-1}~\\rm{cm}^{-2}~\\rm{sr}^{-1}$). These fluxes agree well with model predictions.

  6. Why should we keep measuring zenital dependence of muon flux? Results obtained at Campinas (SP) BR

    CERN Document Server

    Daniel, B; Nunes, M; Vieira, T V; Kemp, E

    2013-01-01

    The zenital dependence of muon flux which reaches the earth's surface is well known as proportional to cos^n(\\theta). Generally, for practical purposes and simplicity in calculations, n is taken as 2. However, compilations of measurements show dependence on the geographical location of the experiments as well as the muons energy range. Since analytical solutions appear to be increasingly less necessary because of the higher accessibility to low cost computational power, accurate and precise determination of the value of the exponent n, under different conditions, can be useful in the necessary calculations to estimate signals and backgrounds, either for terrestrial and underground experiments. In this work we discuss a method for measuring n using a simple muon telescope and the results obtained for measurements taken at Campinas (SP), Brazil. After validation of the method, we intend to extend the measurements for different geographic locations due to the simplicity of the method, and thus collect more value...

  7. Measurement of the TeV atmospheric muon charge ratio with the complete OPERA data set. To the memory of Prof. G. Giacomelli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agafonova, N.; Malgin, A.; Matveev, V.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Shakiryanova, I. [INR-Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Aleksandrov, A.; Buontempo, S.; Consiglio, L.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Shchedrina, T.; Tioukov, V. [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Anokhina, A.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Podgrudkov, D.; Roganova, T.; Shoziyoev, G. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, SINP MSU-Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Aoki, S.; Hara, T.; Ozaki, K.; Takahashi, S. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan); Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Ereditato, A.; Kawada, J.; Kreslo, I.; Pistillo, C.; Tufanli, S.; Vuilleumier, J.L. [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), Bern (Switzerland); Bender, D.; Guler, M.; Kamiscioglu, C.; Kamiscioglu, M. [METU-Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Bertolin, A.; Dusini, S.; Kose, U.; Stanco, L. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Bozza, C.; Grella, G.; Stellacci, S.M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Salerno and ' ' Gruppo Collegato' ' INFN, Fisciano (Salerno) (Italy); Brugnera, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Medinaceli, E.; Roda, M.; Sirignano, C. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell' Universita di Padova, Padua (Italy); Buonaura, A.; De Lellis, G.; Hosseini, B.; Lauria, A.; Montesi, M.C.; Strolin, P. [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita Federico II di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Buettner, B.; Ebert, J.; Goellnitz, C.; Hagner, C.; Hollnagel, A.; Lenkeit, J.; Wonsak, B. [Hamburg University, Hamburg (Germany); Chernyavsky, M.; Okateva, N.; Polukhina, N.; Starkov, N.; Vladimirov, M. [LPI-Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chukanov, A.; Dmitrievski, S.; Gornushkin, Y.; Olshevsky, A.; Sheshukov, A.; Zemskova, S. [JINR-Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); D' Ambrosio, N.; Di Marco, N.; Pupilli, F.; Schembri, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (L' Aquila) (Italy); De Serio, M.; Galati, G.; Muciaccia, M.T.; Simone, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Bari, Bari (Italy); INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Duchesneau, D.; Pessard, H.; Zghiche, A. [LAPP, Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Di Ferdinando, D.; Mandrioli, G.; Patrizii, L.; Sirri, G. [INFN Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dracos, M.; Jollet, C.; Meregaglia, A. [IPHC, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, Strasbourg (France); Fini, R.A.; Pastore, A. [INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Fukuda, T.; Ishida, H.; Matsuo, T.; Ogawa, S.; Shibuya, H. [Toho University, Funabashi (Japan); Giacomelli, G.; Mauri, N.; Pasqualini, L.; Pozzato, M.; Sioli, M.; Tenti, M. [INFN Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell' Universita di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Goldberg, J. [Technion, Department of Physics, Haifa (Israel); Gustavino, C.; Monacelli, P. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Ishiguro, K.; Kitagawa, N.; Komatsu, M.; Morishima, K.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Niwa, K.; Omura, T.; Rokujo, H.; Sato, O.; Shiraishi, T. [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Jakovcic, K.; Klicek, B.; Ljubicic, A.; Malenica, M.; Stipcevic, M. [IRB-Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Kim, J.H.; Kim, S.H.; Park, B.D.; Park, I.G.; Yoon, C.S. [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Kodama, K. [Aichi University of Education, Kariya, Aichi-Ken (Japan); Longhin, A.; Paoloni, A.; Spinetti, M.; Votano, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Loverre, P.; Rosa, G. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy); Mikado, S. [Nihon University, Narashino, Chiba (Japan); Terranova, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G. [IIHE, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    The OPERA detector, designed to search for ν{sub μ} → ν{sub τ} oscillations in the CNGS beam, is located in the underground Gran Sasso laboratory, a privileged location to study TeV-scale cosmic rays. For the analysis here presented, the detector was used to measure the atmospheric muon charge ratio in the TeV region. OPERA collected charge separated cosmic ray data between 2008 and 2012. More than 3 million atmospheric muon events were detected and reconstructed, among which about 110000 multiple muon bundles. The charge ratio R{sub μ} ≡ N{sub μ+}/N{sub μ-} was measured separately for single and for multiple muon events. The analysis exploited the inversion of the magnet polarity which was performed on purpose during the 2012 Run. The combination of the two data sets with opposite magnet polarities allowed minimizing systematic uncertainties and reaching an accurate determination of the muon charge ratio. Data were fitted to obtain relevant parameters on the composition of primary cosmic rays and the associated kaon production in the forward fragmentation region. In the surface energy range 1-20 TeV investigated by OPERA, R{sub μ} is well described by a parametric model including only pion and kaon contributions to the muon flux, showing no significant contribution of the prompt component. The energy independence supports the validity of Feynman scaling in the fragmentation region up to 200 TeV/nucleon primary energy. (orig.)

  8. Time dependences of atmospheric Carbon dioxide fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    DeSalvo, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the lifetime of CO2 in the atmosphere is critical for predictions regarding future climate changes. A simple mass conservation analysis presented here generates tight estimations for the atmosphere's retention time constant. The analysis uses a leaky integrator model that combines the observed deficit (only less than 40% of CO2 produced from combustion of fossil fuels is actually retained in the atmosphere, while more than 60% is continuously shed) with the exponential growth of fossil fuel burning. It reveals a maximum characteristic time of less than 23 year for the transfer of atmospheric CO2 to a segregation sink. This time constant is further constrained by the rapid disappearance of 14C after the ban of atmospheric atomic bomb tests, which provides a lower limit of 18 years for this transfer. The study also generates evaluations of other CO2 fluxes, exchange time constants and volumes exchanged. Analysis of large harmonic oscillations of atmospheric CO2 concentration, often neglected in th...

  9. Measurement of the atmospheric νe flux in IceCube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M G; Abbasi, R; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker Tjus, J; Becker, K-H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Cruz Silva, A H; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Haj Ismail, A; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J-H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Pérez de los Heros, C; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H-G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönherr, L; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2013-04-12

    We report the first measurement of the atmospheric electron neutrino flux in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV, using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low-energy extension. Techniques to identify neutrinos interacting within the DeepCore volume and veto muons originating outside the detector are demonstrated. A sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data, of which 496±66(stat)±88(syst) are estimated to be cascade events, including both electron neutrino and neutral current events. The rest of the sample includes residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos in this energy range. This constitutes the first observation of electron neutrinos and neutral current interactions in a very large volume neutrino telescope optimized for the TeV energy range. PMID:25167245

  10. A Search for a Diffuse Flux of Astrophysical Muon Neutrinos with the IceCube 40-String Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R

    2011-01-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is a 1 km$^{3}$ detector currently taking data at the South Pole. One of the main strategies used to look for astrophysical neutrinos with IceCube is the search for a diffuse flux of high-energy neutrinos from unresolved sources. If there are many weak or moderate sources of extraterrestrial neutrinos, their output will appear as an diffuse flux. A hard energy spectrum of neutrinos from isotropically distributed astrophysical sources could manifest themselves as a detectable signal that may be differentiated from the atmospheric neutrino background by spectral measurement. Since astrophysical neutrinos are expected to have a harder energy spectrum than atmospheric neutrinos, a reliable method of estimating the energy of the neutrino-induced lepton is crucial. This analysis uses data from the IceCube detector collected in its half completed configuration which operated between April 2008 and May 2009 to search for a diffuse flux of astrophysical muon neutrinos. A total of 12,87...

  11. Time calibration with atmospheric muon tracks in the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Adrián-Martínez, S; André, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bogazzi, C.; Bormuth, R.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Dumas, A.; Eberl, T.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fermani, P.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fusco, L.A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Gómez-González, J.P.; Graf, K.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A.J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J.J.; Herrero, A.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; James, C.W.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J.A.; Martini, S.; Mathieu, A.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Păvălaş, G.E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D.F.E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tönnis, C.; Turpin, D.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Visser, E.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ANTARES experiment consists of an array of photomultipliers distributed along 12 lines and located deep underwater in the Mediterranean Sea. It searches for astrophysical neutrinos collecting the Cherenkov light induced by the charged particles, mainly muons, produced in neutrino interactions around the detector. Since at energies of $\\sim$10 TeV the muon and the incident neutrino are almost collinear, it is possible to use the ANTARES detector as a neutrino telescope and identify a source of neutrinos in the sky starting from a precise reconstruction of the muon trajectory. To get this result, the arrival times of the Cherenkov photons must be accurately measured. A to perform time calibrations with the precision required to have optimal performances of the instrument is described. The reconstructed tracks of the atmospheric muons in the ANTARES detector are used to determine the relative time offsets between photomultipliers. Currently, this method is used to obtain the time calibration constants for ph...

  12. Propagation of nuclear particle fluxes in atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo model of propagation of nuclear-active particle shower initiated in the atmosphere by cosmic rays or by any other radiation source is developed. The model permits to calculate spatial distributions and energy spectra of charged and neutral particle fluxes in the air and inside the blocks

  13. Measurement of the underground atmospheric muon charge ratio using the MINOS Near Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D. J.; Ayres, D. S.; Backhouse, C.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Block, G.J; Devenish, N. E.; Falk, E.; Hartnell, J.; Lefeuvre, G.; et al, ...

    2010-01-01

    The magnetized MINOS Near Detector, at a depth of 225 meters of water equivalent (mwe), is used to measure the atmospheric muon charge ratio. The ratio of observed positive to negative atmospheric muon rates, using 301 days of data, is measured to be 1.266+/-0.001(stat.)+0.015/-0.014(syst.). This measurement is consistent with previous results from other shallow underground detectors, and is 0.108+/-0.019(stat. + syst.) lower than the measurement at the functionally identical MINOS Far Detect...

  14. Prompt neutrino flux in the atmosphere revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Garzelli, M V; Sigl, G

    2016-01-01

    Prompt neutrino fluxes due to the interactions of high-energy cosmic rays with the Earth's atmosphere are backgrounds in the search for high-energy neutrinos of galactic or extra-galactic origin performed by Very Large Volume Neutrino Telescopes. We summarize our predictions for prompt neutrinos, showing their basic features as emerging from the calculation in a QCD framework capable of describing recent charm data from the Large Hadron Collider.

  15. Measurement of the atmospheric muon depth intensity relation with the NEMO Phase-2 tower

    CERN Document Server

    Aiello, S; Anghinolfi, M; Barbarino, G; Barbarito, E; Barbato, F; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Bouhadef, B; Bozza, C; Cacopardo, G; Calamai, M; Calì, C; Capone, A; Caruso, F; Ceres, A; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Cocimano, R; Coniglione, R; Costa, M; Cuttone, G; D'Amato, C; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Luca, V; Deniskina, N; De Rosa, G; Di Capua, F; Distefano, C; Fermani, P; Fusco, L A; Garufi, F; Giordano, V; Gmerk, A; Grasso, R; Grella, G; Hugon, C; Imbesi, M; Kulikovskiy, V; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Leismueller, K P; Leonora, E; Litrico, P; Lonardo, A; Longhitano, F; Presti, D Lo; Maccioni, E; Margiotta, A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Migliozzi, P; Migneco, E; Miraglia, A; Mollo, C M; Mongelli, M; Morganti, M; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Papaleo, R; Pellegrino, C; Pellegriti, M G; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Pugliatti, C; Pulvirenti, S; Orselli, A; Raffaelli, F; Randazzo, N; Riccobene, G; Rovelli, A; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Sciacca, V; Sgura, I; Simeone, F; Sipala, V; Speziale, F; Spina, M; Spitaleri, A; Spurio, M; Stellacci, S M; Taiuti, M; Terreni, G; Trasatti, L; Trovato, A; Ventura, C; Vicini, P; Viola, S; Vivolo, D

    2014-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the data collected with the NEMO Phase-2 tower, deployed at 3500 m depth about 80 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy), are presented. Cherenkov photons detected with the photomultipliers tubes were used to reconstruct the tracks of atmospheric muons. Their zenith-angle distribution was measured and the results compared with Monte Carlo simulations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is also included. The associated depth intensity relation was evaluated and compared with previous measurements and theoretical predictions. With the present analysis, the muon depth intensity relation has been measured up to 13 km of water equivalent.

  16. Tau neutrinos favored over sterile neutrinos in atmospheric muon neutrino oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, S; Fukuda, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Kobayashi, K; Koshio, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Sakurai, N; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Toshito, T; Totsuka, Y; Yamada, S; Earl, M; Habig, A; Kearns, E; Messier, M D; Scholberg, K; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Walter, C W; Goldhaber, M; Barszczak, T; Casper, D; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Price, L R; Smy, M; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Keig, W E; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Takemori, D

    2000-11-01

    The previously published atmospheric neutrino data did not distinguish whether muon neutrinos were oscillating into tau neutrinos or sterile neutrinos, as both hypotheses fit the data. Using data recorded in 1100 live days of the Super-Kamiokande detector, we use three complementary data samples to study the difference in zenith angle distribution due to neutral currents and matter effects. We find no evidence favoring sterile neutrinos, and reject the hypothesis at the 99% confidence level. On the other hand, we find that oscillation between muon and tau neutrinos suffices to explain all the results in hand.

  17. Determination of the Atmospheric Neutrino Flux and Searches for New Physics with AMANDA-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer; Collaboration, IceCube

    2009-06-02

    The AMANDA-II detector, operating since 2000 in the deep ice at the geographic South Pole, has accumulated a large sample of atmospheric muon neutrinos in the 100 GeV to 10 TeV energy range. The zenith angle and energy distribution of these events can be used to search for various phenomenological signatures of quantum gravity in the neutrino sector, such as violation of Lorentz invariance (VLI) or quantum decoherence (QD). Analyzing a set of 5511 candidate neutrino events collected during 1387 days of livetime from 2000 to 2006, we find no evidence for such effects and set upper limits on VLI and QD parameters using a maximum likelihood method. Given the absence of evidence for new flavor-changing physics, we use the same methodology to determine the conventional atmospheric muon neutrino flux above 100 GeV.

  18. Observation and Characterization of a Cosmic Muon Neutrino Flux from the Northern Hemisphere using six years of IceCube data

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Anderson, T; Ansseau, I; Anton, G; Archinger, M; Argüelles, C; Auffenberg, J; Axani, S; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blot, S; Bohm, C; Börner, M; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Burgman, A; Carver, T; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Clark, K; Classen, L; Coenders, S; Collin, G H; Conrad, J M; Cowen, D F; Cross, R; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; Rosendo, E del Pino; Dembinski, H; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de Wasseige, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; di Lorenzo, V; Dujmovic, H; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Eller, P; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fahey, S; Fazely, A R; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Flis, S; Fösig, C -C; Franckowiak, A; Friedman, E; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Ghorbani, K; Giang, W; Gladstone, L; Glagla, M; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Grant, D; Griffith, Z; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hansen, E; Hansmann, B; Hansmann, T; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hignight, J; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Holzapfel, K; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huber, M; Hultqvist, K; In, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Japaridze, G S; Jeong, M; Jero, K; Jones, B J P; Jurkovic, M; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Katz, U; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, J; Kheirandish, A; Kim, M; Kintscher, T; Kiryluk, J; Kittler, T; Klein, S R; Kohnen, G; Koirala, R; Kolanoski, H; Konietz, R; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krings, K; Kroll, M; Krückl, G; Krüger, C; Kunnen, J; Kunwar, S; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larson, M J; Lauber, F; Lennarz, D; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leuner, J; Lu, L; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Mahn, K B M; Mancina, S; Mandelartz, M; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meier, M; Meli, A; Menne, T; Merino, G; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Moulai, M; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Neer, G; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Pollmann, A Obertacke; Olivas, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Pandya, H; Pankova, D V; Peiffer, P; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Quinnan, M; Raab, C; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Reimann, R; Relethford, B; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ryckbosch, D; Rysewyk, D; Sabbatini, L; Herrera, S E Sanchez; Sandrock, A; Sandroos, J; Sarkar, S; Satalecka, K; Schimp, M; Schlunder, P; Schmidt, T; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schumacher, L; Seckel, D; Seunarine, S; Soldin, D; Song, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stahlberg, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Steuer, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Sutherland, M; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tatar, J; Tenholt, F; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Turcati, A; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vandenbroucke, J; van Eijndhoven, N; Vanheule, S; van Rossem, M; van Santen, J; Veenkamp, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallace, A; Wallraff, M; Wandkowsky, N; Weaver, Ch; Weiss, M J; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wickmann, S; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wille, L; Williams, D R; Wills, L; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woolsey, E; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zoll, M

    2016-01-01

    The IceCube Collaboration has previously discovered a high-energy astrophysical neutrino flux using neutrino events with interaction vertices contained within the instrumented volume of the IceCube detector. We present a complementary measurement using charged current muon neutrino events where the interaction vertex can be outside this volume. As a consequence of the large muon range the effective area is significantly larger but the field of view is restricted to the Northern Hemisphere. IceCube data from 2009 through 2015 have been analyzed using a likelihood approach based on the reconstructed muon energy and zenith angle. At the highest neutrino energies between 191 TeV and 8.3 PeV a significant astrophysical contribution is observed, excluding a purely atmospheric origin of these events at $5.6\\,\\sigma$ significance. The data are well described by an isotropic, unbroken power law flux with a normalization at 100 TeV neutrino energy of $\\left(0.90^{+0.30}_{-0.27}\\right)\\times10^{-18}\\,\\mathrm{GeV^{-1}\\,c...

  19. Measurement of the atmospheric muon depth intensity relation with the NEMO Phase-2 tower

    OpenAIRE

    Aiello, S.; Ameli, F.; Anghinolfi, M.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Beverini, N.(INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa, Italy); Biagi, S.; Bouhadef, B.; Bozza, C.; Cacopardo, G.; M. Calamai; Calì, C.; A. Capone; Caruso, F.

    2014-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the data collected with the NEMO Phase-2 tower, deployed at 3500 m depth about 80 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy), are presented. Cherenkov photons detected with the photomultipliers tubes were used to reconstruct the tracks of atmospheric muons. Their zenith-angle distribution was measured and the results compared with Monte Carlo simulations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is also include...

  20. Time calibration with atmospheric muon tracks in the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bogazzi, C.; Bormuth, R.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Dumas, A.; Eberl, T.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fermani, P.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herrero, A.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, S.; Mathieu, A.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tönnis, C.; Turpin, D.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Visser, E.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2016-05-01

    The ANTARES experiment consists of an array of photomultipliers distributed along 12 lines and located deep underwater in the Mediterranean Sea. It searches for astrophysical neutrinos collecting the Cherenkov light induced by the charged particles, mainly muons, produced in neutrino interactions around the detector. Since at energies of ∼10 TeV the muon and the incident neutrino are almost collinear, it is possible to use the ANTARES detector as a neutrino telescope and identify a source of neutrinos in the sky starting from a precise reconstruction of the muon trajectory. To get this result, the arrival times of the Cherenkov photons must be accurately measured. A to perform time calibrations with the precision required to have optimal performances of the instrument is described. The reconstructed tracks of the atmospheric muons in the ANTARES detector are used to determine the relative time offsets between photomultipliers. Currently, this method is used to obtain the time calibration constants for photomultipliers on different lines at a precision level of 0.5 ns. It has also been validated for calibrating photomultipliers on the same line, using a system of LEDs and laser light devices.

  1. Effect of muon-nuclear inelastic scattering on high-energy atmospheric muon spectrum at large depth underwater

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Lokhtin, K S; Takahashi, N

    2007-01-01

    The energy spectra of hadron cascade showers produced by the cosmic ray muons travelling through water as well as the muon energy spectra underwater at the depth up to 4 km are calculated with two models of muon inelastic scattering on nuclei, the recent hybrid model (two-component, 2C) and the well-known generalized ector-meson-dominance model for the comparison. The 2C model involves photonuclear interactions at low and moderate virtualities as well as the hard scattering including the weak neutral current processes. For the muon scattering off nuclei substantial uclear effects, shadowing, nuclear binding and Fermi motion of nucleons are taken into account. It is shown that deep nderwater muon energy spectrum calculated with the 2C model are noticeably distorted at energies above 100 TeV as compared to that obtained with the GVMD model.

  2. Measurement of the atmospheric muon depth intensity relation with the NEMO Phase-2 tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, S.; Ameli, F.; Anghinolfi, M.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Bouhadef, B.; Bozza, C.; Cacopardo, G.; Calamai, M.; Calí, C.; Capone, A.; Caruso, F.; Ceres, A.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Cocimano, R.; Coniglione, R.; Costa, M.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amico, A.; De Bonis, G.; De Luca, V.; Deniskina, N.; De Rosa, G.; Di Capua, F.; Distefano, C.; Fermani, P.; Flaminio, V.; Fusco, L. A.; Garufi, F.; Giordano, V.; Gmerk, A.; Grasso, R.; Grella, G.; Hugon, C.; Imbesi, M.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Leismueller, K. P.; Leonora, E.; Litrico, P.; Lonardo, A.; Longhitano, F.; Lo Presti, D.; Maccioni, E.; Margiotta, A.; Martini, A.; Masullo, R.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C. M.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Nicolau, C. A.; Orlando, A.; Papaleo, R.; Pellegrino, C.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pugliatti, C.; Pulvirenti, S.; Orselli, A.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Riccobene, G.; Rovelli, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Sciacca, V.; Sgura, I.; Simeone, F.; Sipala, V.; Speziale, F.; Spina, M.; Spitaleri, A.; Spurio, M.; Stellacci, S. M.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Trasatti, L.; Trovato, A.; Ventura, C.; Vicini, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.

    2015-06-01

    The results of the analysis of the data collected with the NEMO Phase-2 tower, deployed at 3500 m depth about 80 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy), are presented. Čerenkov photons detected with the photomultipliers tubes were used to reconstruct the tracks of atmospheric muons. Their zenith-angle distribution was measured and the results compared with Monte Carlo simulations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is also included. The associated depth intensity relation was evaluated and compared with previous measurements and theoretical predictions. With the present analysis, the muon depth intensity relation has been measured up to 13 km of water equivalent.

  3. Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial and atmospheric neutron flux: A lookup table

    CERN Document Server

    Overholt, Andrew; Atri, Dimitra

    2013-01-01

    Under current conditions, the cosmic ray spectrum incident on the Earth is dominated by particles with energies < 1 GeV. Astrophysical sources including high energy solar flares, supernovae and gamma ray bursts produce high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) with drastically higher energies. The Earth is likely episodically exposed to a greatly increased HECR flux from such events, some of which lasting thousands to millions of years. The air showers produced by HECRs ionize the atmosphere and produce harmful secondary particles such as muons and neutrons. Neutrons currently contribute a significant radiation dose at commercial passenger airplane altitude. With higher cosmic ray energies, these effects will be propagated to ground level. This work shows the results of Monte Carlo simulations quantifying the neutron flux due to high energy cosmic rays at various primary energies and altitudes. We provide here lookup tables that can be used to determine neutron fluxes from primaries with total energies 1 GeV - 1 PeV...

  4. Atmospheric deposition fluxes to Monetary Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, E.; Paytan, A.; Ryan, J.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition has been widely recognized as a source of pollutants and nutrients to coastal ecosystems. Specifically, deposition includes nitrogen compounds, sulfur compounds, mercury, pesticides, phosphate, trace metals and other toxic compounds that can travel great distances. Sources of these components include both natural (volcanoes, mineral dust, forest fires) and anthropogenic (fossil fuels, chemical byproducts, incineration of waste) sources, which may contribute to harmful health and environmental impacts such as eutrophication, contaminated fish and harmful algal blooms. This study looks at the flux of aerosol deposition (TSP - total suspended particle load) to Monterey Bay, California. Samples are collected on a cascade impactor aerosol sampler (size fractions PM 2.5 and PM 10) every 48 hours continuously. Preliminary results indicate that the TSP for PM 10 ranged from 0.026 to 0.104 mg m-3 of air and for PM 2.5 from 0.014 to 0.046 mg m-3 of air. Using a deposition velocity of 2 cm s-1 for the large fraction (PM10 - PM 2.5) and a deposition velocity of 0.7 cm s-1 for the fine fraction (PM 2.5) deposition rates are 13 and 86 mg m-2 d-1 respectively.

  5. High-energy neutrino fluxes and flavor ratio in the Earth atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovskaya, T S; Sinegovsky, S I

    2014-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos from decays of mesons, produced in collisions of cosmic-ray particles with air nuclei, form unavoidable background for detection of astrophysical neutrinos. More precise calculations of the high-energy neutrino spectrum are required since measurements in the IceCube experiment reach the intriguing energy range where a contribution of the prompt neutrinos and/or astrophysical ones should be uncovered. The calculation of muon and electron neutrino fluxes in the energy range 100 GeV - 10 PeV is performed for three hadronic models, QGSJET II, SIBYll 2.1 and Kimel & Mokhov, taking into consideration the "knee" of the cosmic-ray spectrum. All calculations are compared with the atmospheric neutrino measurements by Frejus, AMANDA, IceCube and ANTARES. The prompt neutrino flux predictions obtained with the quark-gluon string model (QGSM) for the charm production by Kaidalov & Piskunova do not contradict to the measurements and upper limits on the astrophysical muon neutrino flux obtained ...

  6. Measurement of the Muon Atmospheric Production Depth with the Water Cherenkov Detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Bueno, Laura [Univ. of Granada (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR) are particles of uncertain origin and composition, with energies above 1 EeV (1018 eV or 0.16 J). The measured flux of UHECR is a steeply decreasing function of energy. The largest and most sensitive apparatus built to date to record and study cosmic ray Extensive Air Showers (EAS) is the Pierre Auger Observatory. The Pierre Auger Observatory has produced the largest and finest amount of data ever collected for UHECR. A broad physics program is being carried out covering all relevant topics of the field. Among them, one of the most interesting is the problem related to the estimation of the mass composition of cosmic rays in this energy range. Currently the best measurements of mass are those obtained by studying the longitudinal development of the electromagnetic part of the EAS with the Fluorescence Detector. However, the collected statistics is small, specially at energies above several tens of EeV. Although less precise, the volume of data gathered with the Surface Detector is nearly a factor ten larger than the fluorescence data. So new ways to study composition with data collected at the ground are under investigation. The subject of this thesis follows one of those new lines of research. Using preferentially the time information associated with the muons that reach the ground, we try to build observables related to the composition of the primaries that initiated the EAS. A simple phenomenological model relates the arrival times with the depths in the atmosphere where muons are produced. The experimental confirmation that the distributions of muon production depths (MPD) correlate with the mass of the primary particle has opened the way to a variety of studies, of which this thesis is a continuation, with the aim of enlarging and improving its range of applicability. We revisit the phenomenological model which is at the root of the analysis and discuss a new way to improve some aspects of the model. We carry

  7. Comparison of Atmospheric Neutrino Flux Calculations at Low Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, T K; Kasahara, K; Lee, H; Midorikawa, S; Naumov, V; Stanev, T; Stanev, Todor

    1996-01-01

    We compare several different calculations of the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy range relevant for contained neutrino interactions, and we identify the major sources of difference among the calculations. We find nothing that would affect the predicted ratio of $\

  8. Leading nucleon and the hadronic flux in the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Bellandi, J; Dias de Deus, J

    1999-01-01

    We present in this paper a calculation of the hadronic flux in the atmosphere. Using an iterative leading particle model and the Glauber model, we relate the moment of the leading particle distribution in nucleon-air collisions with the respective one in nucleon-proton collisions. In this way, we obtain a description of the nucleonic and hadronic fluxes in the atmosphere. Contribution to the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference, Salt Lake City - Utah, August 1999 (HE 1.2.20).

  9. Ageostrophic Generalized E-P Flux in Baroclinic Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Shou-Ting; ZHANG Heng-De; LU Wei-Song

    2004-01-01

    @@ Aimed at limitation and deficiency of the traditional Eliassen-Palm (E-P) flux associated with wave-meanflow interaction and its subsequent generalization based on the Boussinesq approximation or quasi-geostrophic approximation, we develop an ageostrophic Generalized E-P flux in baroclinic stratified atmosphere. This generalized E-P flux can be conveniently used to diagnose and analyse some important phenomena related to wave-meanflow interaction of the baroclinic atmosphere with observational data, such as the upper-level jet acceleration, gravity wave breaking-up and stratospheric erupt warming.

  10. Seasonal modulations of the underground cosmic-ray muon energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parameters of the seasonal modulations in the intensity of muons and cosmogenic neutrons generated by them at a mean muon energy of 280 GeV have been determined in the LVD (Large Volume Detector) experiment. The modulations of muons and neutrons are caused by a temperature effect, the seasonal temperature and density variations of the upper atmospheric layers. The analysis performed here leads to the conclusion that the variations in the mean energy of the muon flux are the main source of underground cosmogenic neutron variations, because the energy of muons is more sensitive to the temperature effect than their intensity. The parameters of the seasonal modulations in the mean energy of muons and the flux of cosmogenic neutrons at the LVD depth have been determined from the data obtained over seven years of LVD operation

  11. Seasonal Modulations of the Underground Cosmic-Ray Muon Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Malgin, A S

    2016-01-01

    The parameters of the seasonal modulations (variations) in the intensity of muons and cosmogenic neutrons generated by them at a mean muon energy of 280 GeV have been determined in the LVD (Large Volume Detector) experiment. The modulations of muons and neutrons are caused by a temperature effect, the seasonal temperature and density variations of the upper atmospheric layers. The analysis performed here leads to the conclusion that the variations in the mean energy of the muon flux are the main source of underground cosmogenic neutron variations, because the energy of muons is more sensitive to the temperature effect than their intensity. The parameters of the seasonal modulations in the mean energy of muons and the flux of cosmogenic neutrons at the LVD depth have been determined from the data obtained over seven years of LVD operation.

  12. Neutron Monitors and muon detectors for solar modulation studies: Interstellar flux, yield function, and assessment of critical parameters in count rate calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Maurin, D; Derome, L; Ghelfi, A; Hubert, G

    2014-01-01

    Particles count rates at given Earth location and altitude result from the convolution of (i) the interstellar (IS) cosmic-ray fluxes outside the solar cavity, (ii) the time-dependent modulation of IS into Top-of-Atmosphere (TOA) fluxes, (iii) the rigidity cut-off (or geomagnetic transmission function) and grammage at the counter location, (iv) the atmosphere response to incoming TOA cosmic rays (shower development), and (v) the counter response to the various particles/energies in the shower. Count rates from neutron monitors or muon counters are therefore a proxy to solar activity. In this paper, we review all ingredients, discuss how their uncertainties impact count rate calculations, and how they translate into variation/uncertainties on the level of solar modulation $\\phi$ (in the simple Force-Field approximation). The main uncertainty for neutron monitors is related to the yield function. However, many other effects have a significant impact, at the 5-10% level on $\\phi$ values. We find no clear ranking...

  13. Volcanoes muon imaging using Cherenkov telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Catalano, Osvaldo; Mineo, Teresa; Cusumano, Giancarlo; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Pareschi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    A detailed understanding of a volcano inner structure is one of the key-points for the volcanic hazards evaluation. To this aim, in the last decade, geophysical radiography techniques using cosmic muon particles have been proposed. By measuring the differential attenuation of the muon flux as a function of the amount of rock crossed along different directions, it is possible to determine the density distribution of the interior of a volcano. Up to now, a number of experiments have been based on the detection of the muon tracks crossing hodoscopes, made up of scintillators or nuclear emulsion planes. Using telescopes based on the atmospheric Cherenkov imaging technique, we propose a new approach to study the interior of volcanoes detecting the Cherenkov light produced by relativistic cosmic-ray muons that survive after crossing the volcano. The Cherenkov light produced along the muon path is imaged as a typical annular pattern containing all the essential information to reconstruct particle direction and energ...

  14. Upper limits on the flux of underground muons from Cygnus X-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beginning in January 1985, the deep underground Large Area Scintillation Detector in the Homestake Mine has been searching for muons from Cygnus X-3; we have seen no excess signal with the characteristic 4.8 hour period from the direction of Cygnus X-3, with an upper limit below that of the NUSEX result. 8 figs; 10 refs

  15. Measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum with IceCube in the 79- and 86-String configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe, T.; Scheriau, F.; Schmitz, M.

    2016-04-01

    IceCube is a neutrino telescope with an instrumented volume of one cubic kilometer. A total of 5160 Digital Optical Modules (DOMs) is deployed on 86 strings forming a three dimensional detector array. Although primarily designed for the detection of neutrinos from astrophysical sources, the detector can be used for spectral measurements of atmospheric neutrinos. These spectral measurements are hindered by a dominant background of atmospheric muons. State-of-the-art techniques from Machine Learning and Data Mining are required to select a high-purity sample of atmospheric neutrino candidates. The energy spectrum of muon neutrinos is obtained from energy-dependent input variables by utilizing regularized unfolding. The results obtained using IceCube in the 79- and 86-string configuration are presented in this paper.

  16. An atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance measurement with the MINOS far detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogos, Jeremy Peter [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2007-12-01

    It is now widely accepted that the Standard Model assumption of massless neutrinos is wrong, due primarily to the observation of solar and atmospheric neutrino flavor oscillations by a small number of convincing experiments. The MINOS Far Detector, capable of observing both the outgoing lepton and associated showering products of a neutrino interaction, provides an excellent opportunity to independently search for an oscillation signature in atmospheric neutrinos. To this end, a MINOS data set from an 883 live day, 13.1 kt-yr exposure collected between July, 2003 and April, 2007 has been analyzed. 105 candidate charged current muon neutrino interactions were observed, with 120.5 ± 1.3 (statistical error only) expected in the absence of oscillation. A maximum likelihood analysis of the observed log(L/E) spectrum shows that the null oscillation hypothesis is excluded at over 96% confidence and that the best fit oscillation parameters are sin223 = 0.95 -0.32 and Δm$2\\atop{23}$ = 0.93$+3.94\\atop{ -0.44}$ x 10-3 eV2. This measurement of oscillation parameters is consistent with the best fit values from the Super-Kamiokande experiment at 68% confidence.

  17. An atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance measurement with the MINOS far detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogos, Jeremy Peter; /Minnesota U.

    2007-12-01

    It is now widely accepted that the Standard Model assumption of massless neutrinos is wrong, due primarily to the observation of solar and atmospheric neutrino flavor oscillations by a small number of convincing experiments. The MINOS Far Detector, capable of observing both the outgoing lepton and associated showering products of a neutrino interaction, provides an excellent opportunity to independently search for an oscillation signature in atmospheric neutrinos. To this end, a MINOS data set from an 883 live day, 13.1 kt-yr exposure collected between July, 2003 and April, 2007 has been analyzed. 105 candidate charged current muon neutrino interactions were observed, with 120.5 {+-} 1.3 (statistical error only) expected in the absence of oscillation. A maximum likelihood analysis of the observed log(L/E) spectrum shows that the null oscillation hypothesis is excluded at over 96% confidence and that the best fit oscillation parameters are sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} = 0.95{sub -0.32} and {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = 0.93{sub -0.44}{sup +3.94} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}. This measurement of oscillation parameters is consistent with the best fit values from the Super-Kamiokande experiment at 68% confidence.

  18. Three dimensional calculation of flux of low energy atmospheric neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.; Bludman, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Results of three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation of low energy flux of atmospheric neutrinos are presented and compared with earlier one-dimensional calculations 1,2 valid at higher neutrino energies. These low energy neutrinos are the atmospheric background in searching for neutrinos from astrophysical sources. Primary cosmic rays produce the neutrino flux peaking at near E sub=40 MeV and neutrino intensity peaking near E sub v=100 MeV. Because such neutrinos typically deviate by 20 approximately 30 from the primary cosmic ray direction, three-dimensional effects are important for the search of atmospheric neutrinos. Nevertheless, the background of these atmospheric neutrinos is negligible for the detection of solar and supernova neutrinos.

  19. Charge-Separated Atmospheric Neutrino-Induced Muons in the MINOS Far Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, P; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Avvakumov, S; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barish, B; Barnes, P D; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Beall, E; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bergfeld, T; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, B; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Border, P M; Bower, C; Buckley-Geer, E; Böhm, J; Böhnlein, D J; Cabrera, A; Chapman, J D; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Culling, A J; De Jong, J K; De Santo, A; Dierckxsens, M; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Drakoulakos, D; Durkin, T; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk-Harris, E; Feldman, G J; Fields, T H; Ford, R; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Giurgiu, G A; Godley, A; Gogos, J; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E W; Grossman, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hartouni, E P; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Holin, A; Howcroft, C; Hylen, J; Indurthy, D; Irwin, G M; Ishitsuka, M; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jenner, L; Jensen, D; Joffe-Minor, T; Kafka, T; Kang, H J; Kasahara, S M; Kim, M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kotelnikov, S K; Kreymer, A; Kumaratunga, S; Lang, K; Lebedev, A; Lee, R; Ling, 6J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Liu, J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marino, A D; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Meier, J R; Merzon, G I; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Milburn, R H; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mislivec, A; Miyagawa, P S; Moore, C D; Morfin, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Osiecki, T; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlovic, Z; Pearce, G F; Peck, C W; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Ping, H; Piteira, R; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Rahman, D; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Reyna, D E; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ruddick, K; Ryabov, V A; Saakyan, R; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Semenov, V K; Seun, S M; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Smirnitsky, V; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Symes, P A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tetteh-Lartey, E; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Trostin, I; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Verebryusov, V; Viren, B; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Webb, R C; Weber, A; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Wu, Q K; Yang, T; Yumiceva, F X; Zheng, H; Zois, M; Zwaska, R

    2007-01-01

    We found 140 neutrino-induced muons in 854.24 live days in the MINOS far detector. We looked for evidence of neutrino disappearance in this data set by computing the ratio of the number of low momentum muons to the sum of the number of high momentum and unknown momentum muons for both data and Monte Carlo expectation in the absence of neutrino oscillations. The ratio of data and Monte Carlo ratios is consistent with an oscillation signal. A fit to the data for the oscillation parameters excludes the null oscillation hypothesis at the 94% confidence level. We separated the muons by charge sign in both the data and Monte Carlo events and found the ratio of the total number of negative to positive muons in both samples. The ratio of those ratios is a test of CPT conservation. The result is consistent with CPT conservation.

  20. Determining neutrino oscillation parameters from atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of IceCube DeepCore data

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Brunner, J; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H -G; Sandroos, J; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zoll, M

    2014-01-01

    We present a measurement of neutrino oscillations via atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of data of the completed IceCube neutrino detector. DeepCore, a region of denser instrumentation, enables the detection and reconstruction of atmospheric muon neutrinos between 10\\,GeV and 100\\,GeV, where a strong disappearance signal is expected. The detector volume surrounding DeepCore is used as a veto region to suppress the atmospheric muon background. Neutrino events are selected where the detected Cherenkov photons of the secondary particles minimally scatter, and the neutrino energy and arrival direction are reconstructed. Both variables are used to obtain the neutrino oscillation parameters from the data, with the best fit given by $\\Delta m^2_{32}=2.72^{+0.19}_{-0.20}\\times 10^{-3}\\,\\mathrm{eV}^2$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{23} = 0.53^{+0.09}_{-0.12}$ (normal mass hierarchy assumed). The results are compatible and comparable in precision to those of dedicated oscillation experiments.

  1. Muon storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protons are accelerated to 103 GeV/c in the energy doubler/saver ring (ED/S). They are extracted, targeted, and pions are collected in the main ring at an energy of approximately 100 GeV/c. The pions decay (tau/sup π/sub lab/ at 100 GeV/c approximately equal to 20 μs), giving birth to a muon beam. This muon beam can be extracted or bumped onto an internal target. The number of muons expected is calculated. The large aperture of the ED/S may allow a time averaged flux of as high as 107 μ+/sec to be achieved

  2. Comparison of atmospheric neutrino flux calculations at low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaisser, T.K.; Honda, M.; Kasahara, K.; Lee, H.; Midorikawa, S.; Naumov, V.; Stanev, T. [Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)]|[Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Tanashi, Tokyo 188 (Japan)]|[Faculty of Engineering, Kanagawa University, Yokohama 221 (Japan)]|[Department of Physics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea)]|[Faculty of Engineering, Aomori University, Aomori 030 (Japan)]|[Instituto Nazionale de Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, Firenze I-50125 (Italy)

    1996-11-01

    We compare several different calculations of the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy range relevant for contained neutrino interactions, and we identify the major sources of difference among the calculations. We find nothing that would affect the predicted ratio of {nu}{sub {ital e}}/{nu}{sub {mu}}, which is nearly the same in all calculations. Significant differences in normalization arise primarily from different treatments of pion production by interactions of protons in the atmosphere. Different assumptions about the primary spectrum and treatments of the geomagnetic field are also of some importance. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Greenhouse gases regional fluxes estimated from atmospheric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    build up a new system to measure continuously CO2 (or CO), CH4, N2O and SF6 mixing ratios. It is based on a commercial gas chromatograph (Agilent 6890N) which have been modified to reach better precision. Reproducibility computed with a target gas on a 24 hours time step gives: 0.06 ppm for CO2, 1.4 ppb for CO, 0.7 ppb for CH4, 0.2 ppb for N2O and 0.05 ppt for SF6. The instrument's run is fully automated, an air sample analysis takes about 5 minutes. In July 2006, I install instrumentation on a telecommunication tall tower (200 m) situated near Orleans forest in Trainou, to monitor continuously greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6), atmospheric tracers (CO, Radon-222) and meteorological parameters. Intake lines were installed at 3 levels (50, 100 and 180 m) and allow us to sample air masses along the vertical. Continuous measurement started in January 2007. I used Mace Head (Ireland) and Gif-sur-Yvette continuous measurements to estimate major greenhouse gases emission fluxes at regional scale. To make the link between atmospheric measurements and surface fluxes, we need to quantify dilution due to atmospheric transport. I used Radon-222 as tracer (radon tracer method) and planetary boundary layer heights estimates from ECMWF model (boundary layer budget method) to parameterize atmospheric transport. In both cases I compared results to available emission inventories. (author)

  4. Limits for the fluxes of non-conventional particles in muon showers underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A search for non-conventional massive particles was carried out with the Mt. Cappuccini spark chamber array, by a study of the interactions initiated in the chamber absorbers. Neither an excess of large electro-magnetic cascades, nor an excess of large-angle scattering events was found. Likewise no difference was seen between the interaction features of prompt and of delayed shower particles. The estimated upper limits of the underground fluxes are not or barely consistent with the assumptions of the mandela or passive X-particle hypotheses; zero fluxes appear most likely. (orig./BJ)

  5. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio at TeV energies with the MINOS detector

    OpenAIRE

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D. J.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barnes, JR; Falk Harris, E; Harris, P.G.; Hartnell, J.; Symes, P. A.; et al, ...

    2007-01-01

    The 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking charge-separated cosmic ray muon data since the beginning of August, 2003 at a depth of 2070 meters-water-equivalent in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. The data with both forward and reversed magnetic field running configurations were combined to minimize systematic errors in the determination of the underground muon charge ratio. When averaged, two independent analyses find the charge ratio underground to be 1.374 +/- 0.004 (...

  6. Atmospheric neutrinos and neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results on the composition of atmospheric neutrinos interacting in underground detectors and on the rate of atmospheric muon neutrino interactions in the earth surrounding the detectors are reviewed. So far, systematic errors on the neutrino flux and on the electrons and muons neutrino interaction identifications are not yet reliable enough to prove that atmospheric neutrinos oscillate before being detected. (author) 22 refs., 5 figs

  7. Solar Flux Deposition And Heating Rates In Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2009-09-01

    We discuss here the solar downward net flux in the 0.25 - 2.5 µm range in the atmosphere of Jupiter and the associated heating rates under a number of vertical cloud structure scenarios focusing in the effect of clouds and hazes. Our numerical model is based in the doubling-adding technique to solve the radiative transfer equation and it includes gas absorption by CH4, NH3 and H2, in addition to Rayleigh scattering by a mixture of H2 plus He. Four paradigmatic Jovian regions have been considered (hot-spots, belts, zones and Polar Regions). The hot-spots are the most transparent regions with downward net fluxes of 2.5±0.5 Wm-2 at the 6 bar level. The maximum solar heating is 0.04±0.01 K/day and occurs above 1 bar. Belts and zones characterization result in a maximum net downward flux of 0.5 Wm-2 at 2 bar and 0.015 Wm-2 at 6 bar. Heating is concentrated in the stratospheric and tropospheric hazes. Finally, Polar Regions are also explored and the results point to a considerable stratospheric heating of 0.04±0.02 K/day. In all, these calculations suggest that the role of the direct solar forcing in the Jovian atmospheric dynamics is limited to the upper 1 - 2 bar of the atmosphere except in the hot-spot areas. Acknowledgments: This work has been funded by Spanish MEC AYA2006-07735 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07.

  8. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Measurement of atmospheric production depth

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides information about the longitudinal development of the muonic component of extensive air showers. Using the timing information from the flash analog-to-digital converter traces of surface detectors far from the shower core, it is possible to reconstruct a muon production depth distribution. We characterize the goodness of this reconstruction for zenith angles around 60 deg. and different energies of the primary particle. From these distributions we define X(mu)max as the depth along the shower axis where the production of muons reaches maximum. We explore the potentiality of X(mu)max as a useful observable to infer the mass composition of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Likewise, we assess its ability to constrain hadronic interaction models.

  9. Measurement of the Atmospheric Muon Charge Ratio at TeV Energies with MINOS

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, P; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Avvakumov, S; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barish, B; Barnes, P D; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Beall, E; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bergfeld, T; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, B; Bock, G J; Böhm, J; Böhnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Border, P M; Bower, C; Buckley-Geer, E; Bungau, C; Cabrera, A; Chapman, J D; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Culling, A J; De Jong, J K; De Santo, A; Dierckxsens, M; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Drakoulakos, D; Durkin, T; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk-Harris, E; Feldman, G J; Fields, T H; Ford, R; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Giurgiu, G A; Godley, A; Gogos, J; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E W; Grossman, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hartouni, E P; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Holin, A; Howcroft, C; Hylen, J; Indurthy, D; Irwin, G M; Ishitsuka, M; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jenner, L; Jensen, D; Joffe-Minor, T; Kafka, T; Kang, H J; Kasahara, S M S; Kim, M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kotelnikov, S K; Kreymer, A; Kumaratunga, S; Lang, K; Lebedev, A; Lee, R; Ling, J; Liu, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marino, A D; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Meier, J R; Merzon, G I; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Milburn, R H; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mislivec, A; Miyagawa, P S; Moore, C D; Morfin, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Osiecki, T; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlovic, Z; Pearce, G F; Peck, C W; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Ping, H; Piteira, R; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Rahman, D; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Reyna, D E; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ruddick, K; Ryabov, V A; Saakyan, R; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Semenov, V K; Seun, S M; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Smirnitsky, V; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Symes, P A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tetteh-Lartey, E; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Trostin, I; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Velissaris, C; Verebryusov, V; Viren, B; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Wu, Q K; Yang, T; Yumiceva, F X; Zheng, H; Zois, M; Zwaska, R

    2007-01-01

    The 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking charge-separated cosmic ray muon data since the beginning of August, 2003 at a depth of 2070 meters-water-equivalent in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. The data with both forward and reversed magnetic field running configurations were combined to minimize systematic errors in the determination of the underground muon charge ratio. When averaged, two independent analyses find the charge ratio underground to be 1.374 +/- 0.004 (stat.) +0.012 -0.010(sys.). Using the map of the Soudan rock overburden, the muon momenta as measured underground were projected to the corresponding values at the surface in the energy range 1-7 TeV. Within this range of energies at the surface, the MINOS data are consistent with the charge ratio being energy independent at the two standard deviation level. When the MINOS results are compared with measurements at lower energies, a clear rise in the charge ratio in the energy range 0.3 -- 1.0 TeV is apparent. A qualitativ...

  10. Muons and Neutrinos 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K

    2008-01-01

    This paper is the written version of the rapporteur talk on Section HE-2, muons and neutrinos, presented at the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference, Merida, Yucatan, July 11, 2007. Topics include atmospheric muons and neutrinos, solar neutrinos and astrophysical neutrinos as well as calculations and instrumentation related to these topics.

  11. Prompt atmospheric neutrino fluxes: perturbative QCD models and nuclear effects

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Atri; Jeong, Yu Seon; Kim, C S; Reno, Mary Hall; Sarcevic, Ina; Stasto, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the prompt atmospheric neutrino flux at high energies using three different frameworks for calculating the heavy quark production cross section in QCD: NLO perturbative QCD, $k_T$ factorization including low-$x$ resummation, and the dipole model including parton saturation. We use QCD parameters, the value for the charm quark mass and the range for the factorization and renormalization scales that provide the best description of the total charm cross section measured at fixed target experiments, at RHIC and at LHC. Using these parameters we calculate differential cross sections for charm and bottom production and compare with the latest data on forward charm meson production from LHCb at $7$ TeV and at $13$ TeV, finding good agreement with the data. In addition, we investigate the role of nuclear shadowing by including nuclear parton distribution functions (PDF) for the target air nucleus using two different nuclear PDF schemes. Depending on the scheme used, we find the reduction of the flux due t...

  12. Linking evaporative fluxes from bare soil across surface viscous sublayer with the Monin-Obukhov atmospheric flux-profile estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Or, Dani

    2015-06-01

    The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) provides the theoretical basis for many "atmospheric-based" methods (such as eddy covariance and flux-profile methods) that are widely used for quantifying surface-atmosphere exchange processes. The turbulence driven and highly nonlinear profiles of momentum, air temperature, and vapor densities require complex resistance expressions applied to simple gradients deduced from a single or few height measurements. Notwithstanding the success of these atmospheric-based methods, they often leave a gap at the immediate vicinity of terrestrial surfaces where fluxes emanate. A complementary approach for quantifying surface fluxes relies on diffusive interactions across a viscous sublayer next to the surface, referred to as the "surface boundary layer (BL)" approach. This study (for bare soil) establishes formal links between these two approaches thereby offering a physically based lower boundary condition (BC) for flux-profile methods while improving the top BC for surface BL-based formulations to include atmospheric stability. The modified lower BC for flux-profile relationships links characteristics of drying evaporating surfaces considering nonlinearities between wetness and evaporative fluxes and obviates reliance on both profile measurements and empirical surface resistances. The revised top BC for surface BL methods greatly improves the agreement with published field-scale experimental measurements. The proposed reconciliation procedure improves estimation capabilities of both flux-profile and surface BL formulations, and considerably enhances their accuracy of flux estimation when applied theoretically (in the absence of measured profiles) to drying bare soil surfaces.

  13. Observation of seasonal variation of atmospheric multiple-muon events in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, P; Aurisano, A; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Castromonte, C M; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; de Jong, J K; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Holin, A; Huang, J; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGivern, C; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Sher, S Moed; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; Connor, J O; Orchanian, M; Osprey, S; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Perch, A; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Poonthottathil, N; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tian, X; Timmons, A; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2015-01-01

    We report the first observation of seasonal modulations in the rates of cosmic ray multiple-muon events at two underground sites, the MINOS Near Detector with an overburden of 225 mwe, and the MINOS Far Detector site at 2100 mwe. At the deeper site, multiple-muon events with muons separated by more than 8 m exhibit a seasonal rate that peaks during the summer, similar to that of single-muon events. In contrast and unexpectedly, the rate of multiple-muon events with muons separated by less than 5-8 m, and the rate of multiple-muon events in the smaller, shallower Near Detector, exhibit a seasonal rate modulation that peaks in the winter.

  14. Observation of seasonal variation of atmospheric multiple-muon events in the MINOS near and far detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). et al.

