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Sample records for atmospheric infrared sounder

  1. Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, Connor J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program

    2016-03-01

    The Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) measures the absolute infrared (IR) spectral radiance (watts per square meter per steradian per wavenumber) of the sky directly above the instrument. More information about the instrument can be found through the manufacturer’s website. The spectral measurement range of the instrument is 3300 to 520 wavenumbers (cm-1) or 3-19.2 microns for the normal-range instruments and 3300 to 400 cm-1 or 3-25 microns, for the extended-range polar instruments. Spectral resolution is 1.0 cm-1. Instrument field-of-view is 1.3 degrees. Calibrated sky radiance spectra are produced on cycle of about 141 seconds with a group of 6 radiance spectra zenith having dwell times of about 14 seconds each interspersed with 55 seconds of calibration and mirror motion. The ASSIST data is comparable to the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data and can be used for 1) evaluating line-by-line radiative transport codes, 2) detecting/quantifying cloud effects on ground-based measurements of infrared spectral radiance (and hence is valuable for cloud property retrievals), and 3) calculating vertical atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor and the detection of trace gases.

  2. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Version 6 cloud products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Kahn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Version 6 cloud products of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU instrument suite are described. The cloud top temperature, pressure, and height and effective cloud fraction are now reported at the AIRS field of view (FOV resolution. Significant improvements in cloud height assignment over Version 5 are shown with pixel-scale comparisons to cloud vertical structure observed by the CloudSat 94 GHz radar and the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP. Cloud thermodynamic phase (ice, liquid, and unknown phase, ice cloud effective diameter (De, and ice cloud optical thickness (τ are derived using an optimal estimation methodology for AIRS FOVs, and global distributions for January 2007 are presented. The largest values of τ are found in the storm tracks and near convection in the Tropics, while De is largest on the equatorial side of the midlatitude storm tracks in both hemispheres, and lowest in tropical thin cirrus and the winter polar atmosphere. Over the Maritime Continent the diurnal cycle of τ is significantly larger than for the total cloud fraction, ice cloud frequency, and De, and is anchored to the island archipelago morphology. Important differences are described between northern and southern hemispheric midlatitude cyclones using storm center composites. The infrared-based cloud retrievals of AIRS provide unique, decadal-scale and global observations of clouds over the diurnal and annual cycles, and captures variability within the mesoscale and synoptic scales at all latitudes.

  3. Tropical Storm Beryl as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: AIRS Microwave Image This is an infrared image of Tropical Storm Beryl in the western Atlantic, from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite on July 20, 2006, 1:30 am local time. This AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the hurricane. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the Earth, revealing warmer temperatures (red). This infrared image shows three large regions of strong convection surrounding the core of the storm. The largest, on the northern edge of the core, also appears in the companion microwave image to contain intense precipitation. The image in figure 1 is created from microwave radiation emitted by Earth's atmosphere and received by the instrument. It shows where the heaviest rainfall is taking place (in blue) in the storm. Blue areas outside of the tropical storm, where there are either some clouds or no clouds indicate where the sea surface shines through. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California

  4. Development of Level 3 (gridded) products for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Stephanie L.; Leroy, Stephen S.; Manning, Evan M.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Oliphant, Robert B.; Braverman, Amy; Lee, Sung-Yung; Lambrigtsen, Bjom H.

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) sounding system is a suite of infrared and microwave instruments flown as part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) onboard the Aqua platform. The AIRS dataset provides a daily, global view of Earth processes at a finer vertical resolution than ever before. However, analysis of the AIRS data is a daunting task given the sheer volume and complexity of the data. The volume of data produced by the EOS project is unprecedented; the AIRS project alone will produce many terabytes of data over the lifetime of the mission. This paper describes development of AIRS Level 3 data products that will help to alleviate problems of access and usability.

  5. Radiometric consistency assessment of hyperspectral infrared sounders

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, L.; Y. Han; Jin, X.; Y. Chen; D. A. Tremblay

    2015-01-01

    The radiometric and spectral consistency among the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is fundamental for the creation of long-term infrared (IR) hyperspectral radiance benchmark datasets for both inter-calibration and climate-related studies. In this study, the CrIS radiance measurements on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite are directly com...

  6. Validation of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Retrieval Products over China and Their Application in Numerical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard Aqua Satellite is a high spectral resolution infrared sounder. In recent years, AIRS has gradually become the primary method of atmospheric vertical observations. To examine the validation of AIRS retrieval products (V3.0) over China, the AIRS surface air temperature retrievals were compared with the ground observations obtained from 540 meteorological stations in July 2004 and January 2005, respectively. The sources of errors were considerably discussed. Based on the error analysis, the AIRS retrieved surface air temperature products were systemically corrected. Moreover, the AIRS temperature and humidity profile retrievals were compared with T213numerical forecasting products. Because T213 forecasting products are not the actual atmospheric states,to further verify the validation, the AIRS temperature and humidity profile products were assimilated into the MM5 model through the analysis nudging. In this paper, the case on February 14, 2005 in North China was simulated in detail. Then, we investigated the effects of AIRS retrievals on snowfall, humidity field,vertical velocity field, divergence field, and cloud microphysical processes. The major results are: (1) the errors of AIRS retrieved surface air temperature products are largely systematic deviations, for which the influences of terrain altitude and surface types are the major reasons; (2) the differences between the AIRS atmospheric profile retrievals and T213 numerical prediction products in temperature are generally less than 2 K, the differences in relative humidity are generally less than 25%; and (3) the AIRS temperature and humidity retrieval products can adjust the model initial field, and thus can improve the capacity of snowfall simulation to some extent.

  7. Carbon Monoxide Distribution over Peninsular Malaysia from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajab, Jaso M.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.

    2009-07-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's Aqua satellite. It daily coverage of ˜70% of the planet represents a significant evolutionary advance in satellite traces gas remote sensing. AIRS, the part of a large international investment to upgrade the operational meteorological satellite systems, is first of the new generation of meteorological advanced sounders for operational and research use, Providing New Insights into Weather and Climate for the 21st Century. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a ubiquitous, an indoor and outdoor air pollutant, is not a significant greenhouse gas as it absorbs little infrared radiation from the Earth. However, it does have an influence on oxidization in the atmosphere through interaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH), which also react with methane, halocarbons and tropospheric ozone. It produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass burning, and that it has a role as a smog. The aim of this investigation is to study the (CO) carbon monoxide distribution over Peninsular Malaysia. The land use map of the Peninsular Malaysia was conducted by using CO total column amount, obtained from AIRS data, the map & data was processed and analyzed by using Photoshop & SigmaPlot 11.0 programs and compared for timing of various (day time) (28 August 2005 & 29 August 2007) for both direct comparison and the comparison using the same a priori profile, the CO concentrations in 28/8/2005 higher. The CO maps were generated using Kriging Interpolation technique. This interpolation technique produced high correlation coefficient, R2 and low root mean square error, RMS for CO. This study provided useful information for influence change of CO concentration on varies temperature.

  8. Measurement approach and design of the CubeSat Infrared Atmospheric Sounder (CIRAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Rider, David; Rud, Mayer; Ting, David; Yee, Karl

    2016-09-01

    The CubeSat Infrared Atmospheric Sounder (CIRAS) will measure upwelling infrared radiation of the Earth in the MWIR region of the spectrum from space on a CubeSat. The observed radiances have information of potential value to weather forecasting agencies and can be used to retrieve lower tropospheric temperature and water vapor globally for weather and climate science investigations. Multiple units can be flown to improve temporal coverage or in formation to provide new data products including 3D atmospheric motion vector winds. CIRAS incorporates key new instrument technologies including a 2D array of High Operating Temperature Barrier Infrared Detector (HOT-BIRD) material, selected for its high uniformity, low cost, low noise and higher operating temperatures than traditional materials. The detectors are hybridized to a commercial ROIC and commercial camera electronics. The second key technology is an MWIR Grating Spectrometer (MGS) designed to provide imaging spectroscopy for atmospheric sounding in a CubeSat volume. The MGS has no moving parts and includes an immersion grating to reduce the volume and reduce distortion. The third key technology is an infrared blackbody fabricated with black silicon to have very high emissivity in a flat plate construction. JPL will also develop the mechanical, electronic and thermal subsystems for CIRAS, while the spacecraft will be a commercially available CubeSat. The integrated system will be a complete 6U CubeSat capable of measuring temperature and water vapor profiles with good lower tropospheric sensitivity. The CIRAS is the first step towards the development of an Earth Observation Nanosatellite Infrared (EON-IR) capable of operational readiness to mitigate a potential loss of CrIS on JPSS or complement the current observing system with different orbit crossing times.

  9. Hurricane Frances as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and SeaWinds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    , the AIRS infrared data reveals the temperature of the atmosphere around the storm, but doesn't tell us about the wind direction or relative intensity. The directional vectors of the SeaWinds data set show how the air is circulating around the storm. Scatterometers measure surface wind speed and direction by bouncing microwave pulses off the ocean's surface. The SeaWinds instruments measure the backscattered radar energy from wind-generated ocean waves. By making multiple measurements from different looks at the same location, we can infer the vector wind averaged over each 25 km resolution cell. The primary mission objective of the SeaWinds and QuikSCAT scatterometers is to obtain long-term, global coverage of the ocean vector winds for oceanographic and climate research. While not specifically designed for detailed mapping and tracking of hurricanes, both instruments have been found to be useful resources for operational forecasters. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Monitoring of atmospheric composition using the thermal infrared IASI/MetOp sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Clerbaux

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric remote sounding from satellites is an essential component of the observational strategy deployed to monitor atmospheric pollution and changing composition. The IASI nadir looking thermal infrared sounder onboard MetOp will provide 15 years of global scale observations for a series of key atmospheric species, with unprecedented spatial sampling and coverage. This paper gives an overview of the instrument's capability for measuring atmospheric composition in the perspective of chemistry and air quality. The assessment is made in terms of species, accuracy and vertical information. Global distributions are presented for CO, CH4, O3 (total and tropospheric, HNO3, NH3, and volcanic SO2. Local distributions of organic species measured during fire events, such as C2H4, CH3OH, HCOOH, and PAN are also shown. For each species or process, the link is made to specialized papers in this issue.

  11. Simultaneous physical retrieval of surface emissivity spectrum and atmospheric parameters from infrared atmospheric sounder interferometer spectral radiances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine

    2013-04-10

    The problem of simultaneous physical retrieval of surface emissivity, skin temperature, and temperature, water-vapor, and ozone atmospheric profiles from high-spectral-resolution observations in the infrared is formulated according to an inverse problem with multiple regularization parameters. A methodology has been set up, which seeks an effective solution to the inverse problem in a generalized L-curve criterion framework. The a priori information for the surface emissivity is obtained on the basis of laboratory data alone, and that for the atmospheric parameters by climatology or weather forecasts. To ensure that we deal with a problem of fewer unknowns than observations, the dimensionality of the emissivity is reduced through expansion in Fourier series. The main objective of this study is to demonstrate the simultaneous retrieval of emissivity, skin temperature, and atmospheric parameters with a two-dimensional L-curve criterion. The procedure has been demonstrated with spectra observed from the infrared atmospheric sounder interferometer, flying onboard the European Meteorological Operational satellite. To check the quality and reliability of the methodology, we have used spectra recorded over regions characterized by known or stable emissivity. These include sea surface, for which effective emissivity models are known, and arid lands (Sahara and Namib Deserts) that are known to exhibit the characteristic spectral signature of quartz-rich sand.

  12. The Impact of Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profiles on Short-term Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Brad; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lapenta, William

    2007-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), represents one of the most advanced spacebased atmospheric sounding systems. The combined AlRS/AMSU system provides radiance measurements used to retrieve temperature profiles with an accuracy of 1 K over 1 km layers under both clear and partly cloudy conditions, while the accuracy of the derived humidity profiles is 15% in 2 km layers. Critical to the successful use of AIRS profiles for weather and climate studies is the use of profile quality indicators and error estimates provided with each profile Aside form monitoring changes in Earth's climate, one of the objectives of AIRS is to provide sounding information of sufficient accuracy such that the assimilation of the new observations, especially in data sparse region, will lead to an improvement in weather forecasts. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate highresolution AIRS profile data in a regional analysis/forecast model. The paper will focus on the impact of AIRS profiles on a rapidly developing east coast storm and will also discuss preliminary results for a 30-day forecast period, simulating a quasi-operation environment. Temperature and moisture profiles were obtained from the prototype version 5.0 EOS science team retrieval algorithm which includes explicit error information for each profile. The error profile information was used to select the highest quality temperature and moisture data for every profile location and pressure level for assimilation into the ARPS Data Analysis System (ADAS). The AIRS-enhanced analyses were used as initial fields for the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) system used by the SPORT project for regional weather forecast studies. The ADASWRF system will be run on CONUS domain with an emphasis on the east coast. The preliminary assessment of the impact of the AIRS profiles will focus on quality control issues associated with AIRS

  13. Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Thermodynamic Profiles on Regional Precipitation Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, S.-H.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Jedloved, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses and lead to better forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), provides temperature and moisture profiles in clear and cloudy regions with accuracy which approaches that of radiosondes. The purpose of this paper is to describe an approach to assimilate AIRS thermodynamic profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model using WRF-Var. Quality indicators are used to select only the highest quality temperature and moisture profiles for assimilation in clear and partly cloudy regions, and uncontaminated portions of retrievals above clouds in overcast regions. Separate error characteristics for land and water profiles are also used in the assimilation process. Assimilation results indicate that AIRS profiles produce an analysis closer to in situ observations than the background field. Forecasts from a 37-day case study period in the winter of 2007 show that AIRS profile data can lead to improvements in 6-h cumulative precipitation forecasts resulting from improved thermodynamic fields. Additionally, in a convective heavy rainfall event from February 2007, assimilation of AIRS profiles produces a more unstable boundary layer resulting in enhanced updrafts in the model. These updrafts produce a squall line and precipitation totals that more closely reflect ground-based observations than a no AIRS control forecast. The location of available high-quality AIRS profiles ahead of approaching storm systems is found to be of paramount importance to the amount of impact the observations will have on the resulting forecasts.

  14. Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Thermodynamic Profiles on Regional Weather Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Jedlovee, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses and lead to better forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), provides temperature and moisture profiles with accuracy comparable to that of radiosondes. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to assimilate AIRS thermodynamic profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model using its three-dimension variational (3DVAR) analysis component (WRF-Var). Quality indicators are used to select only the highest quality temperature and moisture profiles for assimilation in both clear and partly cloudy regions. Separate error characteristics for land and water profiles are also used in the assimilation process. Assimilation results indicate that AIRS profiles produce an analysis closer to in situ observations than the background field. Forecasts from a 37-day case study period in the winter of 2007 show that AIRS profile data can lead to improvements in 6-h cumulative precipitation forecasts due to instability added in the forecast soundings by the AIRS profiles. Additionally, in a convective heavy rainfall event from February 2007, assimilation of AIRS profiles produces a more unstable boundary layer resulting in enhanced updrafts in the model. These updrafts produce a squall line and precipitation totals that more closely reflect ground-based observations than a no AIRS control forecast. The location of available high-quality AIRS profiles ahead of approaching storm systems is found to be of paramount importance to the amount of impact the observations will have on the resulting forecasts.

  15. A radiance-based method for estimating uncertainties in the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) land surface temperature product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulley, Glynn C.; Hook, Simon J.

    2012-10-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) has been identified by NASA and other international organizations as an important Earth System Data Record (ESDR). An ESDR is defined as a long-term, well calibrated and validated data set. Identifying uncertainties in LST products with coarse spatial resolutions (>10 km) such as those from hyperspectral infrared sounders is notoriously difficult due to the challenges of making reliable in situ measurements representative of the spatial scales of the output products. In this study we utilize a Radiance-based (R-based) LST method for estimating uncertainties in the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) v5 LST product. The R-based method provides estimates of the true LST using a radiative closure simulation without the need for in situ measurements, and requires input air temperature, relative humidity profiles and emissivity data. The R-based method was employed at three validation sites over the Namib Desert, Gran Desierto, and Redwood National Park for all AIRS observations from 2002 to 2010. Results showed daytime LST root-mean square errors (RMSE) of 2-3 K at the Namib and Desierto sites, and 1.5 K at the Redwood site. Nighttime LST RMSEs at the two desert sites were a factor of two less when compared to daytime results. Positive daytime LST biases were found at each site due to an underestimation of the daytime AIRS v5 longwave spectral emissivity, while the reverse occurred at nighttime. In the AIRS v6 product (release 2012), LST biases and RMSEs will be reduced significantly due to improved methodologies for the surface retrieval and emissivity first guess.

  16. Characteristics of water-vapour inversions observed over the Arctic by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS and radiosondes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Devasthale

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An accurate characterization of the vertical structure of the Arctic atmosphere is useful in climate change and attribution studies as well as for the climate modelling community to improve projections of future climate over this highly sensitive region. Here, we investigate one of the dominant features of the vertical structure of the Arctic atmosphere, i.e. water-vapour inversions, using eight years of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder data (2002–2010 and radiosounding profiles released from the two Arctic locations (North Slope of Alaska at Barrow and during SHEBA. We quantify the characteristics of clear-sky water vapour inversions in terms of their frequency of occurrence, strength and height covering the entire Arctic for the first time.

    We found that the frequency of occurrence of water-vapour inversions is highest during winter and lowest during summer. The inversion strength is, however, higher during summer. The observed peaks in the median inversion-layer heights are higher during the winter half of the year, at around 850 hPa over most of the Arctic Ocean, Siberia and the Canadian Archipelago, while being around 925 hPa during most of the summer half of the year over the Arctic Ocean. The radiosounding profiles agree with the frequency, location and strength of water-vapour inversions in the Pacific sector of the Arctic. In addition, the radiosoundings indicate that multiple inversions are the norm with relatively few cases without inversions. The amount of precipitable water within the water-vapour inversion structures is estimated and we find a distinct, two-mode contribution to the total column precipitable water. These results suggest that water-vapour inversions are a significant source to the column thermodynamics, especially during the colder winter and spring seasons. We argue that these inversions are a robust metric to test the reproducibility of thermodynamics within climate models. An accurate statistical

  17. Characteristics of water-vapour inversions observed over the Arctic by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS and radiosondes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Devasthale

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An accurate characterization of the vertical structure of the Arctic atmosphere is useful in climate change and attribution studies as well as for the climate modelling community to improve projections of future climate over this highly sensitive region. Here, we investigate one of the dominant features of the vertical structure of the Arctic atmosphere, i.e. water-vapour inversions, using eight years of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder data (2002–2010 and radiosounding profiles released from the two Arctic locations (North Slope of Alaska at Barrow and during SHEBA. We quantify the characteristics of clear-sky water vapour inversions in terms of their frequency of occurrence, strength and height covering the entire Arctic for the first time.

