WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric line observations

  1. Potential of Radiotelescopes for Atmospheric Line Observations: I. Observation Principles and Transmission Curves for Selected Sites

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Nicola; Baron, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Existing and planned radiotelescopes working in the millimetre (mm) and sub-millimetre wavelengths range provide the possibility to be used for atmospheric line observations. To scrutinize this potential, we outline the differences and similarities in technical equipment and observing techniques between ground-based aeronomy mm-wave radiometers and radiotelescopes. Comprehensive tables summarizing the technical characteristics of existing and future (sub)-mm radiotelescopes are given. The advantages and disadvantages using radiotelescopes for atmospheric line observations are discussed. In view of the importance of exploring the sub-mm and far-infrared wavelengths range for astronomical observations and atmospheric sciences, we present model calculations of the atmospheric transmission for selected telescope sites (DOME-C/Antarctica, ALMA/Chajnantor, JCMT and CSO on Mauna Kea/Hawaii, KOSMA/Swiss Alpes) for frequencies between 0 and 2000 GHz (0 to 150 micron) and typical atmospheric conditions using the forwar...

  2. Hot Subdwarf Stars Observed in LAMOST DR1 - Atmospheric parameters from single-lined spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Yangping; Liu, Chao; Deng, Licai; Han, Zhanwen

    2016-01-01

    We present a catalog of 166 spectroscopically identified hot subdwarf stars from LAMOST DR1, 44 of which show the characteristics of cool companions in their optical spectra. Atmospheric parameters of 122 non-composite spectra subdwarf stars were measured by fitting the profiles of hydrogen (H) and helium (He) lines with synthetic spectra from non-LTE model atmospheres. Most of the sdB stars scatter near the Extreme Horizontal Branch in the $T_{\\rm eff}-\\log{g}$ diagram and two well defined groups can be outlined. A clustering of He-enriched sdO stars appears near $T_{\\rm eff}=45\\,000$ K and $\\log(g) = 5.8$. The sdB population separates into several nearly parallel sequences in the $T_{\\rm eff}-{\\rm He}$ abundance diagram with clumps corresponding to those in the $T_{\\rm eff}-\\log{g}$ diagram. Over $38\\,000$ K (sdO) stars show abundance extremes, they are either He-rich or He-deficient and we observe only a few stars in the $ -1 < \\log(y) < 0$ abundance range. With increasing temperature these extremes ...

  3. Instrumental and atmospheric background lines observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.; Strickman, M. S.; Letaw, J. R.; Chupp, E. L.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary identifications of instrumental and atmospheric background lines detected by the gamma-ray spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission satellite (SMM) are presented. The long-term and stable operation of this experiment has provided data of high quality for use in this analysis. Methods are described for identifying radioactive isotopes which use their different decay times. Temporal evolution of the features are revealed by spectral comparisons, subtractions, and fits. An understanding of these temporal variations has enabled the data to be used for detecting celestial gamma-ray sources.

  4. Earthshine observations at high spectral resolution: Exploring and detecting metal lines in the Earth's upper atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    González-Merino, B; Motalebi, F; Montañés-Rodríguez, P; Kissler-Patig, M

    2013-01-01

    Observations of the Earth as a planet using the earthshine technique (i.e. looking at the light reflected from the darkside of the Moon), have been used for climate and astrobiology studies. They provide information about the planetary albedo, a fundamental parameter of the Earth's energy balance. Here we present for the first time, observations of the earthshine taken at high spectral resolution. The high spectral resolution was chosen in order to investigate the possibility of detecting metallic layers in the Earth's atmosphere of geological or meteoritic origin. The SARG echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo in La Palma was used to acquire the earthshine data. Observations were carried out on several nights in February 2011, with the spectral resolution set at 29,000, covering a spectral range from the near-ultraviolet (360 nm) to near-infrared (1011.9 nm). While we find evidence for the detection of a Na layer in the earthshine, other atomic species are not detected, perhaps due to the ...

  5. Infrared signature of transient luminous events in the middle atmosphere simulated for a limb line of sight observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payan, Sebastien; Romand, Frederic; Laurence, Croizé

    2017-04-01

    Transient Luminous Events (TLE) are electrical and optical events which occurs above thunderstorms. Their occurrence is closely linked with the lightning activity below thunderstorms. TLEs are observed from the base of the stratosphere to the thermosphere (15 - 110 km). They are a very brief phenomenon which lasts from 1 to 300 milliseconds. At a worldwide scale, some to some tenths of TLEs occurs each minute. The energy deposition, about some tenths of megajoules, is able to ionize, dissociate and excite the molecules of the atmosphere. Then, a phase of recombination and relaxation starts. The interest of their study is multiple. In atmospheric chemistry we know that lightening are important sources of NOx in the troposphere, which indirectly influence the concentrations of O3 and OH. We wonder what could be the chemical effects of TLEs in the stratosphere and mesosphere. Experimentally, the HALESIS (High altitude Luminous Events Studied by Infrared Spectro-imagery) project aims to load a spectro-imager in a stratospheric balloon in order to measure atmospheric radiances in the moments following the electrical discharge of a TLE and then, to estimate the concentration of some components of interest (CO2, NO, O3, OH…) with spectrum inversions. In a Defense point of view, some airborne detection or guiding devices are equipped with infrared sensors, which may be disturbed by the TLEs infrared signal. The objective is to provide a tool which will describe the TLE phenomenon from the electric discharge to the detection threw an infrared sensor. To achieve this work we first compute the Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium population of a background atmosphere with the code SAMM2. The starting atmosphere comes from the Whole Atmosphere community Climate Model (WACCM). Then, we apply a TLE perturbation to a region of the background atmosphere. To do so we compute the plasma and atmospheric chemistry consecutive to the discharge of a TLE with the codes BOLSIG+ and

  6. Line Transport in Turbulent Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoghossian, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    The spectral line transfer in turbulent atmospheres with a spatially correlated velocity field is examined. Both the finite and semi-infinite media are treated. In finding the observed intensities we first deal with the problem for determining the mean intensity of radiation emerging from the medium for a fixed value of turbulent velocity at its boundary. A new approach proposed for solving this problem is based on the invariant imbedding technique which yields the solution of the proper problems for a family of media of different optical thicknesses and allows tackling different kinds of inhomogeneous problems. The dependence of the line profile, integral intensity, and the line width on the mean correlation length and the average value of the hydrodynamic velocity is studied. It is shown that the transition from a micro-turbulent regime to a macro-turbulence occurs within a comparatively narrow range of variation in the correlation length . Ambartsumian's principle of invariance is used to solve the problem of diffuse reflection of the line radiation from a one-dimensional semi-infinite turbulent atmosphere. In addition to the observed spectral line profile, statistical averages describing the diffusion process in the atmosphere (mean number of scattering events, average time spent by a diffusing photon in the medium) are determined. The dependence of these quantities on the average hydrodynamic velocity and correlation coefficient is studied.

  7. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics & circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly-imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  8. Recent decreases in observed atmospheric concentrations of SO 2 in the Netherlands in line with emission reductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velders, Guus J. M.; Snijder, André; Hoogerbrugge, Ronald

    2011-10-01

    Concentrations of sulphur dioxide (SO 2) have been decreasing in the Netherlands since the beginning of the 1980s, as a result of national and international emission control measures. Since 2007, concentrations observed at the Rotterdam port and industrial areas have shown a large decrease that is in line with recent emission control measures. The average annual SO 2 concentration in 2010 was about 50% below 2000-2006 levels. This drop in concentration level corresponds with recent decreases in emissions of SO 2 from Dutch refineries and international sea shipping, on top of the gradual decreases in emissions from sources outside the Netherlands. The reduction in the emissions from refineries was initiated by a ceiling on the total amount of emissions from this sector, effective since 2010. Emission reductions from sea shipping result from two types of regulations to reduce the sulphur content in marine fuel, by 2010; regulation by the International Maritime Organization for sea ships on the North Sea, and by the EU directive for ships at berth in ports.

  9. Modeling the temporal and spatial variations of the vertical structure of Jupiter's atmosphere using observations of the 3-0 hydrogen quadrupole lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, C. C.; Hunten, D. M.; Tomasko, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    An observational program was established in 1983 to monitor the spatial and temporal variations in the Jovian atmosphere over short and long time scales. The program involves tracking several different longitudes as they rotate around the planet from one limb to another. This tracking experiment was done at many different wavelengths including the 3-0 S(1) and S(0) hydrogen quadrupole lines as well as several broad band methane absorptions. The June 1983 hydrogen quadrupole data was reduced and equivalent widths were measured for approximately 25 east-west positions across the planet at 7 different latitudes for both wavelengths. The data for the South Tropical Zone (20 deg. S) was modeled extensively and the effects of the various model parameters on the value of the calculated equivalent widths of both lines was measured as a longitude rotated from the east (or morning) limb to the west (or evening) limb. The value of the equivalent width is also quite sensitive to the height of the NH3 cloud top and to the value used for the single scattering albedo. A combination of these parameters changing on a diurnal time scale could also explain these observations. This gradual increase from one limb to the other appears in the data for both the North and South Equatorial Belts as well as the equatorial region and the North Tropical Zone. Models that used only normal hydrogen and models that used only equilibrium hydrogen were studied.

  10. Stellar model atmospheres with magnetic line blanketing

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O; Shulyak, D

    2004-01-01

    Model atmospheres of A and B stars are computed taking into account magnetic line blanketing. These calculations are based on the new stellar model atmosphere code LLModels which implements direct treatment of the opacities due to the bound-bound transitions and ensures an accurate and detailed description of the line absorption. The anomalous Zeeman effect was calculated for the field strengths between 1 and 40 kG and a field vector perpendicular to the line of sight. The model structure, high-resolution energy distribution, photometric colors, metallic line spectra and the hydrogen Balmer line profiles are computed for magnetic stars with different metallicities and are discussed with respect to those of non-magnetic reference models. The magnetically enhanced line blanketing changes the atmospheric structure and leads to a redistribution of energy in the stellar spectrum. The most noticeable feature in the optical region is the appearance of the 5200 A depression. However, this effect is prominent only in ...

  11. CO fundamental lines - Indicators for inhomogeneous atmospheres in cool stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Guenter; Ayres, Thomas R.

    1990-01-01

    Carbon monoxide fundamental lines near 4.7 microns are employed to probe the thermal structure of the atmospheres of cool stars. A new non-LTE radiation transfer code is used to analyze high-resolution infrared CO line spectra and derive observation-based stellar atmosphere models. The main results are: (1) the CO-based models developed here deviate strongly from previously published models based on UV/visible observations; (2) varying degrees of agreement between the CO empirical models and predictions based on theoretical radiative-equilibrium atmosphere models are found; and (3) the parameter used to quantify this agreement is anticorrelated with the magnitude of chromospheric activity in the observed stars. These results suggest thermally bifurcated upper atmospheres as the standard case for cool stars.

  12. On the Line Formation in Stellar Magnetized Atmospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The line formation process in stellar magnetized atmospheres is studied by observing the wavelength-dependence of Stokes contribution functions.The influence of magnetic field on the escape line photon distribution and line absorption is obtained by comparing with the null magnetic field case.Two models are adopted.One assumes limited distributions of both the line absorption and magnetic field where a hypothetical magneto-sensitive line is formed.The other is a model atmosphere of sunspot umbra in which Mg I 5172.7 forms.It is found that the magnetic field influences the formation region of Stokes I at wavelengths sufficient close to the Zeeman splitting points ±△λH. The formation regions at wavelengths far away from ?the Zeeman splitting points generally show a non-magnetic behaviour.Further, if the line core is split by the Zeeman effect,the line formation core introduced in the previous paper disappears.On the other hand,Stokes Q,U,V at each wavelength within the line form in the same layers where both the line absorption and magnetic field are present in the models accepted for the lines used.When the line absorption and magnetic field ubiquitously exist,the formation regions of the π peaks or valleys of Stokes Q,U and those of σ of Stokes V generally cover the widest depth range. It is pointed out that such a study is instructive in the explanation of solar polarized filtergrams.It can tell us at each observation point where the received line photons of wavelengths within the bandpass come from and where their polarization states are formed or give us the distributions of these photons as well as their polarization intensities.Thus a three-dimensional image can be constructed for a morphologic study of the observed area from serial filtergrams.

  13. High accuracy molecular line lists for exoplanetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, R. J.; Tennyson, J.

    2008-09-01

    Water, carbon monoxide, methane and ammonia are major constituents exoplanetary atmospheres. Measurements of the relative abundances of these species are capable of yielding information about physical conditions, including: temperature, pressure, thermal profile and metallicity. Modern observational techniques and instrumentation mean that in principle, we now have the capability to detect these molecules in the emission and absorption spectra of transiting exoplanets. However, in order to be able to interpret these data, robust atmospheric models and complete and accurate molecular line lists are required. Our team at UCL is a world leader in the computation of molecular spectroscopic line lists. The BT2 water line list [1], which contains over 500 million transitions, was used in the first secure detection of H2O in the atmosphere of a transiting exoplanet [2]. We are currently computing a line list for NH3, which is a considerably more difficult task as the molecule has nine degrees of internal freedom (H2O has six). In this paper, we will discuss the ab initio computation of ro-vibrational molecular spectra and their application in exoplanetary studies. References [1] Barber R. J., Tennyson J., Harris G. J., Tolchenov R., 2006, MNRAS, 368, 1087 [2] Tinetti G. et al., 2007, Nature, 448, 169

  14. Comparing radial velocities of atmospheric lines with radiosonde measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Figueira, P; Chacon, A; Lovis, C; Santos, N C; Curto, G Lo; Sarazin, M; Pepe, F

    2011-01-01

    The precision of radial velocity (RV) measurements depends on the precision attained on the wavelength calibration. One of the available options is using atmospheric lines as a natural, freely available wavelength reference. Figueira et al. (2010) measured the RV of O2 lines using HARPS and showed that the scatter was only of ~10 m/s over a timescale of 6 yr. Using a simple but physically motivated empirical model, they demonstrated a precision of 2 m/s, roughly twice the average photon noise contribution. In this paper we take advantage of a unique opportunity to confirm the sensitivity of the telluric absorption lines RV to different atmospheric and observing conditions: by means of contemporaneous in-situ wind measurements by radiosondes. The RV model fitting yielded similar results to that of Figueira et al. (2010), with lower wind magnitude values and varied wind direction. The probes confirmed the average low wind magnitude and suggested that the average wind direction is a function of time as well. The...

  15. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  16. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  17. MAVEN Observations of Atmospheric Loss at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Shannon; Luhmann, Janet; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Brain, David; LeBlanc, Francis; Modolo, Ronan; Halekas, Jasper S.; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Deighan, Justin; McFadden, James; Espley, Jared R.; Mitchell, David L.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Dong, Yaxue; Dong, Chuanfei; Ma, Yingjuan; Cohen, Ofer; Fränz, Markus; Holmström, Mats; Ramstad, Robin; Hara, Takuya; Lillis, Robert J.

    2016-06-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission has been making observations of the Martian upper atmosphere and its escape to space since November 2014. The subject of atmospheric loss at terrestrial planets is a subject of intense interest not only because of the implications for past and present water reservoirs, but also for its impacts on the habitability of a planet. Atmospheric escape may have been especially effective at Mars, relative to Earth or Venus, due to its smaller size as well as the lack of a global dynamo magnetic field. Not only is the atmosphere less gravitationally bound, but also the lack of global magnetic field allows the impinging solar wind to interact directly with the Martian atmosphere. When the upper atmosphere is exposed to the solar wind, planetary neutrals can be ionized and 'picked up' by the solar wind and swept away.Both neutral and ion escape have played significant roles the long term climate change of Mars, and the MAVEN mission was designed to directly measure both escaping planetary neutrals and ions with high energy, mass, and time resolution. We will present 1.5 years of observations of atmospheric loss at Mars over a variety of solar and solar wind conditions, including extreme space weather events. We will report the average ion escape rate and the spatial distribution of escaping ions as measured by MAVEN and place them in context both with previous measurements of ion loss by other spacecraft (e.g. Phobos 2 and Mars Express) and with estimates of neutral escape rates by MAVEN. We will then report on the measured variability in ion escape rates with different drivers (e.g. solar EUV, solar wind pressure, etc.) and the implications for the total ion escape from Mars over time. Additionally, we will also discuss the implications for atmospheric escape at exoplanets, particularly weakly magnetized planetary bodies orbiting M-dwarfs, and the dominant escape mechanisms that may drive atmospheric erosion in other

  18. Magneto-induced Line Broadening of Magneto-sensitive Lines in Solar Magnetized Atmospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Quan Qu; Shuai Wang; Cheng-Lin Xu; Xiao-Yu Zhang; Ming-Guo Sun; Chun-Lan Jin

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the spectral line broadening of those magneto-sensitive lines in solar magnetized atmospheres. The broadening at the line wings is due to the increase of the effective width of energy levels involved in Zeeman splitting,and the broadening at the line core also originated in Zeeman splitting under the condition that the Zeeman components are mixed. Therefore, the magnetoinduced or Zeeman broadening take effects on the whole line. The observed Stokes parameter data in a sunspot and outside it acquired by Solar Stokes Spectrum Telescope (S3T) are analyzed for the demonstration of this mechanism, and the Zeeman broadening rates are calculated for FeI 6302.5 under some assumptions.Our result shows that the broadening is increased as the magnetic field strength becomes stronger, but the rate of increase at the line core is decreased as the field strength increases, while the rate at the wing does not show such an obvious regularity. The broadening is more effective in the line core than in the wings.

  19. On line contribution functions and examining spectral line formation in 3D model stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Amarsi, Anish Mayur

    2015-01-01

    Line contribution functions are useful diagnostics for studying spectral line formation in stellar atmospheres. I derive an expression for the contribution function to the abso- lute flux depression that emerges from three-dimensional box-in-a-star model stellar atmospheres. I illustrate the result by comparing the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) spectral line formation of the high-excitation permitted OI777nm lines with the non-LTE case.

  20. COBE-FIRAS Observations of Galactic Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Fixsen, D J; Mather, J C

    1998-01-01

    The COBE Far InfraRed Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) observations constitute an unbiased survey over the wavelength range from 100 um to 1 cm over 99% of the sky. Improved calibration of the FIRAS instrument and the inclusion of all of the FIRAS data allow an improved signal to noise determination of the spectral lines by a factor of ~2 over our previous results. The resolution is low (0.45 cm^{-1}) so only the strongest lines are observable. The CO chain from J=1-0 to J=8-7 is observed towards the Galactic center. The line ratios are roughly consistent with a 40 K excitation temperature. The 157.7 um C II and 205.3 um N II lines are observable over most of the sky. In addition the 370.4 um and 609.1 um lines of C I, and the 121.9 um line of N II are observed in the Galactic plane. The line ratios at the Galactic center are consistent with a density of n_0 ~30 cm^{-3} and a UV flux of G_0 ~ 15 uW m^{-2} sr^{-1} (10 Habing units). The 269 um H2O line is observed toward the Galactic center in absorption.

  1. Atmospheric Profiling Snthetic observation System(APSOS) - a system for whole atmosphere, purpose and preliminary observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Daren; Pan, Weilin; Wang, Yinan

    2016-07-01

    To understand the vertical coupling processes between the troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere and lower thermosphere with high vertical resolution and temporal resolution, an observation system consisted of multi-lidars, a W-band Doppler radar, and a THz spectrometer has been developing starting from 2012. This system is developed to observer the multiple atmospheric parameters, include high clouds, aerosols, CO2, SO2, NO2, water vapor, ozone, atmospheric temperature and wind, sodium atomic layer, in different height ranges, with vertical resolution of tens to hundreds meters and temporal resolution of several to tens minutes. In addition, the simultaneous observation with high cloud radar will enhance the ability of quantitative retrieval of middle and upper atmospheric observation with combined retrieval of cloud micro-physical characteristics and other atmospheric parameters above the cloud layer. As the cirrus cloud occupied about 50% of earth coverage, this ability will increase the whole atmosphere observation ability obviously. During last 5 years. We have finished each unit of the system and have revealed their targets separately. Temperature profile has been observed from 30 to 110 km, ozone up to 50 km, etc. In spring of 2016, we will have preliminary integrated observation in Eastern China, the Huainan Observatory of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, CAS. In the end of 2016, the system will be implemented at Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Observatory, CAS, near Lasa, Tibetan Plateau. Some preliminary results from Huainan observation will be presented in this presentation. This project is founded by NSFC.

  2. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere. III - Line spectrum and radius determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Line profiles are computed on the basis of the moving atmospheres from the hydrodynamic models investigated by Karp (1975). It is found that the velocity gradients in the atmosphere can be used to explain the apparent, slightly supersonic microturbulence. The total observed microturbulence is seen to be consistent with the linear sum of the classical microturbulence and that caused by the velocity gradients.

  3. GARLIC - A general purpose atmospheric radiative transfer line-by-line infrared-microwave code: Implementation and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Hedelt, Pascal; Hess, Michael; Mendrok, Jana; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2014-04-01

    A suite of programs for high resolution infrared-microwave atmospheric radiative transfer modeling has been developed with emphasis on efficient and reliable numerical algorithms and a modular approach appropriate for simulation and/or retrieval in a variety of applications. The Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code - GARLIC - is suitable for arbitrary observation geometry, instrumental field-of-view, and line shape. The core of GARLIC's subroutines constitutes the basis of forward models used to implement inversion codes to retrieve atmospheric state parameters from limb and nadir sounding instruments. This paper briefly introduces the physical and mathematical basics of GARLIC and its descendants and continues with an in-depth presentation of various implementation aspects: An optimized Voigt function algorithm combined with a two-grid approach is used to accelerate the line-by-line modeling of molecular cross sections; various quadrature methods are implemented to evaluate the Schwarzschild and Beer integrals; and Jacobians, i.e. derivatives with respect to the unknowns of the atmospheric inverse problem, are implemented by means of automatic differentiation. For an assessment of GARLIC's performance, a comparison of the quadrature methods for solution of the path integral is provided. Verification and validation are demonstrated using intercomparisons with other line-by-line codes and comparisons of synthetic spectra with spectra observed on Earth and from Venus.

  4. A Survey of Alkali Line Absorption in Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Adam G; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D; Koesterke, Lars; Barman, Travis S

    2011-01-01

    We obtained over 90 hours of spectroscopic observations of four exoplanetary systems with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). Observations were taken in transit and out of transit, and we analyzed the differenced spectra---i.e., the transmission spectra---to inspect it for absorption at the wavelengths of the neutral sodium (\\ion{Na}{1}) doublet at $\\lambda\\lambda5889, 5895$ and neutral potassium (\\ion{K}{1}) at $\\lambda7698$. We used the transmission spectrum at \\ion{Ca}{1} $\\lambda6122$---which shows strong stellar absorption but is not an alkali metal resonance line that we expect to show significant absorption in these atmospheres---as a control line to examine our measurements for systematic errors. We use an empirical Monte Carlo method to quantity these systematic errors. In a reanalysis of the same dataset using a reduction and analysis pipeline that was derived independently, we confirm the previously seen \\ion{Na}{1} absorption in HD 189733b at a level of $(-5.26\\pm1.69)\\times10^{-4}$ (the average val...

  5. Atmospheric Line of Site Experiment (ALOSE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Green, S. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Howard, M. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Yesalusky, M. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Modlin, N. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Atmospheric Line of Site Experiment (ALOSE) was a project to produce best-estimate atmospheric state measurements at the: 1. DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Clouds and Radiation Test-bed (CART) site located in Lamont, Oklahoma (11–14 December 2012) 2. Poker Flat Alaska Research Range (PFRR) located in Poker Flat, Alaska (19–26 February 2013) 3. DOE ARM CART site located in Lamont, Oklahoma (24–28 April 2013) 4. DOE ARM CART site located in Lamont, Oklahoma (9–15 July 2013) 5. DOE ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site located in Darwin, Australia (27 September–3 October 2013).

  6. Hot methane line lists for exoplanet and brown dwarf atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, R J; Michaux, L; Irfan, M; Bernath, P F

    2013-01-01

    We present comprehensive experimental line lists of methane (CH4) at high temperatures obtained by recording Fourier transform infrared emission spectra. Calibrated line lists are presented for the temperatures 300 - 1400 degC at twelve 100 degC intervals spanning the 960 - 5000 cm-1 (2.0 - 10.4 microns) region of the infrared. This range encompasses the dyad, pentad and octad regions, i.e., all fundamental vibrational modes along with a number of combination, overtone and hot bands. Using our CH4 spectra, we have estimated empirical lower state energies (Elow in cm-1) and our values have been incorporated into the line lists along with line positions (cm-1) and calibrated line intensities (S' in cm molecule-1). We expect our hot CH4 line lists to find direct application in the modeling of planetary atmospheres and brown dwarfs.

  7. Equatorial modes observed in atmospheric variables

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Kiranmayi; G S Bhat

    2009-06-01

    Wavenumber –frequency spectral analysis of different atmospheric variables has been carried out using 25 years of data.The area considered is the tropical belt 25°S –25°N. A combined FFT- wavelet analysis method has been used for this purpose.Variables considered are outgoing long- wave radiation (OLR),850 hPa divergence,zonal and meridional winds at 850,500 and 200 hPa levels,sea level pressure and 850 hPa geopotential height.It is shown that the spectra of different variables have some common properties,but each variable also has few features different from the rest. While Kelvin mode is prominent in OLR and zonal winds,it is not clearly observed in pressure and geopotential height fields;the latter two have a dominant wavenumber zero mode not seen in other variables except in meridional wind at 200 hPa and 850 hPa divergences.Different dominant modes in the tropics show significant variations on sub-seasonal time scales.

  8. Lithium in Stellar Atmospheres: Observations and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimkov, L. S.

    2016-09-01

    Of all the light elements, lithium is the most sensitive indicator of stellar evolution. This review discusses current data on the abundance of lithium in the atmospheres of A-, F-, G-, and K-stars of different types, as well as the consistency of these data with theoretical predictions. The variety of observed Li abundances is illustrated by the following objects in different stages of evolution: (1) Old stars in the galactic halo, which have a lithium abundance logɛ(Li)=2.2 (the "lithium plateau") that appears to be 0.5 dex lower than the primordial abundance predicted by cosmological models. (2) Young stars in the galactic disk, which have been used to estimate the contemporary initial lithium abundance logɛ(Li)=3.2±0.1 for stars in the Main sequence. Possible sources of lithium enrichment in the interstellar medium during evolution of the galaxy are discussed. (3) Evolving FGK dwarfs in the galactic disk, which have lower logɛ(Li) for lower effective temperature T eff and mass M. The "lithium dip" near T eff ~6600 K in the distribution of logɛ(Li) with respect to T eff in old clusters is discussed. (4) FGK giants and supergiants, of which most have no lithium at all. This phenomenon is consistent with rotating star model calculations. (5) Lithium rich cold giants with logɛ(Li) ≥ 2.0, which form a small, enigmatic group. Theoretical models with rotation can explain the existence of these stars only in the case of low initial rotation velocities V 0 synthesis of lithium (capture of a giant planet is an alternative). (6) Magnetic Ap-stars, where lithium is concentrated in spots located at the magnetic poles. There the lithium abundance reaches logɛ(Li)=6. Discrepancies between observations and theory are noted for almost all the stars discussed in this review.

  9. An Integrated Global Atmospheric Composition Observing System: Progress and Impediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    In 2003-2005, a vision of an integrated global observing system for atmospheric composition and air quality emerged through several international forums (IGACO, 2004; GEO, 2005). In the decade since, the potential benefits of such a system for improving our understanding and mitigation of health and climate impacts of air pollution have become clearer and the needs more urgent. Some progress has been made towards the goal: technology has developed, capabilities have been demonstrated, and lessons have been learned. In Europe, the Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring Service has blazed a trail for other regions to follow. Powerful new components of the emerging global system (e.g. a constellation of geostationary instruments) are expected to come on-line in the near term. But there are important gaps in the emerging system that are likely to keep us from achieving for some time the full benefits that were envisioned more than a decade ago. This presentation will explore the components and benefits of an integrated global observing system for atmospheric composition and air quality, some of the gaps and obstacles that exist in our current capabilities and institutions, and efforts that may be needed to achieve the envisioned system.

  10. Constraining CO emission estimates using atmospheric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooghiemstra, P. B.

    2012-06-01

    We apply a four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system to optimize carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and to reduce the uncertainty of emission estimates from individual sources using the chemistry transport model TM5. In the first study only a limited amount of surface network observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA/ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) is used to test the 4D-Var system. Uncertainty reduction up to 60% in yearly emissions is observed over well-constrained regions and the inferred emissions compare well with recent studies for 2004. However, since the observations only constrain total CO emissions, the 4D-Var system has difficulties separating anthropogenic and biogenic sources in particular. The inferred emissions are validated with NOAA aircraft data over North America and the agreement is significantly improved from the prior to posterior simulation. Validation with the Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument shows a slight improved agreement over the well-constrained Northern Hemisphere and in the tropics (except for the African continent). However, the model simulation with posterior emissions underestimates MOPITT CO total columns on the remote Southern Hemisphere (SH) by about 10%. This is caused by a reduction in SH CO sources mainly due to surface stations on the high southern latitudes. In the second study, we compare two global inversions to estimate carbon monoxide (CO) emissions for 2004. Either surface flask observations from NOAA or CO total columns from the MOPITT instrument are assimilated in a 4D-Var framework. In the Southern Hemisphere (SH) three important findings are reported. First, due to their different vertical sensitivity, the stations-only inversion increases SH biomass burning emissions by 108 Tg CO/yr more than the MOPITT-only inversion. Conversely, the MOPITT-only inversion results in SH natural emissions

  11. Capturing Characteristics of Atmospheric Refractivity Using Observations and Modeling Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    property of the atmosphere that bends EM energy (e.g., radar, communications) from a straight line path and is caused by spatial variations in temperature...factors that affect the radiation balance include diurnal cycle, season and latitude , presence of clouds and at what altitudes, atmospheric water vapor...coordinated supporting atmospheric and oceanographic data collection was conducted along with EM propagation loss measurements during an intensive

  12. SHIELD II: WSRT HI Spectral Line Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Alex Jonah Robert; Cannon, John M.; Adams, Elizabeth A.; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We present new results from WSRT HI spectral line observations of 22 galaxies in the SHIELD II sample. We explore the morphology and kinematics by comparing images of the HI surface densities and the intensity weighted velocity fields with optical images from HST, SDSS, and WIYN. In most cases the HI and stellar populations are cospatial; projected rotation velocities range from less than 10 km/s to roughly 30 km/s.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College, and by NASA through grant GO-13750 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  13. Martian upper atmospheric aerosol properties from Phobos eclipse observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Mark T.

    2015-11-01

    Solar occultation photometry is a useful method for probing upper atmospheric aerosols, using a long atmospheric path for direct extinction measurements. During April-June 2015, the Mars Science Laboratory’s Mastcam was used for solar occultation photometry by proxy: 3 eclipse ingresses by Phobos into Mars’ shadow were observed, as were 3 egresses from the shadow. The observations occurred in late Southern summer, at LS 331-352°. The observations of the moon’s brightness sample the Martian atmosphere along the lines of site from the Sun to Phobos. The ingresses and egresses sampled longitudes up to 1000s of km west or east of the rover’s position, respectively; sampled latitudes from 30° S to 7° S over time; and sampled local sunset or sunrise, respectively. Each eclipse was imaged with both Mastcam cameras, M-100 with an RGB filter (638, 551, and 493 nm) and M-34 with an 867-nm filter. Light-curves for the eclipses were derived from the images and interpreted via a geometric model of the event, accounting for the full range of lines of sight through the atmosphere. The altitude of 50% extinction was found to vary within the 40-60 km range. Extinction varied with wavelength: four events showed significantly higher extinction in the blue, with a monotonic decrease with wavelength, interpreted as a result of 0.3-0.4 μm dust aerosols. Two events (one of each type) showed no significant wavelength variation of extinction, interpreted as a result of large (>1 μm) aerosols. One of these, probing local sunrise conditions, may suggest a thin layer of CO2 ice cloud. Future work may allow retrieval of vertical gradients in aerosol size near the mid-point of the sensitive region (i.e., altitudes near that of 50% transmission and/or path optical depth unity) and/or identification of discrete layers vs. well-mixed aerosols (for instance, clouds vs. dust)

  14. International arctic systems for observing the atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uttal, Taneil; Starkweather, Sandra; Drummond, James R.;

    2016-01-01

    IASOA activities and partnerships were initiated as a part of the 2007-2009 International Polar Year (IPY) and are expected to continue for many decades as a legacy program. The IASOA focus is on coordinating intensive measurements of the Arctic atmosphere collected in the U.S., Canada, Russia, N...

  15. Observations and Modeling of Solar Flare Atmospheric Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Solar flares are one of the most energetic events in solar atmosphere, which last minutes to tens of minutes. The eruption of a solar flare involves energy release, plasma heating, particle acceleration, mass flows, waves, etc. A solar flare releases a large amount of energy, and its emission spans a wide wavelength range. Solar flares are usually accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs); therefore they could significantly affect the space environments between the Earth and the Sun. At present, we do not fully understand the whole flare process. There are still many important questions to be resolved, such as when and where is the energy released? How long does the energy release last? What are the main ways of energy release? And how does the solar atmosphere respond to the energy release? To address these questions, we study in detail the flare heating and dynamic evolution. We first give a brief review of previous flare studies (Chapter 1), and introduce the observing instruments (Chapter 2) and the modeling method (Chapter 3) related to this thesis work. Then we use spectral data to investigate the chromospheric evaporation (Chapter 4). Based on the results, we further explore the flare heating problem. With observationally inferred heating functions, we model two flare loops, and compare the results with observations (Chapter 5). A consistency is achieved between modeling and observations. In addition, we model two different sets of flare loop systems with quite different heating profiles and dynamic evolutions (Chapter 6). The details are described as below. Firstly, we investigate the chromospheric evaporation in the flare on 2007 January 16 using line profiles observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. Three points with different magnetic polarities at flare ribbons are analyzed in detail. We find that the three points show different patterns of upflows and downflows in the impulsive phase of the flare. The

  16. Atmospheric Retrievals from Exoplanet Observations and Simulations with BART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Joseph

    This project will determine the observing plans needed to retrieve exoplanet atmospheric composition and thermal profiles over a broad range of planets, stars, instruments, and observing modes. Characterizing exoplanets is hard. The dim planets orbit bright stars, giving orders of magnitude more relative noise than for solar-system planets. Advanced statistical techniques are needed to determine what the data can - and more importantly cannot - say. We therefore developed Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART). BART explores the parameter space of atmospheric chemical abundances and thermal profiles using Differential-Evolution Markov-Chain Monte Carlo. It generates thousands of candidate spectra, integrates over observational bandpasses, and compares to data, generating a statistical model for an atmosphere's composition and thermal structure. At best, it gives abundances and thermal profiles with uncertainties. At worst, it shows what kinds of planets the data allow. It also gives parameter correlations. BART is open-source, designed for community use and extension (http://github.com/exosports/BART). Three arXived PhD theses (papers in publication) provide technical documentation, tests, and application to Spitzer and HST data. There are detailed user and programmer manuals and community support forums. Exoplanet analysis techniques must be tested against synthetic data, where the answer is known, and vetted by statisticians. Unfortunately, this has rarely been done, and never sufficiently. Several recent papers question the entire body of Spitzer exoplanet observations, because different analyses of the same data give different results. The latest method, pixel-level decorrelation, produces results that diverge from an emerging consensus. We do not know the retrieval problem's strengths and weaknesses relative to low SNR, red noise, low resolution, instrument systematics, or incomplete spectral line lists. In observing eclipses and transits, we assume

  17. Models of Warm Jupiter Atmospheres: Observable Signatures of Obliquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Emily

    2017-09-01

    We present three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models of a hypothetical “warm Jupiter” planet, for a range of possible obliquities from 0° to 90°. We model a Jupiter-mass planet on a 10 day orbit around a Sun-like star, since this hypothetical planet sits at the boundary between planets for which we expect that tidal forces should have aligned their rotation axes with their orbital axes (i.e., ones with zero obliquity) and planets whose timescale for tidal alignment is longer than the typical age of an exoplanet system. In line with observational progress, which is pushing atmospheric characterization for planets on longer orbital periods, we calculate the observable signatures of obliquity for a transiting warm Jupiter: in orbital phase curves of thermal emission and in the hemispheric flux gradients that could be measured by eclipse mapping. For both of these predicted measurements, the signal that we would see depends strongly on our viewing geometry relative to the orientation of the planet’s rotation axis, and we thoroughly identify the degeneracies that result. We compare these signals to the predicted sensitivities of current and future instruments and determine that the James Webb Space Telescope should be able to constrain the obliquities of nearby warm Jupiters to be small (if ≤slant 10^\\circ ) or to directly measure them if significantly non-zero (≥slant 30^\\circ ) using the technique of eclipse mapping. For a bright target and assuming photon-limited precision, this could be done with a single secondary eclipse observation.

  18. The atmosphere of Pluto as observed by New Horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, G Randall; Stern, S Alan; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Catherine B; Weaver, Harold A; Young, Leslie A; Summers, Michael E; Strobel, Darrell F; Hinson, David P; Kammer, Joshua A; Parker, Alex H; Steffl, Andrew J; Linscott, Ivan R; Parker, Joel Wm; Cheng, Andrew F; Slater, David C; Versteeg, Maarten H; Greathouse, Thomas K; Retherford, Kurt D; Throop, Henry; Cunningham, Nathaniel J; Woods, William W; Singer, Kelsi N; Tsang, Constantine C C; Schindhelm, Eric; Lisse, Carey M; Wong, Michael L; Yung, Yuk L; Zhu, Xun; Curdt, Werner; Lavvas, Panayotis; Young, Eliot F; Tyler, G Leonard

    2016-03-18

    Observations made during the New Horizons flyby provide a detailed snapshot of the current state of Pluto's atmosphere. Whereas the lower atmosphere (at altitudes of less than 200 kilometers) is consistent with ground-based stellar occultations, the upper atmosphere is much colder and more compact than indicated by pre-encounter models. Molecular nitrogen (N2) dominates the atmosphere (at altitudes of less than 1800 kilometers or so), whereas methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), ethylene (C2H4), and ethane (C2H6) are abundant minor species and likely feed the production of an extensive haze that encompasses Pluto. The cold upper atmosphere shuts off the anticipated enhanced-Jeans, hydrodynamic-like escape of Pluto's atmosphere to space. It is unclear whether the current state of Pluto's atmosphere is representative of its average state--over seasonal or geologic time scales. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. The Atmosphere of Pluto as Observed by New Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Gladstone, G Randall; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Catherine B; Weaver, Harold A; Young, Leslie A; Summers, Michael E; Strobel, Darrell F; Hinson, David P; Kammer, Joshua A; Parker, Alex H; Steffl, Andrew J; Linscott, Ivan R; Parker, Joel Wm; Cheng, Andrew F; Slater, David C; Versteeg, Maarten H; Greathouse, Thomas K; Retherford, Kurt D; Throop, Henry; Cunningham, Nathaniel J; Woods, William W; Singer, Kelsi N; Tsang, Constantine C C; Schindhelm, Eric; Lisse, Carey M; Wong, Michael L; Yung, Yuk L; Zhu, Xun; Curdt, Werner; Lavvas, Panayotis; Young, Eliot F; Tyler, G Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Observations made during the New Horizons flyby provide a detailed snapshot of the current state of Pluto's atmosphere. While the lower atmosphere (at altitudes <200 km) is consistent with ground-based stellar occultations, the upper atmosphere is much colder and more compact than indicated by pre-encounter models. Molecular nitrogen (N$_2$) dominates the atmosphere (at altitudes <1800 km or so), while methane (CH$_4$), acetylene (C$_2$H$_2$), ethylene (C$_2$H$_4$), and ethane (C$_2$H$_6$) are abundant minor species, and likely feed the production of an extensive haze which encompasses Pluto. The cold upper atmosphere shuts off the anticipated enhanced-Jeans, hydrodynamic-like escape of Pluto's atmosphere to space. It is unclear whether the current state of Pluto's atmosphere is representative of its average state--over seasonal or geologic time scales.

  20. Observations, Thermochemical Calculations, and Modeling of Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Blecic, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation as a whole aims to provide means to better understand hot-Jupiter planets through observing, performing thermochemical calculations, and modeling their atmospheres. We used Spitzer multi-wavelength secondary-eclipse observations and targets with high signal-to-noise ratios, as their deep eclipses allow us to detect signatures of spectral features and assess planetary atmospheric structure and composition with greater certainty. Chapter 1 gives a short introduction. Chapter 2 presents the Spitzer secondary-eclipse analysis and atmospheric characterization of WASP-14b. WASP-14b is a highly irradiated, transiting hot Jupiter. By applying a Bayesian approach in the atmospheric analysis, we found an absence of thermal inversion contrary to theoretical predictions. Chapter 3 describes the infrared observations of WASP-43b Spitzer secondary eclipses, data analysis, and atmospheric characterization. WASP-43b is one of the closest-orbiting hot Jupiters, orbiting one of the coolest stars with a hot Ju...

  1. The Atmosphere of Pluto as Observed by New Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, Randy

    2016-07-01

    A major goal of the New Horizons (NH) mission was to explore and characterize the structure and composition of Pluto's atmosphere. Several instruments onboard NH contributed to these goals, primarily: 1) the REX instrument, through uplink X-band radio occultations, 2) the Alice instrument, through extreme- and far-ultraviolet solar occultations, and 3) the LORRI panchromatic and MVIC color imagers, through high-resolution imaging. The associated datasets were obtained near closest approach of NH to Pluto at 11:48 UT on 14 July 2015. Pressure and temperature profiles of the lower atmosphere are derived from the REX radio occultation data, the composition and structure of the extended atmosphere are derived from the Alice solar occultation data, and the distribution and properties of Pluto's hazes are derived from the LORRI and MVIC imaging data. The observations made during the NH flyby provide a detailed snapshot of the current state of Pluto's atmosphere. While the lower atmosphere (at altitudes less than 200 km) is largely consistent with ground-based stellar occultations, the upper atmosphere is much colder and more compact than indicated by pre-encounter models. Molecular nitrogen dominates the atmosphere (at altitudes less than 1800 km or so), while methane, acetylene, ethylene, and ethane are important minor species, and likely help produce the haze which surrounds Pluto. The cold upper atmosphere considerably reduces the magnitude of the hydrodynamic escape of Pluto's atmosphere to space. In this talk an overview of the atmosphere science results will be presented.

  2. Cine: Line excitation by infrared fluorescence in cometary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-03-01

    CINE is a Python module for calculating infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. Excitation by solar radiation of vibrational bands followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state is one of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets. This code calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Line transitions are queried from the latest version of the HITRAN spectroscopic repository using the astroquery affiliated package of astropy. Molecular data are obtained from the LAMDA database. These coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  3. An Atmospheric Science Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meemong; Weidner, Richard; Qu, Zheng; Bowman, Kevin; Eldering, Annmarie

    2010-01-01

    An atmospheric sounding mission starts with a wide range of concept designs involving measurement technologies, observing platforms, and observation scenarios. Observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) is a technical approach to evaluate the relative merits of mission and instrument concepts. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the OSSE team has developed an OSSE environment that allows atmospheric scientists to systematically explore a wide range of mission and instrument concepts and formulate a science traceability matrix with a quantitative science impact analysis. The OSSE environment virtually creates a multi-platform atmospheric sounding testbed (MAST) by integrating atmospheric phenomena models, forward modeling methods, and inverse modeling methods. The MAST performs OSSEs in four loosely coupled processes, observation scenario exploration, measurement quality exploration, measurement quality evaluation, and science impact analysis.

  4. Calibrating surface weather observations to atmospheric attenuation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanii, Babak

    2001-06-01

    A correlation between near-IR atmospheric attenuation measurements made by the Atmospheric Visibility Monitor (AVM) at the Table Mountain Facility and airport surface weather observations at Edwards Air Force Base has been performed. High correlations (over 0.93) exist between the Edwards observed sky cover and the average AVM measured attenuations over the course of the 10 months analyzed. The statistical relationship between the data-sets allows the determination of coarse attenuation statistics from the surface observations, suggesting that such statistics may be extrapolated from any surface weather observation site. Furthermore, a superior technique for converting AVM images to attenuation values by way of MODTRAN predictions has been demonstrated.

  5. Passband ripple observed in MSFVW delay lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talisa, S. H.; Emtage, P. R.; Daniel, M. R.; Adam, J. D.

    1986-09-01

    It is suggested that the long-period (100-200 MHz) ripple noted in magnetostatic forward volume wave (MSFVW) delay lines comprising YIG samples a few millimeters wide by a few centimeters long is due to the nonuniformity in the DC demagnetizing field across the YIG sample width. The results indicate that even very small variations in the internal field near the center of the sample can cause the MSFVWs to focus at distances close to the input transducers, and that ray bending is stronger outside the central half of the sample. Experimental studies confirm the strong effects of sample width on the breadth and smoothness of the passband.

  6. Earth Observation for Land-Atmosphere Interaction Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconcini, M.; Fernandez-Prieto, D.; Reissell, A.; Ellis, M.; Blyth, E. M.; Burrows, J. P.; de Leeuw, G.; Gerard, F. F.; Houweling, S.; Kaminski, T.; Krol, M.; Muller, J.-P.; North, P. R. J.; Palmer, P.; Pinty, B.; Plummer, S.; Quegan, S.; Reichstein, M.; Remedios, J. J.; Roberts, G. J.; Shvidenko, A.; Scipal, K.; Sobrino, J. A.; Teuling, A. J.; van der Werf, G. R.

    2011-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA), iLEAPS (Integrated Land Ecosystem-Atmosphere Processes Study, i.e. the land-atmosphere core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme), and the European Geosciences Union (EGU) jointly organized the “Earth Observation for Land-Atmosphere Interaction Science” conference, which took place from 3rd to 5th November 2010 at the Italian premises of ESA in Frascati (Rome). The event represented an attempt to effectively draw together Earth-Observation (EO) and Earth-system scientists investigating land-atmosphere processes in order to better understand the current gaps in science and derive recommendations to advance in the use of EO technology in the context of this important topic. Around 200 people from more than 30 countries world- wide met and discussed for three intensive days. This paper reports key points and the main recommendations of the conference for each of the key themes addressed.

  7. Comparison of line-by-line and band models of near-IR methane absorption applied to outer planet atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Fry, P. M.; Boudon, V.; Campargue, A.; Nikitin, A.

    2012-03-01

    Recent improvements in high spectral resolution measurements of methane absorption at wavenumbers between 4800 cm-1 and 7919 cm-1 have greatly increased the number of lines with known lower state energies, the number of weak lines, and the number of lines observed at low temperatures (Campargue, A., Wang, L., Kassi, S., Mašát, M., Votava, O. [2010]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 111, 1141-1151; Campargue, A., Wang, L., Liu, A.W., Hu, S.M., Kassi, S. [2010]. Chem. Phys. 373, 203-210; Mondelain, D., Kassi, S., Wang, L.C. [2011]. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 7985-7996; Nikitin, A.V. et al. [2011a]. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 268, 93-106; Nikitin, A.V. et al. [2010]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 111, 2211-2224; Wang, L., Kassi, S., Campargue, A. [2010]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 111, 1130-1140; Wang, L., Kassi, S., Liu, A.W., Hu, S.M., Campargue, A. [2011]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 112, 937-951), making it possible to fit near-IR spectra of Titan using line-by-line calculations instead of band models (Bailey, J., Ahlsved, L., Meadows, V.S. [2011]. Icarus 213, 218-232; de Bergh, C. et al. [2011]. Planet. Space Sci. doi:10.1016/j.pss.2011.05.003). Using these new results, we compiled an improved line list relative that used by Bailey et al. by updating several spectral regions with either calculated or more recently measured line parameters, revising lower state energy estimates for lines lacking them, and adding room temperature lines to make the list applicable over a wider range of temperatures. We compared current band models with line-by-line calculations using this new line list, both to assess the behavior of band models, and to identify remaining issues with line-by-line calculations when applied to outer planet atmospheres and over a wider range of wavelengths. Comparisons were made for a selection of uniform paths representing outer planet conditions and for representative non-uniform paths within the atmospheres of Uranus, Saturn

  8. Formation of the infrared emission lines of Mg I in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, E. S.; Avrett, E. H.; Noyes, R. W.; Loeser, R.; Mauas, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    A non-LTE radiative transfer investigation of the emission lines is conducted at 7 and 12 microns using a realistic atomic model for neutral magnesium. An average quiet sun atmospheric model is used to calculate emission-line profiles that resemble the observed ones, i.e., broad absorption troughs with narrow central emission, and significant limb brightening. The charge exchange rates are found to be significant, but the effects of high-n coupling between Mg and Mg(+) together with radiative low-n transitions are of greater importance. It is confirmed that the emission cores are formed no higher than the temperature minimum region, and that the emission is caused by non-LTE effects rather than by the chromospheric temperature rise. It is inferred from the model calculations that the line core is sensitive to magnetic fields located almost 400 km above those measured in ordinary magnetograms; the gas pressure decreases 20-fold between these two heights.

  9. Dynamics of Undisturbed Midlatitude Atmospheric Electricity: From Observations to Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, S. V.; Afinogenov, K. V.; Shikhova, N. M.

    2014-04-01

    Long-term dynamics of the electric field of the midlatitude near-surface atmosphere in a wide range of temporal scales is analyzed according to multiyear observatory and seasonal field observations. It is found that the daily dynamics of the aeroelectric field at mid-latitudes most authentically repeats a diurnal variation for the winter months. It is stated that short-period pulsations of the electric field have a self-similar power-law spectrum. Spatio-temporal scales of the self-similarity interval are estimated and the nature of the generalized diffusive process of the aeroelectric pulsation generation is defined. Characteristics of the turbulent ΔE pulsations are analyzed. Estimates of interrelation between the dynamic (fractal dimensions, intermittency indices) and power (degrees of spectral index and structure function) ΔE characteristics are obtained. Mutual correlations between atmospheric electric field variations, vertical atmospheric electrical current density, space charge density, and atmospheric electrical conductivity are studied. It is shown that variations of the light atmospheric ion number density and space charge density are related with variations of the Radon-222 emanations. Spectral analysis of the space charge density variations is carried out. It is shown that the electrodynamic state of the surface atmosphere depends on the convective state of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  10. Metal Emission Lines as Diagnostic Tools for Shock Waves in Outer Atmospheres of M-type Mira Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, He.; Sedlmayr, E.; Wood, P. R.

    One way to reveal the thermo- and hydrodynamical conditions in M-type Mira atmospheres is to study the various emission lines which are emitted behind a shock front and can be observed over a substantial portion of the pulsation period. Analysing a time-resolved series of these emission lines offers the possibility to determine these conditions in different atmospheric layers influenced by the passing shock wave. In particular, the metal emission lines are a diagnostic tool to probe the hydrodynamical conditions of the outer, dust-forming layers of the atmosphere, because they appear late in the pulsation cycle when the shock wave has reached these layers. We present quantitive data on radial velocities, shapes, widths and fluxes of metal emission lines obtained by spectral observations in the optical wavelength region for a sample of six M-type Miras (periods 281-389 days), namely R Aql, RR Sco, R Car, R Leo, S Scl and R Hya (cf. Richter & Wood 2001, A&A 369, 1027-1047). Because of the multiple phase coverage of our observations, the data shows the history of the shock as it emerges through the deep photosphere and then moves out through the atmosphere. The observations are analysed and discussed with regard to the atmospheric conditions.

  11. Wind measurements in Mars' middle atmosphere at equinox and solstice: IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometric CO observations

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno, R; Encrenaz, T; Forget, F; Chassefière, E; Hourdin, F; Guilloteau, S; Guilloteau, St\\'{e}phane

    2007-01-01

    Characterizing the Martian atmosphere is an essential objective to understand its meteorology and its climate. The lower atmosphere (< 40 km) and middle atmosphere (40-80 km) of Mars appear dynamically coupled at much higher levels than in the case of the Earth. The vertical extension of the weather phenomena is considerable with for example Hadley's cells reaching the top of the neutral atmosphere (120 km). The circulation in the middle atmosphere modifies the meteorology of the lower atmosphere, affecting the transport and climatic processes Observations of the CO rotational lines at millimeter (mm) wavelengths (Clancy et al 1990) have strongly contributed in the study of the vertical distribution of this compound and the thermal profile in the atmosphere of Mars over 0-70 km. Singledish observations of the CO Doppler lineshift have allowed direct wind measurements in the martian middle atmosphere near 50 km altitude (Lellouch et al 1991), but at a low spatial resolution (12'') enabling only an essential...

  12. Assessment of Global Annual Atmospheric Energy Balance from Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Stackhouse, Paul; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Sun, Wenbo; Fan, Tai-Fang (Alice); Hinkelman, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Global atmospheric energy balance is one of the fundamental processes for the earth's climate system. This study uses currently available satellite data sets of radiative energy at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface and latent and sensible heat over oceans for the year 2000 to assess the global annual energy budget. Over land, surface radiation data are used to constrain assimilated results and to force the radiation, turbulent heat, and heat storage into balance due to a lack of observation-based turbulent heat flux estimations. Global annual means of the TOA net radiation obtained from both direct measurements and calculations are close to zero. The net radiative energy fluxes into the surface and the surface latent heat transported into the atmosphere are about 113 and 86 Watts per square meter, respectively. The estimated atmospheric and surface heat imbalances are about -8 9 Watts per square meter, values that are within the uncertainties of surface radiation and sea surface turbulent flux estimates and likely systematic biases in the analyzed observations. The potential significant additional absorption of solar radiation within the atmosphere suggested by previous studies does not appear to be required to balance the energy budget the spurious heat imbalances in the current data are much smaller (about half) than those obtained previously and debated at about a decade ago. Progress in surface radiation and oceanic turbulent heat flux estimations from satellite measurements significantly reduces the bias errors in the observed global energy budgets of the climate system.

  13. Atmospheric Circulation on Hot Jupiters: Modeling and Observable Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Emily Christine

    2010-12-01

    Hot Jupiters are unlike any planets in our Solar System and yet one of the most common types of extrasolar planet discovered. These gas giants orbit their parent stars with periods of a few days. Expected to be tidally locked into synchronous rotation, hot Jupiters experience intense, asymmetric heating from stellar irradiation, such that day-night temperature contrasts could reach hundreds of degrees Kelvin. This unique state of radiative forcing, as well as the slow rotation rates of these planets, places hot Jupiters within a new regime of atmospheric circulation. Hot Jupiters have also been the first type of extrasolar planet with direct detections of their atmospheres, through measurements of emitted, reflected, and transmitted light. This thesis investigates observational methods to distinguish between various atmospheric models, observational signatures of potential atmospheric variability, and presents a three dimensional model with which to study hot Jupiter circulation patterns. First, we find that eclipse mapping is a technique that can be used to image the day sides of these planets and although this is beyond the ability of current instruments, it will be achievable with future missions, such as the James Webb Space Telescope. Second, we consider the signatures of large-scale atmospheric variability in measurements of secondary eclipses and thermal orbital phase curves. For various models we predict the amount of variation in eclipse depth, and the amplitudes and detailed shapes of phase curves. Lastly, we develop a three-dimensional model of hot Jupiter atmospheric dynamics with simplified forcing and adopt a set-up nearly identical to work by another group to facilitate code inter-comparison. Our results are broadly consistent with theirs, with a transonic flow and the hottest region of the atmosphere advected eastward of the substellar point. However, we note important differences and identify areas of concern for future modeling efforts.

  14. Geostationary Atmospheric Observation Satellite Plan in Japan (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, H.; Kasai, Y.; Kita, K.; Irie, H.; Sagi, K.; Hayashida, S.

    2009-12-01

    As emissions of air pollutants in Asia have increased in the past decades accompanying with rapid economic growth of developing countries, Asian regional air pollution has attracted concern from the view of inter-continental and intra-continental long-range transport as well as domestic air quality. Particularly in Japan, transboundary transport of ozone is of recent social concern as one of a cause of increasing trend of near surface ozone concentration. In order to elucidate the transport and chemical transformation processes of air pollution in East Asia, and to attain internationally common understanding on this issue, geostationary atmospheric observation satellite has been proposed in Japan. In 2006, the Japan Society of Atmospheric Chemistry (JSAC) formed Commission on the Atmospheric Environmental Observation Satellite to initiate the discussion. In 2009, Committee on Geostationary Atmospheric Observation Satellite has been formed within JAXA to promote the plan. The proposed satellite consists of a UV/VIS sensor for O3, NO2, HCHO and AOT, and a MIR sensor for O3, CO, HNO3, NO2, H2O and temperature. Targeted spatial and temporal resolutions are ca.10 km and 1-2 hrs, respectively, and focused observation area is northeast Asia potentially covering the southeast and south Asia. Sensitivity analysis and simulation have been made for both the UV/VIS and MIR sensors. Overview of user requirement and the sensitivity analysis for each species will be presented in this talk.

  15. Sixth International Workshop on the Mars Atmosphere: Modelling and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, F.; Millour, M.

    2017-01-01

    The scope of this workshop is to bring together experts in observations and modelling of the present and past Mars climate systems and discuss the nature of the atmospheric circulation and the photochemistry (up to the thermosphere), the dust cycle, the water cycle (vapor, clouds and frost) and the carbon dioxide cycle (polar caps).

  16. Atmospheric CO2 Variability Observed From ASCENDS Flight Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Browell, Edward; Campbell, Joel; Choi, Yonghoon; Dobler, Jeremy; Fan, Tai-Fang; Harrison, F. Wallace; Kooi, Susan; Liu, Zhaoyan; Meadows, Byron; Nehrir, Amin; Obland, Michael; Plant, James; Yang, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Significant atmospheric CO2 variations on various spatiotemporal scales were observed during ASCENDS flight campaigns. For example, around 10-ppm CO2 changes were found within free troposphere in a region of about 200x300 sq km over Iowa during a summer 2014 flight. Even over extended forests, about 2-ppm CO2 column variability was measured within about 500-km distance. For winter times, especially over snow covered ground, relatively less horizontal CO2 variability was observed, likely owing to minimal interactions between the atmosphere and land surface. Inter-annual variations of CO2 drawdown over cornfields in the Mid-West were found to be larger than 5 ppm due to slight differences in the corn growing phase and meteorological conditions even in the same time period of a year. Furthermore, considerable differences in atmospheric CO2 profiles were found during winter and summer campaigns. In the winter CO2 was found to decrease from about 400 ppm in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to about 392 ppm above 10 km, while in the summer CO2 increased from 386 ppm in the ABL to about 396 ppm in free troposphere. These and other CO2 observations are discussed in this presentation.

  17. New observational constraints on hydrocarbon chemistry in Saturn's upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Tommi; Moses, Julianne I.; West, Robert; Guerlet, Sandrine; Jouchoux, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Until now there have been only a few observations of hydrocarbons and photochemical haze in the region where they are produced in Saturn's upper atmosphere. We present new results on hydrocarbon abundances and atmospheric structure based on more than 40 stellar occultations observed by the Cassini/UVIS instrument that we have combined with results from Cassini/CIRS to generate full atmosphere structure models. In addition to detecting CH4, C2H2, C2H4 and C2H6, we detect benzene (C6H6) in UVIS occultations that probe different latitudes and present the first vertical abundance profiles for this species in its production region. Benzene is the simplest ring polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and a stepping stone to the formation of more complex molecules that are believed to form stratospheric haze. Our calculations show that the observed abundances of benzene can be explained by solar-driven ion chemistry that is enhanced by high-latitude auroral production at least in the northern spring hemisphere. Condensation of benzene and heavier hydrocarbons is possible in the cold polar night of the southern winter where we detect evidence for high altitude haze. We also report on substantial variability in the CH4 profiles that arise from dynamics and affects the minor hydrocarbon abundances. Our results demonstrate the importance of hydrocarbon ion chemistry and coupled models of chemistry and dynamics for future studies of Saturn's upper atmosphere.

  18. Chromospheric polarimetry through multi-line observations of the 850 nm spectral region

    CERN Document Server

    Noda, C Quintero; Katsukawa, Y; Rodriguez, J de la Cruz; Carlsson, M; Anan, T; Oba, T; Ichimoto, K; Suematsu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Future solar missions and ground-based telescopes aim to understand the magnetism of the solar chromosphere. We performed a supporting study in Quintero Noda et al. (2016) focused on the infrared Ca II 8542 A line and we concluded that is one of the best candidates because it is sensitive to a large range of atmospheric heights, from the photosphere to the middle chromosphere. However, we believe that it is worth to try improving the results produced by this line observing additional spectral lines. In that regard, we examined the neighbour solar spectrum looking for spectral lines that could increase the sensitivity to the atmospheric parameters. Interestingly, we discovered several photospheric lines that greatly improve the photospheric sensitivity to the magnetic field vector. Moreover, they are located close to a second chromospheric line that also belongs to the Ca II infrared triplet, i.e. the Ca II 8498 A line, and enhances the sensitivity to the atmospheric parameters at chromospheric layers. We conc...

  19. Using observations to evaluate biosphere-atmosphere interactions in models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julia; Konings, Alexandra G.; Alemohammad, Seyed H.; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere interactions influence the hydrologic cycle by altering climate and weather patterns (Charney, 1975; Koster et al., 2006; Seneviratne et al., 2006), contributing up to 30% of precipitation and radiation variability in certain regions (Green et al., 2017). They have been shown to contribute to the persistence of drought in Europe (Seneviratne et al., 2006), as well as to increase rainfall in the Amazon (Spracklen et al., 2012). Thus, a true representation of these feedbacks in Earth System Models (ESMs) is crucial for accurate forecasting and planning. However, it has been difficult to validate the performance of ESMs since often-times surface and atmospheric flux data are scarce and/or difficult to observe. In this study, we use the results of a new global observational study (using remotely sensed solar-induced fluorescence to represent the biosphere flux) (Green et al., 2017) to determine how well a suite of 13 ESMs capture biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks. We perform a Conditional Multivariate Granger Causality analysis in the frequency domain with radiation, precipitation and temperature as atmospheric inputs and GPP as the biospheric input. Performing the analysis in the frequency domain allows for separation of feedbacks at different time-scales (subseasonal, seasonal or interannual). Our findings can be used to determine whether there is agreement between models, as well as, to pinpoint regions or time-scales of model bias or inaccuracy, which will provide insight on potential improvement. We demonstrate that in addition to the well-known problem of convective parameterization over land in models, the main issue in representing feedbacks between the land and the atmosphere is due to the misrepresentation of water stress. These results provide a direct quantitative assessment of feedbacks in models and how to improve them. References: Charney, J.G. Dynamics of deserts and drought in the Sahel. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological

  20. Integrated Global Observation Strategy - Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsenrath, Ernest; Readings, C. J.; Kaye, J.; Mohnen, V.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The "Long Term Continuity of Stratospheric Ozone Measurements and Atmospheric Chemistry" project was one of six established by the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS) in response to the Integrated Global Observing Strategy (IGOS) initiative. IGOS links satellite and ground based systems for global environmental observations. The strategy of this project is to develop a consensus of user requirements including the scientific (SPARC, IGAC, WCRP) and the applications community (WMO, UNEP) and to develop a long-term international plan for ozone and atmospheric chemistry measurements. The major components of the observing system include operational and research (meeting certain criteria) satellite platforms planned by the space faring nations which are integrated with a well supported and sustained ground, aircraft, and balloon measurements program for directed observations as well satellite validation. Highly integrated and continuous measurements of ozone, validation, and reanalysis efforts are essential to meet the international scientific and applications goals. In order to understand ozone trends, climate change, and air quality, it is essential to conduct long term measurements of certain other atmospheric species. These species include key source, radical, and reservoir constituents.

  1. Mg line formation in late-type stellar atmospheres: I. The model atom

    CERN Document Server

    Osorio, Y; Lind, K; Belyaev, A K; Spielfiedel, A; Guitou, M; Feautrier, N

    2015-01-01

    Mg is often traced in late-type stars using lines of neutral magnesium, which is expected to be subject to departures from LTE. The astrophysical importance of Mg as well as its relative simplicity from an atomic physics point of view, makes it a prime target and test bed for detailed ab initio non-LTE modelling in stellar atmospheres. For the low-lying states of Mg i, electron collision data were calculated using the R-matrix method. Calculations for collisional broadening by neutral hydrogen were also performed where data were missing. These calculations, together with data from the literature, were used to build a model atom. First, the modelling was tested by comparisons with observed spectra of benchmark stars with well-known parameters. Second, the spectral line behaviour and uncertainties were explored by extensive experiments in which sets of collisional data were changed or removed. The modelled spectra agree well with observed spectra. The line-to-line scatter in the derived abundances shows improve...