    2015-06-09

    We report the first observation of seasonal modulations in the rates of cosmic ray multiple-muon events at two underground sites, the MINOS Near Detector with an overburden of 225 mwe, and the MINOS Far Detector site at 2100 mwe. Thus, at the deeper site, multiple-muon events with muons separated by more than 8 m exhibit a seasonal rate that peaks during the summer, similar to that of single-muon events. In contrast and unexpectedly, the rate of multiple-muon events with muons separated by less than 5–8 m, and the rate of multiple-muon events in the smaller, shallower Near Detector, exhibit a seasonal rate modulation that peaks in the winter.

  15. Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with the NEMO Phase-1 detector

    OpenAIRE

    Aiello, S.; Ameli, F.; Amore, I.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anzalone, A.; Barbarino, G.; Battaglieri, M.; Bazzotti, M.; Bersani, A.; Beverini, N.(INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa, Italy); Biagi, S.; Bonori, M.; Bouhadef, B.; Brunoldi, M.; Cacopardo, G.

    2009-01-01

    The NEMO Collaboration installed and operated an underwater detector including prototypes of the critical elements of a possible underwater km3 neutrino telescope: a four-floor tower (called Mini-Tower) and a Junction Box. The detector was developed to test some of the main systems of the km3 detector, including the data transmission, the power distribution, the timing calibration and the acoustic positioning systems as well as to verify the capabilities of a single tridimensional detection s...

  16. Feasibility of using backscattered muons for archeological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Use of nondestructive methods to accurately locate and characterize underground objects such as rooms and tools found at archeological sites is ideal to preserve these historic sites. High-energy cosmic ray muons are very sensitive to density variation and have been used to image volcanoes and archeological sites such as the Egyptian and Mayan pyramids. Muons are subatomic particles produced in the upper atmosphere that penetrate the earth's crust up to few kilometers. Their absorption rate depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and the detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, muon tomography can resolve features to the sub-meter scale making it useful for this type of work. However, the muon detector must be placed below the target of interest. For imaging volcanoes, the upper portion is imaged when the detector is placed on the earth's surface at the volcano's base. For sites of interest beneath the ground surface, the muon detector would need to be placed below the site in a tunnel or borehole. Placing the detector underground can be costly and may disturb the historical site. We will assess the feasibility of imaging the subsurface using upward traveling muons, to eliminate the current constraint of positioning the detector below the target. This work consists of three parts 1) determine the backscattered flux rate from theory, 2) distinguish backscattered from forward scattered muons at the detector, and 3) validate the theoretical results with field experimentation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Muons and neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanev, T.

    1986-01-01

    The first generation of large and precise detectors, some initially dedicated to search for nucleon decay has accumulated significant statistics on neutrinos and high-energy muons. A second generation of even better and bigger detectors are already in operation or in advanced construction stage. The present set of experimental data on muon groups and neutrinos is qualitatively better than several years ago and the expectations for the following years are high. Composition studies with underground muon groups, neutrino detection, and expected extraterrestrial neutrino fluxes are discussed.

  18. Investigation of interactions of high energy muons using the electromagnetic calorimeter 'WILLI'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prompted by a number of recent large-scale experiments, approaching astrophysical questions, there is a current interest in the spectroscopy of high energy muons originating from the interactions of cosmic rays particles in the Earth atmosphere. They potentially provide signatures about some characteristics of Ultra High Energy interactions and of the nature of the primary particle. In order to study the feasibility and the actual problems of small and less expensive calorimeter type set-ups, a prototype of an electromagnetic calorimeter (WILLI) has been built up in NIPNE-HH Bucharest. The detector is made up by alternating 20 lead absorber plates with scintillators, the latter viewed by photomultipliers placed in opposite corners to maximize light collection and minimized the position dependence of the signal. High energy muons can be generated by electromagnetic interaction secondary particles, which initiate electromagnetic cascades. The longitudinal profile of such showers will be sampled by the number and energies of the secondary particles. With the Maximum Likelihood Method, one can estimate the energy of the muon. Moreover, the primary information can serve as input for non-parametric statistical methods (Bayes classification or Neural Networks). Using Monte-Carlo simulations the incoming muons can be classified. This study is related to the KASCADE experiment as possible extension of the detection capabilities. A more recent experimental study aimed at muons of lower energy, 1 GeV and less, which stop in the calorimeter and then decay. Because of the nuclear capture of stopped negative muons and the subsequent decrease in the mean life time, one can obtain for the ratio between positive and negative muons in the cosmic flux. This ratio shows an excess in positive muons. The muon charge ratio may serve as a test quantity of hadronic interaction models. At lower muon energies the muon charge ratio can be useful for the interpretation of neutrino detection

  19. Detection of Atmospheric Muon Neutrinos with the IceCube 9-String Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Achterberg, A; Adams, J; Ahrens, J; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bahcall, J N; Bai, X; Baret, B; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Becka, T; Becker, J K; Becker, K H; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Beimforde, M; Blaufuss, E; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bolmont, J; Boser, S; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Braun, J; Burgess, C; Burgess, T; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Davour, A; Day, C T; De Clercq, C; Demirors, L; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; De Young, T; Díaz-Veléz, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Duvoort, M R; Edwards, W R; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Ganugapati, R; Geenen, H; Gerhardt, L; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Gozzini, R; Griesel, T; Grullon, S; Gross, A; Gunasingha, R M; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Hardtke, D; Hardtke, R; Hart, J E; Hasegawa, Y; Hauschildt, T; Hays, D; Heise, J; Helbing, K; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, G C; Hodges, J; Hoffman, K D; Hommez, B; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Hughey, B; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hulss, J P; Hundertmark, S; Inaba, M; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Jones, A; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kawai, H; Kelley, J L; Kislat, F; Kitamura, N; Klein, S R; Klepser, S; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Kühn, K; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Lauer, R; Leich, H; Leier, D; Liubarsky, I; Lundberg, J; Lunemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McCauley, T; McParland, C P; Meagher, K; Meli, A; Messarius, T; Mészáros, P; Miyamoto, H; Mokhtarani, A; Montaruli, T; Morey, A; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Munich, K; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ogelman, H; Olivas, A; Patton, S; Peña-Garay, C; Perez de los Heros, C; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Pretz, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Razzaque, S; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Robbins, S; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Rutledge, D; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H G; Sarkar, S; Satalecka, K; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Smith, A J; Song, C; Sopher, J E; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoufer, M C; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sulanke, K H; Sullivan, G W; Sumner, T J; Taboada, I; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Thollander, L; Tilav, S; Tluczykont, M; Toale, P A; Tosi, D; Turcan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; De Vries-Uiterweerd, G; Viscomi, V; Voigt, B; Wagner, W; Walck, C; Waldmann, H; Walter, M; Wang, Y R; Wendt, C; Wiebusch, C; Wikström, G; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; De Dios-Zornoza-Gomez, Juan

    2007-01-01

    The IceCube neutrino detector is a cubic kilometer TeV to PeV neutrino detector under construction at the geographic South Pole. The dominant population of neutrinos detected in IceCube is due to meson decay in cosmic-ray air showers. These atmospheric neutrinos are relatively well-understood and serve as a calibration and verification tool for the new detector. In 2006, the detector was approximately 10% completed, and we report on data acquired from the detector in this configuration. We observe an atmospheric neutrino signal consistent with expectations, demonstrating that the IceCube detector is capable of identifying neutrino events. In the first 137.4 days of livetime, 234 neutrino candidates were selected with an expectation of 211 +/- 76.1(syst.) +/- 14.5(stat.) events from atmospheric neutrinos.

  20. Detection of atmospheric muon neutrinos with the IceCube 9-string detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, A.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Ahrens, J.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baret, B.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Beattie, K.; Becka, T.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Beimforde, M.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bolmont, J.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Braun, J.; Burgess, C.; Burgess, T.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Davour, A.; Day, C. T.; de Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; De Young, T.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Duvoort, M. R.; Edwards, W. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geenen, H.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Gozzini, R.; Griesel, T.; Grullon, S.; Groß, A.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, D.; Hardtke, R.; Hart, J. E.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hauschildt, T.; Hays, D.; Heise, J.; Helbing, K.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hill, G. C.; Hodges, J.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hommez, B.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Hughey, B.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hundertmark, S.; Inaba, M.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Jones, A.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kawai, H.; Kelley, J. L.; Kislat, F.; Kitamura, N.; Klein, S. R.; Klepser, S.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Kuehn, K.; Labare, M.; Landsman, H.; Lauer, R.; Leich, H.; Leier, D.; Liubarsky, I.; Lundberg, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McCauley, T.; McParland, C. P.; Meagher, K.; Meli, A.; Messarius, T.; Mészáros, P.; Miyamoto, H.; Mokhtarani, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morey, A.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Münich, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Olivas, A.; Patton, S.; Peña-Garay, C.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Pohl, A. C.; Porrata, R.; Pretz, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Razzaque, S.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Robbins, S.; Roth, P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Rutledge, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Smith, A. J.; Song, C.; Sopher, J. E.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoufer, M. C.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sumner, T. J.; Taboada, I.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Tluczykont, M.; Toale, P. A.; Tosi, D.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; Viscomi, V.; Voigt, B.; Wagner, W.; Walck, C.; Waldmann, H.; Walter, M.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wendt, C.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wikström, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, X. W.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zornoza, J. D.

    2007-07-01

    The IceCube neutrino detector is a cubic kilometer TeV to PeV neutrino detector under construction at the geographic South Pole. The dominant population of neutrinos detected in IceCube is due to meson decay in cosmic-ray air showers. These atmospheric neutrinos are relatively well understood and serve as a calibration and verification tool for the new detector. In 2006, the detector was approximately 10% completed, and we report on data acquired from the detector in this configuration. We observe an atmospheric neutrino signal consistent with expectations, demonstrating that the IceCube detector is capable of identifying neutrino events. In the first 137.4 days of live time, 234 neutrino candidates were selected with an expectation of 211±76.1(syst)±14.5(stat) events from atmospheric neutrinos.

  1. A new contribution to the conventional atmospheric neutrino flux

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are an important background to astrophysical neutrino searches, and are also of considerable interest in their own right. This paper points out that the contribution to conventional atmospheric $\

  2. Perturbations to aquatic photosynthesis due to high-energy cosmic ray induced muon flux in the extragalactic shock model

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Lien; Rodriguez, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    We modify a mathematical model of photosynthesis to quantify the perturbations that high energy muons could make on aquatic primary productivity. Then we apply this in the context of the extragalactic shock model, according to which Earth receives an enhanced dose of high-energy cosmic rays when it is at the galactic north. We obtain considerable reduction in the photosynthesis rates, consistent with potential drops in biodiversity.

  3. Quantifying the drivers of ocean-atmosphere CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Williams, Richard G.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    A mechanistic framework for quantitatively mapping the regional drivers of air-sea CO2 fluxes at a global scale is developed. The framework evaluates the interplay between (1) surface heat and freshwater fluxes that influence the potential saturated carbon concentration, which depends on changes in sea surface temperature, salinity and alkalinity, (2) a residual, disequilibrium flux influenced by upwelling and entrainment of remineralized carbon- and nutrient-rich waters from the ocean interior, as well as rapid subduction of surface waters, (3) carbon uptake and export by biological activity as both soft tissue and carbonate, and (4) the effect on surface carbon concentrations due to freshwater precipitation or evaporation. In a steady state simulation of a coarse-resolution ocean circulation and biogeochemistry model, the sum of the individually determined components is close to the known total flux of the simulation. The leading order balance, identified in different dynamical regimes, is between the CO2 fluxes driven by surface heat fluxes and a combination of biologically driven carbon uptake and disequilibrium-driven carbon outgassing. The framework is still able to reconstruct simulated fluxes when evaluated using monthly averaged data and takes a form that can be applied consistently in models of different complexity and observations of the ocean. In this way, the framework may reveal differences in the balance of drivers acting across an ensemble of climate model simulations or be applied to an analysis and interpretation of the observed, real-world air-sea flux of CO2.

  4. Neutrino oscillation effects in Soudan 2 upward-stopping muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upward-going stopping muons initiated by atmospheric νμ and νμ interactions in the rock below the Soudan 2 detector have been isolated, together with a companion sample of neutrino-induced single muons, created within the detector, which travel downwards and exit. The downward-going sample is consistent with the atmospheric-neutrino flux prediction, but the upward-going sample exhibits a sizable depletion. Both are consistent with previously reported Soudan 2 neutrino-oscillation results. Inclusion of the two samples in an all-event likelihood analysis, using recent 3D-atmospheric-neutrino-flux calculations, reduces both the allowed oscillation parameter region and the probability of the no-oscillation hypothesis

  5. Results from the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA)

    CERN Document Server

    Cowen, D F

    2003-01-01

    We show new results from both the older and newer incarnations of AMANDA (AMANDA-B10 and AMANDA-II, respectively). These results demonstrate that AMANDA is a functioning, multipurpose detector with significant physics and astrophysics reach. They include a new higher-statistics measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino flux and preliminary results from searches for a variety of sources of ultrahigh energy neutrinos: generic point sources, gamma-ray bursters and diffuse sources producing muons in the detector, and diffuse sources producing electromagnetic or hadronic showers in or near the detector.

  6. Check of the accuracy of the relativity theory with atmospheric muon neutrinos from the AMANDA data of the years 2000 to 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric neutrinos allow one to test the principles of the Theory of Relativity in particular Lorentz invariance and the equivalence principle. Small deviations from these principles could lead, according to some theories, to detectable neutrino oscillations. Such oscillation effects are analysed in this thesis, using the data collected by the AMANDA detector. The neutrino telescope AMANDA is located at the South Pole and embedded in the Antarctic ice shield at a depth between 1500 m and 2000 m. AMANDA detects muon neutrinos via the Cherenkov light of neutrino induced muons allowing the reconstruction of the original neutrino direction. From the data of the years 2000 to 2003, which contain about seven billion recorded events and which mainly consist of the background of atmospheric muons, a sample of 3401 neutrino induced events has been selected. No indication for alternative oscillation effects has been found. For maximal mixing angles, a lower limit for parameters which violate Lorentz invariance or the equivalence principle could be set to Δβ(2 vertical stroke φ vertical stroke Δγ)≤5.15.10-27. (orig)

  7. Fluxes and Mixing Processes in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Erik Olof

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric models are strongly dependent on the turbulent exchange of momentum, sensible heat and moisture (latent heat) at the surface. Oceans cover about 70% of the Earth’s surface and understanding the processes that control air-sea exchange is of great importance in order to predict weather and climate. In the atmosphere, for instance, hurricane development, cyclone intensity and track depend on these processes. Ocean waves constitute an obvious example of air-sea interaction and can cau...

  8. Statistical study of emerging flux regions and the response of the upper atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Zhao; Hui Li

    2012-01-01

    We statistically study the properties of emerging flux regions (EFRs) and response of the upper solar atmosphere to the flux emergence using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory.Parameters including total emerged flux,flux growth rate,maximum area,duration of the emergence and separation speed of the opposite polarities are adopted to delineate the properties of EFRs.The response of the upper atmosphere is addressed by the response of the atmosphere at different wavelengths (and thus at different temperatures).According to our results,the total emerged fluxes are in the range of (0.44-11.2)× 1019 Mx while the maximum area ranges from 17 to 182 arcsec2.The durations of the emergence are between 1 and 12 h,which are positively correlated to both the total emerged flux and the maximum area.The maximum distances between the opposite polarities are 7-25 arcsec and are also positively correlated to the duration.The separation speeds are from 0.05 to 1.08 km S-1,negatively correlated to the duration.The derived flux growth rates are (0.1-1.3) × 1019 Mxh-1,which are positively correlated to the total emerging flux.The upper atmosphere first responds to the flux emergence in the 1600(A) chromospheric line,and then tens to hundreds of seconds later,in coronal lines,such as the 171(A) (T = 105.8 K) and 211(A)(T = 106.3 K) lines almost simultaneously,suggesting the successive heating of the atmosphere from the chromosphere to the corona.

  9. Muon signature in the CAT imaging telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CAT imaging telescope is sensitive to the Cherenkov light emitted in the atmosphere and thus it is sensitive to a substantial flux of hard muons (E ≥ 5 GeV). A detailed study of these events will help to both calibrate the instrument and to understand the background that they represent in the search for gamma-ray showers. Resorting to simulated events the paper illustrates the use of the muon image reconstruction methods. This consist in fitting a circle on the pixels touched in the chamber by taking into account the muon impact parameter and the dN/dφ. The fitting method contains a parameter r which is the ratio between the number of detected photoelectrons and the number expected from the ring geometry. Besides the effort devoted to the reconstruction procedures we have put into operation two muon detectors. Each of them is composed of a tightly sealed can containing two fast photomultipliers to detect the Cherenkov light locally emitted. A coincidence signal from the two fast photomultipliers indicates the passage of a particle with the threshold higher than the Cherenkov one and gives a signal which is recorded with the telescope data. One of the detectors is mounted on the imaging telescope while the other one is nearby and can be moved in order to catch different values of the ρ/R (the ratio of the distance separating the mirror center and the muon impact location to the mirror radius). Due to this data analysis we are now really able to study the amount of the collected light as well as the observed muon counting rate

  10. Dual Nature of Heat Flux in Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P.; Sharan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The behavior of heat flux (H) with respect to the stability parameter (ζ) in stable surface layer (SSL) is analyzed with in the framework of Monin-Obukhov similarity (MOS) theory. The analytical expressions of H are obtained as functions of wind speed (U) and wind shear (dU/dz) using the linear similarity functions and accordingly two cases, (i) U = δ (constant) and (ii) dU/dz = δ are considered. The mathematical analysis shows that the magnitude of H increases with ζ till it attains a maximum value at ζ =ζc and then starts decreasing with increasing stability suggesting the dual characteristic of heat flux with stability parameter. The point of maximum heat flux is found to be dependent on the roughness length (z0) as well as the height above the surface. An attempt has been made to analyze the sensitivity of this dual characteristic of H with ζ using the non-linear similarity functions. The analysis shows that the dual nature of H persists in the case of linear as well as non-linear similarity functions. However, the point of extremum appears to be dependent on the nature of the similarity functions. Turbulent data over a tropical site Ranchi (India) is analyzed to validate the observed nature of H with the theoretical nature as predicted by MOS. The analysis of observational data reveals the non-existence of any preferred stability state in SSL as speculated by Wang and Bras (2010, 2011) and supports the conclusions of Malhi 1995, Derbyshire 1999, van de Wiel et al. 2007, Basu et al. 2008, and van de Wiel et al. 2011. Thus, the non-uniqueness of MOS equations does not appear to be a mathematical artifact and it is consistent with the observations as far as the nature of heat flux with respect to stability parameter in SSL is concerned.

  11. Variability of Atmospheric CO2 Over India and Surrounding Oceans and Control by Surface Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, R. K.; Dadhwal, V. K.; Majumdar, A.; Patel, N. R.; Dutt, C. B. S.

    2011-08-01

    In the present study, seasonal and inter-annual variability of atmospheric CO2 concentration over India and surrounding oceans during 2002-2010 derived from Atmospheric InfrarRed Sounder observation and their relation with the natural flux exchanges over terrestrial Indian and surrounding oceans were analyzed. The natural fluxes over the terrestrial Indian in the form of net primary productivity (NPP) were simulated based on a terrestrial biosphere model governed by time varying climate parameters (solar radiation, air temperature, precipitation etc) and satellite greenness index together with the land use land cover and soil attribute maps. The flux exchanges over the oceans around India (Tropical Indian Ocean: TIO) were calculated based on a empirical model of CO2 gas dissolution in the oceanic water governed by time varying upper ocean parameters such as gradient of partial pressure of CO2 between ocean and atmosphere, winds, sea surface temperature and salinity. Comparison between the variability of atmospheric CO2 anomaly with the anomaly of surface fluxes over India and surrounding oceans suggests that biosphere uptake over India and oceanic uptake over the south Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of seasonal variability of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate. On inter-annual scale, flux exchanges over the tropical north Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate.

  12. VARIABILITY OF ATMOSPHERIC CO2 OVER INDIA AND SURROUNDING OCEANS AND CONTROL BY SURFACE FLUXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Nayak

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, seasonal and inter-annual variability of atmospheric CO2 concentration over India and surrounding oceans during 2002–2010 derived from Atmospheric InfrarRed Sounder observation and their relation with the natural flux exchanges over terrestrial Indian and surrounding oceans were analyzed. The natural fluxes over the terrestrial Indian in the form of net primary productivity (NPP were simulated based on a terrestrial biosphere model governed by time varying climate parameters (solar radiation, air temperature, precipitation etc and satellite greenness index together with the land use land cover and soil attribute maps. The flux exchanges over the oceans around India (Tropical Indian Ocean: TIO were calculated based on a empirical model of CO2 gas dissolution in the oceanic water governed by time varying upper ocean parameters such as gradient of partial pressure of CO2 between ocean and atmosphere, winds, sea surface temperature and salinity. Comparison between the variability of atmospheric CO2 anomaly with the anomaly of surface fluxes over India and surrounding oceans suggests that biosphere uptake over India and oceanic uptake over the south Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of seasonal variability of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate. On inter-annual scale, flux exchanges over the tropical north Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate.

  13. Magnetohydrostatic Equilibrium. II. Three-dimensional Multiple Open Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Stratified Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, F. A.; Fedun, V.; Erdélyi, R.

    2014-07-01

    A system of multiple open magnetic flux tubes spanning the solar photosphere and lower corona is modeled analytically, within a realistic stratified atmosphere subject to solar gravity. This extends results for a single magnetic flux tube in magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, described in Gent et al. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes are combined to form magnetic structures, which are consistent with high-resolution observations. The observational evidence supports the existence of strands of open flux tubes and loops persisting in a relatively steady state. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes, for which an analytic solution to the plasma density and pressure distribution is possible, are combined. We calculate the appropriate balancing forces, applying to the equations of momentum and energy conservation to preserve equilibrium. Multiplex flux tube configurations are observed to remain relatively stable for up to a day or more, and it is our aim to apply our model as the background condition for numerical studies of energy transport mechanisms from the solar surface to the corona. We apply magnetic field strength, plasma density, pressure, and temperature distributions consistent with observational and theoretical estimates for the lower solar atmosphere. Although each flux tube is identical in construction apart from the location of the radial axis, combinations can be applied to generate a non-axisymmetric magnetic field with multiple non-uniform flux tubes. This is a considerable step forward in modeling the realistic magnetized three-dimensional equilibria of the solar atmosphere.

  14. Summary of Working Group 4 - Intense Muon Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various topics of muon physics were discussed in the Working Group 4 (WG4) of the NuFact04 workshop. This summary will survey various lepton flavor violation (LFV) studies and high precision measurement that could be benefited from higher fluxes of muon beams. Also discussed were muon's applications and future prospects for intense muon beams

  15. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses...

  16. Volcanoes muon imaging using Cherenkov telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, O.; Del Santo, M.; Mineo, T.; Cusumano, G.; Maccarone, M. C.; Pareschi, G.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of a volcano inner structure is one of the key-points for the volcanic hazards evaluation. To this aim, in the last decade, geophysical radiography techniques using cosmic muon particles have been proposed. By measuring the differential attenuation of the muon flux as a function of the amount of rock crossed along different directions, it is possible to determine the density distribution of the interior of a volcano. Up to now, a number of experiments have been based on the detection of the muon tracks crossing hodoscopes, made up of scintillators or nuclear emulsion planes. Using telescopes based on the atmospheric Cherenkov imaging technique, we propose a new approach to study the interior of volcanoes detecting of the Cherenkov light produced by relativistic cosmic-ray muons that survive after crossing the volcano. The Cherenkov light produced along the muon path is imaged as a typical annular pattern containing all the essential information to reconstruct particle direction and energy. Our new approach offers the advantage of a negligible background and an improved spatial resolution. To test the feasibility of our new method, we have carried out simulations with a toy-model based on the geometrical parameters of ASTRI SST-2M, i.e. the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope currently under installation onto the Etna volcano. Comparing the results of our simulations with previous experiments based on particle detectors, we gain at least a factor of 10 in sensitivity. The result of this study shows that we resolve an empty cylinder with a radius of about 100 m located inside a volcano in less than 4 days, which implies a limit on the magma velocity of 5 m/h.

  17. Multi-year Estimates of Methane Fluxes in Alaska from an Atmospheric Inverse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. M.; Commane, R.; Chang, R. Y. W.; Miller, C. E.; Michalak, A. M.; Dinardo, S. J.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Hartery, S.; Karion, A.; Lindaas, J.; Sweeney, C.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate methane fluxes across Alaska over a multi-year period using observations from a three-year aircraft campaign, the Carbon Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE). Existing estimates of methane from Alaska and other Arctic regions disagree in both magnitude and distribution, and before the CARVE campaign, atmospheric observations in the region were sparse. We combine these observations with an atmospheric particle trajectory model and a geostatistical inversion to estimate surface fluxes at the model grid scale. We first use this framework to estimate the spatial distribution of methane fluxes across the state. We find the largest fluxes in the south-east and North Slope regions of Alaska. This distribution is consistent with several estimates of wetland extent but contrasts with the distribution in most existing flux models. These flux models concentrate methane in warmer or more southerly regions of Alaska compared to the estimate presented here. This result suggests a discrepancy in how existing bottom-up models translate wetland area into methane fluxes across the state. We next use the inversion framework to explore inter-annual variability in regional-scale methane fluxes for 2012-2014. We examine the extent to which this variability correlates with weather or other environmental conditions. These results indicate the possible sensitivity of wetland fluxes to near-term variability in climate.

  18. CO2 Flux Estimation Errors Associated with Moist Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazoo, N. C.; Denning, A. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Pawson, S.; Lokupitiya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Vertical transport by moist sub-grid scale processes such as deep convection is a well-known source of uncertainty in CO2 source/sink inversion. However, a dynamical link between vertical transport, satellite based retrievals of column mole fractions of CO2, and source/sink inversion has not yet been established. By using the same offline transport model with meteorological fields from slightly different data assimilation systems, we examine sensitivity of frontal CO2 transport and retrieved fluxes to different parameterizations of sub-grid vertical transport. We find that frontal transport feeds off background vertical CO2 gradients, which are modulated by sub-grid vertical transport. The implication for source/sink estimation is two-fold. First, CO2 variations contained in moist poleward moving air masses are systematically different from variations in dry equatorward moving air. Moist poleward transport is hidden from orbital sensors on satellites, causing a sampling bias, which leads directly to small but systematic flux retrieval errors in northern mid-latitudes. Second, differences in the representation of moist sub-grid vertical transport in GEOS-4 and GEOS-5 meteorological fields cause differences in vertical gradients of CO2, which leads to systematic differences in moist poleward and dry equatorward CO2 transport and therefore the fraction of CO2 variations hidden in moist air from satellites. As a result, sampling biases are amplified and regional scale flux errors enhanced, most notably in Europe (0.43+/-0.35 PgC /yr). These results, cast from the perspective of moist frontal transport processes, support previous arguments that the vertical gradient of CO2 is a major source of uncertainty in source/sink inversion.

  19. Magnetohydrostatic equilibrium. II. Three-dimensional multiple open magnetic flux tubes in the stratified solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Gent, Frederick A; Erd'elyi, Rebertus

    2014-01-01

    A system of multiple open magnetic flux tubes spanning the solar photosphere and lower corona is modelled analytically, within a realistic stratified atmosphere subject to solar gravity. This extends results for a single magnetic flux tube in magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, described in Gent et al. (MNRAS, 435, 689, 2013). Self-similar magnetic flux tubes are combined to form magnetic structures, which are consistent with high-resolution observations. The observational evidence supports the existence of strands of open flux tubes and loops persisting in a relatively steady state. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes, for which an analytic solution to the plasma density and pressure distribution is possible, are combined. We calculate the appropriate balancing forces, applying to the equations of momentum and energy conservation to preserve equilibrium. Multiplex flux tube configurations are observed to remain relatively stable for up to a day or more, and it is our aim to apply our model as the background conditi...

  20. Assessing the impact of crops on regional CO{sub 2} fluxes and atmospheric concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbin, K. D. (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Marine and Atmospheric Research, Aspendale (Australia)), e-mail: katherine.corbin@csiro.au; Denning, A. S.; Lokupitiya, E. Y.; Schuh, A. E.; Baker, I. T. (Dept. of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)); Miles, N. L.; Davis, K. J.; Richardson, S. (Dept. of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

    2010-11-15

    Human conversion of natural ecosystems to croplands modifies not only the exchange of water and energy between the surface and the atmosphere, but also carbon fluxes. To investigate the impacts of crops on carbon fluxes and resulting atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations in the mid-continent region of the United States, we coupled a crop-specific phenology and physiology scheme for corn, soybean and wheat to the coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model SiB3-RAMS. Using SiBcrop-RAMS improved carbon fluxes at the local scale and had regional impacts, decreasing the spring uptake and increasing the summer uptake over the mid-continent. The altered fluxes changed the mid-continent atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration field at 120 m compared to simulations without crops: concentrations increased in May and decreased >20 ppm during July and August, summer diurnal cycle amplitudes increased, synoptic variability correlations improved and the gradient across the mid-continent region increased. These effects combined to reduce the squared differences between the model and high-precision tower CO{sub 2} concentrations by 20%. Synoptic transport of the large-scale N-S gradient caused significant day-to-day variability in concentration differences measured between the towers. This simulation study shows that carbon exchange between crops and the atmosphere significantly impacts regional CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations

  1. The sensitivity of Titan's current atmosphere to variations in solar EUV flux and implications for the evolution of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandt, K.; Bell, J. M.; Waite, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    K. E. Mandt, J. Bell, J. H. Waite, Jr. Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX Stable isotope ratios are an important tool for tracing the evolution of an atmosphere. By carefully evaluating processes that fractionate the isotopes (e.g. escape and photochemistry), the inventory of a constituent can be tracked over geological time scales. For Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, the 14N/15N in N2 and the 12C/13C in CH4 can be used to constrain the initial size of the atmosphere and the amount of time that has passed since the current inventory of methane began outgassing into the atmosphere (see Lunine et al. [1999] and Mandt et al. [2009]). Because the processes that fractionate the isotopes are directly tied to the amount of solar EUV/UV energy deposited in the upper atmosphere, it is important to understand the sensitivity of the atmosphere to varying solar EUV flux. On short time scales, the EUV flux can vary by as much as a factor of two during the eleven-year solar cycle. On geologic time scales, the solar EUV flux is believed to have been about 2.5 times greater than the current flux about 2.5 billion years ago, and 6 times the current flux 3.5 billion years ago [Ribas et al. 2005]. Using a 1D version of the 3D Titan Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (T-GITM), we will explore the impact of the eleven-year solar cycle variations on Titan’s upper atmosphere, focusing on the key fractionating processes of photochemistry and escape. We will then discuss the implications of these results for modeling the evolution of the atmosphere over geological time scales. Lunine, J. I., Y. L. Yung and R. D. Lorenz, 1999. On the volatile inventory of Titan from isotopic abundances in nitrogen and methane. Planetary and Space Science, 47, 1291-1303. Mandt, K. E., J. H. Waite, Jr., B. A. Magee, J. Bell, J. Lunine, O. Mousis, D. Cordier, 2009, Isotopic evolution of Titan’s main atmospheric constituents, Planetary and Space Science, 57, 1917-1930. Ribas, I., E. F. Guinan

  2. Measurement of the atmospheric neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Duvoort, M R; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Geisler, M; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hülß, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K -H; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kemming, N; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kuehn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lehmann, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Matusik, M; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, A R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nießen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Prikockis, M; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Singh, K; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, B T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Turčan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Voge, M; Voigt, B; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wikström, G; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P

    2010-01-01

    A measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV was performed using a data sample of about 18,000 up-going atmospheric muon neutrino events in IceCube. Boosted decision trees were used for event selection to reject mis-reconstructed atmospheric muons and obtain a sample of up-going muon neutrino events. Background contamination in the final event sample is less than one percent. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos up to 400 TeV, and is fundamental to understanding the impact of this neutrino background on astrophysical neutrino observations with IceCube. The measured spectrum is consistent with predictions for the atmospheric muon neutrino plus muon antineutrino flux.

  3. Measurement of the Atmospheric $\

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose1, D; Boser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegard, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glusenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Gora, D; Grant, D; Gross, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klas, J; Klein, S R; Kohne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Kopke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lunemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Meszaros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Perez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Radel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schoneberg, S; Schonherr, L; Schonwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoss, A; Strahler, E A; Strom, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge1, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    We report the first observation in a high energy neutrino telescope of cascades induced by atmospheric electron neutrinos and by neutral current interactions of atmospheric neutrinos of all flavors. Using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low energy extension, a sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data. The number of observed cascades is $N_{\\rm cascade} = 496 \\pm 66 (stat.) \\pm 88(syst.)$ and the rest of the sample consists of residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is determined in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV and is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos.

  4. Muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity micro+micro-colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed

  5. Muon colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sessler, A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Skrinsky, A. [BINP, RU-630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {micro}{sup +}{micro}{sup {minus}}colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  6. Inverse estimation of radon flux distribution for East Asia using measured atmospheric radon concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, S; Hayashi, R; Moriizumi, J; Yamazawa, H; Tohjima, Y; Mukai, H

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the (222)Rn flux density distribution at surface was estimated in East Asia with the Bayesian synthesis inversion using measurement data and a long-range atmospheric (222)Rn transport model. Surface atmospheric (222)Rn concentrations measured at Hateruma Island in January 2008 were used. The estimated (222)Rn flux densities were generally higher than the prior ones. The area-weighted mean (222)Rn flux density for East Asia in January 2008 was estimated to be 44.0 mBq m(-2) s(-1). The use of the estimated (222)Rn flux density improved the discrepancy of the model-calculated concentrations with the measurements at Hateruma Island.

  7. Precipitation of energetic neutral atoms and induced non-thermal escape fluxes from the Martian atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewkow, N. R.; Kharchenko, V. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The precipitation of energetic neutral atoms, produced through charge exchange collisions between solar wind ions and thermal atmospheric gases, is investigated for the Martian atmosphere. Connections between parameters of precipitating fast ions and resulting escape fluxes, altitude-dependent energy distributions of fast atoms and their coefficients of reflection from the Mars atmosphere, are established using accurate cross sections in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Distributions of secondary hot (SH) atoms and molecules, induced by precipitating particles, have been obtained and applied for computations of the non-thermal escape fluxes. A new collisional database on accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections, required for description of the energy-momentum transfer in collisions of precipitating particles and production of non-thermal atmospheric atoms and molecules, is reported with analytic fitting equations. Three-dimensional MC simulations with accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections have been carried out to track large ensembles of energetic atoms in a time-dependent manner as they propagate into the Martian atmosphere and transfer their energy to the ambient atoms and molecules. Results of the MC simulations on the energy-deposition altitude profiles, reflection coefficients, and time-dependent atmospheric heating, obtained for the isotropic hard sphere and anisotropic quantum cross sections, are compared. Atmospheric heating rates, thermalization depths, altitude profiles of production rates, energy distributions of SH atoms and molecules, and induced escape fluxes have been determined.

  8. Heavy Metal Determination in Atmospheric Deposition and Other Fluxes in Northern France Agrosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Azimi, Sam; Cambier, Philippe; Lecuyer, Isabelle; Thevenot, Daniel,

    2004-01-01

    International audience The aim of this study is to assess the annual balance of the fluxes of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn within different cropping systems, in an experimental site located near Versailles, France. Four fluxes through the cultivated horizon were considered to assess the annual heavy metal balance in these systems: 1) atmospheric depositions, 2) fertilisers as inputs, 3) crops and 4) leaching water as outputs. The water mass flow was estimated with a model (CERES) while the other ...

  9. Flux-Profile Relationship for Dust Concentration in the Stratified Atmospheric Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, L. S.; Chamecki, M.; Gillies, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    Flux-profile relationships are usually obtained under the assumption that the mean field of interest is in equilibrium with the associated surface fluxes. In this study, the existence of an equilibrium state for dust concentration in the atmospheric surface layer above sources and sinks is evaluated using large-eddy simulation. Results show that for steady-state turbulence and negligible horizontal advection, an equilibrium mean vertical profile of dust concentration is reached after one boundary-layer eddy turnover time. This is true for cases over a source or sink, under different atmospheric stabilities, and for particles with negligible or significant settling velocity. A new model relating the net surface flux to the vertical concentration profile that accounts for both atmospheric stability and particle settling velocity is proposed. The model compares well with the simulation results for all particle sizes and atmospheric stability conditions evaluated, and it can be used to estimate the concentration profile based on the surface flux, and also to estimate the surface flux by fitting the vertical concentration profile. The resulting equation can be considered as an extension of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory to the concentration of settling particles, such as mineral dust, sea-salt, pollen and other suspended aerosols.

  10. Martian upper atmosphere response to solar EUV flux and soft X-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sonal; Stewart, Ian; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Deighan, Justin; Stiepen, Arnaud; Evans, J. Scott; Stevens, Michael H.; Chaffin, Michael S.; Crismani, Matteo; McClintock, William; Montmessin, Franck; Thiemann, E. M.; Eparvier, Frank; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jacosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Planetary upper atmosphere energetics is mainly governed by absorption of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. Understanding the response of planetary upper atmosphere to the daily, long and short term variation in solar flux is very important to quantify energy budget of upper atmosphere. We report a comprehensive study of Mars dayglow observations made by the IUVS instrument aboard the MAVEN spacecraft, focusing on upper atmospheric response to solar EUV flux. Our analysis shows both short and long term effect of solar EUV flux on Martian thermospheric temperature. We find a significant drop (> 100 K) in thermospheric temperature between Ls = 218° and Ls = 140°, attributed primarily to the decrease in solar activity and increase in heliocentric distance. IUVS has observed response of Martian thermosphere to the 27-day solar flux variation due to solar rotation.We also report effect of two solar flare events (19 Oct. 2014 and 24 March 2015) on Martian dayglow observations. IUVS observed about ~25% increase in observed brightness of major ultraviolet dayglow emissions below 120 km, where most of the high energy photons (< 10 nm) deposit their energy. The results presented in this talk will help us better understand the role of EUV flux in total heat budget of Martian thermosphere.

  11. Sensitivity of upper atmospheric emissions calculations to solar/stellar UV flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barthelemy Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar UV (UltraViolet flux, especially the EUV (Extreme UltraViolet and FUV (Far UltraViolet components, is one of the main energetic inputs for planetary upper atmospheres. It drives various processes such as ionization, or dissociation which give rise to upper atmospheric emissions, especially in the UV and visible. These emissions are one of the main ways to investigate the upper atmospheres of planets. However, the uncertainties in the flux measurement or modeling can lead to biased estimates of fundamental atmospheric parameters, such as concentrations or temperatures in the atmospheres. We explore the various problems that can be identified regarding the uncertainties in solar/stellar UV flux by considering three examples. The worst case appears when the solar reflection component is dominant in the recorded spectrum as is seen for outer solar system measurements from HST (Hubble Space Telescope. We also show that the estimation of some particular line parameters (intensity and shape, especially Lyman α, is crucial, and that both total intensity and line profile are useful. In the case of exoplanets, the problem is quite critical since the UV flux of their parent stars is often very poorly known.

  12. Intercomparison of oceanic and atmospheric forced and coupled mesoscale simulations Part I: Surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Giordani

    Full Text Available A mesoscale non-hydrostatic atmospheric model has been coupled with a mesoscale oceanic model. The case study is a four-day simulation of a strong storm event observed during the SEMAPHORE experiment over a 500 × 500 km2 domain. This domain encompasses a thermohaline front associated with the Azores current. In order to analyze the effect of mesoscale coupling, three simulations are compared: the first one with the atmospheric model forced by realistic sea surface temperature analyses; the second one with the ocean model forced by atmospheric fields, derived from weather forecast re-analyses; the third one with the models being coupled. For these three simulations the surface fluxes were computed with the same bulk parametrization. All three simulations succeed well in representing the main oceanic or atmospheric features observed during the storm. Comparison of surface fields with in situ observations reveals that the winds of the fine mesh atmospheric model are more realistic than those of the weather forecast re-analyses. The low-level winds simulated with the atmospheric model in the forced and coupled simulations are appreciably stronger than the re-analyzed winds. They also generate stronger fluxes. The coupled simulation has the strongest surface heat fluxes: the difference in the net heat budget with the oceanic forced simulation reaches on average 50 Wm-2 over the simulation period. Sea surface-temperature cooling is too weak in both simulations, but is improved in the coupled run and matches better the cooling observed with drifters. The spatial distributions of sea surface-temperature cooling and surface fluxes are strongly inhomogeneous over the simulation domain. The amplitude of the flux variation is maximum in the coupled run. Moreover the weak correlation between the cooling and heat flux patterns indicates that the surface fluxes are not responsible for the whole cooling and suggests that the response of the ocean mixed layer

  13. Formation of extreme surface turbulent heat fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilinina, N. D.; Gulev, S. K.; Gavrikov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The role of extreme surface turbulent fluxes in total oceanic heat loss in the North Atlantic is studied. The atmospheric circulation patterns enhancing ocean-atmosphere heat flux in regions with significant contributions of the extreme heat fluxes (up to 60% of the net heat loss) are analyzed. It is shown that extreme heat fluxes in the Gulf Stream and the Greenland and Labrador Seas occur in zones with maximal air pressure gradients, i.e., in cyclone-anticyclone interaction zones.

  14. Simulation of sea surface temperatures with the surface heat fluxes from an atmospheric circulation model

    OpenAIRE

    Karaca, Mehmet; MÜLLER, DETLEV

    2011-01-01

    The global fields of the surface heat fluxes for the December-February period are calculated with the UCLA atmospheric circulation model (ACM). This model operates on a global grid net. The planetary boundary layer (PBL), as the decisive subsystem for the surface fluxes, is parameterized in terms of its bulk properties. For several locations in the north Atlantic, the model heat fluxes are incorporated into the forcing of a simple ocean mixed-layer (OML) model. The OML-model uses a slight gen...

  15. Precipitation of Energetic Neutral Atoms and Induced Non-Thermal Escape Fluxes from the Martian Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Lewkow, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The precipitation of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), produced through charge exchange (CX) collisions between solar wind (SW) ions and thermal atmospheric gases, is investigated. Subsequent induced non-thermal escape fluxes have been carried out for the Martian atmosphere. Detailed modeling of the ENA energy input and determination of connections between parameters of precipitating ENAs and resulting escape fluxes, reflection coefficients of fast atoms from the Mars atmosphere, and altitude dependent ENA energy distributions are established using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the precipitation process with accurate quantum mechanical (QM) cross sections. Detailed descriptions of secondary hot (SH) atoms and molecules induced by ENAs have been obtained for a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for atmospheric escape and evolution. The effects of using isotropic hard sphere (HS) cross sections as compared to realistic, anisotropic quantum cross sections are examined for energy-deposition profil...

  16. Development of a tomographic method using cosmic ray muons: application to the Mont Terri underground laboratory and la Soufriere de Guadeloupe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmic muons are produced in cascade processes following the interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere. Muons are fundamental particles with a mass 200 times higher than electrons. Their low interaction probability with matter allows them to cross the atmosphere and even the first kilometers of the Earth crust. The muons flux is attenuated through a media as function of the quantity of matter crossed. The study of the muon flux attenuation allows then to obtain a direct measurement of the rock opacity. This opacity corresponds to the media density, integrated along the muon path through rock. Muons' trajectory is indeed considered to be straight when crossing rock. It is then possible to realise geophysical tomographies by setting a sensor network around geological objects in order to determine the internal structures geometry inside these objects. An underground muon flux model is developed herein from flux models estimated at surface and a model of muon flux attenuation through rock. A feasibility equation of the muon tomography is then established in order to determine the minimum time of data acquisition to distinguish heterogeneities. Four muons telescopes have been built during this thesis and conditioned to bear field installation, notably in tropical media. These telescopes are made by two or three matrices of detection constituted of scintillating bars linked to photomultipliers. The modeling of the telescopes detection capacity and angular resolution is realised as function of their geometrical configuration. A calibration method is also established in order to correct the signal from any distortion. Moreover, arrangements to reduce the backward noise produced by low energy particles are set up and evaluated. The development of this new tomographic method is then illustrated by two geophysical applications. The measurements realised in the Mont Terri underground laboratory (Switzerland) allowed us to benefit from stable acquisition conditions to

  17. Microseepage in drylands: Flux and implications in the global atmospheric source/sink budget of methane

    OpenAIRE

    Etiope, G.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Klusman, R. W.; Dept. of Chemistry and Geochemistry, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Co., 80401, United States

    2010-01-01

    Drylands are considered a net sink for atmospheric methane and a main item of the global inventories of the greenhouse gas budget. It is outlined here, however, that a significant portion of drylands occur over sedimentary basins hosting natural gas and oil reservoirs, where gas migration to the surface takes place, producing positive fluxes of methane into the atmosphere. New field surveys, in different hydrocarbonprone basins, confirm that microseepage, enhanced by faults and fr...

  18. Magnetic Reconnection resulting from Flux Emergence: Implications for Jet Formation in the lower solar atmosphere?

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, J. Y.; Madjarska, M. S.; Doyle, J. G.; Lu, Q. M.; Vanninathan, K.; Huang, Z

    2011-01-01

    We aim at investigating the formation of jet-like features in the lower solar atmosphere, e.g. chromosphere and transition region, as a result of magnetic reconnection. Magnetic reconnection as occurring at chromospheric and transition regions densities and triggered by magnetic flux emergence is studied using a 2.5D MHD code. The initial atmosphere is static and isothermal, with a temperature of 20,000 K. The initial magnetic field is uniform and vertical. Two physical environments with diff...

  19. Fluxes of nitrates between snow surfaces and the atmosphere in the European high Arctic

    OpenAIRE

    H. J. Beine; Dominè, F.; Ianniello, A.; Nardino, M.; Allegrini, I.; K. Teinilä; Hillamo, R.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric and snow mixing ratios of nitrates and nitrites and their fluxes above the snow surface were made during two intensive campaigns during spring time 2001 at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard as part of the EU project  "`The NItrogen Cycle and Effects on the oxidation of atmospheric trace species at high latitudes" (NICE). At this coastal site close to the unseasonably unfrozen fjord, of the measured nitrogen species, only ...

  20. New Constraints on Terrestrial Surface-Atmosphere Fluxes of Gaseous Elemental Mercury Using a Global Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnan, Yannick; Le Dantec, Théo; Moore, Christopher W; Edwards, Grant C; Obrist, Daniel

    2016-01-19

    Despite 30 years of study, gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) exchange magnitude and controls between terrestrial surfaces and the atmosphere still remain uncertain. We compiled data from 132 studies, including 1290 reported fluxes from more than 200,000 individual measurements, into a database to statistically examine flux magnitudes and controls. We found that fluxes were unevenly distributed, both spatially and temporally, with strong biases toward Hg-enriched sites, daytime and summertime measurements. Fluxes at Hg-enriched sites were positively correlated with substrate concentrations, but this was absent at background sites. Median fluxes over litter- and snow-covered soils were lower than over bare soils, and chamber measurements showed higher emission compared to micrometeorological measurements. Due to low spatial extent, estimated emissions from Hg-enriched areas (217 Mg·a(-1)) were lower than previous estimates. Globally, areas with enhanced atmospheric Hg(0) levels (particularly East Asia) showed an emerging importance of Hg(0) emissions accounting for half of the total global emissions estimated at 607 Mg·a(-1), although with a large uncertainty range (-513 to 1353 Mg·a(-1) [range of 37.5th and 62.5th percentiles]). The largest uncertainties in Hg(0) fluxes stem from forests (-513 to 1353 Mg·a(-1) [range of 37.5th and 62.5th percentiles]), largely driven by a shortage of whole-ecosystem fluxes and uncertain contributions of leaf-atmosphere exchanges, questioning to what degree ecosystems are net sinks or sources of atmospheric Hg(0). PMID:26599393

  1. Atmospheric concentrations and deposition fluxes of 7Be and 210Pb at Rokkasho village, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biweekly atmospheric concentrations and deposition fluxes of 7Be and 210Pb were measured at Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture, Japan, from March 2000 to March 2006, to clarify their regional features. The atmospheric concentration of 7Be was low in summer and winter and high in spring and fall, and that of 210Pb was low in summer and high in winter. Negative correlations were between the atmospheric 7Be or 210Pb concentrations and precipitation in the sampling periods, and that suggested that both nuclides were removed from the atmosphere mainly by wet deposition (rain or snow). The deposition fluxes of 7Be and 210Pb were low in summer and high in winter to spring. Deposition fluxes of 7Be and 210Pb positively correlated to precipitation. From the results of the power spectral analysis by fast Fourier transform, annual periodicities of 7Be and 210Pb deposition at Rokkasho could be classified as a double peak distribution pattern and single peak distribution pattern, respectively. Backward trajectories for 72 h were calculated every 6 h in order to clarify the relation of air mass transport course and atmospheric concentrations of 210Pb. The results showed that atmospheric 210Pb concentrations were strongly affected by air mass from the northern Asian continental area above 40degN. (author)

  2. Observation of muon intensity variations by season with the MINOS Near Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, P; Aurisano, A; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Castromonte, C M; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; de Jong, J K; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Fields, T H; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Holin, A; Huang, J; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mathis, M; Mayer, N; McGivern, C; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Sher, S Moed; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; Connor, J O; Orchanian, M; Osprey, S; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Perch, A; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Poonthottathil, N; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tian, X; Timmons, A; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2014-01-01

    A sample of 1.53$\\times$10$^{9}$ cosmic-ray-induced single muon events has been recorded at 225 meters-water-equivalent using the MINOS Near Detector. The underground muon rate is observed to be highly correlated with the effective atmospheric temperature. The coefficient $\\alpha_{T}$, relating the change in the muon rate to the change in the vertical effective temperature, is determined to be 0.428$\\pm$0.003(stat.)$\\pm$0.059(syst.). An alternative description is provided by the weighted effective temperature, introduced to account for the differences in the temperature profile and muon flux as a function of zenith angle. Using the latter estimation of temperature, the coefficient is determined to be 0.352$\\pm$0.003(stat.)$\\pm$0.046(syst.).

  3. Observation of muon intensity variations by season with the MINOS Near Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, P.; et al.

    2014-07-22

    A sample of 1.53$\\times$10$^{9}$ cosmic-ray-induced single muon events has been recorded at 225 meters-water-equivalent using the MINOS Near Detector. The underground muon rate is observed to be highly correlated with the effective atmospheric temperature. The coefficient $\\alpha_{T}$, relating the change in the muon rate to the change in the vertical effective temperature, is determined to be 0.428$\\pm$0.003(stat.)$\\pm$0.059(syst.). An alternative description is provided by the weighted effective temperature, introduced to account for the differences in the temperature profile and muon flux as a function of zenith angle. Using the latter estimation of temperature, the coefficient is determined to be 0.352$\\pm$0.003(stat.)$\\pm$0.046(syst.).

  4. [Atmospheric deposition fluxes and seasonal variations of elements in northeast of Sichuan, central China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiao-Ning; Zhou, Hou-Yun; You, Chen-Feng; Tang, Jing; Liu, Hou-Chun; Huang, Ying; He, Hai-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Monthly atmospheric deposition was collected in Northeast of Sichuan Province from August 2011 to July 2012. Contents of Na, Mg, Ca, K, Si, Sr, Ba and Zn in weak-acid leachable fraction (with pH values of ca. 2) of the deposition were determined using ICP-MS. The results indicated that the deposition fluxes of all these elements exhibited notable seasonal variations. For example, the deposition flux of Na increased with precipitation, suggesting a dominant derivation from wet deposition; whereas the fluxes of Ca, Ba, Si, Sr and Mg displayed higher values during winter or spring season, suggesting that these elements may be closely associated with atmospheric dust activity. The annual fluxes of these elements were remarkably different in value. Na had the highest flux of 30 497 microg x (10(2) cm2 x a)(-1), more than three orders of magnitude higher than the lowest flux of Ba of 27.4 microg x (10(2) cm2 x a)(-1).

  5. Energetic electron precipitation into the middle atmosphere -- Constructing the loss cone fluxes from MEPED POES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesse Tyssøy, H.; Sandanger, M. I.; Ødegaard, L.-K. G.; Stadsnes, J.; Aasnes, A.; Zawedde, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) on the chemistry of the middle atmosphere (50-90 km) is still an outstanding question as accurate quantification of EEP is lacking due to instrumental challenges and insufficient pitch angle coverage of current particle detectors. The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detectors (MEPED) instrument on board the NOAA/Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) and MetOp spacecraft has two sets of electron and proton telescopes pointing close to zenith (0°) and in the horizontal plane (90°). Using measurements from either the 0° or 90° telescope will underestimate or overestimate the bounce loss cone flux, respectively, as the energetic electron fluxes are often strongly anisotropic with decreasing fluxes toward the center of the loss cone. By combining the measurements from both telescopes with electron pitch angle distributions from theory of wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, a complete bounce loss cone flux is constructed for each of the electron energy channels >50 keV, >100 keV, and >300 keV. We apply a correction method to remove proton contamination in the electron counts. We also account for the relativistic (>1000 keV) electrons contaminating the proton detector at subauroral latitudes. This gives us full range coverage of electron energies that will be deposited in the middle atmosphere. Finally, we demonstrate the method's applicability on strongly anisotropic pitch angle distributions during a weak geomagnetic storm in February 2008. We compare the electron fluxes and subsequent energy deposition estimates to OH observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Aura satellite substantiating that the estimated fluxes are representative for the true precipitating fluxes impacting the atmosphere.