    We found that the frequency of occurrence of water-vapour inversions is highest during winter and lowest during summer. The inversion strength is, however, higher during summer. The observed peaks in the median inversion-layer heights are higher during the winter half of the year, at around 850 hPa over most of the Arctic Ocean, Siberia and the Canadian Archipelago, while being around 925 hPa during most of the summer half of the year over the Arctic Ocean. The radiosounding profiles agree with the frequency, location and strength of water-vapour inversions in the Pacific sector of the Arctic. In addition, the radiosoundings indicate that multiple inversions are the norm with relatively few cases without inversions. The amount of precipitable water within the water-vapour inversion structures is estimated and we find a distinct, two-mode contribution to the total column precipitable water. These results suggest that water-vapour inversions are a significant source to the column thermodynamics, especially during the colder winter and spring seasons. We argue that these inversions are a robust metric to test the reproducibility of thermodynamics within climate models. An accurate statistical

  18. A 6-year global climatology of occurrence of upper-tropospheric ice supersaturation inferred from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder after synergetic calibration with MOZAIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lamquin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Ice supersaturation in the upper troposphere is a complex and important issue for the understanding of cirrus cloud formation. Infrared sounders have the ability to provide cloud properties and atmospheric profiles of temperature and humidity. On the other hand, they suffer from coarse vertical resolution, especially in the upper troposphere and therefore are unable to detect shallow ice supersaturated layers. We have used data from the Measurements of OZone and water vapour by AIrbus in-service airCraft experiment (MOZAIC in combination with Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS relative humidity measurements and cloud properties to develop a calibration method for an estimation of occurrence frequencies of ice supersaturation. This method first determines the occurrence probability of ice supersaturation, detected by MOZAIC, as a function of the relative humidity determined by AIRS. The occurrence probability function is then applied to AIRS data, independently of the MOZAIC data, to provide a global climatology of upper-tropospheric ice supersaturation occurrence. Our climatology is then related to high cloud occurrence from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP and compared to ice supersaturation occurrence statistics from MOZAIC alone. Finally it is compared to model climatologies of ice supersaturation from the Integrated Forecast System (IFS of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF and from the European Centre HAmburg Model (ECHAM. All the comparisons show good agreements when considering the limitations of each instrument and model. This study highlights the benefits of multi-instrumental synergies for the investigation of upper tropospheric ice supersaturation.

  19. A 6-year global cloud climatology from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder AIRS and a statistical analysis in synergy with CALIPSO and CloudSat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Stubenrauch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a six-year global climatology of cloud properties, obtained from observations of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS onboard the NASA Aqua satellite. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO combined with CloudSat observations, both missions launched as part of the A-Train in 2006, provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the retrieved AIRS cloud properties such as cloud amount and height as well as to explore the vertical structure of different cloud types. AIRS-LMD cloud detection agrees with CALIPSO about 85% over ocean and about 75% over land. Global cloud amount has been estimated as about 66% to 74%, depending on the weighting of not cloudy AIRS footprints by partial cloud cover (0 or 0.3. 40% of all clouds are high clouds, and about 44% of all clouds are single layer low-level clouds. The "radiative" cloud height determined by the AIRS-LMD retrieval corresponds well to the height of the maximum backscatter signal and of the "apparent middle" of the cloud. Whereas the real cloud thickness of high opaque clouds often fills the whole troposphere, their "apparent" cloud thickness (at which optical depth reaches about 5 is on average only 2.5 km. The real geometrical thickness of optically thin cirrus as identified by AIRS-LMD is identical to the "apparent" cloud thickness with an average of about 2.5 km in the tropics and midlatitudes. High clouds in the tropics have slightly more diffusive cloud tops than at higher latitudes. In general, the depth of the maximum backscatter signal increases nearly linearly with increasing "apparent" cloud thickness. For the same "apparent" cloud thickness optically thin cirrus show a maximum backscatter about 10% deeper inside the cloud than optically thicker clouds. We also show that only the geometrically thickest opaque clouds and (the probably surrounding anvil cirrus penetrate the stratosphere in the tropics.

  20. A 6-year global cloud climatology from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder AIRS and a statistical analysis in synergy with CALIPSO and CloudSat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a six-year global climatology of cloud properties, obtained from observations of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS onboard the NASA Aqua satellite. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO combined with CloudSat observations, both missions launched as part of the A-Train in 2006, provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the retrieved AIRS cloud properties such as cloud amount and height. In addition, they permit to explore the vertical structure of different cloud types. AIRS-LMD cloud detection agrees with CALIPSO about 85% over ocean and about 75% over land. Global cloud amount has been estimated from 66% to 74%, depending on the weighting of not cloudy AIRS footprints by partial cloud cover from 0 to 0.3. 42% of all clouds are high clouds, and about 42% of all clouds are single layer low-level clouds. The "radiative" cloud height determined by the AIRS-LMD retrieval corresponds well to the height of the maximum backscatter signal and of the "apparent middle" of the cloud. Whereas the real cloud thickness of high opaque clouds often fills the whole troposphere, their "apparent" cloud thickness (at which optical depth reaches about 5 is on average only 2.5 km. The real geometrical thickness of optically thin cirrus as identified by AIRS-LMD is identical to the "apparent" cloud thickness with an average of about 2.5 km in the tropics and midlatitudes. High clouds in the tropics have slightly more diffusive cloud tops than at higher latitudes. In general, the depth of the maximum backscatter signal increases nearly linearly with increasing "apparent" cloud thickness. For the same "apparent" cloud thickness optically thin cirrus show a maximum backscatter about 10% deeper inside the cloud than optically thicker clouds. We also show that only the geometrically thickest opaque clouds and (the probably surrounding anvil cirrus penetrate the stratosphere in the tropics.

  1. Submillimeter Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry Exploration Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlecht, Erich T.; Allen, Mark A.; Gill, John J.; Choonsup, Lee; Lin, Robert H.; Sin, Seth; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter H.; Maestrini, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry Exploration Sounder (SPACES), a high-sensitivity laboratory breadboard for a spectrometer targeted at orbital planetary atmospheric analysis. The frequency range is 520 to 590 GHz, with a target noise temperature sensitivity of 2,500 K for detecting water, sulfur compounds, carbon compounds, and other atmospheric constituents. SPACES is a prototype for a powerful tool for the exploration of the chemistry and dynamics of any planetary atmosphere. It is fundamentally a single-pixel receiver for spectral signals emitted by the relevant constituents, intended to be fed by a fixed or movable telescope/antenna. Its front-end sensor translates the received signal down to the 100-MHz range where it can be digitized and the data transferred to a spectrum analyzer for processing, spectrum generation, and accumulation. The individual microwave and submillimeter wave components (mixers, LO high-powered amplifiers, and multipliers) of SPACES were developed in cooperation with other programs, although with this type of instrument in mind. Compared to previous planetary and Earth science instruments, its broad bandwidth (approx. =.13%) and rapid tunability (approx. =.10 ms) are new developments only made possible recently by the advancement in submillimeter circuit design and processing at JPL.

  2. A Simple Drought Product and Indicator Derived from Temperature and Relative Humidity Observed by the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, S. L.; Behrangi, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the United States, drought results in agricultural losses, impacts to industry, power and energy production, natural resources, municipal water supplies and human health making it one of the costliest natural hazards in the nation. Monitoring drought is therefore critical to help local governments, resource managers, and other groups make effective decisions, yet there is no single definition of drought, and because of the complex nature of drought there is no universal best drought indicator. Remote sensing applications in drought monitoring are advantageous due to the large spatial and temporal frequency of observations, leading to a better understanding of the spatial extent of drought and its duration, and in detecting the onset of drought and its intensity. NASA Earth Observing System (EOS)-era data have potential for monitoring and assessing drought and many are already used either directly or indirectly for drought monitoring. Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) sensor are widely used for agricultural and environmental plant-stress monitoring via the USDM, the VegDRI project and FEWSNet. However there remain underutilized sources of information from NASA satellite observations that may have promise for characterizing and understanding meteorological drought. Once such sensor is NASA's Advanced Infra-Red Sounder (AIRS) aboard the Aqua satellite. AIRS and it's sister sensor the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) that together provide meteorological information of high relevance to meteorological drought, e.g., profiles of water vapor, surface air temperature, and precipitation. Recent work undertaken to develop simple indicators of drought based on temperature and relative humidity from the AIRS suite of instruments is promising. Although there are more sophisticated indicators developed through the application of a variety of

  3. Cloud properties retrieved from infrared sounders and their analysis in synergy with active remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feofilov, Artem; Stubenrauch, Claudia; Armante, Raymond

    2014-05-01

    Clouds play an important role in the energy budget of the planet: optically thick clouds reflect the incoming solar radiation leading to cooling of the Earth while thinner clouds act as 'greenhouse films' preventing escape of the Earth's infrared radiation to space. Satellite observations provide a continuous survey of clouds over the whole globe and IR sounders have been observing our planet since 1979. The spectral resolution has strongly improved from the TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounders (TOVS) onboard the NOAA polar satellites to the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) onboard Aqua (since 2002) and to the InfraRed Atmospheric Sounding Interferometers (IASI) on board the METOP (since 2006). Their spectral resolution along the CO2 absorption band makes IR sounders most sensitive to cirrus, day and night. In addition, they provide atmospheric temperature and water vapour vertical distribution, surface temperature, and dust aerosol properties. The LMD IR sounder cloud property retrievals are based on a weighted Ξ2 method. Once the cloud physical properties (cloud pressure and IR emissivity) are retrieved, cirrus bulk microphysical properties (De and IWP) are determined by investigating their spectral emissivity difference between 8 and 12 μm. The AIRS instrument is a part of the A-Train constellation, which also includes two active sounders, the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) lidar and the CloudSat radar, providing the vertical structure of the clouds. The IASI observations with their improved spectral and, therefore, vertical resolution complement the AIRS observations in the diurnal cycle. In addition to satellite data, we use temperature, water vapor, and wind distributions from the ERA Interim reanalysis to better assess the environmental conditions for the clouds. The analysis of the joint dataset helps to (1) extend the quantitative and global characterization of cloud properties into a statistical model of

  4. Estimation of volcanic ash refractive index from satellite infrared sounder data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, H.; Masuda, K.

    2014-12-01

    The properties of volcanic ash clouds (cloud height, optical depth, and effective radius of the particles) are planned to estimate from the data of the next Japanese geostationary meteorological satellite, Himawari 8/9. The volcanic ash algorithms, such as those proposed by NOAA/NESDIS and by EUMETSAT, are based on the infrared absorption properties of the ash particles, and the refractive index of a typical volcanic rock (i.e. andesite) has been used in the forward radiative transfer calculations. Because of a variety of the absorption properties for real volcanic ash particles at infrared wavelengths (9-13 micron), a large retrieval error may occur if the refractive index of the observed ash particles was different from that assumed in the retrieval algorithm. Satellite infrared sounder provides spectral information for the volcanic ash clouds. If we can estimate the refractive index of the ash particles from the infrared sounder data, a dataset of the optical properties for similar rock type of the volcanic ash can be prepared for the ash retrieval algorithms of geostationary/polar-orbiting satellites in advance. Furthermore, the estimated refractive index can be used for a diagnostic and a correction of the ash particle model in the retrieval algorithm within a period of the volcanic activities. In this work, optimal estimation of the volcanic ash parameters was conducted through the radiative transfer calculations for the window channels of the atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS). The estimated refractive indices are proposed for the volcanic ash particles of some eruption events.

  5. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Intersatellite Calibrated Clear-Sky High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) Channel 12 Brightness Temperature Version 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) of intersatellite calibrated channel 12 brightness temperature (TB) product is a gridded global monthly time...

  6. The microwave limb sounder for the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, J. W.; Peckham, G. E.; Suttie, R. A.; Curtis, P. D.; Maddison, B. J.; Harwood, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder was designed to map the concentrations of trace gases from the stratosphere to the lower thermosphere, to improve understanding of the photochemical reactions which take place in this part of the atmosphere. The instrument will measure the intensity of thermal radiation from molecules in the atmosphere at frequencies corresponding to rotational absorption bands of chlorine monoxide, ozone, and water vapor. Molecular concentration profiles will be determined over a height range of 15 to 80 km (20 to 45 km for C10). The 57 deg inclination orbit proposed for the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite will allow global coverage.

  7. Lossless data compression for infrared hyperspectral sounders: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bormin; Huang, Hung-Lung A.; Ahuja, Alok; Schmit, Timothy J.; Heymann, Roger W.

    2004-10-01

    The compression of hyperspectral sounder data is beneficial for more efficient archive and transfer given its large 3-D volume. Moreover, since physical retrieval of geophysical parameters from hyperspectral sounder data is a mathematically ill-posed problem that is sensitive to the error of the data, lossless or near-lossless compression is desired. This paper provides an update into applications of state-of-the-art 2D and 3D lossless compression algorithms such as 3D EZW, 3D SPIHT, 2D JPEG2000, 2D JPEG-LS and 2D CALIC for hyperspectral sounder data. In addition, in order to better explore the correlations between the remote spectral regions affected by the same type of atmospheric absorbing constituents or clouds, the Bias-Adjusted Reordering (BAR) scheme is presented which reorders the data such that the bias-adjusted distance between any two neighboring vectors is minimized. This scheme coupled with any of the state-of-the-art compression algorithms produces significant compression gains.

  8. A non-iterative linear retrieval for infrared high resolution limb sounders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Millán

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently most of the high spectral resolution infrared limb sounders use subsets of the recorded spectra (microwindows in their retrieval schemes to reduce the computing time of rerunning the radiative transfer model. A fast linear retrieval scheme is described which allows the whole spectral signature of the target molecule to be used. We determine how close the linearisation point needs to be to the solution in order to fall in the linear regime and also suggest an adjustment to the forward model and Jacobians to propagate the change in pressure and temperature on the gas concentration retrievals. As an example, this technique is implemented for the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding instrument, but it is applicable to any high resolution limb sounder.

  9. Low Cost Upper Atmosphere Sounder (LOCUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Daniel; Swinyard, Bruce M.; Ellison, Brian N.; Aylward, Alan D.; Aruliah, Anasuya; Plane, John M. C.; Feng, Wuhu; Saunders, Christopher; Friend, Jonathan; Bird, Rachel; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Parkes, Steve

    2014-05-01

    The Mesosphere - Lower Thermosphere region (MLT) is often quoted as being the least well known region of the atmosphere, meaning that measurements of this altitude range are sparser than for the neighbouring layers. The reason for this apparent lack of observations can be traced back to a combination of two facts - A) the MLT is ill suited for in-situ sampling on a global scale because the residual air drag is prohibitive for suborbital vehicles (rockets are traditionally used to sample the MLT region, but they only provide snapshot measurements both geographically, as well as temporally), and B) Some of the most important trace gases in the MLT have spectral emission lines in the THz range, a frequency band which has only just become accessible to conventional remote sensing technologies (i.e. passive heterodyne detection) thanks to ongoing technology development, but which still poses massive - often prohibitive - demands on the complexity, weight and power consumption of satellite borne remote sensing detectors. To mitigate the substantial power requirements of a Local Oscillator (LO) able to pump a heterodyne receiver at THZ frequencies, we are suggesting the use of Quantum Cascade Laser diodes (QCL). Combining a QCL LO with a sub-harmonic Schottky mixer in an integrated receiver system would allow us to build a THz passive heterodyne detector for atmospheric remote sensing that is both very compact and power efficient, and could therefore be built and launched much more cheaply than competitive systems. Many of the technologies required for such an instrument already exist at technology readiness levels (TRL) of 3-5. A consortium of RAL Space, University College London (UCL), University of Leeds, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) and STAR-Dundee have been awarded a grant through the ESA In Orbit Demonstration Programme (IOD) to start developing an integrated, sub-harmonic heterodyne receiver with a QCL LO up to a TRL that would allow IOD hopefully in the

  10. Use of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder clear-sky and cloud-cleared radiances in the Weather Research and Forecasting 3DVAR assimilation system for mesoscale weather predictions over the Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Randhir; Kishtawal, C. M.; Pal, P. K.

    2011-11-01

    A set of assimilation experiments is conducted with the Three-Dimensional Variational (3DVAR) data assimilation system associated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The purpose of the investigation is to assess the impact on forecast skill in response to assimilation of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) clear-sky and cloud-cleared radiances over the Indian region. This is the first study that makes use of cloud-cleared radiances in the WRF system. Two sets of thirty-one 72 h forecasts are performed, all initialized at 00:00 UTC each day throughout the month of July 2010, to compare the model performance consequent to assimilation of clear-sky versus cloud-cleared radiances. A rigorous validation is produced against National Centers for Environmental Prediction analyzed wind, temperature, and moisture. In addition, the precipitation forecast skill is assessed against Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission observations. The results show improvement in forecast skill consequent to the assimilation of cloud-cleared radiances (CCR). The implications of using CCR for operational weather forecasting appear to be significant. Since only a small fraction of AIRS channels are cloud-free, information obtained in cloudy regions, which is meteorologically very significant, is lost when assimilating only clear-sky radiances (CSR). On the contrary, assimilation of CCR allows a larger yield, which leads to improved model performance. The assimilation of CCR resulted in significantly improved rainfall prediction compared to that obtained from the use of CSR. The finding of this study clearly shows the advantage of CCR available from clear-sky as well as from partly cloudy regions as compared to CSR, which are available only in clear-sky regions.

  11. The Expected Impacts of NPOESS Microwave and Infrared Sounder Radiances on Operational Numerical Weather Prediction and Data Assimilation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadley, S. D.; Baker, N.; Derber, J.; Collard, A.; Hilton, F.; Ruston, B.; Bell, W.; Candy, B.; Kleespies, T. J.