  2. Lightning Performance on Overhead Distribution Lines : After Improvement Field Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Zoro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Two feeders of 20 kV overhead distribution lines which are located in a high lightning density area are chosen to be observed as a field study due to their good lightning performance after improvement of lightning protection system. These two feeders used the new overhead ground wire and new line arrester equipped with lightning counter on the main lines. The significant reduced of lines outages are reported. Study was carried out to observe these improvements by comparing to the other two feeders line which are not improved and not equipped yet with the ground wire and line arrester. These two feeders located in the nearby area. Two cameras were installed to record the trajectory of the lightning strikes on the improved lines. Lightning peak currents are measured using magnetic tape measurement system installed on the grounding lead of lightning arrester. Lightning overvoltage calculations are carried out by using several scenarios based on observation results and historical lightning data derived from lightning detection network. Lightning overvoltages caused by indirect or direct strikes are analyzed to get the lightning performance of the lines. The best scenario was chosen and performance of the lines were improved significantly by installing overhead ground wire and improvement of lightning arrester installation.

  3. Ground Based Observation of Isotopic Oxygen in the Martian Atmosphere Using Infrared Heterodyne Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. L.; Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Fast, K. E.; Hewagama, T.; Delgado, J. D.; Sonnabend, G.

    2010-01-01

    Infrared heterodyne spectra of isotopic CO2 in the Martian atmosphere were obtained using the Goddard Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind and Composition, HIPWAC, which was interfaced with the 3-meter telescope at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility- Spectra were colle cted at a resolution of lambda/delta lambda=10(exp 7). Absorption fea tures of the CO2 isotopologues have been identified from which isotop ic ratios of oxygen have been determined. The isotopic ratios O-17/O -16 and O-18/O-16 in the Martian atmosphere can be related to Martian atmospheric evolution and can be compared to isotopic ratios of oxyg en in the Earth's atmosphere. Isotopic carbon and oxygen are importa nt constraints on any theory for the erosion of the Martian primordia l atmosphere and the interaction between the atmosphere and surface o r subsurface chemical reservoirs. This investigation explored the pr esent abundance of the stable isotopes of oxygen in Mars' atmospheric carbon dioxide by measuring rovibrational line absorption in isotop ic species of CO2 using groundbased infrared heterodyne spectroscopy in the vicinity of the 9.6 micron and 10.6 micron CO2 lasing bands. T he target transitions during this observation were O-18 C-12 O-16 as well as O-178 C-12 O-16 and O-16 C-113 O-16 at higher resolving power of lambda/delta lambda=10(exp 7) and with high signal-to-noise ratio (longer integration time) in order to fully characterize the absorpt ion line profiles. The fully-resolved lineshape of both the strong n ormal-isotope and the weak isotopic CO2 lines were measured simultane ously in a single spectrum.

  4. Some characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed by radio-interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Mercier

    Full Text Available Observations of atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs are considered through their effect on the horizontal gradient G of the slant total electron content (slant TEC, which can be directly obtained from two-dimensional radio-interferometric observations of cosmic radio-sources with the Nançay radioheligraph (2.2°E, 47.3°N. Azimuths of propagation can be deduced (modulo 180°. The total database amounts to about 800 h of observations at various elevations, local time and seasons. The main results are:

    line-height: 20px;">a AGWs are partially directive, confirming our previous results.

    line-height: 20px;">b The propagation azimuths considered globally are widely scattered with a preference towards the south.

    line-height: 20px;">c They show a bimodal time distribution with preferential directions towards the SE during daytime and towards the SW during night-time (rather than a clockwise rotation as reported by previous authors.

    line-height: 20px;">d The periods are scattered but are larger during night-time than during daytime by about 60%.

    line-height: 20px;">e The effects observed with the solar radio-sources are significantly stronger than with other radio-sources (particularly at higher elevations, showing the role of the geometry in line of sight-integrated observations.

  5. Observations of land-atmosphere interactions using satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julia; Gentine, Pierre; Konings, Alexandra; Alemohammad, Hamed; Kolassa, Jana

    2016-04-01

    Observations of land-atmosphere interactions using satellite data Julia Green (1), Pierre Gentine (1), Alexandra Konings (1,2), Seyed Hamed Alemohammad (3), Jana Kolassa (4) (1) Columbia University, Earth and Environmental Engineering, NY, NY, USA, (2) Stanford University, Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford, CA, USA, (3) Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Cambridge, MA, USA, (4) National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA. Previous studies of global land-atmosphere hotspots have often relied solely on data from global models with the consequence that they are sensitive to model error. On the other hand, by only analyzing observations, it can be difficult to distinguish causality from mere correlation. In this study, we present a general framework for investigating land-atmosphere interactions using Granger Causality analysis applied to remote sensing data. Based on the near linear relationship between chlorophyll sun induced fluorescence (SIF) and photosynthesis (and thus its relationship with transpiration), we use the GOME-2 fluorescence direct measurements to quantify the surface fluxes between the land and atmosphere. By using SIF data to represent the flux, we bypass the need to use soil moisture data from FLUXNET (limited spatially and temporally) or remote sensing (limited by spatial resolution, canopy interference, measurement depth, and radio frequency interference) thus eliminating additional uncertainty. The Granger Causality analysis allows for the determination of the strength of the two-way causal relationship between SIF and several climatic variables: precipitation, radiation and temperature. We determine that warm regions transitioning from water to energy limitation exhibit strong feedbacks between the land surface and atmosphere due to their high sensitivity to climate and weather variability. Tropical rainforest regions show low magnitudes of

  6. GrayStar: A Web application for pedagogical stellar atmosphere and spectral line modelling and visualisation

    CERN Document Server

    Short, C Ian

    2014-01-01

    GrayStar is a stellar atmospheric and spectral line modelling, post-processing, and visualisation code, suitable for classroom demonstrations and laboratory-style assignments, that has been developed in Java and deployed in JavaScript and HTML. The only software needed to compute models and post-processed observables, and to visualise the resulting atmospheric structure and observables, is a common Web browser. Therefore, the code will run on any common PC or related X86 (-64) computer of the type that typically serves classroom data projectors, is found in undergraduate computer laboratories, or that students themselves own, including those with highly portable form-factors such as net-books and tablets. The user requires no experience with compiling source code, reading data files, or using plotting packages. More advanced students can view the JavaScript source code using the developer tools provided by common Web browsers. The code is based on the approximate gray atmospheric solution and runs quickly eno...

  7. Recent Progress in Atmospheric Observation Research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Recent progress in atmospheric observation techniques,observational systems and their application in China are reviewed.According to different observational platforms,the review is presented in three sections,i.e.,satellite remote sensing(SRS),ground-based observation technologies and applications,and aircraft/balloon measurements.The section"satellite remote sensing"presents advances in SRS techniques,SRS of clouds and aerosols,and SRS of trace gases and temperature/moisture profiles.The section"groundbased observation technologies and applications"focuses on research such as lidar systems and applications,sun/sky radiometer and broadband radiation observations,weather radar and wind profilers,GPS measurements,and some new concept systems.The section"aircraft/balloon measurements"presents some newly developed aircraft-and balloon-based sounding techniques.

  8. Study of the upper atmosphere observation by artificial ion beam

    OpenAIRE

    Sugimoto, Sachiko; Kuninaka, Hitoshi; TOKI, Kyoichiro; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; 杉本 幸子; 國中 均; 都木 恭一郎; 荒川 義博

    2005-01-01

    The observing method that uses ENA (Energetic Neutral Atoms), produced by ion beam injected from an ion thruster, is studied and researched in order to estimate the density of neutral particles in the upper atmosphere. The ion beam experiences charge exchange collision (CEX) with neighboring neutral particles to transform into ENAs. The ENA preserves the information about the particles concerned with those collisions. A new method of estimating the density and the composition of the neutral p...

  9. Observation of Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations in Soudan 2

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, M; Alner, G J; Ayres, D S; Barrett, W L; Border, P M; Cobb, J H; Cockerill, D J A; Courant, H; Demuth, D M; Fields, T H; Gallagher, H R; Goodman, M C; Joffe-Minor, T M; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M; Litchfield, P J; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Milburn, R H; Miller, W H; Mualem, L M; Nelson, J K; Napier, A; Oliver, W P; Pearce, G F; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Ruddick, K; Schneps, J; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Thron, J L; West, N

    2003-01-01

    The effects of oscillations of atmospheric muon neutrinos are observed in the 5.90 fiducial kiloton-year exposure of the Soudan 2 detector. An unbinned maximum likelihood analysis of the neutrino L/E distribution has been carried out using the Feldman-Cousins prescription. The probability of the no oscillation hypothesis is 5.8x10-4. The 90% confidence allowed region in the sin**(2theta), Delta m**2 plane is presented.

  10. Joint Observational Research on Nocturnal Atmospheric Dispersion of Aerosols (JORNADA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    REPORT Joint Observational Research on Nocturnal Atmospheric Dispersion of Aerosols ( JORNADA ) Grant W911NF-07-1-0066 Final Progress Report (January 15...2009) 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Four major analyses were conducted using the stable boundary layer JORNADA data. The first was... JORNADA ) Grant W911NF-07-1-0066 Final Progress Report (January 15, 2009) Report Title ABSTRACT Four major analyses were conducted using the stable

  11. The BErkeley Atmospheric CO2 Observation Network: initial evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Alexis A.; Teige, Virginia E.; Turner, Alexander J.; Newman, Catherine; Kim, Jinsol; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2016-10-01

    With the majority of the world population residing in urban areas, attempts to monitor and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions must necessarily center on cities. However, existing carbon dioxide observation networks are ill-equipped to resolve the specific intra-city emission phenomena targeted by regulation. Here we describe the design and implementation of the BErkeley Atmospheric CO2 Observation Network (BEACO2N), a distributed CO2 monitoring instrument that utilizes low-cost technology to achieve unprecedented spatial density throughout and around the city of Oakland, California. We characterize the network in terms of four performance parameters - cost, reliability, precision, and systematic uncertainty - and find the BEACO2N approach to be sufficiently cost-effective and reliable while nonetheless providing high-quality atmospheric observations. First results from the initial installation successfully capture hourly, daily, and seasonal CO2 signals relevant to urban environments on spatial scales that cannot be accurately represented by atmospheric transport models alone, demonstrating the utility of high-resolution surface networks in urban greenhouse gas monitoring efforts.

  12. CONSTRAINING HIGH-SPEED WINDS IN EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES THROUGH OBSERVATIONS OF ANOMALOUS DOPPLER SHIFTS DURING TRANSIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller-Ricci Kempton, Eliza [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Rauscher, Emily, E-mail: ekempton@ucolick.org [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) dynamical models of hot Jupiter atmospheres predict very strong wind speeds. For tidally locked hot Jupiters, winds at high altitude in the planet's atmosphere advect heat from the day side to the cooler night side of the planet. Net wind speeds on the order of 1-10 km s{sup -1} directed towards the night side of the planet are predicted at mbar pressures, which is the approximate pressure level probed by transmission spectroscopy. These winds should result in an observed blueshift of spectral lines in transmission on the order of the wind speed. Indeed, Snellen et al. recently observed a 2 {+-} 1 km s{sup -1} blueshift of CO transmission features for HD 209458b, which has been interpreted as a detection of the day-to-night (substellar to anti-stellar) winds that have been predicted by 3D atmospheric dynamics modeling. Here, we present the results of a coupled 3D atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model, which predicts the Doppler-shifted spectrum of a hot Jupiter during transit resulting from winds in the planet's atmosphere. We explore four different models for the hot Jupiter atmosphere using different prescriptions for atmospheric drag via interaction with planetary magnetic fields. We find that models with no magnetic drag produce net Doppler blueshifts in the transmission spectrum of {approx}2 km s{sup -1} and that lower Doppler shifts of {approx}1 km s{sup -1} are found for the higher drag cases, results consistent with-but not yet strongly constrained by-the Snellen et al. measurement. We additionally explore the possibility of recovering the average terminator wind speed as a function of altitude by measuring Doppler shifts of individual spectral lines and spatially resolving wind speeds across the leading and trailing terminators during ingress and egress.

  13. Quantifying Atmospheric Moist Processes from Earth Observations. Really?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    The amount of water in the Earth's atmosphere is tiny compared to all other sources of water on our planet, fresh or otherwise. However, this tiny amount of water is fundamental to most aspects of human life. The tiny amount of water that cycles from the Earth's surface, through condensation into clouds in the atmosphere returning as precipitation falling is not only natures way of delivering fresh water to land-locked human societies but it also exerts a fundamental control on our climate system producing the most important feedbacks in the system. The representation of these processes in Earth system models contain many errors that produce well now biases in the hydrological cycle. Surprisingly the parameterizations of these important processes are not well validated with observations. Part of the reason for this situation stems from the fact that process evaluation is difficult to achieve on the global scale since it has commonly been assumed that the static observations available from snap-shots of individual parameters contain little information on processes. One of the successes of the A-Train has been the development of multi-parameter analysis based on the multi-sensor data produced by the satellite constellation. This has led to new insights on how water cycles through the Earth's atmosphere. Examples of these insights will be highlighted. It will be described how the rain formation process has been observed and how this has been used to constrain this process in models, with a huge impact. How these observations are beginning to reveal insights on deep convection and examples of the use these observations applied to models will also be highlighted as will the effects of aerosol on clouds on radiation.

  14. Exploring atmospheric blocking with GPS radio occultation observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Brunner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric blocking has been closely investigated in recent years due to its impact on weather and climate, such as heat waves, droughts, and flooding. We use, for the first time, satellite-based observations from Global Positioning System (GPS radio occultation (RO and explore their ability to resolve blocking in order to potentially open up new avenues complementing models and re-analyses. RO delivers globally available and vertically high resolved profiles of atmospheric variables such as temperature and geopotential height (GPH. Applying a standard blocking detection algorithm we find that RO data robustly capture blocking as demonstrated for two well-known blocking events over Russia in summer 2010 and over Greenland in late winter 2013. During blocking episodes, vertically resolved GPH gradients show a distinct anomalous behavior compared to climatological conditions up to 300 hPa and sometimes even further up to the tropopause. The accompanied increase in GPH of up to 300 m in the upper troposphere yields a pronounced tropopause height increase. Corresponding temperatures rise up to 10 K in the middle and lower troposphere. These results demonstrate the feasibility and potential of RO to detect and resolve blocking and in particular to explore the vertical structure of the atmosphere during blocking episodes. This new observation-based view is available globally at the same quality so that also blocking in the Southern Hemisphere can be studied with the same reliability as in the Northern Hemisphere.

  15. Line parameters for the 01111-00001 band of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O{sup 18}O from SOIR measurements of the Venus atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilquet, V. [Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, 3 av. Circulaire, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: valerie.wilquet@aeronomie.be; Mahieux, A.; Vandaele, A.C. [Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, 3 av. Circulaire, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Perevalov, V.I.; Tashkun, S.A. [Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Akademitcheskii av., 1, 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Fedorova, A.; Korablev, O. [Space Research Institute (IKI), 84/32 Profsoyuznaya, 117810 Moscow (Russian Federation); Montmessin, F.; Dahoo, R.; Bertaux, J.-L. [Service d' Aeronomie du CNRS, BP3, 91371, Verrieres-le-Buisson (France); Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Universite de Versailles-Saint-Quentin, 78 Saint Quentin en Yvelines (France)

    2008-04-15

    CO{sub 2} is the major constituent of the atmosphere of Venus. Absorption lines due to its {sup 12}C{sup 16}O{sup 18}O isotopologue have been observed for the first time in Venus spectra in the 2930-3015 cm{sup -1} spectral region, where the HITRAN database does not contain any line from this isotopologue. The measurements were performed by the SOIR instrument, which is part of the SPICAV/SOIR instrument on board the Venus Express mission of ESA. SOIR measured the atmospheric transmission of the upper atmosphere of Venus (z>70 km) by performing a solar occultation experiment using the atmosphere as a gigantic absorption cell. The identification of this newly observed band was first made recently from Mars atmosphere observations by US colleagues. We have made independent theoretical calculations of the positions of the lines of this new 01111-00001 absorption band, which coincide perfectly with the positions of the observed lines. Assuming an oxygen isotopic ratio similar to the one measured previously in the lower atmosphere of Venus, the line strengths of each observed line are deduced and listed.

  16. CAOS: the nested catchment soil-vegetation-atmosphere observation platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Markus; Blume, Theresa

    2016-04-01

    Most catchment based observations linking hydrometeorology, ecohydrology, soil hydrology and hydrogeology are typically not integrated with each other and lack a consistent and appropriate spatial-temporal resolution. Within the research network CAOS (Catchments As Organized Systems), we have initiated and developed a novel and integrated observation platform in several catchments in Luxembourg. In 20 nested catchments covering three distinct geologies the subscale processes at the bedrock-soil-vegetation-atmosphere interface are being monitored at 46 sensor cluster locations. Each sensor cluster is designed to observe a variety of different fluxes and state variables above and below ground, in the saturated and unsaturated zone. The numbers of sensors are chosen to capture the spatial variability as well the average dynamics. At each of these sensor clusters three soil moisture profiles with sensors at different depths, four soil temperature profiles as well as matric potential, air temperature, relative humidity, global radiation, rainfall/throughfall, sapflow and shallow groundwater and stream water levels are measured continuously. In addition, most sensors also measure temperature (water, soil, atmosphere) and electrical conductivity. This setup allows us to determine the local water and energy balance at each of these sites. The discharge gauging sites in the nested catchments are also equipped with automatic water samplers to monitor water quality and water stable isotopes continuously. Furthermore, water temperature and electrical conductivity observations are extended to over 120 locations distributed across the entire stream network to capture the energy exchange between the groundwater, stream water and atmosphere. The measurements at the sensor clusters are complemented by hydrometeorological observations (rain radar, network of distrometers and dense network of precipitation gauges) and linked with high resolution meteorological models. In this

  17. Fine structure of charge exchange lines observed in laboratory plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, K.; Nishimura, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Kondo, K.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the fine structure of charge exchange lines appears only at the plasma edge or in the recombining phase where the ion temperature is low enough. The observed spectra in Li III and C VI are consistent with the sum of fine-structure components populated by statistical weights (assuming complete l-mixing) not by direct charge exchange cross sections. Some discrepancy was observed in the intensity ratio of fine-structure components between the observation and calculation for C VI in the recombining phase. The fine-structure of charge exchange lines gives an apparent Doppler shift in plasma rotation velocity measurement using charge exchange spectroscopy. (author)

  18. Dynamical Behavior of Meteor in AN Atmosphere: Theory vs Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsevich, Maria

    Up to now the only quantities which directly follow from the available meteor observations are its brightness, the height above sea level, the length along the trajectory, and as a consequence its velocity as a function of time. Other important parameters like meteoroid's mass, its shape, bulk and grain density, temperature remain unknown and should be found based on physical theories and special experiments. In this study I will consider modern methods for evaluating meteoroid parameters from observational data, and some of their applications. The study in particular takes an approach in modelling the meteoroids' mass and other properties from the aerodynamical point of view, e.g. from the rate of body deceleration in the atmosphere as opposed to conventionally used luminosity [1]. An analytical model of the atmospheric entry is calculated for registered meteors using published observational data and evaluating parameters describing drag, ablation and rotation rate of meteoroid along the luminous segment of the trajectory. One of the special features of this approach is the possibility of considering a change in body shape during its motion in the atmosphere. The correct mathematical modelling of meteor events is necessary for further studies of consequences for collisions of cosmic bodies with the Earth [2]. It also helps us to estimate the key parameters of the meteoroids, including deceleration, pre-entry mass, terminal mass, ablation coefficient, effective destruction enthalpy, and heat-transfer coefficient. With this information, one can use models for the dust influx onto Earth to estimate the number of meteors detected by a camera of a given sensitivity. References 1. Gritsevich M. I. Determination of Parameters of Meteor Bodies based on Flight Obser-vational Data // Advances in Space Research, 44, p. 323-334, 2009. 2. Gritsevich M. I., Stulov V. P. and Turchak L. I. Classification of Consequences for Col-lisions of Natural Cosmic Bodies with the Earth

  19. Radar observations of individual rain drops in the free atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jerome M; Flatau, Piotr J; Harasti, Paul R; Yates, Robert D; Littleton, Ricky; Pritchard, Michael S; Fischer, Jody M; Fischer, Erin J; Kohri, William J; Vetter, Jerome R; Richman, Scott; Baranowski, Dariusz B; Anderson, Mark J; Fletcher, Ed; Lando, David W

    2012-06-12

    Atmospheric remote sensing has played a pivotal role in the increasingly sophisticated representation of clouds in the numerical models used to assess global and regional climate change. This has been accomplished because the underlying bulk cloud properties can be derived from a statistical analysis of the returned microwave signals scattered by a diverse ensemble comprised of numerous cloud hydrometeors. A new Doppler radar, previously used to track small debris particles shed from the NASA space shuttle during launch, is shown to also have the capacity to detect individual cloud hydrometeors in the free atmosphere. Similar to the traces left behind on film by subatomic particles, larger cloud particles were observed to leave a well-defined radar signature (or streak), which could be analyzed to infer the underlying particle properties. We examine the unique radar and environmental conditions leading to the formation of the radar streaks and develop a theoretical framework which reveals the regulating role of the background radar reflectivity on their observed characteristics. This main expectation from theory is examined through an analysis of the drop properties inferred from radar and in situ aircraft measurements obtained in two contrasting regions of an observed multicellular storm system. The observations are placed in context of the parent storm circulation through the use of the radar's unique high-resolution waveforms, which allow the bulk and individual hydrometeor properties to be inferred at the same time.

  20. The formation of IRIS diagnostics II. The formation of the Mg II h&k lines in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Leenaarts, J; Carlsson, M; Uitenbroek, H; de Pontieu, B

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) small explorer mission will study how the solar atmosphere is energized. IRIS contains an imaging spectrograph that covers the Mg II h&k lines as well as a slit-jaw imager centered at Mg II k. Understanding the observations requires forward modeling of Mg II h&k line formation from 3D radiation-MHD models. We compute the vertically emergent h&k intensity from a snapshot of a dynamic 3D radiation-MHD model of the solar atmosphere, and investigate which diagnostic information about the atmosphere is contained in the synthetic line profiles. We find that the Doppler shift of the central line depression correlates strongly with the vertical velocity at optical depth unity, which is typically located less than 200 km below the transition region (TR). By combining the Doppler shifts of the h and the k line we can retrieve the sign of the velocity gradient just below the TR. The intensity in the central line depression is anticorrelated with the formati...

  1. Line-by-line analysis of Neptune's near-IR spectrum observed with Gemini/NIFS and VLT/CRIRES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, P. G. J.; Lellouch, E.; de Bergh, C.; Courtin, R.; Bézard, B.; Fletcher, L. N.; Orton, G. S.; Teanby, N. A.; Calcutt, S. B.; Tice, D.; Hurley, J.; Davis, G. R.

    2014-01-01

    New line data describing the absorption of CH4 and CH3D from 1.26 to 1.71 μm (WKMC-80K, Campargue, A., Wang, L., Mondelain, D., Kassi, S., Bézard, B., Lellouch, E., Coustenis, A., de Bergh, C., Hirtzig, M., Drossart, P. [2012]. Icarus 219, 110-128) have been applied to the analysis of Gemini-N/NIFS observations of Neptune made in 2009 and VLT/CRIRES observations made in 2010. The new line data are found to greatly improve the fit to the observed spectra and present a considerable advance over previous methane datasets. The improved fits lead to an empirically derived wavelength-dependent correction to the scattering properties of the main observable cloud deck at 2-3 bars that is very similar to the correction determined for Uranus' lower cloud using the same line dataset by Irwin et al. (Irwin, P.G.J., de Bergh, C., Courtin, R., Bézard, B., Teanby, N.A., Davis, G.R., Fletcher, L.N., Orton, G.S., Calcutt, S.B., Tice, D., Hurley, J. [2012]. Icarus 220, 369-382). By varying the abundance of CH3D in our simulations, analysis of the Gemini/NIFS observations leads to a new determination of the CH3D/CH4 ratio for Neptune of 3.0-0.9+1.0×10-4, which is smaller than previous determinations, but is identical (to within error) with the CH3D/CH4 ratio of 2.9-0.5+0.9×10-4 derived by a similar analysis of Gemini/NIFS observations of Uranus made in the same year. Thus it appears that the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune have an almost identical D/H ratio, which suggests that the icy planetisimals forming these planets came from the same source reservoir, or a reservoir that was well-mixed at the locations of ice giant formation, assuming complete mixing between the atmosphere and interior of both these planets. VLT/CRIRES observations of Neptune have also been analysed with the WKMC-80K methane line database, yielding very good fits, with little evidence for missing absorption features. The CRIRES spectra indicate that the mole fraction of CO at the 2-3 bar level must be

  2. Understanding atmospheric peroxyformic acid chemistry: observation, modeling and implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence and importance of peroxyformic acid (PFA in the atmosphere has been under controversy. We present here, for the first time, the observation data for PFA from four field measurements carried out in China. These data provided powerful evidence that PFA can stay in the atmosphere, typically in dozens of pptv level. The relationship between PFA and other detected peroxides was examined. The results showed that PFA had a strong positive correlation with its homolog, peroxyacetic acid, due to their similar sources and sinks. Through an evaluation of PFA production and removal rates, we proposed that the reactions between peroxyformyl radical (HC(OO2 and formaldehyde or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2 were likely to be the major source and degradation into formic acid (FA was likely to be the major sink for PFA. Based on a box model evaluation, we proposed that the HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry was a major source for FA under low NOx conditions. Furthermore, it is found that the impact of the HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry on radical cycling was dependent on the yield of HC(OO2 radical from HC(O + O2 reaction. When this yield exceeded 50%, the HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry should not be neglected for calculating the radical budget. To make clear the exact importance of HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry in the atmosphere, further kinetic, field and modeling studies are required.

  3. Emergence of granular-sized magnetic bubbles through the solar atmosphere: I. Spectropolarimetric observations and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz, Ada; Hansteen, Viggo; Rodriguez, Jaime de la Cruz; van der Voort, Luc Rouppe

    2013-01-01

    We study a granular-sized magnetic flux emergence event that occurred in NOAA 11024 in July 2009. The observations were made with the CRISP spectropolarimeter at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope achieving a spatial resolution of 0.14". Simultaneous full Stokes observations of the two photospheric Fe I lines at 630.2 nm and the chromospheric Ca II 854.2 nm line allow us to describe in detail the emergence process across the solar atmosphere. We report here on 3D semi-spherical bubble events, where instead of simple magnetic footpoints, we observe complex semi-circular feet straddling a few granules. The most characteristic signature in these events is the observation of a dark bubble in filtergrams taken in the wings of the Ca II 854.2 nm line. We can infer how the bubble rises through the solar atmosphere as we see it progressing from the wings to the core of Ca II 854.2 nm. In the photosphere, the magnetic bubble shows mean upward Doppler velocities of 2 km/s. In about 3.5 minutes it travels some 1100 km to r...

  4. Atmospheric aerosol layers over Bangkok Metropolitan Region from CALIPSO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridhikitti, Arika

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies suggested that aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Earth Observing System satellite retrievals could be used for inference of ground-level air quality in various locations. This application may be appropriate if pollution in elevated atmospheric layers is insignificant. This study investigated the significance of elevated air pollution layers over the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR) from all available aerosol layer scenes taken from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) for years 2007 to 2011. The results show that biomass burning smoke layers alone were the most frequently observed. The smoke layers accounted for high AOD variations and increased AOD levels. In the dry seasons, the smoke layers alone with high AOD levels were likely brought to the BMR via northeasterly to easterly prevailing winds and found at altitudes above the typical BMR mixing heights of approximately 0.7 to 1.5 km. The smoke should be attributed to biomass burning emissions outside the BMR.

  5. Ground-Based Observations of Unusual Atmospheric Light Emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨静; 陆高鹏; 杜艰; 潘蔚琳

    2014-01-01

    Unusual atmospheric light emissions were observed from a station located in Shandong Province of East China. The main morphology of these events includes a bright glowing spot, which differs distinctly from any type of transient luminous events (TLEs) well recognized in literature, such as sprites, halos, elves, gigantic jets, blue jets, and blue starters. A comparison between the observations of four such light emission events and the data from lightning detection networks reveals no correlation between these events and the intense lightning activity in the adjacent area. The events reported in this paper may imply the existence of a new phenomenon with a mechanism that remains to be investigated with further observation and complementary lightning measurement.

  6. Development of artificial meteor for observation of upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masaki; Sahara, Hironori; Abe, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Takeo; Nojiri, Yuta; Okajima, Lena

    2016-04-01

    This study proposes a method for the observation of the upper atmosphere using an artificial meteor injected by a mass driver installed on a microsatellite. The mass driver injects a pill at a velocity of 200 m/s and deorbits it into the atmosphere. The emission of the pill can then be observed from the ground at the necessary time and location. This approach could contribute to a better understanding of the global environment as well as different aspects of astronomy and planetary science. To realize the proposed method, the required size and emission of the pill have to be determined. Therefore, we conducted flow-field simulations, spectroscopic estimations, and an experiment on an artificial meteor in the arc heater wind tunnel at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (ISAS/JAXA). From the results, we confirmed that the light emission could be observed as a shooting star by the naked eye and thus verified the feasibility of the method.

  7. Non-LTE Line Blanketing in Stars With Extended Outflowing Atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, D. J.; Miller, D. L.

    1995-05-01

    With continuing advances in radiative transfer techniques, increases in computing power, and the availability of at least some of the necessary atomic data, it is now possible to consider the computation of detailed non-LTE model atmospheres in which the full effects of non-LTE line blanketing are taken into account. We discuss our own implementation of non-LTE line blanketing in a spherical non-LTE code developed for the investigation of objects with extended outflows. A partial linearization technique is used to simultaneously solve the radiative transfer equation in conjunction with the equations of statistical equilibrium. Convergence properties are similar to that obtained with an ``Optimal'' Approximate-Lambda Operator. CNO line blanketing has been incorporated without major difficulty, while Fe blanketing is currently being installed. Comparisons of model spectra with recent HST observations of an LMC WC star will be presented. When completed we anticipate the code will be applicable to the study of a wide range of phenomena exhibiting outflows including Luminous-Blue variables, Supernovae, Wold-Rayet stars and Novae. Partial support for this work was provided by NASA through grant Nos GO-5460.01-93A and GO-4550.01-92A from the Space Science Institute which is operated under the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Support from NASA award NAGW-3828 is also gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Atmospheric Effects on Cosmic Ray Air Showers Observed with HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma Ray detector (HAWC), currently under construction on the Sierra Negra volcano near Puebla, Mexico, can be used to study solar physics with its scaler data acquisition system. Increases in the scaler rates are used to observe GeV cosmic rays from solar flares while decreases in the rates show the heliospheric disturbances associated with coronal mass ejections. However, weather conditions and height-dependent state variables such as pressure and temperature affect the production of extensive particle air showers that can be detected by the scaler system. To see if these atmospheric effects can be removed, we obtained local weather data from the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) and the local weather station at HAWC. The scaler pulse rates were then correlated to the pressure and temperature. We present data from a Forbush decrease observed by HAWC following a significant coronal mass ejection in April 2013, and describe our efforts to remove atmospheric variations from the scaler counts. This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation’s REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881 to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  9. Clear-air radar observations of the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Turker

    2001-10-01

    This dissertation presents the design and operation of a high-resolution frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM- CW) radar system to study the structure and dynamics of clear-air turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This sensitive radar can image the vertical structure of the ABL with both high spatial and temporal resolutions, and provide both qualitative information about the morphology of clear-air structures and quantitative information on the intensity of fluctuations in refractive-index of air. The principles of operation and the hardware and data acquisition characteristics of the radar are described in the dissertation. In October 1999, the radar participated in the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study (CASES'99) Experiment to characterize the temporal structure and evolution of the boundary-layer features in both convective and stable conditions. The observed structures include clear-air convection, boundary layer evolution, gravity waves, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, stably stratified layers, and clear-air turbulence. Many of the S-band radar images also show high- reflectivity returns from Rayleigh scatterers such as insects. An adaptive median filtering technique based on local statistics has, therefore, been developed to discriminate between Bragg and Rayleigh scattering in clear-air radar observations. The filter is tested on radar observations of clear air convection with comparison to two commonly used image processing techniques. The dissertation also examines the statistical mean of the radar-measured C2n for clear-air convection, and compares it with the theoretical predictions. The study also shows that the inversion height, local thickness of the inversion layer, and the height of the elevated atmospheric layers can be estimated from the radar reflectivity measurements. In addition, comparisons to the radiosonde-based height estimates are made. To examine the temporal and spatial structure of C2n , the dissertation

  10. Observations and modelling of Helium lines in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, Paulo J A; Labrosse, Nicolas; Kerr, Graham S

    2015-01-01

    We explore the response of the He II 304 {\\AA} and He I 584 {\\AA} line intensities to electron beam heating in solar flares using radiative hydrodynamic simulations. Comparing different electron beams parameters, we found that the intensities of both He lines are very sensitive to the energy flux deposited in the chromosphere, or more specifically to the heating rate, with He II 304 {\\AA} being more sensitive to the heating than He I 584 {\\AA}. Therefore, the He line ratio increases for larger heating rates in the chromosphere. A similar trend is found in observations, using SDO/EVE He irradiance ratios and estimates of the electron beam energy rate obtained from hard X-ray data. From the simulations, we also found that spectral index of the electrons can affect the He ratio but a similar effect was not found in the observations.

  11. The Lesson Observation On-Line (Evidence Portfolio) Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David G.

    2015-01-01

    At a time when teacher training is being moved to school-based programmes it is important to engage in a research-informed dialogue about creating more distinctive, and cost-effective 21st century models of teacher training. Three years ago I began feasibility field testing the Lesson Observation On-line (Evidence Portfolio) Platform [LOOP]…

  12. Mars MetNet Mission - Martian Atmospheric Observational Post Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukka, Harri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Genzer, Maria; Vazquez, Luis; Siikonen, Timo; Palin, Matti

    2016-10-01

    A new kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars is under development in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Lavochkin Association (LA), Space Research Institute (IKI) and Institutio Nacional de Tecnica Aerospacial (INTA). The Mars MetNet mission is based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called MetNet Lander (MNL).The scientific payload of the Mars MetNet Precursor mission is divided into three categories: Atmospheric instruments, Optical devices and Composition and structure devices. Each of the payload instruments will provide significant insights in to the Martian atmospheric behavior.The key technologies of the MetNet Lander have been qualified and the electrical qualification model (EQM) of the payload bay has been built and successfully tested.Full Qualification Model (QM) of the MetNet landing unit with the Precursor Mission payload is currently under functional tests. In the near future the QM unit will be exposed to environmental tests with qualification levels including vibrations, thermal balance, thermal cycling and mechanical impact shock. One complete flight unit of the entry, descent and landing systems (EDLS) has been manufactured and tested with acceptance levels. Another flight-like EDLS has been exposed to most of the qualification tests, and hence it may be used for flight after refurbishments. Accordingly two flight-capable EDLS systems exist. The eventual goal is to create a network of atmospheric observational posts around the Martian surface. The next step in the MetNet Precursor Mission is the demonstration of the technical robustness and scientific capabilities of the MetNet type of landing vehicle. Definition of the Precursor Mission and discussions on launch opportunities are currently under way. The baseline program development funding exists for the next five years. Flight unit manufacture of the payload bay takes about 18 months, and it will be commenced after the Precursor Mission has been defined.

  13. Evershed flow observed in neutral and singly ionized iron lines

    CERN Document Server

    Khomenko, E; Shchukina, N; Diaz, A

    2015-01-01

    The amplitudes of the Evershed flow are measured using pairs of carefully selected FeI and FeII spectral lines located close in wavelength and registered simultaneously. A sunspot belonging to the NOAA 11582 group was scanned using the spectrograph of the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife). Velocities were extracted from intensity profiles using the lambda-meter technique. The formation heights of the observed spectral lines were calculated using semi-empirical models of a bright and dark penumbral filament taking into account the sunspot location at the limb. Our objective is to compare azimuthally averaged amplitudes of the Evershed flow extracted from neutral and ion lines. We find measurable differences in the radial component of the flow. All five pairs of lines show the same tendency, with a few hundred m/s larger amplitude of the flow measured from FeI lines compared to FeII lines. This tendency is preserved at all photospheric heights and radial distances in the penumbra....

  14. Evershed flow observed in neutral and singly ionized iron lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomenko, E.; Collados, M.; Shchukina, N.; Díaz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The amplitudes of the Evershed flow are measured using pairs of carefully selected Fe i and Fe ii spectral lines that are close in wavelength and registered simultaneously. A sunspot belonging to the NOAA 11582 group was scanned using the spectrograph of the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife). Velocities were extracted from intensity profiles using the λ-meter technique. The formation heights of the observed spectral lines were calculated using semi-empirical models of a bright and dark penumbral filament taking into account the sunspot location at the limb. Our objective is to compare azimuthally averaged amplitudes of the Evershed flow extracted from neutral and ion lines. We find measurable differences in the radial component of the flow. All five pairs of lines show the same tendency; the flow measured from the Fe i lines has an amplitude that is a few hundred ms-1 larger than that of the Fe ii lines. This tendency is preserved at all photospheric heights and radial distances in the penumbra. We discuss the possible origin of this effect.

  15. Atmospheric neutrino observations in the MINOS far detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, John Derek [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-01

    This thesis presents the results of atmospheric neutrino observations from a 12.23 ktyr exposure of the 5.42 kt MINOS Far Detector between 1st August 2003 until 1st March 2006. The separation of atmospheric neutrino events from the large background of cosmic muon events is discussed. A total of 277 candidate contained vertex v/$\\bar{v}$μ CC data events are observed, with an expectation of 354.4±47.4 events in the absence of neutrino oscillations. A total of 182 events have clearly identified directions, 77 data events are identified as upward going, 105 data events are identified as downward going. The ratio between the measured and expected up/down ratio is: R$data\\atop{u/d}$/R$MC\\atop{u/d}$ = 0.72$+0.13\\atop{-0.11}$(stat.)± 0.04 (sys.). This is 2.1σ away from the expectation for no oscillations. A total of 167 data events have clearly identified charge, 112 are identified as vμ events, 55 are identified as $\\bar{v}$μ events. This is the largest sample of charge-separated contained-vertex atmospheric neutrino interactions so far observed. The ratio between the measured and expected $\\bar{v}$μ/vμ ratio is: R$data\\atop{$\\bar{v}$v}$/ R$MC\\atop{$\\bar{v}$v}$ = 0.93 $+0.19\\atop{-0.15}$ (stat.) ± 0.12 (sys.). This is consistent with vμ and $\\bar{v}$μ having the same oscillation parameters. Bayesian methods were used to generate a log(L/E) value for each event. A maximum likelihood analysis is used to determine the allowed regions for the oscillation parameters Δm$2\\atop{32}$ and sin223. The likelihood function uses the uncertainty in log(L/E) to bin events in order to extract as much information from the data as possible. This fit rejects the null oscillations hypothesis at the 98% confidence level. A fit to independent vμ and $\\bar{v}$μ oscillation assuming maximal mixing for both is also performed. The projected

  16. Atmospheric Variations as observed by IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Tilav, Serap; Kuwabara, Takao; Rocco, Dominick; Rothmaier, Florian; Simmons, Matt; Wissing, Henrike

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the correlation of rates in IceCube with long and short term variations in the South Pole atmosphere. The yearly temperature variation in the middle stratosphere (30-60 hPa) is highly correlated with the high energy muon rate observed deep in the ice, and causes a +/-10% seasonal modulation in the event rate. The counting rates of the surface detectors, which are due to secondary particles of relatively low energy (muons, electrons and photons), have a negative correlation with temperatures in the lower layers of the stratosphere (40-80 hPa), and are modulated at a level of +/-5%. The region of the atmosphere between pressure levels 20-120 hPa, where the first cosmic ray interactions occur and the produced pions/kaons interact or decay to muons, is the Antarctic ozone layer. The anticorrelation between surface and deep ice trigger rates reflects the properties of pion/kaon decay and interaction as the density of the stratospheric ozone layer changes. Therefore, IceCube closely probes the ozon...

  17. Center to limb observations and modeling of the Ca I 4227 A line

    CERN Document Server

    Supriya, H D; Nagendra, K N; Stenflo, J O; Bianda, M; Ramelli, R; Ravindra, B; Anusha, L S

    2014-01-01

    The observed center-to-limb variation (CLV) of the scattering polarization in different lines of the Second Solar Spectrum can be used to constrain the height variation of various atmospheric parameters, in particular the magnetic fields via the Hanle effect. Here we attempt to model non-magnetic CLV observations of the $Q/I$ profiles of the Ca I 4227 A line recorded with the ZIMPOL-3 at IRSOL. For modeling, we use the polarized radiative transfer with partial frequency redistribution with a number of realistic 1-D model atmospheres. We find that all the standard FAL model atmospheres, used by us, fail to simultaneously fit the observed ($I$, $Q/I$) at all the limb distances ($\\mu$). However, an attempt is made to find a single model which can provide a fit at least to the CLV of the observed $Q/I$ instead of a simultaneous fit to the ($I$, $Q/I$) at all $\\mu$. To this end we construct a new 1-D model by combining two of the standard models after modifying their temperature structures in the appropriate heigh...

  18. Detection of carbon monoxide and water absorption lines in an exoplanet atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopacky, Quinn M; Barman, Travis S; Macintosh, Bruce A; Marois, Christian

    2013-03-22

    Determining the atmospheric structure and chemical composition of an exoplanet remains a formidable goal. Fortunately, advancements in the study of exoplanets and their atmospheres have come in the form of direct imaging--spatially resolving the planet from its parent star--which enables high-resolution spectroscopy of self-luminous planets in jovian-like orbits. Here, we present a spectrum with numerous, well-resolved molecular lines from both water and carbon monoxide from a massive planet orbiting less than 40 astronomical units from the star HR 8799. These data reveal the planet's chemical composition, atmospheric structure, and surface gravity, confirming that it is indeed a young planet. The spectral lines suggest an atmospheric carbon-to-oxygen ratio that is greater than that of the host star, providing hints about the planet's formation.

  19. Mercury's Atmosphere and Magnetosphere: MESSENGER Third Flyby Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Johnson, Catherine L.; Gloeckler, George; Killen, Rosemary M.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McClintock, William; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Sprague, Ann L.; Vevack, Ronald J., Jr.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury en route to orbit insertion about the innermost planet took place on 29 September 2009. The earlier 14 January and 6 October 2008 encounters revealed that Mercury's magnetic field is highly dipolar and stable over the 35 years since its discovery by Mariner 10; that a structured, temporally variable exosphere extends to great altitudes on the dayside and forms a long tail in the anti-sunward direction; a cloud of planetary ions encompasses the magnetosphere from the dayside bow shock to the downstream magnetosheath and magnetotail; and that the magnetosphere undergoes extremely intense magnetic reconnect ion in response to variations in the interplanetary magnetic field. Here we report on new results derived from observations from MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS), Magnetometer (MAG), and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) taken during the third flyby.

  20. Microwave atmospheric sounder for earth limb observations from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (MAS) experiment which will be performed from a Spacelab pallet on board the Shuttle to study the dynamic structure of the mesosphere and stratosphere is described. The MAS package is the 4th mode of the microwave remote sensing experiment and comprises a SAR, a frequency scatterometer, and a passive radiometer. An elevation scan mode will involve observing through the elevation angle range of 10-16 deg at a constant velocity of 1.25 deg/sec. In a pointing mode, the pallet will operate at a fixed angle which can be changed by telemetered command to within 0.04 deg accuracy. A parabolic antenna receives the earth limb radiation at 62, 184, and 204 GHz. Radiometers down-convert the signal to around 10 GHz for spectral analysis based on chirp compressive receivers with 138 channels, each having 10 bit resolution.

  1. Near Real Time website for IASI observations of atmospheric anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayer, Catherine; Grainger, Don; Marsh, Kevin; Carboni, Elisa; Ventress, Lucy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Rapid analysis of satellite observations of the state of the atmosphere and the contaminant levels within it can be used for pollution monitoring, forest fire detection and volcanic activity monitoring. There are numerous operational satellite instruments for which this is possible. The IASI instruments, currently flying on board the MetOp-A and MetOp-B satellite platforms, are used to produce Near Real Time (NRT) data using analysis algorithms developed by Oxford University. The data is then displayed on a website within 3 hours of measurement. This allows for the semi-continuous monitoring of the state of the atmosphere over most of the globe, both in daylight and at night. Global coverage is achieved 4 times per day, which is a significant advantage over most of the alternatives, either geostationary, giving limited spatial coverage, or UV instruments which are only able to observe during the daylight side of the orbit. The website includes flags for atmospheric contaminants detectable by IASI, including dust, biomass burning-derived species and volcanic ash and SO2. In the near future, the website will be developed to also include a quantitative estimate of the mass loading of SO2 contained within any volcanic cloud. Emissions of volcanic products, such as ash and SO2, are useful indicators of a change in the activity level of a volcano. Since many volcanoes are only monitored by remote sensing methods, such as satellite instruments, this can be the only such indicator available. These emissions are also dangerous to passing aircraft, causing damage to external surfaces of the plane and to the engines, sometimes leading to failure. Evacuation of regions surrounding volcanoes, and cessation or diversion of air traffic around actively erupting volcanoes is costly and highly disruptive but is sometimes required. Up to date information is of critical importance as to when to make these sensitive decisions. An archive of data will be available to allow for easy

  2. Initial analyses of surface spectral radiance between observations and Line-By-Line calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, P.D.; Clough, S.A. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Miller, N.E.; Shippert, T.R.; Turner, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The evaluation an improvement of radiative transfer calculations are essential to attain improved performance of general circulation models (GCMs) for climate change applications. A Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) is being conducted to analyze the spectral residuals between the downwelling longwave radiance measured by the University of Wisconsin Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and spectral radiance calculated by the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM). The three critical components of this study are (1) the assessment of the quality of the high resolution AERI measurements, (2) the assessment of the ability to define the atmospheric state in the radiating column, and (3) the evaluation of the capability of LBLRTM. Validations have been performed on spectral radiance data, obtained from April 1994 through July 1994, through the analysis of the spectral interval and physical process. The results are archived as a function of time, enabling the retrieval of specific data and facilitating investigations and diurnal effects, seasonal effects, and longer-term trends. While the initial focus is restricted to clear-sky analyses, efforts are under way to include the effects of clouds and aerosols. Plans are well formulated for the extension of the current approach to the shortwave. An overview of the concept of the QME is described by Miller et al. (1994), and a detailed description of this study is provided by Clough et al. (1994).

  3. Height formation of bright points observed by IRIS in Mg II line wings during flux emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubecka, M.; Schmieder, B.; Berlicki, A.; Heinzel, P.; Dalmasse, K.; Mein, P.

    2016-09-01

    Context. A flux emergence in the active region AR 111850 was observed on September 24, 2013 with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Many bright points are associated with the new emerging flux and show enhancement brightening in the UV spectra. Aims: The aim of this work is to compute the altitude formation of the compact bright points (CBs) observed in Mg II lines in the context of searching Ellerman bombs (EBs). Methods: IRIS provided two large dense rasters of spectra in Mg II h and k lines, Mg II triplet, C II and Si IV lines covering all the active region and slit jaws in the two bandpasses (1400 Å and 2796 Å) starting at 11:44 UT and 15:39 UT, and lasting 20 min each. Synthetic profiles of Mg II and Hα lines are computed with non-local thermodynamic equlibrium (NLTE) radiative transfer treatment in 1D solar atmosphere model including a hotspot region defined by three parameters: temperature, altitude, and width. Results: Within the two IRIS rasters, 74 CBs are detected in the far wings of the Mg II lines (at +/-1 Å and 3.5 Å). Around 10% of CBs have a signature in Si IV and CII. NLTE models with a hotspot located in the low atmosphere were found to fit a sample of Mg II profiles in CBs. The Hα profiles computed with these Mg II CB models are consistent with typical EB profiles observed from ground based telescopes e.g. THEMIS. A 2D NLTE modelling of fibrils (canopy) demonstrates that the Mg II line centres can be significantly affected but not the peaks and the wings of Mg II lines. Conclusions: We conclude that the bright points observed in Mg II lines can be formed in an extended domain of altitudes in the photosphere and/or the chromosphere (400 to 750 km). Our results are consistent with the theory of heating by Joule dissipation in the atmosphere produced by magnetic field reconnection during flux emergence.

  4. Radiative transfer in CO2-rich atmospheres: 1. Collisional line mixing implies a colder early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozak, N.; Aharonson, O.; Halevy, I.

    2016-06-01

    Fast and accurate radiative transfer methods are essential for modeling CO2-rich atmospheres, relevant to the climate of early Earth and Mars, present-day Venus, and some exoplanets. Although such models already exist, their accuracy may be improved as better theoretical and experimental constraints become available. Here we develop a unidimensional radiative transfer code for CO2-rich atmospheres, using the correlated k approach and with a focus on modeling early Mars. Our model differs from existing models in that it includes the effects of CO2 collisional line mixing in the calculation of the line-by-line absorption coefficients. Inclusion of these effects results in model atmospheres that are more transparent to infrared radiation and, therefore, in colder surface temperatures at radiative-convective equilibrium, compared with results of previous studies. Inclusion of water vapor in the model atmosphere results in negligible warming due to the low atmospheric temperatures under a weaker early Sun, which translate into climatically unimportant concentrations of water vapor. Overall, the results imply that sustained warmth on early Mars would not have been possible with an atmosphere containing only CO2 and water vapor, suggesting that other components of the early Martian climate system are missing from current models or that warm conditions were not long lived.

  5. Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmosphere: Studies of Pressure-Broadening of Alkali Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Hashima (Technical Monitor); Kirby, K.; Babb, J.; Yoshino, K.

    2005-01-01

    We report on progress made in a joint program of theoretical and experimental research to study the line-broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with species such as helium and molecular hydrogen. Accurate knowledge of the line profiles of Na and K as a function of temperature and pressure will allow such lines to serve as valuable diagnostics of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extra-solar giant planets. A new experimental apparatus has been designed, built and tested over the past year, and we are poised to begin collecting data on the first system of interest, the potassium resonance lines perturbed by collisions with helium. On the theoretical front, calculations of line-broadening due to sodium collisions with helium are nearly complete, using accurate molecular potential energy curves and transition moments just recently computed for this system. In addition we have completed calculations of the three relevant potential energy curves and associated transition moments for K - He, using the MOLPRO quantum chemistry codes. Currently, calculations of the potential surfaces describing K-H2 are in progress.

  6. Carbon Observations from Geostationary Earth Orbit as Part of an Integrated Observing System for Atmospheric Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation describes proposed satellite carbon measurements from the CHRONOS mission. The primary goal of this experiment is to measure the atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) from geostationary orbit, with hourly observations of North America at high spatial resolution. CHRONOS observations would provide measurements not currently available or planned as part of a surface, suborbital and satellite integrated observing system for atmospheric composition over North America. Carbon monoxide is produced by combustion processes such as urban activity and wildfires, and serves as a proxy for other combustion pollutants that are not easily measured. Methane has diverse anthropogenic sources ranging from fossil fuel production, animal husbandry, agriculture and waste management. The impact of gas exploration in the Western States of the USA and oil extraction from the Canadian tar sands will be particular foci of the mission, as will the poorly-quantified natural CH4 emissions from wetlands and thawing permafrost. In addition to characterizing pollutant sources, improved understanding of the domestic CH4 budget is a priority for policy decisions related to short-lived climate forcers. A primary motivation for targeting CO is its value as a tracer of atmospheric pollution, and CHRONOS measurements will provide insight into local and long-range transport across the North American continent, as well as the processes governing the entrainment and venting of pollution in and out of the planetary boundary layer. As a result of significantly improved characterization of diurnal changes in atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. We present a quantification of this expected improvement in the prediction of near-surface concentrations when CHRONOS measurements are used in Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). If CHRONOS and the planned NASA Earth

  7. Mars MetNet Mission - Martian Atmospheric Observational Post Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Apestigue, Victor; Genzer, Maria; Vazquez, Luis; Uspensky, Mikhail; Haukka, Harri

    2016-04-01

    3-axis accelerometer combined with a 3-axis gyrometer. The data will be sent via auxiliary beacon antenna throughout the descent phase starting shortly after separation from the spacecraft. MetNet Mission payload instruments are specially designed to operate under very low power conditions. MNL flexible solar panels provides a total of approximately 0.7-0.8 W of electric power during the daylight time. As the provided power output is insufficient to operate all instruments simultaneously they are activated sequentially according to a specially designed cyclogram table which adapts itself to the different environmental constraints. Mission Status Full Qualification Model (QM) of the MetNet landing unit with the Precursor Mission payload is currently under functional tests. In the near future the QM unit will be exposed to environmental tests with qualification levels including vibrations, thermal balance, thermal cycling and mechanical impact shock. One complete flight unit of the entry, descent and landing systems (EDLS) has been manufactured and tested with acceptance levels. Another flight-like EDLS has been exposed to most of the qualification tests, and hence it may be used for flight after refurbishments. Accordingly two flight-capable EDLS systems exist. The eventual goal is to create a network of atmospheric observational posts around the Martian surface. Even if the MetNet mission is focused on the atmospheric science, the mission payload will also include additional kinds of geophysical instrumentation. The next step in the MetNet Precursor Mission is the demonstration of the technical robustness and scientific capabilities of the MetNet type of landing vehicle. Definition of the Precursor Mission and discussions on launch opportunities are currently under way. The baseline program development funding exists for the next five years. Flight unit manufacture of the payload bay takes about 18 months, and it will be commenced after the Precursor Mission has

  8. Mars MetNet Mission - Martian Atmospheric Observational Post Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Genzer, Maria; Vazquez, Luis; Siikonen, Timo; Palin, Matti

    2017-04-01

    accelerometer combined with a 3-axis gyrometer. The data will be sent via auxiliary beacon antenna throughout the descent phase starting shortly after separation from the spacecraft. MetNet Mission payload instruments are specially designed to operate under very low power conditions. MNL flexible solar panels provides a total of approximately 0.7-0.8 W of electric power during the daylight time. As the provided power output is insufficient to operate all instruments simultaneously they are activated sequentially according to a specially designed cyclogram table which adapts itself to the different environmental constraints. 3. Mission Status he eventual goal is to create a network of atmospheric observational posts around the Martian surface. Even if the MetNet mission is focused on the atmospheric science, the mission payload will also include additional kinds of geophysical instrumentation. The next step is the MetNet Precursor Mission that will demonstrate the technical robustness and scientific capabilities of the MetNet type of landing vehicle. Definition of the Precursor Mission and discussions on launch opportunities are currently under way. The first MetNet Science Payload Precursors have already been successfully completed, e,g, the REMS/MSL and DREAMS/Exomars-2016. The next MetNet Payload Precursors will be METEO/Exomars-2018 and MEDA/Mars-2020. The baseline program development funding exists for the next seven years. Flight unit manufacture of the payload bay takes about 18 months, and it will be commenced after the Precursor Mission has been defined. References [1] http://metnet.fmi.fi

  9. Non-line-of-sight optical scattering communication based on atmospheric inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X. J.; Li, S. H.; Yan, W. X.; Zhang, R. W.; Zhang, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new non-line-of-sight (NLOS) propagation model in inhomogeneous atmosphere for long range is presented. The optical scattering communication is simulated, in which the single-scatter propagation model is used and the atmospheric inhomogeneity is also taken into account. Through the comparison with that in other atmosphere conditions, the scattering phase function is found to be a function of height. Moreover, the received energy does not decrease monotonically as the apex angle increases, and there is an optimal apex angle in which the received energy is the largest. All these results are conducive to the precise calculation of the optical scattering communication for long range.

  10. Atmospheric tomography for artificial satellite observations with a single guide star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael; Jefferies, Stuart M; Hope, Douglas A

    2016-08-15

    Estimation of wavefront errors in three dimensions is required to mitigate isoplanatic errors when using adaptive optics or numerical restoration algorithms to recover high-resolution images from blurred data taken through atmospheric turbulence. Present techniques rely on multiple beacons, either natural stars or laser guide stars, to probe the atmospheric aberration along different lines of sight, followed by tomographic projection of the measurements. In this Letter, we show that a three-dimensional estimate of the wavefront aberration can be recovered from measurements by a single guide star in the case where the aberration is stratified, provided that the telescope tracks across the sky with nonuniform angular velocity. This is generally the case for observations of artificial Earth-orbiting satellites, and the new method is likely to find application in ground-based telescopes used for space situational awareness.

  11. Zenith distribution and flux of atmospheric muons measured with the 5-line ANTARES detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANTARES Collaboration; Aguilar, J. A.; Albert, A.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Auer, R.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A. M.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Castel, D.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; de Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehr, F.; Flaminio, V.; Fratini, K.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Giacomelli, G.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; de Jong, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Laschinsky, H.; Lefèvre, D.; Lelaizant, G.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Lyons, K.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Maurin, G.; Mazure, A.; Melissas, M.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Ostasch, R.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Pillet, R.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Radu, A.; Reed, C.; Richardt, C.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; ANTARES Collaboration

    2010-10-01

    The ANTARES high-energy neutrino telescope is a three-dimensional array of about 900 photomultipliers distributed over 12 mooring lines installed in the Mediterranean Sea. Between February and November 2007 it acquired data in a 5-line configuration. The zenith angular distribution of the atmospheric muon flux and the associated depth-intensity relation are measured and compared with previous measurements and Monte Carlo expectations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is presented.

  12. Balloon UV Experiments for Astronomical and Atmospheric Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Sreejith, A G; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Nirmal, K; Ambily, S; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) window has been largely unexplored through balloons for astronomy. We discuss here the development of a compact near-UV spectrograph with ?ber optics input for balloon ights. It is a modi?ed Czerny-Turner system built using o?-the-shelf components. The system is portable and scalable to di?erent telescopes. The use of re ecting optics reduces the transmission loss in the UV. It employs an image-intensi?ed CMOS sensor, operating in photon counting mode, as the detector of choice. A lightweight pointing system developed for stable pointing to observe astronomical sources is also discussed, together with the methods to improve its accuracy, e.g. using the in-house build star sensor and others. Our primary scienti?c objectives include the observation of bright Solar System objects such as visible to eye comets, Moon and planets. Studies of planets can give us valuable information about the planetary aurorae, helping to model and compare atmospheres of other planets and the Earth. The other ma...

  13. What Do Millimeter Continuum and Spectral Line Observations Tell Us about Solar System Bodies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie N.

    2013-01-01

    Solar system objects are generally cold and radiate at low frequencies and tend to have strong molecular rotational transitions. Millimeter continuum and spectral line observations provide detailed information for nearly all solar system bodies. At these wavelengths, details of the bulk physical composition of icy surfaces, the size and albedo of small objects, the composition of planetary atmospheres can be measured as well as monitoring of time variable phenomena for extended periods (not restricted to nighttime observations), etc. Major issues in solar system science can be addressed by observations in the millimeter/sub-millimeter regime such as the origin of the solar system (isotope ratios, composition) and the evolution of solar system objects (dynamics, atmospheric constituents, etc). ALMA s exceptional sensitivity, large spectral bandwidth, high spectral resolution, and angular resolution (down to 10 milliarcsec) will enable researchers for the first time to better resolve the smallest bodies in the solar system and provide detailed maps of the larger objects. Additionally, measurements with nearly 8 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth to fully characterize solar system object s spectrum and detect trace species. The spatial information and line profiles can be obtained over 800 GHz of bandwidth in 8 receiver bands to not only assist in the identification of spectral lines and emission components for a given species but also to help elucidate the chemistry of the extraterrestrial bodies closest to us.

  14. Spectral Inversion of Multi-Line Full-Disk Observations of Quiet Sun Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Balthasar, H

    2012-01-01

    Spectral inversion codes are powerful tools to analyze spectropolarimetric observations, and they provide important diagnostics of solar magnetic fields. Inversion codes differ by numerical procedures, approximations of the atmospheric model, and description of radiative transfer. Stokes Inversion based on Response functions (SIR) is an implementation widely used by the solar physics community. It allows to work with different atmospheric components, where gradients of different physical parameters are possible, e.g., magnetic field strength and velocities. The spectropolarimetric full-disk observations were carried out with the Stokesmeter of the Solar Telescope for Operative Predictions (STOP) at the Sayan Observatory on 3 February 2009, when neither an active region nor any other extended flux concentration was present on the Sun. In this study of quiet Sun magnetic fields, we apply the SIR code simultaneously to 15 spectral lines. A tendency is found that weaker magnetic field strengths occur closer to th...

  15. Observations and Simulations of the Na i D1 Line Profiles in an M-class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Christian, D. J.; Kowalski, A. F.; Jess, D. B.; Grant, S. D. T.; Kawate, T.; Simões, P. J. A.; Allred, J. C.; Keenan, F. P.

    2016-12-01

    We study the temporal evolution of the Na i D1 line profiles in the M3.9 flare SOL2014-06-11T21:03 UT, using observations at high spectral resolution obtained with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer instrument on the Dunn Solar Telescope combined with radiative hydrodynamic simulations. Our results show a significant increase in the intensities of the line core and wings during the flare. The analysis of the line profiles from the flare ribbons reveals that the Na i D1 line has a central reversal with excess emission in the blue wing (blue asymmetry). We combine RADYN and RH simulations to synthesize Na i D1 line profiles of the flaring atmosphere and find good agreement with the observations. Heating with a beam of electrons modifies the radiation field in the flaring atmosphere and excites electrons from the ground state 3s 2S to the first excited state 3p 2P, which in turn modifies the relative population of the two states. The change in temperature and the population density of the energy states make the sodium line profile revert from absorption into emission. Furthermore, the rapid changes in temperature break the pressure balance between the different layers of the lower atmosphere, generating upflow/downflow patterns. Analysis of the simulated spectra reveals that the asymmetries of the Na i D1 flare profile are produced by the velocity gradients in the lower solar atmosphere.

  16. OT2_smalhotr_3: Herschel Extreme Lensing Line Observations (HELLO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, S.

    2011-09-01

    We request 59.8 hours of Herschel time to observe 20 normal star-forming galaxies in the [CII] 158 micron and [OI] 63 micron lines. These galaxies lie at high redshift (1observations of [CII], [OI], or both. Herschel offers the unique opportunity to study both lines with high sensitivity throughout this epoch (using HIFI for [CII] and PACS for [OI]). These two lines are the main cooling lines of the atomic medium. By measuring their fluxes, we will measure (1) the cooling efficiency of gas, (2) gas densities and temperatures near starforming regions, and (3) gas pressures, which are important to drive the winds that provide feedback to starformation processes. By combining the proposed observations with existing multiwavelength data on these objects, we will obtain as complete a picture of galaxy-scale star formation and ISM physical conditions at high redshifts as we have at z=0. Then perhaps we can understand why star formation and AGN activity peaked at this epoch. In Herschel cycle OT1, 49 high redshift IR luminous galaxies were approved for spectroscopy, but only two so-called normal galaxies were included. This is an imbalance that should be corrected, to balance Herschel's legacy.

  17. Male Sterile Lines of Zinnia elegans and Their Cytological Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Yao-mei; HU Qiu-shi; CHEN Tian-hua; BAO Man-zhu

    2008-01-01

    In order to find out a new pathway for utilizing heterosis of Zinnia elegans and accelerate breeding process, the mechanism of anther development of a male sterile line was explored. Backcross, sibmating, selfing of fertile plants and testcross with inbred lines were analyzed and identified in the field, and cytology was observed. Recessive nucleus male sterile line AH209AB capable of being a maintainer was obtained by successive backcrosses with male sterile plants and fertile F, plants as male parents. Cytological and anatomical studies indicated that: (1) The wall of normal anther was constituted of four layers of cells such as epidermis, powder chamber wall, middle level and tapetum cells. The process in meiosis of pollen mother cell in Zinnia elegans was normal and cytoplasm divided simultanously. Mature pollen grain was tricellular type. (2) The petal of male sterile plant degraded as a thread-like structure, the stamens were villiform in appearance and no pollens were formed. The result showed that the anther of male sterile plant no longer proceed to differentiate spore mother cell and the pollen sac after the formation of the tissue of sporogenous cells, there was no evident boundary between tapetum cell, middle lamella and inner wall of PMC, tapetal cells did not develop from the very beginning. So the abortion type was completely structural male sterility. The male sterile line belongs to non-sporange male sterile type and is of great use in F1 seeds production.

  18. Resonance broadening of argon lines in a micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet (argon μAPPJ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipa, A. V.; Ionikh, Yu. Z.; Chekishev, V. M.; Dünnbier, M.; Reuter, S.