  6. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lauros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical profile of particle number distribution does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by biosphere.

    Simulation of aerosol concentration inside the atmospheric boundary layer during nucleation days shows highly dynamical picture, where particle formation is coupled with chemistry and turbulent transport. We have demonstrated suitability of our turbulent mixing scheme in reproducing most important characteristics of particle dynamics inside the atmospheric boundary layer. Deposition and particle flux simulations show that deposition affects noticeably only the smallest particles at the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  7. High Resolution Muon Computed Tomography at Neutrino Beam Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Suerfu, Burkhant

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pio...

  8. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics of the emerging magnetic flux in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, R.; Tajima, T.; Shibata, K.; Kaisig, M.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of an emerging magnetic flux tube or sheet in the solar atmosphere is studied through 3D MHD simulations. In the initial state, a horizontal magnetic flux sheet or tube is assumed to be embedded at the bottom of MHD two isothermal gas layers, which approximate the solar photosphere/chromosphere and the corona. The magnetic flux sheet or tube is unstable against the undular mode of the magnetic buoyancy instability. The magnetic loop rises due to the linear and then later nonlinear instabilities caused by the buoyancy enhanced by precipitating the gas along magnetic field lines. We find by 3D simulation that during the ascendance of loops the bundle of flux tubes or even the flux sheet develops into dense gas filaments pinched between magnetic loops. The interchange modes help produce a fine fiber flux structure perpendicular to the magnetic field direction in the linear stage, while the undular modes determine the overall buoyant loop structure. The expansion of such a bundle of magnetic loops follows the self-similar behavior observed in 2D cases studied earlier. Our study finds the threshold flux for arch filament system (AFS) formation to be about 0.3 x 10 exp 20 Mx.

  9. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  10. Continuous wavelet transform and discrete multi-resolution analysis of surface fluxes and atmospheric stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Variations of land surface fluxes of sensible heat (H), latent heat ( LE ), and CO2(F-CO2) obtained from the eddy-covariance measurements above a winter wheat field from March 30 to April 24, 2001 have been studied at scales ranging from 10 minutes to days. Wavelet transform is used in the analysis of land surface fluxes and atmospheric stability (ζ) calculated from the measurements to reveal the changes in land surface fluxes in hours to days scales. The main results are: (1) Concise and compact information about the fluxes, net radiation (Rn), temperature (T) and ζ in the scale-time domain are extracted from the data by continuous wavelet analysis,and 1 day, 0.5 day and short-period (shorter than 0.5 day) components are revealed. Continuous wavelet coefficients can be used to characterize periodic components of changes in fluxes and ζ. (2) Discrete-time multi-resolution analysis can be used to concentrate total energy variance of time series of the measurements to a small number of coefficients, plotting the relative energy distribution to get several meaningful characteristics of the data. (3) Under neutral atmospheric conditions, the relative energy distributions of the Haar multi-resolution analysis of the three non-dimensional coefficients (T/T* , q/q * and c/c * ) display clear similarities.

  11. Solar diurnal anisotropy measured using muons in GRAPES-3 experiment in 2006

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Mohanty; D Atri; S R Dugad; S K Gupta; B Hariharan; Y Hayashi; A Jain; S Kawakami; S D Morris; P K Nayak; A Oshima; B S Rao

    2013-08-01

    The GRAPES-3 experiment at Ooty contains a large-area (560 m2) tracking muon detector. This detector consists of 16 modules, each 35 m2 in area, that are grouped into four supermodules of 140 m2 each. The threshold energy of muons is $\\sec()$ GeV along a direction with zenith angle and the angular resolution of the muon detector is 6°. Typically, it records ∼ 4 × 109 muons every day. The muon detector has been operating uninterruptedly since 2001, thus providing a high statistics record of the cosmic ray flux as a function of time over one decade. However, prior to using these data, the muon rate has to be corrected for two important atmospheric effects, namely, variations in atmospheric pressure and temperature. Because of the near equatorial location of Ooty (11.4°N), the seasonal variations in the atmospheric temperature are relatively small and shall be ignored here. Due to proximity to the equator, the pressure changes at Ooty display a dominant 12 h periodic behaviour in addition to other seasonal changes. Here, we discuss various aspects of a novel method for accurate pressure measurement and subsequent corrections applied to the GRAPES-3 muon data to correct these pressure-induced variations. The pressure-corrected muon data are used to measure the profile of the solar diurnal anisotropy during 2006. The data, when divided into four segments, display significant variation both in the amplitude (∼ 45%) and phase (∼42 m) of the solar diurnal anisotropy during 2006, which was a period of relatively low solar activity.

  12. The Boston Methane Project: Mapping Surface Emissions to Inform Atmospheric Estimation of Urban Methane Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, N.; Crosson, E.; Down, A.; Hutyra, L.; Jackson, R. B.; McKain, K.; Rella, C.; Raciti, S. M.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Lost and unaccounted natural gas can amount to over 6% of Massachusetts' total annual greenhouse gas inventory (expressed as equivalent CO2 tonnage). An unknown portion of this loss is due to natural gas leaks in pipeline distribution systems. The objective of the Boston Methane Project is to estimate the overall leak rate from natural gas systems in metropolitan Boston, and to compare this flux with fluxes from the other primary methane emissions sources. Companion talks at this meeting describe the atmospheric measurement and modeling framework, and chemical and isotopic tracers that can partition total atmospheric methane flux into natural gas and non-natural gas components. This talk focuses on estimation of surface emissions that inform the atmospheric modeling and partitioning. These surface emissions include over 3,300 pipeline natural gas leaks in Boston. For the state of Massachusetts as a whole, the amount of natural gas reported as lost and unaccounted for by utility companies was greater than estimated landfill emissions by an order of magnitude. Moreover, these landfill emissions were overwhelmingly located outside of metro Boston, while gas leaks are concentrated in exactly the opposite pattern, increasing from suburban Boston toward the urban core. Work is in progress to estimate spatial distribution of methane emissions from wetlands and sewer systems. We conclude with a description of how these spatial data sets will be combined and represented for application in atmospheric modeling.

  13. The fine structure of niobium condensates deposited from ion-atomic fluxes in helium atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helium gas influence on the structural characteristics of niobium coatings deposited by low-energy metallic Nb ion-stoic fluxes in He atmosphere is investigated. It is shown that He implantation in Nb films during condensation is accompanied with the decreasing of the mean size of condensate grains. At the same time, He atoms modify no physical processes of the fine structure formation. Using thermodesorption spectroscopy we have determined that He atoms mainly belong to vacancy/vacancy-solute complexes in Nb coatings. Our conclusion is that such complexes play a dominant role in formation of the fine structure of vacuum coatings deposited from ion-atomic fluxes

  14. Atmospheric Forcing of the Winter Air–Sea Heat Fluxes over the Northern Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Papadopoulos, Vassilis P.

    2013-03-01

    The influence of the atmospheric circulation on the winter air–sea heat fluxes over the northern Red Sea is investigated during the period 1985–2011. The analysis based on daily heat flux values reveals that most of the net surface heat exchange variability depends on the behavior of the turbulent components of the surface flux (the sum of the latent and sensible heat). The large-scale composite sea level pressure (SLP) maps corresponding to turbulent flux minima and maxima show distinct atmospheric circulation patterns associated with each case. In general, extreme heat loss (with turbulent flux lower than −400 W m−2) over the northern Red Sea is observed when anticyclonic conditions prevail over an area extending from the Mediterranean Sea to eastern Asia along with a recession of the equatorial African lows system. Subcenters of high pressure associated with this pattern generate the required steep SLP gradient that enhances the wind magnitude and transfers cold and dry air masses from higher latitudes. Conversely, turbulent flux maxima (heat loss minimization with values from −100 to −50 W m−2) are associated with prevailing low pressures over the eastern Mediterranean and an extended equatorial African low that reaches the southern part of the Red Sea. In this case, a smooth SLP field over the northern Red Sea results in weak winds over the area that in turn reduce the surface heat loss. At the same time, southerlies blowing along the main axis of the Red Sea transfer warm and humid air northward, favoring heat flux maxima.

  15. Variability of Summer Atmospheric Moisture Flux and Its Effect on Precipitation over East China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ying; ZHAI ranmao; WANG Qiyi

    2005-01-01

    Using the in-situ precipitation and NCEP/NCAR daily reanalysis data, we found by studies of change of moisture flux and its effect that the northward water vapor transport represented by moisture flux in East China tends to retreat southward, and the eastward water vapor transport tends to weaken with weakening of the intensity of moisture flux. The north boundary of meridional moisture flux (50 kg m-1s-1) retreats 2.8 degrees in latitude per decade during 1968-2003. The weakening of water vapor transport implies the weakening and southward retreat of East Asian monsoon, which leads to the tendency of decrease in moisture flux convergence over North China and the middle and lower reaches of the Yellow River, and the tendency of decrease in precipitation over those regions, but on the contrary the enhanced water vapor transport convergence over the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River implies the tendency of increase in precipitation to some extent. Indeed the long-term variability of precipitation in East China has a close relation with that of atmospheric moisture flux.

  16. Methane Fluxes to the Atmosphere from Perennial Hydrocarbon Plumes in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, E.; Kastner, M.; MacDonald, I.

    2006-12-01

    Methane is a radiatively important trace gas in the atmosphere playing a significant role in greenhouse warming and ozone destruction. The current atmospheric methane budget, however, is still clouded by large uncertainties in the individual source strengths. Estimates of the flux of methane from the ocean to the atmosphere range from 5-15 Tg/yr, but do not include seafloor methane seepage. The large uncertainty in the magnitude of this flux emphasizes the importance of better constraining the spatial and temporal variations in marine methane emissions. Improved constraints on the natural input of methane from the oceans will enable better estimates of changes in anthropogenic inputs over time and their contribution to global climate change. The northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) contains prolific seafloor gas vents, oil seeps, and gas hydrate deposits. During two research expeditions in the GOM in 2002 and 2003, methane concentrations and carbon isotopic ratios were measured within the water column by a novel experiment in which bubble plumes from 5 seafloor seeps and one mud volcano were sampled with an ascending submersible from the seafloor to the sea surface. Traditionally, CTD casts have been used to sample methane in the water column, which, because of currents, at best only meander through these relatively narrow plumes. Based on δ13C-DIC values of pore waters extracted from push cores at the seeps, methane is not consumed by anaerobic oxidation in the sediment column, thus all of the methane advecting from depth enters the water column. The δ13C of the bottom water methane ranges from -54.38 to -45.91‰, indicating most of it is thermogenic in origin. The gas bubbles also contain C2-C4 hydrocarbons and are coated with oil, which inhibits methane oxidation and bubble dissolution during ascent. This is observed in the only slight increase in δ13C- CH4 to the surface within the plumes. Surface waters have an average δ13C-CH4 of - 47.00‰, thus using an

  17. Vertical resolution dependence of gravity wave momentum flux simulated by an atmospheric general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Watanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the gravity wave spectra of energy and momentum flux on the horizontal resolution and time step of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs has been thoroughly investigated in the past. In contrast, much less attention has been given to the dependence of these gravity wave parameters on models' vertical resolutions. The present study demonstrates the dependence of gravity wave momentum flux in the stratosphere and mesosphere on the model's vertical resolution, which is evaluated using an AGCM with a horizontal resolution of about 0.56°. We performed a series of sensitivity test simulations changing only the model's vertical resolution above a height of 8 km, and found that inertial gravity waves with short vertical wavelengths simulated at higher vertical resolutions likely play an important role in determining the gravity wave momentum flux in the stratosphere and mesosphere.

  18. Energetic electron precipitation into the middle atmosphere - Constructing the loss cone fluxes from MEPED POES

    CERN Document Server

    Tyssøy, H Nesse; Ødegaard, L -K G; Stadsnes, J; Aasnes, A; Zawedde, A E

    2016-01-01

    The impact of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) on the chemistry of the middle atmosphere (50-90 km) is still an outstanding question as accurate quantification of EEP is lacking due to instrumental challenges and insufficient pitch angle coverage of current particle detectors. The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detectors (MEPED) instrument on board the NOAA/Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites(POES) and MetOp spacecraft has two sets of electron and proton telescopes pointing close to zenith ($0\\,^{\\circ}$) and in the horizontal plane ($90\\,^{\\circ}$). Using measurements from either the $0\\,^{\\circ}$ or $90\\,^{\\circ}$ telescope will underestimate or overestimate the bounce loss cone flux, respectively, as the energetic electron fluxes are often strongly anisotropic with decreasing fluxes toward the center of the loss cone. By combining the measurements from both telescopes with electron pitch angle distributions from theory of wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, a complete bounce loss ...

  19. The seasonal cycle of ocean-atmosphere CO2 Flux in Ryder Bay, West Antarctic Peninsula.

    OpenAIRE

    Legge, Oliver J.; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Johnson, Martin T.; Meredith, Michael P.; Venables, Hugh J.; Brown, Peter J.; Lee, Gareth A.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 15 million km2 of the Southern Ocean is seasonally ice covered, yet the processes affecting carbon cycling and gas exchange in this climatically important region remain inadequately understood. Here, 3 years of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) measurements and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes from Ryder Bay on the west Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) are presented. During spring and summer, primary production in the surface ocean promotes atmospheric CO2 uptake. In winter, higher DIC, caus...

  20. Implementation of a boundary layer heat flux parameterization into the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. McGrath-Spangler

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of atmospheric carbon dioxide to a given amount of surface flux is inversely proportional to the depth of the boundary layer. Overshooting thermals that entrain free tropospheric air down into the boundary layer modify the characteristics and depth of the lower layer through the insertion of energy and mass. This alters the surface energy budget by changing the Bowen ratio and thereby altering the vegetative response and the surface boundary conditions. Although overshooting thermals are important in the physical world, their effects are unresolved in most regional models. A parameterization to include the effects of boundary layer entrainment was introduced into a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model (SiB-RAMS. The parameterization is based on a downward heat flux at the top of the boundary layer that is proportional to the heat flux at the surface. Results with the parameterization show that the boundary layer simulated is deeper, warmer, and drier than when the parameterization is turned off. These results alter the vegetative stress factors thereby changing the carbon flux from the surface. The combination of this and the deeper boundary layer change the concentration of carbon dioxide in the boundary layer.

  1. Regional inversion of CO2 ecosystem fluxes from atmospheric measurements. Reliability of the uncertainty estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broquet, G.; Chevallier, F.; Breon, F.M.; Yver, C.; Ciais, P.; Ramonet, M.; Schmidt, M. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, UMR8212, IPSL, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Alemanno, M. [Servizio Meteorologico dell' Aeronautica Militare Italiana, Centro Aeronautica Militare di Montagna, Monte Cimone/Sestola (Italy); Apadula, F. [Research on Energy Systems, RSE, Environment and Sustainable Development Department, Milano (Italy); Hammer, S. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Umweltphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Haszpra, L. [Hungarian Meteorological Service, Budapest (Hungary); Meinhardt, F. [Federal Environmental Agency, Kirchzarten (Germany); Necki, J. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Piacentino, S. [ENEA, Laboratory for Earth Observations and Analyses, Palermo (Italy); Thompson, R.L. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena (Germany); Vermeulen, A.T. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, EEE-EA, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    The Bayesian framework of CO2 flux inversions permits estimates of the retrieved flux uncertainties. Here, the reliability of these theoretical estimates is studied through a comparison against the misfits between the inverted fluxes and independent measurements of the CO2 Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) made by the eddy covariance technique at local (few hectares) scale. Regional inversions at 0.5{sup 0} resolution are applied for the western European domain where {approx}50 eddy covariance sites are operated. These inversions are conducted for the period 2002-2007. They use a mesoscale atmospheric transport model, a prior estimate of the NEE from a terrestrial ecosystem model and rely on the variational assimilation of in situ continuous measurements of CO2 atmospheric mole fractions. Averaged over monthly periods and over the whole domain, the misfits are in good agreement with the theoretical uncertainties for prior and inverted NEE, and pass the chi-square test for the variance at the 30% and 5% significance levels respectively, despite the scale mismatch and the independence between the prior (respectively inverted) NEE and the flux measurements. The theoretical uncertainty reduction for the monthly NEE at the measurement sites is 53% while the inversion decreases the standard deviation of the misfits by 38 %. These results build confidence in the NEE estimates at the European/monthly scales and in their theoretical uncertainty from the regional inverse modelling system. However, the uncertainties at the monthly (respectively annual) scale remain larger than the amplitude of the inter-annual variability of monthly (respectively annual) fluxes, so that this study does not engender confidence in the inter-annual variations. The uncertainties at the monthly scale are significantly smaller than the seasonal variations. The seasonal cycle of the inverted fluxes is thus reliable. In particular, the CO2 sink period over the European continent likely ends later than

  2. The Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data – HOAPS-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Andersson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The availability of microwave instruments on satellite platforms allows the retrieval of essential water cycle components at high quality for improved understanding and evaluation of water processes in climate modelling. HOAPS-3, the latest version of the satellite climatology "Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data" provides fields of turbulent heat fluxes, evaporation, precipitation, freshwater flux and related atmospheric variables over the global ice-free ocean. This paper describes the content, methodology and retrievals of the HOAPS climatology. A sophisticated processing chain, including all available Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I instruments aboard the satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program (DMSP and careful inter-sensor calibration, ensures a homogeneous time-series with dense data sampling and hence detailed information of the underlying weather situations. The completely reprocessed data set with a continuous time series from 1987 to 2005 contains neural network based algorithms for precipitation and wind speed and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR based SST fields. Additionally, a new 85 GHz synthesis procedure for the defective SSM/I channels on DMSP F08 from 1988 on has been implemented. Freely available monthly and pentad means, twice daily composites and scan-based data make HOAPS-3 a versatile data set for studying ocean-atmosphere interaction on different temporal and spatial scales. HOAPS-3 data products are available via http://www.hoaps.org.

  3. The Gran Sasso muon puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    We carry out a time-series analysis of the combined data from three experiments measuring the cosmic muon flux at the Gran Sasso laboratory, at a depth of 3800 m.w.e. These data, taken by the MACRO, LVD and Borexino experiments, span a period of over 20 years, and correspond to muons with a threshold energy, at sea level, of around 1.3 TeV. We compare the best-fit period and phase of the full muon data set with the combined DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA data, which spans the same time period, as a test of the hypothesis that the cosmic ray muon flux is responsible for the annual modulation detected by DAMA. We find in the muon data a large-amplitude fluctuation with a period of around one year, and a phase that is incompatible with that of the DAMA modulation at 5.2 sigmas. Aside from this annual variation, the muon data also contains a further significant modulation with a period between 10 and 11 years and a power well above the 99.9% C.L threshold for noise, whose phase corresponds well with the solar cycle: a s...

  4. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  5. Methane fluxes in the high northern latitudes estimated using a Bayesian atmospheric inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Rona; Stohl, Andreas; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Sasakawa, Motoki; Machida, Toshinobu; Aalto, Tuula; Dlugokencky, Edward; Worthy, Douglas; Skorokhod, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas after CO2. Atmospheric CH4 increased from pre-industrial concentrations of around 850 ppb (parts-per-billion) to 1773 ppb in the late 1990s and then remained approximately stable until the mid 2000s. However, since 2006 atmospheric CH4 has begun to increase again. The reasons for the stabilization and subsequent increase are likely to be a combination of changes in anthropogenic emissions such as from fossil fuels, as well as natural wetland sources. While global atmospheric inversions indicate that natural wetland sources in the tropics and subtropics have contributed to the recent increase, land surface and ecosystem models generally indicate no increase in these sources. Another potential source for the change in CH4 concentration could be wetlands in the high northern latitudes, which comprise about 44% of global wetland area. These latitudes are also undergoing rapid warming, which will impact wetland emissions of CH4. We present CH4 fluxes for the high northern latitudes (>50°N) from 2005 to 2012 estimated from a Bayesian atmospheric inversion. The inversion incorporates observations from 17 in-situ and 6 discrete-sample sites across North America and Northern Eurasia. Atmospheric transport is based on the Lagrangian particle dispersion model, FLEXPART, run with ECMWF meteorological analyses. Emissions were optimized monthly and on a spatial grid of variable resolution (from 1°×1° to 4°×4°). Background concentrations were estimated by coupling FLEXPART to monthly global 2-D fields of CH4 concentration from a bivariate interpolation of smoothed data from the NOAA ESRL network. We estimate the total mean North American flux (>50°N) to be 18 -- 27 Tg y-1, and the total mean Northern Eurasian flux (>50°N) to be 55 -- 66 Tg y-1, both substantially higher than the prior (based on LPX-Bern for wetland and EDGAR-4.2FT2010 for anthropogenic fluxes). We also find a small trend in the

  6. Dynamics of local isolated magnetic flux tubes in a fast-rotating stellar atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, W.; Tajima, C.T. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics; Matsumoto, R. [Chiba Univ. (Japan)]|[ASRC, JAERI, Naka (Japan); Shibata, K. [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    Dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in the fast rotating stellar atmosphere is studied. We focus on the effects and signatures of the instability of the flux tube emergence influenced by the Coriolis force. We present the result from a linear stability analysis and discuss its possible signatures in the course of the evolution of G-type and M-type stars. We present a three dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulation of local isolated magnetic flux tubes under a magnetic buoyancy instability in co-rotating Cartesian coordinates. We find that the combination of the buoyancy instability and the Coriolis effect gives rise to a mechanism, to twist the emerging magnetic flux tube into a helical structure. The tilt angle, east-west asymmetry and magnetic helicity of the Twisted flux tubes in the simulations are studied in detail. The linear and nonlinear analyses provide hints as to what kind of pattern of large spots in young M-type main-sequence stars might be observed. We find that young and old G-type stars may have different distributions of spots while M-type stars may always have low latitudes spots. The size of stellar spots may decrease when a star becomes older, due to the decreasing of magnetic field. A qualitative comparison with solar observations is also presented.

  7. Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghton, R.A.

    2001-02-22

    The database documented in this numeric data package, a revision to a database originally published by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) in 1995, consists of annual estimates, from 1850 through 1990, of the net flux of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere resulting from deliberate changes in land cover and land use, especially forest clearing for agriculture and the harvest of wood for wood products or energy. The data are provided on a year-by-year basis for nine regions (North America, South and Central America, Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, Tropical Africa, the Former Soviet Union, China, South and Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Developed Region) and the globe. Some data begin earlier than 1850 (e.g., for six regions, areas of different ecosystems are provided for the year 1700) or extend beyond 1990 (e.g., fuelwood harvest in South and Southeast Asia, by forest type, is provided through 1995). The global net flux during the period 1850 to 1990 was 124 Pg of carbon (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams). During this period, the greatest regional flux was from South and Southeast Asia (39 Pg of carbon), while the smallest regional flux was from North Africa and the Middle East (3 Pg of carbon). For the year 1990, the global total net flux was estimated to be 2.1 Pg of carbon.

  8. Large eddies modulating flux convergence and divergence in a disturbed unstable atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhongming; Liu, Heping; Russell, Eric S.; Huang, Jianping; Foken, Thomas; Oncley, Steven P.

    2016-02-01

    The effects of large eddies on turbulence structures and flux transport were studied using data collected over a flat cotton field during the Energy Balance Experiment 2000 in the San Joaquin Valley of California in August 2000. Flux convergence (FC; larger fluxes at 8.7 m than 2.7 m) and divergence (FD) in latent heat flux (LE) were observed in a disturbed, unstable atmospheric surface layer, and their magnitudes largely departed from the prediction of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. From our wavelet analysis, it was identified that large eddies affected turbulence structures, scalar distribution, and flux transport differently at 8.7 m and 2.7 m under the FC and FD conditions. Using the ensemble empirical mode decomposition, time series data were decomposed into large eddies and small-scale background turbulence, the time-domain characteristics of large eddies were examined, and the flux contribution by large eddies was also determined quantitatively. The results suggest that large eddies over the frequency range of 0.002 Hz < f < 0.02 Hz (predominantly 300-400 m) enhanced the vertical velocity spectra more significantly at 8.7 m than 2.7 m, leading to an increased magnitude of the cospectra and thus LE at 8.7 m. In the FD case, however, these large eddies were not present and even suppressed in the vertical velocity spectra at 8.7 m. Consequently, the cospectra divergence over the low-frequency ranges primarily caused the LE divergence. This work implies that large eddies may either improve or degrade the surface energy balance closure by increasing or decreasing turbulent fluxes, respectively.

  9. Muon Radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of muons with matter is dominated by the Coulomb interaction. The Coulomb interaction can be factored into the interaction with electrons which results in continuous energy loss and eventual stopping of the charged particle with very small changes in the direction while the interaction with the atomic nuclei results in relatively larger angle changes with only small changes in the energy. Each if these interactions provides a radiographic signal which can be used to study the internal structure of objects. These radiographies will be contrasted with each other, and some data obtained with cosmic ray muons will be presented.*

  10. Fluxes of nitrates between snow surfaces and the atmosphere in the European high Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Beine

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of atmospheric and snow mixing ratios of nitrates and nitrites and their fluxes above the snow surface were made during two intensive campaigns during spring time 2001 at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard as part of the EU project  "`The NItrogen Cycle and Effects on the oxidation of atmospheric trace species at high latitudes' (NICE. At this coastal site close to the unseasonably unfrozen fjord, of the measured nitrogen species, only HNO3 showed a significant flux on to the snow surface; a mean deposition of -8.7 nmol h-1 m-2 was observed in late April / early May 2001. These fluxes may be due to the reaction of HNO3 with sea salt, and especially NaCl, or may be simply uptake of HNO3 by ice, which is alkaline because of the sea salt in our marine environment. During snowfall periods dry deposition of HNO3 may contribute up to 10% of the N budget in the snow; however, the main source for N is wet deposition in falling snow. The surface snow at Ny-Ålesund showed very complex stratigraphy; the NO3- mixing ratio in snow varied between 65 and 520 ng g-1, the total NO3- content of the snowpack was on the order of 2700 ng cm-2. In comparison the atmospheric boundary layer column showed a NO3- content of only 8 ng cm-2. The limited exchange, however, between the snow and the atmosphere was attributed to low mobility of NO3- in the observed snow. Contrary to other Arctic sites (i.e. Alert, Nunavut or Summit, Greenland deposition of sea salt and crustal aerosols in this marine environment made the surface snow alkaline; snow NO3- was associated with heavier cations and was not readily available for physical exchange or photochemical reactions.

  11. Quantifying the Observability of CO2 Flux Uncertainty in Atmospheric CO2 Records Using Products from Nasa's Carbon Monitoring Flux Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Lesley; Pawson, Steven; Collatz, Jim; Watson, Gregg; Menemenlis, Dimitris; Brix, Holger; Rousseaux, Cecile; Bowman, Kevin; Bowman, Kevin; Liu, Junjie; Eldering, Annmarie; Gunson, Michael; Kawa, Stephan R.

    2014-01-01

    NASAs Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) Flux Pilot Project (FPP) was designed to better understand contemporary carbon fluxes by bringing together state-of-the art models with remote sensing datasets. Here we report on simulations using NASAs Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5 (GEOS-5) which was used to evaluate the consistency of two different sets of observationally constrained land and ocean fluxes with atmospheric CO2 records. Despite the strong data constraint, the average difference in annual terrestrial biosphere flux between the two land (NASA Ames CASA and CASA-GFED) models is 1.7 Pg C for 2009-2010. Ocean models (NOBM and ECCO2-Darwin) differ by 35 in their global estimates of carbon flux with particularly strong disagreement in high latitudes. Based upon combinations of terrestrial and ocean fluxes, GEOS-5 reasonably simulated the seasonal cycle observed at northern hemisphere surface sites and by the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) while the model struggled to simulate the seasonal cycle at southern hemisphere surface locations. Though GEOS-5 was able to reasonably reproduce the patterns of XCO2 observed by GOSAT, it struggled to reproduce these aspects of AIRS observations. Despite large differences between land and ocean flux estimates, resulting differences in atmospheric mixing ratio were small, typically less than 5 ppmv at the surface and 3 ppmv in the XCO2 column. A statistical analysis based on the variability of observations shows that flux differences of these magnitudes are difficult to distinguish from natural variability, regardless of measurement platform.

  12. Flux measurements by the NRC Twin Otter atmospheric research aircraft: 1987-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Raymond L.; Worth, Devon E.; MacPherson, J. Ian; Bastian, Matthew; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    Over the past 30 years, the Canadian Twin Otter research group has operated an aircraft platform for the study of atmospheric greenhouse gas fluxes (carbon dioxide, ozone, nitrous oxide and methane) and energy exchange (latent and sensible heat) over a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems in North America. Some of the acquired data from these projects have now been archived at the Flight Research Laboratory and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. The dataset, which contains the measurements obtained in eight projects from 1987 to 2011 are now publicly available. All these projects were carried out in order to improve our understanding of the biophysical controls acting on land-surface atmosphere fluxes. Some of the projects also attempted to quantify the impacts of agroecosystems on the environment. To provide information on the data available, we briefly describe each project and some of the key findings by referring to previously published relevant work. As new flux analysis techniques are being developed, we are confident that much additional information can be extracted from this unique data set.

  13. A Low-cost, Portable, Ruggedized Cosmic Muon Detector Prototype for Geological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo Navarrete, E.; Bonneville, A.

    2012-12-01

    Muons, neutrons and protons observed at the Earth's surface are generated by cosmic ray primaries causing cascades in the atmosphere. Cosmic muon tomography is a cost effective real time monitoring technique that can be applied to determine large scale displacement of reservoir fluids induced by injection of liquid or gas. Such technique would need a detector array with an overall sensitivity tailored to the monitored volume and the expected density change in the target geological formation over the projected injection time. A scalable detector system, able to withstand the harsh conditions of underground deployment is a must for the evaluation of this promising technique. This paper presents the design and construction of a portable muon flux monitor, known as the μ-Witness. The detector is based on coincidence counts between two scintillator panels to be used as an indicator of density-dependent attenuation of cosmic muon flux. The Muon Witness detector (μ-Witness) has been designed to be able to measure cosmic muon flux for periods of time of up to 40 days, using battery power. The prototype has been mounted in a ruggedized case to enable measurements in underground environments. The purpose of this prototype is to evaluate the feasibility of using 3D density tomography in geological applications. The efficiency of the detector has been experimentally determined to be 57±3%. This measurement was performed by comparing the detector response to the response of a larger and more efficient muon counter in the same location. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the cosmic muon flux, and the measured efficiency, the projected sensitivities for density changes in large underground monitored volumes are presented as well as the results of a test run in a shallow underground facility. Along with a detector prototype, a model of the muon attenuation inversion must be developed in order to take into account the different energy and angular distribution of the cosmic muons

  14. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  15. GENERATION OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN LOW SOLAR ATMOSPHERIC FLUX TUBES BY PHOTOSPHERIC MOTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumford, S. J.; Fedun, V.; Erdélyi, R., E-mail: s.mumford@sheffield.ac.uk [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH UK (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-20

    Recent ground- and space-based observations reveal the presence of small-scale motions between convection cells in the solar photosphere. In these regions, small-scale magnetic flux tubes are generated via the interaction of granulation motion and the background magnetic field. This paper studies the effects of these motions on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave excitation from broadband photospheric drivers. Numerical experiments of linear MHD wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube embedded in a realistic gravitationally stratified solar atmosphere between the photosphere and the low choromosphere (above β = 1) are performed. Horizontal and vertical velocity field drivers mimic granular buffeting and solar global oscillations. A uniform torsional driver as well as Archimedean and logarithmic spiral drivers mimic observed torsional motions in the solar photosphere. The results are analyzed using a novel method for extracting the parallel, perpendicular, and azimuthal components of the perturbations, which caters to both the linear and non-linear cases. Employing this method yields the identification of the wave modes excited in the numerical simulations and enables a comparison of excited modes via velocity perturbations and wave energy flux. The wave energy flux distribution is calculated to enable the quantification of the relative strengths of excited modes. The torsional drivers primarily excite Alfvén modes (≈60% of the total flux) with small contributions from the slow kink mode, and, for the logarithmic spiral driver, small amounts of slow sausage mode. The horizontal and vertical drivers primarily excite slow kink or fast sausage modes, respectively, with small variations dependent upon flux surface radius.

  16. Flux measurements in the surface Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer over the Aegean Sea, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostopoulos, V E; Helmis, C G

    2014-10-01

    Micro-meteorological measurements within the surface Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer took place at the shoreline of two islands at northern and south-eastern Aegean Sea of Greece. The primary goal of these experimental campaigns was to study the momentum, heat and humidity fluxes over this part of the north-eastern Mediterranean Sea, characterized by limited spatial and temporal scales which could affect these exchanges at the air-sea interface. The great majority of the obtained records from both sites gave higher values up to factor of two, compared with the estimations from the most widely used parametric formulas that came mostly from measurements over open seas and oceans. Friction velocity values from both campaigns varied within the same range and presented strong correlation with the wind speed at 10 m height while the calculated drag coefficient values at the same height for both sites were found to be constant in relation with the wind speed. Using eddy correlation analysis, the heat flux values were calculated (virtual heat fluxes varied from -60 to 40 W/m(2)) and it was found that they are affected by the limited spatial and temporal scales of the responding air-sea interaction mechanism. Similarly, the humidity fluxes appeared to be strongly influenced by the observed intense spatial heterogeneity of the sea surface temperature.

  17. 3D Simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in Lower Solar Atmospheric Flux Tubes Driven by Photospheric Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Mumford, S J; Erdélyi, R

    2013-01-01

    Aims. Recent ground- and space-based observations reveal the presence of small-scale motions between convection cells in the solar photosphere. In these regions small-scale magnetic flux tubes are generated due to the interaction of granulation motion and background magnetic field. This paper aims to study the effects of these motions, in regions of enhanced magnetic field, on magnetohydrodynamic wave excitation, propagation and energy flux from the solar photosphere up towards the solar corona. Methods. Numerical experiments of magnetohydrodynamic wave propagation in a realistic gravitationally stratified solar atmosphere from five different modelled photospheric drivers are performed. Horizontal and vertical drivers to mimic granular buffeting and solar global oscillations, a uniform torsional driver, an Archimedean spiral and a logarithmic spiral to mimic observed torsional motions in the solar photosphere are investigated. The numerical results are analysed using a novel method for extracting the parallel...

  18. Background concentrations and fluxes of atmospheric ammonia over a deciduous forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.; Pryor, S. C.; Boegh, E.;

    2015-01-01

    . In this study, we present two months of half-hourly NH3 fluxes and concentrations measured using a Relaxed Eddy Accumulation system during late summer and fall 2013 above a remote forest site in the central Midwest in USA. Supplementary nitric acid (HNO3) flux and size-resolved aerosol-N measurements are used.......11 μg NH3-N m−2 s−1. The wetness of the forest surfaces (assessed using a proxy of time since precipitation) was found to be crucial in controlling both deposition and emission of atmospheric NH3. Size resolved aerosol concentrations (of NH4+, NO3−, Cl− and SO42−) indicated that the aerosol and gas...

  19. Climate simulations with a new air-sea turbulent flux parameterization in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Junmei; Gao, Zhiqiu; Lenschow, Donald H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines climate simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (NCAR CAM3) using a new air-sea turbulent flux parameterization scheme. The current air-sea turbulent flux scheme in CAM3 consists of three basic bulk flux equations that are solved simultaneously by an iterative computational technique. We recently developed a new turbulent flux parameterization scheme where the Obukhov stability length is parameterized directly by using a bulk Richardson number, an aerodynamic roughness length, and a heat roughness length. Its advantages are that it (1) avoids the iterative process and thus increases the computational efficiency, (2) takes account of the difference between z0m and z0h and allows large z0m/z0h, and (3) preserves the accuracy of iteration. An offline test using Tropical Ocean-Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) data shows that the original scheme overestimates the surface fluxes under very weak winds but the new scheme gives better results. Under identical initial and boundary conditions, the original CAM3 and CAM3 coupled with the new turbulent flux scheme are used to simulate the global distribution of air-sea surface turbulent fluxes, and precipitation. Comparisons of model outputs against the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS), the Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux), and Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) show that: (1) the new scheme produces more realistic surface wind stress in the North Pacific and North Atlantic trade wind belts and wintertime extratropical storm track regions; (2) the latent heat flux in the Northern Hemisphere trade wind zones shows modest improvement in the new scheme, and the latent heat flux bias in the western boundary current region of the Gulf Stream is reduced; and (3) the simulated precipitation in the new scheme is closer to observation in the Asian monsoon

  20. A plastic scintillator-based muon tomography system with an integrated muon spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, V. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories Ltd (former Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd), Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Canada K0J 1P0 (Canada); Armitage, J. [Department of Physics, Room 3302 Herzberg Laboratories, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Canada K1S 5B6 (Canada); Baig, F.; Boniface, K. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories Ltd (former Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd), Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Canada K0J 1P0 (Canada); Boudjemline, K. [Department of Physics, Room 3302 Herzberg Laboratories, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Canada K1S 5B6 (Canada); Bueno, J. [Advanced Applied Physics Solutions Inc., 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Charles, E. [Canada Border Services Agency, 79 Bentley Avenue, Ottawa, Canada K1A 0L8 (Canada); Drouin, P-L. [Defence Research and Development Canada, 3701 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Canada K1A 0Z4 (Canada); Erlandson, A., E-mail: Andrew.Erlandson@cnl.ca [Department of Physics, Room 3302 Herzberg Laboratories, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Canada K1S 5B6 (Canada); Canadian Nuclear Laboratories Ltd (former Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd), Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Canada K0J 1P0 (Canada); Gallant, G. [Canada Border Services Agency, 79 Bentley Avenue, Ottawa, Canada K1A 0L8 (Canada); Gazit, R. [Advanced Applied Physics Solutions Inc., 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Godin, D.; Golovko, V.V. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories Ltd (former Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd), Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Canada K0J 1P0 (Canada); Howard, C. [Defence Research and Development Canada, 3701 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Canada K1A 0Z4 (Canada); Hydomako, R. [Advanced Applied Physics Solutions Inc., 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Defence Research and Development Canada, 3701 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Canada K1A 0Z4 (Canada); and others

    2015-10-21

    A muon scattering tomography system which uses extruded plastic scintillator bars for muon tracking and a dedicated muon spectrometer that measures scattering through steel slabs has been constructed and successfully tested. The atmospheric muon detection efficiency is measured to be 97% per plane on average and the average intrinsic hit resolution is 2.5 mm. In addition to creating a variety of three-dimensional images of objects of interest, a quantitative study has been carried out to investigate the impact of including muon momentum measurements when attempting to detect high-density, high-Z material. As expected, the addition of momentum information improves the performance of the system. For a fixed data-taking time of 60 s and a fixed false positive fraction, the probability to detect a target increases when momentum information is used. This is the first demonstration of the use of muon momentum information from dedicated spectrometer measurements in muon scattering tomography.

  1. Source, flux and balance of atmospheric deposition of metals at Ile-de-France; Source, flux et bilan des retombees atmospheriques de metaux en Ile de France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azimi, S.

    2004-07-15

    The urban atmosphere is submitted to large inputs of anthropogenic contaminants arising from both stationary (power plants, industries, etc.) and mobile (road traffic) sources. These small particles may be transported over long distances and affect ecosystems. Significant dry and wet atmospheric deposition also occurs locally and contributes to the contamination of urban runoff. The aim of this study is to compare heavy metal and hydrocarbon atmospheric deposition fluxes to other input ways on agricultural and urban areas to assess their importance. Moreover, a source investigation has been done to identify the main origins of these pollutants. Before the quantification of pollutant fluxes, a comparison of several sampling procedures was performed. As a result, the sampling of total atmospheric deposition is not affected by the funnel material (Teflon and polyethylene) or by the sampling duration (7 and 28 days). However, the rinsing step of the funnel walls showed a higher relative importance during short sampling periods. The relative amount contained in these solutions reached 24 to 40 % of the total flux during weekly sampling periods and 8 to 18 % during monthly sampling periods, whatever the element considered. The temporal evolution of atmospheric deposition showed no seasonal influence on flux variations during the 2001-2002 period. Considering an 8-year period behaviour, between 1994 and 2002, a significant decrease of the deposition fluxes of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn occurred at the Creteil site which is placed in an industrialized area of the Paris suburb. The decreasing factor reached 16, 2.5, 4 and 7.5 for these elements respectively. At the Ile-de-France scale, the deposition flux levels on urban and semi-urban areas were of the same order of magnitude (?20 tonnes per year for Ba, Cu, Pb and Sr). Since semi-urban surface area is four times higher than urban ones, the important influence of anthropogenic activities on atmospheric deposition of urban areas is

  2. The micrometeoroid mass flux into the upper atmosphere: Arecibo results and a comparison with prior estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, J. D.; Janches, D.; Meisel, D. D.; Zhou, Q.-H.

    Radar micrometeor observations at Arecibo Observatory have enabled direct estimates of the meteoroid mass flux into the upper atmosphere. We report mass flux determinations from November 1997/1998 observations that are based on the observed number of meteor events per day in the 300-m diameter Arecibo beam and on particle mass determinations from that fraction of all particles for which deceleration is measured. The average mass of the Arecibo micrometeoroids that manifest observable deceleration is ˜0.32/0.76 µgm/particle with a resultant annual whole-Earth mass flux of 1.6 × 106/2.7 × 106 kg/yr over the ˜10-5-10² µgm mass range for 1997/1998, respectively. The annual whole-earth mass flux per decade of particle mass is calculated and compared with that of Ceplecha et al. [1998] (3.7 × 106 kg/yr) and with that derived by Love and Brownlee [1993] (LB) from small particle impact craters on the orbital Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). We also give the LDEF results as significantly modified using the Arecibo-determined average particle velocity of ˜50 km/sec—much larger than the effective value of 12 km/sec used by LB. This modification results in a net LDEF mass flux of 1.8×106 kg/yr—7% of the value we determined from reanalysis of the LB data using their original 12 km/sec mean impact speed. These results may provoke some debate.

  3. Atmospheric Deposition of Indium in the Northeastern United States: Flux and Historical Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sarah Jane O; Keach, Carrie; Hemond, Harold F

    2015-11-01

    The metal indium is an example of an increasingly important material used in electronics and new energy technologies, whose environmental behavior and toxicity are poorly understood despite increasing evidence of detrimental health impacts and human-induced releases to the environment. In the present work, the history of indium deposition from the atmosphere is reconstructed from its depositional record in an ombrotrophic bog in Massachusetts. A novel freeze-coring technique is used to overcome coring difficulties posed by woody roots and peat compressibility, enabling retrieval of relatively undisturbed peat cores dating back more than a century. Results indicate that long-range atmospheric transport is a significant pathway for the transport of indium, with peak concentrations of 69 ppb and peak fluxes of 1.9 ng/cm2/yr. Atmospheric deposition to the bog began increasing in the late 1800s/early 1900s, and peaked in the early 1970s. A comparison of deposition data with industrial production and emissions estimates suggests that both coal combustion and the smelting of lead, zinc, copper, and tin sulfides are sources of indium to the atmosphere in this region. Deposition appears to have decreased considerably since the 1970s, potentially a visible effect of particulate emissions controls instated in North America during that decade. PMID:26426729

  4. The possibilities of Cherenkov telescopes to perform cosmic-ray muon imaging of volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Daniele; Catalano, Osvaldo; Cusumano, Giancarlo; Del Santo, Melania; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Mineo, Teresa; Pareschi, Giovanni; Vercellone, Stefano; Zuccarello, Luciano

    2016-04-01

    atmospheric muons, that is needed to asses a reference model of the through-target integrated flux. Here we describe our plans for the production of a Cherenkov telescope with suitable characteristics for installation in the summit zone of Etna volcano.

  5. Measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux by Super-Kamiokande: energy spectra, geomagnetic effects, and solar modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, E; Abe, K; Haga, Y; Hayato, Y; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakajima, T; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Orii, A; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Takeda, A; Tanaka, H; Tomura, T; Wendell, R A; Akutsu, R; Irvine, T; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Nishimura, Y; Labarga, L; Fernandez, P; Gustafson, J; Kachulis, C; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Berkman, S; Nantais, C M; Tanaka, H A; Tobayama, S; Goldhaber, M; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Weatherly, P; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Takhistov, V; Ganezer, K S; Hartfiel, B L; Hill, J; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Park, R G; Himmel, A; Li, Z; OSullivan, E; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Friend, M; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Yano, T; Cao, S V; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Fukuda, Y; Choi, K; Itow, Y; Suzuki, T; Mijakowski, P; Frankiewicz, K; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Li, X; Palomino, J L; Wilking, M J; Yanagisawa, C; Fukuda, D; Ishino, H; Kayano, T; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Xu, C; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Suda, Y; Yokoyama, M; Bronner, C; Hartz, M; Martens, K; Marti, Ll; Suzuki, Y; Vagins, M R; Martin, J F; Konaka, A; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Wilkes, R J

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study on the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy region from sub-GeV up to several TeV using the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector is presented in this paper. The energy and azimuthal spectra of the atmospheric ${\

  6. The atmospheric signal of terrestrial carbon isotopic discrimination and its implication for partitioning carbon fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 13C/12C ratio in atmospheric carbon dioxide has been measured in samples taken in the NOAA/CMDL network since 1991. By examining the relationship between weekly anomalies in 13C and CO2 at continental sites in the network, we infer temporal and spatial values for the isotopic signature of terrestrial CO2 fluxes. We can convert these isotopic signatures to values of discrimination if we assume the atmospheric starting point for photosynthesis. The average discrimination in the Northern Hemisphere between 30 and 50 deg N is calculated to be 16.6 ± 0.2 per mil. In contrast to some earlier modeling studies, we find no strong latitudinal gradient in discrimination. However, we do observe that discrimination in Eurasia is larger than in North America, which is consistent with two modeling studies. We also observe a possible trend in the North American average of discrimination toward less discrimination. There is no apparent trend in the Eurasian average or at any individual sites. However, there is interannual variability on the order of 2 per mil at several sites and regions. Finally, we calculate the northern temperate terrestrial CO2 flux replacing our previous discrimination values of about 18 per mil with the average value of 16.6 calculated in this study. We find this enhances the terrestrial sink by about 0.4 GtC/yr

  7. Muon and Tau Neutrinos Spectra from Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, D

    2003-01-01

    Solar neutrino flares and mixing are considered. Most power-full solar flare as the ones occurred on 23rd February 1956, September 29th 1989, 28th October and on 2nd-4th November 2003 are sources of cosmic rays, X, gamma and neutrino bursts. These flares took place both on front or in the edge and in the hidden solar disk. The observed and estimated total flare energy should be a source of a prompt secondary neutrino burst originated, by proton-proton-pion production on the sun itself; a more delayed and spread neutrino flux signal arise by the solar charged flare particles reaching the terrestrial atmosphere. Our first estimates of neutrino signals in largest underground detectors hint for few events in correlation with, gamma,radio onser. Our approximated spectra for muons and taus from these rare solar eruption are shown over the most common background. The muon and tau signature is very peculiar and characteristic over electron and anti-electron neutrino fluxes. The rise of muon neutrinos will be detectab...

  8. The use of Pb-210 to normalize fluxes and burdens of atmospheric contaminants in lake sediment cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunskill, G.J.; Wilkinson, P.; Hunt, R.; Muir, D.; Billeck, B.; Lockhart, L. (Freshwater Inst., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada))

    1990-01-09

    It is possible to estimate the local annual atmospheric flux (Bq/m[sup 2] [sm bullet] yr) of Pb-210 to land and lake surfaces from measurements of the integral of excess Pb-210 in soil and peat profiles. If you compare this average Pb-210 flux to the soil surface, to the Pb-210 flux to deep lake sediments, you will usually find that the lake sediment flux is a factor of 2 to 6 greater. This is because most of the clay-sized and organic material added to the lake (and resuspended in the lake) each year is funneled into the deeper parts of the lake basin. The ratio of the deep lake Pb-210 sediment flux to the average terrestrial soil Pb-210 flux will be called the focusing factor, which can be used to crudely estimate whole lake sedimentation rates (g/m[sup 2] lake surface area [sm bullet] yr). Many industrial and agricultural contaminants are delivered to remote lakes by atmospheric deposition, and those contaminants that are strongly particle reactive will usually be resuspended and funneled into the deeper parts of the lake basin similar to Pb-210. Often a single sediment core history of deposition is used to estimate contaminant burdens and fluxes at the coring site in a lake basin. These deep basin contaminant burdens and fluxes can be divided by the focusing factor to estimate the burden per unit lake surface area and the atmospheric deposition rate to the lake surface area.

  9. Comparison of energy fluxes at the land surface-atmosphere interface in an Alpine valley as simulated with different models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Grossi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of a research project coupling meteorological and hydrological models in mountainous areas a distributed Snow-Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model was developed and applied to simulate the energy fluxes at the land surface – atmosphere interface in an Alpine valley (Toce Valley - North Italy during selected flood events in the last decade. Energy fluxes simulated by the distributed energy transfer model were compared with those simulated by a limited area meteorological model for the event of June 1997 and the differences in the spatial and temporal distribution. The Snow/Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model was also applied to simulate the energy fluxes at the land surface-atmosphere interface for a single cell, assumed to be representative of the Siberia site (Toce Valley, where a micro-meteorological station was installed and operated for 2.5 months in autumn 1999. The Siberia site is very close to the Nosere site, where a standard meteorological station was measuring precipitation, air temperature and humidity, global and net radiation and wind speed during the same special observing period. Data recorded by the standard meteorological station were used to force the energy transfer model and simulate the point energy fluxes at the Siberia site, while turbulent fluxes observed at the Siberia site were used to derive the latent heat flux from the energy balance equation. Finally, the hourly evapotranspiration flux computed by this procedure was compared to the evapotranspiration flux simulated by the energy transfer model. Keywords: energy exchange processes, land surface-atmosphere interactions, turbulent fluxes

  10. Carbon allocation and carbon isotope fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, N.; Gessler, A.; Kayler, Z.; Keel, S. G.; Badeck, F.; Barthel, M.; Boeckx, P.; Buchmann, N.; Brugnoli, E.; Esperschütz, J.; Gavrichkova, O.; Ghashghaie, J.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Keitel, C.; Knohl, A.; Kuptz, D.; Palacio, S.; Salmon, Y.; Uchida, Y.; Bahn, M.

    2011-11-01

    The terrestrial carbon (C) cycle has received increasing interest over the past few decades, however, there is still a lack of understanding of the fate of newly assimilated C allocated within plants and to the soil, stored within ecosystems and lost to the atmosphere. Stable carbon isotope studies can give novel insights into these issues. In this review we provide an overview of an emerging picture of plant-soil-atmosphere C fluxes, as based on C isotope studies, and identify processes determining related C isotope signatures. The first part of the review focuses on isotopic fractionation processes within plants during and after photosynthesis. The second major part elaborates on plant-internal and plant-rhizosphere C allocation patterns at different time scales (diel, seasonal, interannual), including the speed of C transfer and time lags in the coupling of assimilation and respiration, as well as the magnitude and controls of plant-soil C allocation and respiratory fluxes. Plant responses to changing environmental conditions, the functional relationship between the physiological and phenological status of plants and C transfer, and interactions between C, water and nutrient dynamics are discussed. The role of the C counterflow from the rhizosphere to the aboveground parts of the plants, e.g. via CO2 dissolved in the xylem water or as xylem-transported sugars, is highlighted. The third part is centered around belowground C turnover, focusing especially on above- and belowground litter inputs, soil organic matter formation and turnover, production and loss of dissolved organic C, soil respiration and CO2 fixation by soil microbes. Furthermore, plant controls on microbial communities and activity via exudates and litter production as well as microbial community effects on C mineralization are reviewed. A further part of the paper is dedicated to physical interactions between soil CO2 and the soil matrix, such as CO2 diffusion and dissolution processes within the

  11. A method for detection of muon induced electromagnetic showers with the ANTARES detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary aim of ANTARES is neutrino astronomy with upward going muons created in charged current muon neutrino interactions in the detector and its surroundings. Downward going muons are background for neutrino searches. These muons are the decay products of cosmic-ray collisions in the Earth's atmosphere far above the detector. This paper presents a method to identify and count electromagnetic showers induced along atmospheric muon tracks with the ANTARES detector. The method is applied to both cosmic muon data and simulations and its applicability to the reconstruction of muon event energies is demonstrated.