    2009-12-01

    The NPOESS atmospheric sounding functionality will be accomplished using two separate sensor suites, the combined infrared (IR) and microwave (MW) sensor suite (CrIMSS), and the Microwave Imager/Sounder (MIS) instrument. CrIMSS consists of the Cross Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the cross track Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), and is scheduled to fly on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP), and NPOESS operational flight units C1 and C3. The MIS is a conical scanning polarimetric imager and sounder patterned after the heritage WindSat, and DMSP Special Sensor Microwave Imagers and Sounders (SSMI and SSMIS), and is scheduled for flight units C2, C3 and C4. ATMS combines the current operational Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), but with an additional channel in the 51.76 GHz oxygen absorption region and 3 additional channels in the 165.5 and 183 GHz water vapor absorption band. CrIS is a Fourier Transform Spectrometer and will provide 159 shortwave IR channels, 433 mid-range IR channels, and 713 longwave IR channels. The heritage sensors for CrIS are the NASA Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the MetOp-A Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). Both AIRS and IASI are high quality, high spectral resolution sounders which represent a significant improvement in the effective vertical resolution over previous IR sounders. This presentation will give an overview of preparations underway for day-1 monitoring of NPP/NPOESS radiances, and subsequent operational radiance assimilation. These preparations capitalize on experience gained during the pre-launch preparations, sensor calibration/validation and operational assimilation for the heritage sensors. One important step is to use pre-flight sensor channel specifications, noise estimates and knowledge of the antenna patterns, to generate and test proxy NPP/NPOESS sensor observations in existing assimilation systems. Other critical factors for

  12. Assessment of Infrared Sounder Radiometric Noise from Analysis of Spectral Residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, E.; Klonecki, A.; Standfuss, C.; Tournier, B.; Serio, C.; Masiello, G.; Tjemkes, S.; Stuhlmann, R.

    2016-08-01

    For the preparation and performance monitoring of the future generation of hyperspectral InfraRed sounders dedicated to the precise vertical profiling of the atmospheric state, such as the Meteosat Third Generation hyperspectral InfraRed Sounder, a reliable assessment of the instrument radiometric error covariance matrix is needed.Ideally, an inflight estimation of the radiometrric noise is recommended as certain sources of noise can be driven by the spectral signature of the observed Earth/ atmosphere radiance. Also, unknown correlated noise sources, generally related to incomplete knowledge of the instrument state, can be present, so a caracterisation of the noise spectral correlation is also neeed.A methodology, relying on the analysis of post-retreival spectral residuals, is designed and implemented to derive in-flight the covariance matrix on the basis of Earth scenes measurements. This methodology is successfully demonstrated using IASI observations as MTG-IRS proxy data and made it possible to highlight anticipated correlation structures explained by apodization and micro-vibration effects (ghost). This analysis is corroborated by a parallel estimation based on an IASI black body measurement dataset and the results of an independent micro-vibration model.

  13. Calibration and Validation of the InfraRed Atmospheric Sounder Onboard the FY3B Satellite%风云三号B星红外分光计的定标和验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    漆成莉; 陈勇; 刘辉; 吴春强; 殷德奎

    2013-01-01

    搭载于风云三号A星和B星上的红外分光计(IRAS)分别于2008年5月27日和2010年11月5日成功发射。该仪器主要提供从可见光到红外波长范围内多通道的辐射观测,并可应用于资料同化、全球大气温度和水汽廓线反演等领域。搭载于风云三号A星上的IRAS由于滤光轮转速不稳定,导致仪器观测不连续。风云三号B星上的IRAS运行正常,处于稳定的业务模式。利用仪器在轨3个月期间的资料,进行了一系列的在轨定标和验证试验,对IRAS仪器的性能进行了一系列的验证,包括冷空和暖黑体定标计数值的长期趋势、噪音等效辐射率等。利用IRAS和红外大气探测干涉仪(IASI)同时观察到的地球场景进行比较,证明了两种观测非常相似。另外,将FY3B/IRAS红外通道的观测与NOAA-19/HIRS对应的通道的辐射传输模式模拟进行了对比。对比结果显示相对于HIRS,部分IRAS红外通道,尤其是通道1到10,15,19和20偏差很小。但是少数通道,如通道13,16和18有较大的偏差。造成这些偏差的原因仍需要进一步的研究。%InfraRed Atmospheric Sounder (IRAS) instruments were successfully launched onboard the FengYun-3A (FY3A) and FengYun-3B (FY3B) satellites on May 27, 2008, and November 5, 2010, respectively. They aim at providing multichannel radiances within the spectral range of visible to infrared (IR) wavelengths for many environmental applications, including data assimilation and retrievals of global atmospheric temperature and humidity proifles. However, the velocity of the iflter wheel of the ifrst IRAS onboard FY3A is unstable and, therefore, induced a discontinuity in the measurement. The IRAS onboard FY3B works well in normal and stable operational mode since its launch without any anomaly. A variety of postlaunch calibration/validation tasks are conducted using on-orbit data during a period of three months. This paper presents

  14. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite microwave limb sounder instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barath, F. T.; Chavez, M. C.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Frerking, M. A.; Gram, M. B.; Harris, W. M.; Holden, J. R.; Jarnot, R. F.; Kloezeman, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    The microwave limb sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is the first satellite experiment using limb sounding techniques at microwave frequencies. Primary measurement objectives are stratospheric ClO, O3, H2O, temperature, and pressure. Measurements are of thermal emission: all are performed simultaneously and continuously and are not degraded by ice clouds or volcanic aerosols. The instrument has a 1.6-m mechanically scanning antenna system and contains heterodyne radiometers in spectral bands centred near 63, 183, and 205 GHz. The radiometers operate at ambient temperature and use Schottky-diode mixers with local oscillators derived from phase-locked Gunn oscillators. Frequency tripling by varactor multipliers generates the 183- and 205-GHz local oscillators, and quasi-optical techniques inject these into the mixers. Six 15-channel filter banks spectrally resolve stratospheric thermal emission lines and produce an output spectrum every 2 s. Thermal stability is sufficient for 'total power' measurements which do not require fast chopping. Radiometric calibration, consisting of measurements of cold space and an internal target, is performed every 65-s limb scan. Instrument in-orbit performance has been excellent, and all objectives are being met.

  15. An artificial neural network based fast radiative transfer model for simulating infrared sounder radiances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Praveen Krishnan; K Srinivasa Ramanujam; C Balaji

    2012-08-01

    The first step in developing any algorithm to retrieve the atmospheric temperature and humidity parameters at various pressure levels is the simulation of the top of the atmosphere radiances that can be measured by the satellite. This study reports the results of radiative transfer simulations for the multichannel infrared sounder of the proposed Indian satellite INSAT-3D due to be launched shortly. Here, the widely used community software k Compressed Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Algorithm (kCARTA) is employed for performing the radiative transfer simulations. Though well established and benchmarked, kCARTA is a line-by-line solver and hence takes enormous computational time and effort for simulating the multispectral radiances for a given atmospheric scene. This necessitates the development of a much faster and at the same time, equally accurate RT model that can drive a real-time retrieval algorithm. In the present study, a fast radiative transfer model using neural networks is proposed to simulate radiances corresponding to the wavenumbers of INSAT-3D. Realistic atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles have been used for training the network. Spectral response functions of GOES-13, a satellite similar in construction, purpose and design and already in use are used. The fast RT model is able to simulate the radiances for 1200 profiles in 18 ms for a 15-channel GOES profile, with a correlation coefficient of over 99%. Finally, the robustness of the model is tested using additional synthetic profiles generated using empirical orthogonal functions (EOF).

  16. Analysis of high altitude clouds in the martian atmosphere based on Mars Climate Sounder observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitarini, L.; Määttänen, A.; Fouchet, T.; Kleinboehl, A.; Kass, D. M.; Schofield, J. T.

    2016-11-01

    High altitude clouds have been observed in the Martian atmosphere. However, their properties still remain to be characterized. Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is an instrument that measures radiances in the thermal infrared, both in limb and nadir views. It allows us to retrieve vertical profiles of radiance, temperature and aerosols. Using the MCS data and radiative transfer model coupled with an automated inversion routine, we can investigate the chemical composition of the high altitude clouds. We will present the first results on the properties of the clouds. CO2 ice is the best candidate to be the main component of some high altitude clouds due to the most similar spectral variation compared to water ice or dust, in agreement with previous studies. Using cloud composition of contaminated CO2 ice (dust core surrounded by CO2 ice) might improve the fitting result, but further study is needed.

  17. No Widespread Dust in the Middle Atmosphere of Mars from Mars Climate Sounder Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinboehl, A.; Schofield, J. T.; Kass, D. M.; Abdou, W. A.; McCleese, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The vertical distribution of dust in the Martian atmosphere has been a topic of discussion in the recent years. Measurements by limb sounding instruments like the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) indicate that atmospheric dust is not homogeneously distributed in the vertical but exhibits layering in the lower atmosphere. Recent retrievals from TES measurements also suggest a dust maximum higher in the atmosphere that predominantly occurs at 50-60 km altitude on the daytime hemisphere. We use new retrievals from MCS measurements to investigate this deduction. MCS is a mid- and far-infrared thermal emission radiometer on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. It measures radiances in limb and on-planet viewing geometries. From these radiance measurements, profiles of atmospheric temperature, dust and water ice are retrieved from the surface to ~80 km altitude with a vertical resolution of ~5 km. Updates to the retrieval algorithm yield improved representations of aerosols above ~40 km altitude. The sensitivity of an MCS limb measurement to aerosols at these altitudes is typically not limited by signal-to-noise but rather by the uncertainties in the representation of the instrument's vertical field-of-view, the far wings of which can provide radiance contributions from the lower atmosphere and the surface. Sensitivity studies suggest that radiances attributed to dust in the middle atmosphere are a consequence of these far wing effects. Our results do not support the existence of widespread dust in the middle atmosphere of Mars inferred from earlier observations. The average dust extinction does not exceed 10-6 km-1 at 463 cm-1 above 50 km altitude in atmospheric conditions without large dust storms.

  18. Preflight Assessment of the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Zavyalov, Vladimir V.; Fish, Chad S.; Bingham, Gail E.; Esplin, Mark; Greenman, Mark; Scott, Deron; Han, Yong

    2011-01-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is a part of the Crosstrack Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS) that will be used to produce accurate temperature, water vapor, and pressure profiles on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and upcoming Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) operational missions. The NPP CrIS flight model has completed sensor qualification, characterization, and calibration and is now integrated with the NPP spacecraft in preparation for the launch. This paper r...

  19. Development and characterization of the superconducting integrated receiver channel of the TELIS atmospheric sounder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, Gert; Birk, Manfred; Boersma, Dick; Dercksen, Johannes; Dmitriev, Pavel; Ermakov, Andrey B.; Filippenko, Lyudmila V.; Golstein, Hans; Hoogeveen, Ruud W. M.; de Jong, Leo; Khudchenko, Andrey V.; Kinev, Nickolay V.; Kiselev, Oleg S.; van Kuik, Bart; de Lange, Arno; van Rantwijk, Joris; Selig, Avri M.; Sobolev, Alexander S.; Torgashin, Mikhail Yu; de Vries, Ed; Wagner, Georg; Yagoubov, Pavel A.; Koshelets, Valery P.

    2010-01-01

    The balloon-borne instrument TELIS (TErahertz and submillimetre LImb Sounder) is a three-channel superconducting heterodyne spectrometer for atmospheric research use. It detects spectral emission lines of stratospheric trace gases that have their rotational transitions at THz frequencies. One of the

  20. Ultraspectral sounder data compression review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bormin HUANG; Hunglung HUANG

    2008-01-01

    Ultraspectral sounders provide an enormous amount of measurements to advance our knowledge of weather and climate applications. The use of robust data compression techniques will be beneficial for ultraspectral data transfer and archiving. This paper reviews the progress in lossless compression of ultra-spectral sounder data. Various transform-based, pre-diction-based, and clustering-based compression methods are covered. Also studied is a preprocessing scheme for data reordering to improve compression gains. All the coding experiments are performed on the ultraspectral compression benchmark dataset col-lected from the NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) observations.

  1. Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) architecture and design accommodations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, L.; Racette, P.; Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Thompson, E.

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term “ hyperspectral microwave” is used to indicate an all-weather sounding that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earth's atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions. The simulations proposed for HyMAS 118/183-GHz system should yield surface precipitation rate and water path retrievals for small hail, soft hail, or snow pellets, snow, rainwater, etc. with accuracies comparable to those of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder. Further improvements in retrieval methodology (for example, polarization exploitation) are expected. The CoSMIR instrument is a packaging concept re-used on HyMAS to ease the integration features of the scanhead. The HyMAS scanhead will include an ultra-compact Intermediate Frequency Processor (IFP) module that is mounted inside the door to improve thermal management. The IFP is fabricated with materials made of Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) technology integrated with detectors, amplifiers, A/D conversion and data aggregation. The IFP will put out 52 channels of 16 bit data comprised of 4 - 9 channel data streams for temperature profiles and 2-8 channel streams for water vapor. With the limited volume of the existing CoSMIR scanhead and new HyMAS front end components, the HyMAS team at Goddard began preliminary layout work inside the new drum. Importing and re-using models of the shell, the s- an head

  2. Comparison of Methane Data Products from the TES and AIRS Infrared Sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, T. J.; Pagano, T. S.; Worden, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is the second most powerful greenhouse gas with a highly positive radiative forcing of 0.48 W/m2 (IPCC 2013). Global concentrations of methane have been steadily increasing since 2007 (Bruhwiler 2014), raising concerns about methane's impact on the future global climate. For about the last decade, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura spacecraft has been detecting several trace gas species in the troposphere including methane. The goal of this study is to compare TES methane retrievals to that of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua spacecraft so that scientific investigations may be transferred from TES to AIRS. The two instruments fly in the afternoon constellation (A-Train), providing numerous coincident measurements for comparison. In addition, they also have a similar spectral range, (3.3 to 15.4 µm) for TES (Beer, 2006) and (3.7 to 15.4 µm) for AIRS (Chahine, 2006), making both instruments sensitive to the mid and upper troposphere. This makes them ideal candidates to compare methane data products. However, because AIRS spectral resolution is lower than that of the TES, there may be a difference in vertical sensitivity. In addition, the retrieval techniques and error characteristics are different for the two data sets. The current state of validation for these data products will be presented. To identify conditions in which the data sets agree and dis agree, we present global maps of methane concentrations from monthly level 3 (L3) data products. We also investigate the temporal stability between the two datasets by comparing global zonal averages derived from L3 over the last decade. Finally, we compare L2 retrieval profiles from representative granules in the tropical, mid-latitude and northern latitudes.

  3. Implementing earth observation and advanced satellite based atmospheric sounders for water resource and climate modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boegh, E.; Dellwik, Ebba; Hahmann, Andrea N.;

    This paper discusses preliminary remote sensing (MODIS) based hydrological modelling results for the Danish island Sjælland (7330 km2) in relation to project objectives and methodologies of a new research project “Implementing Earth observation and advanced satellite based atmospheric sounders...... for effective land surface representation in water resource modeling” (2009- 2012). The purpose of the new research project is to develop remote sensing based model tools capable of quantifying the relative effects of site-specific land use change and climate variability at different spatial scales....... For this purpose, a) internal catchment processes will be studied using a Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system, b) Earth observations will be used to upscale from field to regional scales, and c) at the largest scale, satellite based atmospheric sounders and meso-scale climate modelling will be used...

  4. Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CRIS) Instrument In-flight Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Zavyalov, Vladimir; Bingham, Gail; Esplin, Mark; Greenman, Mark; Scott, Deron; Graham, Brandon; Major, Charles; Phillips, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) sensor was launched on the Suomi NPP spacecraft October 28, 2011. The CrIS sensor is a Michelson interferometer with a 3 x 3 detectors for each of three spectral bands: LWIR 650-1095 wavenumbers, MWIR 1210-1750 wavenumbers and SWIR 2155-2550 wavenumbers. The CrIS sensor is performing very well and is generally exceeding the noise, radiometric and spectral performance requirements for its primary weather sensing mission. However, for climate change appli...

  5. A microwave pressure sounder. [for remote measurement of atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, G. E.; Flower, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for the remote measurement of atmospheric surface pressure will be described. Such measurements could be made from a satellite in polar orbit and would cover many areas for which conventional meteorological data are not available. An active microwave instrument is used to measure the strength of return echoes from the ocean surface at a number of frequencies near the 60 GHz oxygen absorption band. Factors which affect the accuracy with which surface pressure can be deduced from these measurements will be discussed and an instrument designed to test the method by making measurements from an aircraft will be described.

  6. Impacts of field of view configuration of Cross-track Infrared Sounder on clear-sky observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Likun; Chen, Yong; Han, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Hyperspectral infrared radiance measurements from satellite sensors contain valuable information on atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles and greenhouse gases, and therefore are directly assimilated into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models as inputs for weather forecasting. However, data assimilations in current operational NWP models still mainly rely on cloud-free observations due to the challenge of simulating cloud-contaminated radiances when using hyperspectral radiances. The limited spatial coverage of the 3×3 field of views (FOVs) in one field of regard (FOR) (i.e., spatial gap among FOVs) as well as relatively large footprint size (14 km) in current Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instruments limits the amount of clear-sky observations. This study explores the potential impacts of future CrIS FOV configuration (including FOV size and spatial coverage) on the amount of clear-sky observations by simulation experiments. The radiance measurements and cloud mask products (VCM) from the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are used to simulate CrIS clear-sky observation under different FOV configurations. The results indicate that, given the same FOV coverage (e.g., 3×3), the percentage of clear-sky FOVs and the percentage of clear-sky FORs (that contain at least one clear-sky FOV) both increase as the FOV size decreases. In particular, if the CrIS FOV size were reduced from 14 km to 7 km, the percentage of clear-sky FOVs increases from 9.02% to 13.51% and the percentage of clear-sky FORs increases from 18.24% to 27.51%. Given the same FOV size but with increasing FOV coverage in each FOR, the clear-sky FOV observations increases proportionally with the increasing sampling FOVs. Both reducing FOV size and increasing FOV coverage can result in more clear-sky FORs, which benefit data utilization of NWP data assimilation.

  7. Calibration of the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Waters, J. W.; Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.

    1996-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is a three-radiometer, passive, limb emission instrument onboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Radiometric, spectral and field-of-view calibrations of the MLS instrument are described in this paper. In-orbit noise performance, gain stability, spectral baseline and dynamic range are described, as well as use of in-flight data for validation and refinement of prelaunch calibrations. Estimated systematic scaling uncertainties (3 sigma) on calibrated limb radiances from prelaunch calibrations are 2.6% in bands 1 through 3, 3.4% in band 4, and 6% in band 5. The observed systematic errors in band 6 are about 15%, consistent with prelaunch calibration uncertainties. Random uncertainties on individual limb radiance measurements are very close to the levels predicted from measured radiometer noise temperature, with negligible contribution from noise and drifts on the regular in-flight gain calibration measurements.

  8. The Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) phase 2 preliminary laser design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, T. Rhidian; Pindroh, Albert L.; Bowers, Mark S.; Dehart, Terence E.; McDonald, Kenneth F.; Cousins, Ananda; Moody, Stephen E.

    1992-07-01

    The requirements for the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) were determined from system considerations and are summarized in tabular form. The laser subsystem provides for the generation and frequency control of two beams, the transmit high power and local oscillator beams, which are delivered to the optical and receiver subsystems, respectively. In our baseline approach, the excitation of the gain section is achieved by a self-sustaining uv-(corona) preionized discharge. Gas is recirculated within the laser loop using a transverse flow fan. An intra-flow-loop heat exchanger, catalyst monolith, and acoustic attenuators condition the gas to ensure uniform energy output and high beam quality during high pulse repetition rate operation. The baseline LAWS laser pulse temporal profile as calculated by in-house laser codes is given in graphical form.