    2015-06-01

    Optical emission from atmospheric pressure micro-jet operating with pure argon (argon μAPPJ) flow has been detected with a moderate resolution spectrometer. Large broadening of the several argon (Ar) lines has been observed in the near infrared spectral region. This effect was attributed to resonance broadening of the s2 (Paschen notation) level in 3p54s configuration. In the present work, corresponding line profiles are suggested for plasma diagnostics. For this, a general case of resonance broadening coefficient of noble gases is discussed. As broadening reflects the Ar density, and the static gas pressure of the jet is in equilibrium with the ambient, the local gas temperature can be inferred. An estimation of gas temperature from the width of the 750 nm Ar line is in agreement with rotational temperature of OH radicals determined from the A2Σ+ → X2Π (0, 0) band. At low temperatures (300-600 K) and at partial Ar pressure near atmospheric, the resonance width of the suggested lines is very sensitive to small temperature variations. High temperature sensitivity and large width make the resonance broadened lines very attractive for diagnostics of low temperature discharges at elevated pressure, e.g., as they are used in plasma-medicine.

  19. HIFI Observations of Water in the Atmosphere of Comet C/2008 Q3 (Garradd)

    CERN Document Server

    Hartogh, P; de Val-Borro, M; Bockelée-Morvan, D; Biver, N; Lis, D C; Moreno, R; Jarchow, C; Rengel, M; Emprechtinger, M; Szutowicz, S; Banaszkiewicz, M; Bensch, F; Blecka, M I; Cavalié, T; Encrenaz, T; Jehin, E; Küppers, M; Lara, L -M; Lellouch, E; Swinyard, B M; Vandenbussche, B; Bergin, E A; Blake, G A; Blommaert, J A D L; Cernicharo, J; Decin, L; Encrenaz, P; de Graauw, T; Hutsemekers, D; Kidger, M; Manfroid, J; Medvedev, A S; Naylor, D A; Schieder, R; Thomas, N; Waelkens, C; Roelfsema, P R; Dieleman, P; Guesten, R; Klein, T; Kasemann, C; Caris, M; Olberg, M; Benz, A O

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution far-infrared and sub-millimetre spectroscopy of water lines is an important tool to understand the physical and chemical properties of cometary atmospheres. We present observations of several rotational ortho- and para-water transitions in comet C/2008 Q3 (Garradd) performed with HIFI on Herschel. These observations have provided the first detection of the 2_{12}-1_{01} (1669 GHz) ortho and 1_{11}-0_{00} (1113 GHz) para transitions of water in a cometary spectrum. In addition, the ground-state transition 1_{10}-1_{01} at 557 GHz is detected and mapped. By detecting several water lines quasi-simultaneously and mapping their emission we can constrain the excitation parameters in the coma. Synthetic line profiles are computed using excitation models which include excitation by collisions, solar infrared radiation, and radiation trapping. We obtain the gas kinetic temperature, constrain the electron density profile, and estimate the coma expansion velocity by analyzing the map and line shapes. We ...

  20. Solar granulation from photosphere to low chromosphere observed in BaII 4554 A line

    CERN Document Server

    Kostik, R; Shchukina, N

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to characterize the statistical properties of solar granulation in the photosphere and low chromosphere up to 650 km. We use velocity and intensity variations obtained at different atmospheric heights from observations in BaII 4554 A. The observations were done during good seeing conditions at the VTT at the Observatorio del Teide on Tenerife. The line core forms rather high in the atmosphere and allows granulation properties to be studied at heights that have been not accessed before in similar studies. In addition, we analyze the synthetic profiles of the BaII 4554 A line by the same method computed taking NLTE effects into account in the 3D hydrodynamical model atmosphere. We suggest a 16-column model of solar granulation depending on the direction of motion and on the intensity contrast measured in the continuum and in the uppermost layer. We calculate the heights of intensity contrast sign reversal and velocity sign reversal. We show that both parameters depend strongly on th...

  1. Observations of V838 Mon in the CO rotational lines

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminski, T; Tylenda, R

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the structure of a field around the position of V838 Mon as seen in the lowest CO rotational transitions. We also measure and analyse emission in the same lines at the position of V838 Mon.Observations have primarily been done in the CO J = 2-1 and J = 3-2 lines using the KOSMA telescope. A field of 3.4 squared degrees has been mapped in the on-the-fly mode in these transitions. Longer integration spectra in the on-off mode have been obtained to study the emission at the position of V838 Mon. Selected positions in the field have also been observed in the CO J = 1-0 transition using the Delingha telescope.In the observed field we have identified many molecular clouds. They can be divided into two groups from the point of view of their observed radial velocities. One, having V(LSR) in the range 18-32 km/s, can be identified with the Perseus Galactic arm. The other one, having V(LSR) between 44-57 km/s, probably belongs to the Norma-Cygnus arm. The radial velocity of V838 Mon is within the second ...

  2. Simulation of polar atmospheric microwave and sub-millimetre spectra for characterizing potential new ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, David; Turner, Emma; Ford, George; Pumphrey, Hugh; Withington, Stafford

    2016-04-01

    Advanced detector technologies from the fields of astronomy and telecommunications are offering the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. Adoption of these technologies in ground-based passive microwave and sub-millimetre radiometry could allow new measurements of chemical species and winds in the polar middle atmosphere for verifying meteorological data-sets and atmospheric models. A site study to assess the feasibility of new polar observations is performed by simulating the downwelling clear-sky submillimetre spectrum over 10-2000 GHz (30 mm to 150 microns) at two Arctic and two Antarctic locations under different seasonal and diurnal conditions. Vertical profiles for temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis, and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified and minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures estimated. The optimal lines for all species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad frequency range. We also demonstrate the feasibility of measuring horizontal wind profiles above Halley station, Antarctica with time resolution as high as 0.5hr using simulated spectroradiometric observations of Doppler-shifted ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) lines in the 230-250 GHz region. The techniques presented provide a framework that can be applied to the retrieval of additional atmospheric parameters and be taken forward to simulate and guide the design of future microwave and sub

  3. Atmospheric Variability of CO2 impact on space observation Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, A. L.; Sen, B.; Newhart, L.; Segal, G.

    2009-12-01

    If International governments are to reduce GHG levels by 80% by 2050, as recommended by most scientific bodies concerned with avoiding the most hazardous changes in climate, then massive investments in infrastructure and new technology will be required over the coming decades. Such an investment will be a huge commitment by governments and corporations, and while it will offer long-term dividends in lower energy costs, a healthier environment and averted additional global warming, the shear magnitude of upfront costs will drive a call for a monitoring and verification system. Such a system will be required to offer accountability to signatories of governing bodies, as well as, for the global public. Measuring the average global distribution of CO2 is straight forward, as exemplified by the long running station measurements managed by NOAA’s Global Monitoring Division that includes the longterm Keeling record. However, quantifying anthropogenic and natural source/sink distributions and atmospheric mixing have been much more difficult to constrain. And, yet, an accurate accounting of all anthropogenic source strengths is required for Global Treaty verification. The only way to accurately assess Global GHG emissions is to construct an integrated system of ground, air and space based observations with extensive chemical modeling capabilities. We look at the measurement requirements for the space based component of the solutions. To determine what space sensor performance requirements for ground resolution, coverage, and revisit, we have analyzed regional CO2 distributions and variability using NASA and NOAA aircraft flight campaigns. The results of our analysis are presented as variograms showing average spatial variability over several Northern Hemispheric regions. There are distinct regional differences with the starkest contrast between urban versus rural and Coastal Asia versus Coastal US. The results suggest specific consequences on what spatial and temporal

  4. A meta-analysis of the magnetic line broadening in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, A Asensio

    2014-01-01

    A multi-line Bayesian analysis of the Zeeman broadening in the solar atmosphere is presented. A hierarchical probabilistic model, based on the simple but realistic Milne-Eddington approximation to the solution of the radiative transfer equation, is used to explain the data in the optical and near infrared. Our method makes use of the full line profiles of a more than 500 spectral lines from 4000 $\\AA$ to 1.8 $\\mu$m. Although the problem suffers from a strong degeneracy between the magnetic broadening and any other remaining broadening mechanism, the hierarchical model allows to isolate the magnetic contribution with reliability. We obtain the cumulative distribution function for the field strength and use it to put reliable upper limits to the unresolved magnetic field strength in the solar atmosphere. The field is below 160-180 G with 90% probability.

  5. Accurate modeling of the diagnostic 118-GHz oxygen line for remote sensing of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshelev, M. A.; Delahaye, T.; Serov, E. A.; Vilkov, I. N.; Boulet, C.; Tretyakov, M. Yu.

    2017-07-01

    We report the results of laboratory investigations of the shape of the diagnostic atmospheric N = 1- oxygen line performed over a very wide range of pressures from 0.4 to 1000 Torr using two principally different spectrometers having complementary abilities. A spectrometer with a radio-acoustic detector of absorption was used for recording low pressure spectra spanning the 0.4-2 Torr range, and high pressure data from 250 to 1000 Torr were registered by a resonator spectrometer. The sensitivity of both instruments was improved significantly which allowed us to obtain signal-to-noise ratio at spectra recordings of the order of a few thousands. The spectra analysis enabled the first manifestation of the speed-dependence of the collision cross section of the line, along with considerable refinement of other parameters, including pressure broadening, intensity and line-mixing. The results are of primary importance for atmospheric applications.

  6. Aerosol lidar observations of atmospheric mixing in Los Angeles: Climatology and implications for greenhouse gas observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, John; Kort, Eric A; DeCola, Phil; Duren, Riley

    2016-08-27

    Atmospheric observations of greenhouse gases provide essential information on sources and sinks of these key atmospheric constituents. To quantify fluxes from atmospheric observations, representation of transport-especially vertical mixing-is a necessity and often a source of error. We report on remotely sensed profiles of vertical aerosol distribution taken over a 2 year period in Pasadena, California. Using an automated analysis system, we estimate daytime mixing layer depth, achieving high confidence in the afternoon maximum on 51% of days with profiles from a Sigma Space Mini Micropulse LiDAR (MiniMPL) and on 36% of days with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. We note that considering ceilometer data on a logarithmic scale, a standard method, introduces, an offset in mixing height retrievals. The mean afternoon maximum mixing height is 770 m Above Ground Level in summer and 670 m in winter, with significant day-to-day variance (within season σ = 220m≈30%). Taking advantage of the MiniMPL's portability, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the detailed horizontal structure of the mixing layer by automobile. We compare our observations to planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from sonde launches, North American regional reanalysis (NARR), and a custom Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed for greenhouse gas (GHG) monitoring in Los Angeles. NARR and WRF PBL heights at Pasadena are both systematically higher than measured, NARR by 2.5 times; these biases will cause proportional errors in GHG flux estimates using modeled transport. We discuss how sustained lidar observations can be used to reduce flux inversion error by selecting suitable analysis periods, calibrating models, or characterizing bias for correction in post processing.

  7. Aerosol lidar observations of atmospheric mixing in Los Angeles: Climatology and implications for greenhouse gas observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, John; Kort, Eric A.; DeCola, Phil; Duren, Riley

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric observations of greenhouse gases provide essential information on sources and sinks of these key atmospheric constituents. To quantify fluxes from atmospheric observations, representation of transport—especially vertical mixing—is a necessity and often a source of error. We report on remotely sensed profiles of vertical aerosol distribution taken over a 2 year period in Pasadena, California. Using an automated analysis system, we estimate daytime mixing layer depth, achieving high confidence in the afternoon maximum on 51% of days with profiles from a Sigma Space Mini Micropulse LiDAR (MiniMPL) and on 36% of days with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. We note that considering ceilometer data on a logarithmic scale, a standard method, introduces, an offset in mixing height retrievals. The mean afternoon maximum mixing height is 770 m Above Ground Level in summer and 670 m in winter, with significant day-to-day variance (within season σ = 220m≈30%). Taking advantage of the MiniMPL's portability, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the detailed horizontal structure of the mixing layer by automobile. We compare our observations to planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from sonde launches, North American regional reanalysis (NARR), and a custom Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed for greenhouse gas (GHG) monitoring in Los Angeles. NARR and WRF PBL heights at Pasadena are both systematically higher than measured, NARR by 2.5 times; these biases will cause proportional errors in GHG flux estimates using modeled transport. We discuss how sustained lidar observations can be used to reduce flux inversion error by selecting suitable analysis periods, calibrating models, or characterizing bias for correction in post processing.

  8. TIME DEPENDENT NONEQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION OF TRANSITION REGION LINES OBSERVED WITH IRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Pontieu, Bart De; Hansteen, Viggo H. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Gudiksen, Boris, E-mail: j.m.sykora@astro.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2016-01-20

    The properties of nonstatistical equilibrium ionization of silicon and oxygen ions are analyzed in this work. We focus on five solar targets (quiet Sun; coronal hole; plage; quiescent active region, AR; and flaring AR) as observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS is best suited for this work owing to the high cadence (up to 0.5 s), high spatial resolution (up to 0.″32), and high signal-to-noise ratios for O iv λ1401 and Si iv λ1402. We find that the observed intensity ratio between lines of three times ionized silicon and oxygen ions depends on their total intensity and that this correlation varies depending on the region observed (quiet Sun, coronal holes, plage, or active regions) and on the specific observational objects present (spicules, dynamic loops, jets, microflares, or umbra). In order to interpret the observations, we compare them with synthetic profiles taken from 2D self-consistent radiative MHD simulations of the solar atmosphere, where the statistical equilibrium or nonequilibrium treatment of silicon and oxygen is applied. These synthetic observations show vaguely similar correlations to those in the observations, i.e., between the intensity ratios and their intensities, but only in the nonequilibrium case do we find that (some of) the observations can be reproduced. We conclude that these lines are formed out of statistical equilibrium. We use our time-dependent nonequilibrium ionization simulations to describe the physical mechanisms behind these observed properties.

  9. Modeling of atmospheric-coupled Rayleigh waves on planets with atmosphere: From Earth observation to Mars and Venus perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lognonné, Philippe; Karakostas, Foivos; Rolland, Lucie; Nishikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic coupling between solid Earth and atmosphere has been observed since the 1960s, first from ground-based seismic, pressure, and ionospheric sensors and since 20 years with various satellite measurements, including with global positioning system (GPS) satellites. This coupling leads to the excitation of the Rayleigh surface waves by local atmospheric sources such as large natural explosions from volcanoes, meteor atmospheric air-bursts, or artificial explosions. It contributes also in the continuous excitation of Rayleigh waves and associated normal modes by atmospheric winds and pressure fluctuations. The same coupling allows the observation of Rayleigh waves in the thermosphere most of the time through ionospheric monitoring with Doppler sounders or GPS. The authors review briefly in this paper observations made on Earth and describe the general frame of the theory enabling the computation of Rayleigh waves for models of telluric planets with atmosphere. The authors then focus on Mars and Venus and give in both cases the atmospheric properties of the Rayleigh normal modes and associated surface waves compared to Earth. The authors then conclude on the observation perspectives especially for Rayleigh waves excited by atmospheric sources on Mars and for remote ionospheric observations of Rayleigh waves excited by quakes on Venus.

  10. Observed Variability of the Solar Mg II h Spectral Line

    CERN Document Server

    Schmit, Donald; De Pontieu, Bart; McIntosh, Scott; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The Mg II h&k doublet are two of the primary spectral lines observed by the Sun-pointing Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). These lines are tracers of the magnetic and thermal environment that spans from the photosphere to the upper chromosphere. We use a double gaussian model to fit the Mg II h profile for a full-Sun mosaic dataset taken 24-Aug-2014. We use the ensemble of high-quality profile fits to conduct a statistical study on the variability of the line profile as it relates the magnetic structure, dynamics, and center-to-limb viewing angle. The average internetwork profile contains a deeply reversed core and is weakly asymmetric at h2. In the internetwork, we find a strong correlation between h3 wavelength and profile asymmetry as well h1 width and h2 width. The average reversal depth of the h3 core is inversely related to the magnetic field. Plage and sunspots exhibit many profiles which do not contain a reversal. These profiles also occur infrequently in the internetwork. We see indic...

  11. Determining protoplanetary disk gas masses from CO isotopologues line observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotello, A.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Despite intensive studies of protoplanetary disks, there is still no reliable way to determine their total (gast+dust) mass and their surface density distribution, quantities that are crucial for describing both the structure and the evolution of disks up to the formation of planets. Aims: The goal of this work is to use less-abundant CO isotopologues, such as 13CO, C18O and C17O, detection of which is routine for ALMA, to infer the gas mass of disks. Isotope-selective effects need to be taken into account in the analysis, because they can significantly modify CO isotopologues' line intensities. Methods: CO isotope-selective photodissociation has been implemented in the physical-chemical code DALI (Dust And LInes) and more than 800 disk models have been run for a range of disk and stellar parameters. Dust and gas temperature structures have been computed self-consistently, together with a chemical calculation of the main atomic and molecular species. Both disk structure and stellar parameters have been investigated by varying the parameters in the grid of models. Total fluxes have been ray-traced for different CO isotopologues and for various low J-transitions for different inclinations. Results: A combination of 13CO and C18O total intensities allows inference of the total disk mass, although with non-negligible uncertainties. These can be overcome by employing spatially resolved observations, that is the disk's radial extent and inclination. Comparison with parametric models shows differences at the level of a factor of a few, especially for extremely low and high disk masses. Finally, total line intensities for different CO isotopologue and for various low-J transitions are provided and are fitted to simple formulae. The effects of a lower gas-phase carbon abundance and different gas-to-dust ratios are investigated as well, and comparison with other tracers is made. Conclusions: Disk masses can be determined within a factor of a few by comparing CO

  12. Atmospheric contamination for CMB ground-based observations

    CERN Document Server

    Errard, J; Akiba, Y; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Baccigalupi, C; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Cukierman, A; Delabrouille, J; Dobbs, M; Ducout, A; Elleflot, T; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Feeney, S; Gilbert, A; Goeckner-Wald, N; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Hill, C; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A H; Jeong, O; Katayama, N; Kaufman, J; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Jeune, M Le; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leon, D; Linder, E; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Miller, N J; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Okamura, T; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Puglisi, G; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K M; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Tajima, O; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Whitehorn, N; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2015-01-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3d-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive an analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the POLARBEAR-I project first season data set. We compare our results to previous st...

  13. Oxygen spectral line synthesis: 3D non-LTE with CO5BOLD hydrodynamical model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Prakapavicius, D; Kucinskas, A; Ludwig, H -G; Freytag, B; Caffau, E; Cayrel, R

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present first results of our current project aimed at combining the 3D hydrodynamical stellar atmosphere approach with non-LTE (NLTE) spectral line synthesis for a number of key chemical species. We carried out a full 3D-NLTE spectrum synthesis of the oxygen IR 777 nm triplet, using a modified and improved version of our NLTE3D package to calculate departure coefficients for the atomic levels of oxygen in a CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamical solar model atmosphere. Spectral line synthesis was subsequently performed with the Linfor 3D code. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the lines of the oxygen triplet produce deeper cores under NLTE conditions, due to the diminished line source function in the line forming region. This means that the solar oxygen IR 777 nm lines should be stronger in NLTE, leading to negative 3D NLTE-LTE abundance corrections. Qualitatively this result would support previous claims for a relatively low solar oxygen abundance. Finally, we outline several further steps ...

  14. Towards a Better Understanding of the Venus Atmosphere - Observations needed between 65 - 120 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, S. S.; Clancy, R. T.; Rengel, M.; Sorning, M.

    2013-12-01

    provide only line of sight component and so far have been made only from ground based telescopes. The results show sub-stantial variability on long and short time scales and until recently were generally focused more on the zonal circulation and less on the day-night circulation. Spacecraft observations from orbit may be necessary to learn more about the sub-solar to anti-solar circulation that is inferred from the night glow observations. Ground based Döppler observations covering the entire planet and the day and night limb with sufficient spatial resolu-tion will also help to better characterize the atmospheric circulation above the cloudtops to ~ 120 km. In-situ sampling may be necessary to confirm the identity of the ultraviolet absorber(s) in the clouds to better under-stand the global energy deposition and loss from the Venus atmosphere. References: [1] Limaye, S.; Rengel, M., 2013, Int. Space Studies Inst., Bern, Switzerland, Report # 11, 55-72, [2] Machado, P. et al., 2012, , Icarus 221, 248-261. [8] Taylor et al., (1997) Venus II, 325-351. [3] Sánchez-Lavega et al., (2008) Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L13204, doi: 10.1029/2008GL033817. [4] Lebonnois et al. , 2013, Intl. Space Studies Inst., Bern, Switzerland, Report # 11, 129-156. [5]Titov et al. , 2013, Intl. Space Studies Inst., Bern, Switzerland, Report # 11, 23-54.

  15. Stellar model atmospheres with magnetic line blanketing. II. Introduction of polarized radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, S A

    2006-01-01

    The technique of model atmosphere calculation for magnetic Ap and Bp stars with polarized radiative transfer and magnetic line blanketing is presented. A grid of model atmospheres of A and B stars are computed. These calculations are based on direct treatment of the opacities due to the bound-bound transitions that ensures an accurate and detailed description of the line absorption and anomalous Zeeman splitting. The set of model atmospheres was calculated for the field strengths between 1 and 40 kG. The high-resolution energy distribution, photometric colors and the hydrogen Balmer line profiles are computed for magnetic stars with different metallicities and are compared to those of non-magnetic reference models and to the previous paper of this series. The results of modelling confirmed the main outcomes of the previous study: energy redistribution from UV to the visual region and flux depression at 5200A. However, we found that effects of enhanced line blanketing when transfer for polarized radiation take...

  16. On-line detection of atmospheric formaldehyde by a conductometric biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Fabio; Boscolo-Chio, Raffaella; Signorini, Stefano; Rigo, Adelio

    2007-01-15

    Atmospheric formaldehyde (CH(2)O) was detected under continuous flow conditions by an on-line system comprising of a wet scrubber for a continuous transfer of the pollutant to an aqueous solution, a micro-reactor containing immobilized formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) and a conductometric transducer. By this system atmospheric formaldehyde concentrations in the range 0.05-2 ppm were detected with a sensitivity of 20 microS/ppm. In this concentration range the immobilized enzyme oxidized all the sampled formaldehyde molecules to formic acid, avoiding cumbersome calibration procedures. The operational stability of the biosensor was at least 3 months, working continuously 10 h/day at room temperature.

  17. Observational Searches for Chromospheric -Mode Oscillations from CaII H-Line Observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Kariyappa; L. Damé; K. M. Hiremath

    2006-06-01

    We have used a high spatial and temporal resolution of long time sequence of spectra in CaII H-line obtained at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) of the Sacramento Peak Observatory on a quiet region at the center of the solar disk over a large number of bright points and network elements to search for atmospheric (chromospheric) -mode oscillations. An important parameter of the H-line profile, intensity at H2V(IH2V), has been derived from a large number of line profiles. We derived the light curves of all the bright points and network elements. The light curves represent the main pulse with large intensity amplitude and followed by several follower pulses with lower intensity amplitudes. The light curves of these bright points would give an impression that one can as well draw curves towards and away from the highest peak (main pulse) showing an exponential growth and decay of the amplitudes. An exponential decaying function has been fitted for all the light curves of the bright points to determine the damping time of the modes that are more or less the same, and one value of the coefficient of exponent can represent reasonably well the decay for all the cases. The FFT analysis of temporal variation of both the bright points and the network elements indicates around 10-min periodicity. We speculate that this longer period of oscillation may be related to chromospheric -mode oscillations.

  18. Atmospheric profiling via satellite to satellite occultations near water and ozone absorption lines for weather and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursinski, E. R.; Ward, D.; Otarola, A. C.; McGhee, J.; Stovern, M.; Sammler, K.; Reed, H.; Erickson, D.; McCormick, C.; Griggs, E.

    2016-05-01

    Significantly reducing weather and climate prediction uncertainty requires global observations with substantially higher information content than present observations provide. While GPS occultations have provided a major advance, GPS observations of the atmosphere are limited by wavelengths chosen specifically to minimize interaction with the atmosphere. Significantly more information can be obtained via satellite to satellite occultations made at wavelengths chosen specifically to characterize the atmosphere. Here we describe such a system that will probe cm- and mmwavelength water vapor absorption lines called the Active Temperature, Ozone and Moisture Microwave Spectrometer (ATOMMS). Profiling both the speed and absorption of light enables ATOMMS to profile temperature, pressure and humidity simultaneously, which GPS occultations cannot do, as well as profile clouds and turbulence. We summarize the ATOMMS concept and its theoretical performance. We describe field measurements made with a prototype ATOMMS instrument and several important capabilities demonstrated with those ground based measurements including retrieving temporal variations in path-averaged water vapor to 1%, in clear, cloudy and rainy conditions, up to optical depths of 17, remotely sensing turbulence and determining rain rates. We conclude with a vision of a future ATOMMS low Earth orbiting satellite constellation designed to take advantage of synergies between observational needs for weather and climate, ATOMMS unprecedented orbital remote sensing capabilities and recent cubesat technological innovations that enable a constellation of dozens of very small spacecraft to achieve many critical, but as yet unfulfilled, monitoring and forecasting needs.

  19. Direct observations of the atmospheric processing of Asian mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Sullivan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of secondary acids and ammonium on individual mineral dust particles during ACE-Asia has been measured with an online single-particle mass spectrometer, the ATOFMS. Changes in the amounts of sulphate, nitrate, and chloride mixed with dust particles correlate with air masses from different source regions. The uptake of secondary acids depended on the individual dust particle mineralogy; high amounts of nitrate accumulated on calcium-rich dust while high amounts of sulphate accumulated on aluminosilicate-rich dust. Oxidation of S(IV to S(VI by iron in the aluminosilicate dust is a possible explanation for this enrichment of sulphate, which has important consequences for the fertilization of remote oceans by soluble iron. This study shows the segregation of sulphate from nitrate and chloride in individual aged dust particles for the first time. A transport and aging timeline provides an explanation for the observed segregation. Our data suggests that sulphate became mixed with the dust first. This implies that the transport pathway is more important than the reaction kinetics in determining which species accumulate on mineral dust. Early in the study, dust particles in volcanically influenced air masses were mixed predominately with sulphate. Dust mixed with chloride then dominated over sulphate and nitrate when a major dust front reached the R. V. Ronald Brown. We hypothesize that the rapid increase in chloride on dust was due to mixing with HCl(g released from acidified sea salt particles induced by heterogeneous reaction with volcanic SO2(g, prior to the arrival of the dust front. The amount of ammonium mixed with dust correlated strongly with the total amount of secondary acid reaction products in the dust. Submicron dust and ammonium sulphate were internally mixed, contrary to frequent reports that they exist as external mixtures. The size distribution of the mixing state of dust with these secondary species validates previous

  20. Theory, Observation, and Modeling of the Zeeman and Paschen-Back Effects in Molecular Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio Ramos, A.

    2006-12-01

    We present a historical review of the theory of the Zeeman effect in molecular lines, from its discovery at the end of the 19th century till today. The fast development of the quantum theory owes much to the impulse given by the experimental investigation of the molecular Zeeman effect. Laboratory experiments produced fruitful results after the predictions made by the quantum theory. The introduction by Racah of the powerful angular momentum algebra gave a second impulse to the theory and allowed to fully understand the fine structure and polarization properties of molecular transitions. At present, the theory of the Zeeman and Paschen-Back effects in molecular lines is being applied to spectro-(polarimetric) observations to infer the physical and magnetic properties of cold plasmas in the atmospheres of the Sun and of other stars.

  1. Occultation observations of atmosphere and climate change from space: a backbone for the GCOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchengast, G.

    2003-04-01

    , involving the heavily calibration-dependent Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) data, could have been presumably saved had suitable occultation data been available. This talk will highlight, along the lines outlined above, the general principles, properties, capabilities, and exploitation possibilities of occultation methods with a focus on how they provide key contributions to a better understanding of the Earth's climate system and to better prediction of its future evolution. A properly designed occultation observing system has the capacity to become the leading backbone of the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) for monitoring climate change and variability in fundamental atmospheric variables such as temperature, humidity, ozone, and geopotential height from global scales to meso-scales (order 100 km) and from the planetary boundary layer to the mesopause.

  2. Observing the Impact of the Anthropocene from Space: the Evolution of Atmospheric Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, John P.

    2016-04-01

    From the Neolithic revolution to the industrial revolution over ~ 10 000 years, the earth's population rose from several millions to 1 Billion powered by energy from a mixture of biofuels, water and solar power and a limited amount of the combustion of coal. The industrial revolution began in the UK in the late 18th century, and has been fuelled by the combustion of fossil fuels, initially coal but then oil and gas. This has led to a dramatic rise in both the human population, now comprising over 7 Billion with more than 50% living in urban areas, and its standard of living. The expectation is that by 2050 population will be of the order of 10 Billion with 75% dwelling in urban areas. Anthropogenic activity has resulted in pollution from the local to the global scale, changes in land use, the destruction of stratospheric ozone, the modification of biogeochemical cycling, the destruction of species, ecosystems and ecosystem services and climate change. The earth has entered a new geological epoch the anthropocene. The observation of atmospheric composition provides a unique early warning of the natural and anthropogenic origins of change. Consistent and consolidated measurements from the local to the global scale are required to test our knowledge of the biogeochemical cycles, which determine atmospheric composition, and to assess and attribute accurately their modification by anthropogenic activity. To achieve global measurements of atmospheric constituents (trace gases, aerosol and cloud parameters) the SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY), Project was initiated in the early 1980s. This was the first passive remote sensing space based instrumentation, designed to make simultaneous contiguous measurements of the solar upwelling radiation at the top of the atmosphere from the ultraviolet to the shortwave infrared. The SCIAMACHY project resulted in measurements of the instruments GOME, originally called SCIA-mini, on ESA

  3. Simulating Meteor Shower Observations In The Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, J. P.; Christou, A. A.

    2005-08-01

    It is known that fast meteoroids entering the martian atmosphere give rise to bright, detectable meteors (Adolfsson et al, Icarus 119, 144, 1996). Although single meteors have already been detected at Mars (Selsis et al., Nature 435, 581, 2005), the characterisation of the martian meteor year will require a large number of detections. Experience at the Earth suggests that data storage and bandwidth resources to conduct such surveys will be substantial, and may be prohibitive. In an attempt to quantify the problem in detail, we have simulated meteor shower detection in the martian and terrestrial atmospheres. For a given shower, we assume a meteoroid stream flux, size distribution and velocity based on current knowledge of Earth streams as well as the proximity of certain comets' orbits to that of Mars. A numerical code is used to simulate meteoroid ablation in a model martian and terrestrial atmosphere. Finally, using the same baseline detector characteristics (limiting magnitude, sky coverage) we generate detection statistics for the two planets. We will present results for different types of showers, including strong annual activity and episodic outbursts from Halley-type and Jupiter family comets. We will show how detection efficiency at Mars compares to the Earth for these showers and discuss optimum strategies for monitoring the martian atmosphere for meteor activity. Astronomy research at Armagh Observatory is funded by the Northern Ireland Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL).

  4. Interpretation of spatial and temporal variations of hydrogen quadrupole absorptions in the Jovian atmosphere observed during the 1972 apparition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, G. E.; Bergstralh, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported for a systematic investigation of temporal and spatial variations of hydrogen quadrupole lines formed in the Jovian atmosphere, which was performed by measuring the strengths of the S(1) lines of H2 (3,0) and (4,0) quadrupole bands at several points on the Jovian disk during the 1972 apparition. The observations support the hypothesis that the strength of the (3,0) S(1) line varies significantly with time, suggest the possibility of short-term temporal variation in the strength of the (4,0) line, and indicate that the H2 line strengths vary remarkably little from limb to limb in the equatorial region. A Galatry line-shape profile is calculated, and a radiative-transfer analysis is carried out using the Henyey-Greenstein phase function for single particle scattering. It is shown that the observations are consistent with a multilayer atmospheric model having an optically thin upper cloud deck separated by a stratum of nonscattering gas from an optically thick lower cloud.

  5. SYNTHESIZED SPECTRA OF OPTICALLY THIN EMISSION LINES PRODUCED BY THE BIFROST STELLAR ATMOSPHERE CODE, INCLUDING NONEQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION EFFECTS: A STUDY OF THE INTENSITY, NONTHERMAL LINE WIDTHS, AND DOPPLER SHIFTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olluri, K.; Gudiksen, B. V.; Hansteen, V. H.; Pontieu, B. De, E-mail: kosovare.olluri@astro.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P. O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2015-03-20

    In recent years realistic 3D numerical models of the solar atmosphere have become available. The models attempt to recreate the solar atmosphere and mimic observations in the best way, in order to make it possible to couple complicated observations with physical properties such as the temperatures, densities, velocities, and magnetic fields. We here present a study of synthetic spectra created using the Bifrost code in order to assess how well they fit with previously taken solar data. A study of the synthetic intensity, nonthermal line widths, Doppler shifts, and correlations between any two of these three components of the spectra first assuming statistical equilibrium is made, followed by a report on some of the effects nonequilibrium ionization will have on the synthesized spectra. We find that the synthetic intensities compare well with the observations. The synthetic observations depend on the assumed resolution and point-spread function (PSF) of the instrument, and we find a large effect on the results, especially for intensity and nonthermal line width. The Doppler shifts produce the reported persistent redshifts for the transition region (TR) lines and blueshifts for the upper TR and corona lines. The nonthermal line widths reproduce the well-known turnoff point around (2–3) × 10{sup 5} K, but with much lower values than those observed. The nonthermal line widths tend to increase with decreasing assumed instrumental resolution, also when nonequilibrium ionization is included. Correlations between the nonthermal line width of any two TR line studies as reported by Chae et al. are reproduced, while the correlations of intensity to line width are reproduced only after applying a PSF to the data. Doppler shift correlations reported by Doschek for the TR lines and correlations of Doppler shift to nonthermal line width of the Fe xii{sub 19.5} line reported by Doschek et al. are reproduced.

  6. Analysis of a Kalman filter based method for on-line estimation of atmospheric dispersion parameters using radiation monitoring data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drews, Martin; Lauritzen, Bent; Madsen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    A Kalman filter method is discussed for on-line estimation of radioactive release and atmospheric dispersion from a time series of off-site radiation monitoring data. The method is based on a state space approach, where a stochastic system equation describes the dynamics of the plume model...... parameters, and the observables are linked to the state variables through a static measurement equation. The method is analysed for three simple state space models using experimental data obtained at a nuclear research reactor. Compared to direct measurements of the atmospheric dispersion, the Kalman filter...... estimates are found to agree well with the measured parameters, provided that the radiation measurements are spread out in the cross-wind direction. For less optimal detector placement it proves difficult to distinguish variations in the source term and plume height; yet the Kalman filter yields consistent...

  7. Simulation of the infrared signature of transient luminous events in the middle atmosphere for a limb line of sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romand, Frédéric; Croizé, Laurence; Payan, Sébastien; Huret, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Transient Luminous Events (TLE) are electrical and optical events which occurs above thunderstorms. Visual signatures are reported since the beginning of the 20th century but the first picture is accidentally recorded from a television camera in 1989. Their occurrence is closely linked with the lightning activity below thunderstorms. TLEs are observed from the base of the stratosphere to the thermosphere (15 - 110 km). They are a very brief phenomenon which lasts from 1 to 300 milliseconds. At a worldwide scale, four TLEs occur each minute. The energy deposition, about some tenth of megajoules, is able to ionize, dissociate and excite the molecules of the atmosphere. Atmospheric discharges in the troposphere are important sources of NO and NO2. TLEs might have the same effects at higher altitudes, in the stratosphere. NOx then can affect the concentration of O3 and OH. Consequently, TLEs could be locally important contributors to the chemical budget of the middle atmosphere. The perturbation of the atmospheric chemistry induced by TLEs has the consequence to locally modify the radiations in the infrared during the minutes following the event. The interest of studying the infrared signature of a TLE is twofold. For the atmospheric sciences it allows to link the perturbed composition to the resulting infrared spectrum. Then, some Defense systems like detection and guiding devices are equipped with airborne infrared sensors so that the TLE infrared signature might disturb them. We want to obtain a quantitative and kinetic evaluation of the infrared signature of the atmosphere locally perturbed by a TLE. In order to do so we must model three phenomena. 1) The plasma/chemistry coupling, which describes how the different energetic levels of atmospheric molecules are populated by the energetic deposition of the TLE. This step lasts the time of the lightning itself. 2) The chemical kinetics which describes how these populations will evolve in the following minutes. 3) The

  8. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham; Weaver, Clark; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William

    2010-01-01

    US Department of Energy's (DOE) SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These flights were coordinated with DOE investigators who flew an in-situ CO2 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The increasing CO2 line absorptions with altitudes were evident and comparison with in-situ measurements showed agreements to 6 ppm. In spring 2009 we improved the aircraft's nadir window and during July and August we made 9 additional 2 hour long flights and measured the atmospheric CO2 absorption and line shapes using the 1572.33 nm CO2 line. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3-13 km over a variety of surface types in Nebraska, Illinois, the SGP ARM site, and near and over the Chesapeake Bay in North Carolina and eastern Virginia. Strong laser signals and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes, and some measurements were made through thin clouds. The flights over the ARM site were underflown with in-situ measurements made from the DOE Cessna. Analysis shows that the average signal levels follow predicted values, the altimetry measurements had an uncertainty of about 4 m, and that the average optical line depths follow the number density calculated from in-situ sensor readings. The Oklahoma and east coast flights were coordinated with a LaRC/ITT CO2 lidar on the LaRC UC-12 aircraft, a LaRC in-situ CO2 sensor, and the Oklahoma flights also included a JPL CO2 lidar on a Twin Otter aircraft. More details of the flights, measurements, analysis and scaling to space will be described in the presentation.

  9. Observations of atmospheric chemical deposition to high Arctic snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Katrina M.; Sharma, Sangeeta; Toom, Desiree; Chivulescu, Alina; Hanna, Sarah; Bertram, Allan K.; Platt, Andrew; Elsasser, Mike; Huang, Lin; Tarasick, David; Chellman, Nathan; McConnell, Joseph R.; Bozem, Heiko; Kunkel, Daniel; Duan Lei, Ying; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2017-05-01

    Rapidly rising temperatures and loss of snow and ice cover have demonstrated the unique vulnerability of the high Arctic to climate change. There are major uncertainties in modelling the chemical depositional and scavenging processes of Arctic snow. To that end, fresh snow samples collected on average every 4 days at Alert, Nunavut, from September 2014 to June 2015 were analyzed for black carbon, major ions, and metals, and their concentrations and fluxes were reported. Comparison with simultaneous measurements of atmospheric aerosol mass loadings yields effective deposition velocities that encompass all processes by which the atmospheric species are transferred to the snow. It is inferred from these values that dry deposition is the dominant removal mechanism for several compounds over the winter while wet deposition increased in importance in the fall and spring, possibly due to enhanced scavenging by mixed-phase clouds. Black carbon aerosol was the least efficiently deposited species to the snow.

  10. Molecular Line Parameters & VAMDC: An Atmospheric/Laboratory Physicist Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Christof

    2017-09-01

    "Molecular line parameters are used to interpret observational spectra and are an integral part in the data evaluation chain. Given from the perspective of a laboratory physicist, this talk provides an overview on molecular line parameters, how they are obtained and how they are made available to the user. Taking NH3 and O3 as two example molecules, the problem of measuring and modelling line parameters using current technologies from the UV to the mid-infrared are described and associated uncertainties are discussed. We also cover availability and access of molecular line data through the database infrastructure VAMDC (http://portal.vamdc.org/)."

  11. Millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, D. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumura, S.; Miura, K.; Takekawa, S., E-mail: sakai.daisuke@nao.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Institute of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8522 (Japan)

    2014-08-10

    We report the results of millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado Nebula (G357.7-0.1), which is a bright radio source behind the Galactic center region. A 15' × 15' area was mapped in the J = 1-0 lines of CO, {sup 13}CO, and HCO{sup +} with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. The Very Large Array archival data of OH at 1720 MHz were also reanalyzed. We found two molecular clouds with separate velocities, V{sub LSR} = –14 km s{sup –1} and +5 km s{sup –1}. These clouds show rough spatial anti-correlation. Both clouds are associated with OH 1720 MHz emissions in the area overlapping with the Tornado Nebula. The spatial and velocity coincidence indicates violent interaction between the clouds and the Tornado Nebula. Modestly excited gas prefers the position of the Tornado 'head' in the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud, also suggesting the interaction. Virial analysis shows that the +5 km s{sup –1} cloud is more tightly bound by self-gravity than the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud. We propose a formation scenario for the Tornado Nebula; the +5 km s{sup –1} cloud collided into the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud, generating a high-density layer behind the shock front, which activates a putative compact object by Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion to eject a pair of bipolar jets.

  12. Herschel SPIRE and PACS observations of the red supergiant VY CMa: analysis of the molecular line spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuura, Mikako; Barlow, M J; Swinyard, B M; Royer, P; Cernicharo, J; Decin, L; Wesson, R; Polehampton, E T; Blommaert, J A D L; Groenewegen, M A T; Van de Steene, G C; van Hoof, P A M

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the far-infrared and submillimetre molecular emission line spectrum of the luminous M-supergiant VY CMa, observed with the SPIRE and PACS spectrometers aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. Over 260 emission lines were detected in the 190-650-micron SPIRE FTS spectra, with one-third of the observed lines being attributable to H2O. Other detected species include CO, 13CO, H2^18O, SiO, HCN, SO, SO2, CS, H2S, and NH3. Our model fits to the observed 12CO and 13CO line intensities yield a 12C/13C ratio of 5.6+-1.8, consistent with measurements of this ratio for other M supergiants, but significantly lower than previously estimated for VY CMa from observations of lower-J lines. The spectral line energy distribution for twenty SiO rotational lines shows two temperature components: a hot component at 1000 K, which we attribute to the stellar atmosphere and inner wind, plus a cooler ~200 K component, which we attribute to an origin in the outer circumstellar envelope. We fit the line fluxes ...

  13. Observations of atmospheric structures in the Vipava valley based on Lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, Maruska; Wang, Longlong; Stanič, Samo; Gregorič, Asta; Bergant, Klemen; Eichinger, William E.; Vučković, Marko

    2016-04-01

    Located between the Trnovski gozd (1500 m a.s.l.) barrier and Karst (500 m a.s.l.) plateau, Vipava valley (100 m a.s.l.) is a natural laboratory for studies of strong, gusty North-East Bora winds. Being just 30 km away from the coastal line, the weather in the valley is affected by both the sub-mediterranean and sub-alpine climate, leading to abrupt weather changes within the valley. Due to its orography, there are only three prevailing wind directions (North-East, South-East and South-West), which were found to give rise to specific types of atmospheric structures, presented in this contribution. Atmospheric properties were measured at the floor of the Vipava valley, using twelve ultrasonic anemometers, two GPS ionospheric monitors, two meteorological stations and an infra-red Mie-scattering lidar operating at 1064 nm at Ajdovščina. These devices yielded continuous data on wind speed and direction, average absolute humidity within the valley, relative humidity, pressure and temperature. Lidar provided high temporal and spatial resolution backscatter data on aerosols, which were used as tracers for atmospheric flows. Selected time periods in 2015, when lidar data was available, were classified according to wind speed and direction in the valley and investigated in detail, in particular in term of appearance of atmospheric structures. In periods with low wind speeds (predominantly from South-West), vertical evolution of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) was found to be governed by solar radiation and clouds. In such conditions typical daily variations in PBL height with vertical mixing due to convection were observed. Periods with strong or moderate wind mainly correspond to Bora. Due to the airflow over the Trnovski gozd barrier in Bora cases, convection within the PBL was found to be much weaker due to strong turbulence close to the ground, which inhibited the mixing through the entire PBL. Above the PBL, gravity waves were observed. Periods with moderate South

  14. Series of observations of atmospheric methane aboard the icebreaker SHIRASE (abstract)

    OpenAIRE

    Atarashi,Kenji; Murata,Isao; Kita,Kazuyuki; Ogawa, Toshihiro; KOKUBUN, Susumu

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric methane has a greenhouse effect and plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry. Recently, global increase of the atmospheric methane concentration has been reported. However, few data on methane distribution covering a wide area are available. We have been developing an instrument which enables us to observe methane concentration with high time resolution, and we are trying to observe the methane distribution. The instrument utilizes the absorption of He-Ne laser light (

  15. GrayStar: A Web application for pedagogical stellar atmosphere and spectral line modelling and visualisation II: Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Short, C Ian

    2014-01-01

    GrayStar is a stellar atmospheric and spectral line modelling, post-processing, and visualisation code, suitable for classroom demonstrations and laboratory-style assignments, that has been developed in Java and deployed in JavaScript and HTML. The only software needed to compute models and post-processed observables, and to visualise the resulting atmospheric structure and observables, is a common Web browser. Therefore, the code will run on any common PC or related X86 (-64) computer of the type that typically serves classroom data projectors, is found in undergraduate computer laboratories, or that students themselves own, including those with highly portable form-factors such as net-books and tablets. The user requires no experience with compiling source code, reading data files, or using plotting packages. More advanced students can view the JavaScript source code using the developer tools provided by common Web browsers. The code is based on the approximate gray atmospheric solution and runs quickly eno...

  16. Lithium spectral line formation in stellar atmospheres. The impact of convection and NLTE effects

    CERN Document Server

    Klevas, J; Steffen, M; Caffau, E; Ludwig, H -G

    2015-01-01

    Different simplified approaches are used to account for the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects with 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. In certain cases, chemical abundances are derived in 1D NLTE and corrected for the 3D effects by adding 3D-1D LTE abundance corrections (3D+NLTE approach). Alternatively, average model atmospheres are sometimes used to substitute for the full 3D hydrodynamical models. We tested whether the results obtained using these simplified schemes (i.e., 3D+NLTE, NLTE) may reproduce those derived using the full 3D NLTE computations. The tests were made using 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of the main sequence (MS), main sequence turn-off (TO), subgiant (SGB), and red giant branch (RGB) stars, all at [M/H]=0.0 and -2.0. Our goal was to investigate the role of 3D and NLTE effects on the formation of the 670.8 nm lithium line by assessing strengths of synthetic 670.8 nm line profiles, computed using 3D/1D NLTE/LTE approaches. Our results show that Li 670.8 n...

  17. Atmospheric pressure loading parameters from very long baseline interferometry observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmillan, D. S.; Gipson, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric mass loading produces a primarily vertical displacement of the Earth's crust. This displacement is correlated with surface pressure and is large enough to be detected by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements. Using the measured surface pressure at VLBI stations, we have estimated the atmospheric loading term for each station location directly from VLBI data acquired from 1979 to 1992. Our estimates of the vertical sensitivity to change in pressure range from 0 to -0.6 mm/mbar depending on the station. These estimates agree with inverted barometer model calculations (Manabe et al., 1991; vanDam and Herring, 1994) of the vertical displacement sensitivity computed by convolving actual pressure distributions with loading Green's functions. The pressure sensitivity tends to be smaller for stations near the coast, which is consistent with the inverted barometer hypothesis. Applying this estimated pressure loading correction in standard VLBI geodetic analysis improves the repeatability of estimated lengths of 25 out of 37 baselines that were measured at least 50 times. In a root-sum-square (rss) sense, the improvement generally increases with baseline length at a rate of about 0.3 to 0.6 ppb depending on whether the baseline stations are close to the coast. For the 5998-km baseline from Westford, Massachusetts, to Wettzell, Germany, the rss improvement is about 3.6 mm out of 11.0 mm. The average rss reduction of the vertical scatter for inland stations ranges from 2.7 to 5.4 mm.

  18. Oxygen emission line properties from analysis of MAVEN-IUVS Echellograms of the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayyasi, Majd A.; Clarke, John T.; Stewart, Ian; McClintock, William; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Jakosky, Bruce; IUVS Team

    2016-10-01

    The high resolution echelle mode of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) instrument has been used to spectrally image the sunlit limb of Mars during the spacecraft periapse orbital segments. When multiple images are co-added over a few hours, there are detectable spectral emission features that have been identified to originate from atomic and molecular neutral species such as H, D, N, O, CO as well as from C+ ions. The echelle detector has a localized spectral resolution of ~0.008 Angstrom and is therefore capable of spectrally resolving the oxygen resonant triplet (130.217, 130.486 and 130.603 nm) and forbidden doublet (135.560 and 135.851 nm) emission lines. The brightness of each of these emission lines has been determined and will be compared with detected brightnesses of other species. The emission line integrated brightness ratios are being analyzed for insights into the abundance, excitation, and variability of oxygen in the martian atmosphere.

  19. First Global Observations of Atmospheric COCIF from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dejian; Boone, Chris D.; Bernath, Peter F.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Manney, Gloria L.; Walker, Kaley A.

    2010-01-01

    Carbonyl chlorofluoride (COCIF) is an important reservoir of chlorine and fluorine in the Earth's atmosphere. Satellite-based remote sensing measurements of COCIF, obtained by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) for a time period spanning February 2004 through April 2007, have been used in a global distribution study. There is a strong source region for COCIF in the tropical stratosphere near 27 km. A layer of enhanced COCIF spans the low- to mid-stratosphere over all latitudes, with volume mixing ratios of 40-100 parts per trillion by volume, largest in the tropics and decreasing toward the poles. The COCIF volume mixing ratio profiles are nearly zonally symmetric, but they exhibit a small hemispheric asymmetry that likely arises from a hemispheric asymmetry in the parent molecule CCl3 F. Comparisons are made with a set of in situ stratospheric measurements from the mid-1980s and with predictions from a 2-D model.

  20. Observations and simulations of the Na I D1 line profiles in an M-class solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D; Christian, D J; Kowalski, A F; Jess, D B; Grant, S D T; Kawate, T; Simões, P J A; Allred, J C; Keenan, F P

    2016-01-01

    We study the temporal evolution of the Na I D1 line profiles in the M3.9 flare SOL2014-06-11T21:03 UT, using high spectral resolution observations obtained with the IBIS instrument on the Dunn Solar Telescope combined with radiative hydrodynamic simulations. Our results show a significant increase in line core and wing intensities during the flare. The analysis of the line profiles from the flare ribbons reveal that the Na I D1 line has a central reversal with excess emission in the blue wing (blue asymmetry). We combine RADYN and RH simulations to synthesise Na I D1 line profiles of the flaring atmosphere and find good agreement with the observations. Heating with a beam of electrons modifies the radiation field in the flaring atmosphere and excites electrons from the ground state $\\mathrm{3s~^2S}$ to the first excited state $\\mathrm{3p~^2P}$, which in turn modifies relative population of the two states. The change in temperature and the population density of the energy states make the sodium line profile re...

  1. Universal Spectrum for Atmospheric Suspended Particulates: Comparison with Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric flows exhibit self-similar fractal space-time fluctuations on all space-time scales associated with inverse power law distribution for power spectra of meteorological parameters such as wind, temperature, etc. Fractal fluctuations imply long-range correlations, identified as self-organized criticality generic to dynamical systems in nature such as river flows, population dynamics, heart beat patterns etc., and are independent of the exact physical, chemical, physiological and other properties of the dynamical system. The physics of self-organized criticality is not yet identified. A general systems theory developed by the author visualizes the fractal fluctuations to result from the coexistence of eddy fluctuations in an eddy continuum, the larger scale eddies being the integrated mean of enclosed smaller scale eddies. The model predicts that the probability distributions of component eddy amplitudes and the corresponding variances (power spectra) are quantified by the same universal inverse power...

  2. Total observed organic carbon (TOOC in the atmosphere: a synthesis of North American observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Heald

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of organic carbon compounds in both the gas and particle phases made upwind, over and downwind of North America are synthesized to examine the total observed organic carbon (TOOC in the atmosphere over this region. These include measurements made aboard the NOAA WP-3 and BAe-146 aircraft, the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown, and at the Thompson Farm and Chebogue Point surface sites during the summer 2004 ICARTT campaign. Both winter and summer 2002 measurements during the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study are also included. Lastly, the spring 2002 observations at Trinidad Head, CA, surface measurements made in March 2006 in Mexico City and coincidentally aboard the C-130 aircraft during the MILAGRO campaign and later during the IMPEX campaign off the northwestern United States are incorporated. Concentrations of TOOC in these datasets span more than two orders of magnitude. The daytime mean TOOC ranges from 4.0 to 456 μgC m−3 from the cleanest site (Trinidad Head to the most polluted (Mexico City. Organic aerosol makes up 3–17% of this mean TOOC, with highest fractions reported over the northeastern United States, where organic aerosol can comprise up to 50% of TOOC. Carbon monoxide concentrations explain 46 to 86% of the variability in TOOC, with highest TOOC/CO slopes in regions with fresh anthropogenic influence, where we also expect the highest degree of mass closure for TOOC. Correlation with isoprene, formaldehyde, methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein also indicates that biogenic activity contributes substantially to the variability of TOOC, yet these tracers of biogenic oxidation sources do not explain the variability in organic aerosol observed over North America. We highlight the critical need to develop measurement techniques to routinely detect total gas phase VOCs, and to deploy comprehensive suites of TOOC instruments in diverse environments to quantify the ambient evolution of organic carbon from source

  3. Total observed organic carbon (TOOC) in the atmosphere: a synthesis of North American observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heald, C. L.; Goldstein, A. H.; Allan, J. D.; Aiken, A. C.; Apel, E.; Atlas, E. L.; Baker, A. K.; Bates, T. S.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D. R.; Campos, T.; Coe, H.; Crounse, J. D.; Decarlo, P. F.; de Gouw, J. A.; Dunlea, E. J.; Flocke, F. M.; Fried, A.; Goldan, P.; Griffin, R. J.; Herndon, S. C.; Holloway, J. S.; Holzinger, R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Junkermann, W.; Kuster, W. C.; Lewis, A. C.; Meinardi, S.; Millet, D. B.; Onasch, T.; Polidori, A.; Quinn, P. K.; Riemer, D. D.; Roberts, J. M.; Salcedo, D.; Sive, B.; Swanson, A. L.; Talbot, R.; Warneke, C.; Weber, R. J.; Weibring, P.; Wennberg, P. O.; Worsnop, D. R.; Wittig, A. E.; Zhang, R.; Zheng, J.; Zheng, W.

    2008-04-01

    Measurements of organic carbon compounds in both the gas and particle phases made upwind, over and downwind of North America are synthesized to examine the total observed organic carbon (TOOC) in the atmosphere over this region. These include measurements made aboard the NOAA WP-3 and BAe-146 aircraft, the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown, and at the Thompson Farm and Chebogue Point surface sites during the summer 2004 ICARTT campaign. Both winter and summer 2002 measurements during the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study are also included. Lastly, the spring 2002 observations at Trinidad Head, CA, surface measurements made in March 2006 in Mexico City and coincidentally aboard the C-130 aircraft during the MILAGRO campaign and later during the IMPEX campaign off the northwestern United States are incorporated. Concentrations of TOOC in these datasets span more than two orders of magnitude. The daytime mean TOOC ranges from 4.0 to 456 μgC m-3 from the cleanest site (Trinidad Head) to the most polluted (Mexico City). Organic aerosol makes up 3-17% of this mean TOOC, with highest fractions reported over the northeastern United States, where organic aerosol can comprise up to 50% of TOOC. Carbon monoxide concentrations explain 46 to 86% of the variability in TOOC, with highest TOOC/CO slopes in regions with fresh anthropogenic influence, where we also expect the highest degree of mass closure for TOOC. Correlation with isoprene, formaldehyde, methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein also indicates that biogenic activity contributes substantially to the variability of TOOC, yet these tracers of biogenic oxidation sources do not explain the variability in organic aerosol observed over North America. We highlight the critical need to develop measurement techniques to routinely detect total gas phase VOCs, and to deploy comprehensive suites of TOOC instruments in diverse environments to quantify the ambient evolution of organic carbon from source to sink.

  4. Development of a Ground-Based Atmospheric Monitoring Network for the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sprovieri F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Consistent, high-quality measurements of atmospheric mercury (Hg are necessary in order to better understand Hg emissions, transport, and deposition on a global scale. Although the number of atmospheric Hg monitoring stations has increased in recent years, the available measurement database is limited and there are many regions of the world where measurements have not been extensively performed. Long-term atmospheric Hg monitoring and additional ground-based monitoring sites are needed in order to generate datasets that will offer new insight and information about the global scale trends of atmospheric Hg emissions and deposition. In the framework of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS project, a coordinated global observational network for atmospheric Hg is being established. The overall research strategy of GMOS is to develop a state-of-the-art observation system able to provide information on the concentration of Hg species in ambient air and precipitation on the global scale. This network is being developed by integrating previously established ground-based atmospheric Hg monitoring stations with newly established GMOS sites that are located both at high altitude and sea level locations, as well as in climatically diverse regions. Through the collection of consistent, high-quality atmospheric Hg measurement data, we seek to create a comprehensive assessment of atmospheric Hg concentrations and their dependence on meteorology, long-range atmospheric transport and atmospheric emissions.

  5. Satellite Observations of Atmospheric SO2 from Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, M. F.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    Volcanoes are an important source of various atmospheric trace gases. Volcanic eruptions and their emissions are sporadic and intermittent and often occur in uninhabited regions. Therefore assessing the amount and size of the gaseous and particulate emission from volcanoes is difficult. Satellite remote sensing measurements provide one well suited opportunity to overcome this difficulty. Onboard ERS-2, GOME's moderate spectral resolution enables us to apply the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithm to retrieve SO2 column densities from radiance/irradiance measurements in UV spectral region. Volcanic emissions can cause significant variations of climate on a variety of time scales; just one very large eruption can cause a measurable change in the Earth's climate with a time scale of a few years. Stratospheric aerosols produced by volcanic eruptions can influence stratospheric chemistry both through chemical reactions that take place on the surface of the aerosols and through temperature changes induced by their presence in the stratosphere. In this work we give a comprehensive overview on several volcanoes and the retrieval of SO2 column densities from GOME data for the years 1996 - 2002. The focus is on both eruption and out gassing scenarios from different volcanic eruptions in Italy, Iceland, Congo/ Zaire, Ecuador and Mexico.

  6. Development of a tiny tandem balloon system for atmospheric observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Fujiwara, Masatomo

    2016-07-01

    A tandem balloon system with a combination of a zero-pressure balloon on top and a super-pressure balloon on the bottom has a unique trajectory characteristic, with different flight altitudes between day and night and thus with ascending and descending motions at dawn and dusk, respectively. This characteristic provides a unique opportunity to explore the atmosphere, e.g., the upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric region with cross-tropopause measurements twice a day. We started development of a tiny tandem balloon system using a 10 m^{3} super-pressure balloon and a 100 m^{3} zero-pressure balloon, with a capability of carrying 3 kg of payload. One of the scientific targets is to measure water vapor, cloud particles, and temperature around the tropical tropopause which is the entry point of the stratospheric and mesospheric meridional circulation. For the data transfer, the iridium satellite communication module, SBD9603 is used. In this paper, the current status of the development will be reported.

  7. Narrow-line-width UV Bursts in the Transition Region above Sunspots Observed by IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhenyong; Huang, Zhenghua; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Madjarska, Maria S.; Fu, Hui; Mou, Chaozhou; Xie, Haixia

    2016-10-01

    Various small-scale structures abound in the solar atmosphere above active regions, playing an important role in the dynamics and evolution therein. We report on a new class of small-scale transition region structures in active regions, characterized by strong emissions but extremely narrow Si iv line profiles as found in observations taken with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Tentatively named as narrow-line-width UV bursts (NUBs), these structures are located above sunspots and comprise one or multiple compact bright cores at sub-arcsecond scales. We found six NUBs in two data sets (a raster and a sit-and-stare data set). Among these, four events are short-lived with a duration of ∼10 minutes, while two last for more than 36 minutes. All NUBs have Doppler shifts of 15–18 km s‑1, while the NUB found in sit-and-stare data possesses an additional component at ∼50 km s‑1 found only in the C ii and Mg ii lines. Given that these events are found to play a role in the local dynamics, it is important to further investigate the physical mechanisms that generate these phenomena and their role in the mass transport in sunspots.

  8. Narrow-line-width UV bursts in the transition region above Sunspots observed by IRIS

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Zhenyong; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Madjarska, Maria S; Fu, Hui; Mou, Chaozhou; Xie, Haixia

    2016-01-01

    Various small-scale structures abound in the solar atmosphere above active regions, playing an important role in the dynamics and evolution therein. We report on a new class of small-scale transition region structures in active regions, characterized by strong emissions but extremely narrow Si IV line profiles as found in observations taken with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Tentatively named as Narrow-line-width UV bursts (NUBs), these structures are located above sunspots and comprise of one or multiple compact bright cores at sub-arcsecond scales. We found six NUBs in two datasets (a raster and a sit-and-stare dataset). Among these, four events are short-living with a duration of $\\sim$10 mins while two last for more than 36 mins. All NUBs have Doppler shifts of 15--18 km/s, while the NUB found in sit-and-stare data possesses an additional component at $\\sim$50 km/s found only in the C II and Mg II lines. Given that these events are found to play a role in the local dynamics, it is impo...

  9. Comparison between Satellite Water Vapour Observations and Atmospheric Models’ Predictions of the Upper Tropospheric Thermal Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Dim, J. R.; T. Y. Nakajima; T. Takamura; Kikuchi, N

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric profiles (temperature, pressure, and humidity) are commonly used parameters for aerosols and cloud properties retrievals. In preparation of the launch of the Global Change Observation Mission-Climate/Second-Generation GLobal Imager (GCOM-C/SGLI) satellite, an evaluation study on the sensitivity of atmospheric models to variations of atmospheric conditions is conducted. In this evaluation, clear sky and above low clouds water vapour radiances of the upper troposphere obtained from ...

  10. Observation and Modeling of Tsunami-Generated Gravity Waves in the Earth’s Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-08

    Observation and modeling of tsunami-generated gravity waves in the earth’s upper atmosphere 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...for public release; distribution is unlimited. Observation and modeling of tsunami-generated gravity waves in the earth’s upper atmosphere Sharon...viscosity), and reconstruct the GW field. We would then apply our models to several observed tsunamis, and calculate the GW field in the

  11. Impact of atmospheric refraction: How deeply can we probe exo-Earth's atmospheres during primary eclipse observations?

    CERN Document Server

    Betremieux, Y

    2013-01-01

    Most models used to predict or fit exoplanet transmission spectra do not include all the effects of atmospheric refraction. Namely, the angular size of the star with respect to the planet can limit the lowest altitude, or highest density, probed during primary eclipses, as no rays passing below this critical altitude can reach the observer. We discuss this geometrical effect of refraction and show that most habitable exo-Earths cannot be probed down to their surface. We present 0.4-5.0micron model transmission spectra of Earth's atmosphere viewed as a transiting exoplanet, and show how atmospheric refraction modifies the transmission spectrum depending on the spectral type (O5-M9) of the host star. We demonstrate that refraction is another phenomenon that can potentially explain flat transmission spectra over some spectral regions.

  12. Chromatic line-profile tomography to reveal exoplanetary atmospheres: application to HD 189733b

    CERN Document Server

    Borsa, Francesco; Poretti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    Transmission spectroscopy can be used to constrain the properties of exoplanetary atmospheres. During a transit, the light blocked from the atmosphere of the planet leaves an imprint in the light coming from the star. This has been shown for many exoplanets with different techniques, with both photometry and spectroscopy. We aim at testing chromatic line-profile tomography as a new tool to investigate exoplanetary atmospheres. The signal imprinted on the cross-correlation function (CCF) by a planet transiting its star is dependent on the planet-to-star radius ratio. We want to verify if the precision reachable on the CCF obtained from a subset of the spectral orders of the HARPS spectrograph is enough to discriminate the radius of a planet at different wavelengths. Methods. We analyze HARPS archival data of three transits of HD 189733b. We divide the HARPS spectral range in 7 broadbands, calculating for each band the ratio between the area of the out-of-transit CCF and the area of the signal imprinted by the ...

  13. Herschel observations of FIR emission lines in brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Edge, A C; Mittal, R; Allen, S W; Baum, S A; Boehringer, H; Bregman, J N; Bremer, M N; Combes, F; Crawford, C S; Donahue, M; Egami, E; Fabian, A C; Hamer, S L; Hatch, N A; Jaffe, W; Johnstone, R M; McNamara, B R; O'Dea, C P; Popesso, P; Quillen, A C; Salome, P; Sarazin, C L; Voit, G M; Wilman, R J; Wise, M W

    2010-01-01

    The question of how much gas cools in the cores of clusters of galaxies has been the focus of many, multiwavelength studies in the past 30 years. In this letter we present the first detections of the strongest atomic cooling lines, [C II], [O I] and [N I] in two strong cooling flow clusters, A1068 and A2597, using Herschel PACS. These spectra indicate that the substantial mass of cold molecular gas (>10^9 Mo) known to be present in these systems is being irradiated by intense UV radiation, most probably from young stars. The line widths of these FIR lines indicate that they share dynamics similar but not identical to other ionised and molecular gas traced by optical, near-infrared and CO lines. The relative brightness of the FIR lines compared to CO and FIR luminosity is consistent with other star-forming galaxies indicating that the properties of the molecular gas clouds in cluster cores and the stars they form are not unusual. These results provide additional evidence for a reservoir of cold gas that is fed...