  12. A method for detection of muon induced electromagnetic showers with the ANTARES detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, J.A. [IFIC-Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, Apdo. de Correos 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Al Samarai, I. [CPPM-Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 Avenue de Luminy, Case 902, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Albert, A. [GRPHE-Institut universitaire de technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit BP 50568-68008 Colmar (France); Andre, M. [Technical University of Catalonia, Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics, Rambla Exposicio, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Anghinolfi, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Anton, G. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Anvar, S. [Direction des Sciences de la Matiere-Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers-Service d' Electronique des Detecteurs et d' Informatique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Ardid, M. [Institut d' Investigacio per a la Gestio Integrada de Zones Costaneres (IGIC)-Universitat Politecnica de Valencia. C/ Paranimf 1, 46730 Gandia (Spain); Assis Jesus, A.C.; Astraatmadja, T. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2012-05-21

    The primary aim of ANTARES is neutrino astronomy with upward going muons created in charged current muon neutrino interactions in the detector and its surroundings. Downward going muons are background for neutrino searches. These muons are the decay products of cosmic-ray collisions in the Earth's atmosphere far above the detector. This paper presents a method to identify and count electromagnetic showers induced along atmospheric muon tracks with the ANTARES detector. The method is applied to both cosmic muon data and simulations and its applicability to the reconstruction of muon event energies is demonstrated.

  13. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Mediterranean Sea: Atmospheric occurrence, deposition and decoupling with settling fluxes in the water column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ∑30PAH gas phase concentrations (13–86 and 22–40 ng m−3 in the Mediterranean and Black Seas, respectively) dominated the atmospheric levels due to the high contribution of phenanthrene, dibenzothiophene and their alkylated derivates. The high variability of PAH atmospheric concentrations in the different sub-basins is due to several factors (i.e. air-mass trajectory, proximity to sources and losses by deposition). The ∑30PAH atmospheric deposition (dominated by low MW PAH net air–water diffusive fluxes) is estimated to be ∼3100 ton y−1 (Mediterranean) and ∼500 ton y−1 (Black Sea). Net volatilization for certain PAHs was estimated. Deposition fluxes (1–2 orders of magnitude higher than reported PAH settling fluxes in the water column) confirm an important depletion/sink of water column PAH in the photic zone, especially for low MW PAHs. Degradation processes in the water column may be responsible for this decoupling. Conversely, high MW PAHs dry deposition fluxes are similar to their settling fluxes. Highlights: ► First comprehensive assessment of atmospheric PAH levels and deposition across the Mediterranean Sea. ► PAH atmospheric concentrations are highly variable across the Mediterranean Sea. ► Mediterranean Sea open waters receive ∼3100 ton of PAHs each year from the atmosphere. ► Important depletion of low MW PAH water column concentrations in the photic zone. ► Degradation processes most likely responsible of the atmospheric deposition – settling fluxes decoupling. - Capsule: Mediterranean Sea open waters receive ∼3100 ton of PAHs each year from the atmosphere but only a small fraction of this input settle down in the water column due to degradation processes.

  14. Top-of-the-Atmosphere Shortwave Flux Estimation from UV Observations: An Empirical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, P.; Joiner, Joanna; Vasilkov, A.; Bhartia, P. K.; da Silva, Arlindo

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiation are essential to the understanding of Earth's climate. Clouds, aerosols, and ozone (0,) are among the most important agents impacting the Earth's short-wave (SW) radiation budget. There are several sensors in orbit that provide independent information related to the Earth's SW radiation budget. Having coincident information from these sensors is important for understanding their potential contributions. The A-train constellation of satellites provides a unique opportunity to analyze near-simultaneous data from several of these sensors. They include the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), on the NASA Aura satellite, that makes TOA hyper-spectral measurements from ultraviolet (UV) to visible wavelengths, and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument, on the NASA Aqua satellite, that makes broadband measurements in both the long- and short-wave. OMI measurements have been successfully utilized to derive the information on trace gases (e.g., 0 1, NO" and SO,), clouds, and absorbing aerosols. TOA SW fluxes are estimated using a combination of data from CERES and the Aqua MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). In this paper, OMI retrievals of cloud/aerosol parameters and 0 1 have been collocated with CERES TOA SW flux retrievals. We use this collocated data to develop a neural network that estimates TOA shortwave flux globally over ocean using data from OMI and meteorological analyses. This input data include the effective cloud fraction, cloud optical centroid pressure (OCP), total-column 0" and sun-satellite viewing geometry from OMI as well as wind speed and water vapor from the Goddard Earth Observing System 5 Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (GEOS-5 MERRA) along with a climatology of chlorophyll content. We train the neural network using a subset of CERES retrievals of TOA SW flux as the target output (truth) and withhold a different subset of

  15. PHENIX Muon Arms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PHENIX Muon Arms detect muons at rapidities of |y|=(1.2-2.4) with full azimuthal acceptance. Each muon arm must track and identify muons and provide good rejection of pions and kaons (∼10-3). In order to accomplish this we employ a radial field magnetic spectrometer with precision tracking (Muon Tracker) followed by a stack of absorber/low resolution tracking layers (Muon Identifier). The design, construction, testing and expected run parameters of both the muon tracker and the muon identifier are described

  16. PHENIX Muon Arms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akikawa, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Archuleta, J.B.; Archuleta, J.R.; Armendariz, R.; Armijo, V.; Awes, T.C.; Baldisseri, A.; Barker, A.B.; Barnes, P.D.; Bassalleck, B.; Batsouli, S.; Behrendt, J.; Bellaiche, F.G.; Bland, A.W.; Bobrek, M.; Boissevain, J.G.; Borel, H.; Brooks, M.L.; Brown, A.W.; Brown, D.S.; Bruner, N.; Cafferty, M.M.; Carey, T.A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chavez, L.L.; Chollet, S.; Choudhury, R.K.; Chung, M.S.; Cianciolo, V.; Clark, D.J.; Cobigo, Y.; Dabrowski, C.M.; Debraine, A.; DeMoss, J.; Dinesh, B.V.; Drachenberg, J.L.; Drapier, O.; Echave, M.A.; Efremenko, Y.V.; En' yo, H.; Fields, D.E.; Fleuret, F.; Fried, J.; Fujisawa, E.; Funahashi, H.; Gadrat, S.; Gastaldi, F.; Gee, T.F.; Glenn, A.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Hance, R.H.; Hart, G.W.; Hayashi, N.; Held, S.; Hicks, J.S.; Hill, J.C.; Hoade, R.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Horaguchi, T.; Hunter, C.T.; Hurst, D.E.; Ichihara, T.; Imai, K.; Isenhower, L.D.L. Davis; Isenhower, L.D.L. Donald; Ishihara, M.; Jang, W.Y.; Johnson, J.; Jouan, D.; Kamihara, N.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kang, J.H.; Kapoor, S.S.; Kim, D.J.; Kim, D.-W.; Kim, G.-B.; Kinnison, W.W.; Klinksiek, S.; Kluberg, L.; Kobayashi, H.; Koehler, D.; Kotchenda, L.; Kuberg, C.H.; Kurita, K.; Kweon, M.J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G.S.; LaBounty, J.J.; Lajoie, J.G.; Lee, D.M.; Lee, S.; Leitch, M.J.; Li, Z.; Liu, M.X.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.; Lockner, E.; Lopez, J.D.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, X.B.; McCain, M.C.; McGaughey, P.L.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, R.E.; Mohanty, A.K.; Montoya, B.C.; Moss, J.M.; Murata, J.; Murray, M.M.; Nagle, J.L.; Nakada, Y.; Newby, J.; Obenshain, F.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pate, S.F.; Plasil, F.; Pope, K.; Qualls, J.M.; Rao, G.; Read, K.F. E-mail: readkf@ornl.gov; Robinson, S.H.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosnet, P.; Roth, R.; Saito, N.; Sakuma, T.; Sandhoff, W.F.; Sanfratello, L.; Sato, H.D.; Savino, R.; Sekimoto, M.; Shaw, M.R.; Shibata, T.-A.; Sim, K.S.; Skank, H.D.; Smith, D.E.; Smith, G.D. [and others

    2003-03-01

    The PHENIX Muon Arms detect muons at rapidities of |y|=(1.2-2.4) with full azimuthal acceptance. Each muon arm must track and identify muons and provide good rejection of pions and kaons ({approx}10{sup -3}). In order to accomplish this we employ a radial field magnetic spectrometer with precision tracking (Muon Tracker) followed by a stack of absorber/low resolution tracking layers (Muon Identifier). The design, construction, testing and expected run parameters of both the muon tracker and the muon identifier are described.

  17. Propagation and energy deposition of cosmic rays' muons on terrestrial environments

    CERN Document Server

    Marinho, Franciole; Galante, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Earth is constantly struck by radiation coming from the interstellar medium. The very low energy end of the spectrum is shielded by the geomagnetic field but charged particles with energies higher than the geomagnetic cutoff will penetrate the atmosphere and are likely to interact, giving rise to secondary particles. Some astrophysical events, such as gamma ray bursts and supernovae, when happening at short distances, may affect the planet's biosphere due to the temporary enhanced radiation flux. Muons are abundantly produced by high energy cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere. These particles, due to their low cross section, are able to penetrate deep underground and underwater, with the possibility of affecting biological niches normally considered shielded from radiation. We investigate the interaction of muons produced by high energy cosmic rays on Earth's atmosphere using the Geant4 toolkit. We analyze penetration power in water and crust and also the interaction effects within bacteria-like material ac...

  18. Coastal upwelling fluxes of O2, N2O, and CO2 assessed from continuous atmospheric observations at Trinidad, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Lueker

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous atmospheric records of O2/N2, CO2 and N2O obtained at Trinidad, California document the effects of air-sea exchange during coastal upwelling and plankton bloom events. The atmospheric records provide continuous observations of air-sea fluxes related to synoptic scale upwelling events over several upwelling seasons. Combined with satellite, buoy and local meteorology data, calculated anomalies in O2/N2 and N2O were utilized in a simple atmospheric transport model to compute air-sea fluxes during coastal upwelling. CO2 fluxes were linked to the oceanic component of the O2 fluxes through local hydrographic data and estimated as a function of upwelling intensity (surface ocean temperature and wind speed. Regional air-sea fluxes of O2/N2, N2O, and CO2 during coastal upwelling were estimated with the aid of satellite wind and SST data. Upwelling CO2 fluxes were found to represent ~10% of export production along the northwest coast of North America. Synoptic scale upwelling events impact the net exchange of atmospheric CO2 along the coastal margin, and will vary in response to the frequency and duration of alongshore winds that are subject to climate change.

  19. Check of the accuracy of the relativity theory with atmospheric muon neutrinos from the AMANDA data of the years 2000 to 2003; Ueberpruefung der Genauigkeit der Relativitaetstheorie mit atmosphaerischen Myonneutrinos aus den AMANDA-Daten der Jahre 2000 bis 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.C.

    2006-11-08

    Atmospheric neutrinos allow one to test the principles of the Theory of Relativity in particular Lorentz invariance and the equivalence principle. Small deviations from these principles could lead, according to some theories, to detectable neutrino oscillations. Such oscillation effects are analysed in this thesis, using the data collected by the AMANDA detector. The neutrino telescope AMANDA is located at the South Pole and embedded in the Antarctic ice shield at a depth between 1500 m and 2000 m. AMANDA detects muon neutrinos via the Cherenkov light of neutrino induced muons allowing the reconstruction of the original neutrino direction. From the data of the years 2000 to 2003, which contain about seven billion recorded events and which mainly consist of the background of atmospheric muons, a sample of 3401 neutrino induced events has been selected. No indication for alternative oscillation effects has been found. For maximal mixing angles, a lower limit for parameters which violate Lorentz invariance or the equivalence principle could be set to {delta}{beta}(2 vertical stroke {phi} vertical stroke {delta}{gamma}){<=}5.15.10{sup -27}. (orig)

  20. The potential for regional-scale bias in top-down CO2 flux estimates due to atmospheric transport errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Miller

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of CO2 fluxes that are based on atmospheric data rely upon a meteorological model to simulate atmospheric CO2 transport. These models provide a quantitative link between surface fluxes of CO2 and atmospheric measurements taken downwind. Therefore, any errors in the meteorological model can propagate into atmospheric CO2 transport and ultimately bias the estimated CO2 fluxes. These errors, however, have traditionally been difficult to characterize. To examine the effects of CO2 transport errors on estimated CO2 fluxes, we use a global meteorological model-data assimilation system known as "CAM–LETKF" to quantify two aspects of the transport errors: error variances (standard deviations and temporal error correlations. Furthermore, we develop two case studies. In the first case study, we examine the extent to which CO2 transport uncertainties can bias CO2 flux estimates. In particular, we use a common flux estimate known as CarbonTracker to discover the minimum hypothetical bias that can be detected above the CO2 transport uncertainties. In the second case study, we then investigate which meteorological conditions may contribute to month-long biases in modeled atmospheric transport. We estimate 6 hourly CO2 transport uncertainties in the model surface layer that range from 0.15 to 9.6 ppm (standard deviation, depending on location, and we estimate an average error decorrelation time of ∼2.3 days at existing CO2 observation sites. As a consequence of these uncertainties, we find that CarbonTracker CO2 fluxes would need to be biased by at least 29%, on average, before that bias were detectable at existing non-marine atmospheric CO2 observation sites. Furthermore, we find that persistent, bias-type errors in atmospheric transport are associated with consistent low net radiation, low energy boundary layer conditions. The meteorological model is not necessarily more uncertain in these conditions. Rather, the extent to which meteorological

  1. Estimation of Volatile Organic Compound Fluxes Using the Forest-Land-Atmosphere Model (FLAME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inclán, Maria G.; Schween, Jan; Dlugi, Ralph

    1999-07-01

    The prognostic one-dimensional Forest-Land-Atmosphere Model (FLAME) has been further extended to simulate diurnal cycles of volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes inside and above an idealized mixed forest mainly composed of oaks and pines. The tree height is 12 m and the leaf area index is 4. The canopy crown is divided into five layers of equal leaf area increment. The algorithms developed by Guenther et al. are applied to predict the monoterpene emission from leaves in each canopy layer. The value of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) and foliage temperature (Tleaf) required by these algorithms are provided by FLAME. The modeled PAR and Tleaf are used for different leaf angle classes i from sun to shaded leaves within each layer j in the canopy.In the present study the authors examine the VOC fluxes modeled at a reference level above the forest for two cases, A and B, for which the modeled canopy temperature Tc reaches a maximum of approximately 21° and 31°C, respectively. It is supposed that VOC fluxes above the canopy are related to Tc by a function of the form F(Tc) = Fs exp[c(Tc TS)]. The authors intend to study the temperature exponent at canopy level c by deriving best-fit slopes.The resulting mean values of c = 0.125 ± 0.002 K1 for the morning VOC fluxes, and c = 0.267 ± 0.004 K1 for the afternoon, are larger than those used to calculate the emission on leaf scale from cuvette data (1 = 0.124 K1 and 2 = 0.09 K1 for oaks and pines, respectively). A sensitivity study was carried out using the modeled mean values of Tleaf and PAR in a canopy layer instead of the angle dependence to simulate measurements by an infrared radiation thermometer. The authors also tested the importance of the basal emission rate Es on the total VOC fluxes and c above the canopy.

  2. Remote Sensing and Sea-Truth Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian MacDonald

    2011-05-31

    , respectively. Based on the contemporaneous wind speeds at this site, contemporary estimates of the diffusive fluxes from the mixed layer to the atmosphere for methane, ethane, and propane are 26.5, 2.10, and 2.78 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}d, respectively. Continuous measurements of air and sea surface concentrations of methane were made to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution of the diffusive net sea-to-air fluxes. The atmospheric methane fluctuated between 1.70 ppm and 2.40 ppm during the entire cruise except for high concentrations (up to 4.01 ppm) sampled during the end of the occupation of GC600 and the transit between GC600 and GC185. Results from interpolations within the survey areas show the daily methane fluxes to the atmosphere at the three sites range from 0.744 to 300 mol d-1. Considering that the majority of seeps in the GOM are deep (>500 m), elevated CH{sub 4} concentrations in near-surface waters resulting from bubble-mediated CH4 transport in the water column are expected to be widespread in the Gulf of Mexico.

  3. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    Barrel Muons The last CMS week was dominated by the lowering of YB0. The date of lowering was fixed in January for February 28th. RPC and DT cabling of YB0 had to be done on the surface to allow a complete check of the status of the chambers before lowering. When the decision of the date was taken, the wheel cabling, planned to start at end of December, was not yet started for several “muon independent” reasons. Cabling and DT /RPC test started on Jan 22nd and ended on Feb 19th. Several teams worked on the surface of the wheel in parallel on the three different items, finishing just in time for lowering. This was a real challenge and a significant result. So by the end of the CMS Week, all the positive part of CMS plus YB0 were in the cavern. YB+2 had been lowered in January 19th, and YB+1 on February 1st. The vertical chambers of sectors 1 and 7 (8 DT/RPC packs), whose space was taken by the lowering machinery, had to be installed after lowering. This was done from Jan 24 to Jan 26 for...

  4. Outer scale and Monin-Obukhov flux relationships of atmospheric turbulence under dry convective conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruin, Henk; Hartogensis, Oscar

    2015-04-01

    In this study we will investigate the assumption that in the atmospheric surface layer the outer scale (L0) is proportional to the height above the surface, under dry convective conditions. For this purpose we analyzed raw sonic anemometers data collected at 3.5 m and at 9 m in a field campaign at the Santa Cruz Flats (32040.3190'N, 111032.641'W, 526 m of elevation) near Eloy, Arizona. For simplicity, we define the L0 as that separation distance at which the spatial correlation coefficient of air temperature at two points in the surface layer is 0.5. Then, according to the 2/3-Kolmogorov scaling law in the inertial sub-range, L0 is determined by the variance and the structure parameter of T . It is found that L0 does not scale with height. Possible reasons for this negative result will be discussed, by considering the methodology to determine structure parameters, Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, effects of intermittency and Monin-Obukhov flux relationships for variance and structure parameter for T . The question is asked whether the concept of surface constant flux layer still holds under strong convective condition.

  5. On cosmic rays flux variations in midlatitudes and their relations to geomagnetic and atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Anna; Blanco, Juan Jose; Mendes Ribeiro, Paulo Fernando

    The cosmic rays flux is globally modulated by the solar cycle and shows anti-correlation with the sunspot number. Near to the Earth it is modulated by the solar wind and the Earth's magnetic field. The analysis of the secondary cosmic rays produced when they interact in the low stratosphere allows extracting information about solar wind structures surrounding Earth's orbit, the magnetic field of the Earth and the temperature of the stratosphere. Recently, a new cosmic ray detector, the TRAGALDABAS, composed by RPC (Resistive Plate Chamber) planes, has been developed and installed to go deeper into the understanding of the cosmic rays arriving to the Earth surface. An international collaboration has been organized for keeping the detector operative and for analyzing the data. Here we present the analysis of the cosmic rays flux variations measured by two cosmic rays detectors of different types located in Spain (Castilla-La Mancha Neutron Monitor - CaLMa - in Guadalajara and TRAGALDABAS in Santiago de Compostela) and their comparison to changes both in the geomagnetic field components measured by the Coimbra Geomagnetic Observatory (Portugal) and in the atmospheric conditions (tropo- and stratosphere) measured by Spanish and Portuguese meteorological stations. The study is focused on a number of recent cosmic rays events and pays specific attention to the comparison of the CaLMa series and the preliminary TRAGALDABAS data.

  6. Development of a Portable Muon Witness System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.

    2011-01-01

    Since understanding and quantifying cosmic ray induced radioactive backgrounds in copper and germanium are important to the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, methods are needed for monitoring the levels of such backgrounds produced in materials being transported and processed for the experiment. This report focuses on work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop a muon witness system as a one way of monitoring induced activities. The operational goal of this apparatus is to characterize cosmic ray exposure of materials. The cosmic ray flux at the Earth’s surface is composed of several types of particles, including neutrons, muons, gamma rays and protons. These particles induce nuclear reactions, generating isotopes that contribute to the radiological background. Underground, the main mechanism of activation is by muon produced spallation neutrons since the hadron component of cosmic rays is removed at depths greater than a few tens of meters. This is a sub-dominant contributor above ground, but muons become predominant in underground experiments. For low-background experiments cosmogenic production of certain isotopes, such as 68Ge and 60Co, must be accounted for in the background budgets. Muons act as minimum ionizing particles, depositing a fixed amount of energy per unit length in a material, and have a very high penetrating power. Using muon flux measurements as a “witness” for the hadron flux, the cosmogenic induced activity can be quantified by correlating the measured muon flux and known hadronic production rates. A publicly available coincident muon cosmic ray detector design, the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector (BLCRD), assembled by Juniata College, is evaluated in this work. The performance of the prototype is characterized by assessing its muon flux measurements. This evaluation is done by comparing data taken in identical scenarios with other cosmic ray telescopes. The prototype is made of two plastic scintillator paddles with

  7. Next-generation angular distribution models for top-of-atmosphere radiative flux calculation from CERES instruments: methodology

    OpenAIRE

    W. Su; Corbett, J; Z. Eitzen; L. Liang

    2015-01-01

    The top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes are critical components to advancing our understanding of the Earth's radiative energy balance, radiative effects of clouds and aerosols, and climate feedback. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments provide broadband shortwave and longwave radiance measurements. These radiances are converted to fluxes by using scene-type-dependent angular distribution models (ADMs). This paper describes the next-gener...

  8. Hadron Production for the Neutrino Factory and for the Atmospheric Neutrino Flux

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The HARP experiment carries out, at the CERN PS, a programme of measurements of secondary hadron production, over the full solid angle, produced on thin and thick nuclear targets by beams of protons and pions with momenta in the range 2 to 15~\\GeVc. The first aim of this experiment is to acquire adequate knowledge of pion yields for an optimal design of the proton driver of the Neutrino Factory. The second aim is to reduce substantially the existing $\\sim 30$\\% uncertainty in the calculation of absolute atmospheric neutrino fluxes and the $\\sim 7$\\% uncertainty in the ratio of neutrino flavours, required for a refined interpretation of the evidence for neutrino oscillation from the study of atmospheric neutrinos in present and forthcoming experiments. The HARP experiment comprises a large-acceptance charged-particle magnetic spectrometer of conventional design, located in the East Hall of the CERN PS and using the T9 tagged charged-particle beam. The main detector is a cylindrical TPC inside a solenoid magnet...

  9. Feasible groundbased atmospheric and flux measurements by developing countries in support of satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, A. P.

    To allow increasing participation of developing countries in global change studies, ground based measurement systems which can be easily comissioned and provide support to satellite observations so as to fit into global mapping need to be chosen carefully. Those relating to atmospheric parameters (greenhouse gas concentrations, emission fluxes, transport properties, etc.) are discussed here. The simplest and of most immediate interest relate to sources and sinks of CH_4 (primarily from rice paddy fields, animals, wetlands) and N_2O (soils, oceans). Measurement techniques and inter-country campaign plans are discussed. There are also important possibilities of using the same technique for measurements of emissions from biomass burning alongwith ozone measurements coupled with survey of biomass burning areas from satellites. Another major area concerns the proposed ITYO programme (International Tropospheric Ozone Year), for which, apart from balloon ozone ascents, use of UV-B radiometry at selected wavelengths is considered. The third area discussed concerns measurements of atmospheric aerosols using Multi-wavelength Radiometer (MWR). In addition, in the last few years, a number of advanced groundlevel systems have been installed at low latitudes, which, if made available widely to developing country scientists, and their participation supported financially, could provide a major opportunity for world class research. These include: the MST radar at Tirupati (India) Chung-Li (Taiwan) and Arecibo, Puerto Rico; the Lidars at Thumba and at Natal, Brazil; and the Laser Heterodyning System and mm-wave radiospectrometer at Delhi.

  10. Flux induced growth of atmospheric nano-particles by organic vapors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols play critical roles in air quality, public health, and visibility. In addition, they strongly influence climate by scattering solar radiation and by changing the reflectivity and lifetime of clouds. One major but still poorly understood source of atmospheric aerosol is new particle formation, which consists of the formation of thermodynamically stable clusters from trace gas molecules (homogeneous nucleation followed by growth of these clusters to a detectable size (~3 nm. Because freshly nucleated clusters are most susceptible to loss due to high rate of coagulation with pre-existing aerosol population, the initial growth rate strongly influences the rate of new particle formation and ambient aerosol population. Whereas many field observations and modeling studies indicate that organics enhance the initial growth of the clusters and therefore new particle formation, thermodynamic considerations would suggest that the strong increase of equilibrium vapor concentration due to cluster surface curvature (Kelvin effect may prevent ambient organics from condensing on these small clusters. Here the initial condensational growth of freshly nucleated clusters is described as heterogeneous nucleation of organic molecules onto these clusters. We find that the strong gradient in cluster population with respect to its size lead to positive cluster number flux, and therefore driving the growth of clusters substantially smaller than the Kelvin diameter, conventionally considered as the minimum particle size that can be grown through condensation. The conventional approach neglects this contribution from the cluster concentration gradient, and underestimates the rate of new particle formation by a factor of up to 60.

  11. Magnetic Reconnection resulting from Flux Emergence: Implications for Jet Formation in the lower solar atmosphere?

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, J Y; Doyle, J G; Lu, Q M; Vanninathan, K; Huang, Z

    2011-01-01

    We aim at investigating the formation of jet-like features in the lower solar atmosphere, e.g. chromosphere and transition region, as a result of magnetic reconnection. Magnetic reconnection as occurring at chromospheric and transition regions densities and triggered by magnetic flux emergence is studied using a 2.5D MHD code. The initial atmosphere is static and isothermal, with a temperature of 20,000 K. The initial magnetic field is uniform and vertical. Two physical environments with different magnetic field strength (25 G and 50 G) are presented. In each case, two sub-cases are discussed, where the environments have different initial mass density. In the case where we have a weaker magnetic field (25 G) and higher plasma density ($N_e=2\\times 10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$), valid for the typical quiet Sun chromosphere, a plasma jet would be observed with a temperature of 2--3 $\\times 10^4$ K and a velocity as high as 40 km/s. The opposite case of a medium with a lower electron density ($N_e=2\\times 10^{10}$ cm$^{-3...

  12. Effect of atmospheric flux uncertainties on the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandroos Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The next generation of large-volume neutrino telescopes will include low-energy subarrays which will be able to measure neutrinos with energies of a few GeV. In this energy range the primary signal below the horizon is neutrinos created by cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere. The measured event rate will depend on the neutrino mass hierarchy, allowing determination of this quantity to a significance level of about 3.5 sigma within a 5-year period, mostly limited by systematic uncertainties. We present here the impact of the uncertainties on the atmospheric neutrino flux normalization on the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy. We suggest constraining the systematic uncertainties by including the downgoing neutrino sample, which will increase the significance. This work was performed using simulation data from the low-energy extension to the IceCube detector located at the geographic south pole, PINGU, and is relevant to a wide range of other experiments.

  13. Imaging a vertical shaft from a tunnel using muons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.; Dorsey, D. J.; Schwellenbach, D.; Green, A.; Smalley, D.

    2015-12-01

    We use muon technology to image a vertical shaft from a tunnel. The density of the materials through which cosmic ray muons pass influences the flux of muons because muons are more attenuated by higher density material. Additionally, muons can travel several kilometers allowing measurements through deep rock. Density maps are generated from muon flux measurements to locate subsurface features like tunnel structures and ore bodies. Additionally, muon data can be jointly inverted with other data such as gravity and seismic to produce higher quality earth models than produced from a single method. We collected several weeks of data in a tunnel to image a vertical shaft. The minimum length of rock between the vertical shaft and the detector is 120 meters and the diameter of the vertical shaft is 4.6 meters. The rock the muons traveled through consists of Tertiary age volcanic tuff and steeply dipping, small-displacement faults. Results will be presented for muon flux in the tunnel and Monte-Carlo simulations of this experiment. Simulations from both GEANT4 (Geometry And Tracking version 4) and MCNP6 (Monte-Carlo N-Particle version 6) models will be compared. The tunnel overburden from muon measurements is also estimated and compared with actual the overburden. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Muon tomography of rock density using Micromegas-TPC telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hivert, Fanny; Busto, José; Gaffet, Stéphane; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Brunner, Jurgen; Salin, Pierre; Decitre, Jean-Baptiste; Lázaro Roche, Ignacio; Martin, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The knowledge of the subsurface properties is essentially obtained by geophysical methods, e.g., seismic imaging, electric prospection or gravimetry. The current work is based on a recently developed method to investigate in situ the density of rocks using a measurement of the muon flux, whose attenuation depends on the quantity of matter the particles travel through and hence on the rock density and thickness. The present project (T2DM2) aims at performing underground muon flux measurements in order to characterize spatial and temporal rock massif density variations above the LSBB underground research facility in Rustrel (France). The muon flux will be measured with a new muon telescope device using Micromegas-Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detectors. The first step of the work presented covers the muon flux simulation based on the Gaisser model (Gaisser T., 1990), for the muon flux at the ground level, and on the MUSIC code (Kudryavtsev V. A., 2008) for the propagation of muons through the rock. The results show that the muon flux distortion caused by density variations is enough significant to be observed at 500 m depth for measurement times of about one month. This time-scale is compatible with the duration of the water transfer processes within the unsaturated Karst zone where LSBB is located. The work now focuses on the optimization of the detector layout along the LSBB galleries in order to achieve the best sensitivity.

  15. Muon radiography for exploration of Mars geology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kedar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays to image the interior of large-scale geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography is used to image the interior of smaller objects. Recent developments and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can peer deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size, and provide crisp density profile images of their interior at ten meter scale resolution. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near horizontal Martian muon flux, which could be used for muon radiography, is as strong or stronger than that on Earth, making the technique suitable for exploration of numerous high priority geological targets on Mars. The high spatial resolution of muon radiography also makes the technique particularly suited for the discovery and delineation of Martian caverns, the most likely planetary environment for biological activity. As a passive imaging technique, muon radiography uses the perpetually present background cosmic ray radiation as the energy source for probing the interior of structures from the surface of the planet. The passive nature of the measurements provides an opportunity for a low power and low data rate instrument for planetary exploration that could operate as a scientifically valuable primary or secondary instrument in a variety of settings, with minimal impact on the mission's other instruments and operation.

  16. Muon radiography for exploration of Mars geology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kedar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays to image the interior of large scale geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography is used to image the interior of smaller objects. Recent developments and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can peer deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size, and provide crisp density profile images of their interior at ten meter scale resolution. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near horizontal Martian muon flux, which could be used for muon radiography, is as strong or stronger than that on Earth, making the technique suitable for exploration of numerous high priority geological targets on Mars. The high spatial resolution of muon radiography also makes the technique particularly suited for the discovery and delineation of Martian caverns, the most likely planetary environment for biological activity. As a passive imaging technique, muon radiography uses the perpetually present background cosmic ray radiation as the energy source for probing the interior of structures from the surface of the planet. The passive nature of the measurements provides an opportunity for a low power and low data rate instrument for planetary exploration that could operate as a scientifically valuable primary or secondary instrument in a variety of settings, with minimal impact on the mission's other instruments and operation.

  17. Atmospheric stability and turbulence fluxes at Horns Rev—an intercomparison of sonic, bulk and WRF model data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.

    2012-01-01

    Direct estimations of turbulent fluxes and atmospheric stability were performed from a sonic anemometer at 50 m height on a meteorological mast at the Horns Rev wind farm in the North Sea. The stability and flux estimations from the sonic measurements are compared with bulk results from a cup...... anemometer at 15 m height and potential temperature differences between the water and the air above. Surface flux estimations from the advanced weather research and forecast (WRF) model are also validated against the sonic and bulk data. The correlation between the sonic and bulk estimates of friction...

  18. Muon tomography applied to active volcanoes

    CERN Document Server

    Marteau, Jacques; Gibert, Dominique; Ianigro, Jean-Christophe; Jourde, Kevin; Kergosien, Bruno; Rolland, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Muon tomography is a generic imaging method using the differential absorption of cosmic muons by matter. The measured contrast in the muons flux reflects the matter density contrast as it does in conventional medical imaging. The applications to volcanology present may advantadges induced by the features of the target itself: limited access to dangerous zones, impossible use of standard boreholes information, harsh environmental conditions etc. The Diaphane project is one of the largest and leading collaboration in the field and the present article summarizes recent results collected on the Lesser Antilles, with a special emphasis on the Soufri\\`ere of Guadeloupe.

  19. Atmospheric bromine flux from the coastal Abu Dhabi sabkhat: A ground-water mass-balance investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, W.W.; Sanford, W.E.

    2007-01-01

    A solute mass-balance study of ground water of the 3000 km2 coastal sabkhat (salt flats) of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, documents an annual bromide loss of approximately 255 metric tons (0.0032 Gmoles), or 85 kg/km2. This value is an order of magnitude greater than previously published direct measurements from the atmosphere over an evaporative environment of a salar in Bolivia. Laboratory evidence, consistent with published reports, suggests that this loss is by vapor transport to the atmosphere. If this bromine flux to the atmosphere is representative of the total earth area of active salt flats then it is a significant, and generally under recognized, input to the global atmospheric bromide flux.

  20. Decadal trends of ocean and land carbon fluxes from a regional joint ocean-atmosphere inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkamp, K.; Gruber, N.

    2015-12-01

    From 1980 until 2010, the combined CO2 sink strengths of ocean and land increased by nearly 50% (-0.55 Pg C yr-1 decade-1), but the spatial distribution of this trend is not well known. We address this by performing a joint cyclostationary ocean-atmosphere inversion for the three decades 1980-1989, 1990-1999, and 2000-2008, using only carbon data from the ocean and atmosphere as constraints, i.e., without applying any prior information about the land fluxes. We find that in the inversion, most of the 30 year sink trend stems from the ocean (-0.44 Pg C yr-1 decade-1). The contribution of the terrestrial biosphere is commensurably smaller but has more decadal variability. First, the land sink strength intensified in the 1990s by 0.4 (±0.3) Pg C yr-1 compared to the 1980s but then weakened slightly by 0.2 (±0.4) Pg C yr-1 in the 2000s. The different land regions contributed very variedly to these global trends. While the northern extratropical land acted as an increasing carbon sink throughout the examined period primarily driven by boreal regions, the tropical land is estimated to have acted as an increasing source of CO2, with source magnitude and trend dominated by enhanced release in tropical America during the Amazon mean wet season. This pattern is largely unchanged if the oceanic inversion constraint, which is based on a stationary ocean circulation, is replaced by an estimate based on simulation results from an ocean biogeochemical general circulation model that includes year-to-year variability in the air-sea CO2 fluxes and also has a trend (-0.07 Pg C yr-1 decade-1) that is at the very low end of current estimates. However, the land/ocean partitioning of the trend contribution is adjusted accordingly. Oceanic carbon data has a major impact on carbon exchange for all tropical regions and southern Africa but also for observationally better constrained regions in North America and temperate Asia. The European trend exhibits a strong sensitivity to the choice

  1. A Carbon Flux Super Site. New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclerc, Monique Y. [The University of Georgia Research Foundation, Athens, GA (United States)

    2014-11-17

    This final report presents the main activities and results of the project “A Carbon Flux Super Site: New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling” from 10/1/2006 to 9/30/2014. It describes the new AmeriFlux tower site (Aiken) at Savanna River Site (SC) and instrumentation, long term eddy-covariance, sodar, microbarograph, soil and other measurements at the site, and intensive field campaigns of tracer experiment at the Carbon Flux Super Site, SC, in 2009 and at ARM-CF site, Lamont, OK, and experiments in Plains, GA. The main results on tracer experiment and modeling, on low-level jet characteristics and their impact on fluxes, on gravity waves and their influence on eddy fluxes, and other results are briefly described in the report.

  2. Carbon allocation and carbon isotope fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Brüggemann

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial carbon (C cycle has received increasing interest over the past few decades, however, there is still a lack of understanding of the fate of newly assimilated C allocated within plants and to the soil, stored within ecosystems and lost to the atmosphere. Stable carbon isotope studies can give novel insights into these issues. In this review we provide an overview of an emerging picture of plant-soil-atmosphere C fluxes, as based on C isotope studies, and identify processes determining related C isotope signatures. The first part of the review focuses on isotopic fractionation processes within plants during and after photosynthesis. The second major part elaborates on plant-internal and plant-rhizosphere C allocation patterns at different time scales (diel, seasonal, interannual, including the speed of C transfer and time lags in the coupling of assimilation and respiration, as well as the magnitude and controls of plant-soil C allocation and respiratory fluxes. Plant responses to changing environmental conditions, the functional relationship between the physiological and phenological status of plants and C transfer, and interactions between C, water and nutrient dynamics are discussed. The role of the C counterflow from the rhizosphere to the aboveground parts of the plants, e.g. via CO2 dissolved in the xylem water or as xylem-transported sugars, is highlighted. The third part is centered around belowground C turnover, focusing especially on above- and belowground litter inputs, soil organic matter formation and turnover, production and loss of dissolved organic C, soil respiration and CO2 fixation by soil microbes. Furthermore, plant controls on microbial communities and activity via exudates and litter production as well as microbial community effects on C mineralization are reviewed. A further part of the paper is dedicated to physical interactions between soil CO2 and the soil matrix, such as

  3. Measurement of muon charge ratio with the Large Volume Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Agafonova, N Yu; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Bertoni, R; Boyarkin, V V; Bressan, E; Bruno, G; Dadykin, V L; Dobrynina, E A; Enikeev, R I; Fulgione, W; Galeotti, P; Garbini, M; Ghia, P L; Giusti, P; Kemp, E; Malgin, A S; Miguez, B; Molinario, A; Persiani, R; Pless, I A; Ryasny, V G; Ryazhskaya, O G; Saavedra, O; Sartorelli, G; Selvi, M; Trinchero, G C; Vigorito, C; Yakushev, V F; Zichichi, A

    2013-01-01

    The value of ${\\mu^+/\\mu^-}$ ratio for atmospheric muons has been measured with the Large Volume Detector, (LVD) at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy (minimal depth is 3000 m w.e.). To reach this depth muons should have an energy at the sea level higher than 1.3 TeV. The muon charge is determined studying the decay of stopping positive muons in the LVD iron structure and the decay of stopping positive and negative muons in scintillator. We obtain a ratio ${R = 1.26 \\pm 0.04(stat) \\pm 0.11(sys)}$.

  4. MuSIC: delivering the world's most intense muon beam

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, S; Edmonds, A; Fukuda, M; Hatanaka, K; Hino, Y; Kuno, Y; Lancaster, M; Mori, Y; Ogitsu, T; Sakamoto, H; Sato, A; Tran, N H; Truong, N M; Wing, M; Yamamoto, A; Yoshida, M

    2016-01-01

    A new muon beamline, muon science innovative channel (MuSIC), was set up at the Research Centre for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, in Osaka, Japan, using the 392 MeV proton beam impinging on a target. The production of an intense muon beam relies on the efficient capture of pions, which subsequently decay to muons, using a novel superconducting solenoid magnet system. After the pion-capture solenoid the first $36^\\circ$ of the curved muon transport line was commissioned and the muon flux was measured. In order to detect muons, a target of either copper or magnesium was placed to stop muons at the end of the muon beamline. Two stations of plastic scintillators located upstream and downstream from the muon target were used to reconstruct the decay spectrum of muons. In a complementary method to detect negatively-charged muons, the X-ray spectrum yielded by muonic atoms in the target were measured in a germanium detector. Measurements, at a proton beam current of 6 pA, yielded $(10.4 \\pm 2.7) \\times 1...

  5. A method for detection of muon induced electromagnetic showers with the ANTARES detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, J A; Albert, A; André, M; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; Jesus, A C Assis; Astraatmadja, T; Aubert, J J; Baret, B; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bigi, A; Bigongiari, C; Bogazzi, C; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouhou, B; Bouwhuis, M C; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Camarena, F; Capone, A; Carloganu, C; Carminati, G; Carr, J; Cecchini, S; Charif, Z; Charvis, P; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Decowski, M P; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti, Q; Drouhin, D; Eberl, T; Emanuele, U; Enzenhöfer, A; Ernenwein, J P; Escoffier, S; Fermani, P; Ferri, M; Flaminio, V; Folger, F; Fritsch, U; Fuda, J L; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Giacomelli, G; Giordano, V; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; Guillard, G; Halladjian, G; Hallewell, G; van Haren, H; Hartman, J; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hö\\ssl, J; Hsu, C C; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Kooijman, P; Kopper, C; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Lefèvre, D; Lim, G; Presti, D Lo; Loehner, H; Loucatos, S; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Martinez-Mora, J A; Meli, A; Montaruli, T; Moscoso, L; Motz, H; Neff, M; Nezri, E; Palioselitis, D; P\\uav\\uala\\cs, G E; Payet, K; Payre, P; Petrovic, J; Piattelli, P; Picot-Clemente, N; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Presani, E; Racca, C; Reed, C; Richardt, C; Richter, R; Rivière, C; Robert, A; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Ruiz-Rivas, J; Rujoiu, M; Russo, G V; Salesa, F; Sapienza, P; Schöck, F; Schuller, J P; Schüssler, F; Shanidze, R; Simeone, F; Spies, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, T; Sánchez-Losa, A; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Toscano, S; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vannoni, G; Vecchi, M; Vernin, P; Wijnker, G; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; Yepes, H; Zaborov, D; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of ANTARES is neutrino astronomy with upward going muons created in charged current muon neutrino interactions in the detector and its surroundings. Downward going muons are background for neutrino searches. These muons are the decay products of cosmic-ray collisions in the Earth's atmosphere far above the detector. This paper presents a method to identify and count electromagnetic showers produced by muons with the ANTARES detector. The method is applied to both cosmic muon data and simulations and its applicability to the reconstruction of muon event energies is demonstrated.

  6. Soil-atmosphere and vadose zone water fluxes at the Wagna - lysimeter: Workflow, models, and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fank, Johann

    2014-05-01

    A precise knowledge of the water fluxes between the soil-plant system and the atmosphere is of great importance for understanding and modeling water, solute and energy transfer in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Weighing lysimeters are precise tools to allow the determination of the hydrological cycle components in very short time intervals. Lysimeters with controlled suction at the lower boundary allow estimation of capillary rise and deep water percolation on short time scales. Evapotranspiration, rainfall, and irrigation can be computed from weight changes. In the last decades resolution and precision of the weighing systems have been substantially improved, so that modern lysimeters, resting on weighing cells can reach resolutions of up to 0.01 mm. Nevertheless, a lot of external effects (e.g. from maintenance, surface treatment) and small mechanical disturbances (e.g. caused by wind) became visible in the data. Seepage mass data are affected by water sampling and the emptying process of the seepage water container. Increasing parts of corrected seepage mass data show deep water percolation, decreasing parts in dry weather periods can be interpreted as capillary rise. In the evaluation process of corrected lysimeter mass data every increase in system weight (lysimeter mass + cumulative seepage mass) might be interpreted as rainfall or irrigation, whereas every decrease in system weight is interpreted as evapotranspiration. To apply this concept correctly, the noise in both data sets has to be separated from signals using a filtering routine (e.g. Peters et al., 2013) which is appropriate for any event, including events with low disturbances as well as strong wind and heavy precipitation in small time intervals. Based on the data set from the "Wagna" lysimeter in Austria with a high resolution of the scale (~ 0,015 mm) and very low noise due to low wind velocities for the year 2010 a lysimeter data preparation workflow will be executed: (a) correction of the

  7. Variance Method to Determine Turbulent Fluxes of Momentum And Sensible Heat in The Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debruin, H.A.R.; Hartogensis, O.K.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is presented that in the stable atmospheric surface layer turbulent fluxes of heat and momentum can be determined from the standard deviations of longitudinal wind velocity and temperature, ¿u and ¿T respectively, measured at a single level. An attractive aspect of this method is that it yi

  8. Rich soil carbon and nitrogen but low atmospheric greenhouse gas fluxes from North Sulawesi mangrove swamps in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang C; Ulumuddin, Yaya I; Pramudji, Sastro; Chen, Shun Y; Chen, Bin; Ye, Yong; Ou, Dan Y; Ma, Zhi Y; Huang, Hao; Wang, Jing K

    2014-07-15

    The soil to atmosphere fluxes of greenhouse gases N2O, CH4 and CO2 and their relationships with soil characteristics were investigated in three tropical oceanic mangrove swamps (Teremaal, Likupang and Kema) in North Sulawesi, Indonesia. Mangrove soils in North Sulawesi were rich in organic carbon and nitrogen, but the greenhouse gas fluxes were low in these mangroves. The fluxes ranged -6.05-13.14 μmol m(-2)h(-1), -0.35-0.61 μmol m(-2)h(-1) and -1.34-3.88 mmol m(-2)h(-1) for N2O, CH4 and CO2, respectively. The differences in both N2O and CH4 fluxes among different mangrove swamps and among tidal positions in each mangrove swamp were insignificant. CO2 flux was influenced only by mangrove swamps and the value was higher in Kema mangrove. None of the measured soil parameters could explain the variation of CH4 fluxes among the sampling plots. N2O flux was negatively related to porewater salinity, while CO2 flux was negatively correlated with water content and organic carbon. This study suggested that the low gas emissions due to slow metabolisms would lead to the accumulations of organic matters in North Sulawesi mangrove swamps. PMID:24784732

  9. Sensitivity of net thermal flux to the abundance of trace gases in the lower atmosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon Joo; Sagawa, Hideo; Haus, Rainer; Stefani, Stefania; Imamura, Takeshi; Titov, Dmitrij V.; Piccioni, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    We calculated the net thermal flux in the atmosphere of Venus from the surface to 100 km altitude. Our atmospheric model was carefully constructed especially for altitudes below the clouds (Venus using 20-50 ppmv H2O, suggesting that the high H2O abundance of 200 ppmv derived in the earlier analysis is not required. Our sensitivity study shows that the trace gases SO2, H2O, and OCS are effective thermal agents, while CO and HCl influences are rather weak. We suggest that the influence of the former three gases should be taken into account to estimate the net radiative energy in the deep atmosphere.

  10. CO2 and CH4 fluxes and carbon balance in the atmospheric interaction of boreal peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    associated heterotrophic CO2 release. Much of the spatial variability in the gas fluxes was attributed to the microsite properties in natural peatlands. Winter CO2 and CH4 emissions were important components in the C balance, comprising 10Ae30 % of the annual gas release from peat. According to the simulation results, the CH4 release from expanding peatlands could have contributed to the early interglacial atmospheric warming during several millennia, at least prior to the ombrotrophication and increased peat accumulation from about 3500 years BP onwards. The atmospheric cooling effect by peat accumulation is less clear. (orig.)

  11. Spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density of partially coherent electromagnetic beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianlong; Lü, Baida; Zhu, Shifu

    2009-07-01

    The formulas of the energy and energy flux density of partially coherent electromagnetic beams in atmospheric turbulence are derived by using Maxwell's equations. Expressions expressed by elements of electric cross spectral density matrixes of the magnetic and the mutual cross spectral density matrix are obtained for the partially coherent electromagnetic beams. Taken the partially coherent Cosh-Gaussian (ChG) electromagnetic beam as a typical example, the spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density in atmospheric turbulence are numerically calculated. It is found that the turbulence shows a broadening effect on the spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density. Some interesting results are obtained and explained with regard to their physical nature.

  12. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Breedon

    During the ongoing period before beam operation resumes, the Endcap Muon system is dedicated to bringing all components of the system up to the best possible performance condition. As CMS was opened, starting with the +Endcap side, electronic boards, cables, and connectors of the Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) system were replaced or repaired as necessary as access became possible. Due to scheduling constraints, on the –Endcap side this effort has been delayed until the muon stations are each briefly accessible as the experiment is closed again. The CSC gas mixture includes 10% CF4 (carbon tetrafluoride) to reduce aging of the chambers when subjected to high levels of charged particle fluxes during LHC running. CF4, however, is the most expensive component of the gas mixture, and since it is not necessary to protect against aging during chamber commissioning with cosmic rays, the amount of CF4 was temporarily reduced by half to realize a substantial cost saving. Additional filters have been added to ...

  13. CLIMB: cosmic light isotopes and muons with balloons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, M. E-mail: pearce@particle.kth.se; Adriani, O.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Carlson, P.; Mocchiutti, E.; Papini, P.; Straulino, S.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N

    2004-06-01

    A new balloon-borne experiment is proposed which will measure high-energy light isotopes at the top of the Earth's atmosphere and cosmic ray muons at fixed altitudes within the Earth's atmosphere.

  14. Heterogeneity and scaling land-atmospheric water and energy fluxes in climate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of small-scale heterogeneity in land surface characteristics on the large-scale fluxes of water and energy in land-atmosphere system has become a central focus of many of the climatology research experiments. The acquisition of high resolution land surface data through remote sensing and intensive land-climatology field experiments (like HAPEX and FIFE) has provided data to investigate the interactions between microscale land-atmosphere interactions and macroscale models. One essential research question is how to account for the small scale heterogeneities and whether 'effective' parameters can be used in the macroscale models. To address this question of scaling, three modeling experiments were performed and are reviewed in the paper. The first is concerned with the aggregation of parameters and inputs for a terrestrial water and energy balance model. The second experiment analyzed the scaling behavior of hydrologic responses during rain events and between rain events. The third experiment compared the hydrologic responses from distributed models with a lumped model that uses spatially constant inputs and parameters. The results show that the patterns of small scale variations can be represented statistically if the scale is larger than a representative elementary area scale, which appears to be about 2 - 3 times the correlation length of the process. For natural catchments this appears to be about 1 - 2 sq km. The results concerning distributed versus lumped representations are more complicated. For conditions when the processes are nonlinear, then lumping results in biases; otherwise a one-dimensional model based on 'equivalent' parameters provides quite good results. Further research is needed to fully understand these conditions.

  15. High resolution muon computed tomography at neutrino beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pion decay pipe at a neutrino beam facility and what can be achieved for momentum resolution in a muon spectrometer. Such an imaging system can be applied in archaeology, art history, engineering, material identification and whenever there is a need to image inside a transportable object constructed of dense materials

  16. Muon-induced background in the EDELWEISS dark matter search

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, B; Augier, C; Benoit, A; Bergé, L; Bergmann, T; Blümer, J; Bres, G; Broniatowski, A; Brudanin, V; Censier, B; Chapellier, M; Charlieux, F; Collin, S; Coulter, P; Cox, G A; Crauste, O; Domange, J; Dumoulin, L; Eitel, K; Filosofov, D; Fourches, N; Garde, G; Gascon, J; Gerbier, G; Gros, M; Hehn, L; Henry, S; Hervé, S; Heuermann, G; Juillard, A; Kluck, H; Kozlov, V Y; Kleifges, M; Kraus, H; Kudryavtsev, V A; Loaiza, P; Marnieros, S; Menshikov, A; Navick, X -F; Nieder, H; Nones, C; Olivieri, E; Pari, P; Paul, B; Robinson, M; Rodenas, H; Rozov, S; Sanglard, V; Siebenborn, B; Tcherniakhovski, D; Torrentó-Coello, A S; Vagneron, L; Walker, R J; Weber, M; Yakushev, E; Zhang, X; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2013.01.014

    2013-01-01

    A dedicated analysis of the muon-induced background in the EDELWEISS dark matter search has been performed on a data set acquired in 2009 and 2010. The total muon flux underground in the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM) was measured to be $\\Phi_{\\mu}=(5.4\\pm 0.2 ^{+0.5}_{-0.9})$\\,muons/m$^2$/d. The modular design of the muon-veto system allows the reconstruction of the muon trajectory and hence the determination of the angular dependent muon flux in LSM. The results are in good agreement with both MC simulations and earlier measurements. Synchronization of the muon-veto system with the phonon and ionization signals of the Ge detector array allowed identification of muon-induced events. Rates for all muon-induced events $\\Gamma^{\\mu}=(0.172 \\pm 0.012)\\, \\rm{evts}/(\\rm{kg \\cdot d})$ and of WIMP-like events $\\Gamma^{\\mu-n} = 0.008^{+0.005}_{-0.004}\\, \\rm{evts}/(\\rm{kg \\cdot d})$ were extracted. After vetoing, the remaining rate of accepted muon-induced neutrons in the EDELWEISS-II dark matter search was de...

  17. Studies on muon tomography for archaeological internal structures scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, H.; Carloganu, C.; Gibert, D.; Jacquemier, J.; Karyotakis, Y.; Marteau, J.; Niess, V.; Katsanevas, S.; Tonazzo, A.