  9. Preflight assessment of the cross-track infrared sounder (CrIS) performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavyalov, Vladimir V.; Fish, Chad S.; Bingham, Gail E.; Esplin, Mark; Greenman, Mark; Scott, Deron; Han, Yong

    2011-11-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is a part of the Crosstrack Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS) that will be used to produce accurate temperature, water vapor, and pressure profiles on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and upcoming Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) operational missions. The NPP CrIS flight model has completed sensor qualification, characterization, and calibration and is now integrated with the NPP spacecraft in preparation for the launch. This paper reviews the CrIS performance during thermal vacuum tests, including the spacecraft integration test, and provides a comparison to the AIRS and IASI heritage sensors that it builds upon. The CrIS system consists of the instrument itself and ground-based scientific algorithms. The data reported in this paper was processed with the latest version of the CrIS science sensor data record (SDR) algorithm and thus reflects the performance of the CrIS SDR system. This paper includes the key test results for Noise Equivalent Differential Noise (NEdN), Radiometric Performance, and Spectral Accuracy. The CrIS sensor performance is outstanding and will meet the mission needs for the NPP /JPSS mission. NEdN is one of the key performance tests for the CrIS sensor. The overall NEdN performance for the CrIS in the LWIR, MWIR and SWIR spectral bands is excellent and is comparable or exceeds NEdN performance of AIRS and IASI. Also discussed is the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) approach developed to estimate contribution of random and spectrally correlated noise components to the total NEDN.

  10. Satellite Sounder Observations of Contrasting Tropospheric Moisture Transport Regimes: Saharan Air Layers, Hadley Cells, and Atmospheric Rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalli, Nicholas R.; Barnet, Christopher D.; Reale, Tony; Liu, Quanhua; Morris, Vernon R.; Spackman, J. Ryan; Joseph, Everette; Tan, Changyi; Sun, Bomin; Tilley, Frank; Leung, L. Ruby; Wolfe, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    This paper examines the performance of satellite sounder atmospheric vertical moisture proles (AVMP) under tropospheric conditions encompassing moisture contrasts driven by convection and advection transport mechanisms, specifically Atlantic Ocean Saharan air layers (SALs) and Pacific Ocean moisture conveyer belts (MCBs) commonly referred to as atmospheric rivers (ARs), both of these being mesoscale to synoptic meteorological phenomena within the vicinity of subtropical Hadley subsidence zones. Operational AVMP environmental data records retrieved from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) NOAA-Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) are collocated with dedicated radiosonde observations (RAOBs) obtained from ocean-based intensive field campaigns; these RAOBs provide uniquely independent correlative truth data not assimilated into numerical weather prediction models for satellite sounder validation over open ocean. Using these marine-based data, we empirically assess the performance of the operational NUCAPS AVMP product for detecting and resolving these tropospheric moisture features over otherwise RAOB-sparse regions.

  11. The 4-Day Wave as Observed from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Microwave Limb Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D. R.; Stanford, J. L.; Elson, L. S.; Fishbein, E. F.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    The "4-day wave" is an eastward moving quasi-nondispersive feature with period near 4 days occurring near the winter polar stratopause. This paper presents evidence of the 4-day feature in Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) temperature, geopotential height, and ozone data from the late southern winters of 1992 and 1993. Space-time spectral analyses reveal a double-peaked temperature structure consisting of one peak near the stratopause and another in the lower mesosphere, with an out-of-phase relationship between the two peaks. This double- peaked structure is reminiscent of recent three-dimensional barotropic/baroclinic instability model predictions and is observed here for the first time. The height variation of the 4-day ozone signal is shown to compare well with a linear advective-photochemical tracer model. Negative regions of quasigeostrophic potential vorticity (PV) gradient and positive Eliassen-Palm flux divergence are shown to occur, consistent with instability dynamics playing a role in wave forcing. Spectral analyses of PV derived from MLS geopotential height fields reveal a 4-day signal peaking near the polar stratopause. The three-dimensional structure of the 4-day wave resembles the potential vorticity "charge" concept, wherein a PV anomaly in the atmosphere (analogous to an electrical charge in a dielectric material) induces a geopotential field, a vertically oriented temperature dipole, and circulation about the vertical axis.

  12. Next generation global Earth atmospheric composition sounders for the decadal survey requirements and roadmaps Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There are two overall objectives: 1. Define the spatial resolutions and sensitivities required for the instruments; 2. Mature the technology for the limb sounder and...

  13. Development and characterization of the superconducting integrated receiver channel of the TELIS atmospheric sounder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lange, Gert; Boersma, Dick; Dercksen, Johannes; Ermakov, Andrey B; Golstein, Hans; Hoogeveen, Ruud W M; De Jong, Leo; Khudchenko, Andrey V; Kinev, Nickolay V; Kiselev, Oleg S; Van Kuik, Bart; De Lange, Arno; Van Rantwijk, Joris; Selig, Avri M; De Vries, Ed [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, PO Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Birk, Manfred [DLR German Aerospace Centre, Remote Sensing Technology Institute, D-82234 Wessling (Germany); Dmitriev, Pavel; Filippenko, Lyudmila V; Sobolev, Alexander S; Torgashin, Mikhail Yu, E-mail: G.de.Lange@sron.n, E-mail: valery@hitech.cplire.r [Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Science, 11/7 Mokhovaya Street, 125009, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-04-15

    The balloon-borne instrument TELIS (TErahertz and submillimetre LImb Sounder) is a three-channel superconducting heterodyne spectrometer for atmospheric research use. It detects spectral emission lines of stratospheric trace gases that have their rotational transitions at THz frequencies. One of the channels is based on the superconducting integrated receiver (SIR) technology. We demonstrate for the first time the capabilities of the SIR technology for heterodyne spectroscopy in general, and atmospheric limb sounding in particular. We also show that the application of SIR technology is not limited to laboratory environments, but that it is well suited for remote operation under harsh environmental conditions. Within a SIR the main components needed for a superconducting heterodyne receiver such as a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer with a quasi-optical antenna, a flux-flow oscillator (FFO) as the local oscillator, and a harmonic mixer to phase lock the FFO are integrated on a single chip. Light weight and low power consumption combined with broadband operation and nearly quantum limited sensitivity make the SIR a perfect candidate for use in future airborne and space-borne missions. The noise temperature of the SIR was measured to be as low as 120 K, with an intermediate frequency band of 4-8 GHz in double-sideband operation. The spectral resolution is well below 1 MHz, confirmed by our measurements. Remote control of the SIR under flight conditions has been demonstrated in a successful balloon flight in Kiruna, Sweden. The sensor and instrument design are presented, as well as the preliminary science results from the first flight.

  14. The 4-Day Wave as Obvserved from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Microwave Limb Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D. R.; Stanford, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    The 4-day wave is an eastward moving quasi-nondispersive feature with period near 4 days occurring near the winter polar stratopause. This paper presents evidence of the 4-day feature in Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) temperature, geopotential height and ozone data from the late Southern winters of 1992 and 1993.

  15. Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMas) - New Capability in the CoSMIR-CoSSIR Scanhead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, L. M.; Racette, P. E.; Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Thompson, E.

    2015-01-01

    Lincoln Laboratory and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center have teamed to re-use an existing instrument platform, the CoSMIRCoSSIR system for atmospheric sounding, to develop a new capability in hyperspectral filtering, data collection, and display. The volume of the scanhead accomodated an intermediate frequency processor(IFP), that provides the filtering and digitization of the raw data and the interoperable remote component (IRC) adapted to CoSMIR, CoSSIR, and HyMAS that stores and archives the data with time tagged calibration and navigation data.The first element of the work is the demonstration of a hyperspectral microwave receiver subsystem that was recently shown using a comprehensive simulation study to yield performance that substantially exceeds current state-of-the-art. Hyperspectral microwave sounders with 100 channels offer temperature and humidity sounding improvements similar to those obtained when infrared sensors became hyperspectral, but with the relative insensitivity to clouds that characterizes microwave sensors. Hyperspectral microwave operation is achieved using independent RF antennareceiver arrays that sample the same areavolume of the Earths surfaceatmosphere at slightly different frequencies and therefore synthesize a set of dense, finely spaced vertical weighting functions. The second, enabling element of the proposal is the development of a compact 52-channel Intermediate Frequency processor module. A principal challenge in the development of a hyperspectral microwave system is the size of the IF filter bank required for channelization. Large bandwidths are simultaneously processed, thus complicating the use of digital back-ends with associated high complexities, costs, and power requirements. Our approach involves passive filters implemented using low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology to achieve an ultra-compact module that can be easily integrated with existing RF front-end technology. This IF processor is universally

  16. Water Ice Clouds and Dust in the Martian Atmosphere Observed by Mars Climate Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jennifer L.; Kass, David; Heavens, Nicholas; Kleinbohl, Armin

    2011-01-01

    The water ice clouds are primarily controlled by the temperature structure and form at the water condensation level. Clouds in all regions presented show day/night differences. Cloud altitude varies between night and day in the SPH and tropics: (1) NPH water ice opacity is greater at night than day at some seasons (2) The diurnal thermal tide controls the daily variability. (3) Strong day/night changes indicate that the amount of gas in the atmosphere varies significantly. See significant mixtures of dust and ice at the same altitude planet-wide (1) Points to a complex radiative and thermal balance between dust heating (in the visible) and ice heating or cooling in the infrared. Aerosol layering: (1) Early seasons reveal a zonally banded spatial distribution (2) Some localized longitudinal structure of aerosol layers (3) Later seasons show no consistent large scale organization

  17. Enhancements in lower stratospheric CH3CN observed by the upper atmosphere research Sattellite Microwave Limb Sounder following boreal forest fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesey, N. J.; Fromm, M. D.; Waters, J. W.; Manney, G. L.; Santee, M. L.; Read, W. G.

    2004-01-01

    On 25 August 1992, the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite observed a significant enhancement in the abundance of lower stratospheric methyl cyanide (CH3CN) at 100??hPa (16??km altitude) in a small region off the east coast of Florida.

  18. RETRIEVING ATMOSPHERIC SOUNDING PROFILES AROUND TYPHOON YUNNA USING INFRARED HYPERSPECTRAL MEASUREMENTS AIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Bing; LIU Jian-wen; BAI Jie; LI Yao-dong; GAO Shou-ting

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we derived atmospheric profiles of temperature, moisture, and ozone, along with surface emissivity, skin temperature, and surface pressure, from infrared-sounder radiances under clear sky (cloudless) condition. Clouds were detected objectively using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder under a relatively low spatial resolution and cloud-mask information from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer under a high horizontal resolution; this detection was conducted using space matching.Newton's nonlinear physical iterative solution technique is applied to the radiative transfer equation (RTE) to retrieve temperature profiles, relative humidity profiles, and surface variables simultaneously. This technique is carried out by using the results of an eigenvector regression retrieval as the background profile and using corresponding iterative forms for the weighting functions of temperature and water-vapor mixing ratio. The iterative forms are obtained by applying the variational principle to the RTE. We also compared the retrievals obtained with different types of observations. The results show that the retrieved atmospheric sounding profile has great superiority over other observations by accuracy and resolution. Retrieved profiles can be used to improve the initial conditions of numerical models and used in areas where conventional observations are sparse, such as plateaus, deserts, and seas.

  19. Sensitivity of thermal infrared sounders to the chemical and micro-physical properties of UTLS secondary sulphate aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellitto, P.; Legras, B.

    2015-08-01

    Monitoring upper tropospheric-lower stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulphate aerosols and their chemical and micro-physical properties from satellite nadir observations is crucial to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact to the UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of thermal infrared (TIR) satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealized UTLS sulphate aerosol layers. The extinction properties of sulphuric acid/water droplets, for different sulphuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indexes taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealized aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on the brightness temperature spectra observed by this satellite instrument. We found a marked and typical spectral signature of these aerosol layers between 700 and 1200 cm-1, due to the absorption bands of the sulphate and bi-sulphate ions and the undissociated sulphuric acid, with the main absorption peaks at 1170 and 905 cm-1. The dependence of the aerosol spectral signature to the sulphuric acid mixing ratio, and effective number concentration and radius, as well as the role of interferring parameters like the ozone, sulphur dioxide, carbon dioxide and ash absorption, and temperature and water vapour profile

  20. Sensitivity of thermal infrared sounders to the chemical and micro-physical properties of UTLS secondary sulphate aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sellitto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring upper tropospheric-lower stratospheric (UTLS secondary sulphate aerosols and their chemical and micro-physical properties from satellite nadir observations is crucial to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact to the UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of thermal infrared (TIR satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealized UTLS sulphate aerosol layers. The extinction properties of sulphuric acid/water droplets, for different sulphuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indexes taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealized aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on the brightness temperature spectra observed by this satellite instrument. We found a marked and typical spectral signature of these aerosol layers between 700 and 1200 cm−1, due to the absorption bands of the sulphate and bi-sulphate ions and the undissociated sulphuric acid, with the main absorption peaks at 1170 and 905 cm−1. The dependence of the aerosol spectral signature to the sulphuric acid mixing ratio, and effective number concentration and radius, as well as the role of interferring parameters like the ozone, sulphur dioxide, carbon dioxide and ash absorption, and temperature and

  1. Assessment of error propagation in ultraspectral sounder data via JPEG2000 compression and turbo coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Donald P.; Wang, Charles C.; Sklar, Dean; Huang, Bormin; Ahuja, Alok

    2005-08-01

    Research has been undertaken to examine the robustness of JPEG2000 when corrupted by transmission bit errors in a satellite data stream. Contemporary and future ultraspectral sounders such as Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS), and Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) generate a large volume of three-dimensional data. Hence, compression of ultraspectral sounder data will facilitate data transmission and archiving. There is a need for lossless or near-lossless compression of ultraspectral sounder data to avoid potential retrieval degradation of geophysical parameters due to lossy compression. This paper investigates the simulated error propagation in AIRS ultraspectral sounder data with advanced source and channel coding in a satellite data stream. The source coding is done via JPEG2000, the latest International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/International Telecommunication Union (ITU) standard for image compression. After JPEG2000 compression the AIRS ultraspectral sounder data is then error correction encoded using a rate 0.954 turbo product code (TPC) for channel error control. Experimental results of error patterns on both channel and source decoding are presented. The error propagation effects are curbed via the block-based protection mechanism in the JPEG2000 codec as well as memory characteristics of the forward error correction (FEC) scheme to contain decoding errors within received blocks. A single nonheader bit error in a source code block tends to contaminate the bits until the end of the source code block before the inverse discrete wavelet transform (IDWT), and those erroneous bits propagate even further after the IDWT. Furthermore, a single header bit error may result in the corruption of almost the entire decompressed granule. JPEG2000 appears vulnerable to bit errors in a noisy channel of

  2. Infrared remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols; Apports du sondage infrarouge a l'etude des aerosols atmospheriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierangelo, C.

    2005-09-15

    The 2001 report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emphasized the very low level of understanding of atmospheric aerosol effects on climate. These particles originate either from natural sources (dust, volcanic aerosols...) or from anthropogenic sources (sulfates, soot...). They are one of the main sources of uncertainty on climate change, partly because they show a very high spatio-temporal variability. Observation from space, being global and quasi-continuous, is therefore a first importance tool for aerosol studies. Remote sensing in the visible domain has been widely used to obtain a better characterization of these particles and their effect on solar radiation. On the opposite, remote sensing of aerosols in the infrared domain still remains marginal. Yet, not only the knowledge of the effect of aerosols on terrestrial radiation is needed for the evaluation of their total radiative forcing, but also infrared remote sensing provides a way to retrieve other aerosol characteristics (observations are possible at night and day, over land and sea). In this PhD dissertation, we show that aerosol optical depth, altitude and size can be retrieved from infrared sounder observations. We first study the sensitivity of aerosol optical properties to their micro-physical properties, we then develop a radiative transfer code for scattering medium adapted to the very high spectral resolution of the new generation sounder NASA-Aqua/AIRS, and we finally focus on the inverse problem. The applications shown here deal with Pinatubo stratospheric volcanic aerosol, observed with NOAA/HIRS, and with the building of an 8 year climatology of dust over sea and land from this sounder. Finally, from AIRS observations, we retrieve the optical depth at 10 {mu}m, the average altitude and the coarse mode effective radius of mineral dust over sea. (author)

  3. The GEISA system in 1996: towards an operational tool for the second generation vertical sounders radiance simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Scott, N. A.; Chedin, A.; Bonnet, B.; Barbe, A.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Champion, J. P.; Winnewisser, M.; Brown, L. R.; Gamache, R.; Golovko, V. F.; Chursin, A. A.

    1998-05-01

    Since their creation, in 1974, the GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) database system (more than 730,000 entries between 0 and 22,656 cm-1, corresponding to 40 molecules and 86 isotopic species, in its 1992 edition) and the associated software have been widely used for forward atmospheric radiative transfer modelling, with the maximum reliability, tractability and efficiency. For the upcoming high spectral resolution sounders like IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) and AIRS (Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder), more complete and accurate laboratory measurements of spectroscopic parameters, presently included in the databases, are required, and more sophisticated theoretical radiative transfer modelling should be developed. Consequently, it is intended to elaborate the GEISA database as an interactive tool, named GEISA/IASI, designed for providing spectroscopic information tailored to the IASI sounding radiative transfer modelling.

  4. Measurements of hydrogen cyanide (HCN and acetylene (C2H2 from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Clerbaux

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen cyanide (HCN and acetylene (C2H2 are ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases with medium lifetime, which are frequently used as indicators of combustion sources and as tracers for atmospheric transport and chemistry. Because of their weak infrared absorption, overlapped by the CO2 Q-branch near 720 cm−1, nadir sounders have up to now failed to measure these gases routinely. Taking into account CO2 line mixing we provide for the first time extensive measurements of HCN and C2H2 total columns at Reunion Island (21° S; 55° E and Jungfraujoch (46° N; 8° E in 2009–2010 using observations from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI. These are compared with local ground-based Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR measurements and we demonstrate that the seasonality is well captured, except for HCN at Jungfraujoch. We also examine a nonspecific biomass burning plume over austral Africa and show that the emission ratios with respect to CO agree with previously reported values.