  14. Direct observations of the atmospheric processing of Asian mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Sullivan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of secondary acid products and ammonium on individual mineral dust particles during ACE-Asia has been measured in real-time using ATOFMS. Changes in the amounts of sulphate, nitrate, and chloride mixed with dust particles corresponded to different air mass source regions. During volcanically influenced periods, dust mixed with sulphate dominated. This rapidly switched to dust predominantly mixed with chloride when the first Asian dust front reached the R/V Ronald Brown. We hypothesise that the high degree of mixing of dust with chloride was caused by the prior reaction of NOy(g and volcanic SO2(g with sea salt particles, reducing the availability of nitrate and sulphate precursors while releasing HCl(g, which then reacted with the incoming dust front. The segregation of sulphate from nitrate and chloride in individual dust particles is demonstrated for the first time. This is likely caused by the dust plume encountering elevated SO2(g in the Chinese interior before reaching coastal urban areas polluted by both SO2(g and NOx(g. This caused the fractions of dust mixed with nitrate and/or chloride to be strongly dependent on the total dust loadings, whereas dust mixed with sulphate did not show this same dust concentration dependence. Ammonium was also significantly mixed with dust and the amount correlated strongly with the total amount of secondary acid reaction products in the dust. Submicron dust and ammonium sulphate were internally mixed, contrary to frequent statements that they exist as an external mixture. The size distribution of the mixing state of dust with these secondary species validates previous models and mechanisms of the atmospheric processing of dust. The uptake of secondary acids was also dependent on the individual dust particle mineralogy; nitrate accumulated on calcium-rich dust while sulphate accumulated on aluminosilicate-rich dust. Oxidation of S

  15. Impact of atmospheric refraction: how deeply can we probe exo-earth's atmospheres during primary eclipse observations?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bétrémieux, Yan [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kaltenegger, Lisa, E-mail: betremieux@mpia.de [Also at Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. (United States)

    2014-08-10

    Most models used to predict or fit exoplanet transmission spectra do not include all the effects of atmospheric refraction. Namely, the angular size of the star with respect to the planet can limit the lowest altitude, or highest density and pressure, probed during primary eclipses as no rays passing below this critical altitude can reach the observer. We discuss this geometrical effect of refraction for all exoplanets and tabulate the critical altitude, density, and pressure for an exoplanet identical to Earth with a 1 bar N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere as a function of both the incident stellar flux (Venus, Earth, and Mars-like) at the top of the atmosphere and the spectral type (O5-M9) of the host star. We show that such a habitable exo-Earth can be probed to a surface pressure of 1 bar only around the coolest stars. We present 0.4-5.0 μm model transmission spectra of Earth's atmosphere viewed as a transiting exoplanet, and show how atmospheric refraction modifies the transmission spectrum depending on the spectral type of the host star. We demonstrate that refraction is another phenomenon that can potentially explain flat transmission spectra over some spectral regions.

  16. Observation of atmospheric nitrous acid with DOAS in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Min; XIE Pin-hua; LIU Wen-qing; LI Ang; DOU Ke; FANG Wu; LIU Jian-guo; ZHANG Wei-jun

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of nitrous acid (HONO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in Beijing City have been performed by means of a developed differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) system based on photodiode array (PDA), during the autumn of 2004.HONO and NO2 were simultaneously identified by their characteristic absorption bands in the spectral region between 337 nm and 372 nm with high sensibility and time resolution. The concentrations of HONO exhibit obviously diurnal variation with a nocturnal maximum and a daytime minimum. The highest HONO value up to 11.8 μg/m3 was observed during the night of 2/3 September.Possible sources of the observed HONO were discussed. Good correlation to NO2 indicates that NO2 is a main source component. The measurement also shows direct emission of HONO is an important source in strongly polluted urban area.

  17. No Timing Variations Observed in Third Transit of Snow-line Exoplanet Kepler-421b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Muirhead, Philip S.

    2016-07-01

    We observed Kepler-421 during the anticipated third transit of the snow-line exoplanet Kepler-421b in order to constrain the existence and extent of transit timing variations (TTVs). Previously, the Kepler spacecraft only observed two transits of Kepler-421b, leaving the planet’s transit ephemeris unconstrained. Our visible light, time-series observations from the 4.3 m Discovery Channel Telescope were designed to capture pre-transit baseline and the partial transit of Kepler-421b, barring significant TTVs. We use the light curves to assess the probabilities of various transit models using both the posterior odds ratio and the Bayesian Information Criterion, and find that a transit model with no TTVs is favored to 3.6σ confidence. These observations suggest that Kepler-421b is either alone in its system or is only experiencing minor dynamic interactions with an unseen companion. With the Kepler-421b ephemeris constrained, we calculate future transit times and discuss the opportunity to characterize the atmosphere of this cold, long-period exoplanet via transmission spectroscopy. Our investigation emphasizes the difficulties associated with observing long-period exoplanet transits and the consequences that arise from failing to refine transit ephemerides.

  18. Results of Joint Observations of Jupiter's Atmosphere by Juno and a Network of Earth-Based Observing Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Glenn; Momary, Thomas; Bolton, Scott; Levin, Steven; Hansen, Candice; Janssen, Michael; Adriani, Alberto; Gladstone, G. Randall; Bagenal, Fran; Ingersoll, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The Juno mission has promoted and coordinated a network of Earth-based observations, including both Earth-proximal and ground-based facilities, to extend and enhance observations made by the Juno mission. The spectral region and timeline of all of these observations are summarized in the web site: https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/planned-observations. Among the earliest of these were observation of Jovian auroral phenomena at X-ray, ultraviolet and infrared wavelengths and measurements of Jovian synchrotron radiation from the Earth simultaneously with the measurement of properties of the upstream solar wind. Other observations of significance to the magnetosphere measured the mass loading from Io by tracking its observed volcanic activity and the opacity of its torus. Observations of Jupiter's neutral atmosphere included observations of reflected sunlight from the near-ultraviolet through the near-infrared and thermal emission from 5 μm through the radio region. The point of these measurements is to relate properties of the deep atmosphere that are the focus of Juno's mission to the state of the "weather layer" at much higher atmospheric levels. These observations cover spectral regions not included in Juno's instrumentation, provide spatial context for Juno's often spatially limited coverage of Jupiter, and they describe the evolution of atmospheric features in time that are measured only once by Juno. We will summarize the results of measurements during the approach phase of the mission that characterized the state of the atmosphere, as well as observations made by Juno and the supporting campaign during Juno's perijoves 1 (2016 August 27), 3 (2016 December 11), 4 (2017 February 2) and possibly "early" results from 5 (2017 March 27). Besides a global network of professional astronomers, the Juno mission also benefited from the enlistment of a network of dedicated amateur astronomers who provided a quasi-continuous picture of the evolution of features observed by

  19. Altitude dependence of atmospheric temperature trends: Climate models versus observation

    CERN Document Server

    Douglass, D H; Singer, F

    2004-01-01

    As a consequence of greenhouse forcing, all state of the art general circulation models predict a positive temperature trend that is greater for the troposphere than the surface. This predicted positive trend increases in value with altitude until it reaches a maximum ratio with respect to the surface of as much as 1.5 to 2.0 at about 200 to 400 hPa. However, the temperature trends from several independent observational data sets show decreasing as well as mostly negative values. This disparity indicates that the three models examined here fail to account for the effects of greenhouse forcings.

  20. Atmospheric diurnal variations observed with GPS radio occultation soundings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xie

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal variation, driven by solar forcing, is a fundamental mode in the Earth's weather and climate system. Radio occultation (RO measurements from the six COSMIC satellites (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate provide nearly uniform global coverage with high vertical resolution, all-weather and diurnal sampling capability. This paper analyzes the diurnal variations of temperature and refractivity from three-year (2007–2009 COSMIC RO measurements in the troposphere and stratosphere between 30° S and 30° N. The RO observations reveal both propagating and trapped vertical structures of diurnal variations, including transition regions near the tropopause where data with high vertical resolution are critical. In the tropics the diurnal amplitude in refractivity shows the minimum around 14 km and increases to a local maximum around 32 km in the stratosphere. The upward propagating component of the migrating diurnal tides in the tropics is clearly captured by the GPS RO measurements, which show a downward progression in phase from stratopause to the upper troposphere with a vertical wavelength of about 25 km. At ~32 km the seasonal variation of the tidal amplitude maximizes at the opposite side of the equator relative to the solar forcing. The vertical structure of tidal amplitude shows strong seasonal variations and becomes asymmetric along the equator and tilted toward the summer hemisphere in the solstice months. Such asymmetry becomes less prominent in equinox months.

  1. LIDAR Developments at Clermont-Ferrand—France for Atmospheric Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fréville, Patrick; Montoux, Nadège; Baray, Jean-Luc; Chauvigné, Aurélien; Réveret, François; Hervo, Maxime; Dionisi, Davide; Payen, Guillaume; Sellegri, Karine

    2015-01-01

    We present a Rayleigh-Mie-Raman LIDAR system in operation at Clermont-Ferrand (France) since 2008. The system provides continuous vertical tropospheric profiles of aerosols, cirrus optical properties and water vapour mixing ratio. Located in proximity to the high altitude Puy de Dôme station, labelled as the GAW global station PUY since August 2014, it is a useful tool to describe the boundary layer dynamics and hence interpret in situ measurements. This LIDAR has been upgraded with specific hardware/software developments and laboratory calibrations in order to improve the quality of the profiles, calibrate the depolarization ratio, and increase the automation of operation. As a result, we provide a climatological water vapour profile analysis for the 2009–2013 period, showing an annual cycle with a winter minimum and a summer maximum, consistent with in-situ observations at the PUY station. An overview of a preliminary climatology of cirrus clouds frequency shows that in 2014, more than 30% of days present cirrus events. Finally, the backscatter coefficient profile observed on 27 September 2014 shows the capacity of the system to detect cirrus clouds at 13 km altitude, in presence of aerosols below the 5 km altitude. PMID:25643059

  2. Ice shedding from overhead electrical lines by mechanical breaking : a ductile model for viscoplastic behaviour of atmospheric ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandarian, M.

    2005-07-01

    The mechanical characteristics of power line components need improvement in order to avoid power failures during severe ice storms. Atmospheric icing of overhead power lines creates electrical and mechanical problems in the transmission network. The successful development of anti-icing and de-icing techniques requires good knowledge of the adherence and bulk strength characteristics of atmospheric ice. This study presented a model for viscoplastic behaviour of porous atmospheric ice in the ductile region. The model was then modified to consider the effects of cracking activities to predict the material behaviour in transition and brittle regions. The following general methodologies were followed in this research for describing the ductile behaviour of porous atmospheric ice: instantaneous elastic strain; delayed viscoelastic strain; and, permanent plastic strain. The scientific contributions of this study include a classification of atmospheric ice structure on power lines on the basis of its grain shape and c-axis orientation. This thesis also presented 3 computer codes in Maple Mathematical Program for determining the elastic moduli of various types of freshwater ice; a poroelastic model for modifying the elastic moduli of porous atmospheric ice; a cap-model plasticity for various types of porous atmospheric ice; new freshwater ice yield envelopes in ductile regions that take porosity into account by means of an elliptical moving cap; and a newly developed user-defined material subroutine for viscoplastic behaviour of atmospheric ice in ductile region including the poroelastic, viscoelastic, and cap-model plasticity.

  3. Propagation of sausage soliton in the solar lower atmosphere observed by Hinode/SOT

    CERN Document Server

    Zaqarashvili, T V; Khodachenko, M L; 10.1111/j.1745-3933.2010.00838.x

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic waves and pulses propagating from the solar photosphere upwards may quickly develop into shocks due to the rapid decrease of atmospheric density. However, if they propagate along a magnetic flux tube, then the nonlinear steepening may be balanced by tube dispersion effects. This may result in the formation of sausage soliton. The aim of this letter is to report an observational evidence of sausage soliton in the solar chromosphere. Time series of Ca II H line obtained at the solar limb with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on the board of Hinode is analysed. Observations show an intensity blob, which propagates from 500 km to 1700 km above the solar surface with the mean apparent speed of 35 km s$^{-1}$. The speed is much higher than expected local sound speed, therefore the blob can not be a simple pressure pulse. The blob speed, length to width ratio and relative intensity correspond to slow sausage soliton propagating along a magnetic tube. The blob width is increased with height corresponding to...

  4. The multisensor payload 'Structura' for the observation of atmospheric night glows from the ISS board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krot, Yury; Beliaev, Boris; Katkovsky, Leonid

    2016-10-01

    Aerospace Research Department of the Institute of Applied Physical Problems at Belarusian State University has developed a prototype of the optical payload intended for a space experiment on the ISS board. The prototype includes four optical modules for the night glows observation, in particular spatial-brightness and spectral characteristics in the altitude range of 80-320 km. Objects of the interest are emitting top layers of the atmosphere including exited OH radicals, atomic and molecular oxygen and sodium layers. The goal of the space experiment is a research of night glows over different regions of the Earth and a connection with natural disasters like earthquakes, cyclones, etc. Two optical modules for spatial distribution of atomic oxygen layers along the altitude consist of input lenses, spectral interferential filters and line CCD detectors. The optical module for registration of exited OH radical emissions is formed from CCD array spectrometer. The payload includes also a panchromatic (400-900 nm) high sensitive imaging camera for observing of the glows general picture. The optical modules of the prototype have been tested and general optical characteristics were determined in laboratory conditions. A solution of an astigmatism reducing of a concave diffraction grating and a method of the second diffraction order correction were applied and improved spectrometer's optical characteristics. Laboratory equipment and software were developed to imitate a dynamic scene of the night glows in laboratory conditions including an imitation of linear spectra and the spatial distribution of emissions.

  5. Assimilation of pseudo-tree-ring-width observations into an atmospheric general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Walter; Fallah, Bijan; Reich, Sebastian; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2017-05-01

    Paleoclimate data assimilation (DA) is a promising technique to systematically combine the information from climate model simulations and proxy records. Here, we investigate the assimilation of tree-ring-width (TRW) chronologies into an atmospheric global climate model using ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) techniques and a process-based tree-growth forward model as an observation operator. Our results, within a perfect-model experiment setting, indicate that the "online DA" approach did not outperform the "off-line" one, despite its considerable additional implementation complexity. On the other hand, it was observed that the nonlinear response of tree growth to surface temperature and soil moisture does deteriorate the operation of the time-averaged EnKF methodology. Moreover, for the first time we show that this skill loss appears significantly sensitive to the structure of the growth rate function, used to represent the principle of limiting factors (PLF) within the forward model. In general, our experiments showed that the error reduction achieved by assimilating pseudo-TRW chronologies is modulated by the magnitude of the yearly internal variability in the model. This result might help the dendrochronology community to optimize their sampling efforts.

  6. Space shuttle observation of an unusual transient atmospheric emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin; Ziv, Baruch; Israelevich, Peter L.; Sentman, Davis D.; São-Sabbas, Fernanda T.; Devir, Adam D.; Sato, Mitsuteru; Rodger, Craig J.; Moalem, Meir; Greenberg, Eran; Yaron, Ofer

    2005-01-01

    We report an observation of an unusual transient luminous event (TLE) detected in the near IR, south of Madagascar above the Indian Ocean. The event was imaged from the space shuttle Columbia during the MEIDEX sprite campaign [Yair et al., 2004]. It was delayed 0.23 seconds from a preceding visual lightning flash which was horizontally displaced >1000 km from the event. The calculated brightness in the 860 (+/-50) nm filter was ~310 +/- 30 kR, and the morphology of the emitting volume did not resemble any known class of TLE (i.e., sprites, ELVES or halos). This TIGER event (Transient Ionospheric Glow Emission in Red) may constitute a new class of TLE, not necessarily induced by a near-by thunderstorm. We discuss possible generation mechanisms, including the conjugate sprite hypothesis caused by lightning at the magnetic mirror point, lightning-induced electron precipitation and an extraterrestrial source, meteoric or cometary.

  7. Fine Pattern Etching of Molybdenum Thin Film and Silicon Substrate by Using Atmospheric Line-Shaped Microplasma Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Tomohiro; Saitoh, Mitsuo; Yashiro, Yoichiro; Kimura, Tadashi

    2003-06-01

    An atmospheric line-shaped microplasma source was developed for fine pattern etching. Observation of plasma emission of the developed plasma source has revealed that the finest plasma line is formed when helium (He) gas is supplied to the inner gas feed and reaction gas to the outer gas feeds. When reaction gas is supplied to the outer gas feeds, fluorine radical (F*) emission intensity increases with the gas flow rate, eventually exceeding the maximum emission intensity obtained when a mixture of reaction gas and He gas is supplied to the inner gas feed. Fine pattern etching of molybdenum thin film and silicon substrate was experimentally carried out using microplasma sources in two different configurations: one with the copper electrode covered to protect it from plasma exposure (type 1), and the other with the aluminum electrode end knife-edged and exposed to a plasma (type 2). The experiment revealed that the type 2 source provides a higher etching rate than of the type 1 source. The type 2 source can produce a fine etched pattern with lines of several ten to several hundred μm width. The maximum etching rate of silicon substrate is 79.0 μm/min.

  8. Atmospheric correction of Earth-observation remote sensing images by Monte Carlo method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hanane Hadjit; Abdelaziz Oukebdane; Ahmad Hafid Belbachir

    2013-10-01

    In earth observation, the atmospheric particles contaminate severely, through absorption and scattering, the reflected electromagnetic signal from the earth surface. It will be greatly beneficial for land surface characterization if we can remove these atmospheric effects from imagery and retrieve surface reflectance that characterizes the surface properties with the purpose of atmospheric correction. Giving the geometric parameters of the studied image and assessing the parameters describing the state of the atmosphere, it is possible to evaluate the atmospheric reflectance, and upward and downward transmittances which take part in the garbling data obtained from the image. To that end, an atmospheric correction algorithm for high spectral resolution data over land surfaces has been developed. It is designed to obtain the main atmospheric parameters needed in the image correction and the interpretation of optical observations. It also estimates the optical characteristics of the Earth-observation imagery (LANDSAT and SPOT). The physics underlying the problem of solar radiation propagations that takes into account multiple scattering and sphericity of the atmosphere has been treated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  9. Atmospheric gravity waves due to the Tohoku-Oki tsunami observed in the thermosphere by GOCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, R.F.; Doornbos, E.N.; Bruinsma, S.; Hebert, H.

    2014-01-01

    Oceanic tsunami waves couple with atmospheric gravity waves, as previously observed through ionospheric and airglow perturbations. Aerodynamic velocities and density variations are computed from Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometer and thruster data during

  10. Variation of acoustic cutoff period with height in the solar atmosphere: theory versus observations

    CERN Document Server

    Murawski, K; Konkol, P; Wiśniewska, A

    2016-01-01

    Recently Wi\\'sniewska et al. demonstrated observationally how the acoustic cutoff frequency varies with height in the solar atmosphere including the upper photosphere and the lower and middle chromosphere, and showed that the observational results cannot be accounted for by the existing theoretical formulas for the acoustic cutoff. In order to reproduce the observed variation of the cutoff with atmospheric height, numerical simulations of impulsively generated acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere are performed, and the spectral analysis of temporal wave profiles is used to compute numerically changes of the acoustic cutoff with height. Comparison of the numerical results with the observational data shows good agreement, which clearly indicates that the obtained results may be used to determine the structure of the background solar atmosphere.

  11. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid-dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andreas Kürten; Tuija Jokinen; Mario Simon; Mikko Sipilä; Nina Sarnela; Heikki Junninen; Alexey Adamov; João Almeida; Antonio Amorim; Federico Bianchi; Martin Breitenlechner; Josef Dommen; Neil M. Donahue; Jonathan Duplissy; Sebastian Ehrhart; Richard C. Flagan; Alessandro Franchin; Jani Hakala; Armin Hansel; Martin Heinritzi; Manuel Hutterli; Juha Kangasluoma; Jasper Kirkby; Ari Laaksonen; Katrianne Lehtipalo; Markus Leiminger; Vladimir Makhmutov; Serge Mathot; Antti Onnela; Tuukka Petäjä; Arnaud P. Praplan; Francesco Riccobono; Matti P. Rissanen; Linda Rondo; Siegfried Schobesberger; John H. Seinfeld; Gerhard Steiner; António Tomé; Jasmin Tröstl; Paul M. Winkler; Christina Williamson; Daniela Wimmer; Penglin Ye; Urs Baltensperger; Kenneth S. Carslaw; Markku Kulmala; Douglas R. Worsnop; Joachim Curtius

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates...

  12. Atmospheric gravity waves due to the Tohoku-Oki tsunami observed in the thermosphere by GOCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, R.F.; Doornbos, E.N.; Bruinsma, S.; Hebert, H.

    2014-01-01

    Oceanic tsunami waves couple with atmospheric gravity waves, as previously observed through ionospheric and airglow perturbations. Aerodynamic velocities and density variations are computed from Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometer and thruster data during T

  13. Observations and modelling of line intensity ratios of OV multiplet lines for ? - ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Rachlew-Källne, E.; Hörling, P.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    1996-09-01

    Line intensity ratios of OV multiplet lines for the 0953-4075/29/18/019/img3 (J = 2,1,0) transitions are studied using a collisional radiative model and the results are compared with measurements from the reversed field pinch experiments Extrap T1 and T2 at KTH. The measured line intensity ratios deviate from the predictions of the model and the possible causes for the discrepancy are discussed with regard to errors in rate coefficients and non-quasi-steady state.

  14. Mesospheric vertical thermal structure and winds on Venus from HHSMT CO spectral-line observations

    CERN Document Server

    Rengel, M; Jarchow, C

    2008-01-01

    We report vertical thermal structure and wind velocities in the Venusian mesosphere retrieved from carbon monoxide (12CO J=2-1 and 13CO J=2-1) spectral line observations obtained with the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope (HHSMT). We observed the mesosphere of Venus from two days after the second Messenger flyby of Venus (on June 5 2007 at 23:10 UTC) during five days. Day-to-day and day-to-night temperature variations and short-term fluctuations of the mesospheric zonal flow were evident in our data. The extensive layer of warm air detected recently by SPICAV at 90 - to 100 km altitude is also detected in the temperature profiles reported here. These data were part of a coordinated ground-based Venus observational campaign in support of the ESA Venus Express mission. Furthermore, this study attempts to cross-calibrate space- and ground-based observations, to constrain radiative transfer and retrieval algorithms for planetary atmospheres, and to contribute to a more thorough understanding of the global pa...

  15. Global Hawk dropsonde observations of the Arctic atmosphere obtained during the Winter Storms and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers (WISPAR) field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrieri, J. M.; de Boer, G.; Shupe, M. D.; Spackman, J. R.; Wang, J.; Neiman, P. J.; Wick, G. A.; Hock, T. F.; Hood, R. E.

    2014-11-01

    In February and March of 2011, the Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) was deployed over the Pacific Ocean and the Arctic during the Winter Storms and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers (WISPAR) field campaign. The WISPAR science missions were designed to (1) mprove our understanding of Pacific weather systems and the polar atmosphere; (2) evaluate operational use of unmanned aircraft for investigating these atmospheric events; and (3) demonstrate operational and research applications of a UAS dropsonde system at high latitudes. Dropsondes deployed from the Global Hawk successfully obtained high-resolution profiles of temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind information between the stratosphere and surface. The 35 m wingspan Global Hawk, which can soar for ~ 31 h at altitudes up to ~ 20 km, was remotely operated from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB) in California. During the 25 h polar flight on 9-10 March 2011, the Global Hawk released 35 sondes between the North Slope of Alaska and 85° N latitude, marking the first UAS Arctic dropsonde mission of its kind. The polar flight transected an unusually cold polar vortex, notable for an associated record-level Arctic ozone loss, and documented polar boundary layer variations over a sizable ocean-ice lead feature. Comparison of dropsonde observations with atmospheric reanalyses reveal that, for this day, large-scale structures such as the polar vortex and air masses are captured by the reanalyses, while smaller-scale features, including low-level jets and inversion depths, are mischaracterized. The successful Arctic dropsonde deployment demonstrates the capability of the Global Hawk to conduct operations in harsh, remote regions. The limited comparison with other measurements and reanalyses highlights the potential value of Arctic atmospheric dropsonde observations where routine in situ measurements are practically nonexistent.

  16. Experimental Observation of Strongly Bound Dimers of Sulfuric Acid: Application to Nucleation in the Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petaja, Tuukka; Sipila, Mikko; Paasonen, Pauli

    2011-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is a key compound in atmospheric nucleation. Here we report on the observation of a close-to-collision-limited sulfuric acid dimer formation in atmospherically relevant laboratory conditions in the absence of measurable quantities of ammonia or organics. The observed dimer formation...... compound(s) with (a) concentration(s) high enough to prevent the dimer evaporation. Such a stabilizing compound should be abundant enough in any natural environment and would therefore not limit the formation of sulfuric acid dimers in the atmosphere....

  17. Using data assimilation to compare models of Mars and Venus atmospheres with observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Thomas; Forget, Francois; Millour, Ehouarn

    2016-10-01

    Data assimilation is a technique that optimally reconstructs a best estimate of the atmospheric state by combining observations and an a priori provided by a numerical model. The aim of data assimilation is to extrapolate in space and time observations of the atmosphere with the means of a model in order to recover the state of the atmosphere as completely and as accurately as possible.In this work, we employ a state-of-the-art Martian Global Climate Model to assimilate vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, airborne dust, and water ice clouds retrieved from observations of the Mars Climate Sounder onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The assimilation is carried out using an Ensemble Kalman Filter technique, that maps covariances between model variables. Therefore, observations of one variable (e.g. temperature) can be used to estimate other unobserved variables (e.g. winds), using covariances constructed from an ensemble of model simulations for which initial states slightly differ. Using this method, one can estimate dust from temperature observations only, confirming the presence of detached layers of dust in the atmosphere from their thermal signature. Then, the joint assimilation of temperature, dust, and water ice clouds shows that the performance of the assimilation is limited due to model biases, such as an incorrect phasing of the thermal tide and observed dust diurnal variations unexplained by a model. However, dust estimation makes possible the predictability of the atmosphere, up to around ten days in the most favorable cases, a great improvement over previous studies.Future developments for an improved assimilation strongly suggest to assimilate model parameters, such as the ones for the representation of parameterized atmospheric gravity waves.Also, in the light of the recent global observations of the Venusian atmosphere from the Akastuki spacecraft, the case for the first-ever assimilation of Venus will be made.

  18. Observations favor the crossing of phantom divide lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Using three different parameterized dark energy models, we reconstruct the properties of dark energy from the latest 397 Sne Ia, CMB and BAO with the present matter density, Ωm0, given prior. We find that, when Ωm0 is not small, for example, Ωm0 = 0.28 or 0.32, an evolving dark energy with a crossing of phantom divide line is favored and this conclusion seems to be model independent. We also find that the evolving properties of dark energy become more and more evident with the increase of Ωm0 given prior.

  19. Simulation of submillimetre atmospheric spectra for characterising potential ground-based remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Emma C.; Withington, Stafford; Newnham, David A.; Wadhams, Peter; Jones, Anna E.; Clancy, Robin

    2016-11-01

    The submillimetre is an understudied region of the Earth's atmospheric electromagnetic spectrum. Prior technological gaps and relatively high opacity due to the prevalence of rotational water vapour lines at these wavelengths have slowed progress from a ground-based remote sensing perspective; however, emerging superconducting detector technologies in the fields of astronomy offer the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. A site study, with a focus on the polar regions, is performed to assess theoretical feasibility by simulating the downwelling (zenith angle = 0°) clear-sky submillimetre spectrum from 30 mm (10 GHz) to 150 µm (2000 GHz) at six locations under annual mean, summer, winter, daytime, night-time and low-humidity conditions. Vertical profiles of temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified. Signal strengths, centre frequencies, bandwidths, estimated minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures are determined for all cases. HOBr, HBr and HO2 produce brightness temperature peaks in the mK to µK range, whereas the N2O peaks are in the K range. The optimal submillimetre remote sensing lines for the four species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad wavelength range. The techniques presented here provide a framework that can be applied to additional species of interest and taken forward to simulate retrievals and guide the

  20. Validation of the Actuator Line Model with coarse resolution in atmospheric sheared and turbulent inflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, M.; Guggeri, A.; Usera, G.

    2016-09-01

    Wind energy has become cost competitive in recent years for several reasons. Among them, wind turbines have become more efficient, increasing its size, both rotor diameter and tower height. This growth in size makes the prediction of the wind flow through wind turbines more challenging. To avoid the computational cost related to resolve the blade boundary layer as well as the atmospheric boundary layer, actuator models have been proposed in the past few years. Among them, the Actuator Line Model (ALM) has shown to reproduce with reasonable accuracy the wind flow in the wake of a wind turbine with moderately computational cost. However, its use to simulate the flow through wind farms requires a spatial resolution and a time step that makes it unaffordable in some cases. The present paper aims to assess the ALM with coarser resolution and larger time step than what is generally recommended, taking into account an atmospheric sheared and turbulent inflow condition and comparing the results with the Actuator Disk Model with Rotation (ADM-R) and experimental data. To accomplish this, a well known wind tunnel campaign is considered as validation case.

  1. Numerical simulation and analysis of a prefrontal squall line. I - Observations and basic simulation results. II - Propagation of the squall line as an internal gravity wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Jennifer M.; Pielke, Roger A.; Cotton, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an observational and numerical study of the squall line that occurred on June 17-18, 1978, are presented. This squall line was initially triggered by the strong surface convergence along a cold front and stretched from Illinois to the Texas Panhandle. The squall line was aligned with the surface front during its initial development, but then propagated faster than the front, resulting in a separation of approximately 200 km by 0300 UTC and 300-400 km by 0600 UTC. The Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System is used to model the squall-line development and propagation. Results are described from several experiments that tested the sensitivity to the use of the Kuo-type cumulus parameterization scheme and grid-scale microphysical processes. The movement of the squall line in the model is shown to be due to the propagation of a deep tropospheric internal gravity wave in a CISK-like process. The thermal and dynamic perturbations associated with the hypothesized wave are shown to be consistent with internal gravity wave theory.

  2. Resonance vibrations of the Ross Ice Shelf and observations of persistent atmospheric waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A.; Zabotin, Nikolay A.

    2016-10-01

    Recently reported lidar observations have revealed a persistent wave activity in the Antarctic middle and upper atmosphere that has no counterpart in observations at midlatitude and low-latitude locations. The unusual wave activity suggests a geographically specific source of atmospheric waves with periods of 3-10 h. Here we investigate theoretically the hypothesis that the unusual atmospheric wave activity in Antarctica is generated by the fundamental and low-order modes of vibrations of the Ross Ice Shelf (RIS). Simple models are developed to describe basic physical properties of resonant vibrations of large ice shelves and their coupling to the atmosphere. Dispersion relation of the long surface waves, which propagate in the floating ice sheet and are responsible for its low-order resonances, is found to be similar to the dispersion relation of infragravity waves in the ice-free ocean. The phase speed of the surface waves and the resonant frequencies determine the periods and wave vectors of atmospheric waves that are generated by the RIS resonant oscillations. The altitude-dependent vertical wavelengths and the periods of the acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere are shown to be sensitive to the physical parameters of the RIS, which can be difficult to measure by other means. Predicted properties of the atmospheric waves prove to be in a remarkable agreement with the key features of the observed persistent wave activity.

  3. X-ray irradiated protoplanetary disk atmospheres I: Predicted emission line spectrum and photoevaporation

    CERN Document Server

    Ercolano, Barbara; Raymond, John C; Clarke, Cathie C

    2008-01-01

    We present MOCASSIN 2D photoionisation and dust radiative transfer models of a prototypical T Tauri disk irradiated by X-rays from the young pre-main sequence star. The calculations demonstrate a layer of hot gas reaching temperatures of ~10^6 K at small radii and ~10^4 K at a distance of 1 AU. The gas temperatures decrease sharply with depth, but appear to be completely decoupled from dust temperatures down to a column depth of ~5*10^21 cm^-2. We predict that several fine-structure and forbidden lines of heavy elements, as well as recombination lines of hydrogen and helium, should be observable with current and future instrumentation, although optical lines may be smothered by the stellar spectrum. Predicted line luminosities are given for the the brightest collisionally excited lines (down to ~10^-8L_sun, and for recombination transitions from several levels of HI and HeI. The mass loss rate due to X-ray photoevaporation estimated from our models is of the order of 10^-8 M_sun yr^-1, implying a dispersal ti...

  4. Application of Atmospheric-Pressure Microwave Line Plasma for Low Temperature Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Haruka; Nakano, Suguru; Itoh, Hitoshi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure (AP) plasmas have been given much attention because of its high cost benefit and a variety of possibilities for industrial applications. In various kinds of plasma production technique, pulsed-microwave discharge plasma using slot antenna is attractive due to its ability of high-density and stable plasma production. In this plasma source, however, size of the plasma has been limited up to a few cm in length due to standing wave inside a waveguide. To solve this, we have proposed a newly-developed AP microwave plasma source that utilizes not standing wave but travelling wave. By using this plasma source, spatially-uniform AP line plasma with 40 cm in length was realized by pure helium discharge in 60 cm slot and with nitrogen gas additive of 1%. Furthermore, gas temperature as low as 400 K was realized in this device. In this study, as an example of low temperature processes, hydrophilic treatment of PET films was performed. Processing speed increased with pulse frequency and a water contact angle of ~20° was easily obtained within 5 s with no thermal damage to the substrate. To evaluate treatment-uniformity of long line length, PET films were treated by 90 cm slot-antenna plasma and uniform treatment performance was confirmed.

  5. The influence of electron collisions on non-LTE Li line formation in stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Osorio, Y; Lind, K; Asplund, M

    2011-01-01

    The influence of uncertainties in the rate coefficient data for electron-impact excitation and ionization on non-LTE Li line formation in cool stellar atmospheres is investigated. We examine the collision data used in previous non-LTE calculations and compare with recent calculations using convergent close-coupling (CCC) techniques, as well our own calculations using the R-matrix with pseudostates (RMPS) method. We find excellent agreement between rate coefficients from the CCC and RMPS calculations, and reasonable agreement between these data and the semi-empirical data used in non-LTE calculations up till now. The results of non-LTE calculations using the old and new data sets are compared and only small differences are found; of order 0.01 dex (~ 2%) or less in the abundance corrections. We therefore conclude that electron collision data are not a significant source of uncertainty in non-LTE Li line formation calculations. Indeed, together with the collision data for the charge exchange process Li(3s) + H ...

  6. Global Hawk dropsonde observations of the Arctic atmosphere during the Winter Storms and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers (WISPAR) field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrieri, J. M.; de Boer, G.; Shupe, M. D.; Spackman, J. R.; Wang, J.; Neiman, P. J.; Wick, G. A.; Hock, T. F.; Hood, R. E.

    2014-04-01

    In February and March of 2011, the Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) was deployed over the Pacific Ocean and the Arctic during the WISPAR field campaign. The WISPAR science missions were designed to: (1) improve our understanding of Pacific weather systems and the polar atmosphere; (2) evaluate operational use of unmanned aircraft for investigating these atmospheric events; and (3) demonstrate operational and research applications of a UAS dropsonde system at high latitudes. Dropsondes deployed from the Global Hawk successfully obtained high-resolution profiles of temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind information between the stratosphere and surface. The 35 m wingspan Global Hawk, which can soar for ~ 31 h at altitudes up to ~ 20 km, was remotely operated from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards AFB in California. During the 25 h polar flight on 9-10 March 2011, the Global Hawk released 35 sondes between the North Slope of Alaska and 85° N latitude marking the first UAS Arctic dropsonde mission of its kind. The polar flight transected an unusually cold polar vortex, notable for an associated record-level Arctic ozone loss, and documented polar boundary layer variations over a sizable ocean-ice lead feature. Comparison of dropsonde observations with atmospheric reanalyses reveal that for this day, large-scale structures such as the polar vortex and air masses are captured by the reanalyses, while smaller-scale features, including low-level jets and inversion depths, are mischaracterized. The successful Arctic dropsonde deployment demonstrates the capability of the Global Hawk to conduct operations in harsh, remote regions. The limited comparison with other measurements and reanalyses highlights the value of Arctic atmospheric dropsonde observations where routine in situ measurements are practically non-existent.

  7. Global Hawk dropsonde observations of the Arctic atmosphere during the Winter Storms and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers (WISPAR field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Intrieri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In February and March of 2011, the Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS was deployed over the Pacific Ocean and the Arctic during the WISPAR field campaign. The WISPAR science missions were designed to: (1 improve our understanding of Pacific weather systems and the polar atmosphere; (2 evaluate operational use of unmanned aircraft for investigating these atmospheric events; and (3 demonstrate operational and research applications of a UAS dropsonde system at high latitudes. Dropsondes deployed from the Global Hawk successfully obtained high-resolution profiles of temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind information between the stratosphere and surface. The 35 m wingspan Global Hawk, which can soar for ~ 31 h at altitudes up to ~ 20 km, was remotely operated from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards AFB in California. During the 25 h polar flight on 9–10 March 2011, the Global Hawk released 35 sondes between the North Slope of Alaska and 85° N latitude marking the first UAS Arctic dropsonde mission of its kind. The polar flight transected an unusually cold polar vortex, notable for an associated record-level Arctic ozone loss, and documented polar boundary layer variations over a sizable ocean-ice lead feature. Comparison of dropsonde observations with atmospheric reanalyses reveal that for this day, large-scale structures such as the polar vortex and air masses are captured by the reanalyses, while smaller-scale features, including low-level jets and inversion depths, are mischaracterized. The successful Arctic dropsonde deployment demonstrates the capability of the Global Hawk to conduct operations in harsh, remote regions. The limited comparison with other measurements and reanalyses highlights the value of Arctic atmospheric dropsonde observations where routine in situ measurements are practically non-existent.

  8. Impact of difference in absorption line parameters in spectroscopic databases on CO2 and CH4 atmospheric content retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokova, T. Yu.; Chentsov, A. V.; Rokotyan, N. V.; Zakharov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of uncertainties in CH4 and CO2 absorption line parameters in modern spectroscopic databases on the atmospheric transmission simulation in the near-infrared region is investigated. The atmospheric contents of CH4 and CO2 are retrieved from the absorption solar spectra measured by a ground-based Fourier transform spectrometer. Different spectroscopic databases are used in the forward radiative transfer model and a comparison of the retrieved results is made.

  9. A Study on Retrieving Atmospheric Profiles from EOS/AIRS Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Li; ALLEN Huang; LI Jun

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the algorithms for retrieving atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles and surface skin temperature from the high-spectral-resolution Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) with a statistical technique based on principal component analysis. The synthetic regression coefficients for the statistical retrieval are obtained by using a fast radiative transfer model with atmospheric characteristics taken from a dataset of global radiosondes of atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles. Retrievals are evaluated by comparison with radiosonde observations and European Center of Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses. AIRS retrievals of temperature and moisture are in general agreement with the distributions from ECMWF analysis fields and radiosonde observations, but AIRS depicts more detailed structure due to its high spectral resolution (hence, high vertical spatial resolution).

  10. Radiosonde observational evidence of the influence of extreme SST gradient upon atmospheric meso-scale circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, H.; Tachibana, Y.; Udagawa, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Although the influence of the anomalous midlatitude SST upon atmospheric local circulation has been getting common in particular over the Kuroshio and the Gulf Stream regions, observational studies on the influence of the Okhotsk Sea, which is to the north of the Kuroshio, upon the atmospheric local circulation is much less than those of the Kuroshio. The climate of the Okhotsk SST is very peculiar. Extremely cold SST spots, whose summertime SST is lower than 5 Celsius degrees, are formed around Kuril Islands. Because SSTs are generally determined by local air-sea interaction as well as temperature advection, it is very difficult to isolate only the oceanic influence upon the atmosphere. The SST in this cold spot is, however, dominated by the tidal mixing, which is independent of the atmospheric processes. This unique condition may ease the account for the oceanic influence only. Although the SST environment of the Okhotsk Sea is good for understanding the oceanic influence upon the atmosphere, only a few studies has been executed in this region because of the difficulty of observations by research vessels in this region, where territory problems between Japan and Russia is unsolved. Because of the scant of direct observation, the Okhotsk Sea was still mysterious. In 2006 August, GPS radiosonde observation was carried out by Russian research vessel Khromov in the Sea of Okhotsk by the cooperation between Japan and Russia, and strong SST gradient of about 7 Celsius degrees/10km was observed around the Kuril Islands. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate observational finding of meso-scale atmospheric anticyclonic circulation influenced by the cold oceanic spot around the Kuril Island. The summaries of the observation are as follows. Meso-scale atmospheric ageostrophic anticyclonic circulation in the atmospheric marine-boundary layer is observed in and around the cold spot. A high air pressure area as compared with other surrounding areas is also located at the

  11. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models - V. Fe line shapes, shifts and asymmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Magic, Zazralt; Asplund, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the effects and signatures of realistic velocity field and atmospheric inhomogeneities associated with convective motions at the surface of cool late-type stars on the emergent profiles of iron spectral lines for a large range in stellar parameters. We compute 3D spectral line flux profiles under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) by employing state-of-the-art, time-dependent, 3D, radiative-hydrodynamical atmosphere models from the Stagger-grid. A set of 35 real unblended, optical FeI and FeII lines of varying excitation potential are considered. Additionally, fictitious Fe i and Fe ii lines (5000A and 0, 2, 4 eV) are used to construct general curves of growth and enable comparison of line profiles with the same line strength to illustrate systematical trends stemming from the intrinsic structural differences among 3D model atmospheres with different stellar parameters. Theoretical line shifts and bisectors are derived to analyze the shapes, shifts, and a...

  12. Observed anomalous atmospheric patterns in summers of unusual Arctic sea ice melt

    OpenAIRE

    Knudsen, Erlend M.; Orsolini, Yvan J.; Furevik, Tore; Hodges, Kevin I.

    2015-01-01

    The Arctic sea ice retreat has accelerated over the last decade. The negative trend is largest in summer, but substantial interannual variability still remains. Here we explore observed atmospheric conditions and feedback mechanisms during summer months of anomalous sea ice melt in the Arctic. Compositing months of anomalous low and high sea ice melt over 1979–2013, we find distinct patterns in atmospheric circulation, precipitation, radiation, and temperature. Compared to summer months of\\ud...

  13. Report on the O IV and S IV lines observed by IRIS

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    The O IV intercombination lines observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) between 1397 and 1407 A provide useful density diagnostics. This document presents data that address two issues related to these lines: (1) the contribution of S IV to the O IV 1404.8 line; and (2) the range of sensitivity of the O IV 1399.8/1401.2 ratio.

  14. High-resolution molecular line observations of active galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    García-Burillo, S; Usero, A; Gracia-Carpio, J

    2008-01-01

    The study of the content, distribution and kinematics of interstellar gas is a key to understand the origin and maintenance of both starburst and nuclear (AGN) activity in galaxies. The processes involved in AGN fueling encompass a wide range of scales, both spatial and temporal, which have to be studied. Probing the gas flow from the outer disk down to the central engine of an AGN host, requires the use of specific tracers of the interstellar medium adapted to follow the change of phase of the gas as a function of radius. Current mm-interferometers can provide a sharp view of the distribution and kinematics of molecular gas in the circumnuclear disks of galaxies through extensive CO line mapping. As such, CO maps are an essential tool to study AGN feeding mechanisms in the local universe. This is the scientific driver of the NUclei of GAlaxies (NUGA) survey, whose latest results are here reviewed. On the other hand, the use of specific molecular tracers of the dense gas phase can probe the feedback influence...

  15. Determining protoplanetary disk gas masses from CO isotopologues line observations

    CERN Document Server

    Miotello, Anna; Kama, Mihkel; Bruderer, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Despite intensive studies of protoplanetary disks, there is still no reliable way to determine their total mass and their surface density distribution, quantities that are crucial for describing both the structure and the evolution of disks up to the formation of planets. The goal of this work is to use less abundant CO isotopologues, whose detection is routine for ALMA, to infer the gas mass of disks. Isotope-selective effects need to be taken into account in the analysis, because they can significantly modify CO isotopologues line intensities. CO isotope-selective photodissociation has been implemented in the physical-chemical code DALI and 800 disk models have been run for a range of disk and stellar parameters. Dust and gas temperature structures have been computed self-consistently, together with a chemical calculation of the main species. Both disk structure and stellar parameters have been investigated. Total fluxes have been ray-traced for different CO isotopologues and for various transitions for dif...

  16. Observations in the 1.3 and 1.5 THz Atmospheric Windows with the Receiver Lab Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Marrone, D P; Tong, E; Paine, S N; Loudkov, D; Kawamura, J H; Luhr, D; Barrientos, C

    2005-01-01

    The Receiver Lab Telescope (RLT) is a ground-based terahertz telescope; it is currently the only instrument producing astronomical data between 1 and 2 THz. The capabilities of the RLT have been expanding since observations began in late 2002. Initial observations were limited to the 850 GHz and 1.03 THz windows due to the availability of solid state local oscillators. In the last year we have begun observations with new local oscillators for the 1.3 and 1.5 THz atmospheric windows. These oscillators provide access to the 11-10 and 13-12 lines of CO at 1.267 and 1.497 THz, as well as the [N II] line at 1.461 THz. We report on our first measurements of these high CO transitions, which represent the highest-frequency detections ever made from the ground. We also present initial observations of [N II] and discuss the implications of this non-detection for the standard estimates of the strength of this line.

  17. Evaluating Land-Atmosphere Moisture Feedbacks in Earth System Models With Spaceborne Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, P. A.; Randerson, J. T.; Lawrence, D. M.; Swenson, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a set of metrics for measuring the feedback loop between the land surface moisture state and the atmosphere globally on an interannual time scale. These metrics consider both the forcing of terrestrial water storage (TWS) on subsequent atmospheric conditions as well as the response of TWS to antecedent atmospheric conditions. We designed our metrics to take advantage of more than one decade's worth of satellite observations of TWS from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) along with atmospheric variables from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), and Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System (CERES). Metrics derived from spaceborne observations were used to evaluate the strength of the feedback loop in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) Large Ensemble (LENS) and in several models that contributed simulations to Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). We found that both forcing and response limbs of the feedback loop were generally stronger in tropical and temperate regions in CMIP5 models and even more so in LENS compared to satellite observations. Our analysis suggests that models may overestimate the strength of the feedbacks between the land surface and the atmosphere, which is consistent with previous studies conducted across different spatial and temporal scales.

  18. Solar Flare Chromospheric Line Emission: Comparison Between IBIS High-resolution Observations and Radiative Hydrodynamic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Petrosian, Vahé; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Liu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Solar flares involve impulsive energy release, which results in enhanced radiation in a broad spectral and at a wide height range. In particular, line emission from the chromosphere (lower atmosphere) can provide critical diagnostics of plasma heating processes. Thus, a direct comparison between high-resolution spectroscopic observations and advanced numerical modeling results can be extremely valuable, but has not been attempted so far. We present in this paper such a self-consistent investigation of an M3.0 flare observed by the Dunn Solar Telescope's (DST) Interferometric Bi-dimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) on 2011 September 24 that we have modeled with the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN (Carlsson & Stein 1992, 1997; Abbett & Hawley 1999; Allred et al. 2005). We obtained images and spectra of the flaring region with IBIS in H$\\alpha$ 6563 \\AA\\ and Ca II 8542 \\AA, and with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) in X-rays. The latter was used to infer the non-thermal elect...

  19. The French-German Climate Monitoring Initiative on global observations of atmospheric CH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, Gerhard; Flamant, Pierre; Amediek, Axel; Ciais, Philippe; Fabien, Gibert; Fix, Andreas; Kiemle, Christoph; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Wirth, Martin

    2010-05-01

    We report on a new French-German Climate Monitoring Initiative targeting on global measurements of atmospheric methane (CH4). Among the greenhouse gases banned by the Kyoto protocol, CH4 contributes most to global warming after CO2. Questions arise whether global warming in Arctic regions might foster the melting of permafrost soils which contain significant amounts of carbon in organic form which under anaerobic conditions might be converted to CH4 and partially released to the atmosphere. Also the development of natural wetlands which are the biggest methane source, play an important role in climate prediction. Up to now, there is very little knowledge about CH4 sources and sinks in connection with changes in the agro-industrial era of predominant human influence or the very large deposits of CH4 as gas hydrates on ocean shelves that are vulnerable to ocean warming. The objective of this initiative is to improve our knowledge on regional to synoptic scale methane sources, globally. This will be obtained by the measurement of the column-weighted dry-air mixing ratio of CH4, commonly referred to XCH4 which can be used as input for flux inversion models. As a novel feature, the observational instrument will have its own light source emitting pulsed narrow-line laser radiation, not relying on sunlight. The XCH4 values will be provided by a lidar technique with no bias due to particles scattering in the light path, which can have strong regional variability. Using a range-gated receiver for detection of the signals scattered from the Earth surface, the lidar can distinguish surface from cloud or aerosol backscatter, permitting high-precision retrievals of XCH4 in the presence of thin cirrus or aerosol layers. The proposed measurement approach is also capable of providing measurements in partially cloudy conditions. The emitted laser pulses can reach the surface when gaps between clouds occur due to the near-nadir view and the small lidar footprint. The instrument will

  20. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p < 0.05) and all the measurements are perfectly reliable (Bland-Altman coefficient is 4.8 %). It appears from this study that changes in absolute intracranial pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  1. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p < 0.05) and all the measurements are perfectly reliable (Bland-Altman coefficient is 4.8 %). It appears from this study that changes in absolute intracranial pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  2. The upper atmosphere of the exoplanet HD209458b revealed by the sodium D lines: Temperature-pressure profile, ionization layer, and thermosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Vidal-Madjar, A; Etangs, A Lecavelier des; Ferlet, R; Desert, J -M; Hebrard, G; Boisse, I; Ehrenreich, D; Moutou, C

    2010-01-01

    A complete reassessment of the HST observations of the transits of the extrasolar planet HD209458b has provided a transmission spectrum of the atmosphere over a wide range of wavelengths. Analysis of the NaI absorption line profile has already shown that the sodium abundance has to drop by at least a factor of ten above a critical altitude. Here we analyze the profile in the deep core of the NaI doublet line from HST and high-resolution ground-based spectra to further constrain the vertical structure of the HD209458b atmosphere. With a wavelength-dependent cross section that spans more than 5 orders of magnitude, we use the absorption signature of the NaI doublet as an atmospheric probe. The NaI transmission features are shown to sample the atmosphere of HD209458b over an altitude range of more than 6500km, corresponding to a pressure range of 14 scale heights spanning 1 millibar to 1e-9 bar pressures. By comparing the observations with a multi-layer model in which temperature is a free parameter at the resol...

  3. Mars: Correcting surface albedo observations for effects of atmospheric dust loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. W.; Clancy, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a radiative transfer model which allows the effects of atmospheric dust loading on surface albedo to be investigated. This model incorporates atmospheric dust opacity, the single scattering albedo and particle phase function of atmospheric dust, the bidirectional reflectance of the surface, and variable lighting and viewing geometry. The most recent dust particle properties are utilized. The spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric opacity (Tan) strongly influences the radiative transfer modelling results. We are currently using the approach described to determine Tan for IRTM mapping sequences of selected regions. This approach allows Tan to be determined at the highest spatial and temporal resolution supported by the IRTM data. Applying the radiative transfer modelling and determination of Tan described, IRTM visual brightness observations can be corrected for the effects of atmospheric dust loading a variety of locations and times. This approach allows maps of 'dust-corrected surface albedo' to be constructed for selected regions. Information on the variability of surface albedo and the amount of dust deposition/erosion related to such variability results. To date, this study indicates that atmospheric dust loading has a significant effect on observations of surface albedo, amounting to albedo corrections of as much as several tens of percent. This correction is not constant or linear, but depends upon surface albedo, viewing and lighting geometry, the dust and surface phase functions, and the atmospheric opacity. It is clear that the quantitative study of surface albedo, especially where small variations in observed albedo are important (such as photometric analyses), needs to account for the effects of the atmospheric dust loading. Maps of 'dust-corrected surface albedo' will be presented for a number of regions.

  4. ExoMol: Molecular Line List for Exoplanets and Other Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Polyansky, Oleg

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of extrasolar planets is one of the major scientific advances of the last two decades. Thousands of planets have now been detected and astronomers are beginning to characterize their composition and physical characteristics. To do this requires a huge quantity of spectroscopic data most of which are not available from laboratory studies. The ExoMol project [1] is generating a comprehensive solution to this problem by providing spectroscopic data on all the molecular transitions of importance in the atmospheres of exoplanets. These data are widely applicable to other problems such studies on cool stars, brown dwarfs and circumstellar environments as well as industrial and technological problems on earth. ExoMol employs a mixture of first principles and empirically tuned quantum mechanical methods to compute comprehensive and very large rotation-vibration and rovibronic line lists. Results span a variety of closed (NaH, SiO, PN, NaCl, KCl, CS) and open (BeH, MgH, CaH, AlO, VO) shell diatomics to triatomics (HCN/HNC, SO_2, H_2S, H_3^+), tetratomics (H_2CO, PH_3, SO_3, H_2O_2), plus methane [2] and nitric acid [3]. This has led directly to the detection of new species in the atmospheres of exoplanets [4]. A new comprehensive data release has just been completed [5]. Progress on and future prospects of the project will be summarised. J. Tennyson, S. N. Yurchenko, Mon. Not. R. astr. Soc., 425, 21, 2012. S. N. Yurchenko, J. Tennyson, J. Bailey, M. D. J. Hollis, G Tinetti, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 111, 9379, 2014. A. I. Pavlyuchko, S. N. Yurchenko, J. Tennyson, Mon. Not. R. astr. Soc., 452, 1702, 2015. A. Tsiaras et al, Astrophys. J., in press. J. Tennyson et al, J. Mol. Spectrosc., in press.

  5. The effect of intermediate-scale motions on line formation. [sawtooth and sine motions in solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shine, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of LTE and non-LTE line formation in the presence of nonthermal velocity fields with geometric scales between the microscopic and macroscopic limits is investigated in the cases of periodic sinusoidal and sawtooth waves. For a fixed source function (the LTE case), it is shown that time-averaged line profiles progress smoothly from the microscopic to the macroscopic limits as the geometric scale of the motions increases, that the sinusoidal motions produce symmetric time-averaged profiles, and that the sawtooth motions cause a redshift. In several idealized non-LTE cases, it is found that intermediate-scale velocity fields can significantly increase the surface source functions and line-core intensities. Calculations are made for a two-level atom in an isothermal atmosphere for a range of velocity scales and non-LTE coupling parameters and also for a two-level atom and a four-level representation of Na I line formation in the Harvard-Smithsonian Reference Atmosphere (1971) solar model. It is found that intermediate-scale velocity fields in the solar atmosphere could explain the central intensities of the Na I D lines and other strong absorption lines without invoking previously suggested high electron densities.

  6. Titan's atmosphere from ISO observations: Temperature, composition and detection of water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustenis, A.; Salama, A.; Lellouch, E.; Encrenaz, Th.; de Graauw, Th.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Samuelson, R. E.; Gautier, D.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Kessler, M. F.; Orton, G. S.

    1998-09-01

    Observations of Titan in the thermal infrared (2.36-45.2 mu m) were performed by ISO, in Jan. and Dec. 1997, with resolving powers between 1500 and 3000 in the Grating mode and up to 30000 in the Fabry-Perot mode. Two pure rotational water lines were observed using the ISO/SWS/Grating (R=2000) at 39.4 and 43.9 mu m, with fluxes of about 2 Jy over a continuum of 60 Jy [1], with S/N ~ 8. The flux observed can be reproduced with a constant abundance of ~ 4 x 10(-10) , or with a recent photochemical profile [2] multiplied by a factor of 0.4. This yields a H_2O vapor mole fraction of about 10(-8) at the 400 km altitude level (column density of 2.5 x 10(14) mol cm(-2) ). The inferred water influx at Titan at 700 km of altitude is : (0.8-2.8) x 10(6) mol cm(-2) s(-1) , compatible with the CO2 observed abundance and similar to that found at Saturn [3]. This suggests that infalling material from Saturn rings may not be the dominant source of Saturn's water. The analysis of the 233-1500 cm(-1) spectrum of ISO/SWS has provided the thermal and compositional structure of Titan on a disk-average [4]. In particular, observations of the CH_3D band at 1150 cm(-1) significantly improved the determination of the D/H ratio in Titan's stratosphere. The new value of 7.5 x 10(-5) , is four times lower than in comets and suggests that Titan's atmosphere is not of cometary origin, but rather formed by outgassing from the interior. We have also tested available vertical profiles and inferred upper limits for a few likely candidates in Titan's stratosphere (such as benzene and allene) [4]. References [1] COUSTENIS, A., et al. 1998a. Astron. Astrophys. 336, L85. [2] LARA, L. M., et al. 1996. J. Geophys. Res.-Planets 101, 23261-23283. [3] FEUCHTGRUBER, H., et al. 1997. Nature 389, 159-162. [4] COUSTENIS, A., et al. 1998b. Submitted for publication.

  7. Observation of high energy atmospheric neutrinos with antarctic muon and neutrino detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.; Andres, E.; Bai, X.; Barouch, G.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.C.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Bertrand, D.; Binon, F.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Bouhali, O.; Boyce, M.M.; Carius, S.; Chen, A.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Costa, C.G.S.; Cowen, D.F.; Dalberg, E.; De Clercq, C.; DeYoung, T.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Doksus, P.; Edsjo, J.; Ekstrom, P.; Feser, T.; Frere, J.-M.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gaug, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hellwig, M.; Heukenkamp, H.; Hill, G.C.; Hulth, P.O.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Koci, B.; Kopke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Loaiza, P.; Lowder, D.M.; Madsen, J.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.S.; McParland, C.P.; Miller, T.C.; Minaeva, Y.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.C.; Morse, R.; Neunhoffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Ogelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pohl, A.C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.B.; Przybylski, G.T.; Rawlins, K.; Reed, C.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Starinsky, N.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Streicher, O.; Sudhoff, P.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Vander Donckt, M.; Walck, C.; Weinheimer, C.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Wiedeman, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S.

    2002-05-07

    The Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) began collecting data with ten strings in 1997. Results from the first year of operation are presented. Neutrinos coming through the Earth from the Northern Hemisphere are identified by secondary muons moving upward through the array. Cosmic rays in the atmosphere generate a background of downward moving muons, which are about 10{sup 6} times more abundant than the upward moving muons. Over 130 days of exposure, we observed a total of about 300 neutrino events. In the same period, a background of 1.05 x 10{sup 9} cosmic ray muon events was recorded. The observed neutrino flux is consistent with atmospheric neutrino predictions. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that 90 percent of these events lie in the energy range 66 GeV to 3.4 TeV. The observation of atmospheric neutrinos consistent with expectations establishes AMANDA-B10 as a working neutrino telescope.

  8. News from Cosmic Gamma-ray Line Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Diehl, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gamma rays at MeV energies from cosmic radioactivities is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and how they shape objects such as massive stars and supernova explosions. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this same astronomical window, and positrons are often produced from radioactive beta decays. Nuclear gamma-ray telescopes face instrumental challenges from penetrating gamma rays and cosmic-ray induced backgrounds. But the astrophysical benefits of such efforts are underlined by the discoveries of nuclear gamma~rays from the brightest of the expected sources. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivity gamma~rays have been measured in spectral detail, and complement conventional supernova observations with measurements of origins in deep supernova interiors, from the decay of $^{56}$Ni, $^{56}$Co, and $^{44}$Ti. The diffuse afterglow in gamma rays of radioa...

  9. Space-borne imaging observation of the terrestrial upper atmosphere by ISS-IMAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akinori; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Sakanoi, Takeshi

    ISS-IMAP (Ionosphere, Mesosphere, upper Atmosphere, and Plasmasphere mapping) mission is a space-borne mission on the international space station (ISS) to elucidate the mesoscale structures in the ionosphere, the mesosphere, and the plasmasphere by imaging observations. ISS-IMAP measures the following three parameters: (1) distribution of the atmospheric gravity wave in the mesopause (87km), the ionospheric E-region (95km), and the ionospheric F-region (250km) (2) distribution of the ionized atmosphere in the ionospheric F-region (3) distribution of O+ and He+ ions in the ionosphere and plasmasphere. After the initial check outs, its observation was started in October 2012. ISS-IMAP consists of two imaging instruments on the Exposed Facility of Japanese Experiment Module of the International Space Station, EF of ISS-JEM. Visible-light and infrared spectrum imager (VISI) observes the Mesosphere and the Ionosphere. Extra ultraviolet imager (EUVI) observes the Ionosphere and the Plasmasphere. VISI observes the airglow of 730nm (OH, Alt. 85km), 762nm (O2, Alt. 95km), and 630nm (O, Alt. 250km) in the Nadir direction. The global distributions of the airglow structures whose scale size is 50-500km in the nightside of the Mesosphere and the Ionosphere have been obtained by the VISI observation. EUVI measures the resonant scattering of 30.4nm [He+] and 83.4nm [O+]. Its field- of-view is 15 degrees, and points the limb of the Earth to observe the vertical distribution of the ions. The continuous observation of ISS-IMAP started in October 2012. The coordinated observation between ISS-IMAP and the several ground-based instruments have been carried out to elucidate the coupling process between the lower atmosphere and the upper atmosphere by the wave structures in this scale.

  10. Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar and GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    TSUDA, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    The wind velocity and temperature profiles observed in the middle atmosphere (altitude: 10–100 km) show perturbations resulting from superposition of various atmospheric waves, including atmospheric gravity waves. Atmospheric gravity waves are known to play an important role in determining the general circulation in the middle atmosphere by dynamical stresses caused by gravity wave breaking. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan, as well as novel satellite data obtained from global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) measurements. In particular, we focus on the behavior of gravity waves in the mesosphere (50–90 km), where considerable gravity wave attenuation occurs. We also report on the global distribution of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere (10–50 km), highlighting various excitation mechanisms such as orographic effects, convection in the tropics, meteorological disturbances, the subtropical jet and the polar night jet. PMID:24492645

  11. Observations of linear dependence between sulfate and nitrate in atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingdong; Yang, Yiwei; Zhang, Shuanqin; Zhao, Xi; Du, Huanhuan; Fu, Hongbo; Zhang, Shicheng; Cheng, Tiantao; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jianmin; Wu, Dui; Shen, Jiandong; Hong, Shengmao; Jiao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Hourly measurements of water-soluble inorganic ionic species in ambient atmospheric particles were conducted at Shanghai, Hangzhou, and Guangzhou sampling sites in China during the period of 2009-2011. The relation between sulfate and nitrate in particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) was examined based on these measurements. Results showed that the mass fraction of sulfate was strongly negatively correlated with that of nitrate in atmospheric particles on most of the sampling days, especially when sulfate and nitrate made up the vast majority of the total soluble anions and cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+) made a small contribution to the total water-soluble ions, revealing that the formation mechanisms of sulfate and nitrate in the atmosphere are highly correlated, and there exists a significant negative correlation trend between sulfate and nitrate mass fractions in the atmospheric particles. We found that local meteorological conditions presented opposite influences on the mass fractions of sulfate and nitrate. Further analysis indicated that the two mass fractions were modulated by the neutralizing level of atmospheric aerosols, and the negative correlation could be found in acidic atmospheric particles. Strong negative correlation was usually observed on clear days, hazy days, foggy days, and respirable particulate air pollution days, whereas poor negative correlation was often observed during cloud, rain, snow, dust storm, and suspended dust events. The results can help to better understand the formation mechanisms of atmospheric sulfate and nitrate during air pollution episodes and to better explain field results of atmospheric chemistry concerning sulfate and nitrate.

  12. A table of semiempirical gf values. Part 1: Wavelengths: 5.2682 nm to 272.3380 nm. [to calculate line-blanketed model atmospheres for solar and stellar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurucz, R. L.; Peytremann, E.

    1975-01-01

    The gf values for 265,587 atomic lines selected from the line data used to calculate line-blanketed model atmospheres are tabulated. These data are especially useful for line identification and spectral synthesis in solar and stellar spectra. The gf values are calculated semiempirically by using scaled Thomas-Fermi-Dirac radial wavefunctions and eigenvectors found through least-squares fits to observed energy levels. Included in the calculation are the first five or six stages of ionization for sequences up through nickel. Published gf values are included for elements heavier than nickel. The tabulation is restricted to lines with wavelengths less than 10 micrometers.