    2016-05-01

    Muon tomography is a potential non-invasive technique for internal structure scanning. It has already interesting applications in geophysics and can be used for archaeological purposes. Muon tomography is based on the measurement of the muon flux after crossing the structure studied. Differences on the mean density of these structures imply differences on the detected muon rate for a given direction. Based on this principle, Monte Carlo simulations represent a useful tool to provide a model of the expected muon rate and angular distribution depending on the composition of the studied object, being useful to estimate the expected detected muons and to better understand the experimental results. These simulations are mainly dependent on the geometry and composition of the studied object and on the modelling of the initial muon flux at surface. In this work, the potential of muon tomography in archaeology is presented and evaluated with Monte Carlo simulations by estimating the differences on the muon rate due to the presence of internal structures and its composition. The influence of the chosen muon model at surface in terms of energy and angular distributions in the final result has been also studied.

  18. CLIC Muon Sweeper Design

    CERN Document Server

    Aloev, A; Gatignon, L; Modena, M; Pilicer, B; Tapan, I

    2016-01-01

    There are several background sources which may affect the analysis of data and detector performans at the CLIC project. One of the important background source is halo muons, which are generated along the beam delivery system (BDS), for the detector performance. In order to reduce muon background, magnetized muon sweepers have been used as a shielding material that is already described in a previous study for CLIC [1]. The realistic muon sweeper has been designed with OPERA. The design parameters of muon sweeper have also been used to estimate muon background reduction with BDSIM Monte Carlo simulation code [2, 3].

  19. The Application of Flux-Form Semi-Lagrangian Transport Scheme in a Spectral Atmosphere Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaocong; LIU Yimin; WU Guoxiong; Shian-Jiann LIN; BAO Qing

    2013-01-01

    A flux-form semi-Lagrangian transport scheme (FFSL) was implemented in a spectral atmospheric GCM developed and used at IAP/LASG.Idealized numerical experiments show that the scheme is good at shape preserving with less dissipation and dispersion,in comparison with other conventional schemes.Importantly,FFSL can automatically maintain the positive definition of the transported tracers,which was an underlying problem in the previous spectral composite method (SCM).To comprehensively investigate the impact of FFSL on GCM results,we conducted sensitive experiments.Three main improvements resulted:first,rainfall simulation in both distribution and intensity was notably improved,which led to an improvement in precipitation frequency.Second,the dry bias in the lower troposphere was significantly reduced compared with SCM simulations.Third,according to the Taylor diagram,the FFSL scheme yields simulations that are superior to those using the SCM:a higher correlation between model output and observation data was achieved with the FFSL scheme,especially for humidity in lower troposphere.However,the moist bias in the middle and upper troposphere was more pronounced with the FFSL scheme.This bias led to an over-simulation of precipitable water in comparison with reanalysis data.Possible explanations,as well as solutions,are discussed herein.

  20. Exploration of the link between Emiliania huxleyi bloom dynamics and aerosol fluxes to the lower Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainic, M.

    2013-12-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are responsible for about 50% of the global photosynthesis, thus are a key component of the major nutrient cycles in the ocean. These blooms can be a significant source for flux of volatiles and aerosols, affecting physical chemical processes in the atmosphere. One of the most widely distributed and abundant phytoplankton species in the oceans is the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. In this research, we explore the influence of the different stages of E. huxleyi bloom on the emission of primary aerosols. For this purpose, we conducted a series of controlled lab experiments to measure aerosol emissions during the growth of E. huxleyi. The cultures were grown in a specially designed growth chamber, and the aerosols were generated in a bubbling system. We collected the emitted aerosol particles on filters, and conducted a series of analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the aerosols emitted from E.huxleyi 1216 cultures demonstrate emission of CaCO3 platelets from their exoskeleton into the air, while coccolithophores cells were absent. The results suggest that while healthy coccolithophore cells are too heavy to aerosolize, during cell lysis the coccoliths shed from the coccolithophore cells are emitted into the atmosphere. Therefore, aerosol production during bloom demise may be greater than from healthy E.huxleyi populations. We also investigated the size distribution of the aerosols at various stages of E. huxleyi growth. The presence of calcified cells greatly effects the size distribution of the emitted aerosol population. This work motivated us to explore aerosols emitted during E. huxleyi spring bloom, in a laboratory we constructed onboard the R/V Knorr research vessel, as part of the North Atlantic Virus Infection of Coccolithophore Expedition (June-July 2012). These results have far-reaching implications on the effect of E. huxleyi bloom dynamics on aerosol properties. We not only show that the E. huxleyi calcite

  1. Magnetic reconnection resulting from flux emergence: implications for jet formation in the lower solar atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, J. Y.; Madjarska, M. S.; Doyle, J. G.; Lu, Q. M.; Vanninathan, K.; Huang, Z.

    2011-11-01

    Aims: We aim at investigating the formation of jet-like features in the lower solar atmosphere, e.g. chromosphere and transition region, as a result of magnetic reconnection. Methods: Magnetic reconnection as occurring at chromospheric and transition regions densities and triggered by magnetic flux emergence is studied using a 2.5D MHD code. The initial atmosphere is static and isothermal, with a temperature of 2 × 104 K. The initial magnetic field is uniform and vertical. Two physical environments with different magnetic field strength (25 G and 50 G) are presented. In each case, two sub-cases are discussed, where the environments have different initial mass density. Results: In the case where we have a weaker magnetic field (25 G) and higher plasma density (Ne = 2 × 1011 cm-3), valid for the typical quiet Sun chromosphere, a plasma jet would be observed with a temperature of 2-3 × 104 K and a velocity as high as 40 kms-1. The opposite case of a medium with a lower electron density (Ne = 2 × 1010 cm-3), i.e. more typical for the transition region, and a stronger magnetic field of 50 G, up-flows with line-of-sight velocities as high as ~90 kms-1 and temperatures of 6 × 105 K, i.e. upper transition region - low coronal temperatures, are produced. Only in the latter case, the low corona Fe ix 171 Å shows a response in the jet which is comparable to the O v increase. Conclusions: The results show that magnetic reconnection can be an efficient mechanism to drive plasma outflows in the chromosphere and transition region. The model can reproduce characteristics, such as temperature and velocity for a range of jet features like a fibril, a spicule, a hot X-ray jet or a transition region jet by changing either the magnetic field strength or the electron density, i.e. where in the atmosphere the reconnection occurs.

  2. Atmospheric neutrinos observed in underground detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stanev, T.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced when the primary cosmic ray beam hits the atmosphere and initiates atmospheric cascades. Secondary mesons decay and give rise to neutrinos. The neutrino production was calculated and compared with the neutrino fluxes detected in underground detectors. Contained neutrino events are characterized by observation of an interaction within the fiducial volume of the detector when the incoming particle is not observed. Both the neutrino flux and the containment requirement restrict the energy of the neutrinos observed in contained interactions to less than several GeV. Neutrinos interact with the rock surrounding the detector but only muon neutrino interactions can be observed, as the electron energy is dissipated too fast in the rock. The direction of the neutrino is preserved in the interaction and at energies above 1 TeV the angular resolution is restricted by the scattering of the muon in the rock. The muon rate reflects the neutrino spectrum above some threshold energy, determined by the detector efficiency for muons.

  3. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    DT Commissioning of the two negative wheels was done on the surface to gain time; YB-1 was completed in June and that of YB-2 on October 3. A new test is ongoing following their lowering into the experiment cavern (UX). In the UX cavern, YB0 and YB+1 testing was completed by the end of August, and the two last sectors of YB+2 will be finished by the end of November. The two negative wheels were lowered at the beginning of October and the installation of the chambers in the vertical sectors was done immediately. Three important events took place at the end of October: the last of the 250 DT +RPC packs was installed in Sector 7 of YB-2; full power was switched on for the first time in a full wheel (on YB0, albeit with temporary power distribution) and 50,000 events of cosmic muons, including many spectacular showers crossing the fully active YB0 (50 chambers), were recorded in about 15 minutes. Other crucial tests were achieved, in difficult conditions, to prove the performance of the DT DAQ. The DAQ ha...

  4. Characteristics of land-atmosphere energy and turbulent fluxes over the plateau steppe in central Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MaoShan Li; ZhongBo Su; YaoMing Ma; XueLong Chen; Lang Zhang; ZeYong Hu

    2016-01-01

    The land-atmosphere energy and turbulence exchange is key to understanding land surface processes on the Tibetan Plateau (TP). Using observed data for Aug. 4 to Dec. 3, 2012 from the Bujiao observation point (BJ) of the Nagqu Plateau Climate and Environment Station (NPCE-BJ), different characteristics of the energy flux during the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) season and post-monsoon period were analyzed. This study outlines the impact of the ASM on energy fluxes in the central TP. It also demonstrates that the surface energy closure rate during the ASM season is higher than that of the post-monsoon period. Footprint modeling shows the distribution of data quality assessments (QA) and quality controls (QC) surrounding the observation point. The measured turbulent flux data at the NPCE-BJ site were highly rep-resentative of the target land-use type. The target surface contributed more to the fluxes under unstable conditions than under stable conditions. The main wind directions (180° and 210°) with the highest data density showed flux contributions reaching 100%, even under stable conditions. The lowest flux contributions were found in sectors with low data density, e.g., 90.4% in the 360° sector under stable conditions during the ASM season. Lastly, a surface energy water balance (SEWAB) model was used to gap-fill any absent or corrected turbulence data. The potential simulation error was also explored in this study. The Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficients (NSEs) of the observed fluxes with the SEWAB model runs were 0.78 for sensible heat flux and 0.63 for latent heat flux during the ASM season, but unrealistic values of−0.9 for latent heat flux during the post-monsoon period.

  5. Diurnal and seasonal CO{sub 2} fluxes between grassland ecosystems and the atmosphere boundary layer in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirks, B.O.M.; Goudriaan, J. [Department of Theoretical Production Ecology, Wageningen Agricultural University, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    1994-12-31

    To analyse the diurnal and seasonal patterns of atmospheric-biospheric CO2 exchange in Dutch pasture - as causal factor in short-term fluctuations in atmospheric CO2 - a sequence of experimental and theoretical research was carried out. Eddy correlation and aerodynamic gradient exchange field studies (executed by ECN and KNMI, in Zegveld and Cabauw, both Netherlands, in pasture on peat and clay on peat, respectively) were used for a statistical analysis to identify the major environmental factors governing CO2 exchange and determine the quantitative relationship between those factors and the CO2 exchange. For night-time periods both linear and exponential relationships were found between either air or soil temperature and (respiratory) CO2 flux. For day-time periods both inverse exponential and hyperbolic relationships were found between shortwave irradiance and CO2 flux. The latter applied to both net and gross (photosynthetic) CO2 flux, without and with adding calculated respiratory CO2 flux, respectively. The experimental results are subsequently applied in and along a model study for a more exact analysis and quantification of the CO2 exchange. The used dynamic simulation model distinguishes between a vegetational (based on the crop growth model SUCROS) and soil (based on exponential decay of soil organic matter fractions) component, and calculates CO2 exchange as a function of air temperature, irradiance, atmospheric CO2, precipitation, wind speed and air humidity, on both a diurnal and daily basis. 21 figs., 31 refs.

  6. Estimation of matter fluxes in the river-sea and ocean-atmosphere systems for Okhotsk and Bering seas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The matter fluxes from continental and anthropogenic sources to sea take place by river discharge and atmospheric precipitation. The estimation of this flux may be done on the basis of a single concept, but it has its own specific character in both cases: (1) the time-space changeability of the matter distribution in sea components is connected with the complex gradients of hydrophysical, physico-chemical and hydrobiological characteristics of the water mass, by name biological barrier; (2) the altitude and stability of this biogeochemical barrier are determined by short-period (from seconds up to one year) geochemical processes; and (3) it is very interesting and important to estimate not only the matter fluxes on the continent under the motion of water and air, but also the intensity of accumulation on the biogeochemical barrier. It is necessary to do the next complex of investigations on the coast and aquatory of the Okhotsk and Bering Seas. This will include: (1) the synchronous registration of physical, chemical and biological characteristics in the river-sea and ocean- atmosphere systems to determine the transport and transformation of existing forms of matter, (2) observations of the distribution of natural and pollutant matter (such as heavy metals, oil and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, artificial radioisotopes, etc.) in the estuaries, atmosphere, shelf zones and open sea regions; and (3) calculations of the matter fluxes between the different components of the sea

  7. Response of Atmospheric-Methane Oxidation to Methane-Flux Manipulation in a Laboratory Soil-Column Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, M. H.; Mignola, I.; Henneberger, R.

    2015-12-01

    Upland soils are an important sink for atmospheric methane (CH4). Uptake of atmospheric CH4 in soils is generally diffusion limited, and is mediated by aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria (MOB) that possess a high-affinity form of a key enzyme, allowing CH4 consumption at near-atmospheric concentrations (≤ 1.9 µL/L). As cultivation attempts for these high-affinity MOB have shown little success, there remains much speculation regarding their functioning in different environments. For example, it is frequently assumed that they are highly sensitive to physical disturbance, but their response in activity and abundance to changes in substrate availability remains largely unknown. We present results of a laboratory column experiment conducted to investigate the response in activity and abundance of high-affinity MOB to an increase in CH4 flux. Intact soil cores, collected at a field site where atmospheric CH4 oxidation activity is frequently quantified, were transferred into two 1-m-long, 12-cm-dia. columns. The columns were operated at constant temperature in the dark, their headspace being continuously flushed with air. Diffusive gas-transport conditions were maintained in the reference column, whereas CH4 flux was increased in several steps in the treatment column by inducing advective gas flow using a diaphragm pump. Soil-gas samples periodically collected from ports installed along the length of the columns were analyzed for CH4 content. Together with measurements of soil-water content, atmospheric CH4 oxidation was quantified using the soil-profile method. First results indicate that atmospheric CH4 oxidation activity comparable with the field was maintained in the reference column throughout the experiment. Moreover, high-affinity MOB quickly adjusted to an increase in CH4 flux in the treatment column, efficiently consuming CH4. Quantification of MOB abundance is currently ongoing. Our data provide new insights into controls on atmospheric CH4 oxidation in soils.

  8. Detecting Neutrinos from AGN New Fluxes and Cross Sections

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, G C

    1996-01-01

    New information on the structure of the nucleon from the HERA ep collider leads to higher neutrino cross sections for the processes nu_mu + N --> mu + X needed to calculate the expected rates of astrophysical neutrino induced muons in large detectors either under construction, or in the design stage. These higher cross sections lead to higher muon rates for arrival angles where neutrino attenuation in the earth is less important. On the other hand, new estimates of AGN neutrino fluxes suggest that the expected muon rates in these detectors may be much lower than previously calculated. I use the new cross sections to calculate the expected muon rates and angular distributions in large detectors for a variety of AGN models and compare these rates with the atmospheric neutrino backrounds (from both conventional decay channels and the "prompt" charmed meson decay channels). If the lowest flux estimates are correct, there may be diffculties in determining the origin of a small excess of muons, due to the large unc...

  9. Measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux by Super-Kamiokande: Energy spectra, geomagnetic effects, and solar modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, E.; Okumura, K.; Abe, K.; Haga, Y.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakajima, T.; Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Orii, A.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Takeda, A.; Tanaka, H.; Tomura, T.; Wendell, R. A.; Akutsu, R.; Irvine, T.; Kajita, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Labarga, L.; Fernandez, P.; Gustafson, J.; Kachulis, C.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Berkman, S.; Nantais, C. M.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tobayama, S.; Goldhaber, M.; Kropp, W. R.; Mine, S.; Weatherly, P.; Smy, M. B.; Sobel, H. W.; Takhistov, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Hill, J.; Hong, N.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Park, R. G.; Himmel, A.; Li, Z.; O'Sullivan, E.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Jang, J. S.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S. N.; Friend, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A. T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yano, T.; Cao, S. V.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Huang, K.; Kikawa, T.; Minamino, A.; Nakaya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Mijakowski, P.; Frankiewicz, K.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C. K.; Li, X.; Palomino, J. L.; Wilking, M. J.; Yanagisawa, C.; Fukuda, D.; Ishino, H.; Kayano, T.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Xu, C.; Kuno, Y.; Tacik, R.; Kim, S. B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Totsuka, Y.; Suda, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Bronner, C.; Hartz, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Suzuki, Y.; Vagins, M. R.; Martin, J. F.; Konaka, A.; Chen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Wilkes, R. J.; Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive study of the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy region from sub-GeV up to several TeV using the Super-Kamiokande (SK) water Cherenkov detector is presented in this paper. The energy and azimuthal spectra, and variation over time, of the atmospheric νe+ν¯ e and νμ+ν¯μ fluxes are measured. The energy spectra are obtained using an iterative unfolding method by combining various event topologies with differing energy responses. The azimuthal spectra depending on energy and zenith angle, and their modulation by geomagnetic effects, are also studied. A predicted east-west asymmetry is observed in both the νe and νμ samples at 8.0 σ and 6.0 σ significance, respectively, and an indication that the asymmetry dipole angle changes depending on the zenith angle was seen at the 2.2 σ level. The measured energy and azimuthal spectra are consistent with the current flux models within the estimated systematic uncertainties. A study of the long-term correlation between the atmospheric neutrino flux and the solar magnetic activity cycle is performed, and a weak preference for a correlation was seen at the 1.1 σ level, using SK-I-SK-IV data spanning a 20-year period. For several particularly strong solar activity periods, corresponding to Forbush decrease events, no theoretical prediction is available but a deviation below the typical neutrino event rate is seen at the 2.4 σ level. The seasonal modulation of the neutrino flux is also examined, but the change in flux at the SK site is predicted to be negligible, and, as expected, no evidence for a seasonal correlation is seen.

  10. Direct conversion of muon catalyzed fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a method of direct conversion of muon catalyzed fusion (MCF) energy is proposed in order to reduce the cost of muon production. This MCF concept is based on a pellet composed of many thin solid deuterium-tritium (DT) rods encircled by a metallic circuit immersed in a magnetic field. The direct energy conversion is the result of the heating of the pellet by beam injection and fusion alphas. The expanding DT rods causes the change of magnetic flux linked by the circuit. Our calculation shows that the direct conversion method reduces the cost of one muon by a factor of approximately 2.5 over the previous methods. The present method is compatible with a reactor using the pellet concept, where the muon sticking is reduced by the ion cyclotron resonance heating and the confinement of the exploding pellet is handled by magnetic fields and the coronal plasma. 17 refs., 6 figs

  11. Muon catalyzed fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, K. [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nagamine, K. [Muon Science Laboratory, IMSS-KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Matsuzaki, T. [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kawamura, N. [Muon Science Laboratory, IMSS-KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2005-12-15

    The latest progress of muon catalyzed fusion study at the RIKEN-RAL muon facility (and partly at TRIUMF) is reported. The topics covered are magnetic field effect, muon transfer to {sup 3}He in solid D/T and ortho-para effect in dd{mu} formation.

  12. Muon storage ring

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The muon storage ring where the g-2 of the muon is being measured with extremely high accuracy. The ring is 14-m in diameter and has very precise magnetic bending and electric focussing fields so that the muons orbit the ring under well-defined conditions.

  13. Greenhouse gases regional fluxes estimated from atmospheric measurements; Estimation des flux de gaz a effet de serre a l'echelle regionale a partir de mesures atmospheriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messager, C

    2007-07-15

    build up a new system to measure continuously CO{sub 2} (or CO), CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and SF{sub 6} mixing ratios. It is based on a commercial gas chromatograph (Agilent 6890N) which have been modified to reach better precision. Reproducibility computed with a target gas on a 24 hours time step gives: 0.06 ppm for CO{sub 2}, 1.4 ppb for CO, 0.7 ppb for CH{sub 4}, 0.2 ppb for N{sub 2}O and 0.05 ppt for SF{sub 6}. The instrument's run is fully automated, an air sample analysis takes about 5 minutes. In July 2006, I install instrumentation on a telecommunication tall tower (200 m) situated near Orleans forest in Trainou, to monitor continuously greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SF{sub 6}), atmospheric tracers (CO, Radon-222) and meteorological parameters. Intake lines were installed at 3 levels (50, 100 and 180 m) and allow us to sample air masses along the vertical. Continuous measurement started in January 2007. I used Mace Head (Ireland) and Gif-sur-Yvette continuous measurements to estimate major greenhouse gases emission fluxes at regional scale. To make the link between atmospheric measurements and surface fluxes, we need to quantify dilution due to atmospheric transport. I used Radon-222 as tracer (radon tracer method) and planetary boundary layer heights estimates from ECMWF model (boundary layer budget method) to parameterize atmospheric transport. In both cases I compared results to available emission inventories. (author)

  14. Air-sea fluxes in a climate model using hourly coupling between the atmospheric and the oceanic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fangxing; von Storch, Jin-Song; Hertwig, Eileen

    2016-06-01

    We analyse the changes in the air-sea fluxes of momentum, heat and fresh water flux caused by increasing the ocean-atmosphere coupling frequency from once per day to once per hour in the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model. We diagnose the relative influences of daily averaging and high-frequency feedbacks on the basic statistics of the air-sea fluxes at grid point level and quantify feedback modes responsible for large scale changes in fluxes over the Southern Ocean and the Equatorial Pacific. Coupling once per hour instead of once per day reduces the mean of the momentum-flux magnitude by up to 7 % in the tropics and increases it by up to 10 % in the Southern Ocean. These changes result solely from feedbacks between atmosphere and ocean occurring on time scales shorter than 1 day . The variance and extremes of all the fluxes are increased in most parts of the oceans. Exceptions are found for the momentum and fresh water fluxes in the tropics. The increases result mainly from the daily averaging, while the decreases in the tropics are caused by the high-frequency feedbacks. The variance increases are substantial, reaching up to 50 % for the momentum flux, 100 % for the fresh water flux, and a factor of 15 for the net heat flux. These diurnal and intra-diurnal variations account for up to 50-90 % of the total variances and exhibit distinct seasonality. The high-frequency coupling can influence the large-scale feedback modes that lead to large-scale changes in the magnitude of wind stress over the Southern Ocean and Equatorial Pacific. In the Southern Ocean, the dependence of the SST-wind-stress feedback on the mean state of SST, which is colder in the experiment with hourly coupling than in the experiment with daily coupling, leads to an increase of westerlies. In the Equatorial Pacific, Bjerknes feedback in the hourly coupled experiment reveals a diurnal cycle during the El Niño events, with the feedback being stronger in the nighttime than in the daytime and

  15. The program in muon and neutrino physics: Superbeams, cold muon beams, neutrino factory and the muon collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Raja et al.

    2001-08-08

    The concept of a Muon Collider was first proposed by Budker [10] and by Skrinsky [11] in the 60s and early 70s. However, there was little substance to the concept until the idea of ionization cooling was developed by Skrinsky and Parkhomchuk [12]. The ionization cooling approach was expanded by Neufer [13] and then by Palmer [14], whose work led to the formation of the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) [3] in 1995. The concept of a neutrino source based on a pion storage ring was originally considered by Koshkarev [18]. However, the intensity of the muons created within the ring from pion decay was too low to provide a useful neutrino source. The Muon Collider concept provided a way to produce a very intense muon source. The physics potential of neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings was investigated by Geer in 1997 at a Fermilab workshop [19, 20] where it became evident that the neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings needed for the muon collider were exciting on their own merit. The neutrino factory concept quickly captured the imagination of the particle physics community, driven in large part by the exciting atmospheric neutrino deficit results from the SuperKamiokande experiment. As a result, the MC realized that a Neutrino Factory could be an important first step toward a Muon Collider and the physics that could be addressed by a Neutrino Factory was interesting in its own right. With this in mind, the MC has shifted its primary emphasis toward the issues relevant to a Neutrino Factory. There is also considerable international activity on Neutrino Factories, with international conferences held at Lyon in 1999, Monterey in 2000 [21], Tsukuba in 2001 [22], and another planned for London in 2002.

  16. Lidar Scanning of Momentum Flux in and above the Atmospheric Surface Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Jakob; Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Bingöl, Ferhat;

    2010-01-01

    Methods to measure the vertical flux of horizontal momentum using both continuous wave and pulsed Doppler lidar profilers are evaluated. The lidar measurements are compared to momentum flux observations performed with sonic anemometers over flat terrain at Høvsøre, Denmark, and profile......-derived vertical momentum flux observations at the Horns Rev wind farm in the North Sea. Generally, the momentum fluxes are reduced because of the finite measuring volume of the instruments, and the filtering is crudely accounted for theoretically. The essential parameter for the estimation of the reduction...

  17. Improvement of density models of geological structures by fusion of gravity data and cosmic muon radiographies

    OpenAIRE

    Jourde, K.; Gibert, D.; Marteau, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how the resolution of small-scale geological density models is improved through the fusion of information provided by gravity measurements and density muon radiographies. Muon radiography aims at determining the density of geological bodies by measuring their screening effect on the natural flux of cosmic muons. Muon radiography essentially works like medical X-ray scan and integrates density information along elongated narrow conical vol...

  18. Improvement of density models of geological structures by fusion of gravity data and cosmic muon radiographies

    OpenAIRE

    Jourde, K.; Gibert, D.; Marteau, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how the resolution of small-scale geological density models is improved through the fusion of information provided by gravity measurements and density muon radiographies. Muon radiography aims at determining the density of geological bodies by measuring their screening effect on the natural flux of cosmic muons. Muon radiography essentially works like a medical X-ray scan and integrates density information along elongated narrow conical volumes. Gravity m...

  19. LHCb - Novel Muon Identification Algorithms for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Cogoni, Violetta

    2016-01-01

    The present LHCb Muon Identification procedure was optimised to guarantee high muon detection efficiency at the istantaneous luminosity $\\mathcal{L}$ of $2\\cdot10^{32}$~cm$^{-2}$~s$^{-1}$. In the current data taking conditions, the luminosity is higher than foreseen and the low energy background contribution to the visible rate in the muon system is larger than expected. A worse situation is expected for Run III when LHCb will operate at $\\mathcal{L} = 2\\cdot10^{33}$~cm$^{-2}$~s$^{-1}$ causing the high particle fluxes to deteriorate the muon detection efficiency, because of the increased dead time of the electronics, and in particular to worsen the muon identification capabilities, due to the increased contribution of the background, with deleterious consequences especially for the analyses requiring high purity signal. In this context, possible new algorithms for the muon identification will be illustrated. In particular, the performance on combinatorial background rejection will be shown, together with the ...

  20. Estimation of 14CO2 flux at soil-atmosphere interface and distribution of 14C in forest ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To realize the dynamical behavior of 14C among exchangeable carbon reservoirs in terrestrial environment, a method for in situ determination of 14CO2 flux at soil-atmosphere interface and a high flow rate CO2 sampler were developed. This method allowed us to collect integrated quantity of CO2 for determining 14C activity over an extended time period under environmental conditions with minimal site disturbance. The 14CO2 flux from ground surface was estimated to be 1.59x10-5 Bq m-2 s-1 in a forest floor with the method. The specific activities of 14C in environmental materials such as some biological and air samples were also determined in the vicinity of the place, where the flux measurement was made, to discuss the behavior of 14C in the forest ecosystem. The results indicated that fresh pine needles had a similar 14C specific activity to the atmospheric CO2 at the same height due to its fairly rapid equilibrium, 14C specific activity in the atmospheric CO2 has a concentration gradient near the ground surface and, at least in this site, CO2 with high 14C specific activity was generated by decomposition of soil organic matter which may be accumulated in soil as a result of former nuclear weapons tests

  1. Estimating local atmosphere-surface fluxes using eddy covariance and numerical Ogive optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, J.; Papakyriakou, T.; Larsen, S.; Jammet, M. M.; Rysgaard, S.; Sejr, M. K.; Sørensen, L. L.

    2014-08-01

    Regardless of study type, site topography, homogeneity and large-scale meteorological flows, estimating ecosystem-scale surface-fluxes using the micrometeorological eddy covariance method inevitably leads to questions concerning inclusion or exclusion of advective flux contributions, in providing representative results. For process-oriented studies in which fluxes are linked to local physical parameters and up-scaled through numerical modeling efforts, advection represents a site-specific component which interferes with our ability to isolate local biochemical processes of interest, as represented by turbulent fluxes. Yet, outside of discarding data reflecting excessive advective interference, no method currently exists to disentangle these contributions on flux estimates. Here, we present a novel comprehensive numerical scheme to identify and separate out advective contributions to exchanges in the surface layer. Comparison between the presented method and conventional methodology on observations of sensible heat, latent heat and CO2-fluxes from a number of sites suggests the presence of absolute flux thresholds at |QSENS|=30 Wm-2, |QLAT|=16 Wm-2 and |FCO2|=2.0 μmol m-2 s-1 marking clear shifts in the influence of advection. Above the thresholds, the relative difference of flux estimates δ remained fixed at δ =5-25% suggesting arguably negligible advection influence. Below the thresholds, however, relative difference rises to δSENS=⟨ 51%|88%|225%⟩, δLAT=⟨14%|28%|99%⟩ and δCO2=⟨ 41%|83%|521%⟩, where bracketed values are the 13.6th percentile, 50th percentile (the median) and the 86.4th percentile respectively, suggesting non-negligible relative influence of advection on low flux estimates. The thresholds thus serve as lower limits to local-scale flux resolvability by conventional methodology. The presented method is shown to allow for flux estimation during severe signal disruption and to yield fewer estimates for an enclosed gas analyzer during

  2. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  3. On the ability of a global atmospheric inversion to constrain variations of CO2 fluxes over Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Molina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The exchanges of carbon, water, and energy between the atmosphere and the Amazon Basin have global implications for current and future climate. Here, the global atmospheric inversion system of the Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate service (MACC was used to further study the seasonal and interannual variations of biogenic CO2 fluxes in Amazonia. The system assimilated surface measurements of atmospheric CO2 mole fractions made over more than 100 sites over the globe into an atmospheric transport model. This study added four surface stations located in tropical South America, a region poorly covered by CO2 observations. The estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE optimized by the inversion were compared to independent estimates of NEE upscaled from eddy-covariance flux measurements in Amazonia, and against reports on the seasonal and interannual variations of the land sink in South America from the scientific literature. We focused on the impact of the interannual variation of the strong droughts in 2005 and 2010 (due to severe and longer-than-usual dry seasons, and of the extreme rainfall conditions registered in 2009. The spatial variations of the seasonal and interannual variability of optimized NEE were also investigated. While the inversion supported the assumption of strong spatial heterogeneity of these variations, the results revealed critical limitations that prevent global inversion frameworks from capturing the data-driven seasonal patterns of fluxes across Amazonia. In particular, it highlighted issues due to the configuration of the observation network in South America and the lack of continuity of the measurements. However, some robust patterns from the inversion seemed consistent with the abnormal moisture conditions in 2009.

  4. Estimating local atmosphere-surface fluxes using eddy covariance and numerical Ogive optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sievers, Jakob; Papakyriakou, Tim; Larsen, Søren;

    2014-01-01

    -frequency contributions interfere with our ability to isolate local biogeochemical processes of interest, as represented by turbulent fluxes. No method currently exists to disentangle low-frequency contributions on flux estimates. Here, we present a novel comprehensive numerical scheme to identify and separate out low...

  5. Measurement of Cosmic-ray Muons and Muon-induced Neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Blyth, S C; Chen, X C; Chu, M C; Cui, K X; Hahn, R L; Ho, T H; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Lau, Y P; Leung, J K C; Leung, K Y; Lin, G L; Lin, Y C; Luk, K B; Luk, W H; Ngai, H Y; Ngan, S Y; Pun, C S J; Shih, K; Tam, Y H; Tsang, R H M; Wang, C H; Wong, C M; Wong, H L; Wong, K K; Yeh, M; Zhang, B J

    2015-01-01

    We measured the muon flux and the production rate of muon-induced neutrons at a depth of 611 meters water equivalent. Our apparatus comprises of three layers of crossed plastic scintillator hodoscopes for tracking the incident cosmic-ray muons, and 760 L of gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator for both neutron production and detection targets. The vertical muon intensity was measured to be $I_{\\mu}$ = (5.7 $\\pm$ 0.6) $\\times$ 10$^{-6}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ sr$^{-1}$. The muon-induced neutron yield in the liquid scintillator was determined to be $Y_{n}$ = (1.19 $\\pm$ 0.08(stat.) $\\pm$ 0.21(syst.)) $\\times$ 10$^{-4}$ neutrons / ($\\mu$ g cm$^{-2}$). A fitting to recently measured neutron yields at different depths gave a muon energy dependence of $\\left\\langle E_{\\mu} \\right\\rangle^{0.76 \\pm 0.03}$ for scintillator targets.

  6. Measurement of cosmic-ray muons and muon-induced neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel Underground Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, S. C.; Chan, Y. L.; Chen, X. C.; Chu, M. C.; Cui, K. X.; Hahn, R. L.; Ho, T. H.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lau, Y. P.; Leung, J. K. C.; Leung, K. Y.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, Y. C.; Luk, K. B.; Luk, W. H.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ngan, S. Y.; Pun, C. S. J.; Shih, K.; Tam, Y. H.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Wang, C. H.; Wong, C. M.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, K. K.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, B. J.; Aberdeen Tunnel Experiment Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We have measured the muon flux and production rate of muon-induced neutrons at a depth of 611 m water equivalent. Our apparatus comprises three layers of crossed plastic scintillator hodoscopes for tracking the incident cosmic-ray muons and 760 L of a gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator for producing and detecting neutrons. The vertical muon intensity was measured to be Iμ=(5.7 ±0.6 )×10-6 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 . The yield of muon-induced neutrons in the liquid scintillator was determined to be Yn=(1.19 ±0.08 (stat)±0.21 (syst))×10-4 neutrons /(μ .g .cm-2 ) . A fit to the recently measured neutron yields at different depths gave a mean muon energy dependence of ⟨Eμ⟩ 0.76 ±0.03 for liquid-scintillator targets.

  7. The Estimation of Surface Latent Heat Flux over the Ocean and its Relationship to Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Vandemark, Doug; Evans, Keith; Miller, David O.; Demoz, Belay B.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new technique combining active and passive remote sensing instruments for the estimation of surface latent heat flux over the ocean is presented. This synergistic method utilizes aerosol lidar backscatter data, multi-channel infrared radiometer data, and microwave scatterometer data acquired onboard the NASA P-313 research aircraft during an extended field campaign over the Atlantic ocean in support of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) in September of 1994. The 10 meter wind speed derived from scatterometers and lidar-radiometer inferred near-surface moisture are used to obtain an estimate of the surface flux of moisture via a bulk aerodynamic formula. The results are compared with the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) daily average latent heat flux and show reasonable agreement. However, the SSM/I values are biased low by about 15 W/sq m. In addition, the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) height, entrainment zone thickness and integrated lidar backscatter intensity are computed from the lidar data and compared with the magnitude of the surface fluxes. The results show that the surface latent heat flux is most strongly correlated with entrainment zone depth, MABL height and the integrated MABL lidar backscatter, with corresponding correlation coefficients of 0.39, 0.43 and 0.71, respectively.

  8. Observation of muons and neutrinos at great depth underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three large calorimetric type detectors have been operated at great depth of 6.045 and 7,000 hg/cm2 at Kolar Gold Mines. Mains of this paper is as follows: Multiple Parallel Muons; Multiplicity decoherence and special type of muon bundles have been examined. High Energy Neutrinos from Celestial Sources; A total 168 large angle penetrating muons produced in rock have been used to look for neutrino sources. The overall rate of such muon is found to be consistent with that expected from atmospheric neutrinos

  9. Muon Detection of TeV $\\gamma$ Rays from $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Muñiz, J

    1999-01-01

    Because of the limited size of the satellite-borne instruments, it has not been possible to observe the flux of gamma ray bursts (GRB) beyond GeV energy. We here show that it is possible to detect the GRB radiation of TeV energy and above, by detecting the muon secondaries produced when the gamma rays shower in the Earth's atmosphere. Observation is made possible by the recent commissioning of underground detectors (AMANDA, the Lake Baikal detector and MILAGRO) which combine a low muon threshold of a few hundred GeV or less, with a large effective area of 10^3 m^2 or more. Observations will not only provide new insights in the origin and characteristics of GRB, they also provide quantitative information on the diffuse infrared background.

  10. A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new parameterisation of atmospheric muons deep underwater (or ice) is presented. It takes into account the simultaneous arrival of muons in bundle giving the multiplicity of the events and the muon energy spectrum as a function of their lateral distribution in a shower

  11. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G.Gomez

    2011-01-01

    The Muon Alignment work now focuses on producing a new track-based alignment with higher track statistics, making systematic studies between the results of the hardware and track-based alignment methods and aligning the barrel using standalone muon tracks. Currently, the muon track reconstruction software uses a hardware-based alignment in the barrel (DT) and a track-based alignment in the endcaps (CSC). An important task is to assess the muon momentum resolution that can be achieved using the current muon alignment, especially for highly energetic muons. For this purpose, cosmic ray muons are used, since the rate of high-energy muons from collisions is very low and the event statistics are still limited. Cosmics have the advantage of higher statistics in the pT region above 100 GeV/c, but they have the disadvantage of having a mostly vertical topology, resulting in a very few global endcap muons. Only the barrel alignment has therefore been tested so far. Cosmic muons traversing CMS from top to bottom are s...

  12. Panofsky Prize Lecture: Evidence for Oscillation of Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totsuka, Yoji

    2002-04-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are decay products of pions and kaons (and of their decay products muons) produced by nuclear interactions of cosmic rays with air nuclei. Though their flux is not known well, only within 20 %, physics quantities that are independent of the flux uncertainty exist. The ratio of the number of muon neutrinos to the number of electron neutrinos is estimated to be accurate within 5 %. The other quantity is the shape of the zenith-angle distribution. Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande are water Cherenkov detectors with 3,000 ton and 50,000 ton pure water, respectively. Kamiokande was operational in 1983 - 1996, and Super-K in 1996 - 2001 and 2003 - in future. We had already noted in 1988 that the observed μ/e ratio, which represented ν_mu/ν_e, was smaller by about 40 %. Later in 1994 we noted that the zenith angle distribution of muon neutrinos was strongly distorted, namely much fewer muons observed in the upward direction, while downward-going muons were what we expected. Electrons were quite normal. In 1996 Super-Kamiokande was ready. Its fiducial volume is 22.5 kton, much larger than Kamiokande's 1.04 kton. In 1998 based on 25.5 kton years of data we presented convincing results on the small μ/e ratio which was caused by fewer number of muons in the upward direction. The essential feature of the observed anomaly was that the disappearance of muon neutrinos depended strongly on their path length and on their energies. Electrons showed no anomaly within the experimental limit. These results were quantitatively and almost uniquely explained by oscillation of muon neutrinos to tau neutrinos, thus evidence for the finite but tiny mass of neutrinos.

  13. A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganshin, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Oda, T [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Saito, M [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Maksyutov, S [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Valsala, V [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Fischer, R [University of London; Lowry, D [University of London; Lukyanov, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Matsueda, H [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Nisbet, E [University of London; Rigby, M [University of Bristol, UK; Sawa, Y [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Toumi, R [Imperial College, London; Tsuboi, K [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Varlagin, A [A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russia; Zhuravlev, R [Central Aerological Observatory

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model (GELCA), comprising a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e. a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution), which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a) using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b) using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and highresolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to sources of

  14. The flux of carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide between the atmosphere and a spruce forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xu

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS and carbon disulfide (CS2 were measured over a spruce forest in Central Germany using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA technique. A REA sampler was developed and validated using simultaneous measurements of CO2 fluxes by REA and by eddy correlation. REA measurements were conducted during six campaigns covering spring, summer, and fall between 1997 and 1999. Both uptake and emission of COS and CS2 by the forest were observed, with deposition occurring mainly during the sunlit period and emission mainly during the dark period. On the average, however, the forest acts as a sink for both gases. The average fluxes for COS and CS2 are  -93 ± 11.7 pmol m-2 s-1 and  -18 ± 7.6 pmol m-2 s-1, respectively. The fluxes of both gases appear to be correlated to photosynthetically active radiation and to the CO2 and chem{H_2O} fluxes, supporting the idea that the air-vegetation exchange of both gases is controlled by stomata. An uptake ratio COS/CO2 of 10 ± 1.7 pmol m mol-1 has been derived from the regression line for the correlation between the COS and CO2 fluxes. This uptake ratio, if representative for the global terrestrial net primary production, would correspond to a sink of 2.3 ± 0.5 Tg COS yr-1.

  15. WRFv3.2-SPAv2: development and validation of a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model, scaling from surface fluxes of CO2 and energy to atmospheric profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallman, T. L.; Moncrieff, J. B.; Williams, M.

    2013-07-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting meteorological (WRF) model has been coupled to the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere (SPA) terrestrial ecosystem model, to produce WRF-SPA. SPA generates realistic land-atmosphere exchanges through fully coupled hydrological, carbon and energy cycles. The addition of a~land surface model (SPA) capable of modelling biospheric CO2 exchange allows WRF-SPA to be used for investigating the feedbacks between biosphere carbon balance, meteorology, and land use and land cover change. We have extensively validated WRF-SPA using multi-annual observations of air temperature, turbulent fluxes, net radiation and net ecosystem exchange of CO2 at three sites, representing the dominant vegetation types in Scotland (forest, managed grassland and arable agriculture). For example air temperature is well simulated across all sites (forest R2 = 0.92, RMSE = 1.7 °C, bias = 0.88 °C; managed grassland R2 = 0.73, RMSE = 2.7 °C, bias = -0.30 °C; arable agriculture R2 = 0.82, RMSE = 2.2 °C, bias = 0.46 °C; RMSE, root mean square error). WRF-SPA generates more realistic seasonal behaviour at the site level compared to an unmodified version of WRF, such as improved simulation of seasonal transitions in latent heat flux in arable systems. WRF-SPA also generates realistic seasonal CO2 exchanges across all sites. WRF-SPA is also able to realistically model atmospheric profiles of CO2 over Scotland, spanning a 3 yr period (2004-2006), capturing both profile structure, indicating realistic transport, and magnitude (model-data residual <±4 ppm) indicating appropriate source sink distribution and CO2 exchange. WRF-SPA makes use of CO2 tracer pools and can therefore identify and quantify land surface contributions to the modelled atmospheric CO2 signal at a specified location.

  16. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Gomez

    2011-01-01

    A new set of muon alignment constants was approved in August. The relative position between muon chambers is essentially unchanged, indicating good detector stability. The main changes concern the global positioning of the barrel and of the endcap rings to match the new Tracker geometry. Detailed studies of the differences between track-based and optical alignment of DTs have proven to be a valuable tool for constraining Tracker alignment weak modes, and this information is now being used as part of the alignment procedure. In addition to the “split-cosmic” analysis used to investigate the muon momentum resolution at high momentum, a new procedure based on reconstructing the invariant mass of di-muons from boosted Zs is under development. Both procedures show an improvement in the momentum precision of Global Muons with respect to Tracker-only Muons. Recent developments in track-based alignment include a better treatment of the tails of residual distributions and accounting for correla...

  17. Toward an estimation of daily european CO{sub 2} fluxes at high spatial resolution by inversion of atmospheric transport; Vers une estimation des flux de CO{sub 2} journaliers europeens a haute resolution par inversion du transport atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carouge, C

    2006-04-15

    Since the end of the 1980's, measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide have been used to estimate global and regional fluxes of CO{sub 2}. This is possible because CO{sub 2} concentration variation is directly linked to flux variation by atmospheric transport. We can find the spatial and temporal distribution of fluxes from concentration measurements by 'inverting' the atmospheric transport. Until recently, most CO{sub 2} inversions have used monthly mean CO{sub 2} atmospheric concentration measurements to infer monthly fluxes. Considering the sparseness of the global CO{sub 2} measurement network, fluxes were a priori aggregated on sub-continental regions and distributed on a fixed spatial pattern within these regions. Only one flux coefficient per month for each region was optimized. With this strong constraint, estimated fluxes can be biased by non-perfect distribution of fluxes within each region (aggregation error). Therefore, flux estimation at model resolution is being developed where the hard constraint of a fixed distribution within a region is replaced by a soft constraint of covariances between flux uncertainties. The use of continuous observations from an increasing number of measurement sites offers a new challenge for inverse modelers. We investigate the use of daily averaged observations to infer daily CO{sub 2} fluxes at model resolution over Europe. We have developed a global synthesis Bayesian inversion to invert daily fluxes at model resolution (50 x 50 km over Europe) from daily averaged CO{sub 2} concentrations. We have obtained estimated fluxes for the year 2001 over Europe using the 10 European continuous sites from the AEROCARB network. The global atmospheric model LMDZt is used with a nested grid over Europe. It is necessary to add a priori spatial and temporal correlations between flux errors to constrain the Bayesian inversion. We present the impact on estimated fluxes of three different spatial correlations based on

  18. Multiple muons in MACRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, R.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the multiple muon events in the Monopole Astrophysics and Cosmic Ray Observatory detector was conducted to determine the cosmic ray composition. Particular emphasis is placed on the interesting primary cosmic ray energy region above 2000 TeV/nucleus. An extensive study of muon production in cosmic ray showers has been done. Results were used to parameterize the characteristics of muon penetration into the Earth to the location of a detector.

  19. Multi-year search for a diffuse flxu of muon neutrinos with AMANDA-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer; Achterberg, A.; Collaboration, IceCube

    2008-04-13

    A search for TeV-PeV muon neutrinos from unresolved sources was performed on AMANDA-II data collected between 2000 and 2003 with an equivalent livetime of 807 days. This diffuse analysis sought to find an extraterrestrial neutrino flux from sources with non-thermal components. The signal is expected to have a harder spectrum than the atmospheric muon and neutrino backgrounds. Since no excess of events was seen in the data over the expected background, an upper limit of E{sup 2}{Phi}{sub 90%C.L.} < 7.4 x 10{sup -8} GeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} is placed on the diffuse flux of muon neutrinos with a {Phi} {proportional_to} E{sup -2} spectrum in the energy range 16 TeV to 2.5 PeV. This is currently the most sensitive {Phi} {proportional_to} E{sup -2} diffuse astrophysical neutrino limit. We also set upper limits for astrophysical and prompt neutrino models, all of which have spectra different than {Phi} {proportional_to} E{sup -2}.

  20. Next-generation angular distribution models for top-of-atmosphere radiative flux calculation from the CERES instruments: methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Su

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The top-of-atmosphere (TOA radiative fluxes are critical components to advancing our understanding of the Earth's radiative energy balance, radiative effects of clouds and aerosols, and climate feedback. The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES instruments provide broadband shortwave and longwave radiance measurements. These radiances are converted to fluxes by using scene type dependent Angular Distribution Models (ADMs. This paper describes the next-generation ADMs that are developed for Terra and Aqua using all available CERES rotating azimuth plane radiance measurements. Coincident cloud and aerosol retrievals, and radiance measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, and meteorological parameters from Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS data assimilation version 5.4.1 are used to define scene type. CERES radiance measurements are stratified by scene type and by other parameters that are important for determining the anisotropy of the given scene type. Anisotropic factors are then defined either for discrete intervals of relevant parameters or as a continuous functions of combined parameters, depending on the scene type. Compared to the existing ADMs, the new ADMs change the monthly mean instantaneous fluxes by up to 5 W m−2 on a regional scale of 1° latitude × 1° longitude, but the flux changes are less than 0.5 W m−2 on a global scale.

  1. A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 × 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sawa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 × 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e., a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution, which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and high-resolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to sources of large anthropogenic emissions. While this study focused on

  2. Soil-atmosphere exchange of ammonia in a non-fertilized grassland: measured emission potentials and inferred fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, G. R.; Murphy, J. G.; Gregoire, P. K.; Cheyne, C. A. L.; Tevlin, A. G.; Hems, R.

    2014-10-01

    A 50-day field study was carried out in a semi-natural, non-fertilized grassland in south-western Ontario, Canada during the late summer and early autumn of 2012. The purpose was to explore surface-atmosphere exchange processes of ammonia (NH3) with a focus on bi-directional fluxes between the soil and atmosphere. Measurements of soil pH and ammonium concentration ([NH4+]) yielded the first direct quantification of soil emission potential (Γsoil = [NH4+]/[H+]) for this land type, with values ranging from 35 to 1850 (an average of 290). The soil compensation point, the atmospheric NH3 mixing ratio below which net emission from the soil will occur, exhibited both a seasonal trend and diurnal trend. Higher daytime and August compensation points were attributed to higher soil temperature. Soil-atmosphere fluxes were estimated using NH3 measurements from the Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC) and a simple resistance model. Vegetative effects were ignored due to the short canopy height and significant Γsoil. Inferred fluxes were, on average, 2.6 ± 4.5 ng m-2 s-1 in August (i.e. net emission) and -5.8 ± 3.0 ng m-2 s-1 in September (i.e. net deposition). These results are in good agreement with the only other bi-directional exchange study in a semi-natural, non-fertilized grassland. A Lagrangian dispersion model (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory - HYSPLIT) was used to calculate air parcel back-trajectories throughout the campaign and revealed that NH3 mixing ratios had no directional bias throughout the campaign, unlike the other atmospheric constituents measured. This implies that soil-atmosphere exchange over a non-fertilized grassland can significantly moderate near-surface NH3 concentrations. In addition, we provide indirect evidence that dew and fog evaporation can cause a morning increase of [NH3]g. Implications of our findings on current NH3 bi-directional exchange modelling efforts are also discussed.

  3. Soil-atmosphere exchange of ammonia in a non-fertilized grassland: measured emission potentials and inferred fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Wentworth

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A 50 day field study was carried out in a semi-natural, non-fertilized grassland in south-western Ontario, Canada during the late summer and early autumn of 2012. The purpose was to explore surface–atmosphere exchange processes of ammonia (NH3 with a focus on bi-directional fluxes between the soil and atmosphere. Measurements of soil pH and ammonium concentration ([NH4+] yielded the first direct quantification of soil emission potential (Γsoil=[NH4+]/[H+] for this land type, with values ranging from 35 to 1850 (an average of 290. The soil compensation point, the atmospheric NH3 mixing ratio below which net emission from the soil will occur, exhibited both a seasonal trend and diurnal trend. Higher daytime and August compensation points were attributed to higher soil temperature. Soil-atmosphere fluxes were estimated using NH3 measurements from the Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC and a~simple resistance model. Vegetative effects were neglected due to the short canopy height and significant Γsoil. Inferred fluxes were, on average, 2.6 ± 4.5 ng m−2 s−1 in August (i.e. net emission and −5.8 ± 3.0 ng m−2 s−1 in September (i.e. net deposition. These results are in good agreement with the only other bi-directional exchange study in a semi-natural, non-fertilized grassland. A Lagrangian dispersion model (HYSPLIT was used to calculate air parcel back trajectories throughout the campaign and revealed that NH3 mixing ratios had no directional bias throughout the campaign, unlike the other atmospheric constituents measured. This implies that soil-atmosphere exchange over a non-fertilized grassland can significantly moderate near-surface NH3 concentrations. In addition, we provide indirect evidence that dew and fog evaporation can cause a morning increase of [NH3(g]. Implications of our findings on current NH3 bi-directional exchange modelling efforts are also discussed.

  4. Short-term fluctuations in the eddy heat flux and baroclinic stability of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, P. H.; Ghan, S. J.; Spiegel, D.; Rambaldi, S.

    1982-01-01

    National Meteorological Center data from midlatitudes for three Januaries is used in calculating time series of the zonal mean meridional eddy heat flux and the zonal mean baroclinic stability, as measured by the difference between the zonal wind shear and the critical value of the shear in two-level models. Time-lagged correlations between the two series reveal a highly significant negative correlation for short time lags, peaking at approximately -0.4 when the stability parameter lags one half day behind the eddy flux. They also reveal that strongly unstable conditions are not followed by significant increases in the eddy flux. These results are seen as indicating that the synoptic variations of the zonal mean eddy flux are not closely related to the degree of baroclinic instability of the zonal mean flow. The autocorrelation of the eddy flux is then compared with those expected for autoregressive processes. A Bayesian information criterion suggests that the behavior is represented best by a damped oscillation, with a damping time of 0.8 day and a period of five days.

  5. Muons tomography applied to geosciences and volcanology

    CERN Document Server

    Marteau, J; Lesparre, N; Nicollin, F; Noli, P; Giacoppo, F

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the inner part of large geological targets is an important issue in geosciences with various applications. Dif- ferent approaches already exist (e.g. gravimetry, electrical tomography) that give access to a wide range of informations but with identified limitations or drawbacks (e.g. intrinsic ambiguity of the inverse problem, time consuming deployment of sensors over large distances). Here we present an alternative and complementary tomography method based on the measurement of the cosmic muons flux attenuation through the geological structures. We detail the basics of this muon tomography with a special emphasis on the photo-active detectors.

  6. Solar Modulation of Inner Trapped Belt Radiation Flux as a Function of Atmospheric Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, M. A. K.

    2005-01-01

    No simple algorithm seems to exist for calculating proton fluxes and lifetimes in the Earth's inner, trapped radiation belt throughout the solar cycle. Most models of the inner trapped belt in use depend upon AP8 which only describes the radiation environment at solar maximum and solar minimum in Cycle 20. One exception is NOAAPRO which incorporates flight data from the TIROS/NOAA polar orbiting spacecraft. The present study discloses yet another, simple formulation for approximating proton fluxes at any time in a given solar cycle, in particular between solar maximum and solar minimum. It is derived from AP8 using a regression algorithm technique from nuclear physics. From flux and its time integral fluence, one can then approximate dose rate and its time integral dose.