  5. Measurements of hydrogen cyanide (HCN and acetylene (C2H2 from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Duflot

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen cyanide (HCN and acetylene (C2H2 are ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases with medium lifetime, which are frequently used as indicators of combustion sources and as tracers for atmospheric transport and chemistry. Because of their weak infrared absorption, overlapped by the CO2 Q branch near 720 cm−1, nadir sounders have up to now failed to measure these gases routinely. Taking into account CO2 line mixing, we provide for the first time extensive measurements of HCN and C2H2 total columns at Reunion Island (21° S, 55° E and Jungfraujoch (46° N, 8° E in 2009–2010 using observations from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI. A first order comparison with local ground-based Fourier transform infraRed (FTIR measurements has been carried out allowing tests of seasonal consistency which is reasonably captured, except for HCN at Jungfraujoch. The IASI data shows a greater tendency to high C2H2 values. We also examine a nonspecific biomass burning plume over austral Africa and show that the emission ratios with respect to CO agree with previously reported values.

  6. Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) Temperature Data Record (TDR) in netCDF

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) is a series of passive microwave conically scanning imagers and sounders onboard the DMSP satellites beginning...

  7. Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) in netCDF

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) is a series of passive microwave conically scanning imagers and sounders onboard the DMSP satellites beginning...

  8. Stratospheric ClO and ozone from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, J. W.; Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Manney, G. L.; Elson, L. S.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Harwood, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    Concentrations of atmospheric ozone and of ClO (the predominant form of reactive chlorine responsible for stratospheric ozone depletion) are reported for both the Arctic and Antarctic winters of the past 18 months. Chlorine in the lower stratosphere was almost completely converted to chemically reactive forms in both the northern and southern polar winter vortices. This occurred in the south long before the development of the Antarctic ozone hole, suggesting that ozone loss can be masked by influx of ozone-rich air.

  9. Atmospheric refractivity effects on mid-infrared ELT adaptive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Kendrew, S; Mathar, R J; Stuik, R; Hippler, S; Brandl, B

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the effect of atmospheric dispersion on the performance of a mid-infrared adaptive optics assisted instrument on an extremely large telescope (ELT). Dispersion and atmospheric chromaticity is generally considered to be negligible in this wavelength regime. It is shown here, however, that with the much-reduced diffraction limit size on an ELT and the need for diffraction-limited performance, refractivity phenomena should be carefully considered in the design and operation of such an instrument. We include an overview of the theory of refractivity, and the influence of infrared resonances caused by the presence of water vapour and other constituents in the atmosphere. `Traditional' atmospheric dispersion is likely to cause a loss of Strehl only at the shortest wavelengths (L-band). A more likely source of error is the difference in wavelengths at which the wavefront is sensed and corrected, leading to pointing offsets between wavefront sensor and science instrument that evolve with time over a long e...

  10. In-flight control and communication architecture of the GLORIA imaging limb-sounder on atmospheric research aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, E.; Bachner, M.; Blank, J.; Dapp, R.; Ebersoldt, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Guggenmoser, T.; Gulde, T.; Hartmann, V.; Lutz, R.; Maucher, G.; Neubert, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Preusse, P.; Schardt, G.; Schmitt, C.; Schönfeld, A.; Tan, V.

    2015-02-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA), a Fourier transform spectrometer based limb spectral imager, operates on high-altitude research aircraft to study the transit region between the troposphere and the stratosphere. It is one of the most sophisticated systems to be flown on research aircraft in Europe, requiring constant monitoring and human intervention in addition to an automation system. To ensure proper functionality and interoperability on multiple platforms, a flexible control and communication system was laid out. The architectures of the communication system as well as the protocols used are reviewed. The integration of this architecture in the automation process as well as the scientific campaign flight application context are discussed.

  11. In-flight control and communication architecture of the GLORIA imaging limb sounder on atmospheric research aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, E.; Bachner, M.; Blank, J.; Dapp, R.; Ebersoldt, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Guggenmoser, T.; Gulde, T.; Hartmann, V.; Lutz, R.; Maucher, G.; Neubert, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Preusse, P.; Schardt, G.; Schmitt, C.; Schönfeld, A.; Tan, V.

    2015-06-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA), a Fourier-transform-spectrometer-based limb spectral imager, operates on high-altitude research aircraft to study the transit region between the troposphere and the stratosphere. It is one of the most sophisticated systems to be flown on research aircraft in Europe, requiring constant monitoring and human intervention in addition to an automation system. To ensure proper functionality and interoperability on multiple platforms, a flexible control and communication system was laid out. The architectures of the communication system as well as the protocols used are reviewed. The integration of this architecture in the automation process as well as the scientific campaign flight application context are discussed.

  12. In-flight control and communication architecture of the GLORIA imaging limb-sounder on atmospheric research aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kretschmer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA, a Fourier transform spectrometer based limb spectral imager, operates on high-altitude research aircraft to study the transit region between the troposphere and the stratosphere. It is one of the most sophisticated systems to be flown on research aircraft in Europe, requiring constant monitoring and human intervention in addition to an automation system. To ensure proper functionality and interoperability on multiple platforms, a flexible control and communication system was laid out. The architectures of the communication system as well as the protocols used are reviewed. The integration of this architecture in the automation process as well as the scientific campaign flight application context are discussed.

  13. Use of Fourier transforms for asynoptic mapping: Applications to the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite microwave limb sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, Lee S.; Froidevaux, Lucien

    1993-01-01

    Fourier analysis has been applied to data obtained from limb viewing instruments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. A coordinate system rotation facilitates the efficient computation of Fourier transforms in the temporal and longitudinal domains. Fields such as ozone (O3), chlorine monoxide (ClO), temperature, and water vapor have been transformed by this process. The transforms have been inverted to provide maps of these quantities at selected times, providing a method of accurate time interpolation. Maps obtained by this process show evidence of both horizontal and vertical transport of important trace species such as O3 and ClO. An examination of the polar regions indicates that large-scale planetary variations are likely to play a significant role in transporting midstratospheric O3 into the polar regions. There is also evidence that downward transport occurs, providing a means of moving O3 into the polar vortex at lower altitudes. The transforms themselves show the structure and propagation characteristics of wave variations.

  14. Tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric volumes from infrared limb-imager measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungermann, Joern

    2011-08-12

    State-of-the art nadir and limb-sounders, but also in situ measurements, do not offer the capability to highly resolve the atmosphere in all three dimensions. This leaves an observational gap with respect to small-scale structures that arise frequently in the atmosphere and that still lack a quantitative understanding. For instance, filaments and tropopause folds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) are crucial for its composition and variability. One way to achieve a highly resolved three-dimensional (3-D) picture of the atmosphere is the tomographic evaluation of limb-imager measurements. This thesis presents a methodology for the tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric constituents. To be able to deal with the large increase of observations and unknowns compared to conventional retrievals, great care is taken to reduce memory consumption and processing time. This method is used to evaluate the performance of two upcoming infrared limb-imager instruments and to prepare their missions. The first examined instrument is the infrared limb-imager on board of PREMIER (Process Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimetrewave Emitted Radiation), one of three remaining candidates for ESA's 7th Earth Explorer mission. Scientific goals of PREMIER are, among others, the examination of gravity waves and the quantification of processes controlling atmospheric composition in the UTLS, a region of particular importance for climate change. Simulations based on the performance requirements of this instrument deliver a vertical resolution that is slightly better than its vertical field-of-view (about 0.75 km) and a horizontal resolution of {approx}25km x 70 km. Non-linear end-to-end simulations for various gravity wave patterns demonstrate that the high 3-D resolution of PREMIER considerably extends the range of detectable gravity waves in terms of horizontal and vertical wavelength compared to previous observations. The second examined

  15. Sensor System Performance Evaluation and Benefits from the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larar, A.; Zhou, D.; Smith, W.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global-scale measurements of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring, and environmental change detection. Validation of the entire measurement system is crucial to achieving this goal and thus maximizing research and operational utility of resultant data. Field campaigns employing satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft are an essential part of this validation task. The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I) has been a fundamental contributor in this area by providing coincident high spectral/spatial resolution observations of infrared spectral radiances along with independently-retrieved geophysical products for comparison with like products from satellite sensors being validated. This paper focuses on some of the challenges associated with validating advanced atmospheric sounders and the benefits obtained from employing airborne interferometers such as the NAST-I. Select results from underflights of the Aqua Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) obtained during recent field campaigns will be presented.

  16. Global distributions of methanol and formic acid retrieved for the first time from the IASI/MetOp thermal infrared sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Razavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanol (CH3OH and formic acid (HCOOH are among the most abundant volatile organic compounds present in the atmosphere. In this work, we derive the global distributions of these two organic species using for the first time the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI launched onboard the MetOp-A satellite in 2006. This paper describes the method used and provides a first critical analysis of the retrieved products. The retrieval process follows a two-step approach in which global distributions are first obtained on the basis of a simple radiance indexing (transformed into brightness temperatures, and then mapped onto column abundances using suitable conversion factors. For methanol, the factors were calculated using a complete retrieval approach in selected regions. In the case of formic acid, a different approach, which uses a set of forward simulations for representative atmospheres, has been used. In both cases, the main error sources are carefully determined: the average relative error on the column for both species is estimated to be about 50%, increasing to about 100% for the least favorable conditions. The distributions for the year 2009 are discussed in terms of seasonality and source identification. Time series comparing methanol, formic acid and carbon monoxide in different regions are also presented.

  17. Infrared Opacities in Dense Atmospheres of Cool White Dwarf Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, P. M.; Blouin, S.; Dufour, P.

    2017-03-01

    Dense, He-rich atmospheres of cool white dwarfs represent a challenge to the modeling. This is because these atmospheres are constituted of a dense fluid in which strong multi-atomic interactions determine their physics and chemistry. Therefore, the ideal-gas-based description of absorption is no longer adequate, which makes the opacities of these atmospheres difficult to model. This is illustrated with severe problems in fitting the spectra of cool, He-rich stars. Good description of the infrared (IR) opacity is essential for proper assignment of the atmospheric parameters of these stars. Using methods of computational quantum chemistry we simulate the IR absorption of dense He/H media. We found a significant IR absorption from He atoms (He-He-He CIA opacity) and a strong pressure distortion of the H2-He collision-induced absorption (CIA). We discuss the implication of these results for the interpretation of the spectra of cool stars.

  18. Infrared Opacities in Dense Atmospheres of Cool White Dwarf Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, Piotr M; Dufour, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Dense, He-rich atmospheres of cool white dwarfs represent a challenge to the modeling. This is because these atmospheres are constituted of a dense fluid in which strong multi-atomic interactions determine their physics and chemistry. Therefore, the ideal-gas-based description of absorption is no longer adequate, which makes the opacities of these atmospheres difficult to model. This is illustrated with severe problems in fitting the spectra of cool, He-rich stars. Good description of the infrared (IR) opacity is essential for proper assignment of the atmospheric parameters of these stars. Using methods of computational quantum chemistry we simulate the IR absorption of dense He/H media. We found a significant IR absorption from He atoms (He-He-He CIA opacity) and a strong pressure distortion of the H$_2$-He collision-induced absorption (CIA). We discuss the implication of these results for interpretation of the spectra of cool stars.

  19. NESDIS Microwave Sounder-based Tropical Cyclone (TC) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The S-NPP Microwave Sounder-based Tropical Cyclone (TC) Products provide estimates of tropical cyclone maximum wind speed, minimum sea level pressure, radii of 34,...

  20. Memory efficient atmospheric effects modeling for infrared scene generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavak, Çaǧlar; Özsaraç, Seçkin

    2015-05-01

    The infrared (IR) energy radiated from any source passes through the atmosphere before reaching the sensor. As a result, the total signature captured by the IR sensor is significantly modified by the atmospheric effects. The dominant physical quantities that constitute the mentioned atmospheric effects are the atmospheric transmittance and the atmospheric path radiance. The incoming IR radiation is attenuated by the transmittance and path radiance is added on top of the attenuated radiation. In IR scene simulations OpenGL is widely used for rendering purposes. In the literature there are studies, which model the atmospheric effects in an IR band using OpenGLs exponential fog model as suggested by Beers law. In the standard pipeline of OpenGL, the related fog model needs single equivalent OpenGL variables for the transmittance and path radiance, which actually depend on both the distance between the source and the sensor and also on the wavelength of interest. However, in the conditions where the range dependency cannot be modeled as an exponential function, it is not accurate to replace the atmospheric quantities with a single parameter. The introduction of OpenGL Shading Language (GLSL) has enabled the developers to use the GPU more flexible. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for the atmospheric effects modeling using the least squares estimation with polynomial fitting by programmable OpenGL shader programs built with GLSL. In this context, a radiative transfer model code is used to obtain the transmittance and path radiance data. Then, polynomial fits are computed for the range dependency of these variables. Hence, the atmospheric effects model data that will be uploaded in the GPU memory is significantly reduced. Moreover, the error because of fitting is negligible as long as narrow IR bands are used.

  1. ARIEL - Atmospheric Remote-Sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large-survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Drossart, Pierre; Eccleston, Paul; Hartogh, Paul; Leconte, Jérémy; Micela, Giusi; Ollivier, Marc; Pilbratt, Göran; Puig, Ludovic; Turrini, Diego; Vandenbussche, Bart; Wolkenberg, Paulina; ARIEL Consortium, ARIEL ESA Study Team

    2016-10-01

    The Atmospheric Remote-Sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large-survey (ARIEL) is one of the three candidate missions selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) for its next medium-class science mission due for launch in 2026. The goal of the ARIEL mission is to investigate the atmospheres of several hundreds planets orbiting distant stars in order to address the fundamental questions on how planetary systems form and evolve.During its four (with a potential extension to six) years mission ARIEL will observe 500+ exoplanets in the visible and the infrared with its meter-class telescope in L2. ARIEL targets will include Jupiter- and Neptune-size down to super-Earth and Earth-size around different types of stars. The main focus of the mission will be on hot and warm planets orbiting very close to their star, as they represent a natural laboratory in which to study the chemistry and formation of exoplanets. In cooler planets, different gases separate out through condensation and sinking into distinct cloud layers. The scorching heat experienced by hot exoplanets overrides these processes and keeps all molecular species circulating throughout the atmosphere.The ARIEL mission concept has been developed by a consortium of more than 50 institutes from 12 countries, which include UK, France, Italy, Germany, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Denmark, Ireland and Portugal. The analysis of ARIEL spectra and photometric data will allow to extract the chemical fingerprints of gases and condensates in the planets' atmospheres, including the elemental composition for the most favorable targets. It will also enable the study of thermal and scattering properties of the atmosphere as the planet orbit around the star.ARIEL will have an open data policy, enabling rapid access by the general community to the high-quality exoplanet spectra that the core survey will deliver.

  2. A novel retrieval of daytime atmospheric dust and volcanic ash heights through a synergy of AIRS infrared radiances and MODIS L2 optical depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. DeSouza-Machado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method to retrieve daytime atmospheric dust and ash plume heights using a synergy of infrared hyper-spectral radiances and retrieved visible optical depths. The method is developed using data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, both of which are on NASA's Aqua platform, and lends itself to also a χ2 height derivation based on the smallest bias between observations and calculations in the thermal infrared window. The retrieval methodology is validated against almost 30 months of dust centroid heights obtained from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIOP data, and against ash plume heights obtained from the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR after the Puyehue Cordon Caulle volcanic eruption of June 2011. Comparisons are also made against Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART climatological aerosol heights. In general there is good agreement between the heights from the CALIPSO data and the AIRS/MODIS retrieval, especially over the Atlantic and Mediterranean regions; over land one there are more noticeable differences. The AIRS/MODIS derived heights are within typically 25% of the CALIOP centroid heights.

  3. Summertime tropospheric ozone assessment over the Mediterranean region using the thermal infrared IASI/MetOp sounder and the WRF-Chem model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Safieddine

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the Mediterranean region, elevated tropospheric ozone (O3 values are recorded, especially in summer. We use the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI and the Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem to understand and interpret the factors and emission sources responsible for the high O3 concentrations observed in the Mediterranean troposphere. Six years of IASI data have been analyzed and show consistent maxima during summer, with an increase of up to 22% in the [0–8] km O3 column in the eastern part of the basin compared to the middle of the basin. We analyze 2010 as an example year to investigate the processes that contribute to these summer maxima. Using two modeled O3 tracers (inflow to the model domain and local anthropogenic emissions, we show that between the surface and 2 km, O3 is mostly formed from anthropogenic emissions and above 4 km, is mostly transported from outside the domain. Evidence of stratosphere to troposphere exchanges (STE in the eastern part of the basin is shown, and corresponds with low relative humidity and high potential vorticity.

  4. Non-LTE diagnositics of infrared radiation of Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feofilov, Artem; Rezac, Ladislav; Kutepov, Alexander; Vinatier, Sandrine; Rey, Michael; Nikitin, Andrew; Tyuterev, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    Yelle (1991) and Garcia-Comas et al, (2011) demonstrated the importance of accounting for the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) breakdown in the middle and upper atmosphere of Titan for the interpretation of infrared radiances measured at these heights. In this work, we make further advance in this field by: • updating the non-LTE model of CH4 emissions in Titan's atmosphere and including a new extended database of CH4 spectroscopic parameters • studying the non-LTE CH4 vibrational level populations and the impact of non-LTE on limb infrared emissions of various CH4 ro-vibrational bands including those at 7.6 and 3.3 µm • implementing our non-LTE model into the LTE-based retrieval algorithm applied by Vinatier et al., (2015) for processing the Cassini/CIRS spectra. We demonstrate that accounting for non-LTE leads to an increase in temperatures retrieved from CIRS 7.6 µm limb emissions spectra (˜10 K at 600 km altitude) and estimate how this affects the trace gas density retrieval. Finally, we discuss the effects of including a large number of weak one-quantum and combinational bands on the calculated daytime limb 3.3 µm emissions and the impact they may have on the CH4 density retrievals from the Cassini VIMS 3.3 µm limb emission observations.

  5. Infrared Absorption by Atmospheric Aerosols in Mexico City during MILAGRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2007-12-01

    found as colloidal materials in surface and groundwaters (4). Examples of the IR spectra obtained and variance as a function of time at the two sites will be presented. The spectra are taken in Kubelka - Munk format, which also allows the infrared absorption strengths to be evaluated as function of wavelength. The wavelength dependence of the aerosol complex refractive index (m = n + ik) in the infrared spectral region is determined by application of the Kramers Kronig function. The importance of the aerosol absorption in the infrared spectral region to radiative forcing will be discussed. 1. N.A. Marley, J.S. Gaffney, and M.M. Cunningham,Environ. Sci. Technol. 27 2864-2869 (1993). 2. N.A. Marley, J.S. Gaffney, and M.M. Cunningham, Spectroscopy 7 44-53 (1992). 3. J.S. Gaffney and N.A. Marley, Atmospheric Environment, New Directions contribution, 32, 2873-2874 (1998). 4. N.A. Marley, J.S. Gaffney, and K.A. Orlandini, Chapter 7 in Humic/Fulvic Acids and Organic Colloidal Materials in the Environment, ACS Symposium Series 651, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C., pp. 96-107, 1996. This work was performed as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX- Mex) under the support of the Atmospheric Science Program. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64328.