  13. Mechanistic insights into the impact of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on human epithelial cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezest, Marlène; Chavatte, Laurent; Bourdens, Marion; Quinton, Damien; Camus, Mylène; Garrigues, Luc; Descargues, Pascal; Arbault, Stéphane; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Casteilla, Louis; Clément, Franck; Planat, Valérie; Bulteau, Anne-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (CAPP) has potential as a new cancer therapy. However, knowledge about cellular signaling events and toxicity subsequent to plasma treatment is still poorly documented. The aim of this study was to focus on the interaction between 3 different types of plasma (He, He-O2, He-N2) and human epithelial cell lines to gain better insight into plasma-cell interaction. We provide evidence that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are inducing cell death by apoptosis and that the proteasome, a major intracellular proteolytic system which is important for tumor cell growth and survival, is a target of (He or He-N2) CAPP. However, RONS are not the only actors involved in cell death; electric field and charged particles could play a significant role especially for He-O2 CAPP. By differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis we found that CAPP triggers antioxidant and cellular defense but is also affecting extracellular matrix in keratinocytes. Moreover, we found that malignant cells are more resistant to CAPP treatment than normal cells. Taken together, our findings provide insight into potential mechanisms of CAPP-induced proteasome inactivation and the cellular consequences of these events.

  14. Mechanistic insights into the impact of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on human epithelial cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezest, Marlène; Chavatte, Laurent; Bourdens, Marion; Quinton, Damien; Camus, Mylène; Garrigues, Luc; Descargues, Pascal; Arbault, Stéphane; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Casteilla, Louis; Clément, Franck; Planat, Valérie; Bulteau, Anne-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (CAPP) has potential as a new cancer therapy. However, knowledge about cellular signaling events and toxicity subsequent to plasma treatment is still poorly documented. The aim of this study was to focus on the interaction between 3 different types of plasma (He, He-O2, He-N2) and human epithelial cell lines to gain better insight into plasma-cell interaction. We provide evidence that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are inducing cell death by apoptosis and that the proteasome, a major intracellular proteolytic system which is important for tumor cell growth and survival, is a target of (He or He-N2) CAPP. However, RONS are not the only actors involved in cell death; electric field and charged particles could play a significant role especially for He-O2 CAPP. By differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis we found that CAPP triggers antioxidant and cellular defense but is also affecting extracellular matrix in keratinocytes. Moreover, we found that malignant cells are more resistant to CAPP treatment than normal cells. Taken together, our findings provide insight into potential mechanisms of CAPP-induced proteasome inactivation and the cellular consequences of these events. PMID:28120925

  15. 100% N2 atmospheric-pressure microwave-line-plasma production with a modified waveguide structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Haruka; Tamura, Yuto; Itoh, Hitoshi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2016-09-01

    Large-scale atmospheric pressure (AP) plasmas have been given much attention because of its high cost benefit and a variety of possibilities for industrial applications. Microwave discharge plasma using slot antenna is attractive due to its ability of high-density and stable plasma production, and we have developed a long-scale AP microwave plasma (AP microwave line plasma: AP-MLP) source using loop-structured waveguide and travelling wave and have reported spatially-uniform AP-MLP of 40 cm in length using Ar or He gas discharge. However, rare gas discharge is not always suitable for industrial applications because usage of large volume rare gas degrades the AP cost benefit. Furthermore, many industrial applications require chemically-reactive species and the AP-MLP using molecular gas will drastically increase the applications of the AP-MLP. In this study, we demonstrate 100% N2 discharge of the AP-MLP with a modified waveguide structure. Cross-sectional structure of the waveguide is improved to enhance the microwave electric field in the slot. 100% N2 plasma of 15 cm-long is successfully produced using CW microwave power of 2 kW. Low gas temperature of 1000 K is confirmed by optical emission spectroscopy, suggesting applications of the AP-MLP to low temperature processes. Part of this work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25286079.

  16. The photospheric solar oxygen project: I. Abundance analysis of atomic lines and influence of atmospheric models

    CERN Document Server

    Caffau, Elisabetta; Steffen, Matthias; Ayres, Thomas R; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Cayrel, Roger; Freytag, Bernd; Plez, Bertrand

    2008-01-01

    The solar oxygen abundance has undergone a major downward revision in the last decade, the most noticeable one being the update including 3D hydrodynamical simulations to model the solar photosphere. Up to now, such an analysis has been carried out only by one group using one radiation-hydrodynamics code. We investigate the photospheric oxygen abundance considering lines from atomic transitions. We also consider the relationship between the solar model used and the resulting solar oxygen abundance, to understand whether the downward abundance revision is specifically related to 3D hydrodynamical effects. We perform a new determination of the solar photospheric oxygen abundance by analysing different high-resolution high signal-to-noise ratio atlases of the solar flux and disc-centre intensity making use of the latest generation of CO5BOLD 3D solar model atmospheres. We find 8.73 < logNoxygen/Nhydrogen +12 < 8.79. The lower and upper value represent extreme assumptions on the role of collisional excitati...

  17. Multi-Sensor Observations of Earthquake Related Atmospheric Signals over Major Geohazard Validation Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounov, D.; Pulinets, S.; Davindenko, D.; Hattori, K.; Kafatos, M.; Taylor, P.

    2012-01-01

    We are conducting a scientific validation study involving multi-sensor observations in our investigation of phenomena preceding major earthquakes. Our approach is based on a systematic analysis of several atmospheric and environmental parameters, which we found, are associated with the earthquakes, namely: thermal infrared radiation, outgoing long-wavelength radiation, ionospheric electron density, and atmospheric temperature and humidity. For first time we applied this approach to selected GEOSS sites prone to earthquakes or volcanoes. This provides a new opportunity to cross validate our results with the dense networks of in-situ and space measurements. We investigated two different seismic aspects, first the sites with recent large earthquakes, viz.- Tohoku-oki (M9, 2011, Japan) and Emilia region (M5.9, 2012,N. Italy). Our retrospective analysis of satellite data has shown the presence of anomalies in the atmosphere. Second, we did a retrospective analysis to check the re-occurrence of similar anomalous behavior in atmosphere/ionosphere over three regions with distinct geological settings and high seismicity: Taiwan, Japan and Kamchatka, which include 40 major earthquakes (M>5.9) for the period of 2005-2009. We found anomalous behavior before all of these events with no false negatives; false positives were less then 10%. Our initial results suggest that multi-instrument space-borne and ground observations show a systematic appearance of atmospheric anomalies near the epicentral area that could be explained by a coupling between the observed physical parameters and earthquake preparation processes.

  18. Atmospheric monitoring in the mm and sub-mm bands for cosmological observations: CASPER2

    CERN Document Server

    De Petris, Marco; Decina, Barbara; Lamagna, Luca; Pardo, Juan R

    2012-01-01

    Cosmological observations from ground at millimetre and sub-millimetre wavelengths are affected by atmospheric absorption and consequent emission. The low and high frequency (sky noise) fluctuations of atmospheric performance imply careful observational strategies and/or instrument technical solutions. Measurements of atmospheric emission spectra are necessary for accurate calibration procedures as well as for site testing statistics. CASPER2, an instrument to explore the 90-450 GHz (3-15 1/cm) spectral region, was developed and verified its operation in the Alps. A Martin-Puplett Interferometer (MPI) operates comparing sky radiation, coming from a field of view (fov) of 28 arcminutes (FWHM) collected by a 62-cm in diameter Pressman-Camichel telescope, with a reference source. The two output ports of the interferometer are detected by two bolometers cooled down to 300 mK inside a wet cryostat. Three different and complementary interferometric techniques can be performed with CASPER2: Amplitude Modulation (AM)...

  19. 3D modeling of GJ1214b's atmosphere: formation of inhomogeneous high clouds and observational implications

    CERN Document Server

    Charnay, Benjamin; Misra, Amit; Leconte, Jérémy; Arney, Giada

    2015-01-01

    The warm sub-Neptune GJ1214b has a featureless transit spectrum which may be due to the presence of high and thick clouds or haze. Here, we simulate the atmosphere of GJ1214b with a 3D General Circulation Model for cloudy hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, including cloud radiative effects. We show that the atmospheric circulation is strong enough to transport micrometric cloud particles to the upper atmosphere and generally leads to a minimum of cloud at the equator. By scattering stellar light, clouds increase the planetary albedo to 0.4-0.6 and cool the atmosphere below 1 mbar. However, the heating by ZnS clouds leads to the formation of a stratospheric thermal inversion above 10 mbar, with temperatures potentially high enough on the dayside to evaporate KCl clouds. We show that flat transit spectra consistent with HST observations are possible if cloud particle radii are around 0.5 micron, and that such clouds should be optically thin at wavelengths > 3 microns. Using simulated cloudy atmospheres that fit th...

  20. Atmospheric Radionuclides from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident-Two years observations in Tsukuba, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Yasuhito; Kajino, Mizuo; Zaizen, Yuji; Adachi, Koji; Mikami, Masao; Kita, Kazuyuki; Hatano, Yuko

    2013-04-01

    The accident of Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant of the Tokyo Electric Power Corporation arisen by the hit of great earthquake and tsunami in March 11, 2011, emitted abundant fresh radioactive material to the atmospheric environment. The amount has been estimated to be at least a few-tenth of those from the Chernobyl accident (by NISA, etc.). By this large-scale contamination, atmospheric environments over Japan, especially the eastern part, were seriously impacted with such a massive amount of the anthropogenic radionuclides (e.g. typical hotspots). So the persisting aftermath is one of the concerns. Although the heavy primary emission seems to be terminated until April of 2011, 2ndary emissions from contaminated ground surface, coppices, fields, roads, any burnings of the contaminated materials generated the resuspension of radionuclides into the atmosphere. With 2-years observation for the Fukushima radioactivity at the Meteorological Research Institute, Japan (MRI) such persisting resuspension is considered in this presentation. The resuspension seems still in difficulty to give forecast by computer modeling; the observations are indispensable bodies of the research even in the future. The MRI has carried out observations of the atmospheric radionuclides, which are long-lived with potentials of environmental and health impacts, for more than 50 years. Aiming at to clarify temporal change in concentration of anthropogenic radionuclides in the atmosphere and its control factors, the observations have continued over the long period. The long-lasting impacts of the Fukushima accident are addressed with our long-term time series of the atmospheric radioactivity as a reference.

  1. A mobile polar atmospheric parameter measurement system:II. First atmospheric turbulence observation at Antarctic Taishan Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Qiguo; JIANG Peng; WU Xiaoqing; JIN Xinmiao; LU Shan; JI Tuo; CHAI Bo; ZHANG Shaohua; ZHOU Hongyan

    2015-01-01

    This is the second paper of a series devoted to atmospheric optical turbulence Cn2 observation using a mobile polar atmospheric parameter measurement system. We present the initial results of Cn2 measurement at Antarctic Taishan Station using micro-thermal sensors and a three-dimensional sonic anemometer at height ~2.0 m above the snow surface. The site testing experiments were carried out during the 30th Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE). We collected about 1 000 h of data between 30 December 2013 and 10 February 2014. The Cn2 curve exhibits clear daily structures, with two peaks around midnight and midday and two troughs around 7:30 and 17:00 local time (UTC+5). The mean Cn2 is 2.7×10−15 m−2/3 and the 25th and 75th percentiles of the Cn2 cumulative distribution are 9.6×10−16 m−2/3 and 6.2×10−15 m−2/3, respectively. Meteorological parameters such as temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and air pressure are also presented.

  2. Observed glacier and volatile distribution on Pluto from atmosphere-topography processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Tanguy; Forget, François

    2016-12-01

    Pluto has a variety of surface frosts and landforms as well as a complex atmosphere. There is ongoing geological activity related to the massive Sputnik Planitia glacier, mostly made of nitrogen (N2) ice mixed with solid carbon monoxide and methane, covering the 4-kilometre-deep, 1,000-kilometre-wide basin of Sputnik Planitia near the anti-Charon point. The glacier has been suggested to arise from a source region connected to the deep interior, or from a sink collecting the volatiles released planetwide. Thin deposits of N2 frost, however, were also detected at mid-northern latitudes and methane ice was observed to cover most of Pluto except for the darker, frost-free equatorial regions. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution of N2, methane and carbon monoxide on Pluto over thousands of years. The model predicts N2 ice accumulation in the deepest low-latitude basin and the threefold increase in atmospheric pressure that has been observed to occur since 1988. This points to atmospheric-topographic processes as the origin of Sputnik Planitia's N2 glacier. The same simulations also reproduce the observed quantities of volatiles in the atmosphere and show frosts of methane, and sometimes N2, that seasonally cover the mid- and high latitudes, explaining the bright northern polar cap reported in the 1990s and the observed ice distribution in 2015. The model also predicts that most of these seasonal frosts should disappear in the next decade.

  3. Estimating Terrestrial Wood Biomass from Observed Concentrations of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, K. M.; Peters, W.; Carvalhais, N.; van der Werf, G.; Miller, J.

    2008-01-01

    We estimate terrestrial disequilibrium state and wood biomass from observed concentrations of atmospheric CO2 using the CarbonTracker system coupled to the SiBCASA biophysical model. Starting with a priori estimates of carbon flux from the land, ocean, and fossil fuels, CarbonTracker estimates net c

  4. Estimating Terrestrial Wood Biomass from Observed Concentrations of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, K. M.; Peters, W.; Carvalhais, N.; van der Werf, G.; Miller, J.

    2008-01-01

    We estimate terrestrial disequilibrium state and wood biomass from observed concentrations of atmospheric CO2 using the CarbonTracker system coupled to the SiBCASA biophysical model. Starting with a priori estimates of carbon flux from the land, ocean, and fossil fuels, CarbonTracker estimates net

  5. Observed glacier and volatile distribution on Pluto from atmosphere-topography processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Tanguy; Forget, François

    2016-12-01

    Pluto has a variety of surface frosts and landforms as well as a complex atmosphere. There is ongoing geological activity related to the massive Sputnik Planitia glacier, mostly made of nitrogen (N2) ice mixed with solid carbon monoxide and methane, covering the 4-kilometre-deep, 1,000-kilometre-wide basin of Sputnik Planitia near the anti-Charon point. The glacier has been suggested to arise from a source region connected to the deep interior, or from a sink collecting the volatiles released planetwide. Thin deposits of N2 frost, however, were also detected at mid-northern latitudes and methane ice was observed to cover most of Pluto except for the darker, frost-free equatorial regions. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution of N2, methane and carbon monoxide on Pluto over thousands of years. The model predicts N2 ice accumulation in the deepest low-latitude basin and the threefold increase in atmospheric pressure that has been observed to occur since 1988. This points to atmospheric-topographic processes as the origin of Sputnik Planitia’s N2 glacier. The same simulations also reproduce the observed quantities of volatiles in the atmosphere and show frosts of methane, and sometimes N2, that seasonally cover the mid- and high latitudes, explaining the bright northern polar cap reported in the 1990s and the observed ice distribution in 2015. The model also predicts that most of these seasonal frosts should disappear in the next decade.

  6. Using the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect to observe the transmission spectrum of Earth's atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Fei; Petr-Gotzens, Monika G; Pallé, Enric; Zhao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Due to stellar rotation, the observed radial velocity of a star varies during the transit of a planet across its surface, a phenomenon known as the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect. The amplitude of the RM effect is related to the radius of the planet which, because of differential absorption in the planetary atmosphere, depends on wavelength. Therefore, the wavelength-dependent RM effect can be used to probe the planetary atmosphere. We measure for the first time the RM effect of the Earth transiting the Sun using a lunar eclipse observed with the ESO HARPS spectrograph. We analyze the observed RM effect at different wavelengths to obtain the transmission spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere after the correction of the solar limb-darkening and the convective blueshift. The ozone Chappuis band absorption as well as the Rayleigh scattering features are clearly detectable with this technique. Our observation demonstrates that the RM effect can be an effective technique for exoplanet atmosphere characterization. It...

  7. Quantifying Spatial and Seasonal Variability in Atmospheric Ammonia with In Situ and Space-Based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia plays an important role in many biogeochemical processes, yet atmospheric mixing ratios arc not well known. Recently, methods have been developed for retrieving NH3 from space-based observations, but they have not been compared to in situ measurements. We have ...

  8. Atmospheric Gravity Waves and Turbulent Processes in the Mesopause Region Based on PMSE MAARSY Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudadze, N.; Chau, J. L.; Stober, G.; Latteck, R.

    2016-12-01

    Mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT) polar dynamics are interesting and important subject for study in atmospheric physic. It is considered that mesopause region is where the main part of the Atmospheric gravity waves breaks and/or dissipates. However this region is difficult to observe. Continuous Observations of the polar summer mesosphere with the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) and its predecessor the ALOMAR-Wind-Radar (ALWIN) (before 2010), have been used to investigate dynamical structures of well-known phenomenon - Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) which is an important tracer in the summer polar mesopause region. Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and Doppler radial velocity from the PMSE are used to investigate the wave-like motions with periods larger than 5 minutes. Such oscillations are studied in terms of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs). Processes also connected with AGWs as PMSE layering, are studied in connection with the background conditions of the neutral atmosphere as well. Background winds are obtained from collocated meteor radar (MR). We used local enhancement method for the processing of altitude-time SNR images to detect layers in the PMSEs and characterised them. Our preliminary results indicate that PMSE strength and behaviour is correlated with the meridional wind. Furthermore we found that the spectral width (SW), which is a proxy of turbulence, is most of the time weakly dependent on SNR strength. However, there are some events where SW is highly dependent on SNR intensity indicating that they could be associated to turbulent-dominated events.

  9. Abundances of Cloud-Related Gases in the Venus Atmosphere as Inferred from Observed Radio Opacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffes, Paul Gregory

    1982-03-01

    Various radio-analytical techniques have detected microwave opacity in the middle atmosphere of Venus, well above the main carbon dioxide opacity of the lower atmosphere. Consideration of the amount, distribution, and effects of the constituents which produce the main cloud layer at about 50 km altitude, indicate that such cloud-related gases, especially sulfuric acid vapor, are the predominant source of the observed opacity of the middle atmosphere. Theoretical and laboratory studies were made of the microwave absorption from three cloud-related gases: sulfur dioxide, sulfur trioxide, and gaseous sulfuric acid. While the measured absorption from sulfur dioxide under conditions for the middle atmosphere of Venus was found to be 50% larger than suggested by theory, the amount of sulfur dioxide required to explain the opacity as measured by radio occultation exceeded the abundance measured in situ by atmospheric probes, suggesting that there must be another important source of opacity. Sulfur trioxide was tested and found to be relatively transparent, but laboratory measurements of the microwave opacity of gaseous sulfuric acid under Venus atmospheric conditions indicate that it is an exceptionally strong absorber with absorptivity that has a surprisingly weak dependence on radio frequency. Initial theoretical studies also indicate a large absorptivity and weak frequency dependence, although the measured opacity is larger than the computed value, presumably due to deviations from Van Vleck-Weisskopf theory. The absorbing characteristics of sulfuric acid vapor appear to reconcile past inconsistencies among measurements and deductions concerning the constituents of the atmosphere of Venus, and radio occultation, radar reflection, and radio emission measurements of its opacity. The results of the current studies are used with previous data for the absorptivity of water vapor and carbon dioxide to model relative contributions to opacity as a function of height, in a way

  10. Observational Evidence for Variations of the Acoustic Cutoff Frequency with Height in the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewska, A.; Musielak, Z. E.; Staiger, J.; Roth, M.

    2016-03-01

    Direct evidence for the existence of an acoustic cutoff frequency in the solar atmosphere is given by observations performed by using the HELioseismological Large Regions Interferometric DEvice operating on the Vacuum Tower Telescope located on Tenerife. The observational results demonstrate variations of the cutoff with atmospheric heights. The observed variations of the cutoff are compared to theoretical predictions made by using five acoustic cutoff frequencies that have been commonly used in helioseismology and asteroseismology. The comparison shows that none of the theoretical predictions is fully consistent with the observational data. The implication of this finding is far reaching as it urgently requires either major revisions of the existing methods of finding acoustic cutoff frequencies or developing new methods that would much better account for the physical picture underlying the concept of cutoff frequencies in inhomogeneous media.

  11. The Middle and Upper Atmosphere Observations over Syowa Station (69S, 39E), the Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takuji; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Sato, Toru; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Yamanouchi, Takashi; Suzuki, Hidehiko; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Sato, Kaoru; Abo, Makoto; Nishiyama, Takanori; Matsuda, Takashi S.; Mizuno, Akira; Isono, Yasuko; Tsuda, Takuo T.

    The polar middle atmosphere is located in the upward/downward stream of the meridional circulation in summer/winter, and the upper part shows a significant seasonal variation in temperature. The cold mesopause in summer and related phenomena such as PMC (polar mesospheric clouds), NLC (noctiluscent clouds), and PMSE (polar mesospheric summer echo) are the most outstanding signals caused by such large amplitude seasonal variations. However, observations of the dynamics and chemistry in the Antarctic middle atmosphere are still very limited. JARE (Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition) has been carrying out a six year prioritized project of the Antarctic research observations since 2010. One of the sub-project is entitled ``the global environmental change revealed through the Antarctic middle and upper atmosphere.'' Profiling dynamical parameters such as temperature and wind, as well as minor constituents is the key component of observations in this project, together with a long term observations using existent various instruments in Syowa, the Antarctic (39E, 69S). The PANSY (Program of Antarctic Syowa MST/IS) radar, a Rayleigh/Raman/Resonance scatter radar, a millimeter-wave spectrometer are the new instruments which started observations during the project. In this paper, the recent researches obtained from the observations at Syowa Station will be reported, The PANSY radar started research observation in April 2012 with the 1/4 of full-array antenna system. Observations of troposphere/lower stratosphere/ mesosphere are almost continuously carried out except for the intermittent system adjustment periods. Our observations have indicated more frequent PMWEs (Polar Mesospheric Winter Echo) than the previous studies. The Rayleigh/Raman lidar have been observing gravity waves in the stratosphere/mesosphere by temperature perturbations, and recently the altitude range has been successfully extended down to upper troposphere by combining Raman scatter signals to the

  12. Modeled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparision. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modeled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  13. Modelled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long-range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present-day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparison. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modelled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  14. Modeled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Samset

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric black carbon (BC absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF. However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparision. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modeled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  15. Simultaneous Observations of Atmospheric Tides from Combined in Situ and Remote Observations at Mars from the MAVEN Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Scott L.; Liu, Guiping; Withers, Paul; Yigit, Erdal; Lo, Daniel; Jain, Sonal; Schneider, Nicholas M. (Inventor); Deighan, Justin; McClintock, William E.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report the observations of longitudinal variations in the Martian thermosphere associated with nonmigrating tides. Using the Neutral Gas Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) and the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN Mission (MAVEN) spacecraft, this study presents the first combined analysis of in situ and remote observations of atmospheric tides at Mars for overlapping volumes, local times, and overlapping date ranges. From the IUVS observations, we determine the altitude and latitudinal variation of the amplitude of the nonmigrating tidal signatures, which is combined with the NGIMS, providing information on the compositional impact of these waves. Both the observations of airglow from IUVS and the CO2 density observations from NGIMS reveal a strong wave number 2 signature in a fixed local time frame. The IUVS observations reveal a strong latitudinal dependence in the amplitude of the wave number 2 signature. Combining this with the accurate CO2 density observations from NGIMS, this would suggest that the CO2 density variation is as high as 27% at 0-10 deg latitude. The IUVS observations reveal little altitudinal dependence in the amplitude of the wave number 2 signature, varying by only 20% from 160 to 200 km. Observations of five different species with NGIMS show that the amplitude of the wave number 2 signature varies in proportion to the inverse of the species scale height, giving rise to variation in composition as a function of longitude. The analysis and discussion here provide a roadmap for further analysis as additional coincident data from these two instruments become available.

  16. Atmospheric Waves and Dynamics Beneath Jupiters Clouds from Radio Wavelength Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard G.; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Simon, Amy; De Pater, Imke

    2017-01-01

    We observed Jupiter at wavelengths near 2 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in February 2015. These frequencies are mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia abundance and probe between approx. 0.5- 2.0 bars of pressure in Jupiters atmosphere; within and below the visible cloud deck which has its base near 0.7 bars. The resultant observed data were projected into a cylindrical map of the planet with spatial resolution of approx. 1500 km at the equator. We have examined the data for atmospheric waves and observed a prominent bright belt of radio hotspot features near 10 N, likely connected to the same equatorial wave associated with the 5-m hotspots. We conducted a passive tracer power spectral wave analysis for the entire map and latitude regions corresponding to eastward and westward jets and compare our results to previous studies. The power spectra analysis revealed that the atmosphere sampled in our observation (excluding the NEB region) is in a 2-D turbulent regime and its dynamics are predominately governed by the shallow water equations. The Great Red Spot (GRS) is also very prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry and we compare it, and nearby storms, with optical images. We find that the meridional radio profile has a global north-south hemisphere distinction and find correlations of it to optical intensity banding and to shear zones of the zonal wind profile over select regions of latitude. Amateur optical images taken before and after our observation complemented the radio wave- length map to investigate dynamics of the equatorial region in Jupiters atmosphere. We find that two radio hotspots at 2 cm are well correlated with optical plumes in the NEB, additionally revealing they are not the same 5 m hotspot features correlated with optical dark patches between adjacent plumes. This analysis exploits the VLAs upgraded sensitivity and explores the opportunities now possible when studying gas giants, especially atmospheric

  17. Variation in response of Arabidopsis thaliana lines to atmospheric SO2 exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Kooij, T.A W.; De Kok, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    Thirteen lines of Arabidopsis thaliana L. of world-wide origin were exposed to 0.65 mul l(-1) SO2 for 11 days. Shoot growth of most lines was hardly affected. Growth of one line, originating from Tadjikistan, was negatively affected upon SO2 exposure and this line developed acute injury symptoms as

  18. Variation in response of Arabidopsis thaliana lines to atmospheric SO2 exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Kooij, T.A W.; De Kok, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    Thirteen lines of Arabidopsis thaliana L. of world-wide origin were exposed to 0.65 mul l(-1) SO2 for 11 days. Shoot growth of most lines was hardly affected. Growth of one line, originating from Tadjikistan, was negatively affected upon SO2 exposure and this line developed acute injury symptoms as

  19. On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

    2006-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are

  20. Recent AGN Observations by the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kildea, J.; Alabiso, A.; Bramel, D. A.; Carson, J.; Covault, C. E.; Driscoll, D.; Fortin, P.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hanna, D. S.; Jarvis, A.; Lindner, T.; Mukherjee, R.; Mueller, C.; Ong, R. A.; Ragan, K.; Scalzo, R. A.; Williams, D. A.; Zweerink, J.

    2005-02-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for the detection of very high energy gamma rays from Galactic and extra-galactic sources. By utilizing the large collection area provided by the solar mirrors of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico, STACEE achieves a low energy threshold, around 100 GeV, for the detection of gamma rays. We briefly describe the STACEE detector and detail recent observations of Active Galactic Nuclei.

  1. Observation of Periodic Multiplication and Chaotic Phenomena in Atmospheric Cold Plasma Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Bing; HUANG Jian-Jun; ZHANG Zhe-Huang; WANG De-Zhen

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the temporal evolution of the current pulses from an ac He cold plasma jet at atmospheric pressure and with driving frequency in the range 14.76-15.30 kHz. The driving frequency is used as the plasma system's bifurcation parameter in analogy with the evolution in which the current pulses undergoes multiplication and chaos. Such time-domain nonlinearity is important for controlling instabilities in atmospheric glow discharges.In addition, the observation can provide some data to support the simulation results reported previously [Appl.Phys. Lett. 90 (2007) 071501].

  2. IRIS Observations of the Mg II h & k Lines During a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Graham S; Qiu, Jiong; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-01

    The bulk of the radiative output of a solar flare is emitted from the chromosphere, which produces enhancements in the optical and UV continuum, and in many lines, both optically thick and thin. We have, until very recently, lacked observations of two of the strongest of these lines: the Mg II h & k resonance lines. We present a detailed study of the response of these lines to a solar flare. The spatial and temporal behaviour of the integrated intensities, k/h line ratios, line of sight velocities, line widths and line asymmetries were investigated during an M class flare (SOL2014-02-13T01:40). Very intense, spatially localised energy input at the outer edge of the ribbon is observed, resulting in redshifts equivalent to velocities of ~15-26km/s, line broadenings, and a blue asymmetry in the most intense sources. The characteristic central reversal feature that is ubiquitous in quiet Sun observations is absent in flaring profiles, indicating that the source function increases with height during the flare....

  3. A 15 year legacy of cloud and atmosphere observations in Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupe, M.

    2012-12-01

    For the past 15 years, the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has operated the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) atmospheric observatory in Barrow, Alaska. Barrow offers many valuable perspectives on the Arctic environment that complement observations at lower latitudes. Unique features of the Arctic region include cold and dry atmospheric conditions, strong annual variability in sun light, a seasonally high-reflective surface, and persistent clouds that involve mixed-phase processes. ARM's ultimate objective with its flagship observatory at the northernmost point in U.S. territory is to provide measurements that can be used to improve the understanding of these atmospheric physical and radiative properties and processes such that they can be better represented in climate models. The NSA is the most detailed and long-lasting cloud-radiation-atmosphere observatory in the Arctic, providing continuous, sophisticated measurements of climate-relevant parameters. Instrument suites include active radars and lidars at various frequencies, passive radiometers monitoring radiation in microwave, infrared, visible and ultraviolet wavelengths, meteorological towers, and sounding systems. Together these measurements are used to characterize many of the important properties of clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, dynamics, thermodynamics, and the surface. The coordinated nature of these measurements offers important multi-dimensional insight into many fundamental processes linking these different elements of the climate system. Moreover, the continuous operations of the facility support these observations over the full diurnal cycle and in all seasons of the year. This presentation will highlight a number of important studies and key findings that have been facilitated by the NSA observations during the first 15 years in operation. Some of these include: a thorough documentation of clouds, their occurrence frequency, phase, microphysical

  4. Global Hawk Dropsonde Observations of the Arctic Atmosphere from March 9-10, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrieri, J. M.; Spackman, J. R.; Hughes, M. R.; Neiman, P. J.; Wick, G. A.; Hock, T.; Nghiem, S. V.; Hood, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    stability over sea ice and open leads. The successful dropsonde deployment in the Arctic demonstrates the capability of the GH to conduct operations in remote regions of the earth's atmosphere and the value of observations in the Arctic atmosphere where in situ measurements are practically non-existent. The dropsonde data that will be presented provide a unique detailed look of the atmosphere across one of the harshest regions on the planet.

  5. Observed variations in U.S. frost timing linked to atmospheric circulation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Courtenay; McCabe, Gregory J.

    2017-01-01

    Several studies document lengthening of the frost-free season within the conterminous United States (U.S.) over the past century, and report trends in spring and fall frost timing that could stem from hemispheric warming. In the absence of warming, theory and case studies link anomalous frost timing to atmospheric circulation anomalies. However, recent efforts to relate a century of observed changes in U.S. frost timing to various atmospheric circulations yielded only modest correlations, leaving the relative importance of circulation and warming unclear. Here, we objectively partition the U.S. into four regions and uncover atmospheric circulations that account for 25–48% of spring and fall-frost timing. These circulations appear responsive to historical warming, and they consistently account for more frost timing variability than hemispheric or regional temperature indices. Reliable projections of future variations in growing season length depend on the fidelity of these circulation patterns in global climate models.

  6. Atmospheric effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Argirò, S.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves Do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Luna García, R.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Martello, D.; Martínez, J.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, A.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tuci, V.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2009-09-01

    Atmospheric parameters, such as pressure (P), temperature (T) and density (ρ∝P/T), affect the development of extensive air showers initiated by energetic cosmic rays. We have studied the impact of atmospheric variations on extensive air showers by means of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The rate of events shows a ˜10% seasonal modulation and ˜2% diurnal one. We find that the observed behaviour is explained by a model including the effects associated with the variations of P and ρ. The former affects the longitudinal development of air showers while the latter influences the Molière radius and hence the lateral distribution of the shower particles. The model is validated with full simulations of extensive air showers using atmospheric profiles measured at the site of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  7. Atmospheric effects on extensive air showers observed with the Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters, such as pressure (P), temperature (T) and density, affect the development of extensive air showers initiated by energetic cosmic rays. We have studied the impact of atmospheric variations on extensive air showers by means of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The rate of events shows a ~10% seasonal modulation and ~2% diurnal one. We find that the observed behaviour is explained by a model including the effects associated with the variations of pressure and density. The former affects the longitudinal development of air showers while the latter influences the Moliere radius and hence the lateral distribution of the shower particles. The model is validated with full simulations of extensive air showers using atmospheric profiles measured at the site of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  8. On the existence of oscillations in solar filaments observed in H alpha and C IV lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, B.; Malherbe, J. M.; Mein, P.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1986-01-01

    Time sequence observations of filaments in both the H alpha line and the 1548 A C IV line were analyzed with the Fourier transform technique in the frequency range (1 - 10 mHz). No oscillation is detected in filaments except at the footpoints where a steady velocity gradient is large. The energy is probably due to convective motions rather than pressure oscillations.

  9. Herschel observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources (HEXOS): detecting spiral arm clouds by CH absorption lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, S.-L.; Schilke, P.; Comito, C.; Möller, T.; Rolffs, R.; Müller, H. S. P.; Belloche, A.; Menten, K. M.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G.; Bergin, E. A.; Bell, T. A.; Crockett, N. R.; Blake, G. A.; Cabrit, S.; Caux, E.; Ceccarelli, C.; Cernicharo, J.; Daniel, F.; Dubernet, M.-L.; Emprechtinger, M.; Encrenaz, P.; Falgarone, E.; Gerin, M.; Giesen, T. F.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Gupta, H.; Herbst, E.; Joblin, C.; Johnstone, D.; Langer, W. D.; Lord, S. D.; Maret, S.; Martin, P. G.; Melnick, G. J.; Morris, P.; Murphy, J. A.; Neufeld, D. A.; Ossenkopf, V.; Pagani, L.; Pearson, J. C.; Pérault, M.; Plume, R.; Salez, M.; Schlemmer, S.; Stutzki, J.; Trappe, N.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Vastel, C.; Wang, S.; Yorke, H. W.; Yu, S.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Boogert, A.; Güsten, R.; Hartogh, P.; Honingh, N.; Karpov, A.; Kooi, J.; Krieg, J.-M.; Schieder, R.; Diez-Gonzalez, M. C.; Bachiller, R.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Baechtold, W.; Olberg, M.; Nordh, L. H.; Gill, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, G.

    2010-01-01

    We have observed CH absorption lines (J = 3/2, N = 1 ≤ftarrow J = 1/2, N = 1) against the continuum source Sgr B2(M) using the Herschel/HIFI instrument. With the high spectral resolution and wide velocity coverage provided by HIFI, 31 CH absorption features with different radial velocities and line

  10. Explanation of the inverse Doppler effect observed in nonlinear transmission lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, Alexander B; van der Weide, Daniel W

    2005-05-27

    The theory of the inverse Doppler effect recently observed in magnetic nonlinear transmission lines is developed. We explain the crucial role of the backward spatial harmonic in the occurrence of an inverse Doppler effect and draw analogies of the magnetic nonlinear transmission line to the backward wave oscillator.

  11. Information Content Analysis for Selection of Optimal JWST Observing Modes for Transiting Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Natasha E.; Line, M. R.

    2017-04-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is nearing its launch date of 2018, and is expected to revolutionize our knowledge of exoplanet atmospheres. In order to specifically identify which observing modes will be most useful for characterizing a diverse range of exoplanetary atmospheres, we use an information content (IC) based approach commonly used in the studies of solar system atmospheres. We develop a system based upon these IC methods to trace the instrumental and atmospheric model phase space in order to identify which observing modes are best suited for particular classes of planets, focusing on transmission spectra. Specifically, the atmospheric parameter space we cover is T = 600-1800 K, C/O = 0.55-1, [M/H] = 1-100 × Solar for an R = 1.39 R J , M = 0.59 M J planet orbiting a WASP-62-like star. We also explore the influence of a simplified opaque gray cloud on the IC. We find that obtaining broader wavelength coverage over multiple modes is preferred over higher precision in a single mode given the same amount of observing time. Regardless of the planet temperature and composition, the best modes for constraining terminator temperatures, C/O ratios, and metallicity are NIRISS SOSS+NIRSpec G395. If the target’s host star is dim enough such that the NIRSpec prism is applicable, then it can be used instead of NIRISS SOSS+NIRSpec G395. Lastly, observations that use more than two modes should be carefully analyzed because sometimes the addition of a third mode results in no gain of information. In these cases, higher precision in the original two modes is favorable.

  12. [On-line method for measurement of the carbon isotope ratio of atmospheric methane and its application to atmosphere of Yakela condensed gas field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jun-Hong; Bao, Zheng-Yu; Xiang, Wu; Qiao, Sheng-Ying; Li, Bing

    2006-01-01

    An on-line method for measurement of the 13C/12C ratio of methane by a gas chromatography/high-temperature conversion/ isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/MS) technique was developed. This method is less laborious, more rapid (45 min), of high precision (+/- 0.4 x 10(-3)) and by using a small amount of sample (about 200 mL of atmosphere). Its application to isotopic characterization, and hence methane source identification, was demonstrated by examination of atmosphere sample collected in Yakela condensed gas field, China. The average 13C/12C ratio of atmospheric methane in Yakela field was -45.0 x 10(-3) heavier by 1.2 x 10(-3) -2.0 x 10(-3) than the global average. This is caused by seepage and diffusing of methane from Yakela condensed gas reservoir. The concentrations of atmospheric methane in daytimes are found to be lower than those in nighttimes, and the corresponding 13C/12C ratios in daytimes are lighter compared to those in nighttimes, a phenomena probably caused by the fact that a small part of methane from Yakela condensate reservoir is consumed in soil's surface under sunlight.

  13. Impact of biomass burning on surface water quality in Southeast Asia through atmospheric deposition: field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarambal, P.; Balasubramanian, R.; Tkalich, P.; He, J.

    2010-03-01

    Atmospheric nutrients have recently gained attention as a significant additional source of new nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loading to the ocean. The effect of atmospheric N on marine productivity depends on the biological availability of both inorganic and organic N and P forms. During October 2006, the regional smoke haze episode in Southeast Asia (SEA) that resulted from uncontrolled forest fires in Sumatra and Borneo blanketed large tracts of the region. In this work, we determined the composition of nutrients in aerosols and rainwater during haze and non-haze periods to assess their impacts on aquatic ecosystem in SEA for the first time. We compared atmospheric dry and wet deposition of N and P species in aerosol and rainwater in Singapore between haze and non haze periods. Air mass back trajectories showed that large-scale forest and peat fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan were a significant source of atmospheric nutrients to aquatic environments in Singapore and SEA region on hazy days. It was observed that the average concentrations of nutrients increased approximately by a factor of 3 to 8 on hazy days when compared with non-hazy days. The mean dry atmospheric fluxes (g/m2/year) of TN and TP observed during hazy and non-hazy days were 4.77±0.775 and 0.3±0.082, and 0.91±0.471 and 0.046±0.01, respectively. The mean wet deposition fluxes (g/m2/year) of TN and TP were 12.2±3.53 and 0.726±0.074, and 2.71±0.989 and 0.144±0.06 for hazy and non-hazy days, respectively. The occurrences of higher concentrations of nutrients from atmospheric deposition during smoke haze episodes may have adverse consequences on receiving aquatic ecosystems with cascading impacts on water quality.

  14. High-resolution NO2 observations from the Airborne Compact Atmospheric Mapper: Retrieval and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamsal, L. N.; Janz, S. J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Pickering, K. E.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Loughner, C. P.; Crawford, J. H.; Swartz, W. H.; Herman, J. R.

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a short-lived atmospheric pollutant that serves as an air quality indicator and is itself a health concern. The Airborne Compact Atmospheric Mapper (ACAM) was flown on board the NASA UC-12 aircraft during the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality Maryland field campaign in July 2011. The instrument collected hyperspectral remote sensing measurements in the 304-910 nm range, allowing daytime observations of several tropospheric pollutants, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), at an unprecedented spatial resolution of 1.5 × 1.1 km2. Retrievals of slant column abundance are based on the differential optical absorption spectroscopy method. For the air mass factor computations needed to convert these retrievals to vertical column abundance, we include high-resolution information for the surface reflectivity by using bidirectional reflectance distribution function data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. We use high-resolution simulated vertical distributions of NO2 from the Community Multiscale Air Quality and Global Modeling Initiative models to account for the temporal variation in atmospheric NO2 to retrieve middle and lower tropospheric NO2 columns (NO2 below the aircraft). We compare NO2 derived from ACAM measurements with in situ observations from NASA's P-3B research aircraft, total column observations from the ground-based Pandora spectrometers, and tropospheric column observations from the space-based Ozone Monitoring Instrument. The high-resolution ACAM measurements not only give new insights into our understanding of atmospheric composition and chemistry through observation of subsampling variability in typical satellite and model resolutions, but they also provide opportunities for testing algorithm improvements for forthcoming geostationary air quality missions.

  15. Studies of Pressure-Broadening of Alkali Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Kate; Babb, J.; Yoshino, K.

    2004-01-01

    In L-dwarfs and T-dwarfs the resonance lines of sodium and potassium are so profoundly pressure-broadened that their wings extend several hundred nanometers from line center. With accurate knowledge of the line profiles as a function of temperature and pressure: such lines can prove to be valuable diagnostics of the atmospheres of such objects. We have initiated a joint program of theoretical and experimental research to study the line-broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with species such as helium and molecular hydrogen. Although potassium and sodium are the alkali species of most interest in the atmospheres of cool brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets, some of our theoretical focus this year has involved the calculation of pressure-broadening of lithium resonance lines by He, as a test of a newly developed suite of computer codes. In addition, theoretical calculations have been carried out to determine the leading long range van der Waals coefficients for the interactions of ground and excited alkali metal atoms with helium atoms, to within a probable error of 2%. Such data is important in determining the behavior of the resonance line profiles in the far wings. Important progress has been made on the experimental aspects of the program since the arrival of a postdoctoral fellow in September. A new absorption cell has been designed, which incorporates a number of technical improvements over the previous cell, including a larger cell diameter to enhance the signal, and fittings which allow for easier cleaning, thereby significantly reducing the instrument down-time.

  16. First field-based atmospheric observation of the reduction of reactive mercury driven by sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Foy, Benjamin; Tong, Yindong; Yin, Xiufeng; Zhang, Wei; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong; Zhang, Guoshuai; Wang, Xuejun; Schauer, James J.

    2016-06-01

    Hourly speciated measurements of atmospheric mercury made in a remote, high-altitude site in the Tibetan Plateau revealed the first field observations of the reduction of reactive mercury in the presence of sunlight in the atmosphere. Measurements were collected over four winter months on the shore of Nam Co Lake in the inland Tibetan Plateau. The data was analyzed to identify sources and atmospheric transformations of the speciated mercury compounds. The absence of local anthropogenic sources provided a unique opportunity to examine chemical transformations of mercury. An optimization algorithm was used to determine the parameters of a chemical box model that would match the measured reactive mercury concentrations. This required the presence of a photolytic reduction reaction previously observed in laboratory studies and in power plant plumes. In addition, the model estimated the role of vertical mixing in diluting reactive gaseous mercury during the day, and the role of bromine chemistry in oxidizing gaseous elemental mercury to produce reactive gaseous mercury. This work provides further evidence of the need to add the photolytic reduction reaction of oxidized mercury into atmospheric transport models in order to better simulate mercury deposition.

  17. Measurements of C02 Distribution in Saturn's Atmosphere by Cassini-Infrared Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; LeClair, A.; Woodard, E.; Young, M.; Stanbro, M.; Flasar, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Fourier transform infrared spectrometer aboard the Cassini spacecraft, inserted in Saturn s orbit in July 2004, has been providing high resolution/high sensitivity infrared (IR) spectra of the Saturnian system. The measurements cover the spectral range of 10-1400/cm with variable spectral resolutions of 0.53 to 15/cm, exhibiting spectral features of a series of trace gases including CO2 and H2O. The observed spectra may be analyzed for retrieval of global P/T and gas density profiles of Saturn. The infrared measurements of Saturn by ISO(SWS) have indicated unexpected large abundances of CO2 in Saturn's atmosphere. The rigorous photochemical models of Saturn's atmosphere that have been developed indicate exogenic oxygen influx of icy dust grains that lead to the production of CO2. The distribution of CO2 in Saturn's atmosphere needs to be confirmed, and the nature of exogenic sources remains to be investigated. This paper presents comprehensive measurements of the CO2 distribution in Saturn's atmosphere by Cassini IR observations.

  18. Sideband characterization and atmospheric observations with various 340 GHz heterodyne receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renker, Matthias; Murk, Axel; Rea, Simon P.; Emrich, A.; Frisk, U.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes sideband response measurements and atmospheric observations with a double sideband and two Single Sideband (SSB) receiver prototypes developed for the multi-beam limb sounder instrument stratosphere-troposphere exchange and climate monitor radiometer. We first show an advanced Fourier-Transform Spectroscopy (FTS) method for sideband response and spurious signal characterization. We then present sideband response measurements of the different prototype receivers and we compare the results of the SSB receivers with sideband measurements by injecting a continuous wave signal into the upper and lower sidebands. The receivers were integrated into a total-power radiometer and atmospheric observations were carried out. The observed spectra were compared to forward model spectra to conclude on the sideband characteristics of the different receivers. The two sideband characterization methods show a high degree of agreement for both SSB receivers with various local oscillator settings. The measured sideband response was used to correct the forward model simulations. This improves the agreement with the atmospheric observations and explains spectral features caused by an unbalanced sideband response. The FTS method also allows to quantify the influence of spurious harmonic responses of the receiver.

  19. Global Hawk dropsonde observations of the Arctic atmosphere obtained during the Winter Storms and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers (WISPAR) field campaign

    OpenAIRE

    J. M. Intrieri; Boer, G.; Shupe, M. D.; J. R. Spackman; J. Wang; P. J. Neiman; Wick, G. A.; T. F. Hock; R. E. Hood

    2014-01-01

    In February and March of 2011, the Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) was deployed over the Pacific Ocean and the Arctic during the Winter Storms and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers (WISPAR) field campaign. The WISPAR science missions were designed to (1) mprove our understanding of Pacific weather systems and the polar atmosphere; (2) evaluate operational use of unmanned aircraft for investigating these atmospheric events; and (3) demonstrate operational and research applic...

  20. Atmospheric compensation of thermal infrared hyperspectral imagery with the emissive empirical line method and the in-scene atmospheric compensation algorithms: a comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiStasio, Robert J., Jr.; Resmini, Ronald G.

    2010-04-01

    The in-scene atmospheric compensation (ISAC) algorithm of Young et al. (2002) [14] (and as implemented in the ENVI® software system [16] as 'Thermal Atm Correction') is commonly applied to thermal infrared multi- and hyperspectral imagery (MSI and HSI, respectively). ISAC estimates atmospheric transmissivity and upwelling radiance using only the scene data. The ISAC-derived transmissivity and upwelling radiance are compared to those derived from the emissive empirical line method (EELM), another in-scene atmospheric compensation algorithm for thermal infrared MSI and HSI data. EELM is based on the presence of calibration targets (e.g., panels, water pools) captured in the spectral image data for which the emissivity and temperature are well known at the moment of MSI/HSI data acquisition. EELM is similar in concept to the empirical line method (ELM) algorithm commonly applied to visible/near-infrared to shortwave infrared (VNIR/SWIR) spectral imagery and is implemented as a custom ENVI® plugin application. Both ISAC and EELM are in-scene methods and do not require radiative transfer modeling. ISAC and EELM have been applied to airborne longwave infrared (LWIR; ~7.5 μm to ~13.5 μm) HSI data. Captured in the imagery are calibration panels and/or water pools maintained at different temperatures facilitating the application of EELM. Overall, the atmospheric compensation parameters derived from the two methods are in close agreement: the EELM-derived ground-leaving radiance spectra generally contain fewer residual atmospheric spectral features, although ISAC sometimes produces smoother ground-leaving radiance spectra. Nonetheless, the agreement is viewed as validation of ISAC. ISAC is an effective atmospheric compensation algorithm that is readily available to the remote sensing community in the ENVI® software system. Thus studies such as the present testing and comparing ISAC to other methods are important. The ISAC and EELM algorithms are discussed as are the

  1. Intraspecific variation in the response of Arabidopsis thaliana lines to elevated atmospheric CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Kooij, TAW; De Kok, LJ; Stulen, I.

    2000-01-01

    Since a study of the intraspecific variation in the response to elevated CO2 of different genetic lines of one species might reveal the parameters essential for the response of a species to elevated CO2, thirteen lines of Arabidopsis thaliana L. were exposed to elevated CO2 (700 mul l(-1)). All line

  2. LOFAR observations of decameter carbon radio recombination lines towards Cassiopeia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, P.; Oonk, J. B. R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Salgado, F.; Morabito, L. K.; Toribio, M. C.; Emig, K.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a study of carbon radio recombination lines towards Cassiopeia A using LOFAR observations in the frequency range 10-33 MHz. Individual carbon α lines are detected in absorption against the continuum at frequencies as low as 16 MHz. Stacking several Cα lines we obtain detections in the 11-16 MHz range. These are the highest signal-to-noise measurements at these frequencies. The peak optical depth of the Cα lines changes considerably over the 11-33 MHz range with the peak optical depth decreasing from 4 × 10-3 at 33 MHz to 2 × 10-3 at 11 MHz, while the line width increases from 20 km s-1 to ˜150 km s-1. The combined change in peak optical depth and line width results in a roughly constant integrated optical depth. We interpret this as carbon atoms close to local thermodynamic equilibrium. In this work we focus on how the 11-33 MHz carbon radio recombination lines can be used to determine the gas physical conditions. We find that the ratio of the carbon radio recombination lines to that of the 158 μm [CII] fine-structure line is a good thermometer, while the ratio between low frequency carbon radio recombination lines provides a good barometer. By combining the temperature and pressure constraints with those derived from the line width we are able to constrain the gas properties (electron temperature and density) and radiation field intensity. Given the 1σ uncertainties in our measurements these are; Te ≈ 68-98 K, ne ≈ 0.02-0.035 cm-3 and Tr, 100 ≈ 1500-1650 K. Despite challenging RFI and ionospheric conditions, our work demonstrates that observations of carbon radio recombination lines in the 10-33 MHz range can provide insight into the gas conditions.

  3. Assessing molecular line diagnostics of triggered star formation using synthetic observations

    CERN Document Server

    Haworth, Thomas J; Acreman, David M; Rundle, David A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate observational signatures of triggered star formation in bright rimmed clouds (BRCs) by using molecular line transfer calculations based on radiation-hydrodynamic radiatively-driven-implosion models. We find that for BRCs the separation in velocity between the line profile peak of an optically thick and an optically thin line is determined by both the observer viewing angle and the density of the shell driving into the cloud. In agreement with observations, we find that most BRC line profiles are symmetric and that asymmetries can be either red or blue, in contrast to the blue-dominance expected for a collapsing cloud. Asymmetries in the line profiles arise when an optically thick line is dominated by the shell and an optically thin line is dominated by the cloud interior to the shell. The asymmetries are red or blue depending on whether the shell is moving towards or away from the observer respectively. Using the known motions of the molecular gas in our models we rule out the envelope expansio...

  4. A Pilot Study to Evaluate California's Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Using Atmospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, H. D.; Fischer, M. L.; Lueker, T.; Guilderson, T.; Brophy, K. J.; Keeling, R. F.; Arnold, T.; Bambha, R.; Callahan, W.; Campbell, J. E.; Cui, X.; Frankenberg, C.; Hsu, Y.; Iraci, L. T.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J.; LaFranchi, B. W.; Lehman, S.; Manning, A.; Michelsen, H. A.; Miller, J. B.; Newman, S.; Paplawsky, B.; Parazoo, N.; Sloop, C.; Walker, S.; Whelan, M.; Wunch, D.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentration is influenced by human activities and by natural exchanges. Studies of CO2 fluxes using atmospheric CO2 measurements typically focus on natural exchanges and assume that CO2 emissions by fossil fuel combustion and cement production are well-known from inventory estimates. However, atmospheric observation-based or "top-down" studies could potentially provide independent methods for evaluating fossil fuel CO2 emissions, in support of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change. Observation-based estimates of fossil fuel-derived CO2 may also improve estimates of biospheric CO2 exchange, which could help to characterize carbon storage and climate change mitigation by terrestrial ecosystems. We have been developing a top-down framework for estimating fossil fuel CO2 emissions in California that uses atmospheric observations and modeling. California is implementing the "Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006" to reduce total greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, and it has a diverse array of ecosystems that may serve as CO2 sources or sinks. We performed three month-long field campaigns in different seasons in 2014-15 to collect flask samples from a state-wide network of 10 towers. Using measurements of radiocarbon in CO2, we estimate the fossil fuel-derived CO2 present in the flask samples, relative to marine background air observed at coastal sites. Radiocarbon (14C) is not present in fossil fuel-derived CO2 because of radioactive decay over millions of years, so fossil fuel emissions cause a measurable decrease in the 14C/C ratio in atmospheric CO2. We compare the observations of fossil fuel-derived CO2 to simulations based on atmospheric modeling and published fossil fuel flux estimates, and adjust the fossil fuel flux estimates in a statistical inversion that takes account of several uncertainties. We will present the results of the top-down technique to estimate fossil fuel emissions for our field

  5. Rayleigh Lidar observed atmospheric temperature characteristics over a western Indian location: intercomparison with satellite observations and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Som; Vaishnav, Rajesh; Shukla, Krishna K.; Lal, Shyam; Chandra, Harish; Acharya, Yashwant B.

    2017-07-01

    General characteristics of sub-tropical middle atmospheric temperature structure over a high altitude station, Mt. Abu (24.5°N, 72.7°E, altitude 1670 m, above mean sea level (amsl)) are presented using about 150 nights observational datasets of Rayleigh Lidar. The monthly mean temperature contour plot shows two distinct maxima in the stratopause region ( 45-55 km), occurring during February-March and September-October, a seasonal dependence similar to that reported for mid- and high-latitudes respectively. Semi-Annual Oscillation (SAO) are stronger at an altitude 60 km in the mesospheric temperature in comparison to stratospheric region. A comparison with the satellite (Halogen Occultation Experiment, (HALOE)) data shows qualitative agreement, but quantitatively a significant difference is found between the observation and satellite. The derived temperatures from Lidar observations are warmer 2-3 K in the stratospheric region and 5-10 K in the mesospheric region than temperatures observed from the satellite. A comparison with the models, COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA)-86 and Mass Spectrometer Incoherent Scatter Extended (MSISE)-90, showed differences of 3 K in the stratosphere and 5-10 K in the mesosphere, with deviations somewhat larger for CIRA-86. In most of the months and in all altitude regions model temperatures were lower than the Lidar observed temperature except in the altitude range of 40-50 km. MSISE-90 Model temperature overestimates as compared to Lidar temperature during December-February in the altitude region of 50-60 km. In the altitude region of 55-70 km both models deviate significantly, with differences exceeding 10-12 K, particularly during equinoctial periods. An average heating rate of 2.5 K/month during equinoxes and cooling rate of 4 K/month during November-December are found in altitude region of 50-70 km, relatively less heating and cooling rates are found in the altitude range of 30-50 km. The stratospheric

  6. Further signatures of long-term changes in atmospheric electrical parameters observed in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Märcz

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-term decreases found recently in both the atmospheric electrical potential gradient (PG and the air-Earth current density (Jz, using observation series from the UK and Hungary, have motivated studies of other European data. Two surface data series somewhat longer than a decade were available: PG data obtained at Serra do Pilar (Portugal, and PG, Jz and positive air conductivity measurements at Athens (Greece. Selecting data to minimise local effects, the 1960–1971 Serra do Pilar PG values decrease at dawn and in the evening. Dawn data obtained at Athens (1967–1977 indicate a reduction in Jz, while the simultaneous PG values there increase (coincident air conductivity values decrease for the periods investigated. The Athens PG increase is attributed to local aerosol influences, typical of urban environments. Despite the urban influence, the Athens Jz shows similarities with soundings of the ionospheric potential. The decline in Jz at Athens occurs simultaneously with a decrease reported previously in Jz at Kew (UK, indicating that, at least, a regional decrease in the global atmospheric electrical circuit occurred during part of the twentieth century. Similar surface changes occur in European atmospheric electrical parameters, with a decrease of about 0.5% to 0.7% per year between 1920 and 1970 (possibly extending back to 1898, an annual decrease of between 2.7 and 3.4%, between 1959 and 1971 and a continued decrease of about ~1% per year between 1967 and 1984, possibly still continuing.

    Keywords. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (Atmospheric electricity – Geomagnetism and paleomagnetism (Time variations, secular and long term – Atmospheric composition and structure (Aerosols and particles

  7. Tropical Storm Beryl as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: AIRS Microwave Image This is an infrared image of Tropical Storm Beryl in the western Atlantic, from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite on July 20, 2006, 1:30 am local time. This AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the hurricane. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the Earth, revealing warmer temperatures (red). This infrared image shows three large regions of strong convection surrounding the core of the storm. The largest, on the northern edge of the core, also appears in the companion microwave image to contain intense precipitation. The image in figure 1 is created from microwave radiation emitted by Earth's atmosphere and received by the instrument. It shows where the heaviest rainfall is taking place (in blue) in the storm. Blue areas outside of the tropical storm, where there are either some clouds or no clouds indicate where the sea surface shines through. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California

  8. Optimal strategies for observation of active galactic nuclei variability with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Giomi, Matteo; Maier, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Variable emission is one of the defining characteristic of active galactic nuclei (AGN). While providing precious information on the nature and physics of the sources, variability is often challenging to observe with time- and field-of-view-limited astronomical observatories such as Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). In this work, we address two questions relevant for the observation of sources characterized by AGN-like variability: what is the most time-efficient way to detect such sources, and what is the observational bias that can be introduced by the choice of the observing strategy when conducting blind surveys of the sky. Different observing strategies are evaluated using simulated light curves and realistic instrument response functions of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a future gamma-ray observatory. We show that strategies that makes use of very small observing windows, spread over large periods of time, allows for a faster detection of the source, and are less influenced by the...

  9. Gridded field observations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and decabromodiphenyl ethane in the atmosphere of north China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yifan; Ma, Jin; Qiu, Xinghua; Lin, Yan; Yang, Qiaoyun; Zhu, Tong

    2013-08-06

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are important pollutants, yet few data on ambient BFRs levels have been available for North China, one of the most developed regions of the country. In this study, we investigated levels and spatial distributions of BFRs based on gridded field observations coupled with passive air sampling in the aforementioned region. A model incorporating both point and nonpoint sources was developed to simulate the spatial distribution and to achieve source apportionment. Although high concentration was observed at an electronic-waste (e-waste) recycling site, the median level of the sum of tri-, tetra-, hepta-, hexa-, and hepta-PBDEs (∑10PBDEs) was 0.56 ng/sample, which was lower than those observed previously in mainland China. Source apportionment revealed that nonpoint emissions contributed nearly 78% of ∑10PBDEs observed in this study. In contrast, high levels of BDE-209 and DBDPE were observed, with median concentrations of 4.0 and 10.2 ng/sample, respectively. Point sources located in the region around Laizhou Bay, Shandong Province were the major sources, which contributed 31% of BDE-209 and 70% of DBDPE observed in this study, indicating that this manufacturing base was the most important source region for atmospheric deca-BFRs in North China. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report source apportionment of atmospheric BFRs based on gridded field observations.

  10. Total Water Vapor Transport Observed in Twelve Atmospheric Rivers over the Northeastern Pacific Ocean Using Dropsondes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, F. M.; Iacobellis, S.; Neiman, P. J.; Cordeira, J. M.; Spackman, J. R.; Waliser, D. E.; Wick, G. A.; White, A. B.; Fairall, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    Demory et al (2013) recently showed that the global water cycle in climate models, including the magnitude of water vapor transport, is strongly influenced by the model's spatial resolution. The lack of offshore observations is noted as a serious limitation in determining the correct amount of transport. Due to the key role of atmospheric rivers (ARs) in determining the global distribution of water vapor, quantifying transport from ARs is a high priority. This forms a foundation of the CalWater-2 experiment aimed at sampling many ARs during 2014-2018. In February 2014, an "early-start" deployment of the NOAA G-IV research aircraft sampled 10 ARs over the northeast Pacific Ocean. On six of these flights, dropsondes were deployed in a line crossing the AR so as to robustly sample the total water vapor transport (TVT). The TVT is defined here as the sum of the vertically integrated horizontal water vapor transport (IVT) in the AR using a baseline that stretches from its warm southern (or eastern) edge to its cool northern (or western) edge. TVT includes both AR-parallel and AR-perpendicular transport. These data double the overall number of such cross-AR airborne samples suitable for calculating TVT. Analysis of TVT for these six new samples, in combination with the six previous samples from the preceding 16 years (from CalJet, WISPAR, and a Hawaii-based campaign), will be shown. A comparison will be made of the AR width and TVT determined using the well-established integrated water vapor (IWV) threshold of 2 cm, versus an IVT threshold of 250 kg m-1 s-1. Finally, the data from a well sampled case on 13 February 2014 (23 sondes with 75-100 km spacing) will be used to assess the sensitivity of TVT to dropsonde horizontal spacing and vertical resolution. This sensitivity analysis is of practical importance for the upcoming CalWater-2 field campaign where the G-IV will be used to sample many additional AR events, due to the relatively high cost of the dropsondes.

  11. Implementing earth observation and advanced satellite based atmospheric sounders for water resource and climate modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boegh, E.; Dellwik, Ebba; Hahmann, Andrea N.;

    This paper discusses preliminary remote sensing (MODIS) based hydrological modelling results for the Danish island Sjælland (7330 km2) in relation to project objectives and methodologies of a new research project “Implementing Earth observation and advanced satellite based atmospheric sounders...... for effective land surface representation in water resource modeling” (2009- 2012). The purpose of the new research project is to develop remote sensing based model tools capable of quantifying the relative effects of site-specific land use change and climate variability at different spatial scales....... For this purpose, a) internal catchment processes will be studied using a Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system, b) Earth observations will be used to upscale from field to regional scales, and c) at the largest scale, satellite based atmospheric sounders and meso-scale climate modelling will be used...

  12. GCM simulations of Titan's middle and lower atmosphere and comparison to observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lora, Juan M; Russell, Joellen L

    2014-01-01

    Simulation results are presented from a new general circulation model (GCM) of Titan, the Titan Atmospheric Model (TAM), which couples the Flexible Modeling System (FMS) spectral dynamical core to a suite of external/sub-grid-scale physics. These include a new non-gray radiative transfer module that takes advantage of recent data from Cassini-Huygens, large-scale condensation and quasi-equilibrium moist convection schemes, a surface model with "bucket" hydrology, and boundary layer turbulent diffusion. The model produces a realistic temperature structure from the surface to the lower mesosphere, including a stratopause, as well as satisfactory superrotation. The latter is shown to depend on the dynamical core's ability to build up angular momentum from surface torques. Simulated latitudinal temperature contrasts are adequate, compared to observations, and polar temperature anomalies agree with observations. In the lower atmosphere, the insolation distribution is shown to strongly impact turbulent fluxes, and ...

  13. LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF PICOFLARE CATEGORY ENERGY RELEASES IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh, R.; Sasikumar Raja, K.; Kathiravan, C.; Satya Narayanan, A., E-mail: ramesh@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India)

    2013-01-10

    We report low-frequency (80 MHz) radio observations of circularly polarized non-thermal type I radio bursts ({sup n}oise storms{sup )} in the solar corona whose estimated energy is {approx}10{sup 21} erg. These are the weakest energy release events reported to date in the solar atmosphere. The plot of the distribution of the number of bursts (dN) versus their corresponding peak flux density in the range S to S+dS shows a power-law behavior, i.e., dN {proportional_to} S {sup {gamma}} dS. The power-law index {gamma} is in the range -2.2 to -2.7 for the events reported in the present work. The present results provide independent observational evidence for the existence of picoflare category energy releases in the solar atmosphere which are yet to be explored.

  14. Comparison between Satellite Water Vapour Observations and Atmospheric Models’ Predictions of the Upper Tropospheric Thermal Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Dim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric profiles (temperature, pressure, and humidity are commonly used parameters for aerosols and cloud properties retrievals. In preparation of the launch of the Global Change Observation Mission-Climate/Second-Generation GLobal Imager (GCOM-C/SGLI satellite, an evaluation study on the sensitivity of atmospheric models to variations of atmospheric conditions is conducted. In this evaluation, clear sky and above low clouds water vapour radiances of the upper troposphere obtained from satellite observations and those simulated by atmospheric models are compared. The models studied are the Nonhydrostatic ICosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM and the National Center for Environmental Protection/Department Of Energy (NCEP/DOE. The satellite observations are from the Terra/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (Terra/MODIS satellite. The simulations performed are obtained through a forward radiative transfer calculation procedure. The resulting radiances are transformed into the upper tropospheric brightness temperature (UTBT and relative humidity (UTRH. The discrepancies between the simulated data and the observations are analyzed. These analyses show that both the NICAM and the NCEP/DOE simulated UTBT and UTRH have comparable distribution patterns. However the simulations’ differences with the observations are generally lower with the NCEP/DOE than with the NICAM. The NCEP/DOE model outputs very often overestimate the UTBT and therefore present a drier upper troposphere. The impact of the lower troposphere instability (dry convection on the upper tropospheric moisture and the consequences on the models’ results are evaluated through a thunderstorm and moisture predictor (the K-stability index. The results obtained show a positive relation between the instability and the root mean square error (RMSE: observation versus models. The study of the impact of convective clouds shows that the area covered by these clouds increases with the

  15. Comparing Global Atmospheric CO2 Flux and Transport Models with Remote Sensing (and Other) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, S. R.; Collatz, G. J.; Pawson, S.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wofsy, S. C.; Andrews, A. E.