  7. Interpreting the variations in atmospheric methane fluxes observed above a restored wetland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Mathias; Friborg, Thomas; Ringgaard, Rasmus;

    2011-01-01

    of the source area. This area covered not only different plant communities but also a gravel road and a river surface, and it had a microtopography that visibly induced a large spatial variability in the wetness of the top soil. It is shown that the control mechanisms for the methane emission from restored...... cattle moving through the source area of the eddy flux mast increased the measured emission rates by one order of magnitude during short time periods. (2) Friction velocity exerted a strong control on the CH4 flux whenever there were water pools on the surface. (3) An exponential response of the daily CH...

  8. Ship-based Surface Flux Observations Under Atmospheric Rivers During the CALWATER 2015 Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomquist, B.; Fairall, C. W.; Intrieri, J. M.; Wolfe, D. E.; Pezoa, S.

    2015-12-01

    The NOAA Physical Sciences Division portable flux system was deployed on the R/V Ron Brown as part of the surface observational strategy for the CALWATER 2015 field investigation. Measurements included turbulent fluxes of temperature, water vapor and wind stress. A refined 'best' set of bulk meteorological measurements for the duration of the cruise was produced from combined NOAA, DOE ARM-AMF2 and shipboard sensors. Direct eddy correlation and bulk model estimates of sensible and latent heat are broadly consistent (RMSE transport budget.

  9. Western Pacific atmospheric nutrient deposition fluxes, their impact on surface ocean productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, M.; Hamilton, D.; Baker, A. R.; Jickells, T. D.; Bromley, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Quack, B.; Boyd, P. W.

    2014-07-01

    The atmospheric deposition of both macronutrients and micronutrients plays an important role in driving primary productivity, particularly in the low-latitude ocean. We report aerosol major ion measurements for five ship-based sampling campaigns in the western Pacific from ~25°N to 20°S and compare the results with those from Atlantic meridional transects (~50°N to 50°S) with aerosols collected and analyzed in the same laboratory, allowing full incomparability. We discuss sources of the main nutrient species (nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and iron (Fe)) in the aerosols and their stoichiometry. Striking north-south gradients are evident over both basins with the Northern Hemisphere more impacted by terrestrial dust sources and anthropogenic emissions and the North Atlantic apparently more impacted than the North Pacific. We estimate the atmospheric supply rates of these nutrients and the potential impact of the atmospheric deposition on the tropical western Pacific. Our results suggest that the atmospheric deposition is P deficient relative to the needs of the resident phytoplankton. These findings suggest that atmospheric supply of N, Fe, and P increases primary productivity utilizing some of the residual excess phosphorus (P*) in the surface waters to compensate for aerosol P deficiency. Regional primary productivity is further enhanced via the stimulation of nitrogen fixation fuelled by the residual atmospheric iron and P*. Our stoichiometric calculations reveal that a P* of 0.1 µmol L-1 can offset the P deficiency in atmospheric supply for many months. This study suggests that atmospheric deposition may sustain ~10% of primary production in both the western tropical Pacific.

  10. Impacts of a decadal drainage disturbance on surface-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide in a permafrost ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, Fanny; Burjack, Ina; Corradi, Chiara A. R.; Heimann, Martin; Kolle, Olaf; Merbold, Lutz; Zimov, Nikita; Zimov, Sergey; Göckede, Mathias

    2016-09-01

    Hydrologic conditions are a major controlling factor for carbon exchange processes in high-latitude ecosystems. The presence or absence of water-logged conditions can lead to significant shifts in ecosystem structure and carbon cycle processes. In this study, we compared growing season CO2 fluxes of a wet tussock tundra ecosystem from an area affected by decadal drainage to an undisturbed area on the Kolyma floodplain in northeastern Siberia. For this comparison we found the sink strength for CO2 in recent years (2013-2015) to be systematically reduced within the drained area, with a minor increase in photosynthetic uptake due to a higher abundance of shrubs outweighed by a more pronounced increase in respiration due to warmer near-surface soil layers. Still, in comparison to the strong reduction of fluxes immediately following the drainage disturbance in 2005, recent CO2 exchange with the atmosphere over this disturbed part of the tundra indicate a higher carbon turnover, and a seasonal amplitude that is comparable again to that within the control section. This indicates that the local permafrost ecosystem is capable of adapting to significantly different hydrologic conditions without losing its capacity to act as a net sink for CO2 over the growing season. The comparison of undisturbed CO2 flux rates from 2013-2015 to the period of 2002-2004 indicates that CO2 exchange with the atmosphere was intensified, with increased component fluxes (ecosystem respiration and gross primary production) over the past decade. Net changes in CO2 fluxes are dominated by a major increase in photosynthetic uptake, resulting in a stronger CO2 sink in 2013-2015. Application of a MODIS-based classification scheme to separate the growing season into four sub-seasons improved the interpretation of interannual variability by illustrating the systematic shifts in CO2 uptake patterns that have occurred in this ecosystem over the past 10 years and highlighting the important role of the late

  11. Effect of spatial vegetation and relief heterogeneity on vertical CO2 fluxes between land surface and the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olchev, Alexander; Mukhartova, Yulia; Levashova, Natalia; Volkova, Elena

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of the study is to describe the influence of spatial vegetation and relief heterogeneity on turbulent CO2 fluxes between land surface and the atmosphere using a process-based two-dimensional turbulent exchange models. As a key area for this modeling study the hilly territory situated at the southern boundary of broadleaf forest community in European part of Russia (Tula region) was selected. The vegetation cover in the study region is mainly represented by mosaic of agricultural areas, grasslands, mires and groves that makes very difficult an adequate determining the local and regional CO2 fluxes using experimental methods only. Applied two two-dimensional models based on solution of the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations using the first-order and one-and-a-half order (TKE) closure schemes. Numerical scheme of the first-order closure model is based on the theory of contrast structures (Levashova et al 2005). For description of the plant canopy photosynthesis and respiration rates an aggregated approach based on the model of Ball et al (1987) in Leuning modification (1990, 1995), the Beer-Lambert equation for the description of solar radiation penetration within a plant canopy (Monsi, Saeki 1953), and also an algorithm describing the response of stomatal conductance of the leaves to incoming photosynthetically active radiation is used. All necessary input parameters describing the photosynthesis and respiration properties of different plants and soil types in the study region were obtained from the field measurements or taken from the literature. To quantify the possible effects of relief and vegetation heterogeneity on CO2 fluxes the three transects crossing the study area were chosen. For each transect the 2D patterns of wind speed components, turbulent exchange coefficients, CO2 concentrations and fluxes were calculated both for actual vegetation structure and for additional scenario assuming the total area deforestation. All modeling

  12. Reanalysis of the Atmospheric Flux of Nutrient Elements to the Southern Yellow Sea and the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Xiaofang; Wu Zengmao; Chang Zhiqing

    2003-01-01

    Based on the recent research results on dry and wet deposition of nutrient elements and sulphate, we estimate the atmospheric flux of nutrient elements and sulphate to the southern Yellow Sea and the East China Sea in each season. The results suggest that the concentrations of nutrient elements and sulphate in aerosol and precipitation show an apparent seasonal cycle with the maximum values in winter and the minimum values in summer. Depositions of nitrate and sulphate are dominated by wet deposition, while the deposition for phosphate is mainly dry deposition. Moreover, compared with the riverine inputs, the atmospheric deposition may be the main source of dissolved inorganic nutrients in the southern Yellow Sea and the East China Sea.

  13. Modeling atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles and fluxes above sloping terrain at a boreal site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Aalto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 fluxes and concentrations were simulated in the planetary boundary layer above subarctic hilly terrain using a three dimensional model. The model solves the transport equations in the local scale and includes a vegetation sub-model. A WMO/GAW background concentration measurement site and an ecosystem flux measurement site are located inside the modeled region at a hilltop and above a mixed boreal forest, respectively. According to model results, the concentration measurement at the hill site was representative for continental background. However, this was not the case for the whole model domain. Concentration at few meters above active vegetation represented mainly local variation. Local variation became inseparable from the regional signal at about 60-100 m above ground. Flow over hills changed profiles of environmental variables and height of inversion layer, however CO2 profiles were more affected by upwind land use than topography. The hill site was above boundary layer during night and inside boundary layer during daytime. The CO2 input from model lateral boundaries dominated in both cases. Daily variation in the CO2 assimilation rate was clearly seen in the CO2 profiles. Concentration difference between the hill site and the forest site was about 5ppm during afternoon according to both model and measurements. The average modeled flux to the whole model region was about 40% of measured and modeled local flux at the forest site.

  14. Ultraviolet actinic flux in clear and cloudy atmospheres: model calculations and aircraft-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Palancar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV actinic fluxes measured with two Scanning Actinic Flux Spectroradiometers (SAFS aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft are compared with the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV model. The observations from 17 days in July–August 2004 (INTEX-NA field campaign span a wide range of latitudes (27.5° N–53.0° N, longitudes (45.1° W–139.5° W, altitudes (0.1–11.9 km, ozone columns (285.4–352.7 DU, and solar zenith angles (1.7°–85°. Both cloudy and cloud-free conditions were encountered. For cloud-free conditions, the ratio of observed to clear-sky-model actinic flux (integrated from 298 to 422 nm is 1.01±0.04, i.e. in good agreement with observations. The agreement improves to 1.00±0.03 for the down-welling component under clear sky conditions. In the presence of clouds, both down-welling and up-welling components show reductions or enhancements from clear sky values, depending on the position of the airplane relative to clouds. The correlations between up-welling and down-welling deviations are well reproduced with sensitivity studies using the TUV model, and are understood qualitatively with a simple conceptual model. This analysis of actinic flux observations illustrates opportunities for future evaluations of photolysis rates in three-dimensional chemistry-transport models.

  15. On extreme atmospheric and marine nitrogen fluxes and chlorophyll-a levels in the Kattegat Strait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, C.B.; Carstensen, J.; Ellermann, T.;

    2003-01-01

    A retrospective analysis is carried out to investigate the importance of the vertical fluxes of nitrogen to the marine sea surface layer in which high chlorophyll a levels may cause blooms of harmful algae and subsequent turn over and oxygen depletion at the bottom of the sea. Typically nitrogen ...

  16. Differential Muon Tomography to Continuously Monitor Changes in the Composition of Subsurface Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Max; Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.; Spooner, Neil J.; Fung, Cora; Gluyas, John

    2013-01-01

    Muon tomography has been used to seek hidden chambers in Egyptian pyramids and image subsurface features in volcanoes. It seemed likely that it could be used to image injected, supercritical carbon dioxide as it is emplaced in porous geological structures being used for carbon sequestration, and also to check on subsequent leakage. It should work equally well in any other application where there are two fluids of different densities, such as water and oil, or carbon dioxide and heavy oil in oil reservoirs. Continuous monitoring of movement of oil and/or flood fluid during enhanced oil recovery activities for managing injection is important for economic reasons. Checking on leakage for geological carbon storage is essential both for safety and for economic purposes. Current technology (for example, repeat 3D seismic surveys) is expensive and episodic. Muons are generated by high- energy cosmic rays resulting from supernova explosions, and interact with gas molecules in the atmosphere. This innovation has produced a theoretical model of muon attenuation in the thickness of rock above and within a typical sandstone reservoir at a depth of between 1.00 and 1.25 km. Because this first simulation was focused on carbon sequestration, the innovators chose depths sufficient for the pressure there to ensure that the carbon dioxide would be supercritical. This innovation demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of using the natural cosmic-ray muon flux to generate continuous tomographic images of carbon dioxide in a storage site. The muon flux is attenuated to an extent dependent on, amongst other things, the density of the materials through which it passes. The density of supercritical carbon dioxide is only three quarters that of the brine in the reservoir that it displaces. The first realistic simulations indicate that changes as small as 0.4% in the storage site bulk density could be detected (equivalent to 7% of the porosity, in this specific case). The initial

  17. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land−atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land−atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt C⋅y−1 of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt C⋅y−1, equivalent to 8–37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the “hotspots,” largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g C⋅m−2⋅y−1), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty. PMID:27247397

  18. Analysis of atmospheric CO2 growth rates at Mauna Loa using CO2 fluxes derived from an inverse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) growth rates are estimated for a period 1959-2004 from atmospheric CO2 measurements at Mauna Loa by the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. Only during a few short periods, 1965-1966, 1972-1973, 1987-1988 and 1997-1998, in the last 45 yr have growth rates of atmospheric CO2 been of a similar magnitude or higher than that due to the total emission from burning of fossil fuels. Using results from a time-dependent inverse (TDI) model, based on observations of atmospheric CO2 at 87 stations, we establish that El Nino-induced climate variations in the tropics and large-scale forest fires in the boreal regions are the main causes of anomalous growth rates of atmospheric CO2. The high growth rate of 2.8 ppm/yr in 2002 can be predicted fairly successfully by using the correlations between (1) the peak-to-trough amplitudes in the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index and tropical flux anomaly, and (2) anomalies in CO2 flux and area burned by fire from the boreal regions. We suggest that the large interannual changes in CO2 growth rates can mostly be explained by natural climate variability. Our analysis also shows that the decadal average growth rate, linked primarily to human activity, has fluctuated around an all-time high value of 1.5 ppm/yr over the past 20 yr. A statistical model analysis is performed to identify the regions which have the maximum influence on the observed growth rate anomaly at Mauna Loa

  19. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land-atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G L; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-06-14

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land-atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt C⋅y(-1) of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt C⋅y(-1), equivalent to 8-37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the "hotspots," largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g C⋅m(-2)⋅y(-1)), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty. PMID:27247397

  20. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land‑atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-06-01

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land‑atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt Cṡy‑1 of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt Cṡy‑1, equivalent to 8–37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the “hotspots,” largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g Cṡm‑2ṡy‑1), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty.

  1. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land-atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-06-01

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land-atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt Cṡy-1 of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt Cṡy-1, equivalent to 8-37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the “hotspots,” largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g Cṡm-2ṡy-1), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty.

  2. Muon Fluence Measurements for Homeland Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankney, Austin S.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Borgardt, James D.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2010-08-10

    This report focuses on work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to better characterize aspects of backgrounds in RPMs deployed for homeland security purposes. Two polyvinyl toluene scintillators were utilized with supporting NIM electronics to measure the muon coincidence rate. Muon spallation is one mechanism by which background neutrons are produced. The measurements performed concentrated on a broad investigation of the dependence of the muon flux on a) variations in solid angle subtended by the detector; b) the detector inclination with the horizontal; c) depth underground; and d) diurnal effects. These tests were conducted inside at Building 318/133, outdoors at Building 331G, and underground at Building 3425 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  3. JADE muon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, J.; Armitage, J.C.M.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Bamford, G.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Glendinning, I.; Greenshaw, T.; Hassard, J.F.; Hill, P.; King, B.T.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McCann, H.; Mercer, D.; Mills, H.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Prosper, H.B.; Rowe, P.; Stephens, K.

    1985-08-01

    The JADE muon detector consists of 618 planar drift chambers interspersed between layers of hadron absorber. This paper gives a detailed description of the construction and operation of the detector as a whole and discusses the properties of the drift chambers. The muon detector has been operating successfully at PETRA for five years. (orig.).

  4. Slow Muons and Muonium

    CERN Document Server

    Kirch, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland operates the high intensity proton accelerator facility HIPA. A 590 MeV kinetic energy proton beam of presently up to 2.4 mA is sent to target stations producing pions, muons and neutrons for fundamental and applied physics. The beam power of 1.4 MW provides the world's highest intensities of low momentum muons which can be stopped in low mass targets. Rates of surface muons of up to about $10^8$/s are being provided to various unique precision particle physics experiments. Two feasibility studies are ongoing to considerably improve the available muon beams. The high intensity muon beamline, HiMB, could deliver on the order of $10^{10}$/s surface muons and the stopped muon cooler, muCool, aims at a gain factor of $10^{10}$ in phase space quality while sacrificing only less than 3 orders of magnitude in intensity for low energy $\\mu^+$. These beams will allow a new generation of precision physics experiments with stopped muons and muonium atoms.

  5. Telecommunication using muon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  6. OPAL Muon Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the 4 experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 to 2000. This is a slice of the outermost layer of OPAL : the muon chambers. This outside layer detects particles which are not stopped by the previous layers. These are mostly muons.

  7. Pion-Muon Concentrating System for Detectors of Highly Enriched Uranium

    CERN Document Server

    Kurennoy, Sergey; Blind, Barbara; Jason, Andrew J; Neri, Filippo

    2005-01-01

    One of many possible applications of low-energy antiprotons collected in a Penning trap can be a portable muon source. Released antiprotons annihilate on impact with normal matter producing on average about 3 charged pions per antiproton, which in turn decay into muons. Existence of such negative-muon sources of sufficient intensity would bring into play, for example, detectors of highly enriched uranium based on muonic X-rays. We explore options of collecting and focusing pions and resulting muons to enhance the muon flux toward the detector. Simulations with MARS and MAFIA are used to choose the target material and parameters of the magnetic system consisting of a few solenoids.

  8. CMS: Cosmic muons in simulation and measured data

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    A dedicated cosmic muon Monte-Carlo event generator CMSCGEN has been developed for the CMS experiment. The simulation relies on parameterisations of the muon energy and the incidence angle, based on measured and simulated data of the cosmic muon flux. The geometry and material density of the CMS infrastructure underground and surrounding geological layers are also taken into account. The event generator is integrated into the CMS detector simulation chain of the existing software framework. Cosmic muons can be generated on earth's surface as well as for the detector located 90 m underground. Many million cosmic muon events have been generated and compared to measured data, taken with the CMS detector at its nominal magnetic field of 3.8 T.

  9. Three-dimensional parameterizations of the synoptic scale kinetic energy and momentum flux in the Earth's atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Coumou

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a new set of statistical-dynamical equations (SDEs which can accurately reproduce the three-dimensional atmospheric fields of synoptic scale kinetic energy and momentum flux. The set of equations is closed by finding proper parameterizations for the vertical macro-turbulent diffusion coefficient and ageostrophic terms. The equations have been implemented in a new SD atmosphere model, named Aeolus. We show that the synoptic scale kinetic energy and momentum fluxes generated by the model are in good agreement with empirical data, which were derived from bandpass-filtered ERA-40 data. In addition to present-day climate, the model is tested for substantially colder (last glacial maximum and warmer (2×CO2 climates, and shown to be in agreement with general circulation model (GCM results. With the derived equations, one can efficiently study the position and strength of storm tracks under different climate scenarios with calculation time a fraction of those of GCMs. This work prepares ground for the development of a new generation of fast Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity which are able to perform multi-millennia simulations in a reasonable time frame while appropriately accounting for the climatic effect of storm tracks.

  10. How large is the cosmic dust flux into the Earth's atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, John; Janches, Diego; Gomez-Martin, Juan Carlos; Bones, David; Diego Carrillo-Sanchez, Juan; James, Sandy; Nesvorny, David; Pokorny, Petr

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic dust particles are produced in the solar system from the sublimation of comets as they orbit close to the sun, and also from collisions between asteroids in the belt between Mars and Jupiter. Current estimates of the magnitude of the cosmic dust input rate into the Earth's atmosphere range from 2 to well over 100 tons per day, depending on whether the measurements are made in space, in the middle atmosphere, or at the surface in polar ice cores. This nearly 2 order-of-magnitude discrepancy indicates that there are serious flaws in the interpretation of observations that have been used to make the estimates. Dust particles enter the atmosphere at hyperthermal velocities (11 - 72 km s ^{-1}), and mostly ablate at heights between 80 and 120 km in a region of the atmosphere known as the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT). The resulting metal vapours (Fe, Mg, Si and Na etc.) then oxidize and recondense to form nm-size particles, termed "meteoric smoke". These particles are too small to sediment downwards. Instead, they are transported by the general circulation of the atmosphere, taking roughly 5 years to reach the surface. There is great interest in the role smoke particles play as condensation nuclei of noctilucent ice clouds in the mesosphere, and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere. Various new estimates of the dust input will be discussed. The first is from a zodiacal dust cloud model which predicts that more than 90% of the dust entering the atmosphere comes from Jupiter Family Comets; this model is constrained by observations of the zodiacal cloud using the IRAS, COBE and Planck satellites. The cometary dust is predicted to mostly be in a near-prograde orbit, entering the atmosphere with an average velocity around 14 km s ^{-1}. The total dust input should then be about 40 t d ^{-1}. However, relatively few of these particles are observed, even by the powerful Arecibo 430 MHz radar. Coupled models of meteoroid differential ablation

  11. Tutorial models of the climate and habitability of Proxima Centauri b: a thin atmosphere is sufficient to distribute heat given low stellar flux

    CERN Document Server

    Goldblatt, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Proxima Centauri b, an Earth-size planet in the habitable zone of our nearest stellar neighbour, has just been discovered. A theoretical framework of synchronously rotating planets, in which the risk of a runaway greenhouse on the sunlight side and atmospheric collapse on the reverse side are mutually ameliorated via heat transport is discussed. This is developed via simple (tutorial) models of the climate. These show that lower incident stellar flux means that less heat transport, so less atmospheric mass, is required. The incident stellar flux at Proxima Centauri b is indeed low, which may help enhance habitability if it has suffered some atmospheric loss or began with a low volatile inventory.

  12. Effects of precipitation on sonic anemometer measurements of turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongwang; Huang, Jian; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Jun A.; Huang, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Effects caused by precipitation on the measurements of three-dimensional sonic anemometer are analyzed based on a field observational experiment conducted in Maoming, Guangdong Province, China. Obvious fluctuations induced by precipitation are observed for the outputs of sonic anemometer-derived temperature and wind velocity components. A technique of turbulence spectra and cospectra normalized in the framework of similarity theory is utilized to validate the measured variables and calculated fluxes. It is found that the sensitivity of sonic anemometer-derived temperature to precipitation is significant, compared with that of the wind velocity components. The spectra of wind velocity and cospectra of momentum flux resemble the standard universal shape with the slopes of the spectra and cospectra at the inertial subrange, following the -2/3 and -4/3 power law, respectively, even under the condition of heavy rain. Contaminated by precipitation, however, the spectra of temperature and cospectra of sensible heat flux do not exhibit a universal shape and have obvious frequency loss at the inertial subrange. From the physical structure and working principle of sonic anemometer, a possible explanation is proposed to describe this difference, which is found to be related to the variations of precipitation particles. Corrections for errors of sonic anemometer-derived temperature under precipitation is needed, which is still under exploration.

  13. Trends in atmospheric deposition fluxes of sulphur and nitrogen in Czech forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the temporal trends and spatial changes of deposition of sulphur and nitrogen in Czech forests based on records from long-term monitoring. A statistically significant trend for sulphur was detected at most of the sites measuring for wet, dry, and total deposition fluxes and at many of these the trend was also present for the period after 2000. The spatial pattern of the changes in sulphur deposition flux between 1995 and 2011 shows the decrease over the entire forested area in a wide range of 18.1–0.2 g m−2 year−1 with the most pronounced improvement in formerly most impacted regions. Nitrogen still represents a considerable stress in many areas. The value of nitrogen deposition flux of 1 g m−2 year−1 is exceeded over a significant portion of the country. On an equivalent basis, the ion ratios of NO3−/SO42− and NH4+/SO42− in precipitation show significantly increasing trends in time similarly to those of pH. -- Highlights: • Significant decrease of sulphur deposition at most of sites has been recorded. • Nitrogen deposition still represents a considerable stress in Czech forests. • Significantly increasing trends of NO3−/SO42−, NH4+/SO42−, and pH in precipitation. -- While sulphur deposition significantly decreased with the highest improvement in formerly most affected areas, nitrogen deposition still represents a considerable stress in Czech forests

  14. A biogenic CO2 flux adjustment scheme for the mitigation of large-scale biases in global atmospheric CO2 analyses and forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustí-Panareda, Anna; Massart, Sébastien; Chevallier, Frédéric; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Boussetta, Souhail; Dutra, Emanuel; Beljaars, Anton

    2016-08-01

    Forecasting atmospheric CO2 daily at the global scale with a good accuracy like it is done for the weather is a challenging task. However, it is also one of the key areas of development to bridge the gaps between weather, air quality and climate models. The challenge stems from the fact that atmospheric CO2 is largely controlled by the CO2 fluxes at the surface, which are difficult to constrain with observations. In particular, the biogenic fluxes simulated by land surface models show skill in detecting synoptic and regional-scale disturbances up to sub-seasonal time-scales, but they are subject to large seasonal and annual budget errors at global scale, usually requiring a posteriori adjustment. This paper presents a scheme to diagnose and mitigate model errors associated with biogenic fluxes within an atmospheric CO2 forecasting system. The scheme is an adaptive scaling procedure referred to as a biogenic flux adjustment scheme (BFAS), and it can be applied automatically in real time throughout the forecast. The BFAS method generally improves the continental budget of CO2 fluxes in the model by combining information from three sources: (1) retrospective fluxes estimated by a global flux inversion system, (2) land-use information, (3) simulated fluxes from the model. The method is shown to produce enhanced skill in the daily CO2 10-day forecasts without requiring continuous manual intervention. Therefore, it is particularly suitable for near-real-time CO2 analysis and forecasting systems.

  15. Effects of atmospheric deposition nitrogen flux and its composition on soil solution chemistry from a red soil farmland, southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Zhou, Jing; Peng, Ying; Chan, Andrew; Mao, Jingdong

    2015-12-01

    A detailed study on the solution chemistry of red soil in South China is presented. Data are collected from two simulated column-leaching experiments with an improved setup to evaluate the effects of atmospheric N deposition (ADN) composition and ADN flux on agricultural soil acidification using a (15)N tracer technique and an in situ soil solution sampler. The results show that solution pH values decline regardless of the increase of the NH4(+)/NO3(-) ratio in the ADN composition or ADN flux, while exchangeable Al(3+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and K(+) concentrations increase at different soil depths (20, 40, and 60 cm). Compared with the control, ADN (60 kg per ha per year N, NH4(+)/NO3(-) ratio of 2 : 1) decreases solution pH values, increases solution concentrations of NO3(-)-N, Al(3+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) at the middle and lower soil depths, and promotes their removal. NH4(+)-N was not detected in red soil solutions of all the three soil layers, which might be attributed to effects of nitrification, absorption and fixation in farmland red soil. Some of the NO3(-)-N concentrations at 40-60 cm soil depth exceed the safe drinking level of 10 mg L(-1), especially when the ADN flux is beyond 60 kg ha(-1) N. These features are critical for understanding the ADN agro-ecological effects, and for future assessment of ecological critical loads of ADN in red soil farmlands.

  16. Heat flux to the helium cryogenic system elements in the case of incidental vacuum vessel ventilation with atmospheric air

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The selection process for size in safety equipment for cold vessels or process pipes in cryogenic systems should take into consideration the incidental ventilation of the vacuum vessel with atmospheric air. In this case, a significant heat input toward the cold elements of the system can be expected. A number of experimental investigations have been done for the elements at liquid helium temperature which have been covered with 10 layers of MLI. The typical values of the heat flux were measured in a range of 3.7 to 5.0 kW/m2 of the element surface. The helium temperature parts are typically surrounded by thermal shields that are kept in a temperature range of 50-80K. On the external side, the thermal shields are covered with 30-40 layers of MLI while on the internal side, the shields are bare. The theoretical calculations of heat flux to the thermal shield, with respect to the possibility of air condensation and freezing on the bare side of the thermal shield, show that the heat flux to the thermal shield can...

  17. Carbon Fluxes Between the Atmosphere, Terrestrial, and River Systems Across a Glacier-Dominated Landscape in Southcentral Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulueta, R. C.; Welker, J. M.; Tomco, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    The coastal Gulf of Alaska region is experiencing rapid and accelerating changes due to local and regional warming. Predicted high latitude warming may result in rapid recession of glaciers with subsequent changes in river discharge, nutrient fluxes into the rivers, shifts in landscape vegetation cover, and altered CO2 fluxes affecting the regional carbon balance. As glaciers recede an increase in glacier-dominated river discharge and a change in seasonality of the river discharge are expected. Recently deglaciated landscapes will, over time, be occupied by a succession of vegetation cover that are likely to alter the fluxes of carbon both between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems, and between terrestrial ecosystems and stream and river systems. As the landscape evolves from deglaciated forelands it is expected that there is low to no CO2 fluxes between the atmosphere and the recently deglaciated landscape, as well as dissolved organic and inorganic carbon inputs into rivers and streams. These recently deglaciated landscapes will transition to early successional plant species and on towards mature spruce forests. Each transitional terrestrial ecosystem will have different carbon cycling between the atmosphere, terrestrial, and aquatic systems until the mature spruce forests which is expected to have high carbon uptake and sequestration as well as increased inputs of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon into the rivers and streams. A new research project was initiated in the summer of 2011 focusing on glacier-dominated landscapes within the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve in southcentral Alaska with the objective to quantify how the transition from deglaciated forelands to mature spruce forests (a successional sequence) alters the patterns and magnitudes of CO2 exchange, the dissolved carbon inputs from terrestrial to aquatic systems and the extent to which these are manifested due to changes in glacier coverage. We seek to examine present

  18. Preservation of atmospheric dimethyl sulphide samples on Tenax in sea-to-air flux measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zemmelink, H.J.; Gieskes, W.W C; Holland, P.M.; Dacey, J.W

    2002-01-01

    The low concentration of dimethyl sulphide (DMS) in the atmosphere makes it necessary to concentrate the gas before gas-chromatographic analysis. One of the preferred methods has been to use a cold Tenax adsorbent in this concentration step. DMS concentration onto Tenax-TA traps is shown to be sensi

  19. Muon background studies for shallow depth Double - Chooz near detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, H.

    2015-08-01

    Muon events are one of the main concerns regarding background in neutrino experiments. The placement of experimental set-ups in deep underground facilities reduce considerably their impact on the research of the expected signals. But in the cases where the detector is installed on surface or at shallow depth, muon flux remains high, being necessary their precise identification for further rejection. Total flux, mean energy or angular distributions are some of the parameters that can help to characterize the muons. Empirically, the muon rate can be measured in an experiment by a number of methods. Nevertheless, the capability to determine the muons angular distribution strongly depends on the detector features, while the measurement of the muon energy is quite difficult. Also considering that on-site measurements can not be extrapolated to other sites due to the difference on the overburden and its profile, it is necessary to find an adequate solution to perform the muon characterization. The method described in this work to obtain the main features of the muons reaching the experimental set-up, is based on the muon transport simulation by the MUSIC software, combined with a dedicated sampling algorithm for shallow depth installations based on a modified Gaisser parametrization. This method provides all the required information about the muons for any shallow depth installation if the corresponding overburden profile is implemented. In this work, the method has been applied for the recently commissioned Double - Chooz near detector, which will allow the cross-check between the simulation and the experimental data, as it has been done for the far detector.

  20. Muon background studies for shallow depth Double - Chooz near detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, H. [Laboratoire Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC) - Université Paris 7. Paris (France)

    2015-08-17

    Muon events are one of the main concerns regarding background in neutrino experiments. The placement of experimental set-ups in deep underground facilities reduce considerably their impact on the research of the expected signals. But in the cases where the detector is installed on surface or at shallow depth, muon flux remains high, being necessary their precise identification for further rejection. Total flux, mean energy or angular distributions are some of the parameters that can help to characterize the muons. Empirically, the muon rate can be measured in an experiment by a number of methods. Nevertheless, the capability to determine the muons angular distribution strongly depends on the detector features, while the measurement of the muon energy is quite difficult. Also considering that on-site measurements can not be extrapolated to other sites due to the difference on the overburden and its profile, it is necessary to find an adequate solution to perform the muon characterization. The method described in this work to obtain the main features of the muons reaching the experimental set-up, is based on the muon transport simulation by the MUSIC software, combined with a dedicated sampling algorithm for shallow depth installations based on a modified Gaisser parametrization. This method provides all the required information about the muons for any shallow depth installation if the corresponding overburden profile is implemented. In this work, the method has been applied for the recently commissioned Double - Chooz near detector, which will allow the cross-check between the simulation and the experimental data, as it has been done for the far detector.

  1. The Effect of Cumulus Cloud Field Anisotropy on Domain-Averaged Solar Fluxes and Atmospheric Heating Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkelman, Laura M.; Evans, K. Franklin; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Cumulus clouds can become tilted or elongated in the presence of wind shear. Nevertheless, most studies of the interaction of cumulus clouds and radiation have assumed these clouds to be isotropic. This paper describes an investigation of the effect of fair-weather cumulus cloud field anisotropy on domain-averaged solar fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles. A stochastic field generation algorithm was used to produce twenty three-dimensional liquid water content fields based on the statistical properties of cloud scenes from a large eddy simulation. Progressively greater degrees of x-z plane tilting and horizontal stretching were imposed on each of these scenes, so that an ensemble of scenes was produced for each level of distortion. The resulting scenes were used as input to a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. Domain-average transmission, reflection, and absorption of broadband solar radiation were computed for each scene along with the average heating rate profile. Both tilt and horizontal stretching were found to significantly affect calculated fluxes, with the amount and sign of flux differences depending strongly on sun position relative to cloud distortion geometry. The mechanisms by which anisotropy interacts with solar fluxes were investigated by comparisons to independent pixel approximation and tilted independent pixel approximation computations for the same scenes. Cumulus anisotropy was found to most strongly impact solar radiative transfer by changing the effective cloud fraction, i.e., the cloud fraction when the field is projected on a surface perpendicular to the direction of the incident solar beam.

  2. Plant species diversity affects soil-atmosphere fluxes of methane and nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklaus, Pascal A; Le Roux, Xavier; Poly, Franck; Buchmann, Nina; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Weigelt, Alexandra; Barnard, Romain L

    2016-07-01

    Plant diversity effects on ecosystem functioning can potentially interact with global climate by altering fluxes of the radiatively active trace gases nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4). We studied the effects of grassland species richness (1-16) in combination with application of fertilizer (nitrogen:phosphorus:potassium = 100:43.6:83 kg ha(-1) a(-1)) on N2O and CH4 fluxes in a long-term field experiment. Soil N2O emissions, measured over 2 years using static chambers, decreased with species richness unless fertilizer was added. N2O emissions increased with fertilization and the fraction of legumes in plant communities. Soil CH4 uptake, a process driven by methanotrophic bacteria, decreased with plant species numbers, irrespective of fertilization. Using structural equation models, we related trace gas fluxes to soil moisture, soil inorganic N concentrations, nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activity, and the abundance of ammonia oxidizers, nitrite oxidizers, and denitrifiers (quantified by real-time PCR of gene fragments amplified from microbial DNA in soil). These analyses indicated that plant species richness increased soil moisture, which in turn increased N cycling-related activities. Enhanced N cycling increased N2O emission and soil CH4 uptake, with the latter possibly caused by removal of inhibitory ammonium by nitrification. The moisture-related indirect effects were surpassed by direct, moisture-independent effects opposite in direction. Microbial gene abundances responded positively to fertilizer but not to plant species richness. The response patterns we found were statistically robust and highlight the potential of plant biodiversity to interact with climatic change through mechanisms unrelated to carbon storage and associated carbon dioxide removal. PMID:27038993

  3. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Gomez and Y. Pakhotin

    2012-01-01

      A new track-based alignment for the DT chambers is ready for deployment: an offline tag has already been produced which will become part of the 52X Global Tag. This alignment was validated within the muon alignment group both at low and high momentum using a W/Z skim sample. It shows an improved mass resolution for pairs of stand-alone muons, improved curvature resolution at high momentum, and improved DT segment extrapolation residuals. The validation workflow for high-momentum muons used to depend solely on the “split cosmics” method, looking at the curvature difference between muon tracks reconstructed in the upper or lower half of CMS. The validation has now been extended to include energetic muons decaying from heavily boosted Zs: the di-muon invariant mass for global and stand-alone muons is reconstructed, and the invariant mass resolution is compared for different alignments. The main areas of development over the next few months will be preparing a new track-based C...

  4. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Dallavalle

    2013-01-01

    A new Muon misalignment scenario for 2011 (7 TeV) Monte Carlo re-processing was re-leased. The scenario is based on running of standard track-based reference-target algorithm (exactly as in data) using single-muon simulated sample (with the transverse-momentum spectrum matching data). It used statistics similar to what was used for alignment with 2011 data, starting from an initially misaligned Muon geometry from uncertainties of hardware measurements and using the latest Tracker misalignment geometry. Validation of the scenario (with muons from Z decay and high-pT simulated muons) shows that it describes data well. The study of systematic uncertainties (dominant by now due to huge amount of data collected by CMS and used for muon alignment) is finalised. Realistic alignment position errors are being obtained from the estimated uncertainties and are expected to improve the muon reconstruction performance. Concerning the Hardware Alignment System, the upgrade of the Barrel Alignment is in progress. By now, d...

  5. Atmospheric fluxes of organic N and P to the global ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakidou, Maria; Duce, Robert A.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Baker, Alex R.; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Dentener, Frank J.; Hunter, Keith A.; Liss, Peter S.; Mahowald, Natalie; Okin, Gregory S.; Sarin, Manmohan; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Zamora, Lauren M.; Zhu, Tong

    2012-09-01

    The global tropospheric budget of gaseous and particulate non-methane organic matter (OM) is re-examined to provide a holistic view of the role that OM plays in transporting the essential nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus to the ocean. A global 3-dimensional chemistry-transport model was used to construct the first global picture of atmospheric transport and deposition of the organic nitrogen (ON) and organic phosphorus (OP) that are associated with OM, focusing on the soluble fractions of these nutrients. Model simulations agree with observations within an order of magnitude. Depending on location, the observed water soluble ON fraction ranges from ˜3% to 90% (median of ˜35%) of total soluble N in rainwater; soluble OP ranges from ˜20-83% (median of ˜35%) of total soluble phosphorus. The simulations suggest that the global ON cycle has a strong anthropogenic component with ˜45% of the overall atmospheric source (primary and secondary) associated with anthropogenic activities. In contrast, only 10% of atmospheric OP is emitted from human activities. The model-derived present-day soluble ON and OP deposition to the global ocean is estimated to be ˜16 Tg-N/yr and ˜0.35 Tg-P/yr respectively with an order of magnitude uncertainty. Of these amounts ˜40% and ˜6%, respectively, are associated with anthropogenic activities, and 33% and 90% are recycled oceanic materials. Therefore, anthropogenic emissions are having a greater impact on the ON cycle than the OP cycle; consequently increasing emissions may increase P-limitation in the oligotrophic regions of the world's ocean that rely on atmospheric deposition as an important nutrient source.

  6. Z to Muon Muon Collision Event Animation

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS experiment

    2010-01-01

    This animation was created of an actual ATLAS collision event in 2010. This animation shows from the particle view the race through the LHC, ending in the detector where the particle collision occurs. Candidate for an event with a Z boson decaying to two muons.

  7. Measuring the Disappearance of Muon Neutrinos with the MINOS Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radovic, Alexander [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    MINOS is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It measures the flux from the predominately muon neutrino NuMI beam first 1 km from beam start and then again 735 km later using a pair of steel scintillator tracking calorimeters. The comparison of measured neutrino energy spectra at our Far Detector with the prediction based on our Near Detector measurement allows for a measurement of the parameters which define neutrino oscillations. This thesis will describe the most recent measurement of muon neutrino disappearance in the NuMI muon neutrino beam using the MINOS experiment.

  8. Coastal upwelling fluxes of O2, N2O, and CO2 assessed from continuous atmospheric observations at Trinidad,California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Lueker

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous atmospheric records of O2/N2, CO2 and N2O obtained at Trinidad, California document the effects of air-sea exchange during coastal upwelling and plankton bloom events. The atmospheric records provide continuous observations of air-sea fluxes related to synoptic scale upwelling events over several upwelling seasons. Combined with satellite, buoy and local meteorology data, calculated anomalies in O2/N2 and N2O were utilized in a simple atmospheric transport model to compute air-sea fluxes during coastal upwelling. CO2 fluxes were linked to the oceanic component of the O2 fluxes through local hydrographic data and estimated as a function of upwelling intensity (surface ocean temperature and wind speed. Regional air-sea fluxes of O2/N2O, and CO2 during coastal upwelling were estimated with the aid of satellite wind and SST data. Upwelling CO2 fluxes were found to represent ~10% of export production along the northwest coast of North America. Synoptic scale upwelling events impact the net exchange of atmospheric CO2 along the coastal margin, and will vary in response to the frequency and duration of alongshore winds that are subject to climate change.

  9. Development and analysis of prognostic equations for mesoscale kinetic energy and mesoscale (subgrid scale) fluxes for large-scale atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avissar, Roni; Chen, Fei

    1993-01-01

    Generated by landscape discontinuities (e.g., sea breezes) mesoscale circulation processes are not represented in large-scale atmospheric models (e.g., general circulation models), which have an inappropiate grid-scale resolution. With the assumption that atmospheric variables can be separated into large scale, mesoscale, and turbulent scale, a set of prognostic equations applicable in large-scale atmospheric models for momentum, temperature, moisture, and any other gaseous or aerosol material, which includes both mesoscale and turbulent fluxes is developed. Prognostic equations are also developed for these mesoscale fluxes, which indicate a closure problem and, therefore, require a parameterization. For this purpose, the mean mesoscale kinetic energy (MKE) per unit of mass is used, defined as E-tilde = 0.5 (the mean value of u'(sub i exp 2), where u'(sub i) represents the three Cartesian components of a mesoscale circulation (the angle bracket symbol is the grid-scale, horizontal averaging operator in the large-scale model, and a tilde indicates a corresponding large-scale mean value). A prognostic equation is developed for E-tilde, and an analysis of the different terms of this equation indicates that the mesoscale vertical heat flux, the mesoscale pressure correlation, and the interaction between turbulence and mesoscale perturbations are the major terms that affect the time tendency of E-tilde. A-state-of-the-art mesoscale atmospheric model is used to investigate the relationship between MKE, landscape discontinuities (as characterized by the spatial distribution of heat fluxes at the earth's surface), and mesoscale sensible and latent heat fluxes in the atmosphere. MKE is compared with turbulence kinetic energy to illustrate the importance of mesoscale processes as compared to turbulent processes. This analysis emphasizes the potential use of MKE to bridge between landscape discontinuities and mesoscale fluxes and, therefore, to parameterize mesoscale fluxes

  10. Continuous atmospheric monitoring of the injected CO2 behavior over geological storage sites using flux stations: latest technologies and resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, George; Madsen, Rodney; Feese, Kristin

    2014-05-01

    Flux stations have been widely used to monitor emission rates of CO2 from various ecosystems for climate research for over 30 years [1]. The stations provide accurate and continuous measurements of CO2 emissions with high temporal resolution. Time scales range from 20 times per second for gas concentrations, to 15-minute, hourly, daily, and multi-year periods. The emissions are measured from the upwind area ranging from thousands of square meters to multiple square kilometers, depending on the measurement height. The stations can nearly instantaneously detect rapid changes in emissions due to weather events, as well as changes caused by variations in human-triggered events (pressure leaks, control releases, etc.). Stations can also detect any slow changes related to seasonal dynamics and human-triggered low-frequency processes (leakage diffusion, etc.). In the past, station configuration, data collection and processing were highly-customized, site-specific and greatly dependent on "school-of-thought" practiced by a particular research group. In the last 3-5 years, due to significant efforts of global and regional CO2 monitoring networks (e.g., FluxNet, Ameriflux, Carbo-Europe, ICOS, etc.) and technological developments, the flux station methodology became fairly standardized and processing protocols became quite uniform [1]. A majority of current stations compute CO2 emission rates using the eddy covariance method, one of the most direct and defensible micrometeorological techniques [1]. Presently, over 600 such flux stations are in operation in over 120 countries, using permanent and mobile towers or moving platforms (e.g., automobiles, helicopters, and airplanes). Atmospheric monitoring of emission rates using such stations is now recognized as an effective method in regulatory and industrial applications, including carbon storage [2-8]. Emerging projects utilize flux stations to continuously monitor large areas before and after the injections, to locate and

  11. Muons reveal the interior of volcanoes

    CERN Multimedia

    Francesco Poppi

    2010-01-01

    The MU-RAY project has the very challenging aim of providing a “muon X-ray” of the Vesuvius volcano (Italy) using a detector that records the muons hitting it after traversing the rock structures of the volcano. This technique was used for the first time in 1971 by the Nobel Prize-winner Louis Alvarez, who was searching for unknown burial chambers in the Chephren pyramid.   The location of the muon detector on the slopes of the Vesuvius volcano. Like X-ray scans of the human body, muon radiography allows researchers to obtain an image of the internal structures of the upper levels of volcanoes. Although such an image cannot help to predict ‘when’ an eruption might occur, it can, if combined with other observations, help to foresee ‘how’ it could develop and serves as a powerful tool for the study of geological structures. Muons come from the interaction of cosmic rays with the Earth's atmosphere. They are able to traverse layers of ro...

  12. The Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R and D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R and D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  13. A mechanistic model of H{sub 2}{sup 18}O and C{sup 18}OO fluxes between ecosystems and the atmosphere: Model description and sensitivity analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, W.J.; Still, C.J.; Torn, M.S.; Berry, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The concentration of 18O in atmospheric CO2 and H2O is a potentially powerful tracer of ecosystem carbon and water fluxes. In this paper we describe the development of an isotope model (ISOLSM) that simulates the 18O content of canopy water vapor, leaf water, and vertically resolved soil water; leaf photosynthetic 18OC16O (hereafter C18OO) fluxes; CO2 oxygen isotope exchanges with soil and leaf water; soil CO2 and C18OO diffusive fluxes (including abiotic soil exchange); and ecosystem exchange of H218O and C18OO with the atmosphere. The isotope model is integrated into the land surface model LSM, but coupling with other models should be straightforward. We describe ISOLSM and apply it to evaluate (a) simplified methods of predicting the C18OO soil-surface flux; (b) the impacts on the C18OO soil-surface flux of the soil-gas diffusion coefficient formulation, soil CO2 source distribution, and rooting distribution; (c) the impacts on the C18OO fluxes of carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity in soil and leaves; and (d) the sensitivity of model predictions to the d18O value of atmospheric water vapor and CO2. Previously published simplified models are unable to capture the seasonal and diurnal variations in the C18OO soil-surface fluxes simulated by ISOLSM. Differences in the assumed soil CO2 production and rooting depth profiles, carbonic anhydrase activity in soil and leaves, and the d18O value of atmospheric water vapor have substantial impacts on the ecosystem CO2 flux isotopic composition. We conclude that accurate prediction of C18OO ecosystem fluxes requires careful representation of H218O and C18OO exchanges and transport in soils and plants.

  14. An improved method for measuring muon energy using the truncated mean of dE/dx

    OpenAIRE

    IceCube collaboration; Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Ackermann, M; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J.A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of muon energy is critical for many analyses in large Cherenkov detectors, particularly those that involve separating extraterrestrial neutrinos from the atmospheric neutrino background. Muon energy has traditionally been determined by measuring the specific energy loss (dE/dx) along the muon's path and relating the dE/dx to the muon energy. Because high-energy muons (E_mu > 1 TeV) lose energy randomly, the spread in dE/dx values is quite large, leading to a typical energy res...

  15. A new muon-pion collection and transport system design using superconducting solenoids based on CSNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ran; Liu, Yan-Fen; Xu, Wen-Zhen; Ni, Xiao-Jie; Pan, Zi-Wen; Ye, Bang-Jiao

    2016-05-01

    A new muon and pion capture system is proposed for the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS), currently under construction. Using about 4% of the pulsed proton beam (1.6 GeV, 4 kW and 1 Hz) of CSNS to bombard a cylindrical graphite target inside a superconducting solenoid, both surface muons and pions can be acquired. The acceptance of this novel capture system - a graphite target wrapped up by a superconducting solenoid - is larger than the normal muon beam lines using quadrupoles at one side of the separated muon target. The muon and pion production at different capture magnetic fields was calculated using Geant4. The bending angle of the capture solenoid with respect to the proton beam was also optimized in simulation to achieve more muons and pions. Based on the layout of the muon experimental area reserved at the CSNS project, a preliminary muon beam line was designed with multi-purpose muon spin rotation areas (surface, decay and low-energy muons). Finally, high-flux surface muons (108/s) and decay muons (109/s) simulated by G4beamline will be available at the end of the decay solenoid based on the first phase of CSNS. This collection and transport system will be a very effective beam line at a proton current of 2.5 μA. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11527811)

  16. Comparing Evapotranspiration Rates Estimated from Atmospheric Flux and TDR Soil Moisture Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schelde, Kirsten; Ringgaard, Rasmus; Herbst, Mathias;

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor fluxes using eddy covariance (EC) and measurements of root zone soil moisture depletion using time domain reflectometry (TDR) represent two independent approaches to estimating evapotranspiration. This study investigated the possibility of using TDR to provide a lower...... limit estimate (disregarding dew evaporation) of evapotranspiration on dry days. During a period of 7 wk, the two independent measuring techniques were applied in a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) field, and six dry periods were identified. Measurements of daily root zone soil moisture depletion were...... compared with daily estimates of water vapor loss. During the first dry periods, agreement between the two approaches was good, with average daily deviation between estimates below 1.0 mm d-1 Toward the end of the measurement period, the estimates of the two techniques tended to deviate due to different...

  17. An analytical approach to scattering between two thin magnetic flux tubes in a stratified atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Chris S.; Cally, Paul S., E-mail: christopher.hanson@monash.edu [Monash Centre for Astrophysics and School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2014-02-01

    We expand on recent studies to analytically model the behavior of two thin flux tubes interacting through the near- and acoustic far-field. The multiple scattering that occurs between the pair alters the absorption and phase of the outgoing wave when compared to non-interacting tubes. We have included both the sausage and kink scatter produced by the pair. It is shown that the sausage mode's contribution to the scattered wave field is significant, and plays an equally important role in the multiple scattering regime. A disparity between recent numerical results and analytical studies, in particular the lack of symmetry between the two kink modes, is addressed. This symmetry break is found to be caused by an incorrect solution for the near-field modes.

  18. An Analytical Approach to Scattering Between Two Thin Magnetic Flux Tubes in a Stratified Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Hanson, Chris S

    2014-01-01

    We expand on recent studies to analytically model the behavior of two thin flux tubes interacting through the near- and acoustic far-field. The multiple scattering that occurs between the pair alters the absorption and phase of the outgoing wave, when compared to non-interacting tubes. We have included both the sausage and kink scatter produced by the pair. It is shown that the sausage mode's contribution to the scattered wave field is significant, and plays an equally important role in the multiple scattering regime. A disparity between recent numerical results and analytical studies, in particular the lack of symmetry between the two kink modes, is addressed. This symmetry break is found to be caused by an incorrect solution for the near-field modes.

  19. Numerical calculation of mean intensity and radiative flux in plane-parallel stellar atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariai, K.; Yoshioka, K.

    The four-point Gaussian-quadrature formulas of Kegel (1962) for the evaluation of the intensity and flux (F) integrals is improved by using Bessel's interpolation technique and by subdividing the integral range. Steps in the analysis include the calculation of the Gaussian points of division and weightings for the interval (y, z), for a small (y, z), and for (O, z); determination of the precision of n-point formulas in calculating intensity and F; and the derivation of a four-point version of the two-point quadrature method of Cayrel (1960) and Norton (Mihalas, 1967). The numerical results are presented and compared with those of other models. The gray-model delta-F/F ratio calculated by this method is found to be less than 0.01 percent.

  20. Deposition of flux and atmospheric behavior of oil shale combustion aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric behavior of oil shale combustion fly ash aerosol was studied under simulated conditions. The fine (respirable) fraction of fly ash particles, which contributes most to the health effects of the aerosol, significantly increased (from 25 to 65 % by mass) in time scale. The toxic elements and carcinogenic PAH adsorbed on the fine particles of fly ash could represent a health hazard for human. The bulk and trace elements in emissions (flue gases) and integrated deposition samples were also investigated based on original measurements and literature data. (author)

  1. A study of muon neutrino disappearance in the MINOS detectors and the NuMI beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Jiajie [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2010-01-01

    There is now substantial evidence that the proper description of neutrino involves two representations related by the 3 x 3 PMNS matrix characterized by either distinct mass or flavor. The parameters of this mixing matrix, three angles and a phase, as well as the mass differences between the three mass eigenstates must be determined experimentally. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search experiment is designed to study the flavor composition of a beam of muon neutrinos as it travels between the Near Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory at 1 km from the target, and the Far Detector in the Soudan iron mine in Minnesota at 735 km from the target. From the comparison of reconstructed neutrino energy spectra at the near and far location, precise measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters from muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance are expected. It is very important to know the neutrino flux coming from the source in order to achieve the main goal of the MINOS experiment: precise measurements of the atmospheric mass splitting |Δm232|, sin2 θ23. The goal of my thesis is to accurately predict the neutrino flux for the MINOS experiment and measure the neutrino mixing angle and atmospheric mass splitting.