  6. Degradation of near infrared and shortwave infrared imager performance due to atmospheric scattering of diffuse night illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmerhausen, Richard

    2013-07-20

    On moonless nights, airglow is the primary source of natural ground illumination in the near infrared and shortwave infrared spectral bands. Therefore, night vision imagers operating in these spectral bands view targets that are diffusely illuminated. Aerosol scattering of diffuse airglow illumination causes atmospheric path radiance and that radiance causes increased imager noise. These phenomena and their quantification are described in this paper.

  7. Infrared photometry and spectrophotometry of Titan. [for atmospheric brightness temperature model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, D.

    1974-01-01

    The wide variation in infrared brightness temperature of Titan is explained in terms of a greenhouse effect. Radiometric observations in the infrared and microwave frequencies indicate an alternate hot atmospheric model. Methane, ammonia, hydrogen atoms, and nitrogen atoms are suggested as main constituents for the Titan atmosphere.

  8. Requirements for an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) for Improved Regional Weather Prediction and Monitoring of Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Susskind, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral infrared atmospheric sounders (e.g., the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on Met Op) provide highly accurate temperature and water vapor profiles in the lower to upper troposphere. These systems are vital operational components of our National Weather Prediction system and the AIRS has demonstrated over 6 hrs of forecast improvement on the 5 day operational forecast. Despite the success in the mid troposphere to lower stratosphere, a reduction in sensitivity and accuracy has been seen in these systems in the boundary layer over land. In this paper we demonstrate the potential improvement associated with higher spatial resolution (1 km vs currently 13.5 km) on the accuracy of boundary layer products with an added consequence of higher yield of cloud free scenes. This latter feature is related to the number of samples that can be assimilated and has also shown to have a significant impact on improving forecast accuracy. We also present a set of frequencies and resolutions that will improve vertical resolution of temperature and water vapor and trace gas species throughout the atmosphere. Development of an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) with these improvements will improve weather forecast at the regional scale and of tropical storms and hurricanes. Improvements are also expected in the accuracy of the water vapor and cloud properties products, enhancing process studies and providing a better match to the resolution of future climate models. The improvements of technology required for the ALS are consistent with the current state of technology as demonstrated in NASA Instrument Incubator Program and NOAA's Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) formulation phase development programs.

  9. Studies of Arctic Middle Atmosphere Chemistry using Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmaier, Rodica

    The objective of this Ph.D. project is to investigate Arctic middle atmosphere chemistry using solar infrared absorption spectroscopy. These measurements were made at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka, Nunavut, which is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). This research is part of the CANDAC/PEARL Arctic Middle Atmosphere Chemistry theme and aims to improve our understanding of the processes controlling the stratospheric ozone budget using measurements of the concentrations of stratospheric constituents. The instrument, a Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, has been specifically designed for high-resolution measurements over a broad spectral range and has been used to measure reactive species, source gases, reservoirs, and dynamical tracers at PEARL since August 2006. The first part of this research focuses on the optimization of ozone retrievals, for which 22 microwindows were studied and compared. The spectral region from 1000 to 1005 cm-1 was found to be the most sensitive in both the stratosphere and troposphere, giving the highest number of independent pieces of information and the smallest total error for retrievals at Eureka. Similar studies were performed in coordination with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change for nine other species, with the goal of improving and harmonizing the retrieval parameters among all Infrared Working Group sites. Previous satellite validation exercises have identified the highly variable polar conditions of the spring period to be a challenge. In this work, comparisons between the 125HR and ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier transform spectrometer) from 2007 to 2010 have been used to develop strict criteria that allow the ground and satellite-based instruments to be confidently compared. After applying these criteria, the differences between the two instruments were generally

  10. A Fourier transform infrared trace gas analyser for atmospheric applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. T. Griffith

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Concern in recent decades about human impacts on Earth's climate has led to the need for improved and expanded measurement capabilities for greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. In this paper we describe in detail an in situ trace gas analyser based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy that is capable of simultaneous and continuous measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, carbon monoxide (CO, nitrous oxide (N2O and 13C in CO2 in air with high precision and accuracy. Stable water isotopes can also be measured in undried airstreams. The analyser is automated and allows unattended operation with minimal operator intervention. Precision and accuracy meet and exceed the compatibility targets set by the World Meteorological Organisation – Global Atmosphere Watch Programme for baseline measurements in the unpolluted troposphere for all species except 13C in CO2.

    The analyser is mobile and well suited to fixed sites, tower measurements, mobile platforms and campaign-based measurements. The isotopic specificity of the optically-based technique and analysis allows application of the analyser in isotopic tracer experiments, for example 13C in CO2 and 15N in N2O. We review a number of applications illustrating use of the analyser in clean air monitoring, micrometeorological flux and tower measurements, mobile measurements on a train, and soil flux chamber measurements.

  11. Optical Design of Spaceborne Broadband Limb Sounder for Detecting Atmospheric Trace Gas%星载宽波段大气痕量气体临边探测仪光学设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛庆生

    2012-01-01

    In order to meet the urgent requirements of delecting atmospheric trace gas in limb observation geometry, an optical system of spaceborne broadband limb sounder for detecting atmospheric trace gas is designed. The system is an imaging spectrometer with the working wavelength band from 0. 3 μm to 0. 7 μm, and its full field of view is 2. 4% focal length is 120 mm, and the relative aperture is 1 : 6. To avoid the problems of the classical Czerny-Truncr spectrometer, such as low spatial resolution caused by large astigmatism, a modified Czerny-Turner spectrometer is designed, in which astigmatism can be corrected simultaneously in a wide band. By matching the modified Czerny-Turner spectrometer with a off-axis parabolic telescope,an examplc of limb sounder optical system is designed. Ray tracing, optimization and analysing are performed by ZEMAX software. The analyzed results demonstrate that the astigmatism is substantially corrected, and the MTF for different spectral band is more than 0. 69 which satisfies the pre-designed requirement and proves the feasibility of the astigmatism-correction method.%为满足大气痕量气体临边探测的迫切需求,克服传统Czerny-Turner光谱仪由于像散大导致空间分辨率低的缺点,设计了一种可以在宽波段内同时校正像散的改进型Czerny-Turner光谱仪,光谱范围为0.3~0.7μm,全视场角为2.4°,焦距为120 mm,相对孔径为1∶6.将离轴抛物面镜与改进型Czerny-Turner光谱仪匹配设计了一个临边探测仪光学系统并运用光学设计软件ZEMAX对临边探测仪光学系统进行了光线追迹和优化并对设计结果进行了分析,结果表明该系统的像散得到充分校正,光学系统在各个谱段的光学传递函数均达到0.69以上,完全满足设计指标要求,也证明了所提出的在宽波段内同时像散校正方法是可行的.

  12. Laboratory infrared spectroscopy of some important atmospheric trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Qunjun

    High-resolution measurements of the infrared spectra of water vapor (H 2O) carbon monoxide (CO) and the fluorocarbon C2F6 have been performed using a Bruker EFS-120 HR Fourier-transform spectrometer. Two stainless steel cryogenically cooled absorption cells have been employed with provided path lengths of 2.15 and 9.28 cm. A multiple-reflection White cell has also been used with path lengths between 3.2 to 41.2 meters in increasing steps of 3.2 meters. In order to retrieve the spectral line parameters from the observed transmission spectra, a multi-spectral non- linear least-squares fitting algorithm has been developed with special attention paid to the shape of the instrumental function of the spectrometer. Spectral line parameters have been obtained for more than 1000 transmissions of water vapor in the 950-2100 Cm-1 and 3000-4050 Cm-1 regions. The measurements have been performed at 252, 273 and 296 K. Line positions, line strengths, self-broadened line widths and self- induced line shifts have been measured for all of these lines. Air-broadened line widths and air-induced line shifts have been obtained for some of the lines. The exponent n in the power law characterizing the dependence of air-broadened line widths upon temperature has been determined for the strong lines in these spectral regions mentioned. Spectral line parameters have also been measured for the lines of 12C16O in the fundamental band and in the first overtone band. More than 100 spectra have been taken at several temperatures between 170 and 296 K to determine these parameters. Line strengths, self- and air-broadened line widths, self- and air-induced line shifts have been retrieved for the lines between P(24) and R(23) in the first overtone band. Line strengths, air-broadened line widths and air-induced line shifts have been retrieved for the spectral lines between P(23) and R(25) in the fundamental band. The exponent n characterizing the temperature- dependence of the self- and air

  13. Tuneable Heterodyne Infrared Spectrometer for atmospheric and astronomical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnabend, Guido; Wirtz, Daniel; Schmülling, Frank; Schieder, Rudolf

    2002-05-20

    The transportable setup of the Cologne Tuneable Heterodyne Infrared Spectrometer (THIS) is presented. Frequency tuneability over a wide range provided by the use of tuneable diode lasers as local oscillators (LO) allows a variety of molecules in the mid-infrared to be observed. Longtime integration, which is essential for astronomical observations, is possible owing to tight frequency control of the LO with optical feedback from an external cavity. THIS is developed to fly on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy beginning in 2006 but can also be used on different types of ground-based telescopes.

  14. Mars Atmospheric CO2 Condensation Above the North and South Poles as Revealed by Radio Occultation, Climate Sounder, and Laser Ranging Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Renyu; Cahoy, Kerri; Zuber, Maria T.

    2012-01-01

    We study the condensation of CO2 in Mars atmosphere using temperature profilesretrieved from radio occultation measurements from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) as wellas the climate sounding instrument onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO),and detection of reflective clouds by the MGS Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Wefind 11 events in 1999 where MGS temperature profiles indicate CO2 condensation andMOLA simultaneously detects reflective clouds. We thus provide causal evidence thatMOLA non-ground returns are associated with CO2 condensation, which strongly indicatestheir nature being CO2 clouds. The MGS and MRO temperature profiles together revealthe seasonal expansion and shrinking of the area and the vertical extent of atmosphericsaturation. The occurrence rate of atmospheric saturation is maximized at high latitudes inthe middle of winter. The atmospheric saturation in the northern polar region exhibits moreintense seasonal variation than in the southern polar region. In particular, a shrinking ofsaturation area and thickness from LS 270 to 300 in 2007 is found; this is probablyrelated to a planet-encircling dust storm. Furthermore, we integrate the condensation areaand the condensation occurrence rate to estimate cumulative masses of CO2 condensatesdeposited onto the northern and southern seasonal polar caps. The precipitation flux isapproximated by the particle settling flux which is estimated using the impulse responses ofMOLA filter channels. With our approach, the total atmospheric condensation mass canbe estimated from these observational data sets with average particle size as the onlyfree parameter. By comparison with the seasonal polar cap masses inferred from thetime-varying gravity of Mars, our estimates indicate that the average condensate particleradius is 822 mm in the northern hemisphere and 413 mm in the southern hemisphere.Our multi-instrument data analysis provides new constraints on modeling the global climateof Mars.

  15. Absorption of infra-red radiation by atmospheric molecular cluster-ions

    OpenAIRE

    Aplin, K. L.; R. A. McPheat

    2005-01-01

    Protonated water clusters are a common species of atmospheric molecular cluster-ion, produced by cosmic rays throughout the troposphere and stratosphere. Under clear-sky conditions or periods of increased atmospheric ionisation, such as solar proton events, the IR absorption by atmospheric ions may affect climate through the radiative balance. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry in a long path cell, of path length 545m, has been used to detect IR absorption by corona-generated positive mo...

  16. The 2003 edition of geisa: a spectroscopic database system for the second generation vertical sounders radiance simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Lmd Team

    The GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) computer accessible database system, in its former 1997 and 2001 versions, has been updated in 2003 (GEISA-03). It is developed by the ARA (Atmospheric Radiation Analysis) group at LMD (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, France) since 1974. This early effort implemented the so-called `` line-by-line and layer-by-layer '' approach for forward radiative transfer modelling action. The GEISA 2003 system comprises three databases with their associated management softwares: a database of spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located in a spectral range from the microwave to the limit of the visible. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the Giant Planets. a database of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. a database of refractive indices of basic atmospheric aerosol components. Illustrations will be given of GEISA-03, data archiving method, contents, management softwares and Web access facilities at: http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr The performance of instruments like AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder; http://www-airs.jpl.nasa.gov) in the USA, and IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer; http://smsc.cnes.fr/IASI/index.htm) in Europe, which have a better vertical resolution and accuracy, compared to the presently existing satellite infrared vertical sounders, is directly related to the quality of the spectroscopic parameters of the optically active gases, since these are essential input in the forward models used to simulate recorded radiance spectra. For these upcoming atmospheric sounders, the so-called GEISA/IASI sub-database system has been elaborated

  17. Characterization of exoplanet atmospheres using future space-based infrared telescopes: challenges in detecting biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enya, Keigo

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of exoplanet atmospheres with space-based infrared telescopes is important to detect biomarkers. A promising method is temporary differential observation. For this method, designs of a wideband infrared spectral disperser are presented. A design using a CdTe prism simultaneously covers λ=1-30 μm. Designing binary pupil masks for segmented pupils to be used in spatially resolved observations are also shown for another observational method.

  18. Atmospheric Longwave Infrared Emission Spectroscopy of Water Vapor at the South Pole

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Brooke A.

    2000-01-01

    The downward infrared radiance spectrum was measured with a Michelson Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) spectrometer at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Spectra were collected year-round at the South Pole in 1998. This research focuses on the atmospheric water emission lines between 250 and 800 cm-1 (40 to 12.5 μm) region. The spectral resolution is 1 cm-1. The atmosphere over the South Pole is the driest and coldest on Earth. Winter surface temperatures average approximately -60°C, while the t...

  19. The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: the atmospheric dispersion corrector

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, Andrew C; Larkin, James E; Moore, Anna M; Niehaus, Cynthia N; Cramptone, David; Simard, Luc

    2010-01-01

    We present a conceptual design for the atmospheric dispersion corrector (ADC) for TMT's Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). The severe requirements of this ADC are reviewed, as are limitations to observing caused by uncorrectable atmospheric effects. The requirement of residual dispersion less than 1 milliarcsecond can be met with certain glass combinations. The design decisions are discussed and the performance of the design ADC is described. Alternative options and their performance tradeoffs are also presented.

  20. Infrared Spectral Radiance Intercomparisons With Satellite and Aircraft Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement system validation is critical for advanced satellite sounders to reach their full potential of improving observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface for enabling enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Experimental field campaigns, focusing on satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft, are an essential part of the validation task. Airborne FTS systems can enable an independent, SI-traceable measurement system validation by directly measuring the same level-1 parameters spatially and temporally coincident with the satellite sensor of interest. Continuation of aircraft under-flights for multiple satellites during multiple field campaigns enables long-term monitoring of system performance and inter-satellite cross-validation. The NASA / NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I) has been a significant contributor in this area by providing coincident high spectral/spatial resolution observations of infrared spectral radiances along with independently-retrieved geophysical products for comparison with like products from satellite sensors being validated. This presentation gives an overview of benefits achieved using airborne sensors such as NAST-I utilizing examples from recent field campaigns. The methodology implemented is not only beneficial to new sensors such as the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) flying aboard the Suomi NPP and future JPSS satellites but also of significant benefit to sensors of longer flight heritage such as the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the AQUA and METOP-A platforms, respectively, to ensure data quality continuity important for climate and other applications. Infrared spectral radiance inter-comparisons are discussed with a particular focus on usage of NAST-I data for enabling inter-platform cross-validation.

  1. Cine: Line excitation by infrared fluorescence in cometary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-03-01

    CINE is a Python module for calculating infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. Excitation by solar radiation of vibrational bands followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state is one of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets. This code calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Line transitions are queried from the latest version of the HITRAN spectroscopic repository using the astroquery affiliated package of astropy. Molecular data are obtained from the LAMDA database. These coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  2. MISTiC Winds, a Micro-Satellite Constellation Approach to High Resolution Observations of the Atmosphere using Infrared Sounding and 3D Winds Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschhoff, K. R.; Polizotti, J. J.; Susskind, J.; Aumann, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    MISTiCTM Winds is an approach to improve short-term weather forecasting based on a miniature high resolution, wide field, thermal emission spectrometry instrument that will provide global tropospheric vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity at high (3-4 km) horizontal and vertical ( 1 km) spatial resolution. MISTiC's extraordinarily small size, payload mass of less than 15 kg, and minimal cooling requirements can be accommodated aboard a 27U-class CubeSat or an ESPA-Class micro-satellite. Low fabrication and launch costs enable a LEO sun-synchronous sounding constellation that would collectively provide frequent IR vertical profiles and vertically resolved atmospheric motion vector wind observations in the troposphere. These observations are highly complementary to present and emerging environmental observing systems, and would provide a combination of high vertical and horizontal resolution not provided by any other environmental observing system currently in operation. The spectral measurements that would be provided by MISTiC Winds are similar to those of NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder that was built by BAE Systems and operates aboard the AQUA satellite. These new observations, when assimilated into high resolution numerical weather models, would revolutionize short-term and severe weather forecasting, save lives, and support key economic decisions in the energy, air transport, and agriculture arenas-at much lower cost than providing these observations from geostationary orbit. In addition, this observation capability would be a critical tool for the study of transport processes for water vapor, clouds, pollution, and aerosols. Key technical risks are being reduced through laboratory and airborne testing under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program.

  3. An empirical model for estimating the atmospheric transmittance of upward infrared radiation at different altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qiumin; Fang, Xiande; Zhao, Yingjie; Xing, Daoming

    2016-12-01

    The upward infrared (IR) radiation is one of the most important factors that affect the thermal characteristics of light-than-air (LTA) vehicles. Therefore, it is necessary to propose an accurate model to evaluate the upward atmospheric transmittance. The upward IR atmospheric transmittances of 6 different atmospheric models at the altitude from sea level to 30 km are obtained from the MODTRAN atmospheric radiative transfer code. Based on the data, a new upward IR atmospheric transmittance correlation related to pressure and vertical water column is proposed by regression analysis. It has excellent prediction accuracy with the coefficient of determination of 0.928, the root mean square error of 0.028, and the mean absolute percentage error of 2.68% for the database. Based on the new correlation, the thermal characteristics of a stratospheric airship located in tropics in midsummer are numerical studied and discussed.

  4. Improving retrieval quality for airborne limb sounders by horizontal regularisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ungermann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern airborne infrared limb sounders are capable of measuring profiles so fast that neighbouring profiles are very similar to one another. This can be exploited by retrieving whole 2-D cross-sections instead of simple 1-D profiles.