    2010-01-01

    We report recent progress derived from comparison of global CO2 flux and transport models with new remote sensing and other sources of CO2 data including those from satellite. The overall objective of this activity is to improve the process models that represent our understanding of the workings of the atmospheric carbon cycle. Model estimates of CO2 surface flux and atmospheric transport processes are required for initial constraints on inverse analyses, to connect atmospheric observations to the location of surface sources and sinks, to provide the basic framework for carbon data assimilation, and ultimately for future projections of carbon-climate interactions. Models can also be used to test consistency within and between CO2 data sets under varying geophysical states. Here we focus on simulated CO2 fluxes from terrestrial vegetation and atmospheric transport mutually constrained by analyzed meteorological fields from the Goddard Modeling and Assimilation Office for the period 2000 through 2009. Use of assimilated meteorological data enables direct model comparison to observations across a wide range of scales of variability. The biospheric fluxes are produced by the CASA model at 1x1 degrees on a monthly mean basis, modulated hourly with analyzed temperature and sunlight. Both physiological and biomass burning fluxes are derived using satellite observations of vegetation, burned area (as in GFED-3), and analyzed meteorology. For the purposes of comparison to CO2 data, fossil fuel and ocean fluxes are also included in the transport simulations. In this presentation we evaluate the model's ability to simulate CO2 flux and mixing ratio variability in comparison to remote sensing observations from TCCON, GOSAT, and AIRS as well as relevant in situ observations. Examples of the influence of key process representations are shown from both forward and inverse model comparisons. We find that the model can resolve much of the synoptic, seasonal, and interannual

  16. The oxygen red OI 630.0 nm line nightglow intensity as an indicator of atmospheric waves propagation in the mid-latitude ionosphere F2 region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javakhishvili, Giorgi; Didebulidze, Goderdzi; Gudadze, Nikoloz; Toriashvili, Lexo

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of the oxygen red OI 630.0 nm line nightglow intensity under influence of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) is considered, taking into account nightly changes of the thermosphere meridional wind by observations from Abastumani (41.75 N; 42.82 E). The vortical type perturbations, which can be in situ excited, are also considered. On the basis of theoretical model, the 630.0 nm line integral intensity variations are estimated taking into account thermosphere wind field changes and atmospheric waves propagation influence on the nighttime ionosphere F2 layer. A possibility of identification of waves propagation from polar and equatorial regions during various helio-geophysical conditions is noted. The cases of detected large scale traveling ionosphere disturbances -TIDs (mostly generated in the polar regions) and traveling atmospheric disturbances -TADs (which can be generated both in polar and equatorial regions) are demonstrated. Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by Shota Rustaveli National Science Foundation Grant no. 31/56.

  17. Retrieval and Observations of Atmospheric BrO from SCIAMACHY nadir Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Afe, Oluyemi Temitayo

    2005-01-01

    Measurements from the space-borne instrument SCIAMACHY launched in March 2002 onboard the ENVISAT platform, have been analysed for BrO absorption using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. BrO is an important atmospheric trace gas mainly responsible for the depletion of ozone in the polar boundary layer, the free troposphere and the stratosphere. Since 1995, global observations of BrO have been successfully demonstrated by the GOME instrument in several publications...

  18. Aerosol Observability and Data Assimilation Investigations in Support of Atmospheric Composition Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    aerosol model demands for such applications as joint surface-atmosphere retrievals, directed energy (DE), and intelligence, surveillance, and...C. Schmidt, J. I Miettinen, L. Giglio, (2012), Different views of fire activity over Indonesia and Malaysia from polar and geostationary...Greece, 25-29 June, 2012. Hyer, E. J., J. S. Reid, E. M. Prins, J. Hoffman, C. C. Schmidt, L. Giglio, D. A. Peterson (2011) Biomass burning observations

  19. Dynamics of the middle atmosphere as observed by the ARISE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, E.

    2015-12-01

    It has been strongly demonstrated that variations in the circulation of the middle atmosphere influence weather and climate all the way to the Earth's surface. A key part of this coupling occurs through the propagation and breaking of planetary and gravity waves. However, limited observations prevent to faithfully reproduce the dynamics of the middle atmosphere in numerical weather prediction and climate models. The main challenge of the ARISE (Atmospheric dynamics InfraStructure in Europe) project is to combine existing national and international observation networks including: the International infrasound monitoring system developed for the CTBT (Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) verification, the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) lidar network, European observation infrastructures at mid latitudes (OHP observatory), tropics (Maïdo observatory), high latitudes (ALOMAR and EISCAT), infrasound stations which form a dense European network and satellites. The ARISE network is unique by its coverage (polar to equatorial regions in the European longitude sector), its altitude range (from troposphere to mesosphere and ionosphere) and the involved scales both in time (from seconds to tens of years) and space (from tens of meters to thousands of kilometers). Advanced data products are produced with the scope to assimilate data in the Weather Prediction models to improve future forecasts over weeks and seasonal time scales. ARISE observations are especially relevant for the monitoring of extreme events such as thunderstorms, volcanoes, meteors and at larger scales, deep convection and stratospheric warming events for physical processes description and study of long term evolution with climate change. Among the applications, ARISE fosters integration of innovative methods for remote detection of non-instrumented volcanoes including distant eruption characterization to provide notifications with reliable confidence indices to the

  20. Observed characteristics of atmospheric ducts over the South China Sea in autumn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yinhe; Zhou, Shengqi; Wang, Dongxiao; Lu, Yuanzheng; Huang, Ke; Yao, Jinglong; You, Xiaobao

    2016-05-01

    The observed characteristics of lower atmospheric ducts over the South China Sea (SCS) were analyzed based on Global Position Systerm (GPS) radiosonde data collected four times daily during autumn open cruises from 2006 to 2012. Duct occurrence, thickness, and strength over the SCS were about 40%, 150-m thick, and 8 M units, respectively, which were larger than during the summer monsoon period. Most ducts occurred at heights military applications.

  1. The state of the atmosphere as inferred from the FGGE satellite observing systems during SOP-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halem, M.; Kalnay, E.; Baker, W. E.; Atlas, R.

    1981-01-01

    Data assimilation experiments were performed to test the influence of different elements of the satellite observing systems. Results from some of the experiments are presented. These findings show that the FGGE satellite systems are able to infer the three-dimensional motion field and improve the representation of the large-scale state of the atmosphere. Preliminary results of the forecast impact of the FGGE data sets are also presented.

  2. Observed variations of methane on Mars unexplained by known atmospheric chemistry and physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Franck; Forget, François

    2009-08-06

    The detection of methane on Mars has revived the possibility of past or extant life on this planet, despite the fact that an abiogenic origin is thought to be equally plausible. An intriguing aspect of the recent observations of methane on Mars is that methane concentrations appear to be locally enhanced and change with the seasons. However, methane has a photochemical lifetime of several centuries, and is therefore expected to have a spatially uniform distribution on the planet. Here we use a global climate model of Mars with coupled chemistry to examine the implications of the recently observed variations of Martian methane for our understanding of the chemistry of methane. We find that photochemistry as currently understood does not produce measurable variations in methane concentrations, even in the case of a current, local and episodic methane release. In contrast, we find that the condensation-sublimation cycle of Mars' carbon dioxide atmosphere can generate large-scale methane variations differing from those observed. In order to reproduce local methane enhancements similar to those recently reported, we show that an atmospheric lifetime of less than 200 days is necessary, even if a local source of methane is only active around the time of the observation itself. This implies an unidentified methane loss process that is 600 times faster than predicted by standard photochemistry. The existence of such a fast loss in the Martian atmosphere is difficult to reconcile with the observed distribution of other trace gas species. In the case of a destruction mechanism only active at the surface of Mars, destruction of methane must occur with an even shorter timescale of the order of approximately 1 hour to explain the observations. If recent observations of spatial and temporal variations of methane are confirmed, this would suggest an extraordinarily harsh environment for the survival of organics on the planet.

  3. Can the envisaged reductions of fossil fuel CO2 emissions be detected by atmospheric observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Ingeborg; Rödenbeck, Christian

    2008-03-01

    The lower troposphere is an excellent receptacle, which integrates anthropogenic greenhouse gases emissions over large areas. Therefore, atmospheric concentration observations over populated regions would provide the ultimate proof if sustained emissions changes have occurred. The most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO(2)), also shows large natural concentration variations, which need to be disentangled from anthropogenic signals to assess changes in associated emissions. This is in principle possible for the fossil fuel CO(2) component (FFCO(2)) by high-precision radiocarbon ((14)C) analyses because FFCO(2) is free of radiocarbon. Long-term observations of (14)CO(2) conducted at two sites in south-western Germany do not yet reveal any significant trends in the regional fossil fuel CO(2) component. We rather observe strong inter-annual variations, which are largely imprinted by changes of atmospheric transport as supported by dedicated transport model simulations of fossil fuel CO(2). In this paper, we show that, depending on the remoteness of the site, changes of about 7-26% in fossil fuel emissions in respective catchment areas could be detected with confidence by high-precision atmospheric (14)CO(2) measurements when comparing 5-year averages if these inter-annual variations were taken into account. This perspective constitutes the urgently needed tool for validation of fossil fuel CO(2) emissions changes in the framework of the Kyoto protocol and successive climate initiatives.

  4. Molecular Hydrogen Emission Lines in Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Observations of Mira B

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, B E; Wood, Brian E.; Karovska, Margarita

    2004-01-01

    We present new Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of Mira A's wind-accreting companion star, Mira B. We find that the strongest lines in the FUSE spectrum are H2 lines fluoresced by H I Lyman-alpha. A previously analyzed Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectrum also shows numerous Lyman-alpha fluoresced H2 lines. The HST lines are all Lyman band lines, while the FUSE H2 lines are mostly Werner band lines, many of them never before identified in an astrophysical spectrum. We combine the FUSE and HST data to refine estimates of the physical properties of the emitting H2 gas. We find that the emission can be reproduced by an H2 layer with a temperature and column density of T=3900 K and log N(H2)=17.1, respectively. Another similarity between the HST and FUSE data, besides the prevalence of H2 emission, is the surprising weakness of the continuum and high temperature emission lines, suggesting that accretion onto Mira B has weakened dramatically. The UV fluxes observed by HST on 1999 August ...

  5. Radiocarbon observations in atmospheric CO2: determining fossil fuel CO2 over Europe using Jungfraujoch observations as background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Ingeborg; Hammer, Samuel; Kromer, Bernd; Meinhardt, Frank

    2008-03-01

    Monthly mean 14CO2 observations at two regional stations in Germany (Schauinsland observatory, Black Forest, and Heidelberg, upper Rhine valley) are compared with free tropospheric background measurements at the High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps) to estimate the regional fossil fuel CO2 surplus at the regional stations. The long-term mean fossil fuel CO2 surplus at Schauinsland is 1.31+/-0.09 ppm while it is 10.96+/-0.20 ppm in Heidelberg. No significant trend is observed at both sites over the last 20 years. Strong seasonal variations of the fossil fuel CO2 offsets indicate a strong seasonality of emissions but also of atmospheric dilution of ground level emissions by vertical mixing.

  6. Atmospheric boundary layer characteristics based on the observations at the Climate Change Tower in Ny Alesund( Svalbard).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Mario; Mazzola, Mauro; Lupi, Angelo; Drofa, Oxana; Tampieri, Francesco; Pelliccioni, Armando; Choi, Taejin; Vitale, Vito; Viola, Angelo P.

    2017-04-01

    At high latitudes, the Atmospheric Boundary Layer ( ABL) is often characterized by extremely stable vertical stratification since the surface radiative cooling determines inversions in temperature profiles especially during the polar night over land, ice and snow surfaces. Improvements are required in the theoretical understanding of the turbulent behavior of the high-latitude ABL. The parameterizations of surface-atmosphere exchanges employed in numerical weather prediction and climate models have also to be tested in the Arctic area. Moreover, the boundary layer structure and dynamics influence the vertical distribution of aerosol. The main issue is related to the height of PBL: the question is whether some decoupling occurs between the surface layer and the atmosphere aloft when the PBL is shallow or the mechanical mixing due to the synoptic circulation provides an overall vertical homogeneity of the concentration of the aerosol irrespective of the stability conditions. In this aim, the work investigates the features of the high-latitude ABL with particular attention to its vertical structure, the relationships among the main turbulent statistics (in a similarity approach) and their variation with the ABL state. The used data refer to measurements collected since 2012 to 2016 by slow and fast response sensors deployed at the 34 m high Amundsen-Nobile Climate Change Tower (CCT) installed at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard. Data from four conventional Young anemometers and Väisäla thermo-hygrometers at 2, 4.8, 10.3 and 33.4 m a.g.l., alternated by three lined up sonic anemometers at 3.7, 7.5 and 21 m a.g.l., are used in the analysis. The presented results highlight that the performance of the commonly adopted ABL similarity schemes (e.g. flux-gradient relationships and parameterizations for the stable ABL height) depends upon the ABL state, determined mainly by the wind speed and the shape of the profiles of second order moments (the two being related) . For neutral or

  7. Modeling Exoplanetary Atmospheres using BART, TEA, and Drift-RHD; Theoretical studies and Observational Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    The explosion in the number of exoplanets detected to date has revealed a surprising diversity. When attempting to model this diversity, it is crucial to account for the uncertainties resulting from our limited knowledge of chemical, dynamical, and cloud formation processes in their atmospheres. Combining a retrieval technique with theorydriven models is a particularly promising way to address these processes and constrain a physically plausible atmospheric structure. In particular, a detailed micro-physical treatment of clouds and the longitudinal and latitudinal assessments of temperature and chemical profiles, have yet to be addressed in the field. Our team members are experts in radiative-hydrodynamic modeling (Dr. Ian DobbsDixon), cloud kinetics (Dr. Christiana Helling), retrievals and thermo-equilibrium chemistry (Dr. Jasmina Blecic), and observational diagnostics and predictions (Dr. Thomas Greene). The key goals of this proposal are to extend our understanding of the 3D atmospheric structure of gas-giant exoplanets by coupling state-of-the-art selfconsistent models together with a retrieval framework to 1) address cloud kinetics in retrievals, 2) assess 3D temperature and chemical structures in retrievals, 3) model a suite of well-observed planets within the framework of our models, and 4) make observational predictions for current and future NASA missions. To address these goals we have developed a number of tools: Drift-RHD, TEA, BART, and OBS. Drift-RHD solves both the 3D radiative-hydrodynamic equations and a time dependent kinetic cloud model. TEA, Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances, calculates abundances of chemical species present in the atmosphere. BART, a Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer code, is a statistical retrieval framework to explore the parameter space of atmospheric chemical abundances and thermal profiles. OBS is a suite of tools developed to simulate observations. Though these tools exist and have been utilized independently in

  8. Atmospheric influence on a laser beam observed on the OICETS – ARTEMIS communication demonstration link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Löscher

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In 2006 bi-directional optical inter-satellite communication experiments were conducted between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA Optical Inter-orbit Communications Engineering Test Satellite (OICETS and the European Space Agency (ESA multi-purpose telecommunications and technology demonstration satellite (Advanced Relay and Technology MISsion ARTEMIS. On 5 April 2006, an experiment was successfully carried out by maintaining the inter-satellite link during OICETS's setting behind the Earth limb until the signal was lost. This setup resembles an occultation observation where the influence of Earth's atmosphere is evident in the power fluctuations recorded at ARTEMIS's (and OICETS's receiver. These fluctuations do not exist or are at a low level at a link path above the atmosphere and steadily increase as OICETS sets behind the horizon until the tracking of the signal is lost. This specific experiment was performed only once since atmospheric science was not the goal of this demonstration. Nevertheless, this kind of data, if available more frequently in future, can help to study atmospheric turbulence and validate models. The data present here were recorded at ARTEMIS.

  9. Atmospheric influence on a laser beam observed on the OICETS – ARTEMIS communication demonstration link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Löscher

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2006 bi-directional optical inter-satellite communication experiments have been conducted between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA Optical Inter-orbit Communications Engineering Test Satellite (OICETS and the European Space Agency (ESA multi purpose telecommunications and technology demonstration satellite (Advanced Relay and Technology MISsion ARTEMIS. On 5 April 2006 an experiment was successfully carried out maintaining the inter-satellite link during OICETS's setting behind the Earth limb until the signal was lost. This setup resembles an occultation observation where the influence of Earth's atmosphere is evident in the power fluctuations recorded at ARTEMIS's (and OICETS's receiver. These fluctuations are not existing or at a low level at a link path above the atmosphere and steadily increase as OICETS sets behind the horizon until the tracking of the signal is lost. This specific experiment was performed only once since atmospheric science was not the goal of this demonstration. Nevertheless this kind of data, if available more frequently in future, can help to study atmospheric turbulence and validate respective models. The data presented here had been recorded at ARTEMIS.

  10. Cytological Observation of Microsporogenesis in Male-Sterile Lines of Chinese Pink (Dianthus chinensis L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xiao-peng; HU Jin-yi; HU Hui-rong; BAO Man-zhu

    2008-01-01

    This study addressed the differences in microsporogenesis between male sterile and fertile lines of Chinese pink. The microsporogenesis processes of male sterile and fertile lines were histologically examined in squashed pollen grains and in paraffin embedded sections. A stable male-sterile line (H-37B) was obtained following six generations of inbreeding in a self-fertile line, followed by two generations of backcrossing. In the corresponding fertile line, development of the mature pollen grains was followed through the initiation of the sporogenous cell, microsporocyte formation, and the tetrad developmental period. In the male-sterile line, abortion of the developing pollen grains was observed to take place at various stages, namely, sporogenous cell growth, mother cell meiosis, and tetrad transformation to the uninuclear state. The pollen grains of the fertile line were spheroid, turgid, and viable. By contrast, the male-sterile line produced pollen that was irregular in shape, empty, and nonviable. The abortion of the microspore in the male-sterile line appeared to relate to abnormal growth of the tapetum layer.

  11. An on-line modelling study of the direct effect of atmospheric aerosols over Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, L.; Baro, R.; Jimenez-Guerrero, P.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect human health, ecosystems, materials, visibility and Earths climate. Those effects are studied in this present work and depend mainly on the aerosol optical properties and how they influence the Earths radiation budget. Such properties can be divided on direct and semi-direct effect, produced by the scattering and absorption of radiation; and indirect effect, which influences the aerosols-cloud interactions. The aim of this work is to assess the direct effect through the study of the mean temperature; the radiation that reaches the Earths surface and at the top of the atmosphere; and the interaction of these meteorological variables with particulate matter (PM10). Results indicate decreases in temperature and radiation that reaches the Earth's surface, together with increases in the outgoing radiation at top of the atmosphere, and changes in the particulate matter, thus proving a colder climate due to the direct effect of atmospheric aerosols. (Author)

  12. An on-line modelling study of the direct effect of atmospheric aerosols over Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, L.; Baro, R.; Jimenez-Guerrero, P.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect human health, ecosystems, materials, visibility and Earth’s climate. Those effects are studied in this present work and depend mainly on the aerosol optical properties and how they influence the Earth’s radiation budget. Such properties can be divided on direct and semi-direct effect, produced by the scattering and absorption of radiation; and indirect effect, which influences the aerosols-cloud interactions. The aim of this work is to assess the direct effect through the study of the mean temperature; the radiation that reaches the Earth’s surface and at the top of the atmosphere; and the interaction of these meteorological variables with particulate matter (PM10). Results indicate decreases in temperature and radiation that reaches the Earth's surface, together with increases in the outgoing radiation at top of the atmosphere, and changes in the particulate matter, thus proving a colder climate due to the direct effect of atmospheric aerosols. (Author)

  13. Satellite observations of atmosphere-ionosphere vertical coupling by gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Thai; Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Riese, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The Earth's thermosphere/ionosphere (T/I) is strongly influenced by various processes from above as well as from below. One of the most important processes from below is vertical coupling by atmospheric waves. Among these waves, gravity waves (GWs) excited in the lower atmosphere, mainly in the troposphere and tropopause region, are likely essential for the mean state of the T/I system. The penetration of GWs into the T/I system is however not well understood in modeling as well as observations. In this work, we analyze the correlation between different GW parameters at lower altitudes (below 90 km) and GW induced perturbations in the T/I. At lower altitudes, GW parameters are derived from temperature observations of the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER). In the T/I, GW induced perturbations of neutral density measured by Gravity field and Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) and CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) are analyzed. Interestingly, we find positive correlations between the spatial distributions at low altitudes (i.e. below 90km) and the spatial distributions of GW-induced density fluctuations in the T/I (at 200km and above), which suggests that many waves seen in the T/I have their origins in the troposphere or lower stratosphere. It is also indicated that mountain waves generated near the Andes and Antarctic Peninsula propagate up to the T/I. Strong positive correlations between GW perturbations in the T/I and GW parameters at 30 km are mainly found at mid latitudes, which may be an indicator of propagation of convectively generated GWs. Increase of correlation starting from 70 km in many cases shows that filtering of the GW distribution by the background atmosphere is very important. Processes that are likely involved are GW dissipation, generation of secondary GWs, as well as horizontal propagation of GWs. Limitations of our method and of the observations are also discussed.

  14. Escape of Pluto's Atmosphere: In Situ Measurements from New Horizons and Remote Observations from Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Hill, M. E.; Kollmann, P.; Krimigis, S. M.; Brown, L. E.; Kusterer, M. B.; Lisse, C. M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Vandegriff, J. D.; McComas, D. J.; Bagenal, F.; Elliott, H. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Horanyi, M.; Olkin, C.; Piquette, M. R.; Stern, A.; Strobel, D. F.; Szalay, J.; Valek, P. W.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Weidner, S.; Young, L. A.; Zirnstein, E.; Wolk, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The escape rate of Pluto's atmosphere is of significant scientific interest. It is a Group 1 science goal of the New Horizons mission. In addition, a Group 3 science goal of the mission has been to characterize the energetic particle environment of the Pluto system. The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) is a compact, energy by time-of-flight (TOF) instrument developed to address both of these science goals. Pluto is known to have an atmosphere, and current models postulate a majority N2 composition with free escape of up to ~1028 molecules/sec. This is very similar to the physical situation of a variety comets observed in the inner heliosphere. However, the gravitational field of Pluto exerts a significant effect on the escaping neutrals, unlike at a comet. The ionization of neutrals emitted from comets results in heavy ions, which are accelerated by the convective solar-wind electric field. The expected major ionization product near Pluto is singly ionized N2 molecules with pickup energies sufficient to be measured with PEPSSI. In the process of measuring the local energetic particle environment, such measurements will also provide constraints on the local density of Pluto's extended atmosphere, which, along with plasma measurements from the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument also on New Horizons should allow the inference of the strengh and extent of mass-loading of the solar wind due to Pluto's atmosphere. Pluto's neutral atmosphere also provides a source population for charge exchange of highly ionized, minor ions in the solar wind, such as O, C, and N. This process allows these ions to capture one electron and be left in an excited state. That state, in turn decays with the emission of a low-energy (100 eV to 1 keV) X-ray, which can be detected at Earth. Such observations have been made of comets since the X-ray emission discovery in 1996 and used to infer cometary outgassing rates. Similar observatins have been made

  15. Relativistic Fe Kα line study in Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, G.; Nandra, K.; Ponti, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present an analysis of a sample of Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with Suzaku. The aim of this work is to examine critically the evidence for a relativistic Fe Kα line in the X-ray spectra of these active galactic nuclei. The sample was compiled from those sources in which a relativistic component was missing in at least one XMM-Newton observation. We analysed the Suzaku spectra of these objects in order to have more constraints on the high-energy emission, including the Compton reflection hump. The results show that the relativistic Fe Kα line is detected (at >95 per cent confidence) in all sources observed with high-signal-to-noise ratio (e.g. where the counts in the 5-7 keV energy band are ≳4 × 104). This is in agreement with the idea that relativistic lines are a ubiquitous feature in the spectra of Seyfert galaxies, but are often difficult to detect without very high-quality data. We also investigate the relation between the Fe Kα line and the reflection continuum at high energies. For most of the sample, the strength of the reflection component is consistent with that of the line. There are exceptions in both senses, however i.e. where the reflection continuum is strong but with weak line emission, and vice versa. These observations present a challenge for standard reflection models.

  16. Atmospheric waves and dynamics beneath Jupiter's clouds from radio wavelength observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Richard G.; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberías, Raúl; Simon, Amy; de Pater, Imke

    2017-08-01

    We observed Jupiter at wavelengths near 2 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in February 2015. These frequencies are mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia abundance and probe between ∼ 0.5 - 2.0 bars of pressure in Jupiter's atmosphere; within and below the visible cloud deck which has its base near 0.7 bars. The resultant observed data were projected into a cylindrical map of the planet with spatial resolution of ∼1500 km at the equator. We have examined the data for atmospheric waves and observed a prominent bright belt of radio hotspot features near 10°N, likely connected to the same equatorial wave associated with the 5-μm hotspots. We conducted a passive tracer power spectral wave analysis for the entire map and latitude regions corresponding to eastward and westward jets and compare our results to previous studies. The power spectra analysis revealed that the atmosphere sampled in our observation (excluding the NEB region) is in a 2-D turbulent regime and its dynamics are predominately governed by the shallow water equations. The Great Red Spot (GRS) is also very prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry and we compare it, and nearby storms, with optical images. We find that the meridional radio profile has a global north-south hemisphere distinction and find correlations of it to optical intensity banding and to shear zones of the zonal wind profile over select regions of latitude. Amateur optical images taken before and after our observation complemented the radio wavelength map to investigate dynamics of the equatorial region in Jupiter's atmosphere. We find that two radio hotspots at 2 cm are well correlated with optical plumes in the NEB, additionally revealing they are not the same 5 μm hotspot features correlated with optical dark patches between adjacent plumes. This analysis exploits the VLA's upgraded sensitivity and explores the opportunities now possible when studying gas giants, especially atmospheric dynamics

  17. Verification of Atmospheric Signals Associated with Major Seismicity by Space and Terrestrial Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounov, D.; Pulinets, S.; Taylor, P.; Bryant, N.; Cervone, G.; Kafatos, M.; Habib, S.

    2008-12-01

    Observations from the last twenty years suggest the existence of electromagnetic (EM) phenomena during or preceding some earthquakes [Hayakawa et al, 2004; Pulinets at al, 1999,2004, 2006, Ouzounov et al, 2007 and Liu et al, 2004]. Both our previous studies [Pulinets at al, 2005, 2006, Ouzounov et al, 2006, 2007] and the latest review by the Earthquake Remote Precursor Sensing panel [ERPS; 2003-2005]; have shown that there were precursory atmospheric TIR signals observed on the ground and in space associated with several recent earthquakes. [Tramutoli et al, 2005, 2006, Cervone et al, 2006, Ouzounov et al, 2004,2006]. To study these signals, we applied both multi parameter statistical analysis and data mining methods that require systematic measurements from an Integrated Sensor Web of observations of several physical and environmental parameters. These include long wave earth infra-red radiation, ionospheric electrical and magnetic parameters, temperature and humidity of the boundary layer, seismicity and may be associated with major earthquakes. Our goal is to verify the earthquake atmospheric correlation in two cases: (i) backward analysis - 2000-2008 hindcast monitoring of multi atmospheric parameters over the Kamchatka region, Russia ; and (ii) forward real-time alert analysis over different seismo-tectonic regions for California, Turkey, Taiwan and Japan. Our latest results, from several post-earthquake independent analyses of more then 100 major earthquakes, show that joint satellite and some ground measurements, using an integrated web, could provide a capability for observing pre-earthquake atmospheric signals by combining the information from multiple sensors into a common framework. Using our methodology, we evaluated and compared the observed signals preceding the latest M7.9 Sichuan earthquake (05/12/2008), M8.0 earthquake in Peru (08/15/2007), M7.6 Kashmir earthquake (10/08/2005) and M9.0 Sumatra earthquake (12/26/2004). We found evidence of the

  18. Ground-based Observational Characterization of Transiting Hot-Jupiter Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.

    2016-09-01

    Transiting exoplanets are currently among the most favorable targets for atmospheric studies of exoplanets. Such special orbital geometry enables transits and secondary eclipses to be observable, which refer to the events when planets move in front of or behind host stars. Corresponding observations would result in transmission spectroscopy or emission spectroscopy, which are extremely powerful in the investigation of atmospheric compositions and temperature structures. Based on these two techniques, this thesis presents photometric observations on the secondary eclipses of three hot Jupiters using GROND (Gamma-Ray Burst Optical and Near-infrared Detector) mounted on the MPG 2.2 m telescope, and spectroscopic observations on the transits of another two hot Jupiters using DBSP (Double Spectrograph), TSpec (Triple Spectrograph), and COSMIC (Carnegie Observatories Spectroscopic Multislit and Imaging Camera) mounted on the Palomar 5.1 Hale telescope. The primary goal is to search for any detectable signals of atmospheric origin, and to study potential atmospheric diversity among hot Jupiters with various physical properties. The photometric observations on the secondary eclipses of WASP-5 b, WASP-46 b, and WASP-43 b are detailed in Chapter 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The dips of secondary eclipse have been significantly detected for all three hot Jupiters in the K band, along with some possible detection or 3σ upper limit in the J or H band. These near-infrared eclipse detection measures the thermal emission from the deep dayside atmosphere. It is the first time to detect any thermal emission in the near infrared for WASP-5 b and WASP-46 b. Our GROND measurements indicate a roughly isothermal temperature profile of around 2700 K in the deep layers of WASP-5 b's dayside atmosphere. Together with Spitzer observations, which probe higher layers with a temperature of around 1900 K, a temperature inversion is ruled out in the probed pressure range. While an oxygen

  19. He I lines in B stars - Comparison of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium models with observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heasley, J. N.; Timothy, J. G.; Wolff, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    Profiles of He gamma-gamma 4026, 4387, 4471, 4713, 5876, and 6678 have been obtained in 17 stars of spectral type B0-B5. Parameters of the nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium models appropriate to each star are determined from the Stromgren index and fits to H-alpha line profiles. These parameters yield generally good fits to the observed He I line profiles, with the best fits being found for the blue He I lines where departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium are relatively small. For the two red lines it is found that, in the early B stars and in stars with log g less than 3.5, both lines are systematically stronger than predicted by the nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium models.

  20. A tentative detection of the 183-GHz water vapor line in the martian atmosphere: Constraints upon the H2O abundance and vertical distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, TH.; Lellouch, E.; Cernicharo, J.; Paubert, G.; Gulkis, S.

    1995-01-01

    The 183-GHz water vapor line was tentatively detected on Mars in January 1991, with the IRAM 30-m millimeter antenna, under extremely dry atmospheric conditions. The measurement refers to the whole disk. The spectral line, although marginally detected, can be fit with a constant H2O mixing ratio of 1.0 x 10(exp -5), which corresponds to a water abundance of 1 pr-microns; in any case, an upper limit of 3 pr-microns is inferred. This value is comparable to the very small abundances measured by Clancy (1992) 5 weeks before our observation and seems to imply both seasonal and long-term variations in the martian water cycle.

  1. Remote Sensing of lower thermospheric temperature and composition based on observations of O2 Atmospheric band emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, A. B.; Yee, J.; Budzien, S. A.; Bishop, R. L.; Hecht, J. H.; Stephan, A. W.; Crowley, G.

    2011-12-01

    The properties of the O2 Atmospheric bands emitted in the lower thermosphere are examined through the use of a photochemical model and compared with measurements from the RAIDS near-infrared spectrometer on the International Space Station. An updated model (Yee, 2011) has been used to establish the sensitivity of the line-of-sight (LOS) brightness of the (0,0), (1,1) and (0,1) bands to changes in neutral composition and some reaction rate and branching ratios. We found that the most sensitive region to O2 variability is near 120 km where the brightness is ~ [O2]^2. Calculations based on the MSIS-90E neutral atmospheric model corresponding to the geographical locations of the brightness measurements at 120 and 125 km for several days of observations indicate greater variability in the model results than observed by RAIDS based on our current understanding of the pointing errors. Up to about 200 km the (0,0) band lifetime is sufficiently long to allow thermalization of the upper state through collisions with the background gasses making the rotational distribution representative of the local temperature. The analysis of rocket data by Heller et al. (1991) and more recently Sheese et al. (2010) using OSIRIS observations up to an altitude of ~ 110 km illustrates the approach. Using the same measurement concept, the RAIDS data extend the range of altitudes an additional two scale heights to approximately 130 km. Comparing RAIDS and TIMED/SABER LOS measurements we have been able to validate temperatures in the region around 100 km. During moderate geomagnetic activity (Kp ~ 4) localized but greatly enhanced temperatures have been observed. J. W. Heller, A. B. Christensen, J. H. Yee and W. E. Sharp, Mesospheric temperature inferred from daytime observation of the O2 atmospheric (0,0) band system, J. Geophys. Res., 96,19,499-19,505,1991. P. E. Sheese, E. J. Llewellyn, R. L. Gattinger, A. E. Bourassa, D. A. Degenstein, N. D. Lloyd, and I. C. McDade, Temperatures in the

  2. [Research on On-Line Calibration Based Photoacoustic Spectrometry System for Monitoring the Concentration of CO2 in Atmosphere].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-feng; Pan, Sun-qiang; Lin, Xiao-lu; Hu, Peng-bing; Chen, Zhe-min

    2016-01-01

    Resonate frequency and cell constant of photoacoustic spectrum system are usually calibrated by using standard gas in laboratory, whereas the resonate frequency and cell constant will be changed in-situ, leading to measurement accuracy errors, caused by uncertainties of standard gas, differences between standard and measured gas components and changes in environmental condition, such as temperature and humidity. As to overcome the above problems, we have proposed an on-line atmospheric oxygen-based calibration technology for photoacoustic spectrum system and used in measurement of concentration of carbon dioxide in atmosphere. As the concentration of atmospheric oxygen is kept as constant as 20.96%, the on-line calibration for the photoacoustic spectrum system can be realized by detecting the swept-frequency and peak signal at 763.73 nm. The cell of the PAS has a cavity with length of 100 mm and an inner diameter of 6 mm, and worked in a first longitudinal resonant mode. The influence of environmental temperature and humidity, gas components on the photoacoustic cell's performance has been theoretically analyzed, and meanwhile the resonant frequencies and cell constants were calibrated and acquired respectively using standard gas, indoor air and outdoor air. Compared with calibrated gas analyzer, concentration of carbon dioxide is more accurate by using the resonant frequency and cell constant calculated by oxygen in tested air, of which the relative error is less than 1%, much smaller than that calculated by the standard gas in laboratory. The innovation of this paper is that using atmospheric oxygen as photoacoustic spectrum system's calibration gas effectively reduces the error caused by using standard gas and environmental condition changes, and thus improves the on-line measuring accuracy and reliability of the photoacoustic spectrum system.

  3. Observations of the forward scattering Hanle effect in the Ca i 4227 {\\AA} line

    CERN Document Server

    Bianda, M; Anusha, L S; Stenflo, J O; Nagendra, K N; Holzreuter, R; Sampoorna, M; Frisch, H; Smitha, H N

    2011-01-01

    Chromospheric magnetic fields are notoriously diffcult to measure. The chromospheric lines are broad, while the fields are producing a minuscule Zeeman-effect polarization. A promising diagnostic alternative is provided by the forward-scattering Hanle effect, which can be recorded in chromospheric lines such as the He i 10830 {\\AA} and the Ca i 4227 {\\AA} lines. We present a set of spectropolarimetric observations of the full Stokes vector obtained near the center of the solar disk in the Ca i 4227 {\\AA} line with the ZIMPOL polarimeter at the IRSOL observatory.We detect a number of interesting forward-scattering Hanle effect signatures, which we model successfully using polarized radiative transfer. Here we focus on the observational aspects, while a separate companion paper deals with the theoretical modeling.

  4. Observations of atmospheric Hg species and depositions in remote areas of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng X.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available From September 2007, we conducted continuous measurements of speciated atmospheric mercury (Hg and atmospheric mercury depositions at five remote sites in China. Four of these sites were involved in the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS as ground-based stations. These stations were located in the northwest, southwest, northeast, and east part of China, respectively, which represent the regional atmospheric Hg budgets in different areas of China. The preliminary results showed that mean TGM concentrations were in the range of 1.60 – 2.88 ng m-3, with relatively higher levels observed at sites in Eastern China and Southwestern China and lower levels at sites in Northeastern and Northwestern China. TGM concentrations at remote sites of China were also higher than those reported from background sites in North America and Europe, and this is corresponding very well with the Chinese great anthropogenic Hg emissions. Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM and particulate bounded mercury (PBM were in the ranges of 3.2 – 7.4 pg m−3 and 19.4 – 43.5 pg m-3, respectively. The preliminary result on precipitation showed mean precipitation THg concentrations were in the range of 2.7 – 18.0 ng L-1.

  5. VLTI/AMBER observations of cold giant stars: atmospheric structures and fundamental parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Arroyo-Torres, B; Marcaide, J M; Wittkowski, M; Guirado, J C; Hauschildt, P H; Quirrenbach, A; Fabregat, J

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this research is to determine the angular size and the atmospheric structures of cool giant stars and to compare them with hydrostatic stellar model atmospheres, to estimate the fundamental parameters, and to obtain a better understanding of the circumstellar environment. We conducted spectro-interferometric observations of epsilon Oct, beta Peg, NU Pav, and psi Peg in the near-infrared K band (2.13-2.47 microm), and gamma Hya (1.9-2.47 microm) with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution. To obtain the fundamental parameters, we compared our data with hydrostatic atmosphere models (PHOENIX). We estimated the Rosseland angular diameters of epsilon Oct, beta Peg, NU Pav, psi Peg, and gamma Hya. Together with distances and bolometric fluxes, we estimated radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities of our targets. In the beta Peg visibility, we observed a molecular layer of CO with a size similar to that modeled with PHOENIX. However, there is an additional slope in absorptio...

  6. SUMO: A small unmanned meteorological observer for atmospheric boundary layer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuder, J; Jonassen, M; Mayer, S [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Allegaten 70, 5009 Bergen (Norway); Brisset, P [Ecole Nationale de l' Aviation Civile (ENAC), 7 avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse (France); Mueller, M [Orleansstrasse 26a, 31135 Hildesheim (Germany)], E-mail: joachim.reuder@gfi.uib.no, E-mail: pascal.brisset@enac.fr, E-mail: marius.jonassen@gfi.uib.no, E-mail: martin@pfump.org, E-mail: stephanie.mayer@gfi.uib.no

    2008-05-01

    A new system for atmospheric measurements in the lower troposphere has been developed and successfully tested. The presented Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (SUMO) is based on a light-weighted commercially available model airplane, equipped with an autopilot and meteorological sensors for temperature, humidity and pressure. During the 5 week field campaign FLOHOF (Flow over and around HofsjoUkull) in Central Iceland the system has been successfully tested in July/August 2007. Atmospheric profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction have been determined up to 3500 m above ground. In addition the applicability of SUMO for horizontal surveys up to 4 km away from the launch site has been approved. During a 3 week campaign on and around Spitsbergen in February/March 2008 the SUMO system also proved its functionality under harsh polar conditions, reaching altitudes above 1500 m at ground temperatures of -20 deg. C and wind speeds up to 15 m s{sup -1}. With its wingspan of 80 cm, its length of 75 cm and its weight of below 600 g, SUMO is easy to transport and operate even in remote areas. The direct material costs for one SUMO unit, including airplane, autopilot and sensors are below 1200 Euro. Assuming at least several tenths of flights for each airframe, SUMO provides a cost-efficient measurement system with a large potential to close the existing observational gap of reasonable atmospheric measurement systems in between meteorological masts/towers and radiosondes.

  7. Assessing Greenhouse Gas emissions in the Greater Toronto Area using atmospheric observations (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, F. R.; Chan, E.; Huang, L.; Levin, I.; Worthy, D.

    2013-12-01

    Urban areas are said to be responsible for approximately 75% of anthropogenic Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) emissions while comprising only two percent of the land area [1]. This limited spatial expansion should facilitate a monitoring of anthropogenic GHGs from atmospheric observations. As major sources of emissions, cities also have a huge potential to drive emissions reductions. To effectively manage emissions, cities must however, first measure and report these publicly [2]. Modelling studies and measurements of CO2 from fossil fuel burning (FFCO2) in densely populated areas does, however, pose several challenges: Besides continuous in-situ observations, i.e. finding an adequate atmospheric transport model, a sufficiently fine-grained FFCO2 emission model and the proper background reference observations to distinguish the large-scale from the local/urban contributions to the observed FFCO2 concentration offsets ( ΔFFCO2) are required. Pilot studies which include the data from two 'sister sites*' in the vicinity of Toronto, Canada helped to derive flux estimates for Non-CO2 GHGs [3] and improve our understanding of urban FFCO2 emissions. Our 13CO2 observations reveal that the contribution of natural gas burning (mostly due to domestic heating) account for 80%×7% of FFCO2 emissions in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) during winter. Our 14CO2 observations in the GTA, furthermore, show that the local offset of CO2 (ΔCO2) between our two sister sites can be largely attributed to urban FFCO2 emissions. The seasonal cycle of the observed ΔFFCO2 in Toronto, combined with high-resolution atmospheric modeling, helps to independently assess the contribution from different emission sectors (transportation, primary energy and industry, domestic heating) as predicted by a dedicated city-scale emission inventory, which deviates from a UNFCCC-based inventory. [1] D. Dodman. 2009. Blaming cities for climate change? An analysis of urban greenhouse gas emissions inventories

  8. Tracking atmospheric boundary layer dynamics with water vapor D-excess observations

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotope water vapor observations present a history of hydrological processes that have impacted on an air mass. Consequently, there is scope to improve our knowledge of how different processes impact on humidity budgets by determining the isotopic end members of these processes and combining them with in-situ water vapor measurements. These in-situ datasets are still rare and cover a limited geographical expanse, so expanding the available data can improve our ability to define isotopic end members and knowledge about atmospheric humidity dynamics. Using data collected from an intensive field campaign across a semi-arid grassland site in eastern Australia, we combine multiple methods including in-situ stable isotope observations to study humidity dynamics associated with the growth and decay of the atmospheric boundary layer and the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The deuterium-excess (D-excess) in water vapor is traditionally thought to reflect the sea surface temperature and relative humidity at the point of evaporation over the oceans. However, a number of recent studies suggest that land-atmosphere interactions are also important in setting the D-excess of water vapor. These studies have shown a highly robust diurnal cycle for the D-excess over a range of sites that could be exploited to better understand variations in atmospheric humidity associated with boundary layer dynamics. In this study we use surface radon concentrations as a tracer of surface layer dynamics and combine these with the D-excess observations. The radon concentrations showed an overall trend that was inversely proportional to the D-excess, with early morning entrainment of air from the residual layer of the previous day both diluting the radon concentration and increasing the D-excess, followed by accumulation of radon at the surface and a decrease in the D-excess as the stable nocturnal layer developed in the late afternoon and early evening. The stable nocturnal boundary layer

  9. A China-Japan Cooperative JICA Atmospheric Observing Network over the Tibetan Plateau (JICA/Tibet Project): An Overviews

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ZHANG, Renhe; KOIKE, Toshio; XU, Xiangde; MA, Yaoming; YANG, Kun

    2012-01-01

    ... constructed an integrated atmospheric observing system, especially for the water vapor observation, across the Tibetan Plateau and its adjacent areas during the period of 2005-2009 under the JICA...

  10. Herschel-PACS observation of gas lines from the disc around HD141569A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thi, Wing-Fai; Pinte, Christophe; Pantin, Eric; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Ménard, Francois; Martin-Zaidi, Claire; Woitke, Peter; Riviere-Marichalar, Pablo; Kamp, Inga; Carmona, Andres; Sandell, Goran; Eiroa, Carlos; Dent, William; Montesinos, Benjamin; Aresu, Giambattista; Meijerink, Rowin; Spaans, Marco; White, Glenn; Ardila, David; Lebreton, Jeremy; Mendigutia, Ignacio; Brittain, Sean

    2013-01-01

    At the distance of ˜ 99-116 pc, HD141569A is one of the nearest HerbigAe stars that is surrounded by a tenuous disc, probably in transition between a massive primordial disc and a debris disc. We observed the fine-structure lines of O I at 63 and 145 μm , and the C II line at 157 μm with the PACS in

  11. Observations Of The Egret Blazar W Comae With The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Scalzo, R A

    2004-01-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a wavefront-sampling atmospheric Cherenkov telescope which uses an array of solar heliostat mirrors as its primary optic. STACEE is designed to detect air showers from astrophysical gamma rays with energies between 50 and 250 GeV. Recent observations of the BL Lac object W Comae (ON+231), made in the spring of 2003 using STACEE, detect no significant gamma ray emission. The implications of this null result for the composition of the relativistic jet in W Comae is discussed, examining both leptonic and hadronic jet models from the literature. The 95% confidence level upper limit on the flux ranges from 1.5–3.5 × 10−10 cm−2 s−1 above 100 GeV for the leptonic models, and from 0.5–1.1 × 10−10 cm−2 s−1 above 150 GeV for the hadronic models.

  12. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Kürten, Andreas; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even tho...

  13. Results of instrumental observations of tidal wave propagation in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adushkin, V. V.; Spivak, A. A.; Kharlamov, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the results of processing and analysis of acoustic waves in the surface layer of the atmosphere, registered at the Mikhnevo Geophysical Observatory, Institute of Geosphere Dynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IGD RAS). Using the autoregression model of digital series, the spectrum of acoustic oscillations was evaluated and the tidal waves in the envelopes of acoustic oscillations were distinguished. The tidal components with similar periods were separated using the method of extraction of harmonic components by using adaptive notch filters. The observed features of the spectrum of acoustic oscillations open up new opportunities for instrumental control over meteorological conditions and the establishment of general regularities controlling the regimes of energy-exchange processes in the Earth's atmosphere.

  14. Metrological challenges for measurements of key climatological observables, Part 4: Atmospheric relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell-Smith, J W; Feistel, R; Harvey, A H; Hellmuth, O; Bell, S A; Heinonen, M; Cooper, J R

    Water in its three ambient phases plays the central thermodynamic role in the terrestrial climate system. Clouds control Earth's radiation balance, atmospheric water vapour is the strongest "greenhouse" gas, and non-equilibrium relative humidity at the air-sea interface drives evaporation and latent heat export from the ocean. In this paper, we examine the climatologically relevant atmospheric relative humidity, noting fundamental deficiencies in the definition of this key observable. The metrological history of this quantity is reviewed, problems with its current definition and measurement practice are analysed, and options for future improvements are discussed in conjunction with the recent seawater standard TEOS-10. It is concluded that the International Bureau of Weights and Measures, (BIPM), in cooperation with the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam, IAPWS, along with other international organisations and institutions, can make significant contributions by developing and recommending state-of-the-art solutions for this long standing metrological problem, such as are suggested here.

  15. Observed atmospheric total column ozone distribution from SCIAMACHY over Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chooi, T. K.; San, L. H.; Jafri, M. Z. M.

    2014-02-01

    The increase in atmospheric ozone has received great attention because it degrades air quality and brings hazard to human health and ecosystems. The aim of this study was to assess the seasonal variations of ozone concentrations in Peninsular Malaysia from January 2003 to December 2009 using Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY). Level-2 data of total column ozone WFMD version 1.0 with spatial resolution 1° × 1.25° were acquired through SCIAMACHY. Analysis for trend of five selected sites exhibit strong seasonal variation in atmospheric ozone concentrations, where there is a significant difference between northeast monsoon and southwest monsoon. The highest ozone values occurred over industrial and congested urban zones (280.97 DU) on August at Bayan Lepas. The lowest ozone values were observed during northeast monsoon on December at Subang (233.08 DU). In addition, the local meteorological factors also bring an impact on the atmospheric ozone. During northeast monsoon, with the higher rate of precipitation, higher relative humidity, low temperature, and less sunlight hours let to the lowest ozone concentrations. Inversely, the highest ozone concentrations observed during southwest monsoon, with the low precipitation rate, lower relative humidity, higher temperature, and more sunlight hours. Back trajectories analysis is carried out, in order to trace the path of the air parcels with high ozone concentration event, suggesting cluster of trajectory (from southwest of the study area) caused by the anthropogenic sources associated with biogenic emissions from large tropical forests, which can make important contribution to regional and global pollution.

  16. Modeling and Observational Framework for Diagnosing Local Land-Atmosphere Coupling on Diurnal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Alonge, Charles; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    Land-atmosphere interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface temperature and moisture states. The degree of coupling between the land surface and PBL in numerical weather prediction and climate models remains largely unexplored and undiagnosed due to the complex interactions and feedbacks present across a range of scales. Further, uncoupled systems or experiments (e.g., the Project for Intercomparison of Land Parameterization Schemes, PILPS) may lead to inaccurate water and energy cycle process understanding by neglecting feedback processes such as PBL-top entrainment. In this study, a framework for diagnosing local land-atmosphere coupling is presented using a coupled mesoscale model with a suite of PBL and land surface model (LSM) options along with observations during field experiments in the U. S. Southern Great Plains. Specifically, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model has been coupled to the Land Information System (LIS), which provides a flexible and high-resolution representation and initialization of land surface physics and states. Within this framework, the coupling established by each pairing of the available PBL schemes in WRF with the LSMs in LIS is evaluated in terms of the diurnal temperature and humidity evolution in the mixed layer. The co-evolution of these variables and the convective PBL is sensitive to and, in fact, integrative of the dominant processes that govern the PBL budget, which are synthesized through the use of mixing diagrams. Results show how the sensitivity of land-atmosphere interactions to the specific choice of PBL scheme and LSM varies across surface moisture regimes and can be quantified and evaluated against observations. As such, this methodology provides a potential pathway to study factors controlling local land-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) using the LIS-WRF system, which will serve as a testbed for future experiments to evaluate

  17. Some salient features of the atmosphere observed over the north Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G S Bhat

    2003-06-01

    This paper describes the near surface characteristics and vertical variations based on the observations made at 17.5°N and 89°E from ORV Sagar Kanya in the north Bay of Bengal during the Bay of Bengal Monsoon Experiment (BOBMEX) carried out in July-August 1999. BOBMEX captured both the active and weak phases of convection. SST remained above the convection threshold throughout the BOBMEX. While the response of the SST to atmospheric forcing was clearly observed, the response of the atmosphere to SST changes was not clear. SST decreased during periods of large scale precipitation, and increased during a weak phase of convection. It is shown that the latent heat flux at comparable wind speeds was about 25-50% lower over the Bay during BOBMEX compared to that over the Indian Ocean during other seasons and tropical west Pacific. On the other hand, the largest variations in the surface daily net heat flux are observed over the Bay during BOBMEX. SST predicted using observed surface fluxes showed that 1-D heat balance model works sometime but not always, and horizontal advection is important. The high resolution Vaisala radiosondes launched during BOBMEX could clearly bring out the changes in the vertical structure of the atmosphere between active and weak phases of convection. Convective Available Potential Energy of the surface air decreased by 2-3 kJ kg−1 following convection, and recovered in a time period of one or two days. The mid tropospheric relative humidity and water vapor content, and wind direction show the major changes between the active and weak phases of convection.

  18. Observational Investigation of Energy Release in the Lower Solar Atmosphere of a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Sharykin, I N; Kosovichev, A G; Vargas-Dominguez, S; Zimovets, I V

    2016-01-01

    We study flare processes in the lower solar atmosphere using observational data for a M1-class flare of June 12, 2014, obtained by New Solar Telescope (NST/BBSO) and Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI/SDO). The main goal is to understand triggers and manifestations of the flare energy release in the lower layers of the solar atmosphere (the photosphere and chromosphere) using high-resolution optical observations and magnetic field measurements. We analyze optical images, HMI Dopplergrams and vector magnetograms, and use Non-Linear Force-Free Field (NLFFF) extrapolations for reconstruction of the magnetic topology. The NLFFF modelling reveals interaction of oppositely directed magnetic flux-tubes in the PIL. These two interacting magnetic flux tubes are observed as a compact sheared arcade along the PIL in the high-resolution broad-band continuum images from NST. In the vicinity of the PIL, the NST H alpha observations reveal formation of a thin three-ribbon structure corresponding to the small-scale photospher...

  19. Atmospheric extinction coefficients and night sky brightness at the Xuyi Observation Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Hua Zhang; Xiao-Wei Liu; Hai-Bo Yuan; Hai-Bin Zhao; Jin-Sheng Yao; Hua-Wei Zhang; Mao-Sheng Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of the optical broadband atmospheric extinction coefficients and the night sky brightness at the Xuyi Observation Station of Purple Mountain Observatory.The measurements are based on CCD imaging data taken in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's g,r and i bands with the Xuyi 1.04/1.20m Schmidt Telescope for the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey of the Galactic Anticenter (XSTPS-GAC),the photometric part of the Digital Sky Survey of the Galactic Anti-center (DSS-GAC).The data were collected during more than 140 winter nights from 2009 to 2011.We find that the atmospheric extinction coefficients for the g,r and i bands are 0.69,0.55 and 0.38 mag/airmass,respectively,based on observations taken on several photometric nights.The night sky brightness determined from images with good quality has median values of 21.7,20.8 and 20.0 mag arcsec-2 and reaches 22.1,21.2 and 20.4 mag arcsec-2 under the best observing conditions for the g,r and i bands,respectively.The relatively large extinction coefficients compared with other good astronomical observing sites are mainly due to the relatively low elevation (i.e.180 m) and high humidity at the station.

  20. Development of Innovative Technology to Provide Low-Cost Surface Atmospheric Observations in Data Sparse Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Paul; Steinson, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Accurate and reliable real-time monitoring and dissemination of observations of surface weather conditions is critical for a variety of societal applications. Applications that provide local and regional information about temperature, precipitation, moisture, and winds, for example, are important for agriculture, water resource monitoring, health, and monitoring of hazard weather conditions. In many regions of the World, surface weather stations are sparsely located and/or of poor quality. Existing stations have often been sited incorrectly, not well-maintained, and have limited communications established at the site for real-time monitoring. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), with support from USAID, has started an initiative to develop and deploy low-cost weather instrumentation in sparsely observed regions of the world. The project is focused on improving weather observations for environmental monitoring and early warning alert systems on a regional to global scale. Instrumentation that has been developed use innovative new technologies such as 3D printers, Raspberry Pi computing systems, and wireless communications. The goal of the project is to make the weather station designs, software, and processing tools an open community resource. The weather stations can be built locally by agencies, through educational institutions, and residential communities as a citizen effort to augment existing networks to improve detection of natural hazards for disaster risk reduction. The presentation will provide an overview of the open source weather station technology and evaluation of sensor observations for the initial networks that have been deployed in Africa.

  1. Tests of the remote sensing spectrumradiometer DAN-2 on atmospheric lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandin, Sergei F.; Kopytin, Yury D.; Kokhanov, Vladimir I.; Shishigin, Sergei A.

    2004-02-01

    Presented results of testing a developing equipment DAN-2, allowing remote define gas components in atmosphere with the big degree noiseproof factor [1,2]. Determined condition of applicability of method lying in the base of functioning (working) an equipment, on tilted atmospheric routes a length before 3 km and more in the different for dioxide nitrogen. Experimental shown that under tilted corners of flexing, forming (0-10)° from the surface of the Land it is necessary to enter an additional calibring factors, connected with the solar spectrum transformation in atmosphere. Adjustments of other sort, stipulated by corner effects, it is necessary to take account into corners from 0° before 20° at orientation to optical axis of receiving telescope toward the solar disk. Determined factors for different visibility and meteoconditions: cloud, mist, fair weather. Given concrete recommendations on using an equipment DAN-2 for correct interpreting the results of measurements. For length of time from november 2002 on a may 2003 on the base of apparatus complex DAN-2 was received near 400 experimental studies. As a source of atmospheric contamination was choose industrial object, residing in the most center of city Tomsk electric power station GRES-2. Measurements were conducted at a different time of with different types of the atmospheric condition (fair weather, obscured cloud, hazes and mists). Made registratin to concentrations a gas NO2 provided in relative units. Primary task of the experimental studies was producing evaluation of potential possibilities of laboratory complex with provision for dispersion-diffusing characteristics of complex atmospheric ambience, reveal main theoretical and technical problems for the reason further modernizations testing device.

  2. IASOA circumpolar observations in service for research of atmospheric transports into and out of the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihma, Timo; Uttal, Taneil; Walden, Von; Cox, Christopher; Starkweather, Sandy; Makshtas, Alexander; Key, Jeff

    2016-04-01

    The International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) is an International Polar Year legacy consortium that focuses on coordinating measurements of the Arctic atmosphere collected at ten observatories in the U.S., Canada, Russia, Norway, Finland, and Greenland. The IASOA data portal and collaboratory process support thematic expert groups that work towards common goals for utilizing interoperable data products across the observatories. In addition to detailed surface observations and upper-air radiosonde program, some of the IASOA observatories collect information on the vertical profiles of moisture, cloud boundaries, cloud water/ice contents, and aerosols using radars, lidars ceilometers and radiometers. Collectively the IASOA network provides a unique source of information that can be utilized in order to provide the best possible empirical estimates of the horizontal atmospheric transports of momentum, heat, moisture, cloud water, cloud ice, and aerosols into and out of the Arctic Ocean region. These can be used in turn to support the evaluation of atmospheric reanalyses, weather and climate models, and satellite remote sensing products, and subsequently studies on the interaction between the Arctic and lower latitudes including the role of mid- and low-latitude forcing on the Arctic amplification of climate warming and the effects of Arctic changes on mid-latitude weather and climate. In addition, the IASOA data are valuable for the evaluation of gridded products (reanalyses, models, and satellite data) with respect to Earth surface variables, such as snow depth, soil moisture, surface temperature, radiative fluxes, albedo, as well as turbulent fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, CO2, and CH4. Evaluation of surface fluxes is a vital to complement the evaluation of horizontal transports. These together will yield a comprehensive assessment of the quality of available gridded products in representing atmospheric budgets of heat, moisture

  3. Observation and modeling of main sequence star chromospheres. 3: Differential analysis of hydrogen lines versus activity level in M dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdebine, E. R.; Doyle, J. G.; Koscielecki, M.

    1995-02-01

    We use the constraints at the extremes in magnetic activity level to simulate the effect of varying magnetic non-thermal heating in dM and dMe chromospheres by varying the transition region pressure and temperature minimum. We built four grids of model atmospheres with temperature minimum either at 2,660 K or 3,000 K, and a range of transition region pressure. We found that when decreasing the transition region pressure (i.e. the chromospheric temperature gradient), the Balmer lines change rapidly from emission to strong absorption, then the profiles weaken and become narrower until they disappear totally (zero Halpha stars). The Paschen and Brackett series exhibit a qualitatively similar behavior, but the `emission domain' is at a higher column mass. The Brackett lines never really develop a strong absorption. In opposition with other series, the Lyman lines show a monotonous decrease and even change to absorption for very low density models. These differences are useful spectral diagnostics for M dwarf atmospheres. All hydrogen series, except the Lyman series for intermediate and high pressures, are sensitive to the temperature minimum when large changes are considered. We also investigated the effect of the temperature break zone and found it is important only for high pressure atmospheres. Our grids of models successfully reproduce all type of observed Halpha profiles: (1) high activity with strong emission and weak self-reversal, (2) filled in intermediate activity with inner wings in emission and the core in absorption, (3) intermediate activity with strong and broad absorption, (4) low activity with weak and narrow absorption, (5) `zero activity' with an undetectable profile. We discuss the line characteristics over this wide range of physical conditions. We analyze the ionization fraction and electron density for our series of chromospheres. Changes in the ionization fraction are important throughout the pressure range. Heavy elements are the main electron

  4. A non-local thermodynamical equilibrium line formation for neutral and singly ionized titanium in model atmospheres of reference A-K stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnova, T. M.; Mashonkina, L. I.; Ryabchikova, T. A.

    2016-09-01

    We construct a model atom for Ti I-II using more than 3600 measured and predicted energy levels of Ti I and 1800 energy levels of Ti II, and quantum mechanical photoionization cross-sections. Non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) line formation for Ti I and Ti II is treated through a wide range of spectral types from A to K, including metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] down to -2.6 dex. NLTE leads to weakened Ti I lines and positive abundance corrections. The magnitude of NLTE corrections is smaller compared to the literature data for FGK atmospheres. NLTE leads to strengthened Ti II lines and negative NLTE abundance corrections. For the first time, we have performed NLTE calculations for Ti I-II in the 6500 ≤ Teff ≤ 13 000 K range. For four A-type stars, we derived in LTE an abundance discrepancy of up to 0.22 dex between Ti I and Ti II, which vanishes in NLTE. For four other A-B stars, with only Ti II lines observed, NLTE leads to a decrease of line-to-line scatter. An efficiency of inelastic Ti I + H I collisions was estimated from an analysis of Ti I and Ti II lines in 17 cool stars with -2.6 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ 0.0. Consistent NLTE abundances from Ti I and Ti II were obtained by applying classical Drawinian rates for the stars with log g ≥ 4.1, and neglecting inelastic collisions with H I for the very metal-poor (VMP) giant HD 122563. For the VMP turn-off stars ([Fe/H] ≤ -2 and log g ≤ 4.1), we obtained the positive abundance difference Ti I-II already in LTE, which increases in NLTE. Accurate collisional data for Ti I and Ti II are necessary to help solve this problem.

  5. Seasonal oscillations of middle atmosphere temperature observed by Rayleigh lidars and their comparisons with TIMED/SABER observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiankang; Li, Tao; Xu, Jiyao; Liu, Han-Li; Xue, Xianghui; Wang, Shui; Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, I. Stuart; Hauchecorne, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Bencherif, Hassan; Heinselman, Craig; Steinbrecht, Wolfgang; Mlynczak, M. G.; Russell, J. M.

    2009-10-01

    The long-term temperature data sets obtained by Rayleigh lidars at six different locations from low to high latitudes within the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) were used to derive the annual oscillations (AO) and semiannual oscillations (SAO) of middle atmosphere temperature: Reunion Island (21.8°S); Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (19.5°N); Table Mountain Facility, California (34.4°N); Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (43.9°N); Hohenpeissenberg, Germany (47.8°N); Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland (67.0°N). The results were compared with those derived from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument onboard the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. The zonal mean temperatures at similar latitudes show good agreement. The observations also reveal that the AO dominates the seasonal oscillations in both the stratosphere and the mesosphere at middle and high latitudes, with the amplitudes increasing poleward. The SAO oscillations are weaker at all six sites. The oscillations in the upper mesosphere are usually stronger than those in the upper stratosphere with a local minimum near 50-65 km. The upper mesospheric signals are clearly out of phase with upper stratospheric signals. Some differences between lidar and SABER results were found in both the stratosphere and mesosphere. These could be due to: the difference in data sampling between ground-based and space-based instruments, the length of data set, the tidal aliasing owing to the temperature AO and SAO since lidar data are nighttime only, and lidar temperature analysis algorithms. The seasonal oscillations of tidal amplitudes derived from SABER observations suggests that the tidal aliasing of the lidar temperature AO and SAO in the upper mesosphere may over- or under-estimate the real temperature oscillations, depending on the tidal phases. In addition, the possibly unrealistic seasonal

  6. MIRO Observation of Comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) Water Line Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwon; Frerking, Margaret; Hofstadter, Mark; Gulkis, Samuel; von Allmen, Paul; Crovisier, Jaques; Biver, Nicholas; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) was observed with the Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO) on April 30, 2004, between 5 hr and 16 hr UT. The comet was 0.63AU distance from the Sun and 0.68AU distance from the MIRO telescope at the time of the observations. The water line involving the two lowest rotational levels at 556.936 GHz is observed at 557.070 GHz due to a large Doppler frequency shift. The detected water line spectrum is interpreted using a non local thermal equilibrium (Non-LTE) molecular excitation and radiative transfer model. Several synthetic spectra are calculated with various coma profiles that are plausible for the comet at the time of observations. The coma profile is modeled with three characteristic parameters: outgassing rate, a constant expansion velocity, and a constant gas temperature. The model calculation result shows that for the distant line observation where contributions from a large coma space is averaged, the combination of the outgassing rate and the gas expansion velocity determines the line shape while the gas temperature has a negligible effect. The comparison between the calculated spectra and the MIRO measured spectrum suggests that the outgassing rate of the comet is about 2.0x1029 molecules/second and its gas expansion velocity about 1.2 km/s at the time of the observations.