  2. Studies on muon showers underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 4 m2 spark chamber telescope array of the Mt. Cappuccini Laboratory, Torino, At 40 m w.e. underground was operated for about 830 h recording muon showers. The data were analysed with respect to the multiplicity distribution of the shower particles, adn to local interactions initiated in the chamber absorbers. Regarding the multiplicity analysis a semi-empirical expression for the likely shower size dependence of a structure function of the analytical form proposed by Vernov et al., was derived and applied with systematically varied parameters. The comparison of the observed rates of multiples with those calculated with a variety of parameters showed that a satisfactory agreement can be attained only if one admits a variation with the shower size of the parameters, and an enhanced muon/electron ratio at the lower primary energies, possibly indicative of an increased abundance of primary heavy nuclei. This would conform with the idea of a two-component primary composition in which a pulsar-produced fraction, enriched in heavy nuclei, dominated only at medium energies. The records on multiplicative interactions, and on large-angle scattering, were analysed by comparing their rates observed for shower particles with those found in single-muon check runs. The results are consistent with the assumption that all shower particle interactions are electromagnetic in nature, and that nonconventional components like mandelas are absent. Only making extreme allowances for statistical fluctuations the data can be made compatible with a mandela flux as large as that suggested by Baruch et al., provided that the mandela attenuation length is less than 1 500g/cm2 of rock

  3. A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 × 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Toumi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model (GELCA, comprising a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 × 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e. a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution, which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and high-resolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to

  4. Muon identification in JADE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, J.; Armitage, J.C.M.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Bamford, G.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Glendinning, I.; Greenshaw, T.; Hassard, J.F.; Hill, P.; King, B.T.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McCann, H.; Mercer, D.; Mills, H.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Prosper, H.B.; Rowe, P.; Stephens, K.

    1985-08-01

    The method of identification of high energy muons in the JADE detector is described in detail. The performance of the procedure is discussed in detail for the case of prompt identification in multihadronic final states. (orig.).

  5. Musing over muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Standard Model of modern physics looks simple - six types of quark grouped pairwise into three families, each associated with a different type of weakly interacting particle, or lepton - the electron, the muon and the tau. Despite its many successes, this picture cannot be the end of the road. Why is the muon about two hundred times heavier than the electron? The answer is hidden by the Standard Model's price tag. The physicists attending a workshop on Low Energy Muon Science in the 1990s, held at the Swiss Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in April, were looking for ways to learn more about the muon and uncover what lies behind the Standard Model

  6. Crossing muons in Icecube at highest energy: a cornerstone to ν Astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highest energy neutrino events (contained) in cubic km ICECUBE detector resulted in last three years to be as many as 37−2=35 signals (two of those having been recently discharged); these tens-hundred TeV (32 energetic events) up to rarest (only 3) PeV cascade showers, proved to have an extraterrestrial origin. Their flux exceeded, indeed, the expected atmospheric noise and clearly favored and tested the birth of a long waited ν astronomy. The UHE neutrino flavor transition from a νμ atmospheric dominance (over νe showers at TeV energy), toward a higher energy shower cascade (νe,ντ) events at few tens TeV up to PeV energy is a hint of such a fast extraterrestrial injection. The majority (28 out of 35) of all these events are spherical cascade showers and their exact timing in shower shining provided an approximate ν arrival direction, within about ±10°. However, their consequent smeared map is inconclusive: both because of such a wide angle spread signal of ±10° and because of their paucity, is not yet allowable to define any meaningful source correlation or anisotropy. The additional rarest 9−2=7 muon tracks, while being sharp in arrival directions, did not offer any correlated clustering nor any overlapping within known sources. Larger sample of UHE ν signals and their most accurate directionality is needed. We recently suggested that the highest energy (tens-TeV) crossing muon along the ICECUBE, mostly at horizons or upcoming, are the ideal tool able to reveal soon such clustering or even any narrow angle pointing to known (IR, X, Radio or γ) sources or self-correlation in rare doublet or triplet: a last hope for a meaningful and short-time ν Astronomy. Any crossing muons clustering along galactic sources or within UHECR arrivals might also probe rarest (possibly galactic, radioactive and in decay in flight) UHECR event made by nuclei or neutrons. Within three years of ICECUBE data all the non-contained crossing highest energy muons above few

  7. Muon-proton Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Borie, E.

    2012-01-01

    A recent proposal to measure the proton form factor by means of muon-proton scattering will use muons which are not ultrarelativistic (and also not nonrelativistic). The usual equations describing the scattering cross section use the approximation that the scattered lepton (usually an electron) is ultrarelativistic, with v/c approximately equal to 1. Here the cross section is calculated for all values of the energy. It agrees with the standard result in the appropriate limit.

  8. Research on flux of dry atmospheric falling dust and its characterization in a subtropical city, Guangzhou, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinping; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Ma, Shexia; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-09-01

    Guangzhou is the central city in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China, and is one of the most polluted cities in the world. To characterize the ambient falling dust pollution, two typical sampling sites: urban (Wushan) and suburban (University Town) areas in Guangzhou city were chosen for falling dust collection over 1 year at time intervals of 1 or 2 months. The flux of dry deposition was calculated. In addition, mineral composition and morphology of atmospheric falling dust were studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and microscopic observation. The results revealed that the dust flux in Guangzhou city was 3.34-3.78 g/(m(2) month) during the study period. The main minerals in the dust were quartz, illite, calcite, kaolinite, gypsum, plagioclase, dolomite, and amorphous matter. The morphological types included grained and flaky individual minerals, chain-like aggregates, spherical flying beads, and irregular aggregates, with the chain-like and spherical aggregates indicators of industrial ash. The major dusts were derived from industrial and construction activities. The gypsum present in the dust collected in winter season was not only derived from cement dust but may also have originated from the reaction of calcic material with sulfuric acids resulting from photooxidation of SO(x) and NO(x), which confirmed serious air pollution due to SO(x) and NO(x) in Guangzhou. The abatement of fossil fuel combustion emissions and construction dust will have a significant beneficial effect on dust reduction.

  9. Growth rates of atmospheric molecular clusters determined from cluster appearance times and collision-evaporation fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontkanen, Jenni; Olenius, Tinja; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kulmala, Markku

    2015-04-01

    The probability of freshly formed particles to survive to climatically relevant sizes is determined by the competition between the coagulation loss rate and the particle growth rate. Therefore, various methods have been developed to deduce the growth rates from measured particle size distributions. Recently, the growth rates of sub-3nm clusters have been determined based on the appearance times of different cluster sizes. However, it is not clear to what extent these growth rates are consistent with the growth rates corresponding to molecular fluxes between clusters. In this work, we simulated the time evolution of a population of sub-3 nm molecular clusters and compared the growth rates determined (1) from the cluster appearance times and (2) from the collision-evaporation fluxes between different cluster sizes. We performed a number of simulations by varying the ambient conditions and the properties of the model substance. In the first simulation set, the Gibbs free energy of the formation of the clusters was assumed to have a single maximum and no minima, corresponding to a monotonically increasing stability as a function of cluster size. The saturation vapor pressure was selected so that the growth proceeded solely via monomer additions. The growth rates were determined separately for each cluster. However, to see the effect of finite size resolution, we also performed simulations where the clusters were grouped into size bins, for which we determined the growth rates. In the second simulation set, the saturation vapor pressure was lowered so that the collisions of small clusters significantly contributed to the growth. As the growth rate of a single cluster is ambiguous in this case, the growth rates were determined only for different size bins. We performed simulations using a similar free energy profile as in other simulations but we also used a free energy profile containing a local minimum, corresponding to small stable clusters. Our simulations show that

  10. Effects of atmospheric deposition nitrogen flux and its composition on soil solution chemistry from a red soil farmland, southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Zhou, Jing; Peng, Ying; Chan, Andrew; Mao, Jingdong

    2015-12-01

    A detailed study on the solution chemistry of red soil in South China is presented. Data are collected from two simulated column-leaching experiments with an improved setup to evaluate the effects of atmospheric N deposition (ADN) composition and ADN flux on agricultural soil acidification using a (15)N tracer technique and an in situ soil solution sampler. The results show that solution pH values decline regardless of the increase of the NH4(+)/NO3(-) ratio in the ADN composition or ADN flux, while exchangeable Al(3+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and K(+) concentrations increase at different soil depths (20, 40, and 60 cm). Compared with the control, ADN (60 kg per ha per year N, NH4(+)/NO3(-) ratio of 2 : 1) decreases solution pH values, increases solution concentrations of NO3(-)-N, Al(3+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) at the middle and lower soil depths, and promotes their removal. NH4(+)-N was not detected in red soil solutions of all the three soil layers, which might be attributed to effects of nitrification, absorption and fixation in farmland red soil. Some of the NO3(-)-N concentrations at 40-60 cm soil depth exceed the safe drinking level of 10 mg L(-1), especially when the ADN flux is beyond 60 kg ha(-1) N. These features are critical for understanding the ADN agro-ecological effects, and for future assessment of ecological critical loads of ADN in red soil farmlands. PMID:26515781

  11. Atmospheric dry deposition fluxes of trace elements measured in Queretaro City, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R.; Hernandez, R.; Solis, S.; Perez, R.; Hernandez, G.; Morton, O.; Hernandez, E.; Torres, M. C.; Baez, A.

    2012-04-01

    Sampling was made in the southern section of downtown Mexico City. Samples were collected with an Mini-Vol PM10 . Eight different sources were identified for PM10 aerosols: secondary sulfate, wood combustion, fireworks, road traffic, mineral dust, de-icing salt, industrial and local anthropogenic activities. The ions SO42-, NO3-, Cl-, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and NH4+,were analyzed by ion chromatography and the trace metals using an atomic absorption spectrometer. The result indicated that SO42- was the most abundant ion and with respect to trace metal. All the trace elements except Mn and V show statistically significant differences between monitoring sites. The Pearson's correlation applied to all data, showed a high correlation among SO42-, NO3- and NH4+, indicating a common anthropogenic origin. In addition the correlation found between Ca2+ and Al indicated a crustal origin. On the other hand, in considering the total sampling period for particles as well as for all the metals, it is appreciable the significant differences between sites and meteorological seasons. The cluster analysis of air back-trajectories employed in the paper is a technique widely used to identify transport patterns and potential sources of both anthropogenic pollution and natural constituents of the atmosphere, including atmospheric aerosols. It is also used to determine how aerosol optical properties observed over the station differ depending on source region and transport pathways In order to gain a better insight into the origin of trace metal and major inorganic ions, a Principal Component Analysis was applied to the results for 6 elements and 8 ions, from the years 2009 and 2010. Further, the statistical analysis demonstrated the adequate selection of the monitoring areas, confirming that main emission source of these atmospheric pollutants is anthropogenic origin. Evidence suggests that the organic and inorganic species are not always internally mixed, especially in the small modes. The

  12. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    Gervasio Gomez

    2012-01-01

      The new alignment for the DT chambers has been successfully used in physics analysis starting with the 52X Global Tag. The remaining main areas of development over the next few months will be preparing a new track-based CSC alignment and producing realistic APEs (alignment position errors) and MC misalignment scenarios to match the latest muon alignment constants. Work on these items has been delayed from the intended timeline, mostly due to a large involvement of the muon alignment man-power in physics analyses over the first half of this year. As CMS keeps probing higher and higher energies, special attention must be paid to the reconstruction of very-high-energy muons. Recent muon POG reports from mid-June show a φ-dependence in curvature bias in Monte Carlo samples. This bias is observed already at the tracker level, where it is constant with muon pT, while it grows with pT as muon chamber information is added to the tracks. Similar studies show a much smaller effect in data, at le...

  13. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Gomez

    2012-01-01

      A new muon alignment has been produced for 2012 A+B data reconstruction. It uses the latest Tracker alignment and single-muon data samples to align both DTs and CSCs. Physics validation has been performed and shows a modest improvement in stand-alone muon momentum resolution in the barrel, where the alignment is essentially unchanged from the previous version. The reference-target track-based algorithm using only collision muons is employed for the first time to align the CSCs, and a substantial improvement in resolution is observed in the endcap and overlap regions for stand-alone muons. This new alignment is undergoing the approval process and is expected to be deployed as part of a new global tag in the beginning of December. The pT dependence of the φ-bias in curvature observed in Monte Carlo was traced to a relative vertical misalignment between the Tracker and barrel muon systems. Moving the barrel as a whole to match the Tracker cures this pT dependence, leaving only the &phi...

  14. Ship-based observations of atmospheric potential oxygen and regional air-sea O2 flux in the northern North Pacific and the Arctic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Ishidoya, Shigeyuki; Uchida, Hiroshi; Sasano, Daisuke; Kosugi, Naohiro; Taguchi, Shoichi; Ishii, Masao; Morimoto, Shinji; Tohjima, Yasunori; Nishino, Shigeto; Murayama, Shohei; Aoki, Shuji; Ishijima, Kentaro; Fujita, Ryo; Goto, Daisuke; Nakazawa, Takakiyo

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of atmospheric potential oxygen (APO=O2+1.1×CO2) and air–sea O2 flux, derived from dissolved oxygen in surface seawater, were carried out onboard the research vessel MIRAI in the northern North Pacific and the Arctic Ocean in the autumns of 2012–2014. A simulation of the APO was also carried out using a three-dimensional atmospheric transport model that incorporated a monthly air–sea O2 flux climatology. By comparing the observed and simulated APO, as well as the obs...

  15. Reconstruction of flux and altitude of volcanic SO2 emissions from satellite observations: implications for volcanological and atmospherical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boichu, Marie; Clarisse, Lieven; Péré, Jean-Christophe; Herbin, Hervé; Goloub, Philippe; Thieuleux, François; Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Ducos, Fabrice; Clerbaux, Cathy; Tanré, Didier

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic sulphur dioxide (SO2) degassing is a crucial indicator of the sub-surface volcanic activity, which is widely used today for volcano monitoring and hazard assessment purposes. Volcanic SO2 is also important regarding atmospherical studies. More easily detectable from space, SO2 can be used as a proxy of the presence of ash to anticipate air traffic issues caused by explosive eruptions. Moreover, volcanic SO2 strongly impacts air quality but also climate following its conversion to radiatively-active sulphate aerosols. However, the accurate assessment of these various impacts is currently hampered by the poor knowledge of volcanic SO2 emissions, which can substantially vary with time, in terms of flux and altitude. To fulfil this need, we propose a strategy relying on satellite observations, which consequently allows for monitoring the eruptive activity of any remote volcano. The method consists in assimilating snapshots of the SO2 load, provided by infrared or ultraviolet satellite observations, in an inversion scheme that involves the use of a chemistry-transport model to describe the dispersion of SO2 released in the atmosphere. Applied on Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland) and Etna (Italy) eruption case-studies, this procedure allows for retrospectively reconstructing both the flux and altitude of the SO2 emissions with an hourly resolution. We show the improvement gained in the simulations and forecasts of the location and mass load of volcanic SO2 clouds using such a detailed reconstruction of emissions. For calibration-validation purpose, we compared our satellite-derived time-series of the SO2 flux with ground-based observations available on Etna. This comparison indicates a good agreement during ash-poor phases of the eruption. However, large discrepancies are observed during the ash-rich paroxysmal phase as a result of enhanced plume opacity affecting ground-based ultraviolet spectroscopic retrievals. Therefore, the SO2 emission rate derived from the

  16. Discovering Tau and Muon Solar Neutrino Flares above backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, D

    2004-01-01

    Solar neutrino flares astronomy is at the edge of its discover. High energy flare particles (protons, alpha) whose self scattering within the solar corona is source of a rich prompt charged pions are also source of sharp solar neutrino "burst" (at tens-hundred MeV) produced by their pion-muon primary decay in flight. This brief (minute) solar neutrino "burst" at largest peak overcome by four-five order of magnitude the steady atmospheric neutrino noise at the Earth. Later on, solar flare particles hitting the terrestrial atmosphere may marginally increase the atmospheric neutrino flux without relevant consequences. Largest prompt "burst" solar neutrino flare may be detected in present or better in future largest neutrino underground neutrino detectors. Our estimate for the recent and exceptional October - November 2003 solar flares gives a number of events above or just near unity for Super-Kamiokande. The neutrino spectra may reflect in a subtle way the neutrino flavour mixing in flight. A surprising tau app...

  17. CH4 fluxes across the seafloor at three district gas hydrate fields: Impacts on ocean and atmosphere chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastner, M.; Bartlett, D.; MacDonald, I.; Solomon, E.

    2005-07-01

    The role of methane hydrate in the global methane budget is poorly documented because relatively little is known about the transport of methane through the seafloor into the ocean and atmosphere, and the extent of en route water-column methanotrophy. Pore fluids and water column samples within and adjacent to methane plumes were analyzed for methane, dissolved inorganic C (DIC), sulfide/sulfate, alkalinity, and major element concentrations, and for delta{sup 13}C-CH4 and DIC, at three distinct gas hydrate environments. The three environments are: Bush Hill (BH) in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Eel River (ER) offshore Northern California, and North and South Hydrate Ridges (HR), Cascadia, Oregon margin. The methane source at these sites ranges from mostly thermogenic at GOM to primarily biogenic at HR. At these three distinct gas hydrate environments, at all the sites a significant enrichment in {sup 13}C-CH4 along isopycnals away from the methane plumes is observed, indicating extensive aerobic bacterial methane oxidation in the water column, and correspondingly of oxygen consumption. This is principally pronounced in the mostly biogenic methane setting. The delta{sup 13}C-CH4 values range from approx. 12 to -67 , PDB, at the Hydrate Ridges, from approx. 34 to -52 at Eel River, and from approx. 41 to -67 at Bush Hill. The large variation in methane C isotope ranges between the sites suggests that major differences exist in both the rates of aerobic methane oxidation and system openness at the studied locations. Methane fluxes across the sediment/seawater interface were measured, with a flux meter, MOSQUITO (Multiple Orifice Sampler and Quantitative Injection Tracer Observers) only at BH (Solomon et al., 2005). Water column methane concentrations are on average lower at HR than at ER and GOM. Preliminary estimates suggests that aerobic oxidation is nearly complete, consumes most to all of the water column methane at HR, but at the GOM only approx. 80% to a

  18. Ozone fluxes from Citrus species exposed to different levels of atmospheric ozone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, S.; Ormeño, E.; Park, J.; Gentner, D. R.; McKay, M.; Karlik, J. F.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2009-12-01

    Citrus includes a large number of species and varieties widely cultivated in the Central Valley of California and in many other countries having Mediterranean climates. Orchards in California often experience high levels of tropospheric ozone, formed from reactions of VOC and NOx. On one hand, citrus trees may contribute to cleaning the air when the ozone is deposited on the canopies through stomatal and non-stomatal mechanisms, but on the other hand ozone is known to oxidize leaf tissues after entering stomata, resulting in a decrease of carbon assimilation and decrease in crop yield. To characterize ozone deposition for lemon (Citrus limon), mandarin (Citrus reticulata), and orange (Citrus sinensis), we designed branch enclosures which allowed a direct measurement of ozone uptake under different physiological conditions obtained in a greenhouse-controlled environment. A second aim of this study was to test the capability of Citrus species to emit volatile organic compounds which may play a key role in locally removing ozone through chemical reactions in the intercellular spaces and in the gas phase or forming more ozone on the regional scale through reactions with NO¬x. Ozone uptake was quantified to be in the range of 5-12 nmol m-2 s-1 under the highest conditions of physiological activity. Under high levels of ozone concentration, measured ozone deposition was lower than modeled ozone deposition based on the level of stomatal aperture. Our study evaluates the possible role of VOC in scavenging ozone through gas-phase reactions, but the results instead lead to the hypothesis of an accumulation of ozone in the intercellular spaces resulting in a decrease of ozone fluxes for the citrus species studied.

  19. PCDD/Fs atmospheric deposition fluxes and soil contamination close to a municipal solid waste incinerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassura, Ivano; Passarini, Fabrizio; Ferroni, Laura; Bernardi, Elena; Morselli, Luciano

    2011-05-01

    Bulk depositions and surface soil were collected in a suburban area, near the Adriatic Sea, in order to assess the contribution of a municipal solid waste incinerator to the area's total contamination with polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs and PCDFs). Samples were collected at two sites, situated in the area most affected by plant emissions (according to the results of the Calpuff air dispersion model), and at an external site, considered as a reference. Results show that the studied area is subject to low contamination, as far as these compounds are concerned. Deposition fluxes range from 14.3 pg m(-2)d(-1) to 89.9 pg m(-2)d(-1) (0.75 pg-TEQ m(-2)d(-1) to 3.73 pg-TEQ m(-2)d(-1)) and no significant flow differences are observed among the three monitored sites. Total soil concentration amounts to 93.8 ng kg(-1) d.w. and 1.35 ng-TEQ kg(-1)d.w, on average, and confirms a strong homogeneity in the studied area. Furthermore, from 2006 to 2009, no PCDD/Fs enrichment in the soil was noticed. Comparing the relative congener distributions in environmental samples with those found in stack emissions from the incineration plant, significant differences are observed in the PCDD:PCDF ratio and in the contribution of the most chlorinated congeners. From this study we can conclude that the incineration plant is not the main source of PCDD/Fs in the studied area, which is apparently characterized by a homogeneous and widespread contamination situation, typical of an urban area. PMID:21459405

  20. Next-Generation Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Calculation from the CERES Instruments: Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W.; Corbett, J.; Eitzen, Z.; Liang, L.

    2015-01-01

    The top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes are critical components to advancing our understanding of the Earth's radiative energy balance, radiative effects of clouds and aerosols, and climate feedback. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments provide broadband shortwave and longwave radiance measurements. These radiances are converted to fluxes by using scene-type-dependent angular distribution models (ADMs). This paper describes the next-generation ADMs that are developed for Terra and Aqua using all available CERES rotating azimuth plane radiance measurements. Coincident cloud and aerosol retrievals, and radiance measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and meteorological parameters from Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) data assimilation version 5.4.1 are used to define scene type. CERES radiance measurements are stratified by scene type and by other parameters that are important for determining the anisotropy of the given scene type. Anisotropic factors are then defined either for discrete intervals of relevant parameters or as a continuous functions of combined parameters, depending on the scene type. Significant differences between the ADMs described in this paper and the existing ADMs are over clear-sky scene types and polar scene types. Over clear ocean, we developed a set of shortwave (SW) ADMs that explicitly account for aerosols. Over clear land, the SW ADMs are developed for every 1 latitude1 longitude region for every calendar month using a kernel-based bidirectional reflectance model. Over clear Antarctic scenes, SW ADMs are developed by accounting the effects of sastrugi on anisotropy. Over sea ice, a sea-ice brightness index is used to classify the scene type. Under cloudy conditions over all surface types, the longwave (LW) and window (WN) ADMs are developed by combining surface and cloud-top temperature, surface and cloud emissivity, cloud fraction, and precipitable water

  1. Results from atmospheric neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J G Learned

    2000-07-01

    With the announcement of new evidence for muon neutrino disappearance observed by the super-Kamiokande experiment, the more than a decade old atmospheric neutrino anomaly moved from a possible indication for neutrino oscillations to an apparently inescapable fact. The evidence is reviewed, and new indications are presented that the oscillations are probably between muon and tau neutrinos. Implications and future directions are discussed.

  2. High energy muon induced radioactive nuclides in nickel plate and its use for 2-D muon-beam image profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurebayashi, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Sakurai, H., E-mail: sakurail@sci.kj.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Takahashi, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Doshita, N. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Kikuchi, S. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Tokanai, F. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Horiuchi, K. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, 3, Bunkyo-chou, Hirosaki 036-8561, Aomori (Japan); Tajima, Y. [Institute of Arts and Sciences, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Oe, T. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Sato, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Gunji, S. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Inui, E. [Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Kondo, K. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Iwata, N. [Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Sasaki, N. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, 3, Bunkyo-chou, Hirosaki 036-8561, Aomori (Japan); Matsuzaki, H. [Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem accelerator (MALT), The University Museum, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Kunieda, S. [Nuclear Data Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun 319-1195, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2015-11-01

    Target materials were exposed to a muon beam with an energy of 160 GeV/c at the COMPASS experiment line in CERN-SPS to measure the production cross-sections for muon-induced radionuclides. A muon imager containing four nickel plates, each measuring 100 mm×100 mm, exposed to the IP plate successfully detected the muon beam image during an irradiation period of 33 days. The contrasting density rate of the nickel plate was (5.2±0.7)×10{sup –9} PSL/muon per one-day exposure to IP. The image measured 122 mm and 174 mm in horizontal and vertical lengths, respectively, in relation to the surface of the base, indicating that 50±6% of the muon beam flux is confined to an area of 18% of the whole muon beam. The number of muons estimated from the PSL value in the total beam image area (0.81±0.1)×10{sup 13} was comparable to the total muon counts of the ion-chamber at the M2 beam line in the CERN-SPS. The production cross-sections of Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, and Co-58 in nickel were 0.19±0.08, 0.34±0.06, 0.5±0.05, 3.44±0.07, 0.4±0.03 in the unit of mb, respectively, reducing muon associated particles effects. They are approximately 10 times smaller than that a proceeding study by Heisinger et al.

  3. High energy muon induced radioactive nuclides in nickel plate and its use for 2-D muon-beam image profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurebayashi, Y.; Sakurai, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Doshita, N.; Kikuchi, S.; Tokanai, F.; Horiuchi, K.; Tajima, Y.; Oe, T.; Sato, T.; Gunji, S.; Inui, E.; Kondo, K.; Iwata, N.; Sasaki, N.; Matsuzaki, H.; Kunieda, S.

    2015-11-01

    Target materials were exposed to a muon beam with an energy of 160 GeV/c at the COMPASS experiment line in CERN-SPS to measure the production cross-sections for muon-induced radionuclides. A muon imager containing four nickel plates, each measuring 100 mm×100 mm, exposed to the IP plate successfully detected the muon beam image during an irradiation period of 33 days. The contrasting density rate of the nickel plate was (5.2±0.7)×10-9 PSL/muon per one-day exposure to IP. The image measured 122 mm and 174 mm in horizontal and vertical lengths, respectively, in relation to the surface of the base, indicating that 50±6% of the muon beam flux is confined to an area of 18% of the whole muon beam. The number of muons estimated from the PSL value in the total beam image area (0.81±0.1)×1013 was comparable to the total muon counts of the ion-chamber at the M2 beam line in the CERN-SPS. The production cross-sections of Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, and Co-58 in nickel were 0.19±0.08, 0.34±0.06, 0.5±0.05, 3.44±0.07, 0.4±0.03 in the unit of mb, respectively, reducing muon associated particles effects. They are approximately 10 times smaller than that a proceeding study by Heisinger et al.

  4. Hadron production in high energy muon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment was performed to study muon-proton scattering at an incident energy of 225 GeV and a total effective flux of 4.3 x 1010 muons. This experiment is able to detect charged particles in coincidence with the scattered muon in the forward hemisphere, and results are reported for the neutral strange particles K/sub s/0 and Λ0 decaying into two charged particles. Within experimental limits the masses and lifetimes of these particles are consistent with previous measurements. The distribution of hadrons produced in muon scattering is determined, measuring momentum components parallel and transverse to the virtual photon direction, and these distributions are compared to other high energy experiments involving the scattering of pions, protons, and neutrinos from protons. Structure functions for hadron production and particle ratios are calculated. No azimuthal dependence is observed, and lambda production does not appear to be polarized. The physical significance of the results is discussed within the framework of the quark-parton model. 29 references

  5. Electron-Muon Ranger: performance in the MICE Muon Beam

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bene, P.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 9...

  6. Electron-muon ranger: performance in the MICE muon beam

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bene, P.; Bertoni, R.; Oates, A; Onel, Y.; D. Orestano; Overton, E.

    2015-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 9...

  7. Performance of the Majorana Demonstrator Muon Veto System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Clinton; Majorana Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator is a neutrinoless double beta decay experiment operating at the 4850-ft. level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. The low-background goals of this Ge-based experiment require a muon veto system. The operation of the partial veto panel array (2/3 coverage) provides the first opportunity to study muon events during the commissioning of the Ge detectors. The Prototype Ge detector module operated in the Demonstrator shield for a total exposure of over 600 kg*day with the partial veto system. The operation of Module 1, consisting of 22.5 kg of Ge mass, in the shield with full veto panel coverage will provide a complete array to study muon-induced events in the experiment. The veto panels are synchronized with Ge detectors using a common 100MHz clock, presenting a unique opportunity to 1) study the flux and angular distribution of muons incident on the Demonstrator using the experiment's modular veto panel design, and 2) examine the effect of muon-related events on the Ge detectors. In this talk the performance of the muon veto system, including an analysis of the coincidence patterns of the incident muons and the corresponding spectra produced in the Ge detectors, is presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  8. Fukushima Daiichi Muon Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyadera, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    Japanese government announced cold-shutdown condition of the reactors at Fukushima Daiichi by the end of 2011, and mid- and long-term roadmap towards decommissioning has been drawn. However, little is known for the conditions of the cores because access to the reactors has been limited by the high radiation environment. The debris removal from the Unit 1 - 3 is planned to start as early as 2020, but the dismantlement is not easy without any realistic information of the damage to the cores, and the locations and amounts of the fuel debris. Soon after the disaster of Fukushima Daiichi, several teams in the US and Japan proposed to apply muon transmission or scattering imagings to provide information of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors without accessing inside the reactor building. GEANT4 modeling studies of Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 and 2 showed clear superiority of the muon scattering method over conventional transmission method. The scattering method was demonstrated with a research reactor, Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA), where a fuel assembly was imaged with 3-cm resolution. The muon scattering imaging of Fukushima Daiichi was approved as a national project and is aiming at installing muon trackers to Unit 2. A proposed plan includes installation of muon trackers on the 2nd floor (operation floor) of turbine building, and in front of the reactor building. Two 7mx7m detectors were assembled at Toshiba and tested.

  9. ATLAS Muon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Woudstra, MJ; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the highest energy proton-proton collider, providing also the highest instantaneous luminosity as a hadron collider. Bunch crossings occurred every 50 ns in 2012 runs. Amongst of which the online event selection system should reduce the event recording rate down to a few 100 Hz, while events are in a harsh condition with many overlapping proton-proton collisions occurring in a same bunch crossing. Muons often provide an important and clear signature of physics processes that are searched for, for instance as in the discovery of Higgs particle in year 2012. The ATLAS experiment deploys a three-levels processing scheme at online. The level-1 muon trigger system gets its input from fast muon trigger detectors. Fast sector logic boards select muon candidates, which are passed via an interface board to the central trigger processor and then to the High Level Trigger (HLT). The muon HLT is purely software based and encompasses a level-2 (L2) trigger followed by an event filte...

  10. Local flux-profile relationships of wind speed and temperature in a canopy layer in atmospheric stable conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G.; Leclerc, M. Y.; Karipot, A.

    2010-11-01

    The particularities of the physics of the canopy layer pose challenges to the determination and use of traditional universal functions so helpful in the atmospheric surface layer. Progress toward "universal-like functions" such as those provided by Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for the canopy layer has been modest. One of the challenges lies in that the assumptions underlying Monin-Obukhov similarity theory do not hold within a canopy layer. This paper thus examines the local flux-profile relations for wind (Φm) and for temperature (Φh). It uses three different stability parameters, i.e., h/L(h) at tree top, local z/L(z), and the local bulk Richardson number (Ri), within a tall forest canopy in nighttime stable (indicated by h/L(h) > 0) conditions. Results suggest that the in-canopy Φm can be described using the local Richardson number Ri. Furthermore, Φm is found to increase linearly with Ri in the upper canopy layer for |Ri| 1, |Φm| decreases with |Ri| in a power function, a result consistent for all levels of measurements within the canopy. When both local Φh and local Ri are positive, i.e., the local downward turbulent heat flux is consistent with the local temperature gradient, the local Φh increases with the local Ri when Ri 1. The relationship between local Φh and Ri disappears when counter-gradient heat transfer occurs in strongly stable conditions. A self-correlation analysis is used to examine the influence of self-correlation and the physical meaning of these relationships.

  11. Methane Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Methane (CH4) flux is the net rate of methane exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS LandCarbon project...

  12. Sea-to-air fluxes from measurements of the atmospheric gradient of dimethylsulfide and comparison with simultaneous relaxed eddy accumulation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hintsa, EJ; Dacey, JWH; McGillis, WR; Edson, JB; Zappa, CJ; Zemmelink, HJ

    2004-01-01

    [1] We measured vertical profiles of dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the atmospheric marine boundary layer from R/P FLIP during the 2000 FAIRS cruise. Applying Monin-Obukhov similarity theory to the DMS gradients and simultaneous micrometeorological data, we calculated sea-to-air DMS fluxes for 34 profiles

  13. Seasonal variations of the rate of multiple-muons in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Ronga, F

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the rate of cosmic ray muons depends on the atmospheric temperature, and that for events with a single muon the peak of the rate is in summer, in underground laboratories in the northern hemisphere. In 2015 the MINOS experiment, in USA, found that, for small distances between the multiple-muons, the rate of multiple-muons peaks in the winter and that the amplitude of the modulation is smaller than in the case of a single muon. I have done a re-analysis of data of the past MACRO experiment. The result is that under Gran Sasso the rate of multiple-muons at small distances peaks in the summer. This difference with MINOS could be explained by differences in the atmospheric temperature due to latitude. This results could be of interest for dark matter experiments looking to dark matter seasonal modulation due to the Earth's motion.

  14. Arrays of microplasmas for the controlled production of tunable high fluxes of reactive oxygen species at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric-pressure generation of singlet delta oxygen (O2(a 1Δg)) by microplasmas was experimentally studied. The remarkable stability of microcathode sustained discharges (MCSDs) allowed the operation of dc glow discharges, free from the glow-to-arc transition, in He/O2/NO mixtures at atmospheric pressure. From optical diagnostics measurements we deduced the yield of O2(a 1Δg). By operating arrays of several MCSDs in series, O2(a 1Δg) densities higher than 1.0 × 1017 cm−3 were efficiently produced and transported over distances longer than 50 cm, corresponding to O2(a 1Δg) partial pressures and production yields greater than 5 mbar and 6%, respectively. At such high O2(a 1Δg) densities, the fluorescence of the so-called O2(a 1Δg) dimol was observed as a red glow at 634 nm up to 1 m downstream. Parallel operation of arrays of MCSDs was also implemented, generating O2(a 1Δg) fluxes as high as 100 mmol h−1. In addition, ozone (O3) densities up to 1016 cm−3 were obtained. Finally, the density ratio of O2(a 1Δg) to O3 was finely and easily tuned in the range [10−3–10+5], through the values of the discharge current and NO concentration. This opens up opportunities for a large spectrum of new applications, making this plasma source notably very useful for biomedicine. (paper)

  15. Estimation of the atmosphere-ocean fluxes of greenhouse gases and aerosols at the finer resolution of the coastal ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Vasco; Sahlée, Erik; Jurus, Pavel; Clementi, Emanuela; Pettersson, Heidi; Mateus, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    The balances and fluxes of greenhouse gases and aerosols between atmosphere and ocean are fundamental for Earth's heat budget. Hence, the scientific community needs to know and simulate them with accuracy in order to monitor climate change from Earth-Observation satellites and to produce reliable estimates of climate change using Earth-System Models (ESM). So far, ESM have represented earth's surface with coarser resolutions so that each cell of the marine domain is dominated by the open ocean. In such case it is enough to use simple algorithms considering the wind speed 10m above sea-surface (u10) as sole driver of the gas transfer velocity. The formulation by Wanninkhof (1992) is broadly accepted as the best. However, the ESM community is becoming increasingly aware of the need to model with finer resolutions. Then, it is no longer enough to only consider u10 when modelling gas transfer velocities across the coastal oceans' surfaces. More comprehensive formulations are required that adjust better to local conditions by also accounting for the effects of sea-surface agitation, wave breaking, atmospheric stability of the Surface Boundary Layer, current drag with the bottom, surfactants and rain. Accurate algorithms are also fundamental to monitor atmosphere and ocean greenhouse gas concentrations using satellite data and reverse modelling. Past satellite missions ERS, Envisat, Jason-2, Aqua, Terra and Metop, have already been remotely sensing the ocean's surface at much finer resolutions than ESM using instruments like MERIS, MODIS, AMR, AATSR, MIPAS, Poseidon-3, SCIAMACHY, SeaWiFS, and IASI. The planned new satellite missions Sentinel-3, OCO-2 and GOSAT will further increase the resolutions. We developed a framework to congregate competing formulations for the estimation of the solubility and transfer velocity of virtually any gas on the biosphere taking into consideration the atmosphere and ocean fundamental variables and their derived geophysical processes

  16. Cosmic ray energy spectrum measurement with the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirkin, Dmitry Aleksandrovich

    AMANDA-II is a neutrino telescope composed of 677 optical sensors organized along 19 strings buried deep in the Antarctic ice cap. It is designed to detect Cherenkov light produced by cosmic-ray- and neutrino-induced charged leptons. The majority of events recorded by AMANDA-II are caused by muons which are produced in the atmosphere by high-energy cosmic rays. The leading uncertainties in simulating such events come from the choice of the high-energy model used to describe the first interaction of the cosmic rays, uncertainties in our knowledge and implementation of the ice properties at the depth of the detector, and individual optical module sensitivities. Contributions from uncertainties in the atmospheric conditions and muon cross sections in ice are smaller. The downgoing muon simulation was substantially improved by using the extensive air shower generator CORSIKA to describe the shower development in the atmosphere, and by writing a new software package for the muon propagation (MMC), which reduced computational and algorithm errors below the level of uncertainties of the muon cross sections in ice. A method was developed that resulted in a flux measurement of cosmic rays with energies 1.5--200 TeV per nucleon (95% of primaries causing low-multiplicity events in AMANDA-II have energies in this range) independent of ice model and optical module sensitivities. Predictions of six commonly used high-energy interaction models (QGSJET, VENUS, NEXUS, DPMJET, HDPM, and SIBYLL) are compared to data. The best agreement with direct measurements is achieved with QGSJET, VENUS, and NEXUS. Assuming a power-law energy spectrum (phi0,i · E -gammai) for cosmic-ray components from hydrogen to iron (i = H,..., Fe) and their mass distribution according to Wiebel-South (Wiebel-South & Biermann, 1999), phi 0,i and gammai were corrected to achieve the best description of the data. For the hydrogen component, values of phi0,H = 0.106 +/- 0.007 m-2 sr-1s-1TeV-1 , gammaH = 2

  17. Going to the school of muons

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Italian secondary school pupils will be given the opportunity to take part in a large-scale experiment looking at cosmic muons thanks to the EEE Project. Two Italian pupils building an MRPC muon chamber in CERN's Building 29. For several months, Italian secondary school pupils have been coming to CERN each week and heading for Building 29. They are not just visiting. They are participating in the EEE (Extreme Energy Events) Project, the aim of which is to carry out a real-life experiment in search of large atmospheric showers using muon detectors located in their schools. In this hall at CERN they are helping to build and test muon chambers - MRPCs (Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers). These chambers, which were invented several years ago by Crispin Williams as part of the LAA Project led by Professor Antonino Zichichi, are similar to those that will be used for ALICE's TOF (Time of Flight) detector at the LHC. In this way, the pupils are receiving a direct, practical and effective initiation to particle phy...

  18. High-energy atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

    2010-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons that were produced through the cosmic rays collisions with air nuclei, form unavoidable background noise in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. The atmospheric neutrino flux above 1 PeV should be supposedly dominated by the contribution of charmed particle decays. These (prompt) neutrinos originated from decays of massive and shortlived particles, $D^\\pm$, $D^0$, $\\bar{D}{}^0$, $D_s^\\pm$, $\\Lambda^+_c$, form the most uncertain fraction of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux because of poor explored processes of the charm production. Besides, an ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. There is the energy region where above flux uncertainties superimpose. A new calculation presented here reveals sizable differences, up to the factor of 1.8 above 1 TeV, in muon neutrino flux predictions obtained with usage of known...

  19. The LHCb Muon Sistem

    CERN Document Server

    Brusa, Simone

    2008-01-01

    In this paper is described the LHCb muon detector, which plays a fundamental role in the Level-0 (L0) trigger and muon identification for the high-level trigger (HLT) and offline analysis. After a short review of the detector structure and of the required performances, we will describe, with some detail, the construction procedures and the relative quality control tests of the single chambers. The results of the quality control tests performed in the production centers, and the tests with fully equipped chambers performed at CERN before the installation on the experiment site, will also be reported.

  20. Monitoring the yearly sporadic Micrometeor Flux into the upper Atmosphere using the Arecibo Dual-Beam 430 MHz Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, D. E.; Janches, D.; Meisel, D. D.; Nolan, M. C.; Bartlett, B. D.; Mathews, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    A year long program of observations and study of the micrometeor flux into the upper atmosphere using the dual-beam 430 MHz Arecibo radar (AO) in Puerto Rico began in January 2002. The AO radar detects decelerating particles in the size range 0.5-100 microns for which precise altitude, instantaneous Doppler velocity, and (linear) deceleration are obtained. This provides a tool for the study of a mass-region of the interplanetary dust distribution that was previously inaccessible to ground-based instruments and helps bridge the gap between spacecraft dust measurements and traditional meteor radar capabilities. Each month, a minimum of one 14-hour interval of observations (18:00-08:00 hrs LT) is collected. The antenna line feed is pointed vertically while the Gregorian feed is pointed at a zenith angle of 15 degrees. The off-vertical radar beam is initially placed pointing north and every 30 minutes is rotated 180 degrees. Over 10000 events are observed daily inside the 300m diameter beam, within an observed altitude range of 80-140 km (150 m height resolution). With the application of a Doppler technique, instantaneous meteor velocities are obtained with errors on the order of 10-100 m/sec. Orbital results derived from the observations performed in January and June are presented and discussed.

  1. Towards Direct Numerical Simulation of mass and energy fluxes at the soil-atmospheric interface with advanced Lattice Boltzmann methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Krafczyk, Manfred; Geier, Martin; Schönherr, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of soil evaporation and of soil water content dynamics near the soil surface are critical in the physics of land-surface processes on many scales and are dominated by multi-component and multi-phase mass and energy fluxes between the ground and the atmosphere. Although it is widely recognized that both liquid and gaseous water movement are fundamental factors in the quantification of soil heat flux and surface evaporation, their computation has only started to be taken into account using simplified macroscopic models. As the flow field over the soil can be safely considered as turbulent, it would be natural to study the detailed transient flow dynamics by means of Large Eddy Simulation (LES [1]) where the three-dimensional flow field is resolved down to the laminar sub-layer. Yet this requires very fine resolved meshes allowing a grid resolution of at least one order of magnitude below the typical grain diameter of the soil under consideration. In order to gain reliable turbulence statistics, up to several hundred eddy turnover times have to be simulated which adds up to several seconds of real time. Yet, the time scale of the receding saturated water front dynamics in the soil is on the order of hours. Thus we are faced with the task of solving a transient turbulent flow problem including the advection-diffusion of water vapour over the soil-atmospheric interface represented by a realistic tomographic reconstruction of a real porous medium taken from laboratory probes. Our flow solver is based on the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) [2] which has been extended by a Cumulant approach similar to the one described in [3,4] to minimize the spurious coupling between the degrees of freedom in previous LBM approaches and can be used as an implicit LES turbulence model due to its low numerical dissipation and increased stability at high Reynolds numbers. The kernel has been integrated into the research code Virtualfluids [5] and delivers up to 30% of the

  2. Neutrino-induced Muons In The Minos Far Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rebel, B J

    2004-01-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is an experiment designed to probe the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations. When MINOS is completed it will consist of a neutrino beam and two detectors, which are separated by a distance of 735∼km. The near detector measures the energy distribution and flux of a beam of muon neutrinos produced at Fermilab, while the far detector, located in Soudan, MN, measures these same neutrino properties 735∼km away. The signal for a detection of neutrino oscillations is a deficit of neutrinos at the far detector compared to expectations based on the near detector measurements. In addition to measuring beam neutrinos, the far detector can be used to measure neutrinos produced in cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere. While waiting for the beam to begin running, the far detector was used in this mode. Several previous experiments, such as Super-K and MACRO, have suggested that the atmospheric neutrinos oscillate between different flavor states. This...

  3. Summer fluxes of atmospheric greenhouse gases N{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} from mangrove soil in South China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, G.C. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Tam, N.F.Y., E-mail: bhntam@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Ye, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian (China)

    2010-06-01

    The atmospheric fluxes of N{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} from the soil in four mangrove swamps in Shenzhen and Hong Kong, South China were investigated in the summer of 2008. The fluxes ranged from 0.14 to 23.83 {mu}mol m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, 11.9 to 5168.6 {mu}mol m{sup -2} h{sup -1} and 0.69 to 20.56 mmol m{sup -2} h{sup -1} for N{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}, respectively. Futian mangrove swamp in Shenzhen had the highest greenhouse gas fluxes, followed by Mai Po mangrove in Hong Kong. Sha Kong Tsuen and Yung Shue O mangroves in Hong Kong had similar, low fluxes. The differences in both N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} fluxes among different tidal positions, the landward, seaward and bare mudflat, in each swamp were insignificant. The N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} fluxes were positively correlated with the soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphate, total iron and NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N contents, as well as the soil porosity. However, only soil NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N concentration had significant effects on CH{sub 4} fluxes.

  4. First measurements of muon production rate using a novel pion capture system at MuSIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MuSIC (Muon Science Innovative Channel) beam line at RCNP (Research Centre for Nuclear Physics), Osaka will be the most intense source of muons in the world. A proton beam is incident on a target and, by using a novel capture solenoid, guides the produced pions into the beam line where they subsequently decay to muons. This increased muon flux will allow more precise measurements of cLFV (charged Lepton Flavour Violation) as well as making muon beams more economically feasible. Currently the first 36° of solenoid beam pipe have been completed and installed for testing with low proton current of 1 nA. Measurements of the total particle flux and the muon life time were made. The measurements were taken using thin plastic scintillators coupled to MPPCs (Multi-Pixel Photon Counter) that surrounded a magnesium or copper stopping target. The scintillators were used to record which particles stopped and their subsequent decay times giving a muon yield of 8.5 × 105 muons W−1protonbeam or 3 × 108 muons s−1 when using the RCNP's full power (400 W).

  5. Evaluation of radioactive cesium impact from atmospheric deposition and direct release fluxes into the North Pacific from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubono, Takaki; Misumi, Kazuhiro; Tsumune, Daisuke; Bryan, Frank O.; Hirose, Katsumi; Aoyama, Michio

    2016-09-01

    The North Pacific distribution of 134Cs released from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (F1NPP) has been investigated using an eddy-resolving model. We conducted simulations based on two scenarios: (1) an input flux that was a combination of atmospheric deposition and direct release from the F1NPP (combination-flux scenario) and (2) an input flux that took account only of the direct release of 134Cs (single-flux scenario). The combination-flux scenario simulation successfully reproduced the distribution of 134Cs activity observed in the surface layer from April 2011 to January 2014. The results indicate that 134Cs deposited via atmospheric deposition into the Kuroshio-Oyashio Interfrontal Zone and 134Cs directly released from F1NPP were both transported to south of the Subarctic Front around 42°N in June of 2012. The combination-flux scenario suggests that the 134Cs activities observed in the area north of 42°N in 2012 originated from atmospheric deposition and that the 134Cs activity was subducted in Central Mode Water during the winters of 2011 and 2012. We directly compared simulated and observed 134Cs activities in the surface layer at 179 points across a wide area to the east of 155°E from 2011 to 2013 to evaluate the accuracy of the two scenarios. The root-mean-square error and correlation coefficient, R, were 7.3 Bq m-3 and 0.86, respectively, for the combination-flux scenario and 13.8 Bq m-3 and 0.46, respectively, for the single-flux scenario, confirming that reproduction of the 134Cs activity in the North Pacific after the F1NPP accident requires taking both fluxes into consideration. Based on a linear least-squares regression between simulated and observed 134Cs activity, the total 134Cs flux into the North Pacific was estimated at 16.1±1.4 PBq.

  6. Bridging nations through muons

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    From America to Israel and Japan, a team of international technicians and scientists are working together to build the ATLAS endcap muon chambers. The Israeli and Pakistani teams stand in front of part of the ATLAS endcap muon spectrometer. They are working on the project along with...... a team from American universities and research institutions. It's a small world; at least you might think so after a visit to Building 180. Inside, about 30 engineers and physicists weld, measure and hammer away, many of whom are miles from their homes and families. They hail from Pakistan, Israel, Japan, China, Russia and the United States. Coordinated by a group of CERN engineers, the team represents an international collaboration in every sense. Whether they've been here for years or months, CERN is their temporary home as they work toward one common goal: the completion of the ATLAS muon chamber endcaps. When finished, the ATLAS muon spectrometer will include four moving 'big wheel'structures on each end of the detecto...

  7. Muon-induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of recent experimental results on negative-muon-induced fission, both of 238U and 232Th, is given. Some conclusions drawn by the author are concerned with muonic atoms of fission fragments and muonic atoms of the shape isomer of 238U. (author)

  8. Nitrogen Flux in Watersheds: The Role of Atmospheric Deposition, Waste Water Treatment Plants and Climate Oscillations in Nitrogen Exported to the Coastal Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showers, W. J.; Harris, J.; Genna, B.

    2007-12-01

    Quantifying the flux of nitrate from different sources in watersheds is important to understand the increased flux of nitrogen to coastal ecosystems. Recent technological advances in chemical sensor networks has demonstrated that chemical variability in aquatic environments are chronically under-sampled, and that many chemical monitoring programs with monthly or daily sampling rates are inadequate to characterize the dominate seasonal, daily or semi-diurnal process and episodic storm event fluxes. The RiverNet program has measured the nitrate flux in the Neuse River Basin, NC on a 15 minute interval over the past six years. Significant diurnal variation has been observed in nitrate concentrations during high and low flow periods associated with waste water treatment plants in the basin. Other species of riverine nitrogen do not show this type of concentration variation. Comparison of 15 minute versus 24 hour nitrate flux calculations show that daily monitoring programs underestimate N flux by 10-40%. Two RiverNet stations were used to estimate nitrate gains in the river from biosolid application fields at one waste water treatment plant. Over a 4 year period non-point source nitrate entering the river from the fields was 50% of the nitrogen released in plant effluent. Non-point source flux from biosolid application fields is event driven and can not be determined from daily or weekly sampling. These results suggest that the importance of waste water treatment plant N flux has been under-estimated in current models. The δ15N and δ 18O composition of nitrate has been used to assess importance of atmospheric sources to watershed N flux, but because of transformations contaminant source tracing with these isotopes has been complicated. We have used multiple isotope tracers of nitrate δ 15N, Δ 17O, δ 18O to distinguish between different N contamination sources, areas of extensive denitrification, and areas of atmospheric N. Areas of extensive denitrification are

  9. Latitudinal distributions of activities in atmospheric aerosols, deposition fluxes, and soil inventories of 7Be in the East Asian monsoon zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities of atmospheric aerosols, bulk deposition fluxes, and undisturbed soil inventories of 7Be were investigated in China's East Asian monsoon zone at various latitudes ranging from 23.8°N to 43.5°N. The annual latitudinal distributions of 7Be concentrations in aerosols follow a distribution pattern which looks similar to a normal distribution with the maxima occurring in the mid-latitude region. Simultaneous measurements of 7Be at various latitudes suggest that atmospheric circulation may play an important role in the latitudinal distributions of 7Be in surface air. Latitude and wet precipitation are the main factors controlling the bulk 7Be depositional fluxes. Significant seasonal variations in 7Be depositional fluxes in Beijing, a mid-latitude city, were observed with the highest flux in summer and the lowest in winter, whereas less seasonality were found in the high- and the low-latitude cities. The highest 7Be inventory in undisturbed soils in summer also occurred at a mid-latitudinal area in the East Asian monsoon zone. Precipitation is the main factor controlling the 7Be soil inventory in Qingdao with the highest values occurring in autumn followed by summer. - Highlights: • 7Be in atmospheric aerosols, rainfall, and soils were measured at different latitudes. • The annual maxima of 7Be concentrations in aerosols occurred at ∼40°N. • Spring and autumn are seasons of high atmospheric 7Be with maxima at 30°N. • The annual maxima of 7Be deposition fluxes occurred at ∼40°N. • High rainfall in summer is the main cause of higher 7Be soil inventory

  10. Overestimation of soil CO2 fluxes from closed chamber measurements at low atmospheric turbulence biases the diurnal pattern and the annual soil respiration budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braendholt, Andreas; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Ibrom, Andreas; Pilegaard, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Precise quantification of the diurnal and seasonal variation of soil respiration (Rs) is crucial to correctly estimate annual soil carbon fluxes as well as to correctly interpret the response of Rs to biotic and abiotic factors on different time scale. In this study we found a systematic effect of low atmospheric turbulence on continuous hourly Rs measurements with closed chambers throughout one year in a temperate Danish beech forest. Using friction velocity (u⋆) measured at the site above the canopy, we filtered out chamber flux data measured at low atmospheric turbulence. The non-filtered data showed a clear diurnal pattern of Rs across all seasons with highest fluxes during night time suggesting an implausible negative temperature sensitivity of Rs. When filtering out data at low turbulence, the annually averaged diurnal pattern changed, such that the highest Rs fluxes were seen during day time, i.e. following the course of soil temperatures. This effect on the diurnal pattern was due to low turbulence primarily occurring during night time. We calculated different annual Rs budgets by filtering out fluxes for different levels of u⋆. The highest annual Rs budget was found when including all data and it decreased with an increasing u⋆ filter threshold. Our results show that Rs was overestimated at low atmospheric turbulence throughout the year and that this overestimation considerably biased the diurnal pattern of Rs and led to an overestimation of the annual Rs budget. Thus we recommend that that any analysis of the diurnal pattern of Rs must consider overestimation of Rs at low atmospheric turbulence, to yield unbiased diurnal patterns. This is crucial when investigating temperature responses and potential links between CO2 production and Rs on a short time scale, but also for correct estimation of annual Rs budgets. Acknowledgements: This study was funded by the free Danish Ministry for Research, Innovation and higher Education, the free Danish Research

  11. Effects of source spatial partial coherence on temporal fade statistics of irradiance flux in free-space optical links through atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunyi; Yang, Huamin; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Weizhi; Kavehrad, Mohsen; Tong, Shoufeng; Wang, Tianshu

    2013-12-01

    The temporal covariance function of irradiance-flux fluctua-tions for Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams propagating in atmospheric turbulence is theoretically formulated by making use of the method of effective beam parameters. Based on this formulation, new expressions for the root-mean-square (RMS) bandwidth of the irradiance-flux temporal spectrum due to GSM beams passing through atmospheric turbulence are derived. With the help of these expressions, the temporal fade statistics of the irradiance flux in free-space optical (FSO) communication systems, using spatially partially coherent sources, impaired by atmospheric turbulence are further calculated. Results show that with a given receiver aperture size, the use of a spatially partially coherent source can reduce both the fractional fade time and average fade duration of the received light signal; however, when atmospheric turbulence grows strong, the reduction in the fractional fade time becomes insignificant for both large and small receiver apertures and in the average fade duration turns inconsiderable for small receiver apertures. It is also illustrated that if the receiver aperture size is fixed, changing the transverse correlation length of the source from a larger value to a smaller one can reduce the average fade frequency of the received light signal only when a threshold parameter in decibels greater than the critical threshold level is specified.