    This paper presents algorithms that are able to perform such a large-scale retrieval and that efficiently produce typical diagnostic quantities. The characteristics and capabilities of the proposed method are analysed and demonstrated in a detailed case study using a series of profiles that were measured by CRISTA-NF (Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescope for the Atmosphere–New Frontiers.

    It is shown that cross-section retrievals can either reduce noise-induced artefacts or produce finer vertical structures while maintaining the same image noise level. Further, it is discussed how the presented methodology can also be applied to improve the retrievals for other instrument types including current satellite-borne nadir-sounders and near-future satellite-borne limb sounders.

  5. Ground Based Observation of Isotopic Oxygen in the Martian Atmosphere Using Infrared Heterodyne Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. L.; Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Fast, K. E.; Hewagama, T.; Delgado, J. D.; Sonnabend, G.

    2010-01-01

    Infrared heterodyne spectra of isotopic CO2 in the Martian atmosphere were obtained using the Goddard Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind and Composition, HIPWAC, which was interfaced with the 3-meter telescope at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility- Spectra were colle cted at a resolution of lambda/delta lambda=10(exp 7). Absorption fea tures of the CO2 isotopologues have been identified from which isotop ic ratios of oxygen have been determined. The isotopic ratios O-17/O -16 and O-18/O-16 in the Martian atmosphere can be related to Martian atmospheric evolution and can be compared to isotopic ratios of oxyg en in the Earth's atmosphere. Isotopic carbon and oxygen are importa nt constraints on any theory for the erosion of the Martian primordia l atmosphere and the interaction between the atmosphere and surface o r subsurface chemical reservoirs. This investigation explored the pr esent abundance of the stable isotopes of oxygen in Mars' atmospheric carbon dioxide by measuring rovibrational line absorption in isotop ic species of CO2 using groundbased infrared heterodyne spectroscopy in the vicinity of the 9.6 micron and 10.6 micron CO2 lasing bands. T he target transitions during this observation were O-18 C-12 O-16 as well as O-178 C-12 O-16 and O-16 C-113 O-16 at higher resolving power of lambda/delta lambda=10(exp 7) and with high signal-to-noise ratio (longer integration time) in order to fully characterize the absorpt ion line profiles. The fully-resolved lineshape of both the strong n ormal-isotope and the weak isotopic CO2 lines were measured simultane ously in a single spectrum.

  6. Sound velocity from inverted echo sounders (IES) in the western Pacific Ocean from 19920826 to 19930322 (NODC Accession 9300159)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains inverted echo sounder data collected from two stations in the western Pacific, TPW nominally @ 2S and 154E and TPE nominally @ 2S and 164E....

  7. Clouds and Chemistry Brown Dwarf Atmospheric Properties from Optical and Infrared Colors

    CERN Document Server

    Marley, M S; Saumon, D S; Lodders, K; Ackerman, A S; Freedman, R

    2001-01-01

    The optical and infrared colors of L and T dwarfs are sensitive to cloud sedimentation and chemical processes in their atmospheres. In particular the J-K color of a cooling brown dwarf is sensitive to the vertical distribution of condensates in its atmosphere. Only atmosphere models which include sedimentation of condensates are able to reproduce the observed trends in J-K in which objects first become redder, then bluer with falling effective temperature. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey color i'-z' is sensitive to assumptions surrounding the alkali metal chemistry. Chemical equilibrium models which account for cloud sedimentation predict redder colors, by up to 2 magnitudes, than models which neglect sedimentation. The i'-z' vs. J-K color-color diagram is thus interesting for the window it opens into diverse atmospheric processes. In addition, we predict the locus in this color-color diagram of brown dwarfs cooler than yet found.

  8. Comparative study on atmospheric correction methods of visible and near-infrared hyperspectral image

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qian; Wu, Jingli; Wang, Guangping; Liu, Chang; Tao, Tao

    2015-03-01

    Currently, common atmospheric correction methods usually based on the statistical information of image itself for relative reflectance calculation, or make use of the radiative transfer model and meteorological parameters for accurate calculations. In order to compare the advantages and disadvantages of these methods, we carried out some atmospheric correction experiments based on AVIRIS Airborne Visible and Near-Infrared hyperspectral data. It proved that, the statistical method is simple and convenient, but not wide adaptability, that can only get the relative reflectance; while the radiative transfer model method is very complex and require the support of auxiliary information, but it can get the precise absolute reflectance of surface features.

  9. Atmospheric echo sounding. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundemann, A. S.

    1980-09-01

    s pertaining to equipment, design, and use of acoustic sounders are presented. Use of the sounders to sense the atmosphere for weather changes, temperature inversions, aircraft wakes, ionospheric properties, and other characteristics is discussed.

  10. Optimal Use of Space-Borne Advanced Infrared and Microwave Soundings for Regional Numerical Weather Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chian-Yi Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Satellite observations can either be assimilated as radiances or as retrieved physical parameters to reduce error in the initial conditions used by the Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP model. Assimilation of radiances requires a radiative transfer model to convert atmospheric state in model space to that in radiance space, thus requiring a lot of computational resources especially for hyperspectral instruments with thousands of channels. On the other hand, assimilating the retrieved physical parameters is computationally more efficient as they are already in thermodynamic states, which can be compared with NWP model outputs through the objective analysis scheme. A microwave (MW sounder and an infrared (IR sounder have their respective observational limitation due to the characteristics of adopted spectra. The MW sounder observes at much larger field-of-view (FOV compared to an IR sounder. On the other hand, MW has the capability to reveal the atmospheric sounding when the clouds are presented, but IR observations are highly sensitive to clouds, The advanced IR sounder is able to reduce uncertainties in the retrieved atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles due to its higher spectral-resolution than the MW sounder which has much broader spectra bands. This study tries to quantify the optimal use of soundings retrieved from the microwave sounder AMSU and infrared sounder AIRS onboard the AQUA satellite in the regional Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF model through three-dimensional variational (3D-var data assimilation scheme. Four experiments are conducted by assimilating soundings from: (1 clear AIRS single field-of-view (SFOV; (2 retrieved from using clear AMSU and AIRS observations at AMSU field-of-view (SUP; (3 all SFOV soundings within AMSU FOVs must be clear; and (4 SUP soundings which must have all clear SFOV soundings within the AMSU FOV. A baseline experiment assimilating only conventional data is generated for comparison

  11. Infrared thermal mapping of the martian surface and atmosphere: first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, H H; Chase, S C; Miner, E D; Palluconi, F D; Münch, G; Neugebauer, G; Martin, T Z

    1976-08-27

    The Viking infrared thermal mapper measures the thermal emission of the martian surface and atmosphere and the total reflected sunlight. With the high resolution and dense coverage being achieved, planetwide thermal structure is apparent at large and small scales. The thermal behavior of the best-observed areas, the landing sites, cannot be explained by simple homogeneous models. The data contain clear indications for the relevance of additional factors such as detailed surface texture and the occurrence of clouds. Areas in the polar night have temperatures distinctly lower than the CO(2) condensation point at the surface pressure. This observation implies that the annual atmospheric condensation is less than previously assumed and that either thick CO(2) clouds exist at the 20-kilometer level or that the polar atmosphere is locally enriched by noncondensable gases.

  12. Infrared thermal mapping of the Martian surface and atmosphere - First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, H. H.; Martin, T. Z.; Chase, S. C., Jr.; Miner, E. D.; Palluconi, F. D.; Muench, G.; Neugebauer, G.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking infrared thermal mapper measures the thermal emission of the Martian surface and atmosphere and the total reflected sunlight. With the high resolution and dense coverage being achieved, planetwide thermal structure is apparent at large and small scales. The thermal behavior of the best-observed areas, the landing sites, cannot be explained by simple homogeneous models. The data contain clear indications for the relevance of additional factors such as detailed surface texture and the occurrence of clouds. Areas in the polar night have temperatures distinctly lower than the CO2 condensation point at the surface pressure. This observation implies that the annual atmospheric condensation is less than previously assumed and that either thick CO2 clouds exist at the 20-kilometer level or that the polar atmosphere is locally enriched by noncondensable gases.

  13. Infrared absorption of dense helium and its importance in the atmospheres of cool white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, Piotr M

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Hydrogen deficient white dwarfs are characterized by very dense, fluid-like atmospheres of complex physics and chemistry that are still poorly understood. The incomplete description of these atmospheres by the models results in serious problems with the description of spectra of these stars and subsequent difficulties in derivation of their surface parameters. Here, we address the problem of infrared (IR) opacities in the atmospheres of cool white dwarfs by direct $ab$ $initio$ simulations of IR absorption of dense helium. Methods: We applied state-of-the-art density functional theory-based quantum molecular dynamics simulations to obtain the time evolution of the induced dipole moment. The IR absorption coefficients were obtained by the Fourier transform of the dipole moment time autocorrelation function. Results: We found that a dipole moment is induced due to three- and more-body simultaneous collisions between helium atoms in highly compressed helium. This results in a significant IR absorption that...

  14. A synthetic data set of high-spectral-resolution infrared spectra for the Arctic atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher J.; Rowe, Penny M.; Neshyba, Steven P.; Walden, Von P.

    2016-05-01

    Cloud microphysical and macrophysical properties are critical for understanding the role of clouds in climate. These properties are commonly retrieved from ground-based and satellite-based infrared remote sensing instruments. However, retrieval uncertainties are difficult to quantify without a standard for comparison. This is particularly true over the polar regions, where surface-based data for a cloud climatology are sparse, yet clouds represent a major source of uncertainty in weather and climate models. We describe a synthetic high-spectral-resolution infrared data set that is designed to facilitate validation and development of cloud retrieval algorithms for surface- and satellite-based remote sensing instruments. Since the data set is calculated using pre-defined cloudy atmospheres, the properties of the cloud and atmospheric state are known a priori. The atmospheric state used for the simulations is drawn from radiosonde measurements made at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site at Barrow, Alaska (71.325° N, 156.615° W), a location that is generally representative of the western Arctic. The cloud properties for each simulation are selected from statistical distributions derived from past field measurements. Upwelling (at 60 km) and downwelling (at the surface) infrared spectra are simulated for 260 cloudy cases from 50 to 3000 cm-1 (3.3 to 200 µm) at monochromatic (line-by-line) resolution at a spacing of ˜ 0.01 cm-1 using the Line-by-line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) and the discrete-ordinate-method radiative transfer code (DISORT). These spectra are freely available for interested researchers from the NSF Arctic Data Center data repository (doi:10.5065/D61J97TT).

  15. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy characterization of gaseous atmospheric pressure plasmas with 2 mm spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche, G; Vallade, J; Bazinette, R; van Nijnatten, P; Hernandez, E; Hernandez, G; Massines, F

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes an optical setup built to record Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra in an atmospheric pressure plasma with a spatial resolution of 2 mm. The overall system consisted of three basic parts: (1) optical components located within the FTIR sample compartment, making it possible to define the size of the infrared beam (2 mm × 2 mm over a path length of 50 mm) imaged at the site of the plasma by (2) an optical interface positioned between the spectrometer and the plasma reactor. Once through the plasma region, (3) a retro-reflector module, located behind the plasma reactor, redirected the infrared beam coincident to the incident path up to a 45° beamsplitter to reflect the beam toward a narrow-band mercury-cadmium-telluride detector. The antireflective plasma-coating experiments performed with ammonia and silane demonstrated that it was possible to quantify 42 and 2 ppm of these species in argon, respectively. In the case of ammonia, this was approximately three times less than this gas concentration typically used in plasma coating experiments while the silane limit of quantification was 35 times lower. Moreover, 70% of the incoming infrared radiation was focused within a 2 mm width at the site of the plasma, in reasonable agreement with the expected spatial resolution. The possibility of reaching this spatial resolution thus enabled us to measure the gaseous precursor consumption as a function of their residence time in the plasma.

  16. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy characterization of gaseous atmospheric pressure plasmas with 2 mm spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laroche, G. [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie de Surface, Centre de Recherche sur les Materiaux Avances, Departement de genie des mines, de la metallurgie et des materiaux, Universite Laval, 1065, avenue de la Medecine, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Centre de recherche du CHUQ, Hopital St Francois d' Assise, 10, rue de l' Espinay, local E0-165, Quebec G1L 3L5 (Canada); Vallade, J. [Laboratoire Procedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, PROMES, CNRS, Technosud, Rambla de la Thermodynamique, F-66100 Perpignan (France); Agence de l' environnement et de la Ma Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -carettrise de l' Energie, 20, avenue du Gresille, BP 90406, F-49004 Angers Cedex 01 (France); Bazinette, R.; Hernandez, E.; Hernandez, G.; Massines, F. [Laboratoire Procedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, PROMES, CNRS, Technosud, Rambla de la Thermodynamique, F-66100 Perpignan (France); Nijnatten, P. van [OMT Solutions bv, High Tech Campus 9, 5656AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    This paper describes an optical setup built to record Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra in an atmospheric pressure plasma with a spatial resolution of 2 mm. The overall system consisted of three basic parts: (1) optical components located within the FTIR sample compartment, making it possible to define the size of the infrared beam (2 mm Multiplication-Sign 2 mm over a path length of 50 mm) imaged at the site of the plasma by (2) an optical interface positioned between the spectrometer and the plasma reactor. Once through the plasma region, (3) a retro-reflector module, located behind the plasma reactor, redirected the infrared beam coincident to the incident path up to a 45 Degree-Sign beamsplitter to reflect the beam toward a narrow-band mercury-cadmium-telluride detector. The antireflective plasma-coating experiments performed with ammonia and silane demonstrated that it was possible to quantify 42 and 2 ppm of these species in argon, respectively. In the case of ammonia, this was approximately three times less than this gas concentration typically used in plasma coating experiments while the silane limit of quantification was 35 times lower. Moreover, 70% of the incoming infrared radiation was focused within a 2 mm width at the site of the plasma, in reasonable agreement with the expected spatial resolution. The possibility of reaching this spatial resolution thus enabled us to measure the gaseous precursor consumption as a function of their residence time in the plasma.

  17. Quantitative infrared absorption cross-sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, C. S.; Blake, T. A.; Guenther, A. B.; Sams, R. L.; Johnson, T. J.

    2014-04-01

    Isoprene (C5H8, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. Produced by vegetation as well as anthropogenic sources, the OH- and O3-initiated oxidations of isoprene are a major source of atmospheric oxygenated organics. Few quantitative infrared studies have been reported for isoprene, however, limiting the ability to quantify isoprene emissions via stand-off infrared or in situ detection. We thus report absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600-6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298 and 323 K in a 19.94 cm path length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker 66v FTIR. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven isoprene sample pressures at each temperature and the number densities are normalized to 296 K and 1 atmosphere.

  18. Quantitative infrared absorption cross-sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Brauer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Isoprene (C5H8, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene is a volatile organic compound (VOC that is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. Produced by vegetation as well as anthropogenic sources, the OH- and O3-initiated oxidations of isoprene are a major source of atmospheric oxygenated organics. Few quantitative infrared studies have been reported for isoprene, however, limiting the ability to quantify isoprene emissions via stand-off infrared or in situ detection. We thus report absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600–6500 cm−1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2 spectra were recorded at 278, 298 and 323 K in a 19.94 cm path length cell at 0.112 cm−1 resolution, using a Bruker 66v FTIR. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven isoprene sample pressures at each temperature and the number densities are normalized to 296 K and 1 atmosphere.

  19. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrite and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O, and adsorbed H2O. The spectral character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micron, 2.2 micron, 2.7 micron, 3 micron, and 6 microns are reported here in spectra measured under a Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stronger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micron feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3-micron band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micron band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural OH features observed in these materials

  20. A Useful Tool for Atmospheric Correction and Surface Temperature Estimation of Landsat Infrared Thermal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivalland, Vincent; Tardy, Benjamin; Huc, Mireille; Hagolle, Olivier; Marcq, Sébastien; Boulet, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Land Surface temperature (LST) is a critical variable for studying the energy and water budgets at the Earth surface, and is a key component of many aspects of climate research and services. The Landsat program jointly carried out by NASA and USGS has been providing thermal infrared data for 40 years, but no associated LST product has been yet routinely proposed to community. To derive LST values, radiances measured at sensor-level need to be corrected for the atmospheric absorption, the atmospheric emission and the surface emissivity effect. Until now, existing LST products have been generated with multi channel methods such as the Temperature/Emissivity Separation (TES) adapted to ASTER data or the generalized split-window algorithm adapted to MODIS multispectral data. Those approaches are ill-adapted to the Landsat mono-window data specificity. The atmospheric correction methodology usually used for Landsat data requires detailed information about the state of the atmosphere. This information may be obtained from radio-sounding or model atmospheric reanalysis and is supplied to a radiative transfer model in order to estimate atmospheric parameters for a given coordinate. In this work, we present a new automatic tool dedicated to Landsat thermal data correction which improves the common atmospheric correction methodology by introducing the spatial dimension in the process. The python tool developed during this study, named LANDARTs for LANDsat Automatic Retrieval of surface Temperature, is fully automatic and provides atmospheric corrections for a whole Landsat tile. Vertical atmospheric conditions are downloaded from the ERA Interim dataset from ECMWF meteorological organization which provides them at 0.125 degrees resolution, at a global scale and with a 6-hour-time step. The atmospheric correction parameters are estimated on the atmospheric grid using the commercial software MODTRAN, then interpolated to 30m resolution. We detail the processing steps

  1. Atmospheric transmission and thermal background emission in the mid-infrared at Mauna Kea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otárola, A.; Richter, M.; Packham, C.; Chun, M.

    2015-04-01

    We present results of a preliminary study intended to quantitatively estimate the atmospheric transmission and thermal background emission in the mid-infrared (MIR), 7 μm - 26 μm, at the 13N TMT site in Mauna Kea. This is in the interest of supporting the planning of MIR instrumentation for the posible second-generation of astronomical instruments for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project. Mauna Kea, located at high altitude (4,050 m above sea level), enjoys natural conditions that make it an outstanding location for astronomical observations in the mid-infrared. The goal of this work is to produce a dataset and model that shows the atmospheric transmission and thermal emission for two cases of precipitable water vapor (PWV), a low value of 0.3 mm, and at 1.5 mm which represent near median conditions at the site. Besides, and driven by the interest of the MIR community to exploit the daily twilight times, we look at the specific atmospheric conditions around twilight as a function of season. The best conditions are found for cold and dry winter days, and in particular the morning twilight offers the best conditions. The analysis of PWV data, shows the median value for the site (all year conditions between 6:00 PM and 7:30AM) is 1.8 mm and that periods of water vapor lower than 1.0 mm are common, these supports the opportunity and discovery potential of the TMT project in the mid-infrared bands.