  7. Evaluating and improving cloud phase in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 using spaceborne lidar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Jennifer E.; Bourdages, Line; Miller, Nathaniel B.; Morrison, Ariel; Yettella, Vineel; Chepfer, Helene; Eaton, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Spaceborne lidar observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite are used to evaluate cloud amount and cloud phase in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), the atmospheric component of a widely used state-of-the-art global coupled climate model (Community Earth System Model). By embedding a lidar simulator within CAM5, the idiosyncrasies of spaceborne lidar cloud detection and phase assignment are replicated. As a result, this study makes scale-aware and definition-aware comparisons between model-simulated and observed cloud amount and cloud phase. In the global mean, CAM5 has insufficient liquid cloud and excessive ice cloud when compared to CALIPSO observations. Over the ice-covered Arctic Ocean, CAM5 has insufficient liquid cloud in all seasons. Having important implications for projections of future sea level rise, a liquid cloud deficit contributes to a cold bias of 2-3°C for summer daily maximum near-surface air temperatures at Summit, Greenland. Over the midlatitude storm tracks, CAM5 has excessive ice cloud and insufficient liquid cloud. Storm track cloud phase biases in CAM5 maximize over the Southern Ocean, which also has larger-than-observed seasonal variations in cloud phase. Physical parameter modifications reduce the Southern Ocean cloud phase and shortwave radiation biases in CAM5 and illustrate the power of the CALIPSO observations as an observational constraint. The results also highlight the importance of using a regime-based, as opposed to a geographic-based, model evaluation approach. More generally, the results demonstrate the importance and value of simulator-enabled comparisons of cloud phase in models used for future climate projection.

  8. Optimal strategies for observation of active galactic nuclei variability with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giomi, Matteo; Gerard, Lucie; Maier, Gernot

    2016-07-01

    Variable emission is one of the defining characteristic of active galactic nuclei (AGN). While providing precious information on the nature and physics of the sources, variability is often challenging to observe with time- and field-of-view-limited astronomical observatories such as Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). In this work, we address two questions relevant for the observation of sources characterized by AGN-like variability: what is the most time-efficient way to detect such sources, and what is the observational bias that can be introduced by the choice of the observing strategy when conducting blind surveys of the sky. Different observing strategies are evaluated using simulated light curves and realistic instrument response functions of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a future gamma-ray observatory. We show that strategies that makes use of very small observing windows, spread over large periods of time, allows for a faster detection of the source, and are less influenced by the variability properties of the sources, as compared to strategies that concentrate the observing time in a small number of large observing windows. Although derived using CTA as an example, our conclusions are conceptually valid for any IACTs facility, and in general, to all observatories with small field of view and limited duty cycle.

  9. Impact of biomass burning on ocean water quality in Southeast Asia through atmospheric deposition: field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarambal, P.; Balasubramanian, R.; Tkalich, P.; He, J.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric nutrients have recently gained considerable attention as a significant additional source of new nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loading to the ocean. The effect of atmospheric macro nutrients on marine productivity depends on the biological availability of both inorganic and organic N and P forms. During October 2006, the regional smoke haze episodes in Southeast Asia (SEA) that resulted from uncontrolled forest and peat fires in Sumatra and Borneo blanketed large parts of the region. In this work, we determined the chemical composition of nutrients in aerosols and rainwater during hazy and non-hazy days to assess their impacts on aquatic ecosystem in SEA for the first time. We compared atmospheric dry and wet deposition of N and P species in aerosol and rainwater in Singapore between hazy and non-hazy days. Air mass back trajectories showed that large-scale forest and peat fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan were a significant source of atmospheric nutrients to aquatic environments in Singapore and SEA region on hazy days. It was observed that the average concentrations of nutrients increased approximately by a factor of 3 to 8 on hazy days when compared with non-hazy days. The estimated mean dry and wet atmospheric fluxes (mg/m2/day) of total nitrogen (TN) were 12.72 ± 2.12 and 2.49 ± 1.29 during non-hazy days and 132.86 ± 38.39 and 29.43 ± 10.75 during hazy days; the uncertainty estimates are represented as 1 standard deviation (1σ) here and throughout the text. The estimated mean dry and wet deposition fluxes (mg/m2/day) of total phosphorous (TP) were 0.82 ± 0.23 and 0.13 ± 0.03 for non-hazy days and 7.89 ± 0.80 and 1.56 ± 0.65 for hazy days. The occurrences of higher concentrations of nutrients from atmospheric deposition during smoke haze episodes may have adverse consequences on receiving aquatic ecosystems with cascading impacts on water quality.

  10. An Analysis of Cassini Observations Regarding the Structure of Jupiter's Equatorial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David S.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of intriguing atmospheric phenomena reside on both sides of Jupiter's equator. 5-micron bright hot spots and opaque plumes prominently exhibit dynamic behavior to the north, whereas compact, dark chevron-shaped features and isolated anticyclonic disturbances periodically occupy the southern equatorial latitudes. All of these phenomena are associated with the vertical and meridional perturbations of Rossby waves disturbing the mean atmospheric state. As previous observational analysis and numerical simulations have investigated the dynamics of the region, an examination of the atmosphere's vertical structure though radiative transfer analysis is necessary for improved understanding of this unique environment. Here we present preliminary analysis of a multispectral Cassini imaging data set acquired during the spacecraft's flyby of Jupiter in 2000. We evaluated multiple methane and continuum spectral channels at available viewing angles to improve constraints on the vertical structure of the haze and cloud layers comprising these interesting features. Our preliminary results indicate distinct differences in the structure for both hemispheres. Upper troposphere hazes and cloud layers are prevalent in the northern equatorial latitudes, but are not present in corresponding southern latitudes. Continued analysis will further constrain the precise structure present in these phenomena and the differences between them.

  11. An Analysis of Cassini Observations Regarding the Structure of Jupiter's Equatorial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David S.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of intriguing atmospheric phenomena reside on both sides of Jupiter's equator. 5-micron bright hot spots and opaque plumes prominently exhibit dynamic behavior to the north, whereas compact, dark chevron-shaped features and isolated anticyclonic disturbances periodically occupy the southern equatorial latitudes. All of these phenomena are associated with the vertical and meridional perturbations of Rossby waves disturbing the mean atmospheric state. As previous observational analysis and numerical simulations have investigated the dynamics of the region, an examination of the atmosphere's vertical structure though radiative transfer analysis is necessary for improved understanding of this unique environment. Here we present preliminary analysis of a multispectral Cassini imaging data set acquired during the spacecraft's flyby of Jupiter in 2000. We evaluated multiple methane and continuum spectral channels at available viewing angles to improve constraints on the vertical structure of the haze and cloud layers comprising these interesting features. Our preliminary results indicate distinct differences in the structure for both hemispheres. Upper troposphere hazes and cloud layers are prevalent in the northern equatorial latitudes, but are not present in corresponding southern latitudes. Continued analysis will further constrain the precise structure present in these phenomena and the differences between them.

  12. Molecular ions and protonated molecules observed in the atmospheric solids analysis probe analysis of steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Andrew D; Hammond, Janet; Major, Hilary

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) has often been used to ionise steroids in mass spectrometry, usually when interfaced to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). However, in positive ion mode, a dehydrated protonated molecule is often observed with a loss of structural information. The recently introduced technique of atmospheric solids analysis probe (ASAP) has the advantage that the sample can be analysed directly and does not need to be interfaced to HPLC. Existing ionisation sources such as direct analysis in real time (DART) and desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) have shown the advantage of direct analysis techniques in a variety of applications. ASAP can be performed on commercial atmospheric pressure ionisation (API) mass spectrometers with only simple modifications to API sources. The samples are vaporised by hot nitrogen gas from the electrospray desolvation heater and ionised by a corona discharge. A range of commercially available steroids were analysed by ASAP to investigate the mechanism of ionisation. ASAP analysis of steroids generally results in the formation of the parent molecular ion as either the radical cation M+* or the protonated molecule MH+. The formation of the protonated molecule is a result of proton transfer from ionised water clusters in the source. However, if the source is dry, then formation of the radical cation is the primary ionisation mechanism.

  13. Correcting atmospheric effects in thermal ground observations for hyperspectral emissivity estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Joris; Buitrago, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of Land surface temperature is of crucial importance in energy balance studies and environmental modeling. Accurate retrieval of land surface temperature (LST) demands detailed knowledge of the land surface emissivity. Measured radiation by remote sensing sensors to land surface temperature can only be performed using a-priori knowledge of the emissivity. Uncertainties in the retrieval of this emissivity can cause huge errors in LST estimations. The retrieval of emissivity (and LST) is per definition an underdetermined inversion, as only one observation is made while two variables are to be estimated. Several researches have therefore been performed on measuring emissivity, such as the normalized emissivity method, the temperature-emissivity separation (TES) using the minimum and maximum difference of emissivity and the use of vegetation indices. In each of these approaches atmospherically corrected radiance measurements by remote sensing sensors are correlated to ground measurements. Usually these ground measurements are performed with the ground equivalent of the remote sensing sensors; the CIMEL 312-2 has the same spectral bands as ASTER. This way parameterizations acquired this way are only usable for specific sensors and need to be redone for newer sensors. Recently hyperspectral thermal radiometers, such as the MIDAC, have been developed that can solve this problem. By using hyperspectral observations of emissivity, together with sensor simulators, ground measurements of different satellite sensor can be simulated. This facilitates the production of validation data for the different TES algorithms. However before such measurements can be performed extra steps of processing need to be performed. Atmospheric correction becomes more important in hyperspectral observations than for broadband observations, as energy levels measured per band is lower. As such the atmosphere has a relative larger contribution if bandwidths become smaller. The goal of this

  14. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid-dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-10-21

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus.

  15. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H.; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus. PMID:25288761

  16. An infrared metamaterial selective absorber with emitter considering atmospheric absorption for low observability (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jagyeong; Han, Kiwook; Hahn, Jae W.

    2016-09-01

    Advancement in stealth technology is very crucial for the protection from enemy. Detection of IR electromagnetic wave is performed by detecting the IR radiation from aircraft fuselage or reflected laser by using laser guided missile. In this research, we designed the metamaterial selective absorber with emitter considering atmospheric absorption to minimize observability from these detecting system. The model is designed as T-asymmetric structure for dual-band absorption or emission, and these two parts can be independently tuned. One part is designed as emitter which emit the radiation in the wavelength region where atmospheric absorption is strong. In order to select the target wavelength region, we used the MODTRAN database to calculate the molecular absorption in the atmosphere and strong absorptions occurs at 2μm, 4μm and 5-8μm wavelength regions. The other part is designed as an absorber which absorbs the IR signal from laser guided missile at 1.064μm. Selective emission or absorption at these wavelength region can be achieved by tuning the geometry of the structure. These mechanisms suppose the thermal equilibrium state so that the Kirchhoff law is satisfied. FDTD simulations of the designed structure was conducted to confirm the electromagnetic resonance. Also, we calculated the detected energy from the designed structure and compared with that from conventional aircraft surface. According to the calculation results, the measured signal from the suggested structure decreases to 1/10 of the signal from conventional surface.

  17. Fluctuations and Flares in the Ultraviolet Line Emission of Cool Stars: Implications for Exoplanet Transit Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Loyd, R O Parke

    2014-01-01

    Variations in stellar flux can potentially overwhelm the photometric signal of a transiting planet. Such variability has not previously been well-characterized in the ultraviolet lines used to probe the inflated atmospheres surrounding hot Jupiters. Therefore, we surveyed 38 F-M stars for intensity variations in four narrow spectroscopic bands: two enclosing strong lines from species known to inhabit hot Jupiter atmospheres, CII $\\lambda\\lambda$1334,1335 and SiIII $\\lambda$1206; one enclosing SiIV $\\lambda\\lambda$1393,1402; and 36.5 \\AA\\ of interspersed continuum. For each star/band combination, we generated 60 s cadence lightcurves from archival HST COS and STIS time-tagged photon data. Within these lightcurves, we characterized flares and stochastic fluctuations as separate forms of variability. Flares: We used a cross-correlation approach to detect 116 flares. These events occur in the time-series an average of once per 2.5 h, over 50% last 4 min or less, and most produce the strongest response in SiIV. If...

  18. Efficiency and Sensitivity Analysis of Observation Networks for Atmospheric Inverse Modelling with Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xueran; Jacob, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The controllability of advection-diffusion systems, subject to uncertain initial values and emission rates, is estimated, given sparse and error affected observations of prognostic state variables. In predictive geophysical model systems, like atmospheric chemistry simulations, different parameter families influence the temporal evolution of the system.This renders initial-value-only optimisation by traditional data assimilation methods as insufficient. In this paper, a quantitative assessment method on validation of measurement configurations to optimize initial values and emission rates, and how to balance them, is introduced. In this theoretical approach, Kalman filter and smoother and their ensemble based versions are combined with a singular value decomposition, to evaluate the potential improvement associated with specific observational network configurations. Further, with the same singular vector analysis for the efficiency of observations, their sensitivity to model control can be identified by deter...

  19. Weather and atmosphere observation with the ATOM all-sky camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankowsky Felix

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Automatic Telescope for Optical Monitoring (ATOM for H.E.S.S. is an 75 cm optical telescope which operates fully automated. As there is no observer present during observation, an auxiliary all-sky camera serves as weather monitoring system. This device takes an all-sky image of the whole sky every three minutes. The gathered data then undergoes live-analysis by performing astrometric comparison with a theoretical night sky model, interpreting the absence of stars as cloud coverage. The sky monitor also serves as tool for a meteorological analysis of the observation site of the the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array. This overview covers design and benefits of the all-sky camera and additionally gives an introduction into current efforts to integrate the device into the atmosphere analysis programme of H.E.S.S.

  20. The solar eclipse and associated atmospheric variations observed in South Korea on 22 July 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yong Seung; Kim, Hak Sung; Choo, Seung Ho

    2010-09-01

    A partial solar eclipse occurred in South Korea on 22 July 2009. It started at 09:30 a.m. and lasted until 12:14 LST with coverage of between 76.8% and 93.1% of the sun. The observed atmospheric effects of the eclipse are presented. It was found that from the onset of the eclipse, solar radiation was reduced by as much as 88.1 approximately 89.9% at the present research centre. Also, during the eclipse, air temperature decreased slightly or remained almost unchanged. After the eclipse, however, it rose by 2.5 to 4.5 degrees C at observed stations. Meanwhile, relative humidity increased and wind speeds were lowered by the eclipse. Ground-level ozone was observed to decrease during the event.

  1. Observing system simulation experiments for the laser atmospheric wind sounder using global spectral model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohaly, Gregg; Krishnamurti, T. N.

    1991-01-01

    Fundamental to improving the understanding of the total Earth system are increased and improved observations. In the coming decade several spaceborne instrumented platforms will be constructed and implemented. These platforms will, in large, be housing the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) instrument suite. One of the proposed instruments is a wind profiling system which is currently referred to as the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS). This instrument will use a CO2 Doppler lidar wind profiler to give wind measurements with a vertical and horizontal resolution which has yet to be seen globally. The LAWS instrument is now a candidate for launch on a NASA EOS-B platform and is fundamental to increasing our understanding of Earth system science. The LAWS data sets will form an integral component of the temporally continuous data base needed for research of the coupled climate systems. This instrument's observations will aid in giving an improved description of the atmospheric circulation, including the transports of energy, momentum, moisture, trace gases, and aerosols. Also, the wind data will be assimilated and used as the initial state for many global forecast models at various operational centers. Results of system simulation experiments are discussed, and future experiments are described.

  2. Indo-Japanese Lidar Observations of the Tropical Middle Atmosphere During 1998 and 1999

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A state-of-the art Rayleigh and Mie backscattering lidar was set up at Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) in the Tropics in India. Using this system, regular observations of upper tropospheric clouds, aerosols at stratospheric heights and atmospheric temperatures in the range from 30 to 80 km were made. In this paper, the data collected during the period of 1998-99 were selected for systematic investigation and presentation. The Mie scattering lidar system is capable of measuring the degree of depolarization in the laser backscattering. Several tropical cirrus cloud structures have been identified with low to moderate ice content. Occasionally, thin sub-visible cirrus clouds in the vicinity of the tropical tropopause have also been detected. The aerosol measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere show low aerosol content with a vertical distribution up to 35 km altitude. Rayleigh-scattering lidar observations reveal that at the tropical site, temperature inversion occurs at mesospheric heights. Atmospheric waves have induced perturbations in the temperatures for several times at the upper stratospheric heights. A significant warming in the lower mesosphere associated with a consistent cooling in the upper stratospheric heights is observed particularly in the winter season during the events of sudden stratospheric warming (SSW).

  3. Atmospheric Extinction Coefficients and Night Sky Brightness At the Xuyi Observational Station

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, H -H; Yuan, H -B; Zhao, H -B; Yao, J -S; Zhang, H -W; Xiang, M -S

    2012-01-01

    We present measurements of the optical broadband atmospheric extinction coefficients and the night sky brightness at the Xuyi Observational Station of Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO). The measurements are based on CCD imaging data taken in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey g, r and i bands with the Xuyi 1.04/1.20m Schmidt Telescope for the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey of the Galactic Anti-center (XSTPS-GAC), the photometric part of the Digital Sky Survey of the Galactic Anti-center (DSS-GAC). The data were collected in more than 130 winter nights from 2009 to 2011. We find that the atmospheric extinction coefficients for the g, r and i bands are 0.70, 0.55 and 0.38 mag/airmass, respectively, based on observations taken in several photometric nights. The night sky brightness determined from images of good quality has median val- ues of 21.7, 20.8 and 20.0 mag/arcsec2 and reaches 22.1, 21.2 and 20.4 mag/arcsec2 under the best observing conditions for the g, r and i bands, respectively. The relatively ...

  4. LOTOS: A Proposed Lower Tropospheric Observing System from the Land Surface through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, S. A.; Lee, W. C.; Carbone, R. E.; Oncley, S.; Brown, W. O. J.; Spuler, S.; Horst, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sensor capabilities, but also in electronics, optics, RF communication, and off-the-grid power are enabling new measurement paradigms. NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) is considering new sensors, new deployment modes, and integrated observing strategies to address challenges in understanding within the atmospheric boundary layer and the underlying coupling to the land surface. Our vision is of a network of deployable observing sites, each with a suite of complementary instruments that measure surface-atmosphere exchange, and the state and evolution of the boundary layer. EOL has made good progress on distributed surface energy balance and flux stations, and on boundary layer remote sensing of wind and water vapor, all suitable for deployments of combined instruments and as network of such sites. We will present the status of the CentNet surface network development, the 449-MHz modular wind profiler, and a water vapor and temperature profiling differential absorption lidar (DIAL) under development. We will further present a concept for a test bed to better understand the value of these and other possible instruments in forming an instrument suite flexible for multiple research purposes.

  5. Observation of hard radiations in a laboratory atmospheric high-voltage discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Agafonov, A V; Chubenko, A P; Oginov, A V; Rodionov, A A; Rusetskiy, A S; Ryabov, V A; Shepetov, A L; Shpakov, K V

    2016-01-01

    The new results concerning neutron emission detection from a laboratory high-voltage discharge in the air are presented. Data were obtained with a combination of plastic scintillation detectors and $^3$He filled counters of thermal neutrons. Strong dependence of the hard x-ray and neutron radiation appearance on the field strength near electrodes, which is determined by their form, was found. We have revealed a more sophisticated temporal structure of the neutron bursts observed during of electric discharge. This may indicate different mechanisms for generating penetrating radiation at the time formation and development of the atmospheric discharge.

  6. Observational perspectives on cloud-atmosphere-surface coupling at Summit, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, C. J.; Shupe, M.; Miller, N.; Noone, D.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Raudzens Bailey, A.; O'Neill, M.; Persson, O. P. G.; Rowe, P. M.; Schneider, D. P.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Steffen, K.; Turner, D. D.; Walden, V. P.; White, J. W. C.

    2016-12-01

    The atmosphere modulates the surface mass and energy balances of the Greenland ice sheet, including the temperature of the snow and firn, thus facilitating surface melt. In the absence of clouds, infrared loss at the surface leads to the development of a stably-stratified boundary layer, which weakens turbulent mixing and limits surface mass loss through sublimation. This stable state is eroded by clouds, which are frequently observed throughout the year. Through precipitation clouds are a source of accumulation, but clouds also modify the surface energy budget substantially, providing an overall warming of the surface in all months (33 W m-2 annually) over the central plateau. Thus, variability in cloud cover can drive or facilitate many of the physical processes acting out at and near the surface. Here, recent research on the coupled surface-atmosphere dynamic, radiative, and mass relationships at Summit Station are discussed. The response of the surface energy and mass budgets to forcing caused by varying atmospheric and cloud conditions is quantified and contextualized with other Arctic locations. Some unique features of the Summit environment, such as its high elevation, low humidity, and seasonally persistent snow cover, are found to be important factors in the way that clouds and the atmosphere interact with the surface there compared to elsewhere. This work is supported by a recent critical mass of measurements pertaining to such interactions at Summit. Observations have been made by the Integrated Characterization of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric state, and Precipitation at Summit (ICECAPS) program since 2010, including twice-daily temperature and humidity profiles from radiosoundings and cloud properties acquired from measurements made by lidar, radar, and passive spectral infrared and microwave radiometers. These measurements complement those of the surface radiation budget and meteorology made by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and NOAA

  7. Approach to simultaneously denoise and invert backscatter and extinction from photon-limited atmospheric lidar observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Willem J; Holz, Robert E; Hu, Yu Hen; Kuehn, Ralph E; Eloranta, Edwin E; Willett, Rebecca M

    2016-10-10

    Atmospheric lidar observations provide a unique capability to directly observe the vertical column of cloud and aerosol scattering properties. Detector and solar-background noise, however, hinder the ability of lidar systems to provide reliable backscatter and extinction cross-section estimates. Standard methods for solving this inverse problem are most effective with high signal-to-noise ratio observations that are only available at low resolution in uniform scenes. This paper describes a novel method for solving the inverse problem with high-resolution, lower signal-to-noise ratio observations that are effective in non-uniform scenes. The novelty is twofold. First, the inferences of the backscatter and extinction are applied to images, whereas current lidar algorithms only use the information content of single profiles. Hence, the latent spatial and temporal information in noisy images are utilized to infer the cross-sections. Second, the noise associated with photon-counting lidar observations can be modeled using a Poisson distribution, and state-of-the-art tools for solving Poisson inverse problems are adapted to the atmospheric lidar problem. It is demonstrated through photon-counting high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) simulations that the proposed algorithm yields inverted backscatter and extinction cross-sections (per unit volume) with smaller mean squared error values at higher spatial and temporal resolutions, compared to the standard approach. Two case studies of real experimental data are also provided where the proposed algorithm is applied on HSRL observations and the inverted backscatter and extinction cross-sections are compared against the standard approach.

  8. Observable Effects of Atmospheric Pollution on Outpatient and Inpatient Morbidity in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мagdalena PLATIKANOVA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of Europe’s most well-developed industrial regions is found in the Republic of Bulgaria. The industrialization of the region has a big impact on air pollution. Thermal power plant “Maritza East” (the largest of its kind in southeastern Europe, the army training range, machine manufacturers, household heating and high volume of automobile traffic are all major sources of pollution in the region.Methods: A five year study (2009-2013 followed yearly concentrations of principal atmospheric pollutants such as sulfur dioxide, dust, nitrogen dioxide, lead aerosols and hydrogen sulfide, and the way in which those levels had an effect on morbidity (outpatient and inpatient medical care in the area. Statistical processing of data has been completed to represent and analyze the collected data in nonparametric and alternative format.Results: Atmospheric pollution affects human health directly through pathological changes in the human organism. The registered outpatient care provided for the period 2009-2013 is highest for diseases of the cardiovascular system (11.85%, the respiratory system (17.34% and the genitourinary system (9.76%. The registered rate of hospitalization for the same period is for diseases of the digestive system (11.90%, the cardiovascular system (11.85%, respiratory system (10.86% and the genitourinary system (8.88%.Conclusion: The observed period shows a decrease in average yearly concentrations of the principal atmospheric pollutants in the industrial region (Bulgaria and reflects a decrease in morbidity based on outpatient care and an increase in morbidity by inpatient care (hospitalization. Our findings should be corroborated in future longitudinal studies. Keywords: Atmospheric pollution, Morbidity, Industrial region, Bulgaria

  9. Observations of the 12.3 micron Mg I emission line during a major solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Donald E.; Osherovich, Vladimir; Wiedemann, Gunter; Hewagama, Tilak

    1990-01-01

    The extremely Zeeman-sensitive 12.32 micron Mg I solar emission line was observed during a 3B/X5.7 solar flare on October 24, 1989. When compared to postflare values, Mg I emission-line intensity in the penumbral flare ribbon was 20 percent greater at the peak of the flare in soft X-rays, and the 12 micron continuum intensity was 7 percent greater. The flare also excited the emission line in the umbra where it is normally absent. The umbral flare emission exhibits a Zeeman splitting 200 G less than the adjacent penumbra, suggesting that it is excited at higher altitude. The absolute penumbral magnetic field strength did not change by more than 100 G between the flare peak and postflare period. However, a change in the inclination of the field lines, probably related to the formation and development of the flare loop system, was seen.

  10. Chandra X-ray Observations of NGC 4258: Iron Absorption Lines from the Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Young, A J

    2004-01-01

    We report sub-arcsecond resolution X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the low luminosity active galactic nucleus of NGC 4258 and its immediate surroundings with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. NGC 4258 was observed four times, with the first two observations separated by one month, followed over a year later by two consecutive observations. The spectrum of the nucleus is well described by a heavily absorbed, hard X-ray power law of variable luminosity, plus a constant, thermal soft X-ray component. We do not detect an iron K alpha emission line with the upper limit to the equivalent width of a narrow, neutral iron line ranging between 94 and 887 eV (90% confidence) for the different observations. During the second observation on 2000-04-17, two narrow absorption features are seen with >99.5% confidence at ~6.4 keV and ~6.9 keV, which we identify as resonant absorption lines of Fe XVIII - Fe XIX K alpha and Fe XXVI K alpha, respectively. In addition, the 6.9 keV absorption line is probably variable on a timescale of...

  11. Spectropolarimetric observations of the Ca II 8498 A and 8542 A lines in the quiet Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Pietarila, A; Bogdan, T

    2007-01-01

    The Ca II infrared triplet is one of the few magnetically sensitive chromospheric lines available for ground-based observations. We present spectropolarimetric observations of the 8498 A and 8542 A lines in a quiet Sun region near a decaying active region and compare the results with a simulation of the lines in a high plasma-beta regime. Cluster analysis of Stokes V profile pairs shows that the two lines, despite arguably being formed fairly close, often do not have similar shapes. In the network, the local magnetic topology is more important in determining the shapes of the Stokes V profiles than the phase of the wave, contrary to what our simulations show. We also find that Stokes V asymmetries are very common in the network, and the histograms of the observed amplitude and area asymmetries differ significantly from the simulation. Both the network and internetwork show oscillatory behavior in the Ca II lines. It is stronger in the network, where shocking waves, similar to those in the high-beta simulation...

  12. A comparison of field-line resonances observed at the Goose Bay and Wick radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Provan

    Full Text Available Previous observations with the Goose Bay HF coherent-scatter radar have revealed structured spectral peaks at ultra-low frequencies. The frequencies of these spectral peaks have been demonstrated to be extremely consistent from day to day. The stability of these spectral peaks can be seen as evidence for the existence of global magnetospheric cavity modes whose resonant frequencies are independent of latitude. Field-line resonances occur when successive harmonics of the eigenfrequency of the magnetospheric cavity or waveguide match either the first harmonic eigenfrequency of the geomagnetic field lines or higher harmonics of this frequency. Power spectra observed at the SABRE VHF coherent-scatter radar at Wick, Scotland, during night and early morning are revealed to show similarly clearly structured spectral peaks. These spectral peaks are the result of local field-line resonances due to Alfvén waves standing on magnetospheric field lines. A comparison of the spectra observed by the Goose Bay and Wick radars demonstrate that the frequencies of the field-line resonances are, on average, almost identical, despite the different latitudinal ranges covered by the two radars. Possible explanations for the similarity of the signatures on the two radar systems are discussed.

  13. Formation of Zr I and II lines under non-LTE conditions of stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Velichko, A; Nilsson, H

    2011-01-01

    The non-local thermodynaic equilibrium (non-LTE) line formation for the two ions of zirconium is considered through a range of spectral types when the Zr abundance varies from the solar value down to [Zr/H] = -3. The model atom was built using 148 energy levels of Zr I, 772 levels of Zr II, and the ground state of Zr III. It was shown that the main non-LTE mechnism for the minority species Zr I is ultraviolet overionization. Non-LTE leads to systematically depleted total absorption in the Zr I lines and positive abundance corrections, reaching to 0.33 dex for the solar metallicity models. The excited levels of Zr II are overpopulated relative to their thermodynamic equilibrium populations in the line formation layers due to radiative pumping from the low-excitation levels. As a result, the line source function exceeds the Planck function leading to weakening the Zr II lines and positive non-LTE abundance corrections. Such corrections grow towards lower metallicity and lower surface gravity and reach to 0.34 d...

  14. FLUCTUATIONS AND FLARES IN THE ULTRAVIOLET LINE EMISSION OF COOL STARS: IMPLICATIONS FOR EXOPLANET TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loyd, R. O. Parke [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); France, Kevin, E-mail: robert.loyd@colorado.edu [NASA Nancy Grace Roman Fellow. (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Variations in stellar flux can potentially overwhelm the photometric signal of a transiting planet. Such variability has not previously been well-characterized in the ultraviolet lines used to probe the inflated atmospheres surrounding hot Jupiters. Therefore, we surveyed 38 F-M stars for intensity variations in four narrow spectroscopic bands: two enclosing strong lines from species known to inhabit hot Jupiter atmospheres, C II λλ1334, 1335 and Si III λ1206; one enclosing Si IV λλ1393, 1402; and 36.5 Å of interspersed continuum. For each star/band combination, we generated 60 s cadence lightcurves from archival Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph time-tagged photon data. Within these lightcurves, we characterized flares and stochastic fluctuations as separate forms of variability. Flares: we used a cross-correlation approach to detect 116 flares. These events occur in the time-series an average of once per 2.5 hr, over 50% last 4 minutes or less, and most produce the strongest response in Si IV. If the flare occurred during a transit measurement integrated for 60 minutes, 90/116 would destroy the signal of an Earth, 27/116 Neptune, and 7/116 Jupiter, with the upward bias in flux ranging from 1% to 109% of quiescent levels. Fluctuations: photon noise and underlying stellar fluctuations produce scatter in the quiescent data. We model the stellar fluctuations as Gaussian white noise with standard deviation σ {sub x}. Maximum likelihood values of σ {sub x} range from 1% to 41% for 60 s measurements. These values suggest that many cool stars will only permit a transit detection to high confidence in ultraviolet resonance lines if the radius of the occulting disk is ≳1 R{sub J} . However, for some M dwarfs this limit can be as low as several R {sub ⊕}.

  15. Fluctuations and Flares in the Ultraviolet Line Emission of Cool Stars: Implications for Exoplanet Transit Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, R. O. Parke; France, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Variations in stellar flux can potentially overwhelm the photometric signal of a transiting planet. Such variability has not previously been well-characterized in the ultraviolet lines used to probe the inflated atmospheres surrounding hot Jupiters. Therefore, we surveyed 38 F-M stars for intensity variations in four narrow spectroscopic bands: two enclosing strong lines from species known to inhabit hot Jupiter atmospheres, C II λλ1334, 1335 and Si III λ1206 one enclosing Si IV λλ1393, 1402; and 36.5 Å of interspersed continuum. For each star/band combination, we generated 60 s cadence lightcurves from archival Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph time-tagged photon data. Within these lightcurves, we characterized flares and stochastic fluctuations as separate forms of variability. Flares: we used a cross-correlation approach to detect 116 flares. These events occur in the time-series an average of once per 2.5 hr, over 50% last 4 minutes or less, and most produce the strongest response in Si IV. If the flare occurred during a transit measurement integrated for 60 minutes, 90/116 would destroy the signal of an Earth, 27/116 Neptune, and 7/116 Jupiter, with the upward bias in flux ranging from 1% to 109% of quiescent levels. Fluctuations: photon noise and underlying stellar fluctuations produce scatter in the quiescent data. We model the stellar fluctuations as Gaussian white noise with standard deviation σ x . Maximum likelihood values of σ x range from 1% to 41% for 60 s measurements. These values suggest that many cool stars will only permit a transit detection to high confidence in ultraviolet resonance lines if the radius of the occulting disk is gsim1 RJ . However, for some M dwarfs this limit can be as low as several R ⊕.

  16. Direct atmosphere opacity observations from CALIPSO provide new constraints on cloud-radiation interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, R.; Chepfer, H.; Noel, V.; Vaillant de Guélis, T.; Kay, J. E.; Raberanto, P.; Cesana, G.; Vaughan, M. A.; Winker, D. M.

    2017-01-01

    The spaceborne lidar CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) directly measures atmospheric opacity. In 8 years of CALIPSO observations, we find that 69% of vertical profiles penetrate through the complete atmosphere. The remaining 31% do not reach the surface, due to opaque clouds. The global mean altitude of full attenuation of the lidar beam (z_opaque) is 3.2 km, but there are large regional variations in this altitude. Of relevance to cloud-climate studies, the annual zonal mean longwave cloud radiative effect and annual zonal mean z_opaque weighted by opaque cloud cover are highly correlated (0.94). The annual zonal mean shortwave cloud radiative effect and annual zonal mean opaque cloud cover are also correlated (-0.95). The new diagnostics introduced here are implemented within a simulator framework to enable scale-aware and definition-aware evaluation of the LMDZ5B global climate model. The evaluation shows that the model overestimates opaque cloud cover (31% obs. versus 38% model) and z_opaque (3.2 km obs. versus 5.1 km model). In contrast, the model underestimates thin cloud cover (35% obs. versus 14% model). Further assessment shows that reasonable agreement between modeled and observed longwave cloud radiative effects results from compensating errors between insufficient warming by thin clouds and excessive warming due to overestimating both z_opaque and opaque cloud cover. This work shows the power of spaceborne lidar observations to directly constrain cloud-radiation interactions in both observations and models.

  17. Lidar Observations of Atmospheric CO2 Column During 2014 Summer Flight Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Harrison, F. Wallace; Fan, Tai-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Advanced knowledge in atmospheric CO2 is critical in reducing large uncertainties in predictions of the Earth' future climate. Thus, Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) from space was recommended by the U.S. National Research Council to NASA. As part of the preparation for the ASCENDS mission, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Exelis, Inc. have been collaborating in development and demonstration of the Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar approach for measuring atmospheric CO2 column from space. Airborne laser absorption lidars such as the Multi-Functional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL) and ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) operating in the 1.57 micron CO2 absorption band have been developed and tested to obtain precise atmospheric CO2 column measurements using integrated path differential absorption technique and to evaluate the potential of the space ASCENDS mission. This presentation reports the results of our lidar atmospheric CO2 column measurements from 2014 summer flight campaign. Analysis shows that for the 27 Aug OCO-2 under flight over northern California forest regions, significant variations of CO2 column approximately 2 ppm) in the lower troposphere have been observed, which may be a challenge for space measurements owing to complicated topographic condition, heterogeneity of surface reflection and difference in vegetation evapotranspiration. Compared to the observed 2011 summer CO2 drawdown (about 8 ppm) over mid-west, 2014 summer drawdown in the same region measured was much weak (approximately 3 ppm). The observed drawdown difference could be the results of the changes in both meteorological states and the phases of growing seasons. Individual lidar CO2 column measurements of 0.1-s integration were within 1-2 ppm of the CO2 estimates obtained from on-board in-situ sensors. For weak surface reflection conditions such as ocean surfaces, the 1- s integrated signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of

  18. Video Observations, Atmospheric Path, Orbit and Fragmentation Record of the Fall of the Peekskill Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceplecha, Z.; Brown, P.; Hawkes, R. L.; Wertherill, G.; Beech, M.; Mossman, K.

    1996-02-01

    Large Near-Earth-Asteroids have played a role in modifying the character of the surface geology of the Earth over long time scales through impacts. Recent modeling of the disruption of large meteoroids during atmospheric flight has emphasized the dramatic effects that smaller objects may also have on the Earth's surface. However, comparison of these models with observations has not been possible until now. Peekskill is only the fourth meteorite to have been recovered for which detailed and precise data exist on the meteoroid atmospheric trajectory and orbit. Consequently, there are few constraints on the position of meteorites in the solar system before impact on Earth. In this paper, the preliminary analysis based on 4 from all 15 video recordings of the fireball of October 9, 1992 which resulted in the fall of a 12.4 kg ordinary chondrite (H6 monomict breccia) in Peekskill, New York, will be given. Preliminary computations revealed that the Peekskill fireball was an Earth-grazing event, the third such case with precise data available. The body with an initial mass of the order of 104 kg was in a pre-collision orbit with a = 1.5 AU, an aphelion of slightly over 2 AU and an inclination of 5‡. The no-atmosphere geocentric trajectory would have lead to a perigee of 22 km above the Earth's surface, but the body never reached this point due to tremendous fragmentation and other forms of ablation. The dark flight of the recovered meteorite started from a height of 30 km, when the velocity dropped below 3 km/s, and the body continued 50 km more without ablation, until it hit a parked car in Peekskill, New York with a velocity of about 80 m/s. Our observations are the first video records of a bright fireball and the first motion pictures of a fireball with an associated meteorite fall.

  19. Observed and simulated global distribution and budget of atmospheric C2-C5 alkanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelieveld

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The primary sources and atmospheric chemistry of C2-C5 alkanes were incorporated into the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC. Model output is compared with new observations from the NOAA/ESRL GMD Cooperative Air Sampling Network. Based on the global coverage of the data, two different anthropogenic emission datasets for C4-C5 alkanes, widely used in the modelling community, are evaluated. We show that the model reproduces the main atmospheric features of the C2-C5 alkanes (e.g., seasonality. While the simulated values for ethane and propane are within a 20% range of the measurements, larger deviations are found for the other tracers. According to the analysis, an oceanic source of butanes and pentanes larger than the current estimates would be necessary to match the observations at some coastal stations. Finally the effect of C2-C5 alkanes on the concentration of acetone and acetaldehyde are assessed. Their chemical sources are largely controlled by the reaction with OH, while the reactions with NO3 and Cl contribute only to a little extent. The total amount of acetone produced by propane, i-butane and i-pentane oxidation is 11.2 Tg/yr, 4.3 Tg/yr, and 5.8 Tg/yr, respectively. Moreover, 18.1, 3.1, 3.4, 1.4 and 4.8 Tg/yr of acetaldehyde are formed by the oxidation of ethane, propane, n-butane, n-pentane and i-pentane, respectively.

  20. Energetic electron acceleration observed by MMS in the vicinity of an X-line crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Turner, D. L.; Wilder, F. D.; Osmane, A.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Reeves, G. D.; Ergun, R. E.; Giles, B. L.; Gershman, D. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    During the first months of observations, the Magnetospheric Multiscale Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Spectrometer instrument has observed several instances of electron acceleration up to >100 keV while in the vicinity of the dayside reconnection region. While particle acceleration associated with magnetic reconnection has been seen to occur up to these energies in the tail region, it had not yet been reported at the magnetopause. This study reports on observations of electron acceleration up to hundreds of keV that were recorded on 19 September 2015 around 1000 UT, in the midst of an X-line crossing. In the region surrounding the X-line, whistler-mode and broadband electrostatic waves were observed simultaneously with the appearance of highly energetic electrons which exhibited significant energization in the perpendicular direction. The mechanisms by which particles may be accelerated via reconnection-related processes are intrinsic to understanding particle dynamics among a wide range of spatial scales and plasma environments.

  1. CO Spectral Line Energy Distributions in Orion Sources: Templates for Extragalactic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indriolo, Nick; Bergin, Edwin A.; Goicoechea, Javier; Schilke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Relative populations in the excited rotational levels of CO are sensitive to conditions in the interstellar medium. Emission lines originating in these levels can thus be used in constraining parameters such as density, temperature, and radiation field. The Herschel Space Observatory has enabled the observation of CO emission lines arising from the J=4 through J=48 rotational levels, many of which are detected in different sources within the Orion star-forming region. We present observations of CO emission toward Orion KL, Orion H2 Peak 1, Orion South, and the Orion Bar, all of which show distinctive CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) indicating the different excitation mechanisms at work. Using the high spectral resolution HIFI observations, we decompose emission line profiles into multiple components (e.g., shock, outflow, photodissociation region, ambient cloud) in order to characterize the CO SLED associated with each component. In doing so, we generate templates for the various excitation mechanisms that can be applied toward understanding the processes occurring in unresolved star-forming regions where CO observations have been made.

  2. Absorption-line strengths of 18 late-type spiral galaxies observed with SAURON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganda, Katia; Peletier, Reynier F.; McDermid, Richard M.; Falcon-Barroso, Jesus; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Bacon, Roland; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Emsellem, Eric; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Sarzi, Marc; van de Ven, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    We present absorption line strength maps for a sample of 18 Sb-Sd galaxies observed using the integral-field spectrograph SAURON operating at the William Herschel Telescope on La Palma, as part of a project devoted to the investigation of the kinematics and stellar populations of late-type spirals,

  3. A possible edge effect in enhanced network. [solar K-line observations by multichannel spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, H. P.; Brown, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    K-line observations of enhanced network taken with the NASA/SPO Multichannel Spectrometer on September 28, 1975, in support of OSO-8 are discussed. The data show a correlation between core brightness and asymmetry for spatial scans which cross enhanced network boundaries. The implications of this result concerning mass flow in and near supergranule boundaries are discussed.

  4. A possible edge effect in enhanced network. [solar K-line observations by multichannel spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, H. P.; Brown, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    K-line observations of enhanced network taken with the NASA/SPO Multichannel Spectrometer on September 28, 1975, in support of OSO-8 are discussed. The data show a correlation between core brightness and asymmetry for spatial scans which cross enhanced network boundaries. The implications of this result concerning mass flow in and near supergranule boundaries are discussed.

  5. Argentinian multi-wavelength scanning Raman lidar to observe night sky atmospheric transmission

    CERN Document Server

    Pallotta, Juan; Otero, Lidia; Chouza, Fernando; Raul, Delia; Gonzalez, Francisco; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Quel, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the multi-wavelength scanning Raman lidar being built at Lidar Division, CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET) in the frame of the Argentinean Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) collaboration to measure the spectral characteristics of the atmospheric aerosol extinction profiles to provide better transmission calculations at the future CTA site. This lidar emits short laser pulses of 7-9 ns at 355, 532 and 1064 nm at 50 Hz with nominal energy of 125 mJ at 1064 nm. This wavelengths are also used to retrieve the atmospheric (air, aerosol and clouds) backscattered radiation in the UV, VIS and IR ranges. Raman capabilities were added in the UV and VIS wavelengths to retrieve the spectral characteristics of the aerosol extinction and the water vapor profile. Due to the expected low aerosol optical depth of the future site, the short observation period as well as the extension of the observation, an enhanced collection area is required. This system uses six 40 cm f/2.5 newtonian telescopes to avoid dealing with...

  6. Neural Network Based Retrieval of Atmospheric Temperature Profile Using AMSU-A Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Gangwar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes artificial neural network (ANN based approach for the retrieval of atmospheric temperature profiles from AMSU-A microwave temperature sounder. The nonlinear relationship between the temperature profiles and satellite brightness temperatures dictates the use of ANN, which is inherently nonlinear in nature. Since latitudinal variation of temperature is dominant one in the Earth’s atmosphere, separate network configurations have been established for different latitudinal belts, namely, tropics, mid-latitudes, and polar regions. Moreover, as surface emissivity in the microwave region of electromagnetic spectrum significantly influences the radiance (or equivalently the brightness temperature at the satellite altitude, separate algorithms have been developed for land and ocean for training the networks. Temperature profiles from National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP analysis and brightness temperature observations of AMSU-A onboard NOAA-19 for the year 2010 have been used for training of the networks. Further, the algorithm has been tested on the independent dataset comprising several months of 2012 AMSU-A observations. Finally, an error analysis has been performed by comparing retrieved profiles with collocated temperature profiles from NCEP. Errors in the tropical region are found to be less than those in the mid-latitude and polar regions. Also, in each region the errors over ocean are less than the corresponding ones over land.

  7. Observations and methodology of atmospheric ammonia within the Colorado Rocky Mountain pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdina, Amy; Moravek, Alexander; Murphy, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Concentrations of trace gases (HCl, HNO3, HONO, NH3, SO2) and particle phase constituents from fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were continuously measured using an online ambient ion monitor ion chromatograph (AIM-IC) within the canopy at the Rocky Mountain Research Station (Manitou Experimental Forest) in Woodland Park, Colorado, from July 31 - August 12 2015. A consistent diurnal pattern of ammonia mixing ratios was observed, ranging from 0.1 - 2.6 ppb. Analysis of PM2.5ammonium was below the 130 ng m-3 detection limit of the instrument, which was corroborated by parallel particle concentration data also gathered at the site showing extremely low overall particle concentrations in the order of 103. As a result, variability in gas phase ammonia can be attributed to surface-atmosphere exchange and/or transport rather than gas particle partitioning. Complimentary analysis of ammonium found within the pine needles and the soil was also performed on site using established extraction methods and analysis by ion chromatography. Emissions potentials calculated from observed ammonium levels were generally consistent in the pine needles showing stomatal emission potentials within the range of 28 - 60, whereas the soil data varied widely, spanning 5 - 2100. The measurements are used to quantify compensation points of ammonia representative of the canopy and ground at the site to better predict the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of ammonia within the forest.

  8. High-resolution observations of flare precursors in the low solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haimin; Liu, Chang; Ahn, Kwangsu; Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Deng, Na; Huang, Nengyi; Liu, Rui; Kusano, Kanya; Fleishman, Gregory D.; Gary, Dale E.; Cao, Wenda

    2017-03-01

    Solar flares are generally believed to be powered by free magnetic energy stored in the corona1, but the build up of coronal energy alone may be insufficient to trigger the flare to occur2. The flare onset mechanism is a critical but poorly understood problem, insights into which could be gained from small-scale energy releases known as precursors. These precursors are observed as small pre-flare brightenings in various wavelengths3-13 and also from certain small-scale magnetic configurations such as opposite-polarity fluxes14-16, where the magnetic orientation of small bipoles is opposite to that of the ambient main polarities. However, high-resolution observations of flare precursors together with the associated photospheric magnetic field dynamics are lacking. Here we study precursors of a flare using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope, complemented by new microwave data. Two episodes of precursor brightenings are initiated at a small-scale magnetic channel17-20 (a form of opposite-polarity flux) with multiple polarity inversions and enhanced magnetic fluxes and currents, lying near the footpoints of sheared magnetic loops. Microwave spectra corroborate that these precursor emissions originate in the atmosphere. These results provide evidence of low-atmospheric small-scale energy release, possibly linked to the onset of the main flare.

  9. The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO: A new tool for atmospheric boundary layer research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Reuder

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO has been developed as a cost-efficient measurement system with the aim to close the existing observational gap of atmospheric measurement systems in between meteorological masts/towers and radiosondes. The system is highly flexible and has the capability for in-situ ABL measurements with unique spatial and temporal resolution. SUMO is based on a light-weighted styrofoam model airplane, equipped with an autopilot system for autonomous flight missions and in its recent version with meteorological sensors for temperature, humidity and pressure. With its wingspan of 80 cm, its length of 75 cm and a total lift-off weight of 580 g, SUMO is easy to transport and operate even in remote areas with limited infrastructure. During several field campaigns in 2007 and 2008 the system has been successfully tested and operated. Atmospheric profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction have been determined up to 3500 m above ground during the FLOHOF (FLOw over and around HOFsjökull field campaign in Central Iceland in July/August 2007. During a 3 week campaign on and around Spitsbergen in February/March 2008 the SUMO system also proved its functionality under polar conditions, reaching altitudes above 1500 m even at ground temperatures of -20° C and wind speeds up to 15 m s-1.

  10. The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO. A new tool for atmospheric boundary layer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuder, Joachim; Jonassen, Marius; Mayer, Stephanie [Bergen Univ. (Norway). Geophysical Inst.; Brisset, Pascal [Ecole Nationale de l' Aviation Civile (ENAC), Toulouse (France); Mueller, Martin [Martin Mueller Engineering, Hildesheim (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO has been developed as a cost-efficient measurement system with the aim to close the existing observational gap of atmospheric measurement systems in between meteorological masts/towers and radiosondes. The system is highly flexible and has the capability for in-situ ABL measurements with unique spatial and temporal resolution. SUMO is based on a light-weighted styrofoam model airplane, equipped with an autopilot system for autonomous flight missions and in its recent version with meteorological sensors for temperature, humidity and pressure. With its wingspan of 80 cm, its length of 75 cm and a total lift-off weight of 580 g, SUMO is easy to transport and operate even in remote areas with limited infrastructure. During several field campaigns in 2007 and 2008 the system has been successfully tested and operated. Atmospheric profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction have been determined up to 3500 m above ground during the FLOHOF (FLOw over and around HOFsjoekull) field campaign in Central Iceland in July/August 2007. During a 3 week campaign on and around Spitsbergen in February/March 2008 the SUMO system also proved its functionality under polar conditions, reaching altitudes above 1500 m even at ground temperatures of -20 C and wind speeds up to 15 m s{sup -1}. (orig.)

  11. Photolysis rate coefficients in the upper atmosphere: Effect of line by line calculations of the O{sub 2} absorption cross section in the Schumann-Runge bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Rafael P. [INFIQC, Centro Laser de Ciencias Moleculares, Departamento de Fisico Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, 5000, Cordoba (Argentina); Palancar, Gustavo G. [INFIQC, Centro Laser de Ciencias Moleculares, Departamento de Fisico Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, 5000, Cordoba (Argentina)]. E-mail: palancar@fcq.unc.edu.ar; Madronich, Sasha [Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table mesa Drive, Boulder, CO, 80303 (United States); Toselli, Beatriz M. [INFIQC, Centro Laser de Ciencias Moleculares, Departamento de Fisico Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, 5000, Cordoba (Argentina)]. E-mail: tosellib@fcq.unc.edu.ar

    2007-03-15

    A line by line (LBL) method to calculate highly resolved O{sub 2} absorption cross sections in the Schumann-Runge (SR) bands region was developed and integrated in the widely used Tropospheric Ultraviolet Visible (TUV) model to calculate accurate photolysis rate coefficients (J values) in the upper atmosphere at both small and large solar zenith angles (SZA). In order to obtain the O{sub 2} cross section between 49,000 and 57,000cm{sup -1}, an algorithm which considers the position, strength, and half width of each spectral line was used. Every transition was calculated by using the HIgh-resolution TRANsmission molecular absorption database (HITRAN) and a Voigt profile. The temperature dependence of both the strength and the half widths was considered within the range of temperatures characteristic of the US standard atmosphere, although the results show a very good agreement also at 79K. The cross section calculation was carried out on a 0.5cm{sup -1} grid and the contributions from all the lines lying at +/-500cm{sup -1} were considered for every wavelength. Both the SR and the Herzberg continuums were included. By coupling the LBL method to the TUV model, full radiative transfer calculations that compute J values including Rayleigh scattering at high altitudes and large SZA can now be done. Thus, the J values calculations were performed for altitudes from 0 to 120km and for SZA up to 89{sup o}. The results show, in the J{sub O{sub 2}} case, differences of more than +/-10% (e.g. at 96km and 30{sup o}) when compared against the last version of the TUV model (4.4), which uses the Koppers and Murtagh parameterization for the O{sub 2} cross section. Consequently, the J values of species with cross sections overlapping the SR band region show variable differences at lower altitudes. Although many species have been analyzed, the results for only four of them (O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, HNO{sub 3}, CFC12) are presented. Due to the fact that the HNO{sub 3} absorption cross

  12. New observational capabilities on atmospheric sciences of the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) Graciosa island ARM facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitschke, Kim; Ortega, Paul; Azevedo, Eduardo; Miller, Mark

    2016-04-01

    One source of uncertainty that thwarts accurate and comprehensive representation of the present and future climate in models is the response of shallow cloud systems to changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols. Low clouds systems that prevail over subtropical oceans, in particular, play a critical role in boundary layer dynamics and in the global climate, despite being poorly represented in climate models. The Azores have been identified as an optimal site to conduct research aimed at better understanding the physical processes and life cycle of marine stratocumulus and other marine boundary layer clouds. The United States Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Program has been providing data to advance research from atmospheric observations at diverse climatic regimes around the world (http://www.arm.gov/) for over 20 years. Since 2009, the Azores has been included in this global program. The campaign of the ARM Mobile Facility at Graciosa Island, Azores, in the context of the Clouds, Aerosol and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) project, added the most extensive and comprehensive dataset of marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds to date. Solid preliminary findings from this valuable data set have been used to understand interactions between the cloud microphysical and macrophysical processes in marine boundary layer clouds that play a fundamental role in the cloud dynamics and precipitation, which in turn determine cloud radiative properties that impact on the energy balance of the Earth. Based upon the design and siting from the previous ARM Mobile Facility in support of CAP-MBL, the new Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) fixed site joined the global network of ARM Climate Research Facilities in October 2013. Since then, this user facility has augmented its baseline measurement capability to include a Ka-/W-Band scanning cloud radar, an X-Band precipitation radar and Raman and Doppler lidars. Coupled

  13. Atmospheric observations and emissions estimates of methane and nitrous oxide from regional to global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort, Eric Adam

    2011-12-01

    Methane (CH4) and Nitrous Oxide (N2O) are the two most significant anthropogenic, long-lived, non-CO2 greenhouse gases, together perturbing the earth's energy balance by an amount comparable to that of CO2. This dissertation will focus on the use of atmospheric observations to quantify emissions of CH4 and N2O. First top-down emissions constraints on the regional scale, covering large areas of the U.S and southern Canada, are derived from airborne observations made in Spring of 2003. Using a receptor-oriented Lagrangian particle dispersion model provides robust validation of bottom-up emission estimates from EDGAR 32FT2000 and GEIA inventories. It is found that EDGAR CH4 emission rates are slightly low by a factor of 1.08 +/- 0.15 (2 sigma), while both EDGAR and GEIA N2O emissions are significantly too low, by factors of 2.62 +/- 0.50 and 3.05 +/- 0.61 respectively. This analysis is then extended over a full calendar year in 2004 with observations from NOAA's tall tower and aircraft profile network. EDGAR 32FT2000 CH 4 emissions are found to be consistent with observations, though the newer EDGAR v4.0 reduces CH4 emissions by 30%, and this reduction is not consistent with this study. Scaling factors found for N2O in May/June of 2003 (2.62 & 3.05) are found to hold for February-May of 2004, suggesting inventories are significantly too low in primary growing season coincident with significant fertilizer inputs. A new instrument for airborne observation of CO2, CH 4, N2O, and CO is introduced, and its operation and in-field performance are highlighted (demonstrated 1-sec precisions of 20 ppb, 0.5 ppb, 0.09 ppb, and 0.15 ppb respectively). Finally, global N2O observations collected with this sensor on the HIPPO (Hlaper Pole to Pole Observations) campaign are assessed. Comparison with a global model and subsequent inversion indicates strong, episodic inputs of nitrous oxide from tropical regions are necessary to bring observations and model in agreement. Findings

  14. Coseismic deformation observed with radar interferometry: Great earthquakes and atmospheric noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Chelsea Phipps

    Spatially dense maps of coseismic deformation derived from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) datasets result in valuable constraints on earthquake processes. The recent increase in the quantity of observations of coseismic deformation facilitates the examination of signals in many tectonic environments associated with earthquakes of varying magnitude. Efforts to place robust constraints on the evolution of the crustal stress field following great earthquakes often rely on knowledge of the earthquake location, the fault geometry, and the distribution of slip along the fault plane. Well-characterized uncertainties and biases strengthen the quality of inferred earthquake source parameters, particularly when the associated ground displacement signals are near the detection limit. Well-preserved geomorphic records of earthquakes offer additional insight into the mechanical behavior of the shallow crust and the kinematics of plate boundary systems. Together, geodetic and geologic observations of crustal deformation offer insight into the processes that drive seismic cycle deformation over a range of timescales. In this thesis, I examine several challenges associated with the inversion of earthquake source parameters from SAR data. Variations in atmospheric humidity, temperature, and pressure at the timing of SAR acquisitions result in spatially correlated phase delays that are challenging to distinguish from signals of real ground deformation. I characterize the impact of atmospheric noise on inferred earthquake source parameters following elevation-dependent atmospheric corrections. I analyze the spatial and temporal variations in the statistics of atmospheric noise from both reanalysis weather models and InSAR data itself. Using statistics that reflect the spatial heterogeneity of atmospheric characteristics, I examine parameter errors for several synthetic cases of fault slip on a basin-bounding normal fault. I show a decrease in uncertainty in fault

  15. Observation of the Emission Spectra of an Atmospheric Pressure Radio-frequency Plasma Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using radio-frequency (13.56 MHz)power has been developed to produce homogeneous glow discharge at low temperature. With optical emission spectroscopy, we observed the excited species (atomic helium, atomic oxygen and metastable oxygen) generated in this APPJ and their dependence on gas composition ratio and RF power. O and O2(b1∑g+) are found in the effluent outside the jet by measuring the emission spectra of effluent perpendicular to the jet. An interesting phenomenon is found that there is an abnormal increase of O emission intensity (777.4 nm) between 10 mm and 40 mm away from the nozzle. This observation result is very helpful in practical operation.

  16. The Impact of Assimilating Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Observation on the Forecast of Typhoon Tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Ben Chou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work assesses the effects of assimilating atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS observations on typhoon prediction using the three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVAR and forecasting system of the weather research and forecasting (WRF model. Two major parameters in the data assimilation scheme, the spatial decorrelation scale and the magnitude of the covariance matrix of the background error, are varied in forecast experiments for the track of typhoon Sinlaku over the Western Pacific. The results show that within a wide parameter range, the inclusion of the AIRS observation improves the prediction. Outside this range, notably when the decorrelation scale of the background error is set to a large value, forcing the assimilation of AIRS data leads to degradation of the forecast. This illustrates how the impact of satellite data on the forecast depends on the adjustable parameters for data assimilation. The parameter-sweeping framework is potentially useful for improving operational typhoon prediction.

  17. Events related to lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling observed by DEMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrot, Michel; Hattori, Katsumi; Liu, Tiger; Namgaladze, Alexander; Ouzounov, Dimitar; Pulinets, Sergey; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2015-04-01

    There are several models of Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere-Magnetosphere (LAIM) coupling to explain ionospheric perturbations which are observed prior to earthquakes. In 2013 an ISSI Team led by S. Pulinets (RU) and D. Ouzounov (US) started to work with the following aim: "Multi-instrument Space-Borne Observations and Validation of the Physical Model of the LAIM Coupling" (see http://www.issibern.ch/teams/spaceborneobserve/). In the frame of this model validation several events have been studied with the DEMETER satellite data. It concerns the effects of (i) the ancient natural nuclear reactor located at Oklo (Gabon), (ii) the sand storms in Sahara, (iii) the volcanic activity, (iv) the lightning activity, and (v) the hurricanes. The main signature of these events in the ionosphere will be shown in this presentation.

  18. A virtual remote sensing observation network for continuous, near-real-time monitoring of atmospheric instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporov, Maria; Löhnert, Ulrich; Potthast, Roland; Cimini, Domenico; De Angelis, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Short-term forecasts of current high-resolution numerical weather prediction models still have large deficits in forecasting the exact temporal and spatial location of severe, locally influenced weather such as summer-time convective storms or cool season lifted stratus or ground fog. Often, the thermodynamic instability - especially in the boundary layer - plays an essential role in the evolution of weather events. While the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere is well measured close to the surface (i.e. 2 m) by in-situ sensors and in the upper troposphere by satellite sounders, the planetary boundary layer remains a largely under-sampled region of the atmosphere where only sporadic information from radiosondes or aircraft observations is available. The major objective of the presented DWD-funded project ARON (Extramural Research Programme) is to overcome this observational gap and to design an optimized network of ground based microwave radiometers (MWR) and compact Differential Absorption Lidars (DIAL) for a continuous, near-real-time monitoring of temperature and humidity in the atmospheric boundary layer in order to monitor thermodynamic (in)stability. Previous studies showed, that microwave profilers are well suited for continuously monitoring the temporal development of atmospheric stability (i.e. Cimini et al., 2015) before the initiation of deep convection, especially in the atmospheric boundary layer. However, the vertical resolution of microwave temperature profiles is best in the lowest kilometer above the surface, decreasing rapidly with increasing height. In addition, humidity profile retrievals typically cannot be resolved with more than two degrees of freedom for signal, resulting in a rather poor vertical resolution throughout the troposphere. Typical stability indices used to assess the potential of convection rely on temperature and humidity values not only in the region of the boundary layer but also in the layers above. Therefore, satellite

  19. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As(+)) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH(+)) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As(+) through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As(+) signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH(+) signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As(+). Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. A Suzaku Observation of the Low-Ionization Fe-Line Emission from RCW 86

    CERN Document Server

    Ueno, M; Kataoka, J; Bamba, A; Harrus, I; Hiraga, J; Hughes, J P; Kilbourne, C A; Koyama, K; Kokubun, M; Nakajima, H; Ozaki, M; Petre, R; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tomida, H; Yamaguchi, H; Ueno, Masaru; Sato, Rie; Kataoka, Jun; Bamba, Aya; Harrus, Ilana; Hiraga, Junko; Hughes, John P.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Koyama, Katsuji; Kokubun, Motohide; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Petre, Robert; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tomida, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2006-01-01

    The newly operational X-ray satellite Suzaku observed the southwestern quadrant of the supernova remnant (SNR) RCW 86 in February 2006 to study the nature of the 6.4 keV emission line first detected with the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astronomy (ASCA). The new data confirm the existence of the line, localizing it for the first time; most of the line emission is adjacent and interior to the forward shock and not at the locus of the continuum hard emission. We also report the first detection of a 7.1 keV line that we interpret as the K-beta emission from low-ionization iron. The Fe-K line features are consistent with a non-equilibrium plasma of Fe-rich ejecta with n_{e}t <~ 10^9 cm^-3 s and kT_{e} ~ 5 keV. This combination of low n_{e}t and high kT_{e} suggests collisionless electron heating in an SNR shock. The Fe K-alpha line shows evidence for intrinsic broadening, with a width of 47 (34--59) eV (99% error region). The difference of the spatial distributions of the hard continuum above 3 keV and...

  1. HST WFC3 Early Release Science: Emission-Line Galaxies from IR Grism Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Straughn, A N; Kuemmel, M; Walsh, J R; Cohen, S H; Gardner, J P; Windhorst, R A; O'Connell, R W; Pirzkal, N; Meurer, G; McCarthy, P J; Hathi, N P; Malhotra, S; Rhoads, J; Balick, B; Bond, H E; Calzetti, D; Disney, M J; Dopita, M A; Frogel, J A; Hall, D N B; Holtzman, J A; Kimble, R A; Luppino, G; Paresce, F; Saha, A; Silk, J I; Trauger, J T; Walker, A R; Whitmore, B C; Young, E T

    2010-01-01

    We present grism spectra of emission--line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6--1.6 microns from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L (0.6--0.95 micron) grism data in GOODS--South, extending the wavelength covereage well past the G800L red cutoff. The ERS grism field was observed at a depth of 2 orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which are presented here. ELGs are studied via the \\Ha, \\OIII, and \\OII\\ emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2$\\cle$z$\\cle$1.6, 1.2$\\cle$z$\\cle$2.4 and 2.0$\\cle$z$\\cle$3.6 respectively in the G102 (0.8--1.1 microns; R$\\sim$210) and G141 (1.1--1.6 microns; R$\\sim$130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., \\SII\\ and \\SIII\\ lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star--formation rates, and grism s...

  2. Synthetic Observations of Carbon Lines of Turbulent Flows in Diffuse Multiphase Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, M; Omukai, K; Inutsuka, S

    2006-01-01

    We examine observational characteristics of multi-phase turbulent flows in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) using a synthetic radiation field of atomic and molecular lines. We consider the multi-phase ISM which is formed by thermal instability under the irradiation of UV photons with moderate visual extinction $A_V\\sim 1$. Radiation field maps of C$^{+}$, C$^0$, and CO line emissions were generated by calculating the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (nonLTE) level populations from the results of high resolution hydrodynamic simulations of diffuse ISM models. By analyzing synthetic radiation field of carbon lines of [\\ion{C}{2}] 158 $\\mu$m, [\\ion{C}{1}] $^3P_2-^3P_1$ (809 GHz), $^3P_1-^3P_0$ (492 GHz), and CO rotational transitions, we found a high ratio between the lines of high- and low-excitation energies in the diffuse multi-phase interstellar medium. This shows that simultaneous observations of the lines of warm- and cold-gas tracers will be useful in examining the thermal structure, and hence the...