  12. Local flux-profile relationships of wind speed and temperature in a canopy layer in atmospheric stable conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zhang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The particularities of the physics of the canopy layer pose challenges to the determination and use of traditional universal functions so helpful in the atmospheric surface layer. Progress toward "universal-like functions" such as those provided by Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for the canopy layer has been modest. One of the challenges lies in that the assumptions underlying Monin-Obukhov similarity theory do not hold within a canopy layer. This paper thus examines the local flux-profile relations for wind (φm and for temperature (φh using three different stability parameters, i.e., h/L(h at tree top, local z/L(z, and local bulk Richardson number (Ri, within a tall forest canopy in nighttime stable (indicated by h/L(h>0 conditions. Results suggest that the in-canopy φm can be described using the local Richardson number Ri. φm is found to increase linearly with Ri in the upper canopy layer for |Ri|<1. When local |Ri|>1, |φm| decreases with |Ri|, a result consistent for all levels of measurements within the canopy. When both local φh and local Ri are positive, i.e., local downward turbulent heat flux is consistent with local temperature gradient, local φh increases with local Ri when Ri<1 but does not change with Ri (or much more scattered when Ri>1. The relationship between local φh and Ri disappears when counter-gradient heat transfer occurs in strongly stable conditions. A self-correlation analysis is used to examine the influence of self-correlation and the physical meaning of these relationships.

  13. Local flux-profile relationships of wind speed and temperature in a canopy layer in atmospheric stable conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zhang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The particularities of the physics of the canopy layer pose challenges to the determination and use of traditional universal functions so helpful in the atmospheric surface layer. Progress toward "universal-like functions" such as those provided by Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for the canopy layer has been modest. One of the challenges lies in that the assumptions underlying Monin-Obukhov similarity theory do not hold within a canopy layer. This paper thus examines the local flux-profile relations for wind (Φm and for temperature (Φh. It uses three different stability parameters, i.e., h/L(h at tree top, local z/L(z, and the local bulk Richardson number (Ri, within a tall forest canopy in nighttime stable (indicated by h/L(h > 0 conditions. Results suggest that the in-canopy Φm can be described using the local Richardson number Ri. Furthermore, Φm is found to increase linearly with Ri in the upper canopy layer for |Ri| < 1. When local |Ri| > 1, |Φm| decreases with |Ri| in a power function, a result consistent for all levels of measurements within the canopy. When both local Φh and local Ri are positive, i.e., the local downward turbulent heat flux is consistent with the local temperature gradient, the local Φh increases with the local Ri when Ri < 1. However, Φh does not change with Ri (or much more scattered when Ri > 1. The relationship between local Φh and Ri disappears when counter-gradient heat transfer occurs in strongly stable conditions. A self-correlation analysis is used to examine the influence of self-correlation and the physical meaning of these relationships.

  14. Atmospheric deposition fluxes of 7Be, 210Pb and chemical species to the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerosol samples collected close to the air-sea interface, between February 1997 to February 1999, over the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal were analyzed to determine the atmospheric dry-deposition of Fe (dust inputs), anthropogenic constituents (NO3-, SO42-) and environmental nuclides (7Be, 210Pb). In general, aerosol 210Pb concentrations showed a good correlation with 7Be, suggesting the long-range transport of 210Pb from the continents (via upper troposphere) and similarities in the processes governing their deposition through the marine boundary layer (MBL). The relatively low 7Be/210Pb ratios observed over the Bay of Bengal, during February 1999, are dominated by aerosol transport from the continental surface sources. The dry deposition fluxes of 210Pb and 7Be, to these two oceanic regions, average around 245 and 1860 Bq m-2 y-l, respectively. The non-sea-salt (nss) SO42- (range: 1.7 to 9.4 μg m-3) and NO3- (range: 0.6 to 4.1 μg m-3) are uncorrelated in the MBL, presumably because continental pollution sources for SO42- overwhelm the transport of NO3- from crustal dust and biomass burning. The oceanic biogenic emission (DMS) constitutes a very minor source for nss-SO42-. The enhanced concentrations of aerosol NO3- and Fe observed over the Arabian Sea are attributed to dust storm activities from the adjacent desert areas (Saudi Arabia and Thar). Significant scatter in the linear regression analyses indicate that the aerosol composition along the coastal tracks is different from those transported to the open ocean. On average, dry deposition fluxes of N-NO3 and non-marine SO42- are 150 and 1225 mg m-2 y-1, respectively. In contrast, dry deposition of Fe over the Arabian Sea (255 mg m-2 y-1) far exceeds that over the Bay of Bengal (93 mg m-2 y-1). Thus, dust from desert regions appears to be a potential source of micronutrients (Fe) to the surface Arabian Sea. (author)

  15. Effects of land use on surface–atmosphere exchanges of trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing fluxes over oil palm plantations and a rainforest

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, David; Nemitz, Eiko; Misztal, Pawel; Di Marco, Chiara; Skiba, Ute; Ryder, James; Helfter, Carole; Cape, J. Neil; Owen, Sue; Dorsey, James; Gallagher, Martin W.; Coyle, Mhairi; Phillips, Gavin; Davison, Brian; Langford, Ben

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of land–atmosphere fluxes of sensible and latent heat, momentum, CO2, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), NO, NO2, N2O and O3 over a 30 m high rainforest canopy and a 12 m high oil palm plantation in the same region of Sabah in Borneo between April and July 2008. The daytime maximum CO2 flux to the two canopies differs by approximately a factor of 2, 1200 mg C m−2 h−1 for the oil palm and 700 mg C m−2 h−1 for the rainforest, with the oil palm plantation showing ...

  16. Can LSND and SuperKamiokande be explained by radiative decays of muons-neutrinos?

    OpenAIRE

    Vannucci, F.

    1999-01-01

    The radiative decay of muon-neutrinos in matter with a scheme of mass-degenerate neutrinos could be the common origin of the appearance of anti-electron-neutrinos at LSND and the disappearance of muons-neutrinos at SuperKamiokande. With the decay probability fixed by the LSND signal, the deficit of atmospheric neutrinos can be satisfactorily reproduced.

  17. CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes and carbon balance in the atmospheric interaction of boreal peatlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, J.

    1997-12-31

    contributed to the total peat CO{sub 2} efflux by 10-40 % as root respiration and root associated heterotrophic CO{sub 2} release. Much of the spatial variability in the gas fluxes was attributed to the microsite properties in natural peatlands. Winter CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} emissions were important components in the C balance, comprising 10Ae30 % of the annual gas release from peat. According to the simulation results, the CH{sub 4} release from expanding peatlands could have contributed to the early interglacial atmospheric warming during several millennia, at least prior to the ombrotrophication and increased peat accumulation from about 3500 years BP onwards. The atmospheric cooling effect by peat accumulation is less clear. (orig.)

  18. Local Magnetic Fields in Ferromagnetics Studied by Positive Muon Precession

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Positive muons are used to study local magnetic fields in different materials. A polarized muon beam is employed with energies of 30-50 MeV, and the muons are stopped in the target being studied. During its lifetime the muon will precess in the magnetic fields present, and after the decay of the muon the emitted positron is detected in plastic scintillators. The time and angle of the detected positron is used to calculate the magnetic field at the position of the muon in the sample. \\\\ \\\\ The detector system consists of plastic scintillators. Most of the measurements are made in an applied magnetic field. A dilution cryostat is used to produce temperatures down to well below $ 1 ^0 $ K. \\\\ \\\\ The present line of experiments concern mainly: \\item a)~~~~Local magnetism in the paramagnetic state of the Lave's phase type REAl$_{2} $ and RENi$_{2} $ systems ~~~where RE is a rare-earth ion. \\item b)~~~~Local magnetic fields and critical behaviour of the magnetism in Gd metal. \\item c)~~~~Investigation of flux exclu...

  19. J-PARC muon control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higemoto, W. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: higemoto.wataru@jaea.go.jp; Shimomura, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Makimura, S.; Miyake, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kai, T.; Sakai, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2009-02-21

    At the J-PARC MLF muon science facility (MUSE), muon experimental instruments are operated by means of a Muon Control System. The following are subject to the Muon Control System: (1) Muon production target and the beam scrapers, (2) M1/M2 line air-conditioning system, (3) Cryogenic system for the superconducting solenoid magnet, (4) Muon secondary line vacuum system, (5) Muon secondary line magnets, and (6) Muon beam blockers and related safety instruments. Details of the muon control system are described below.

  20. An Initial Investigation into the Use of a Flux Chamber Technique to Measure Soil-Atmosphere Gas Exchanges from Application of Biosolids to UK Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Donovan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While a significant amount of work has been conducted to assess the concentration of pollutants in soils and waterways near land that has been amended with biosolids, a relatively small body of research investigating emissions to atmosphere is available in the literature. Some studies have indicated that while the CO2 emissions from soils decrease with fertiliser application, the CH4 and N2O emissions might be increased, offsetting the benefit. The objective of the research presented in this paper was to address this gap, by the use of a flux chamber technique to measure soil-atmosphere gas exchanges from the application of biosolids to land. This was done by applying three different types of biosolids to soils and measuring gases at the soil-atmosphere interface. The measurements were taken on areas with three different types of vegetation. The gases were collected using a flux chamber technique and analysed by gas chromatography. The results presented here are preliminary findings of an ongoing experiment. Insignificant variation appeared to occur between different areas of vegetation; however, small variations in gas concentrations were observed indicating a need for continued monitoring of soil-atmosphere gas exchanges to determine the long-term impacts on the atmosphere and the environment.

  1. An Initial Investigation into the Use of a Flux Chamber Technique to Measure Soil-Atmosphere Gas Exchanges from Application of Bio solids to UK Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While a significant amount of work has been conducted to assess the concentration of pollutants in soils and waterways near land that has been amended with bio solids, a relatively small body of research investigating emissions to atmosphere is available in the literature. Some studies have indicated that while the CO2 emissions from soils decrease with fertiliser application, the CH4 and N2O emissions might be increased, offsetting the benefit. The objective of the research presented in this paper was to address this gap, by the use of a flux chamber technique to measure soil-atmosphere gas exchanges from the application of bio solids to land. This was done by applying three different types of bio solids to soils and measuring gases at the soil-atmosphere interface. The measurements were taken on areas with three different types of vegetation. The gases were collected using a flux chamber technique and analysed by gas chromatography. The results presented here are preliminary findings of an ongoing experiment. Insignificant variation appeared to occur between different areas of vegetation; however, small variations in gas concentrations were observed indicating a need for continued monitoring of soil-atmosphere gas exchanges to determine the long-term impacts on the atmosphere and the environment.

  2. Atmospheric fluxes of organic matter to the Mediterranean Sea: contribution to the elemental C: N: P ratios of surface dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaoudi, Kahina; Barani, Aude; Hélias-Nunige, Sandra; Van Wambeke, France; Pulido-Villena, Elvira

    2016-04-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that atmospheric transport plays an important role in the supply of macro- and micro-nutrients to the surface ocean. This atmospheric input is especially important in oligotrophic regions where the vertical supply from the subsurface is low particularly during the stratification period. Compared to its inorganic counterpart, the organic fraction of atmospheric deposition and its impact on surface ocean biogeochemistry has been poorly explored. In the ocean, carbon export to depth (and therefore, its long term storage with presumed consequences on climate) occurs both through particle sedimentation and through the transfer of dissolved organic matter (DOM) via diffusion or convection. DOM export from the surface ocean represents up to 50% of total organic carbon flux to the deep ocean in oligotrophic regions such as the Mediterranean Sea. The efficiency of this C export pathway depends, among others, on the elemental C: N: P ratios of surface DOM which might be affected by the relative contribution of microbial processes and allochthonous sources. This work reports a one-year time-series (April 2015-April 2016) of simultaneous measurements of (1) total (dry + wet) atmospheric fluxes of organic carbon, organic nitrogen, and organic phosphorus and (2) concentration of dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic nitrogen, and dissolved organic phosphate at the surface layer (0-200 m) in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Atmospheric and oceanic surveys were conducted at the Frioul and ANTARES sites, respectively, operated by the long-term observation network MOOSE (Mediterranean Oceanic Observation System for the Environment).

  3. Temporal and spatial changes in mixed layer properties and atmospheric net heat flux in the Nordic Seas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, A; Alekseev, G [SI ' Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Korablev, A; Esau, I, E-mail: avsmir@aari.nw.r [Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Centre, Bergen (Norway)

    2010-08-15

    The Nordic Seas are an important area of the World Ocean where warm Atlantic waters penetrate far north forming the mild climate of Northern Europe. These waters represent the northern rim of the global thermohaline circulation. Estimates of the relationships between the net heat flux and mixed layer properties in the Nordic Seas are examined. Oceanographic data are derived from the Oceanographic Data Base (ODB) compiled in the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute. Ocean weather ship 'Mike' (OWS) data are used to calculate radiative and turbulent components of the net heat flux. The net shortwave flux was calculated using a satellite albedo dataset and the EPA model. The net longwave flux was estimated by Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) method. Turbulent fluxes at the air-sea interface were calculated using the COARE 3.0 algorithm. The net heat flux was calculated by using oceanographic and meteorological data of the OWS 'Mike'. The mixed layer depth was estimated for the period since 2002 until 2009 by the 'Mike' data as well. A good correlation between these two parameters has been found. Sensible and latent heat fluxes controlled by surface air temperature/sea surface temperature gradient are the main contributors into net heat flux. Significant correlation was found between heat fluxes variations at the OWS 'Mike' location and sea ice export from the Arctic Ocean.

  4. Effects of Long-Term CO2 Enrichment on Soil-Atmosphere CH4 Fluxes and the Spatial Micro-Distribution of Methanotrophic Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Karbin

    Full Text Available Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on plant growth and associated C cycling have intensively been studied, but less is known about effects on the fluxes of radiatively active trace gases other than CO2. Net soil-atmosphere CH4 fluxes are determined by the balance of soil microbially-driven methane (CH4 oxidation and methanogenesis, and both might change under elevated CO2.Here, we studied CH4 dynamics in a permanent grassland exposed to elevated CO2 for 14 years. Soil-atmosphere fluxes of CH4 were measured using large static chambers, over a period of four years. The ecosystem was a net sink for atmospheric CH4 for most of the time except summer to fall when net CH4 emissions occurred. We did not detect any elevated CO2 effects on CH4 fluxes, but emissions were difficult to quantify due to their discontinuous nature, most likely because of ebullition from the saturated zone. Potential methanotrophic activity, determined by incubation of fresh sieved soil under standardized conditions, also did not reveal any effect of the CO2 treatment. Finally, we determined the spatial micro-distribution of methanotrophic activity at less than 5× atmospheric (10 ppm and elevated (10000 ppm CH4 concentrations, using a novel auto-radiographic technique. These analyses indicated that domains of net CH4 assimilation were distributed throughout the analyzed top 15 cm of soils, with no dependence on CH4 concentration or CO2 treatment.Our investigations suggest that elevated CO2 exerts no or only minor effects on CH4 fluxes in the type of ecosystem we studied, at least as long as soil moisture differences are small or absent as was the case here. The autoradiographic analyses further indicate that the spatial niche of CH4 oxidation does not shift in response to CO2 enrichment or CH4 concentration, and that the same type of methanotrophs may oxidize CH4 from atmospheric and soil-internal sources.

  5. Muon identification with Muon Telescope Detector at the STAR experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T. C.; Ma, R.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Ruan, L.; Todoroki, T.; Xu, Z.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Zha, W.

    2016-10-01

    The Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) is a newly installed detector in the STAR experiment. It provides an excellent opportunity to study heavy quarkonium physics using the dimuon channel in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, we report the muon identification performance for the MTD using proton-proton collisions at √{ s }=500 GeV with various methods. The result using the Likelihood Ratio method shows that the muon identification efficiency can reach up to ∼90% for muons with transverse momenta greater than 3 GeV/c and the significance of the J / ψ signal is improved by a factor of 2 compared to using the basic selection.

  6. Muon ID- Taking Care of Lower Momenta Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Milstene, C; Para, A

    2006-01-01

    In the Muon package under study, the tracks are extrapolated using an algorithm which accounts for the magnetic field and the ionization (dE/dx). We improved the calculation of the field dependent term to increase the muon detection efficiency at lower momenta using a Runge-Kutta method. The muon identification and hadron separation in b-bbar jets is reported with the improved software. In the same framework, the utilization of the Kalman filter is introduced. The principle of the Kalman filter is described in some detail with the propagation matrix, with the Runge-Kutta term included, and the effect on low momenta single muons particles is described.

  7. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    Z. Szillasi and G. Gomez.

    2013-01-01

    When CMS is opened up, major components of the Link and Barrel Alignment systems will be removed. This operation, besides allowing for maintenance of the detector underneath, is needed for making interventions that will reinforce the alignment measurements and make the operation of the alignment system more reliable. For that purpose and also for their general maintenance and recalibration, the alignment components will be transferred to the Alignment Lab situated in the ISR area. For the track-based alignment, attention is focused on the determination of systematic uncertainties, which have become dominant, since now there is a large statistics of muon tracks. This will allow for an improved Monte Carlo misalignment scenario and updated alignment position errors, crucial for high-momentum muon analysis such as Z′ searches.

  8. The LHCb Muon Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Cardini, A

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration is currently working on the upgrade of the experiment to allow, after 2018, an efficient data collection while running at an instantaneous luminosity of 2x10$^{33}$/cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. The upgrade will allow 40 MHz detector readout, and events will be selected by means of a very flexible software-based trigger. The muon system will be upgraded in two phases. In the first phase, the off-detector readout electronics will be redesigned to allow complete event readout at 40 MHz. Also, part of the channel logical-ORs, used to reduce the total readout channel count, will be removed to reduce dead-time in critical regions. In a second phase, higher-granularity detectors will replace the ones installed in highly irradiated regions, to guarantee efficient muon system performances in the upgrade data taking conditions.

  9. Muon astronomy with the MACRO detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlen, S P; Antolini, R; Auriemma, G; Baldini, A; Bam, B B; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bisi, V; Bloise, C; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, P; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Chiera, C; Cobis, A; Cormack, R; Corona, A; Coutu, S; De Cataldo, G; Dekhissi, H; De Marzo, C; De Vincenzi, M; Di Credico, A; Diehl, E; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Ficenec, D; Forti, C; Foti, L; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giubellino, P; Grassi, M; Green, P; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Heinz, R; Hong, J T; Iarocci, Enzo; Katsavounidis, E; Kearns, E T; Klein, S; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Lee, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Liu, G; Liu, R; Longo, M J; Ludlam, G; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Margiotta-Neri, A; Marin, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Martellotti, G; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Matteuzzi, P; Michael, D; Miller, L; Monacelli, P; Monteno, M; Mufson, S L; Musser, J; Nutter, S L; Okada, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Parlati, S; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Petrakis, J; Petrera, S; Pignatano, N D; Pistilli, P; Predieri, F; Ramello, L; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Rosa, G; Satriano, C; Satta, L; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Serra-Lugaresi, P; Severi, M; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steele, J V; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, Lawrence R; Surdo, A; Tarlé, G; Togo, V; Valente, V; Verdone, G R; Walter, C W; Webb, R; Worstell, W

    1993-01-01

    Summary form only given. An all-sky survey for cosmic point sources yielding a DC excess of cosmic ray muons above the expected background has been performed using the single plus double muon events collected between June 1991 and 20 September 2000 by the streamer tube system of MACRO. A total of 45.192 million selected muons, single plus double, were collected in 60775.5 h of effective livetime. No statistically significant DC excess has been found. For selected sources we made a search for DC excesses, and upper flux limits were established; they are at the level of 10/sup -13/cm/sup -2/S/sup -1/. Periodicity (AC) analyses have been performed for Cygnus X-3 and Hercules X-1; the AC limits are at the level of 10/sup -13/cm/sup -2/S/sup -1/. Searches for bursts were made for CygX-3, Mrk 421, Mrk 501 and the Crab. (1 refs).

  10. The US Muon Accelerator Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torun, Y.; /IIT, Chicago; Kirk, H.; /Brookhaven; Bross, A.; Geer, Steve; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab; Zisman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-01

    An accelerator complex that can produce ultra-intense beams of muons presents many opportunities to explore new physics. A facility of this type is unique in that, in a relatively straightforward way, it can present a physics program that can be staged and thus move forward incrementally, addressing exciting new physics at each step. At the request of the US Department of Energy's Office of High Energy Physics, the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC) and the Fermilab Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) have recently submitted a proposal to create a Muon Accelerator Program that will have, as a primary goal, to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for an energy-frontier Muon Collider by the end of a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a description of a Muon Collider facility and gives an overview of the proposal.

  11. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G.Gomez.

    Since June of 2009, the muon alignment group has focused on providing new alignment constants and on finalizing the hardware alignment reconstruction. Alignment constants for DTs and CSCs were provided for CRAFT09 data reprocessing. For DT chambers, the track-based alignment was repeated using CRAFT09 cosmic ray muons and validated using segment extrapolation and split cosmic tools. One difference with respect to the previous alignment is that only five degrees of freedom were aligned, leaving the rotation around the local x-axis to be better determined by the hardware system. Similarly, DT chambers poorly aligned by tracks (due to limited statistics) were aligned by a combination of photogrammetry and hardware-based alignment. For the CSC chambers, the hardware system provided alignment in global z and rotations about local x. Entire muon endcap rings were further corrected in the transverse plane (global x and y) by the track-based alignment. Single chamber track-based alignment suffers from poor statistic...

  12. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G.Gomez

    2010-01-01

    The main developments in muon alignment since March 2010 have been the production, approval and deployment of alignment constants for the ICHEP data reprocessing. In the barrel, a new geometry, combining information from both hardware and track-based alignment systems, has been developed for the first time. The hardware alignment provides an initial DT geometry, which is then anchored as a rigid solid, using the link alignment system, to a reference frame common to the tracker. The “GlobalPositionRecords” for both the Tracker and Muon systems are being used for the first time, and the initial tracker-muon relative positioning, based on the link alignment, yields good results within the photogrammetry uncertainties of the Tracker and alignment ring positions. For the first time, the optical and track-based alignments show good agreement between them; the optical alignment being refined by the track-based alignment. The resulting geometry is the most complete to date, aligning all 250 DTs, ...

  13. An improved measurement of muon antineutrino disappearance in MINOS

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, P; Backhouse, C; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Danko, I Z; de Jong, J K; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Huang, X; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mathis, M; Mayer, N; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mitchell, J; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; Oliver, W P; Orchanian, M; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Ratchford, J; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Strait, M; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tinti, G; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Walding, J J; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2012-01-01

    We report an improved measurement of muon anti-neutrino disappearance over a distance of 735km using the MINOS detectors and the Fermilab Main Injector neutrino beam in a muon anti-neutrino enhanced configuration. From a total exposure of 2.95e20 protons on target, of which 42% have not been previously analyzed, we make the most precise measurement of the anti-neutrino "atmospheric" delta-m squared = 2.62 +0.31/-0.28 (stat.) +/- 0.09 (syst.) and constrain the anti-neutrino atmospheric mixing angle >0.75 (90%CL). These values are in agreement with those measured for muon neutrinos, removing the tension reported previously.

  14. The ATLAS Trigger Muon "Vertical Slice"

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; Biglietti, M; Carlino, G; Cataldi, G; Conventi, F; Del Prete, T; Di Mattia, A; Falciano, S; Gorini, S; Kanaya, N; Kohno, T; Krasznahorkay, A; Lagouri, T; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Marzano, F; Nagano, K; Nisati, A; Panikashvili, N; Pasqualucci, E; Primavera, M; Scannicchio, D A; Spagnolo, S; Tarem, S; Tarem, Z; Tokushuku, K; Usai, G; Ventura, A; Vercesi, V; Yamazaki, Y; 10th Pisa Meeting on Advanced Detectors : Frontier Detectors For Frontier Physics

    2007-01-01

    The muon trigger system is a fundamental component of the ATLAS detector at the LHC collider. In this paper we describe the ATLAS multi-level trigger selecting events with muons: the Muon Trigger Slice.

  15. Pool Boiling Behavior and Critical Heat Flux on Zircaloy and SiC Claddings in Deionized Water under Atmospheric Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently several researches on SiC material as an alternative of the nuclear fuel cladding have been conducted. From a fundamental point of view, Snead et al. did an extensive investigation on SiC properties. Their work revealed non-irradiated and irradiated material properties. In addition to the existing literature data, they even added new data, particularly in the high-temperature irradiation regime. Moreover, Carpenter has studied performance of a SiC fuel cladding in his Ph. D. thesis. With extensive in-core tests at MITR-II, his works showed the effects of cladding design for monolith and triplex types. He concluded that manufacturing techniques of the SiC cladding affected corrosion rates and swelling behavior after irradiation. For more practical nuclear applications, oxidation rates of a SiC cladding was investigated with a comparison assessment of those of a zircaloy-4 cladding. Lee et al. adopted an oxidation process under the conditions of the Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) in LWRs. They found that SiC oxidation rates were greatly lower than those of zircaloy-4. In order to demonstrate the superiority of SiC cladding in terms of thermal performance, in this study pool boiling heat transfer experiments were carried out in a pool of saturated deionized water (DI water) at atmospheric pressure. For a comparison study, zircaloy-4 claddings, which are current fuel claddings in LWRs, were used as a reference case. Not only measuring nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficient (NBHTC) and critical heat flux (CHF) but also observing boiling behavior of both the claddings were conducted. In this study, pool boiling heat transfer experiments with zircaloy and SiC heaters were carried out. Comparison of the CHF and nucleate boiling heat transfer of the zircaloy-4 and SiC cladding were compared. Specifically, sophisticated high-speed photographs of nucleate boiling, the CHF, and film boiling phenomena were captured. · Structural integrity of the SiC heaters was

  16. Nitrous oxide in the Changjiang (Yangtze River Estuary and its adjacent marine area: Riverine input, sediment release and atmospheric fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.-L. Zhang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved nitrous oxide (N2O was measured in the waters of the Changjiang (Yangtze River Estuary and its adjacent marine area during five surveys covering the period of 2002–2006. Dissolved N2O concentrations ranged from 6.04 to 21.3 nM, and indicate great temporal and spatial variations. Distribution of N2O in the Changjiang Estuary was influenced by multiple factors and the key factor varied between cruises. Dissolved riverine N2O was observed monthly at station Xuliujing of the Changjiang, and ranged from 12.4 to 33.3 nM with an average of 19.4 ± 7.3 nM. N2O concentrations in the river waters showed obvious seasonal variations with higher values occurring in both summer and winter. Annual input of N2O from the Changjiang to the estuary was estimated to be 15.0 × 106 mol/yr. N2O emission rates from the sediments of the Changjiang Estuary in spring ranged from −1.88 to 2.02 μmol m−2 d−1, which suggests that sediment can act as either a source or a sink of N2O in the Changjiang Estuary. Average annual sea-to-air N2O fluxes from the studied area were estimated to be 7.7 ± 5.5, 15.1 ± 10.8 and 17.0 ± 12.6 μmol m−2d−1 using LM86, W92 and RC01 relationships, respectively. Hence the Changjiang Estuary and its adjacent marine area are a net source of atmospheric N2O.

  17. Net soil-atmosphere fluxes mask patterns in gross production and consumption of nitrous oxide and methane in a managed ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wendy H.; Silver, Whendee L.

    2016-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) are potent greenhouse gases that are both produced and consumed in soil. Production and consumption of these gases are driven by different processes, making it difficult to infer their controls when measuring only net fluxes. We used the trace gas pool dilution technique to simultaneously measure gross fluxes of N2O and CH4 throughout the growing season in a cornfield in northern California, USA. Net N2O fluxes ranged 0-4.5 mg N m-2 d-1 with the N2O yield averaging 0.68 ± 0.02. Gross N2O production was best predicted by net nitrogen (N) mineralization, soil moisture, and soil temperature (R2 = 0.60, n = 39, poxidation exhibited a strong positive relationship with gross CH4 production rates (R2 = 0.67, n = 37, p< 0.001), which reached as high as 5.4 mg C m-2 d-1. Our study is the first to demonstrate the simultaneous in situ measurement of gross N2O and CH4 fluxes, and results highlight that net soil-atmosphere fluxes can mask significant gross production and consumption of these trace gases.

  18. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.

    2016-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240 MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than ~1% contamination. To make the final muon sel...

  19. Annual input fluxes and source identification of trace elements in atmospheric deposition in Shanxi Basin: the largest coal base in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Cong; Yang, Zhongfang; Jiang, Wei; Yu, Tao; Hou, Qingye; Li, Desheng; Wang, Jianwu

    2014-11-01

    Industrialization and urbanization have led to a great deterioration of air quality and provoked some serious environmental concerns. One hundred and five samples of atmospheric deposition were analyzed for their concentrations of 13 trace elements (As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Al, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Mo, Pb, Se, and Zn) in Shanxi Basin, which includes six isolate basins. The input fluxes of the trace elements in atmospheric deposition were observed and evaluated. Geostatistical analysis (EF, PCA, and CA ) were conducted to determine the spatial distribution, possible sources, and enrichment degrees of trace elements in atmospheric deposition. Fe/Al and K/Al also contribute to identify the sources of atmospheric deposition. The distribution of trace elements in atmospheric deposition was proved to be geographically restricted. The results show that As, Cd, Pb, Zn, and Se mainly come from coal combustion. Fe, Cu, Mn, Hg, and Co originate mainly from interactions between local polluted soils and blowing dust from other places, while the main source of Al, Cr, and Mo are the soil parent materials without pollution. This work provides baseline information to develop policies to control and reduce trace elements, especially toxic elements, from atmospheric deposition. Some exploratory analytical methods applied in this work are also worth considering in similar researches.

  20. Gas-particle interactions above a Dutch heathland: II. Concentrations and surface exchange fluxes of atmospheric particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nemitz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Size-dependent particle number fluxes measured by eddy-covariance (EC and continuous fluxes of ammonium (NH4+ measured with the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM are reported for a Dutch heathland. Daytime deposition velocities (Vd by EC with peak values of 5 to 10 mm s-1 increased with particle diameter (dp over the range 0.1–0.5 µm, and are faster than predicted by current models. With a mean Vd of 2.0 mm s-1 (daytime: 2.7; night-time 0.8 mm s-1 NH4+ fluxes by AGM are overall in agreement with former measurements and NH4+-N dry deposition amounts to 20% of the dry input of NH3-N over the measurement period. These surface exchange fluxes are analyzed together with simultaneous gas-phase flux measurements for indications of gas-particle interactions. On warm afternoons the apparent fluxes of acids and aerosol above the heathland showed several coinciding anomalies, all of which are consistent with NH4+ evaporation during deposition: (i canopy resistances for HNO3 and HCl of up to 100 s m-1, (ii simultaneous particle emission of small particles (DpDp>0.18 µm, (iii NH4+ deposition faster than derived from size-distributions and size-segregated EC particle fluxes. These observations coincide with the observations of (i surface concentration products of NH3 and HNO3 well below the thermodynamic equilibrium value and (ii Damköhler numbers that indicate chemical conversion to be sufficiently fast to modify exchange fluxes. The measurements imply a removal rate of volatile NH4+ of 3−30×10-6 s-1 averaged over the 1 km boundary-layer, while NH3 deposition is underestimated by typically 20 ng m-2 s-1 (28% and flux reversal may occur.

  1. Physical applications of muon catalysis: Muon capture in hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filchenkov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Results of theoretical and experimental research on capture of negative muons in hydrogen are reported with an emphasis on the accompanying phenomenon of muon catalysis in hydrogen and subtleties of the experimental method. A conclusion is drawn that precise determination of the capture rate is important for refining the standard model.

  2. Optimising a muon spectrometer for measurements at the ISIS pulsed muon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giblin, S.R. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Cottrell, S.P., E-mail: stephen.cottrell@stfc.ac.uk [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); King, P.J.C.; Tomlinson, S.; Jago, S.J.S.; Randall, L.J.; Roberts, M.J.; Norris, J.; Howarth, S.; Mutamba, Q.B.; Rhodes, N.J.; Akeroyd, F.A. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    This work describes the development of a state-of-the-art muon spectrometer for the ISIS pulsed muon source. Conceived as a major upgrade of the highly successful EMU instrument, emphasis has been placed on making effective use of the enhanced flux now available at the ISIS source. This has been achieved both through the development of a highly segmented detector array and enhanced data acquisition electronics. The pulsed nature of the ISIS beam is particularly suited to the development of novel experiments involving external stimuli, and therefore the ability to sequence external equipment has been added to the acquisition system. Finally, the opportunity has also been taken to improve both the magnetic field and temperature range provided by the spectrometer, to better equip the instrument for running the future ISIS user programme.

  3. Study of the ANTARES detector sensitivity to a diffuse high-energy cosmic neutrino flux; Etude de la sensibilite du detecteur ANTARES a un flux diffus de neutrinos cosmiques de haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romeyer, A

    2003-04-01

    The ANTARES collaboration aims to built an underwater neutrino telescope, 2 400 m deep, 40 km from Toulon (France). This detector is constituted by 12 strings, each one comprising 90 photomultipliers. Neutrinos are detected through their charged current interaction in the medium surrounding the detector (water or rock) leading to the production of a muon in the final state. Its Cherenkov light emitted all along its travel is detected by a three dimensional array of photomultipliers. The diffuse neutrino flux is constituted by the addition of the neutrino emission of sources. Only astrophysical ones have been discussed. The different theoretical models predicting such a flux have been listed and added to the simulation possibilities. As the muon energy reconstruction was a crucial parameter in this analysis, a new energy estimator has been developed. It gives a resolution of a factor three on the muon energy above 1 TeV. Discriminant variables have been also developed in order to reject the atmospheric muon background. Including all these developments, the ANTARES sensitivity is found to be around 8.10{sup -8} GeV-cm{sup -2}-s{sup -1}-sr{sup -1} after one year of data taking for an E{sup -2} spectrum and a 10 string detector. (author)

  4. Electron-Muon Ranger: performance in the MICE Muon Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Chignoli, F.; Mazza, R.; Palladino, V.; de Bari, A.; Cecchet, G.; Capponi, M.; Iaciofano, A.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tortora, L.; Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Ishimoto, S.; Filthaut, F.; Hansen, O.M.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Bene, P.; Blondel, A.; Cadoux, F.; Debieux, S.; Drielsma, F.; Graulich, J.S.; Husi, C.; Karadzhov, Y.; Masciocchi, F.; Nicola, L.; Messomo, E.Noah; Rothenfusser, K.; Sandstrom, R.; Wisting, H.; Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Gallagher, A.; Grant, A.; Griffiths, S.; Hartnett, T.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Oates, A.; Owens, P.; Stokes, G.; Warburton, P.; White, C.; Adams, D.; Barclay, P.; Bayliss, V.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Lintern, A.; Macwaters, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Stanley, T.; Tarrant, J.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A.; Bayes, R.; Nugent, J.C.; Soler, F.J.P.; Cooke, P.; Gamet, R.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Colling, D.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Hunt, C.; Lagrange, J-B.; Long, K.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Pasternak, J.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Uchida, M.A.; Blackmore, V.J.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.A.; Tunnell, C.D.; Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Langlands, J.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.J.; Dick, A.; Ronald, K.; Speirs, D.; Whyte, C.G.; Young, A.; Boyd, S.; Franchini, P.; Greis, J.; Pidcott, C.; Taylor, I.; Gardener, R.; Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Bross, A.D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Hanlet, P.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Rajaram, D.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y.; Blot, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Bravar, U.; Onel, Y.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Luo, T.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J.; Cline, D.; Yang, X.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. The EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100-280 MeV/$c$.

  5. Land-atmosphere fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide at Siberian polygonal tundra - new data from 2009 in comparison to data from 2003/04 and 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Peter; Wille, Christian; Sachs, Torsten; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria; Kutzbach, Lars

    2010-05-01

    The fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) between wet arctic polygonal tundra and the atmosphere were investigated by the eddy covariance method and empirical modeling. The study site is situated in the Lena River Delta in Northern Siberia (72° 22' N, 126° 30' E) and is characterized by a polar and distinctly continental climate, very cold and ice-rich permafrost, and its position at the interface between the Eurasian continent and the Arctic Ocean. The soils at the site are characterized by high organic matter content, low nutrient availability and pronounced water logging. The vegetation is dominated by sedges and mosses. Flux measurements were performed during one 'synthetic' growing season consisting of the periods July - October 2003 and May - July 2004, one full growing season in 2006 (June - September), and during July - August in 2009. The main carbon exchange processes - gross photosynthesis, ecosystem respiration, and CH4 emissions - were generally found to be of low intensity. Over the 2004/2003 growing season (June - September), these gas fluxes accumulated to -0.43 kg m-2, +0.33 kg m-2, and +2 g m-2, respectively. CH4 emissions from June - September 2006 were 1.96 g m-2 with highest emissions in July (+0.57 g m-2) and August (+0.64 g m-2). Day-to-day variations of photosynthesis were mainly controlled by radiation and hence by the synoptic weather conditions. Variations of ecosystem respiration were best explained by an exponential function of surface temperature, which indicates that plant respiration plays a major role within the tundra carbon balance. The factors controlling CH4 emissions were found to be soil temperature and near-surface atmospheric turbulence. The influence of atmospheric turbulence was attributed to the high coverage of open water surfaces in the tundra. For the 2003- 2004 period, winter fluxes were modeled based on functional relationships found in the measured data. On an annual basis, CH4 emissions accounted for

  6. Ten years of CO2, CH4, CO and N2O fluxes over Western Europe inferred from atmospheric measurements at Mace Head, Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Jennings

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We estimated CO2, CH4, CO and N2O emission fluxes over the British Isles and Western Europe using atmospheric radon observations and concentrations recorded at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station between 1996 and 2005. We classified hourly concentration data into either long-range European or regional sources from Ireland and UK, by using local wind speed data in conjunction with 222Rn and 212Pb threshold criteria. This leads to the selection of about 7% of the total data for both sectors. We then used continuous 222Rn measurements and assumptions on the surface emissions of 222Rn to deduce the unknown fluxes of CO2, CH4, CO and N2O. Our results have been compared to the UNFCCC, EMEP and EDGAR statistical inventories and to inversion results for CH4. For Western Europe, we found yearly mean fluxes of 4.1±1.5 106 kg CO2 km−2 yr−1 , 11.9±2.0 103 kg CH4 km−2 yr−1, 12.8±4.2 103 kg CO km−2 yr−1 and 520.2±129.2 kg N2O km−2 yr−1, respectively, for CO2, CH4, CO and N2O over the period 1996–2005. The method based upon 222Rn to infer emissions has many sources of systematic errors, in particular its poorly known and variable footprint, uncertainties in 222Rn soil fluxes and in atmospheric mixing of air masses with background air. However, these biases are likely to remain constant in the long-term, which makes the method quite efficient to detect trends in fluxes. Over the last ten years period, the decrease of the anthropogenic CH4, CO and N2O emissions in Europe estimated by inventories (respectively −30%, −35% and −23% is confirmed by the Mace Head data within 2%. Therefore, the 222Rn method provides an independent way of verification of changes in national emissions derived from inventories. Using European-wide estimates of the CO/CO2 emission ratio, we also found that it is possible to separate the fossil fuel CO2 emissions contribution from the one of total CO2 fluxes. The fossil fuel CO2 emissions and their trends

  7. The CDF forward muon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general properties of the toroids, drift chambers and trigger counters in the CDF forward muon (FMU) system are discussed. The operation of the PSL time-to-digital converter and the UW HOPU (Half Octant Pattern Unit) module is also described. The forward muon level 1 trigger is presented. (orig.)

  8. High luminosity muon collider design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.; Gallardo, J.

    1996-10-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  9. Muon collider design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of muon colliders was introduced by Skrinsky et al., Neuffer, and others. More recently, several workshops and collaboration meetings have greatly increased the level of discussion. In this paper we present scenarios for 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV colliders based on an optimally designed proton source, and for a lower luminosity 0.5 TeV demonstration based on an upgraded version of the AGS. It is assumed that a demonstration version based on upgrades of the FERMILAB machines would also be possible. 53 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs

  10. Muon collider design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sessler, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Skrinsky, A. [AN SSSR, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    1996-03-01

    The possibility of muon colliders was introduced by Skrinsky et al., Neuffer, and others. More recently, several workshops and collaboration meetings have greatly increased the level of discussion. In this paper we present scenarios for 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV colliders based on an optimally designed proton source, and for a lower luminosity 0.5 TeV demonstration based on an upgraded version of the AGS. It is assumed that a demonstration version based on upgrades of the FERMILAB machines would also be possible. 53 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. An improved method for measuring muon energy using the truncated mean of dE/dx

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eisch, J; Elliott, C; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Klepser, S; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McDermott, A; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nießen, P; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, J; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Roucelle, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönherr, L; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shulman, L; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sulanke, K-H; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of muon energy is critical for many analyses in large Cherenkov detectors, particularly those that involve separating extraterrestrial neutrinos from the atmospheric neutrino background. Muon energy has traditionally been determined by measuring the specific energy loss (dE/dx) along the muon's path and relating the dE/dx to the muon energy. Because high-energy muons (E_mu > 1 TeV) lose energy randomly, the spread in dE/dx values is quite large, leading to a typical energy resolution of 0.29 in log10(E_mu) for a muon observed over a 1 km path length in the IceCube detector. In this paper, we present an improved method that uses a truncated mean and other techniques to determine the muon energy. The muon track is divided into separate segments with individual dE/dx values. The elimination of segments with the highest dE/dx results in an overall dE/dx that is more closely correlated to the muon energy. This method results in an energy resolution of 0.22 in log10(E_mu), which gives a 26% improvem...

  12. Composition from high pT muons in IceCube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soldin Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmic rays with energies up to 1011 GeV enter the atmosphere and produce showers of secondary particles. Inside these showers muons with high transverse momentum (pT ≳ 2 GeV are produced from the decay of heavy hadrons, or from high pT pions and kaons very early in the shower development. These isolated muons can have large transverse separations from the shower core up to several hundred meters, together with the muon bundle forming a double or triple track signature in IceCube. The separation from the core is a measure of the transverse momentum of the muon's parent particle. Assuming the validity of perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD the muon lateral distribution depends on the composition of the incident nuclei, thus the composition of high energy cosmic rays can be determined from muon separation measurements. Vice versa these muons can help to understand uncertainties due to phenomenological models as well as test pQCD predictions of high energy interactions involving heavy nuclei. After introducing the physics scenario of high pT muons in kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes we will review results from IceCube in its 59-string configuration as a starting point and discuss recent studies on composition using laterally separated muons in the final detector configuration.

  13. Air-sea fluxes of CO2 and CH4 from the Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory on the south-west coast of the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingxi; Bell, Thomas G.; Hopkins, Frances E.; Kitidis, Vassilis; Cazenave, Pierre W.; Nightingale, Philip D.; Yelland, Margaret J.; Pascal, Robin W.; Prytherch, John; Brooks, Ian M.; Smyth, Timothy J.

    2016-05-01

    We present air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), momentum, and sensible heat measured by the eddy covariance method from the recently established Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory (PPAO) on the south-west coast of the United Kingdom. Measurements from the south-westerly direction (open water sector) were made at three different sampling heights (approximately 15, 18, and 27 m above mean sea level, a.m.s.l.), each from a different period during 2014-2015. At sampling heights ≥ 18 m a.m.s.l., measured fluxes of momentum and sensible heat demonstrate reasonable ( ≤ ±20 % in the mean) agreement with transfer rates over the open ocean. This confirms the suitability of PPAO for air-sea exchange measurements in shelf regions. Covariance air-sea CO2 fluxes demonstrate high temporal variability. Air-to-sea transport of CO2 declined from spring to summer in both years, coinciding with the breakdown of the spring phytoplankton bloom. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first successful eddy covariance measurements of CH4 emissions from a marine environment. Higher sea-to-air CH4 fluxes were observed during rising tides (20 ± 3; 38 ± 3; 29 ± 6 µmole m-2 d-1 at 15, 18, 27 m a.m.s.l.) than during falling tides (14 ± 2; 22 ± 2; 21 ± 5 µmole m-2 d-1), consistent with an elevated CH4 source from an estuarine outflow driven by local tidal circulation. These fluxes are a few times higher than the predicted CH4 emissions over the open ocean and are significantly lower than estimates from other aquatic CH4 hotspots (e.g. polar regions, freshwater). Finally, we found the detection limit of the air-sea CH4 flux by eddy covariance to be 20 µmole m-2 d-1 over hourly timescales (4 µmole m-2 d-1 over 24 h).

  14. Investigation of the zenith angle dependence of cosmic-ray muons at sea level

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Bektasoglu; Halil Arslan

    2013-05-01

    Angular distribution of cosmic-ray muons at sea level has been investigated using the Geant4 simulation package. The model used in the simulations was tested by comparing the simulation results with the measurements made using the Berkeley Lab cosmic ray detector. Primary particles’ energy and fluxes were obtained from the experimental measurements. Simulations were run at each zenith angle starting from = 0° up to = 70° with 5° increment. The angular distribution of muons at sea level has been estimated to be in the form $I() = I(0^{°}) \\cos^{n}()$, where (0°) is the muon intensity at 0° and is a function of the muon momentum. The exponent = 1.95 ± 0.08 for muons with energies above 1 GeV is in good agreement, within error, with the values reported in the literature.

  15. Comparison of GCM subgrid fluxes calculated using BATS and SiB schemes with a coupled land-atmosphere high-resolution model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jinmei; Arritt, R.W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The importance of land-atmosphere interactions and biosphere in climate change studies has long been recognized, and several land-atmosphere interaction schemes have been developed. Among these, the Simple Biosphere scheme (SiB) of Sellers et al. and the Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) of Dickinson et al. are two of the most widely known. The effects of GCM subgrid-scale inhomogeneities of surface properties in general circulation models also has received increasing attention in recent years. However, due to the complexity of land surface processes and the difficulty to prescribe the large number of parameters that determine atmospheric and soil interactions with vegetation, many previous studies and results seem to be contradictory. A GCM grid element typically represents an area of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} km{sup 2}. Within such an area, there exist variations of soil type, soil wetness, vegetation type, vegetation density and topography, as well as urban areas and water bodies. In this paper, we incorporate both BATS and SiB2 land surface process schemes into a nonhydrostatic, compressible version of AMBLE model (Atmospheric Model -- Boundary-Layer Emphasis), and compare the surface heat fluxes and mesoscale circulations calculated using the two schemes. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  16. A semianalytical algorithm for quantitatively estimating sediment and atmospheric deposition flux from MODIS-derived sea ice albedo in the Bohai Sea, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhantang; Hu, Shuibo; Wang, Guifen; Zhao, Jun; Yang, Yuezhong; Cao, Wenxi; Lu, Peng

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative estimates of particulate matter [PM) concentration in sea ice using remote sensing data is helpful for studies of sediment transport and atmospheric dust deposition flux. In this study, the difference between the measured dirty and estimated clean albedo of sea ice was calculated and a relationship between the albedo difference and PM concentration was found using field and laboratory measurements. A semianalytical algorithm for estimating PM concentration in sea ice was established. The algorithm was then applied to MODIS data over the Bohai Sea, China. Comparisons between MODIS derived and in situ measured PM concentration showed good agreement, with a mean absolute percentage difference of 31.2%. From 2005 to 2010, the MODIS-derived annual average PM concentration was approximately 0.025 g/L at the beginning of January. After a month of atmospheric dust deposition, it increased to 0.038 g/L. Atmospheric dust deposition flux was estimated to be 2.50 t/km2/month, similar to 2.20 t/km2/month reported in a previous study. The result was compared with on-site measurements at a nearby ground station. The ground station was close to industrial and residential areas, where larger dust depositions occurred than in the sea, but although there were discrepancies between the absolute magnitudes of the two data sets, they demonstrated similar trends.

  17. Effects of upward-going cosmic muons on density radiography of volcanoes

    CERN Document Server

    Jourde, K; Marteau, J; D'ars, J De Bremond; Gardien, S; Girerd, C; Ianigro, J -C; Carbone, D

    2013-01-01

    Muon tomography aims at deriving the density structure of geological bodies from their screening attenuation produced on the natural cosmic muons flux. Because of their open-sky exposure, muons telescopes are subject to noise fluxes with large intensities relative to the tiny flux of interest. A recognized source of noise flux comes from fake tracks caused by particles that fortuitously trigger the telescope detectors at the same time. Such a flux may be reduced by using multiple-detector telescopes so that fortuitous events become very unlikely. In the present study, we report on a different type of noise flux caused by upward-going muons crossing the detectors from the rear side. We describe field experiments on La Soufri\\'ere of Guadeloupe and Mount Etna, and give details on the high-resolution clocking system and the statistical procedure necessary to detect upward-going muons. We analyse several data sets acquired either in calibration or in volcano tomography situation. All data sets are shown clearly b...

  18. Can muon-induced backgrounds explain the DAMA data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Joel; Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2016-05-01

    We present an accurate simulation of the muon-induced background in the DAMA/LIBRA experiment. Muon sampling underground has been performed using the MUSIC/MUSUN codes and subsequent interactions in the rock around the DAMA/LIBRA detector cavern and the experimental setup including shielding, have been simulated with GEANT4.9.6. In total we simulate the equivalent of 20 years of muon data. We have calculated the total muon-induced neutron flux in the DAMA/LIBRA detector cavern as Φμ n = 1.0 × 10-9 cm-2s-1, which is consistent with other simulations. After selecting events which satisfy the DAMA/LIBRA signal criteria, our simulation predicts 3.49 × 10-5 cpd/kg/keV which accounts for less than 0.3% of the DAMA/LIBRA modulation amplitude. We conclude from our work that muon-induced backgrounds are unable to contribute to the observed signal modulation.

  19. The Estimation Surface Latent Heat Flux Over the Ocean and its Relationship to Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Vandemark, Doug; Evans, Keith; Miller, David O.

    1999-01-01

    A new technique combining active and passive remote sensing instruments for the estimation of surface latent heat flux over the ocean is presented. This synergistic method utilizes aerosol lidar backscatter data, multi-