  3. A Chandra HETGS observation of the Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy Ark 564

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, C; Marshall, H L; Matsumoto, Chiho; Leighly, Karen M.; Marshall, Herman L.

    2004-01-01

    We present results from a 50 ks observation of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy Ark 564 with the Chandra HETGS. The spectra above 2 keV are modeled by a power-law with a photon-index of 2.56+/-0.06. We confirm the presence of the soft excess below about 1.5 keV. If we fit the excess with blackbody model, the best-fit temperature is 0.124 keV. Ark 564 has been reported to show a peculiar emission line-like feature at 1 keV in various observations using lower resolution detectors, and the Chandra grating spectroscopy rules out an origin of blends of several narrow emission lines. We detect an edge-like feature at 0.712 keV in the source rest frame. The preferred interpretation of this feature is combination of the O VII K-edge and a number of L-absorption lines from slightly ionized iron, which suggests a warm absorber with ionization parameter xi~1 and N_H ~ 10^21 cm^-2. These properties are roughly consistent with those of the UV absorber. We also detect narrow absorption lines of O VII, O VIII, Ne IX, Ne X, ...

  4. Herschel observations of extra-ordinary sources: Detecting spiral arm clouds by CH absorption lines

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, S -L; Comito, C; Möller, T; Rolffs, R; Müller, H S P; Belloche, A; Menten, K M; Lis, D C; Phillips, T G; Bergin, E A; Bell, T A; Crockett, N R; Blake, G A; Cabrit, S; Caux, E; Ceccarelli, C; Cernicharo, J; Daniel, F; Dubernet, M -L; Emprechtinger, M; Encrenaz, P; Falgarone, E; Gerin, M; Giesen, T F; Goicoechea, J R; Goldsmith, P F; Gupta, H; Herbst, E; Joblin, C; Johnstone, D; Langer, W D; Lord, S D; Maret, S; Martin, P G; Melnick, G J; Morris, P; Murphy, J A; Neufeld, D A; Ossenkopf, V; Pagani, L; Pearson, J C; Pérault, M; Plume, R; Salez, M; Schlemmer, S; Stutzki, J; Trappe, N; van der Tak, F F S; Vastel, C; Wang, S; Yorke, H W; Yu, S; Zmuidzinas, J; Boogert, A; Güsten, R; Hartogh, P; Honingh, N; Karpov, A; Kooi, J; Krieg, J M; Schieder, R; Diez-Gonzalez, M C; Bachille, R; Martin-Pintado, J; Baechtold, W; Olberg, M; Nordh, L H; Gill, J L; Chattopadhyay, G

    2010-01-01

    We have observed CH absorption lines ($J=3/2, N=1 \\leftarrow J=1/2, N=1$) against the continuum source Sgr~B2(M) using the \\textit{Herschel}/HIFI instrument. With the high spectral resolution and wide velocity coverage provided by HIFI, 31 CH absorption features with different radial velocities and line widths are detected and identified. The narrower line width and lower column density clouds show `spiral arm' cloud characteristics, while the absorption component with the broadest line width and highest column density corresponds to the gas from the Sgr~B2 envelope. The observations show that each `spiral arm' harbors multiple velocity components, indicating that the clouds are not uniform and that they have internal structure. This line-of-sight through almost the entire Galaxy offers unique possibilities to study the basic chemistry of simple molecules in diffuse clouds, as a variety of different cloud classes are sampled simultaneously. We find that the linear relationship between CH and H$_2$ column dens...

  5. Evaluation of Atmospheric Precipitable Water from Reanalysis Products Using Homogenized Radiosonde Observations over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T.; Wang, J.; Dai, A.

    2015-12-01

    Many multi-decadal atmospheric reanalysis products are avialable now, but their consistencies and reliability are far from perfect. In this study, atmospheric precipitable water (PW) from the NCEP/NCAR, NCEP/DOE, MERRA, JRA-55, JRA-25, ERA-Interim, ERA-40, CFSR and 20CR reanalyses is evaluated against homogenized radiosonde observations over China during 1979-2012 (1979-2001 for ERA-40). Results suggest that the PW biases in the reanalyses are within ˜20% for most of northern and eastern China, but the reanalyses underestimate the observed PW by 20%-40% over western China, and by ˜60% over the southwestern Tibetan Plateau. The newer-generation reanalyses (e.g., JRA25, JRA55, CFSR and ERA-Interim) have smaller root-mean-square error (RMSE) than the older-generation ones (NCEP/NCAR, NCEP/DOE and ERA-40). Most of the reanalyses reproduce well the observed PW climatology and interannual variations over China. However, few reanalyses capture the observed long-term PW changes, primarily because they show spurious wet biases before about 2002. This deficiency results mainly from the discontinuities contained in reanalysis RH fields in the mid-lower troposphere due to the wet bias in older radiosonde records that are assimilated into the reanalyses. An empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis revealed two leading modes that represent the long-term PW changes and ENSO-related interannual variations with robust spatial patterns. The reanalysis products, especially the MERRA and JRA-25, roughly capture these EOF modes, which account for over 50% of the total variance. The results show that even during the post-1979 satellite era, discontinuities in radiosonde data can still induce large spurious long-term changes in reanalysis PW and other related fields. Thus, more efforts are needed to remove spurious changes in input data for future long-term reanlayses.

  6. Global observations and modeling of atmosphere-surface exchange of elemental mercury: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Lin, Che-Jen; Wang, Xun; Sommar, Jonas; Fu, Xuewu; Feng, Xinbin

    2016-04-01

    Reliable quantification of air-surface fluxes of elemental Hg vapor (Hg0) is crucial for understanding mercury (Hg) global biogeochemical cycles. There have been extensive measurements and modeling efforts devoted to estimating the exchange fluxes between the atmosphere and various surfaces (e.g., soil, canopies, water, snow, etc.) in the past three decades. However, large uncertainties remain due to the complexity of Hg0 bidirectional exchange, limitations of flux quantification techniques and challenges in model parameterization. In this study, we provide a critical review on the state of science in the atmosphere-surface exchange of Hg0. Specifically, the advancement of flux quantification techniques, mechanisms in driving the air-surface Hg exchange and modeling efforts are presented. Due to the semi-volatile nature of Hg0 and redox transformation of Hg in environmental media, Hg deposition and evasion are influenced by multiple environmental variables including seasonality, vegetative coverage and its life cycle, temperature, light, moisture, atmospheric turbulence and the presence of reactants (e.g., O3, radicals, etc.). However, the effects of these processes on flux have not been fundamentally and quantitatively determined, which limits the accuracy of flux modeling. We compile an up-to-date global observational flux database and discuss the implication of flux data on the global Hg budget. Mean Hg0 fluxes obtained by micrometeorological measurements do not appear to be significantly greater than the fluxes measured by dynamic flux chamber methods over unpolluted surfaces (p = 0.16, one-tailed, Mann-Whitney U test). The spatiotemporal coverage of existing Hg0 flux measurements is highly heterogeneous with large data gaps existing in multiple continents (Africa, South Asia, Middle East, South America and Australia). The magnitude of the evasion flux is strongly enhanced by human activities, particularly at contaminated sites. Hg0 flux observations in East

  7. Dark matter line emission constraints from NuSTAR observations of the Bullet Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riemer-Sørensen, S.; Wik, D.; Madejski, G.

    2015-01-01

    Some dark matter candidates, e.g., sterile neutrinos, provide observable signatures in the form of mono-energetic line emission. We present the first search for dark matter line emission in the range in a pointed observation of the Bullet Cluster with NuSTAR. We do not detect any significant line...

  8. Herschel-PACS observation of gas lines from the disc around HD141569A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi, Wing-Fai; Pinte, Christophe; Pantin, Eric; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Ménard, Francois; Martin-Zaidi, Claire; Woitke, Peter; Riviere-Marichalar, Pablo; Kamp, Inga; Carmona, Andres; Sandell, Goran; Eiroa, Carlos; Dent, William; Montesinos, Benjamin; Aresu, Giambattista; Meijerink, Rowin; Spaans, Marco; White, Glenn; Ardila, David; Lebreton, Jeremy; Mendigutia, Ignacio; Brittain, Sean

    2013-07-01

    At the distance of ˜ 99-116 pc, HD141569A is one of the nearest HerbigAe stars that is surrounded by a tenuous disc, probably in transition between a massive primordial disc and a debris disc. We observed the fine-structure lines of O I at 63 and 145 μm , and the C II line at 157 μm with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Telescope as part of the open-time large programme GASPS. We complemented the atomic line observations with Spitzer spectroscopic and photometric continuum data, ground-based VLT-VISIR image at 8.6 microns, and 12CO J=3-2 observations. We simultaneously modelled the continuum emission and the line fluxes with the Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code MCFOST and the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo to derive the disc gas and dust properties. We modelled the [O I] lines at 63 μm and at 145 μm, and the [C II] line at 157 μm. The models show that the oxygen lines are emitted from the inner disc around HD141569A, whereas the [C II] line emission is more extended. The CO submillimeter flux is emitted from the outer disc. Simultaneous modelling of the photometric and line data using a realistic disc structure suggests a dust mass derived from grains having a radius less than 1 mm of ˜ 2.1 × 10-7M⊙ and a total solid mass of 4.9 × 10-6 M⊙ . We constrained the PAH mass to be between 2 × 10-11 and 1.4 × 10-10 M⊙ depending on the size of the PAH. The associated PAH abundance is lower than those found in the interstellar medium by two to three orders of magnitude. The gas mass is a few 10-4M⊙. We constrained simultaneously the silicate dust grain, PAH, and gas mass in an evolved Herbig Ae disc. The uncertainty on the gas mass is large (around a factor 5) because the different gas tracers give estimates that do not agree with each other.

  9. Constraining atmospheric ammonia emissions through new observations with an open-path, laser-based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kang

    As the third most abundant nitrogen species in the atmosphere, ammonia (NH3) is a key component of the global nitrogen cycle. Since the industrial revolution, humans have more than doubled the emissions of NH3 to the atmosphere by industrial nitrogen fixation, revolutionizing agricultural practices, and burning fossil fuels. NH3 is a major precursor to fine particulate matter (PM2.5), which has adverse impacts on air quality and human health. The direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcings currently constitute the largest uncertainties for future climate change predictions. Gas and particle phase NH3 eventually deposits back to the Earth's surface as reactive nitrogen, leading to the exceedance of ecosystem critical loads and perturbation of ecosystem productivity. Large uncertainties still remain in estimating the magnitude and spatiotemporal patterns of NH3 emissions from all sources and over a range of scales. These uncertainties in emissions also propagate to the deposition of reactive nitrogen. To improve our understanding of NH3 emissions, observational constraints are needed from local to global scales. The first part of this thesis is to provide quality-controlled, reliable NH3 measurements in the field using an open-path, quantum cascade laser-based NH3 sensor. As the second and third part of my research, NH3 emissions were quantified from a cattle feedlot using eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements, and the similarities between NH3 turbulent fluxes and those of other scalars (temperature, water vapor, and CO2) were investigated. The fourth part involves applying a mobile laboratory equipped with the open-path NH3 sensor and other important chemical/meteorological measurements to quantify fleet-integrated NH3 emissions from on-road vehicles. In the fifth part, the on-road measurements were extended to multiple major urban areas in both the US and China in the context of five observation campaigns. The results significantly improved current urban NH3

  10. The state of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere using global observations through 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, Oksana; Koide, Hiroshi; Dlugokencky, Ed

    2016-04-01

    We present results from the eleventh annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin (http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/gaw/ghg/GHGbulletin.html) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The results are based on research and observations performed by laboratories contributing to the WMO Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme (www.wmo.int/gaw). The Bulletin presents results of global analyses of observational data collected according to GAW recommended practices and submitted to the World Data Center for Greenhouse Gases (WDCGG). Bulletins are prepared by the WMO/GAW Scientific Advisory Group for Greenhouse Gases (http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/gaw/ScientificAdvisoryGroups.html) in collaboration with WDCGG. Observations used for global analysis are collected at more than 100 marine and terrestrial sites worldwide for CO2 and CH4 and at a smaller number of sites for other greenhouse gases. Globally averaged dry-air mole fractions of CO2, CH4 and N2O derived from this network reached new highs in 2014, at 397.7±0.1 ppm, 1833±1 ppb and 327.1±0.1 ppb respectively. These values constitute 143%, 254% and 121% of pre-industrial (before 1750) levels. The atmospheric increase of CO2 from 2013 to 2014 was 1.9 ppm, which is smaller than the increase from 2012 to 2013 and the average growth rate for the past decade (˜2.06 ppm per year), but larger than the average growth rate for the 1990s (˜1.5 ppm per year). Smaller growth in 2014 compared with other recent years is most likely related to a relatively small net change in large fluxes between the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere. The rise of atmospheric CO2 has been only about a half of what is expected if all excess CO2 from burning fossil-fuels stayed in the air. The other half has been absorbed by the land biosphere and the oceans, leading to ocean acidification. For both CH4 and N2O the increases from 2013 to 2014 were larger than those observed from 2012 to 2013 and the mean rates over the past 10 years. The National

  11. Observing broad-absorption line quasars with Spectrum-Rontgen-Gamma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, K.P.; Schnopper, H.W.; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    1998-01-01

    Broad-absorption line quasars are found to have extremely weak soft X-ray emission when compared with other optically selected quasars. In the only example of PHL 5200 for which a detailed X-ray spectrum has been obtained with ASCA, strong absorption in the source appears to be responsible for th...... from the line of sight passing through large column density clouds. Simultaneous UV observations will help to constrain the ionization state of the absorbers, and also improve the overall UV to X-ray continuum measurements in them....

  12. Observation of narrow isotopic optical magnetic resonances in individual emission spectral lines of neon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saprykin, E G [Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sorokin, V A; Shalagin, A M [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-31

    Narrow resonances are observed in the course of recording the individual emission lines of the glow discharge in the mixture of isotopes {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne, depending on the strength of the longitudinal magnetic field. The position of resonances in the magnetic scale corresponds to the compensation of the isotopic shift for certain spectral lines due to the Zeeman effect. It is found that the contrast of the resonances is higher for the transitions between the highly excited energy levels, and the resonances themselves are formed in the zone of longitudinal spatial nonuniformity of the magnetic field. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  13. Density diagnostics derived from the OIV and SIV intercombination lines observed by IRIS

    CERN Document Server

    Polito, V; Dudík, J; Mason, H E; Giunta, A; Reeves, K K

    2016-01-01

    The intensity of the \\oiv~2s$^{2}$ 2p $^{2}$P-2s2p$^{2}$ $^{4}$P and \\siv~3 s$^{2}$ 3p $^{2}$P- 3s 3p$^{2}$ $^{4}$ P intercombination lines around 1400~\\AA~observed with the \\textit{Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph} (IRIS) provide a useful tool to diagnose the electron number density ($N_\\textrm{e}$) in the solar transition region plasma. We measure the electron number density in a variety of solar features observed by IRIS, including an active region (AR) loop, plage and brightening, and the ribbon of the 22-June-2015 M 6.5 class flare. By using the emissivity ratios of \\oiv\\ and \\siv\\ lines, we find that our observations are consistent with the emitting plasma being near isothermal (log$T$[K] $\\approx$ 5) and iso-density ($N_\\textrm{e}$ $\\approx$~10$^{10.6}$ cm$^{-3}$) in the AR loop. Moreover, high electron number densities ($N_\\textrm{e}$ $\\approx$~10$^{13}$ cm$^{-3}$) are obtained during the impulsive phase of the flare by using the \\siv\\ line ratio. We note that the \\siv\\ lines provide a higher ran...

  14. Relativistic Fe K alpha line study in Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Mantovani, Giulia; Ponti, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of a sample of Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with Suzaku. The aim of this work is to examine critically the evidence for a relativistic Fe K alpha line in the X-ray spectra of these AGN. The sample was compiled from those sources in which a relativistic component was missing in at least one XMM-Newton observation. We analysed the Suzaku spectra of these objects in order to have more constraints on the high energy emission, including the Compton reflection hump. The results show that the relativistic Fe K alpha line is detected (at >95% confidence) in all sources observed with high signal-to-noise ratio (e.g. where the counts in the 5-7 keV energy band are > 4 x 10^4). This is in agreement with the idea that relativistic lines are a ubiquitous feature in the spectra of Seyfert galaxies, but are often difficult to detect without very high quality data. We also investigate the relation between the Fe K alpha line and the reflection continuum at high energies. For most of the sample, the stre...

  15. CO Spectral Line Energy Distributions in Galactic Sources: Empirical Interpretation of Extragalactic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indriolo, Nick; Bergin, E. A.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Cernicharo, J.; Gerin, M.; Gusdorf, A.; Lis, D. C.; Schilke, P.

    2017-02-01

    The relative populations in rotational transitions of CO can be useful for inferring gas conditions and excitation mechanisms at work in the interstellar medium. We present CO emission lines from rotational transitions observed with Herschel/HIFI in the star-forming cores Orion S, Orion KL, Sgr B2(M), and W49N. Integrated line fluxes from these observations are combined with those from Herschel/PACS observations of the same sources to construct CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) from 5 ≤ J u ≤ 48. These CO SLEDs are compared to those reported in other galaxies, with the intention of empirically determining which mechanisms dominate excitation in such systems. We find that CO SLEDs in Galactic star-forming cores cannot be used to reproduce those observed in other galaxies, although the discrepancies arise primarily as a result of beam filling factors. The much larger regions sampled by the Herschel beams at distances of several megaparsecs contain significant amounts of cooler gas, which dominate the extragalactic CO SLEDs, in contrast to observations of Galactic star-forming regions, which are focused specifically on cores containing primarily hot molecular gas. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  16. An Observational Diagnostic for Distinguishing between Clouds and Haze in Hot Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Bean, Jacob L.; Parmentier, Vivien

    2017-08-01

    The nature of aerosols in hot exoplanet atmospheres is one of the primary vexing questions facing the exoplanet field. The complex chemistry, multiple formation pathways, and lack of easily identifiable spectral features associated with aerosols make it especially challenging to constrain their key properties. We propose a transmission spectroscopy technique to identify the primary aerosol formation mechanism for the most highly irradiated hot Jupiters (HIHJs). The technique is based on the expectation that the two key types of aerosols—photochemically generated hazes and equilibrium condensate clouds—are expected to form and persist in different regions of a highly irradiated planet’s atmosphere. Haze can only be produced on the permanent daysides of tidally locked hot Jupiters, and will be carried downwind by atmospheric dynamics to the evening terminator (seen as the trailing limb during transit). Clouds can only form in cooler regions on the nightside and morning terminator of HIHJs (seen as the leading limb during transit). Because opposite limbs are expected to be impacted by different types of aerosols, ingress and egress spectra, which primarily probe opposing sides of the planet, will reveal the dominant aerosol formation mechanism. We show that the benchmark HIHJ, WASP-121b, has a transmission spectrum consistent with partial aerosol coverage and that ingress-egress spectroscopy would constrain the location and formation mechanism of those aerosols. In general, using this diagnostic we find that observations with the James Webb Space Telescope and potentially with the Hubble Space Telescope should be able to distinguish between clouds and haze for currently known HIHJs.

  17. Development of Innovative Technology to Provide Low-Cost Surface Atmospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Paul; Steinson, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Accurate and reliable real-time monitoring and dissemination of observations of surface weather conditions is critical for a variety of societal applications. Applications that provide local and regional information about temperature, precipitation, moisture, and winds, for example, are important for agriculture, water resource monitoring, health, and monitoring of hazard weather conditions. In many regions in Africa (and other global locations), surface weather stations are sparsely located and/or of poor quality. Existing stations have often been sited incorrectly, not well-maintained, and have limited communications established at the site for real-time monitoring. The US National Weather Service (NWS) International Activities Office (IAO) in partnership with University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) has started an initiative to develop and deploy low-cost weather instrumentation in sparsely observed regions of the world. The goal is to provide observations for environmental monitoring, and early warning alert systems that can be deployed at weather services in developing countries. Instrumentation is being designed using innovative new technologies such as 3D printers, Raspberry Pi computing systems, and wireless communications. The initial effort is focused on designing a surface network using GIS-based tools, deploying an initial network in Zambia, and providing training to Zambia Meteorological Department (ZMD) staff. The presentation will provide an overview of the project concepts, design of the low cost instrumentation, and initial experiences deploying a surface network deployment in Zambia.

  18. New Platforms for Suborbital Astronomical Observations and In Situ Atmospheric Measurements: Spacecraft, Instruments, and Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodway, K.; DeForest, C. E.; Diller, J.; Vilas, F.; Sollitt, L. S.; Reyes, M. F.; Filo, A. S.; Anderson, E.

    2014-12-01

    Suborbital astronomical observations have over 50 years' history using NASA's sounding rockets and experimental space planes. The new commercial space industry is developing suborbital reusable launch vehicles (sRLV's) to provide low-cost, flexible, and frequent access to space at ~100 km altitude. In the case of XCOR Aerospace's Lynx spacecraft, the vehicle design and capabilities work well for hosting specially designed experiments that can be flown with a human-tended researcher or alone with the pilot on a customized mission. Some of the first-generation instruments and facilities that will conduct solar observations on dedicated Lynx science missions include the SwRI Solar Instrument Pointing Platform (SSIPP) and Atsa Suborbital Observatory, as well as KickSat sprites, which are picosatellites for in situ atmospheric and solar phenomena measurements. The SSIPP is a demonstration two-stage pointed solar observatory that operates inside the Lynx cockpit. The coarse pointing stage includes the pilot in the feedback loop, and the fine stage stabilizes the solar image to achieve arcsecond class pointing. SSIPP is a stepping-stone to future external instruments that can operate with larger apertures and shorter wavelengths in the solar atmosphere. The Planetary Science Institute's Atsa Suborbital Observatory combines the strengths of ground-based observatories and space-based observing to create a facility where a telescope is maintained and used interchangeably with either in-house facility instruments or user-provided instruments. The Atsa prototype is a proof of concept, hand-guided camera that mounts on the interior of the Lynx cockpit to test target acquisition and tracking for human-operated suborbital astronomy. KickSat sprites are mass-producible, one inch printed circuit boards (PCBs) populated by programmable off the shelf microprocessors and radios for real time data transmission. The sprite PCBs can integrate chip-based radiometers, magnetometers

  19. A multiyear estimate of methane fluxes in Alaska from CARVE atmospheric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scot M.; Miller, Charles E.; Commane, Roisin; Chang, Rachel Y.-W.; Dinardo, Steven J.; Henderson, John M.; Karion, Anna; Lindaas, Jakob; Melton, Joe R.; Miller, John B.; Sweeney, Colm; Wofsy, Steven C.; Michalak, Anna M.

    2016-10-01

    Methane (CH4) fluxes from Alaska and other arctic regions may be sensitive to thawing permafrost and future climate change, but estimates of both current and future fluxes from the region are uncertain. This study estimates CH4 fluxes across Alaska for 2012-2014 using aircraft observations from the Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) and a geostatistical inverse model (GIM). We find that a simple flux model based on a daily soil temperature map and a static map of wetland extent reproduces the atmospheric CH4 observations at the statewide, multiyear scale more effectively than global-scale process-based models. This result points to a simple and effective way of representing CH4 fluxes across Alaska. It further suggests that process-based models can improve their representation of key processes and that more complex processes included in these models cannot be evaluated given the information content of available atmospheric CH4 observations. In addition, we find that CH4 emissions from the North Slope of Alaska account for 24% of the total statewide flux of 1.74 ± 0.26 Tg CH4 (for May-October). Global-scale process models only attribute an average of 3% of the total flux to this region. This mismatch occurs for two reasons: process models likely underestimate wetland extent in regions without visible surface water, and these models prematurely shut down CH4 fluxes at soil temperatures near 0°C. Lastly, we find that the seasonality of CH4 fluxes varied during 2012-2014 but that total emissions did not differ significantly among years, despite substantial differences in soil temperature and precipitation.

  20. Contribution of ultraviolet and shortwave infrared observations to atmospheric correction of PACE ocean-color imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouin, Robert J.; Gross-Colzy, Lydwine S.

    2016-05-01

    The Pre-Aerosol, Cloud, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission will carry into space a spectrometer measuring at 5 nm resolution in the ultraviolet (UV) to near infrared (NIR) and at lower resolution in spectral bands in the NIR and shortwave infrared (SWIR). These observations have great potential for improving estimates of marine reflectance in the post-EOS era. In view of this, we evaluate, using simulations with a coupled radiation transfer code, the gain in marine reflectance accuracy expected by including observations in the UV and SWIR compared with just using observations in the visible to NIR. The study is performed for the PACE threshold aggregate bands with respect to the standard set of bands used to generate ocean color products. The top-of-atmosphere (TOA) signal measured by the PACE spectrometer is simulated for a variety of realistic atmospheric and oceanic conditions. The TOA reflectance and the marine reflectance of the simulated ensemble are decomposed into principal components, and the components of the TOA reflectance sensitive to the ocean signal identified. Inverse models are constructed to retrieve the principal components of the marine reflectance, allowing a reconstruction, therefore an estimation of the marine reflectance. Theoretical performance is quantified as a function of angular geometry, aerosol properties, and water type, showing a significant improvement in retrieval accuracy when using the extended spectral range. On average over all the situations considered (including sun glint), the RMS error is reduced from 0.0037 to 0.0024 at 412 nm, from 0.0013 to 0.0007 at 665 nm, and from 0.0010 to 0.0004 at 865 nm (Case 2 waters are better handled). The performance is degraded at large zenith angles and aerosol optical thickness, is better at scattering angles around 120-130 degrees, and exhibits little dependence on aerosol single scattering albedo and aerosol scale height.

  1. Theoretical Studies of Squall-Line Type and Tornado-Like Disturbances in the Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-16

    Axisymmetric Similarity Solutions (Submitted to Tellus and revised after reviewing ) 97-13 4 i1 7. Multl-Two-Dimensional Model of Squall Line Type Disturbances...somewhat complicated but show a generally unidirectional shear. That is, there is no systematic veering or backing of the winds with height. One also sees...to show that the cualitative structure remains the same as well as providing a more realistic picture of the storm’s structure. The moisture equations

  2. Interstellar absorption along the line of sight to Sigma Scorpii using Copernicus observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M. M.; Snow, T. P.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1990-01-01

    From Copernicus observations of Sigma Sco, 57 individual lines of 11 elements plus the molecular species H2 and CO were identified. By using a profile-fitting technique, rather than curves of growth, it was possible to obtain column densities and Doppler b values for up to four separate components along this line of sight. Electron density in the major H I component was derived from the photoionization equilibrium of sulfur, obtaining, n(e) of about 0.3/cu cm. The neutral hydrogen density in the same component was also derived using fine-structure excitation of O I. An H II component is also present in which the electron density was n(e) about 20/cu cm. As a by-product of this analysis, previously undetermined oscillator strengths for two Mn II lines were obtained: for 1162.-017 A, f about 0.023 and for 1164.211 A, f about 0.0086.

  3. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fukao

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF, probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam observations with the EAR. The ESF plumes drifted eastward while keeping distances of several hundred to a thousand kilometers. Comparing the occurrence of the plumes and the F-layer uplift measured by the FM-CW sounders, plumes were initiated within the scanned area around sunset only, when the F-layer altitude rapidly increased. Therefore, the PreReversal Enhancement (PRE is considered as having a zonal variation with the scales mentioned above, and this variation causes day-to-day variability, which has been studied for a long time. Modulation of the underlying E-region conductivity by gravity waves, which causes inhomogeneous sporadic-E layers, for example, is a likely mechanism to determine the scale of the PRE.

  4. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukao, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Tayama, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Maruyama, T.; Saito, S.

    2006-07-01

    The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF), probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S) and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam observations with the EAR. The ESF plumes drifted eastward while keeping distances of several hundred to a thousand kilometers. Comparing the occurrence of the plumes and the F-layer uplift measured by the FM-CW sounders, plumes were initiated within the scanned area around sunset only, when the F-layer altitude rapidly increased. Therefore, the PreReversal Enhancement (PRE) is considered as having a zonal variation with the scales mentioned above, and this variation causes day-to-day variability, which has been studied for a long time. Modulation of the underlying E-region conductivity by gravity waves, which causes inhomogeneous sporadic-E layers, for example, is a likely mechanism to determine the scale of the PRE.

  5. AMS Observations over Coastal California from the Biological and Oceanic Atmospheric Study (BOAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, K. H.; Coggon, M. M.; Hodas, N.; Negron, A.; Ortega, A. M.; Crosbie, E.; Sorooshian, A.; Nenes, A.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.

    2015-12-01

    In July 2015, fifteen research flights were conducted on a US Navy Twin Otter aircraft as part of the Biological and Oceanic Atmospheric Study (BOAS) campaign. The flights took place near the California coast at Monterey, to investigate the effects of sea surface temperature and algal blooms on oceanic particulate emissions, the diurnal mixing of urban pollution with other airmasses, and the impacts of biological aerosols on the California atmosphere. The aircraft's payload included an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), a differential mobility analyzer, a cloud condensation nuclei counter, a counterflow virtual impactor, a cloudwater collector, and two instruments designed to detect biological aerosols - a wideband integrated biological spectrometer and a SpinCon II - as well as a number of meteorology and aerosol probes, two condensation particle counters, and instruments to measure gas-phase CO, CO2, O3, and NOx. Here, we describe in depth the objectives and outcomes of BOAS and report preliminary results, primarily from the AMS. We detail the spatial characteristics and meteorological variability of speciated aerosol components over a strong and persistent bloom of Pseudo-Nitzschia, the harmful algae that cause 'red tide', and report newly identified AMS markers for biological particles. Finally, we compare these results with data collected during BOAS over urban, forested, and agricultural environments, and describe the mixing observed between oceanic and terrestrial airmasses.

  6. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zhaoxia [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  7. Metrological challenges for measurements of key climatological observables. Part 4: atmospheric relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell-Smith, J. W.; Feistel, R.; Harvey, A. H.; Hellmuth, O.; Bell, S. A.; Heinonen, M.; Cooper, J. R.

    2016-02-01

    Water in its three ambient phases plays the central thermodynamic role in the terrestrial climate system. Clouds control Earth’s radiation balance, atmospheric water vapour is the strongest ‘greenhouse’ gas, and non-equilibrium relative humidity at the air-sea interface drives evaporation and latent heat export from the ocean. In this paper, we examine the climatologically relevant atmospheric relative humidity, noting fundamental deficiencies in the definition of this key observable. The metrological history of this quantity is reviewed, problems with its current definition and measurement practice are analysed, and options for future improvements are discussed in conjunction with the recent seawater standard TEOS-10. It is concluded that the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM), in cooperation with the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS), along with other international organizations and institutions, can make significant contributions by developing and recommending state-of-the-art solutions, such as are suggested here, for what are long-standing metrological problems.

  8. Tidal wind oscillations in the tropical lower atmosphere as observed by Indian MST Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Sasi

    Full Text Available Diurnal tidal components in horizontal winds measured by MST radar in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over a tropical station Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E are presented for the autumn equinox, winter, vernal equinox and summer seasons. For this purpose radar data obtained over many diurnal cycles from September 1995 to August 1996 are used. The results obtained show that although the seasonal variation of the diurnal tidal amplitudes in zonal and meridional winds is not strong, vertical phase propagation characteristics show significant seasonal variation. An attempt is made to simulate the diurnal tidal amplitudes and phases in the lower atmosphere over Gadanki using classical tidal theory by incorporating diurnal heat sources, namely, solar radiation absorption by water vapour, planetary boundary layer (PBL heat flux, latent heat release in deep convective clouds and short wave solar radiation absorption by clouds. A comparison of the simulated amplitudes and phases with the observed ones shows that agreement between the two is quite good for the equinox seasons, especially the vertical structure of the phases of the meridional wind components.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (tropical meteorology; waves and tides

  9. The state of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere using global observations through 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, Oksana; Vermeulen, Alex; Ueno, Mikio

    2017-04-01

    We present results from the twelfth annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin (http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/gaw/ghg/GHGbulletin.html) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The results are based on research and observations performed by laboratories contributing to the WMO Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme (www.wmo.int/gaw). The Bulletin presents results of global analyses of observational data collected according to GAW recommended practices and submitted to the World Data Center for Greenhouse Gases (WDCGG). Bulletins are prepared by the WMO/GAW Scientific Advisory Group for Greenhouse Gases (http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/gaw/ScientificAdvisoryGroups.html) in collaboration with WDCGG. Observations used for global analysis are collected at more than 100 marine and terrestrial sites worldwide for CO2 and CH4 and at a smaller number of sites for other greenhouse gases. Globally averaged dry-air mole fractions of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide derived from this network reached new highs in 2015, with CO2 at 400.0±0.1 ppm, CH4 at 1845±2 ppb and N2O at 328.0±0.1 ppb. These values constitute 144%, 256% and 121% of pre-industrial (before 1750) levels, respectively. It is predicted that 2016 will be the first year in which CO2 at the Mauna Loa Observatory remains above 400 ppm all year, and hence for many generations ( Betts et al., 2016). The atmospheric increase of CO2 from 2014 to 2015 was 2.3 ppm, which is larger than the increase from 2013 to 2014 and the average growth rate for the past decade (˜2.08 ppm per year), despite evidence that global anthropogenic emissions remained essentially static between 2014 and 2015. The higher growth rate in 2015 compared with the previous years is due to increased natural emissions of CO2 related to the most recent El Niño event. According to the most recent data, increased growth rates have persisted far into 2016, consistent with the expected lag between CO2 growth and the ENSO index. The average

  10. Approximation of lateral distribution of atmospheric Cherenkov light at different observation levels. Comparison with previous results

    CERN Document Server

    Mishev, A; Stamenov, J

    2005-01-01

    This work summarizes the results presented at 29th International Cosmic Ray Conference in Pune India. Generally the aim of this work is to obtain the lateral distribution of the atmospheric Cherenkov light in extensive air showers produced by different primary particles in wide energy range and at several observation levels and to fit the obtained lateral distributions. Using one large detector and partially modified CORSIKA code version are obtained the lateral distributions of Cherenkov light flux densities at several observation levels for different particle primaries precisely at 536 g/cm2 Chacaltaya, 700 g/cm2 Moussala and 875 g/cm2 Kartalska field observation levels for hadronic primaries and gamma quanta in the energy range 1011 eV-1016 eV. On the basis of the solution of over-determined inverse problem the approximation of these distributions is obtained. The same model function for all the primaries is used and for the different observation levels. The different model parameters for the different pri...

  11. Numerical experiments on consistent horizontal and vertical resolution for atmospheric models and observing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.; Lindzen, Richard S.

    1993-01-01

    Simple numerical experiments are performed in order to determine the effects of inconsistent combinations of horizontal and vertical resolution in both atmospheric models and observing systems. In both cases, we find that inconsistent spatial resolution is associated with enhanced noise generation. A rather fine horizontal resolution in a satellite-data observing system seems to be excessive when combined with the usually available relatively coarse vertical resolution. Using horizontal filters of different strengths, adjusted in such a way as to render the effective horizontal resolution more consistent with vertical resolution for the observing system, may result in improvement of the analysis accuracy. The increase of vertical resolution for a satellite data observing system with better vertically resolved data, the results are different in that little or no horizontal filtering is needed to make spatial resolution more consistent for the system. The obtained experimental estimates of consistent vertical and effective horizontal resolution are in a general agreement with consistent resolution estimates previously derived theoretically by the authors.

  12. Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition to the Oceans: Observation- and Model-Based Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Alex

    2016-04-01

    The reactive nitrogen (Nr) burden of the atmosphere has been increased by a factor of 3-4 by anthropogenic activity since the Industrial Revolution. This has led to large increases in the deposition of nitrate and ammonium to the surface waters of the open ocean, particularly downwind of major human population centres, such as those in North America, Europe and Southeast Asia. In oligotrophic waters, this deposition has the potential to significantly impact marine productivity and the global carbon cycle. Global-scale understanding of N deposition to the oceans is reliant on our ability to produce effective models of reactive nitrogen emission, atmospheric chemistry, transport and deposition (including deposition to the land surface). Over land, N deposition models can be assessed using comparisons to regional monitoring networks of precipitation chemistry (notably those located in North America, Europe and Southeast Asia). No similar datasets exist which would allow observation - model comparisons of wet deposition for the open oceans, because long-term wet deposition records are available for only a handful of remote island sites and rain collection over the open ocean itself is logistically very difficult. In this work we attempt instead to use ~2800 observations of aerosol nitrate and ammonium concentrations, acquired from sampling aboard ships in the period 1995 - 2012, to assess the performance of modelled N deposition fields over the remote ocean. This database is non-uniformly distributed in time and space. We selected three ocean regions (the eastern tropical North Atlantic, the northern Indian Ocean and northwest Pacific) where we considered the density and distribution of observational data is sufficient to provide effective comparison to the model ensemble. Our presentation will focus on the eastern tropical North Atlantic region, which has the best data coverage of the three. We will compare dry deposition fluxes calculated from the observed nitrate

  13. What causes the large extensions of red-supergiant atmospheres? Comparisons of interferometric observations with 1-D hydrostatic, 3-D convection, and 1-D pulsating model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Arroyo-Torres, B; Chiavassa, A; Scholz, M; Freytag, B; Marcaide, J M; Hauschildt, P H; Wood, P R; Abellan, F J

    2015-01-01

    We present the atmospheric structure and the fundamental parameters of three red supergiants, increasing the sample of RSGs observed by near-infrared spectro-interferometry. Additionally, we test possible mechanisms that may explain the large observed atmospheric extensions of RSGs. We carried out spectro-interferometric observations of 3 RSGs in the near-infrared K-band with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution. To comprehend the extended atmospheres, we compared our observational results to predictions by available hydrostatic PHOENIX, available 3-D convection, and new 1-D self-excited pulsation models of RSGs. Our near-infrared flux spectra are well reproduced by the PHOENIX model atmospheres. The continuum visibility values are consistent with a limb-darkened disk as predicted by the PHOENIX models, allowing us to determine the angular diameter and the fundamental parameters of our sources. Nonetheless, in the case of V602 Car and HD 95686, the PHOENIX model visibilities do not predict ...

  14. Sparsity-driven tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric water vapor using GNSS and InSAR observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heublein, Marion; Alshawaf, Fadwa; Zhu, Xiao Xiang; Hinz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    An accurate knowledge of the 3D distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere is a key element for weather forecasting and climate research. On the other hand, as water vapor causes a delay in the microwave signal propagation within the atmosphere, a precise determination of water vapor is required for accurate positioning and deformation monitoring using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). However, due to its high variability in time and space, the atmospheric water vapor distribution is difficult to model. Since GNSS meteorology was introduced about twenty years ago, it has increasingly been used as a geodetic technique to generate maps of 2D Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV). Moreover, several approaches for 3D tomographic water vapor reconstruction from GNSS-based estimates using the simple least squares adjustment were presented. In this poster, we present an innovative and sophisticated Compressive Sensing (CS) concept for sparsity-driven tomographic reconstruction of 3D atmospheric wet refractivity fields using data from GNSS and InSAR. The 2D zenith wet delay (ZWD) estimates are obtained by a combination of point-wise estimates of the wet delay using GNSS observations and partial InSAR wet delay maps. These ZWD estimates are aggregated to derive realistic wet delay input data of 100 points as if corresponding to 100 GNSS sites within an area of 100 km × 100 km in the test region of the Upper Rhine Graben. The made-up ZWD values can be mapped into different elevation and azimuth angles. Using the Cosine transform, a sparse representation of the wet refractivity field is obtained. In contrast to existing tomographic approaches, we exploit sparsity as a prior for the regularization of the underdetermined inverse system. The new aspects of this work include both the combination of GNSS and InSAR data for water vapor tomography and the sophisticated CS estimation. The accuracy of the estimated 3D water

  15. Comparing Stable Water Isotope Variation in Atmospheric Moisture Observed over Coastal Water and Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, C. T.; Rambo, J. P.; Welp, L. R.; Bible, K.; Hollinger, D. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Stable oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopologues of atmospheric moisture are strongly influenced by large-scale synoptic weather cycles, surface evapotranspiration and boundary layer mixing. Atmospheric water isotope variation has been shown to empirically relate to relative humidity (Rh) of near surface moisture, and to a less degree, air temperature. Continuous δ18O and δD measurements are becoming more available, providing new opportunities to investigate processes that control isotope variability. This study shows the comparison of δ18O and δD measured at a continental location and over coastal waters for 3 seasons (spring to fall, 2014). The surface moisture isotope measurements were made using two LGR spectroscopy water vapor isotope analyzers (Los Gatos Research Inc.), one operated in an old-growth coniferous forest at Wind River field station, WA (45.8205°N, 121.9519°W), and another sampling marine air over seawater at the Scripps Pier in San Diego, CA (32.8654°N, 117.2536°W), USA. Isotope variations were measured at 1Hz and data were reported as hourly averages with an overall accuracy of ±0.1‰ for δ18O, ±0.5‰ for δ2H. Day-to-day variations in δ18O and δD are shown strongly influenced by synoptic weather events at both locations. Boundary layer mixing between surface moisture and the dry air entrained from the free troposphere exerts a midday maximum and a consistent diel pattern in deuterium excess (dx). At the forest site, surface moisture also interacts with leaf water through transpiration during the day and re-equilibration at night. The latter occurs by retro-diffusion of atmospheric H2O molecules into leaf intercellular space, which becomes intensified as Rh increaes after nightfall, and continues until sunrise, to counter-balance the evaporative isotopic enrichment in leaf water on a daily basis. These vegetation effects lead to negative dx values consistently observed at nighttime in this continental location that were not

  16. Observational relationship between meso-sized convection and 5-min oscillation in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, S.; Kitai, R.

    In order to understand 3-dimensional structures of upper solar convection zone, we performed two different kinds of observation simultaneously with the Domeless Solar Telescope of Hida Observatory. One is the 2D imaging observation of solar quiet photosphere in wavelengths around lambda4308 AA. Another is the slit 1D spectroscopy of the neutral iron line lambda6302.5 AA; at the central region of the field-of-view of the imaging observation. Thus the horizontal velocity field is obtained from the former observation, while the radial velocity field is obtained from the latter one at the same region. In both velocity fields, we found the meso-sized structures and confirmed convective nature of the flow. And we observed that amplitudes of 5-min oscillations were increased soon after large downward motions of convection, similar to the other observations' results (T.R. Rimmele, P.R. Goode, E. Harold, and R.T. Stebbins 1995; O. Espagnet, R. Muller, Th. Roudier, P. Mein, N. Mein, and J.M. Malherbe 1996). Moreover, we report the possible relationship between horizontal velocity gradient distributions and oscillation excitations.

  17. The velocity distribution of interstellar gas observed in strong UV absorption lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, L. L.; York, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of three strong interstellar UV absorption lines of N I (1199 A), N II (1083 A), and Si III (1206 A) in 47 stars of widely varying distance and a variety of spectral types are analyzed to obtain a velocity distribution function for the interstellar gas. A technique based on the maximum and minimum velocities observed along a line of sight is adopted because of heavy line blending, and results are discussed for both power-law and exponential distribution functions. The expected distribution of radiative-phase supernova remnants (SNRs) in the interstellar medium is calculated as a function of SNR birthrate and of the interstellar density in which they evolve. The results are combined with observed distance estimates, and it is shown that an interstellar density in excess of 0.1 per cu cm would be required to keep the SNRs sufficiently confined so that their cross sections are consistent with the observed number of components. The alternative possibility is considered that SNRs do not enter the radiative phase before escaping from the Galaxy or colliding with neighboring remnants.

  18. Hurricane Frances as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and SeaWinds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    , the AIRS infrared data reveals the temperature of the atmosphere around the storm, but doesn't tell us about the wind direction or relative intensity. The directional vectors of the SeaWinds data set show how the air is circulating around the storm. Scatterometers measure surface wind speed and direction by bouncing microwave pulses off the ocean's surface. The SeaWinds instruments measure the backscattered radar energy from wind-generated ocean waves. By making multiple measurements from different looks at the same location, we can infer the vector wind averaged over each 25 km resolution cell. The primary mission objective of the SeaWinds and QuikSCAT scatterometers is to obtain long-term, global coverage of the ocean vector winds for oceanographic and climate research. While not specifically designed for detailed mapping and tracking of hurricanes, both instruments have been found to be useful resources for operational forecasters. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Density diagnostics derived from the O iv and S iv intercombination lines observed by IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, V.; Del Zanna, G.; Dudík, J.; Mason, H. E.; Giunta, A.; Reeves, K. K.

    2016-10-01

    The intensity of the O iv 2s2 2p 2P-2s2p24P and S iv 3 s2 3p 2P-3s 3p24 P intercombination lines around 1400 Å observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) provide a useful tool to diagnose the electron number density (Ne) in the solar transition region plasma. We measure the electron number density in a variety of solar features observed by IRIS, including an active region (AR) loop, plage and brightening, and the ribbon of the 22-June-2015 M 6.5 class flare. By using the emissivity ratios of O iv and S iv lines, we find that our observations are consistent with the emitting plasma being near isothermal (logT[K] ≈ 5) and iso-density (Ne ≈ 1010.6 cm-3) in the AR loop. Moreover, high electron number densities (Ne ≈ 1013 cm-3) are obtained during the impulsive phase of the flare by using the S iv line ratio. We note that the S iv lines provide a higher range of density sensitivity than the O iv lines. Finally, we investigate the effects of high densities (Ne ≳ 1011 cm-3) on the ionization balance. In particular, the fractional ion abundances are found to be shifted towards lower temperatures for high densities compared to the low density case. We also explored the effects of a non-Maxwellian electron distribution on our diagnostic method. The movie associated to Fig. 3 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Herschel/HIFI⋆ observations of the circumstellar ammonia lines in IRC+10216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M. R.; He, J. H.; Szczerba, R.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Cernicharo, J.; Decin, L.; Justtanont, K.; Teyssier, D.; Menten, K. M.; Neufeld, D. A.; Olofsson, H.; Planesas, P.; Marston, A. P.; Sobolev, A. M.; de Koter, A.; Schöier, F. L.

    2016-01-01

    Context A discrepancy exists between the abundance of ammonia (NH3) derived previously for the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of IRC+10216 from far-IR submillimeter rotational lines and that inferred from radio inversion or mid-infrared (MIR) absorption transitions. Aims To address the discrepancy described above, new high-resolution far-infrared (FIR) observations of both ortho- and para-NH3 transitions toward IRC+10216 were obtained with Herschel, with the goal of determining the ammonia abundance and constraining the distribution of NH3 in the envelope of IRC+10216. Methods We used the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) on board Herschel to observe all rotational transitions up to the J = 3 level (three ortho- and six para-NH3 lines). We conducted non-LTE multilevel radiative transfer modelling, including the effects of near-infrared (NIR) radiative pumping through vibrational transitions. The computed emission line profiles are compared with the new HIFI data, the radio inversion transitions, and the MIR absorption lines in the ν2 band taken from the literature. Results We found that NIR pumping is of key importance for understanding the excitation of rotational levels of NH3. The derived NH3 abundances relative to molecular hydrogen were (2.8 ± 0.5) × 10−8 for ortho-NH3 and (3.2−0.6+0.7)×10−8 for para-NH3, consistent with an ortho/para ratio of 1. These values are in a rough agreement with abundances derived from the inversion transitions, as well as with the total abundance of NH3 inferred from the MIR absorption lines. To explain the observed rotational transitions, ammonia must be formed near to the central star at a radius close to the end of the wind acceleration region, but no larger than about 20 stellar radii (1σ confidence level). PMID:28065983

  1. Suzaku Observations of Iron K-lines from the Intracluster Medium of the Coma Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Takuya; Ota, Naomi; Sato, Kosuke; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Sarazin, Craig L

    2011-01-01

    The Coma cluster was observed with an X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) onboard Suzaku in six pointings, including the central X-ray peak region, the 14'west offset region, 30'and 34'north-west offset regions, and 44'and 60'south-west offset regions. Owing to its lower background level, Suzaku has better sensitivity to Fe K-alpha lines than other satellites. Using precise Fe line measurements, we studied the temperature structure, possible bulk motions, and iron abundance distributions in the intracluster medium (ICM). The observed spectra were well-represented by a single-temperature model, and two- or three- temperature model did not improve chi-square substantially. The temperature, derived from K-alpha line ratios of H-like and He-like Fe, agree with those derived from the single-temperature model. Because the line ratio is a steep function of temperature, the consistency supports the accuracy of temperature measurements conducted with Suzaku. Within the 34'region, the redshift derived from the central ene...

  2. Observation of HCN hyperfine line anomalies towards low- and high-mass star-forming cores

    CERN Document Server

    Loughnane, R M; Thompson, M A; Lo, N; O'Dwyer, B; Cunningham, M R; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.20121.x

    2013-01-01

    HCN is becoming a popular choice of molecule for studying star formation in both low- and high-mass regions and for other astrophysical sources from comets to high-redshift galaxies. However, a major and often overlooked difficulty with HCN is that it can exhibit non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) behaviour in its hyperfine line structure. Individual hyperfine lines can be strongly boosted or suppressed. In low-mass star-forming cloud observations, this could possibly lead to large errors in the calculation of opacity and excitation temperature, while in massive star-forming clouds, where the hyperfine lines are blended due to turbulent broadening, errors will arise in infall measurements that are based on the separation of the peaks in a self-absorbed profile. The underlying line shape cannot be known for certain if hyperfine anomalies are present. We present a first observational investigation of these anomalies across a range of conditions and transitions by carrying out a survey of low-mass sta...

  3. COMPTEL observations of Ti-44 gamma-ray line emission from Cas A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyudin, A. F.; Diehl, R.; Bloemen, H.; Hermsen, W.; Lichti, G. G.; Morris, D.; Ryan, J.; Schoenfelder, V.; Steinle, H.; Varendorff, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) telescope aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) is capable of imaging gamma-ray line sources in the MeV region with a sensitivity of the order 10(exp -5) photons/(sq cm s). During two observations periods in July 1992 and February 1993 the Galactic plane in the region of the young supernova remnant Cas A was observed, showing evidence for line emission at 1.16 MeV from the decay of Ti-44 at a significance level of approximately 4 sigma. This is the first time a supernova remnant has been detected in the gamma-ray line from Ti-44 decay. Adopting a distance of 2.8 kpc to the Cas A remnant, the measured line flux (7.0 +/- 1.7) x 10(exp -5) photons/(sq cm s), can be translated into a Ti-44 mass ejected during the Cas A supernova explosion, between (1.4 +/- 0.4) x 10(exp -4) solar mass and (3.2 +/- 0.8) x 10(exp -4) solar mass, depending on the precise value of the Ti-44 mean life time and on the precise date of the event. Implications of this result for supernova nucleosynthesis models are discussed.

  4. Analysis of high altitude clouds in the martian atmosphere based on Mars Climate Sounder observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitarini, L.; Määttänen, A.; Fouchet, T.; Kleinboehl, A.; Kass, D. M.; Schofield, J. T.

    2016-11-01

    High altitude clouds have been observed in the Martian atmosphere. However, their properties still remain to be characterized. Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is an instrument that measures radiances in the thermal infrared, both in limb and nadir views. It allows us to retrieve vertical profiles of radiance, temperature and aerosols. Using the MCS data and radiative transfer model coupled with an automated inversion routine, we can investigate the chemical composition of the high altitude clouds. We will present the first results on the properties of the clouds. CO2 ice is the best candidate to be the main component of some high altitude clouds due to the most similar spectral variation compared to water ice or dust, in agreement with previous studies. Using cloud composition of contaminated CO2 ice (dust core surrounded by CO2 ice) might improve the fitting result, but further study is needed.

  5. The possibility to observe the non-standard interaction by the Hyperkamiokande atmospheric neutrino experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Fukasawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It was suggested that a tension between the mass-squared differences obtained from the solar neutrino and KamLAND experiments can be solved by introducing the non-standard flavor-dependent interaction in neutrino propagation. In this paper we discuss the possibility to test such a hypothesis by atmospheric neutrino observations at the future Hyper-Kamiokande experiment. Assuming that the mass hierarchy is known, we find that the best-fit value from the solar neutrino and KamLAND data can be tested at more than 8σ, while the one from the global analysis can be examined at 5.0σ (1.4σ for the normal (inverted mass hierarchy.

  6. The possibility to observe the non-standard interaction by the Hyperkamiokande atmospheric neutrino experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukasawa, Shinya; Yasuda, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    It was suggested that a tension between the mass-squared differences obtained from the solar neutrino and KamLAND experiments can be solved by introducing the non-standard flavor-dependent interaction in neutrino propagation. In this paper we discuss the possibility to test such a hypothesis by atmospheric neutrino observations at the future Hyper-Kamiokande experiment. Assuming that the mass hierarchy is known, we find that the best-fit value from the solar neutrino and KamLAND data can be tested at more than 8σ, while the one from the global analysis can be examined at 5.0σ (1.4σ) for the normal (inverted) mass hierarchy.

  7. The possibility to observe the non-standard interaction by the Hyperkamiokande atmospheric neutrino experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fukasawa, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    It was suggested that a tension between the mass-squared differences obtained from the solar neutrino and KamLAND experiments can be solved by introducing the non-standard flavor-dependent interaction in neutrino propagation. In this paper we discuss the possibility to test such a hypothesis by atmospheric neutrino observations at the future Hyper-Kamiokande experiment. Assuming that the mass hierarchy is known, we find that the best-fit value from the solar neutrino and KamLAND data can be tested at more than 8 $\\sigma$, while the one from the global analysis can be examined at 5.0 $\\sigma$ (1.4 $\\sigma$) for the normal (inverted) mass hierarchy.

  8. Automatic on-line monitoring of atmospheric volatile organic compounds: gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection as complementary systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blas, Maite; Navazo, Marino; Alonso, Lucio; Durana, Nieves; Iza, Jon

    2011-11-15

    Traditionally air quality networks have been carrying out the continuous, on-line measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in ambient air with GC-FID. In this paper some identification and coelution problems observed while using this technique in long-term measurement campaigns are described. In order to solve these problems a GC-MS was set up and operated simultaneously with a GC-FID for C2-C11 VOCs measurement. There are few on-line, unattended, long term measurements of atmospheric VOCs performed with GC-MS. In this work such a system has been optimized for that purpose, achieving good repeatability, linearity, and detection limits of the order of the GC-FID ones, even smaller in some cases. VOC quantification has been made by using response factors, which is not frequent in on-line GC-MS. That way, the identification and coelution problems detected in the GC-FID, which may led to reporting erroneous data, could be corrected. The combination of GC-FID and GC-MS as complementary techniques for the measurement of speciated VOCs in ambient air at sub-ppbv levels is proposed. Some results of the measurements are presented, including concentration values for some compounds not found until now on public ambient air VOC databases, which were identified and quantified combining both techniques. Results may also help to correct previously published VOC data with wrongly identified compounds by reprocessing raw chromatographic data.

  9. Automatic on-line monitoring of atmospheric volatile organic compounds: Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection as complementary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blas, Maite de, E-mail: maite.deblas@ehu.es [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, University College of Technical Mining and Civil Engineering, University of the Basque Country, Colina de Beurco s/n, 48902 Barakaldo (Spain); Navazo, Marino; Alonso, Lucio; Durana, Nieves [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering, University of the Basque Country, Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Iza, Jon [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of the Basque Country, Paseo de la Universidad, 7, 01006, Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Traditionally air quality networks have been carrying out the continuous, on-line measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in ambient air with GC-FID. In this paper some identification and coelution problems observed while using this technique in long-term measurement campaigns are described. In order to solve these problems a GC-MS was set up and operated simultaneously with a GC-FID for C{sub 2}-C{sub 11} VOCs measurement. There are few on-line, unattended, long term measurements of atmospheric VOCs performed with GC-MS. In this work such a system has been optimized for that purpose, achieving good repeatability, linearity, and detection limits of the order of the GC-FID ones, even smaller in some cases. VOC quantification has been made by using response factors, which is not frequent in on-line GC-MS. That way, the identification and coelution problems detected in the GC-FID, which may led to reporting erroneous data, could be corrected. The combination of GC-FID and GC-MS as complementary techniques for the measurement of speciated VOCs in ambient air at sub-ppbv levels is proposed. Some results of the measurements are presented, including concentration values for some compounds not found until now on public ambient air VOC databases, which were identified and quantified combining both techniques. Results may also help to correct previously published VOC data with wrongly identified compounds by reprocessing raw chromatographic data.

  10. Spectroscopic line parameters of 12CH4 for atmospheric composition retrievals in the 4300-4500 cm-1 region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, R.; Predoi-Cross, A.; Nikitin, A. V.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.; Sung, K.; Smith, M. A. H.; Malathy Devi, V.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the importance of methane as a trace atmospheric gas and a greenhouse gas, we have carried out a precise line-shape study to obtain the CH4-CH4 and CH4-air half-width coefficients, CH4-CH4 and CH4-air shift coefficients and off-diagonal relaxation matrix element coefficients for methane transitions in the spectral range known as the "methane Octad". In addition, the associated temperature dependences of these coefficients have been measured in the 4300-4500 cm-1 region of the Octad. The high signal to noise ratio spectra of pure methane and of dilute mixtures of methane in dry air with high resolution have been recorded at temperatures from 148 K to room temperature using the Bruker IFS 125 HR Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. The analysis of spectra was done using a multispectrum non-linear least-squares curve fitting technique. Theoretical calculations have been performed and the results are compared with the previously published line positions, intensities and with the line parameters available in the GEISA and HITRAN2012 databases.

  11. Two centuries of observed atmospheric variability and change over the North Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stendel, Martin; van den Besselaar, Else; Hannachi, Abdel; Kent, Elizabeth; Lefebvre, Christiana; Rosenhagen, Gudrun; Schenk, Frederik; van der Schrier, Gerard; Woollings, Tim

    2016-04-01

    In the upcoming North Sea Region Climate Change Assessment (NOSCCA), we present a synthesis of current knowledge about past, present and possible future climate change in the North Sea region. A climate change assessment from published scientific work has been conducted as a kind of regional IPCC report, and a book has been produced that will be published by Springer in 2016. In the framework of the NOSCCA project, we examine past and present studies of variability and changes in atmospheric variables within the North Sea region over the instrumental period, roughly the past 200 years, based on observations and reanalyses. The variables addressed in this presentation are large-scale circulation, pressure and wind, surface air temperature, precipitation and radiative properties (clouds, solar radiation, and sunshine duration). While air temperature over land, not unexpectedly, has increased everywhere in the North Sea region, with strongest trends in spring and in the north of the region, a precipitation increase has been observed in the north and a decrease in the south of the region. This pattern goes along with a north-eastward shift of storm tracks and is in agreement with climate model projections under enhanced greenhouse gas concentrations. For other variables, it is not obvious which part of the observed changes may be due to anthropogenic activities and which is internally forced. It remains also unclear to what extent atmospheric circulation over the North Sea region is influenced by distant factors, in particular Arctic sea-ice decline in recent decades. There are indications of an increase in the number of deep cyclones (but not in the total number of cyclones), while storminess since the late 19th century shows no robust trends. The persistence of circulation types appears to have increased over the last century, and consequently, there is an indication for 'more extreme' extreme events. However, changes in extreme weather events are difficult to assess

  12. Sources of atmospheric mercury in the tropics: continuous observations at a coastal site in Suriname

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, D.; Wip, D.; Warneke, T.; Holmes, C. D.; Dastoor, A.; Notholt, J.

    2012-08-01

    Mercury measurements at a coastal site in Nieuw Nickerie (5°56' N, 56°59' W), Suriname, provide the only continuous records of atmospheric mercury in the tropics. Here we evaluate observations of total gaseous mercury (TGM) during 2007. Nieuw Nickerie typically samples marine air from the Atlantic Ocean, with occasional influence from continental South America. Over the year, average concentrations are 1.40 ng m-3. As the intertropical convergence zone passes over Suriname twice each year, the site samples both northern and southern hemispheric air masses. We use back trajectories to classify each measurement by hemisphere, as well as continental or ocean. For air passing over ocean before sampling, TGM concentrations are 10% higher in air coming from the Northern Hemisphere (1.45 ng m-3) than from the Southern Hemisphere (1.32 ng m-3). Air from the South American continent also carries higher TGM (1.43 ng m-3) than air from the South Atlantic Ocean, with most of these trajectories occurring in August and September. Biomass burning in Brazil peaks in the same months and likely contributes significantly to elevated concentrations seen in Nickerie. We also compare the observed seasonal cycle to two atmospheric mercury chemistry and transport models (GRAHM and GEOS-Chem). Both models simulate transition between northern and southern hemispheric air, thus capturing the seasonal cycle; however the models overestimate the TGM concentrations during months when Nickerie samples Northern Hemisphere air. It is difficult to determine whether the models' sources or sinks in the Northern Hemisphere tropics are responsible.

  13. Narrow absorption lines with two observations of Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhi-Fu; Chen, Yan-Mei; Cao, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We assemble 3524 quasars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with repeated observations to search for variations of narrow C IV1548,1551 and Mg II2796,2803 absorption doublets in spectral regions shortward of 7000 Ang at the observed frame, which corresponds to time-scales of about 150 ~ 2643 days at quasar rest frame. In these quasar spectra, we detect 3580 C IV absorption systems with z_{abs} = 1.5188 ~ 3.5212, and 1809 Mg II absorption systems with z_{abs} = 0.3948 ~ 1.7167. In term of the absorber velocity (beta) distribution at quasar rest frame, we find a substantial number of C IV absorbers with beta4sigma for lambda2796 lines and >3sigma for lambda2803 lines.

  14. The first winter solstice observed at the meridian line of Santa Maria degli Angeli in Rome

    CERN Document Server

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2014-01-01

    The page written by the astronomer Francesco Bianchini (1662-1729) and containing the data of the 1701 winter solstice observed at Santa Maria degli Angeli is presented for the first time in figure 2 and widely discussed along this paper. The great meridian line in the Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli in Rome was built in 1701/1702 with the scope to measure the Obliquity of the Earth's orbit in the following eight centuries, upon the will of pope Clement XI. During the winter solstice of 1701 the first measurements of the obliquity have been realized by Francesco Bianchini, the astronomer who designed the meridian line, upgrading the similar instrument realized by Giandomenico Cassini in San Petronio, Bononia. In this paper the accuracy of the data observed by Francesco Bianchini is discussed and compared with up-to-date ephemerides. The modern situation of this historical instrument is also presented.

  15. Determination of magnetic fields in broad line region of active galactic nuclei from polarimetric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrovich, Mikhail; Silant'ev, Nikolai; Gnedin, Yuri; Natsvlishvili, Tinatin; Buliga, Stanislava

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in confining gas clouds in the broad line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and in maintaining the stability of these clouds. Without magnetic fields the clouds would not be stable, and soon after their formation they would expand and disperse. We show that the strength of the magnetic field can be derived from the polarimetric observations. Estimates of magnetic fields for a number of AGNs are based on the observed polarization degrees of broad Hα lines and nearby continuum. The difference between their values allows us to estimate the magnetic field strength in the BLR using the method developed by Silant'ev et al. (2013). Values of magnetic fields in BLR for a number of AGNs have been derived.

  16. Direct Insights into Observational Absorption Line Analysis Methods of the Circumgalactic Medium Using Cosmological Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, Christopher W; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Kacprzak, Glenn G; Klypin, Anatoly

    2014-01-01

    We study the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of a z=0.54 simulated dwarf galaxy using hydroART simulations. We present our analysis methods, which emulate observations, including objective absorption line detection, apparent optical depth (AOD) measurements, Voigt profile (VP) decomposition, and ionization modelling. By comparing the inferred CGM gas properties from the absorption lines directly to the gas selected by low ionization HI and MgII, and by higher ionization CIV and OVI absorption, we examine how well observational analysis methods recover the "true" properties of CGM gas. In this dwarf galaxy, low ionization gas arises in kiloparsec "cloud" structures, but high ionization gas arises in multiple extended structures spread over 100 kpc; due to complex velocity fields, highly separated structures give rise to absorption at similar velocities. We show that AOD and VP analysis fails to accurately characterize the spatial, kinematic, and thermal conditions of high ionization gas. We find that HI absorption...

  17. Closing in on the Fermi Line with a New Observation Strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Weniger, Christoph; Finkbeiner, Douglas P; Bringmann, Torsten; Mirabal, Nestor

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for a spectral line in the inner Galaxy has caused a great deal of excitement over the last year, mainly because of its interpretation as a possible dark matter signal. The observation has raised important questions about statistics and suspicions about systematics, especially in photons from the Earth limb. With enough additional data, we can address these concerns. In this white paper, we summarize the current observational situation and project future sensitivities, finding that the status quo is dangerously