  2. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopic Study on Reaction between Self-Assembled Monolayers and Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Shinohara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma is becoming increasingly adopted in bioapplications such as plasma medicine and agriculture. This study investigates the interaction between plasma and molecules in living tissues, focusing on plasma-protein interactions. To this end, the reaction of air-pressure air plasma with NH2-terminated self-assembled monolayer is investigated by infrared spectroscopy in multiple internal reflection geometry. The atmospheric-pressure plasma decomposed the NH2 components, the characteristic units of proteins. The decomposition is attributed to water clusters generated in the plasma, indicating that protein decomposition by plasma requires humid air.

  3. Near-infrared thermal emissivity from ground based atmospheric dust measurements at ORM

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardi, G; Ortolani, S; Melnick, J; Ghedina, A; Garcia, A; Molinari, E; Gatica, C

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the atmospheric content of aerosols measured at Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM; Canary Islands). Using a laser diode particle counter located at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) we have detected particles of 0.3, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0 um size. The seasonal behavior of the dust content in the atmosphere is calculated. The Spring has been found to be dustier than the Summer, but dusty conditions may also occur in Winter. A method to estimate the contribution of the aerosols emissivity to the sky brightness in the near-infrared (NIR) is presented. The contribution of dust emission to the sky background in the NIR has been found to be negligible comparable to the airglow, with a maximum contribution of about 8-10% in the Ks band in the dusty days.

  4. The science of ARIEL (Atmospheric Remote-sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large-survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, G.; Drossart, P.; Eccleston, P.; Hartogh, P.; Heske, A.; Leconte, J.; Micela, G.; Ollivier, M.; Pilbratt, G.; Puig, L.; Turrini, D.; Vandenbussche, B.; Wolkenberg, P.; Pascale, E.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Güdel, M.; Min, M.; Rataj, M.; Ray, T.; Ribas, I.; Barstow, J.; Bowles, N.; Coustenis, A.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Decin, L.; Encrenaz, T.; Forget, F.; Friswell, M.; Griffin, M.; Lagage, P. O.; Malaguti, P.; Moneti, A.; Morales, J. C.; Pace, E.; Rocchetto, M.; Sarkar, S.; Selsis, F.; Taylor, W.; Tennyson, J.; Venot, O.; Waldmann, I. P.; Wright, G.; Zingales, T.; Zapatero-Osorio, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    The Atmospheric Remote-Sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large-survey (ARIEL) is one of the three candidate missions selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) for its next medium-class science mission due for launch in 2026. The goal of the ARIEL mission is to investigate the atmospheres of several hundred planets orbiting distant stars in order to address the fundamental questions on how planetary systems form and evolve. During its four (with a potential extension to six) years mission ARIEL will observe 500+ exoplanets in the visible and the infrared with its meter-class telescope in L2. ARIEL targets will include gaseous and rocky planets down to the Earth-size around different types of stars. The main focus of the mission will be on hot and warm planets orbiting close to their star, as they represent a natural laboratory in which to study the chemistry and formation of exoplanets. The ARIEL mission concept has been developed by a consortium of more than 50 institutes from 12 countries, which include UK, France, Italy, Germany, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Denmark, Ireland and Portugal. The analysis of the ARIEL spectra and photometric data in the 0.5-7.8 micron range will allow to extract the chemical fingerprints of gases and condensates in the planets' atmospheres, including the elemental composition for the most favorable targets. It will also enable the study of thermal and scattering properties of the atmosphere as the planet orbit around the star. ARIEL will have an open data policy, enabling rapid access by the general community to the high-quality exoplanet spectra that the core survey will deliver.

  5. Absorption of infra-red radiation by atmospheric molecular cluster-ions

    CERN Document Server

    Aplin, K L

    2005-01-01

    Protonated water clusters are a common species of atmospheric molecular cluster-ion, produced by cosmic rays throughout the troposphere and stratosphere. Under clear-sky conditions or periods of increased atmospheric ionisation, such as solar proton events, the IR absorption by atmospheric ions may affect climate through the radiative balance. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry in a long path cell, of path length 545m, has been used to detect IR absorption by corona-generated positive molecular cluster-ions. The column concentration of ions in the laboratory spectroscopy experiment was estimated to be ~10^13 m-2; the column concentration of protonated atmospheric ions estimated using a simple model is ~10^14 m-2. Two regions of absorption, at 12.3 and 9.1 um are associated with enhanced ion concentrations. After filtering of the measured spectra to compensate for spurious signals from neutral water vapour and residual carbon dioxide, the strongest absorption region is at 9.5 to 8.8 um (1050 to 1140 cm-1)...

  6. 温度对CrIS热红外卫星资料反演臭氧廓线的影响分析%Analysis of the Influence of Temperature on the Retrieval of Ozone Vertical Profiles Using the Thermal Infrared CrIS Sounder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马鹏飞; 陈良富; 邹铭敏; 张莹; 陶明辉; 王子峰; 苏林

    2015-01-01

    this molecule plays a key role in the photo-chemical reactions and climate change .The TIR measurements can capture the variability of ozone and are weakly sensitive to the lowermost tropospheric ozone content but can provide accurate measurements of tropospheric ozone and higher vertical resolution ozone profiles ,with the additional advantage that measurements are also possible during the night .Because of the influence of at-mospheric temperature ,the ozone profile retrieval accuracy is severely limited .This paper analyze and discuss the ozone absorp-tion spectra and weighting function sensitivity of temperature and its influence on ozone profile retrieval in detail .First ,we simu-late the change of atmospheric transmittance and radiance by importing 1 K temperature uncertainty ,using line-by-line radiative transfer mode under 6 different atmosphere modes .The results show that the transmittance change ratio for 1 K temperature variation was consistent with the transmittance change ratio for 5% ~6% change of ozone density variation in all layers of the profile .Then ,we calculate the change of weighting function by a temperature error of 1 K ,using the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM ) for the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite and calculate the corresponding change of retrieval result .The results demonstrate that CrIS is sensitive to Ozone in the middle to upper stratosphere ,with the peak vertical sensitivity between 10~100 hPa and the change of weighting function for 1 K temperature variation was consistent with 6% change in the ozone profile .Finally ,the paper retrieves ozone profiles from the CrIS radiances with a nonlinear Newton iteration method and use the eigenvector regression algorithm to construct the a priori state .In order to resolve the problem of temperature uncertainty and get high accuracy ozone profile ,atmospheric temper-ature profile and ozone profile are

  7. Development of Mid-Infrared Lasers for the Measurement of Trace Atmospheric Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannun, R. A.; Witinski, M. F.; Forouhar, S.; Anderson, J.

    2012-12-01

    In order to thoroughly characterize atmospheric composition at all altitudes, an unprecedented scientific and technical effort is needed. Essential to the advancement of both satellite and in situ science are improvements in continuous wave (CW) and high-power pulsed laser systems in the infrared spectral region integrated with miniaturized electronic and optical components, allowing for the deployment of single mode light sources aboard satellite and UAV platforms. Sources in the the spectral region from 2.8 μm to 3.5 μm are crucial to the sensitive and precise quantification of several atmospherically relevant species, including: OH, H2O, H218O, HDO, CH4, 13CH4, CO2, CH2O, and C2H6, all of which present strong fundamental vibrational absorptions in this mid-infrared range. Currently, however, a massive technology gap exists in both CW and pulsed laser systems within this spectral window. Recent developments include the advancement of CW tunable diode technology using new solid state materials to improve electron hole localization, and the initial integration of these lasers into miniaturized optoelectronic systems ideal for in situ deployment. In addition, high-power pulsed light sources have been produced using optical parametric generation (OPG). A single-frequency Nd:YAG pumps a nonlinear crystal, injection seeded with a diode laser to enhance efficiency and reduce the bandwidth of the output radiation, creating a light source ideal for LIDAR and other remote sensing applications.

  8. Heterogeneous doped one-dimensional photonic crystal with low emissivity in infrared atmospheric window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Lei; Shi, Jiaming; Wang, Jiachun; Zhao, Dapeng; Chen, Zongsheng; Wang, Qichao

    2016-05-01

    The characteristic matrix method in thin-film optical theory was used to calculate heterogeneous doped one-dimensional photonic crystals (1-D PCs), which were fabricated by alternate deposition of Te, ZnSe, and Si materials on a silicon wafer. The heterogeneous structure was adopted to broaden the photonic band gap, within which the low reflection valley was achieved by doping. Infrared spectrum tests showed that the average emissivities of the 1-D PC were 0.0845 and 0.281, corresponding, respectively, to the bands of 3 to 5 and 8 to 14 μm. Moreover, the emissivity was 0.45 over the 5 to 8 μm nonatmospheric window, and the reflectivity was 0.28 at the wavelength of 10.6 μm. The results indicated that the heterogeneous doped 1-D PC was able to selectively achieve low emissivities over infrared atmospheric windows and a low reflectivity for the CO2 laser, which exhibited remarkable competence in compatible infrared and laser stealth applications.

  9. Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    techniques such as attenuated total reflectance [6]. The two final papers deal with what seem to be wholly different scientific fields [7, 8]. One paper describes SOFIA, an aeroplane-based astronomical observatory covering the whole IR range [7], while the other represents a small review of the quite new topic of terahertz physics at the upper end of the IR spectral range, from around 30 µm to 3 mm wavelength, and its many applications in science and industry [8]. Although artificially separated, all these fields use similar kinds of detectors, similar kinds of IR sources and similar technologies, while the instruments use the same physical principles. We are convinced that the field of infrared physics will develop over the next decade in the same dynamic way as during the last, and this special issue may serve as starting point for regular submissions on the topic. At any rate, it shines a light on this fascinating and many-faceted subject, which started more than 200 years ago. References [1] Mangold K, Shaw J A and Vollmer M 2013 The physics of near-infrared photography Eur. J. Phys. 34 S51-71 [2] Vollmer M and Möllmann K-P 2013 Characterization of IR cameras in student labs Eur. J. Phys. 34 S73-90 [3] Ibarra-Castanedo C, Tarpani J R and Maldague X P V 2013 Nondestructive testing with thermography Eur. J. Phys. 34 S91-109 [4] Shaw J A and Nugent P W 2013 Physics principles in radiometric infrared imaging of clouds in the atmosphere Eur. J. Phys. 34 S111-21 [5] Möllmann K-P and Vollmer M 2013 Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in physics laboratory courses Eur. J. Phys. 34 S123-37 [6] Heise H M, Fritzsche J, Tkatsch H, Waag F, Karch K, Henze K, Delbeck S and Budde J 2013 Recent advances in mid- and near-infrared spectroscopy with applications for research and teaching, focusing on petrochemistry and biotechnology relevant products Eur. J. Phys. 34 S139-59 [7] Krabbe A, Mehlert D, Röser H-P and Scorza C 2013 SOFIA, an airborne observatory for infrared astronomy

  10. Infrared measurements in the Arctic using two Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Mariani

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Extended-range Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (E-AERI is a moderate resolution (1 cm−1 Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for measuring the absolute downwelling infrared spectral radiance from the atmosphere between 400 and 3000 cm−1. The extended spectral range of the instrument permits monitoring of the 400–550 cm−1 (20–25 μm region, where most of the infrared surface cooling currently occurs in the dry air of the Arctic. Spectra from the E-AERI have the potential to provide information about radiative balance, trace gases, and cloud properties in the Canadian high Arctic. Calibration, performance evaluation, and certification of the E-AERI were performed at the University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Centre from September to October 2008. The instrument was then installed at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL Ridge Lab (610 m altitude at Eureka, Nunavut, in October 2008, where it acquired one year of data. Measurements are taken every seven minutes year-round, including polar night when the solar-viewing spectrometers at PEARL are not operated. A similar instrument, the University of Idaho's Polar AERI (P-AERI, was installed at the Zero-altitude PEARL Auxiliary Laboratory (0PAL, 15 km away from the PEARL Ridge Lab, from March 2006 to June 2009. During the period of overlap, these two instruments provided calibrated radiance measurements from two altitudes. A fast line-by-line radiative transfer model is used to simulate the downwelling radiance at both altitudes; the largest differences (simulation-measurement occur in spectral regions strongly influenced by atmospheric temperature and/or water vapour. The two AERI instruments at close proximity but located at two different altitudes are well-suited for investigating cloud forcing. As an example, it is shown that a thin, low ice cloud resulted in a 6% increase in irradiance. The presence

  11. Sea surface velocities from visible and infrared multispectral atmospheric mapping sensor imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, P. A.; Emery, W. J.; Radebaugh, M.

    1992-01-01

    High resolution (100 m), sequential Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS) images were used in a study to calculate advective surface velocities using the Maximum Cross Correlation (MCC) technique. Radiance and brightness temperature gradient magnitude images were formed from visible (0.48 microns) and infrared (11.12 microns) image pairs, respectively, of Chandeleur Sound, which is a shallow body of water northeast of the Mississippi delta, at 145546 GMT and 170701 GMT on 30 Mar. 1989. The gradient magnitude images enhanced the surface water feature boundaries, and a lower cutoff on the gradient magnitudes calculated allowed the undesirable sunglare and backscatter gradients in the visible images, and the water vapor absorption gradients in the infrared images, to be reduced in strength. Requiring high (greater than 0.4) maximum cross correlation coefficients and spatial coherence of the vector field aided in the selection of an optimal template size of 10 x 10 pixels (first image) and search limit of 20 pixels (second image) to use in the MCC technique. Use of these optimum input parameters to the MCC algorithm, and high correlation and spatial coherence filtering of the resulting velocity field from the MCC calculation yielded a clustered velocity distribution over the visible and infrared gradient images. The velocity field calculated from the visible gradient image pair agreed well with a subjective analysis of the motion, but the velocity field from the infrared gradient image pair did not. This was attributed to the changing shapes of the gradient features, their nonuniqueness, and large displacements relative to the mean distance between them. These problems implied a lower repeat time for the imagery was needed in order to improve the velocity field derived from gradient imagery. Suggestions are given for optimizing the repeat time of sequential imagery when using the MCC method for motion studies. Applying the MCC method to the infrared

  12. The Atmospheric Remote-sensing Infrared Exoplanets Large-survey (ARIEL) payload electronic subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focardi, M.; Pace, E.; Colomé, J.; Ribas, I.; Rataj, M.; Ottensamer, R.; Farina, M.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Wawer, P.; Pancrazzi, M.; Noce, V.; Pezzuto, S.; Morgante, G.; Artigues, B.; Sierra-Roig, C.; Gesa, L.; Eccleston, P.; Crook, M.; Micela, G.

    2016-07-01

    The ARIEL mission has been proposed to ESA by an European Consortium as the first space mission to extensively perform remote sensing on the atmospheres of a well defined set of warm and hot transiting gas giant exoplanets, whose temperature range between ~600 K and 3000 K. ARIEL will observe a large number (~500) of warm and hot transiting gas giants, Neptunes and super-Earths around a range of host star types using transit spectroscopy in the ~2-8 μm spectral range and broad-band photometry in the NIR and optical. ARIEL will target planets hotter than 600 K to take advantage of their well-mixed atmospheres, which should show minimal condensation and sequestration of high-Z materials and thus reveal their bulk and elemental composition. One of the major motivations for exoplanet characterisation is to understand the probability of occurrence of habitable worlds, i.e. suitable for surface liquid water. While ARIEL will not study habitable planets, its major contribution to this topic will results from its capability to detect the presence of atmospheres on many terrestrial planets outside the habitable zone and, in many cases, characterise them. This represents a fundamental breakthrough in understanding the physical and chemical processes of a large sample of exoplanets atmospheres as well as their bulk properties and to probe in-space technology. The ARIEL infrared spectrometer (AIRS) provides data on the atmospheric composition; these data are acquired and processed by an On-Board Data Handling (OBDH) system including the Cold Front End Electronics (CFEE) and the Instrument Control Unit (ICU). The Telescope Control Unit (TCU) is also included inside the ICU. The latter is directly connected to the Control and Data Management Unit (CDMU) on board the Service Module (SVM). The general hardware architecture and the application software of the ICU are described. The Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) electronics and the Cooler Control Electronics are also presented.

  13. Atmospheric effects on infrared measurements at ground level: Application to monitoring of transport infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Vincent; Dumoulin, Jean

    2014-05-01

    Being able to perform easily non-invasive diagnostics for surveillance and monitoring of critical transport infrastructures is a major preoccupation of many technical offices. Among all the existing electromagnetic methods [1], long term thermal monitoring by uncooled infrared camera [2] is a promising technique due to its dissemination potential according to its low cost on the market. Nevertheless, Knowledge of environmental parameters during measurement in outdoor applications is required to carry out accurate measurement corrections induced by atmospheric effects at ground level. Particularly considering atmospheric effects and measurements in foggy conditions close as possible to those that can be encountered around transport infrastructures, both in visible and infrared spectra. In the present study, atmospheric effects are first addressed by using data base available in literature and modelling. Atmospheric attenuation by particles depends greatly of aerosols density, but when relative humidity increases, water vapor condenses onto the particulates suspended in the atmosphere. This condensed water increases the size of the aerosols and changes their composition and their effective refractive index. The resulting effect of the aerosols on the absorption and scattering of radiation will correspondingly be modified. In a first approach, we used aerosols size distributions derived from Shettle and Fenn [3] for urban area which could match some of experimental conditions encountered during trials on transport infrastructures opened to traffic. In order to calculate the influence of relative humidity on refractive index, the Hänel's model [4] could be used. The change in the particulate size is first related to relative humidity through dry particle radius, particle density and water activity. Once the wet aerosol particle size is found, the effective complex refractive index is the volume weighted average of the refractive indexes of the dry aerosol substance

  14. Synergy between middle infrared and millimeter-wave limb sounding of atmospheric temperature and minor constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Ugo; Del Bianco, Samuele; Ceccherini, Simone; Gai, Marco; Dinelli, Bianca Maria; Castelli, Elisa; Oelhaf, Hermann; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Höpfner, Michael; Gerber, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Synergistic exploitation of redundant and complementary information from independent observations of the same target remains a major issue in atmospheric remote sounding and increasing attention is devoted to investigate optimized or innovative methods for the combination of two or more measured data sets. This paper focuses on the synergy between middle infrared and millimeter-wave limb sounding measurements of atmospheric composition and temperature and reports the results of a study conducted as part of the preparatory activities of the PREMIER (Process Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimeter-wave Emitted Radiation) mission candidate to the Core Missions of the European Space Agency (ESA) Earth Explorer 7. The activity was based on data acquired by the MIPAS-STR (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding - STRatospheric aircraft) and MARSCHALS (Millimetre-wave Airborne Receivers for Spectroscopic CHaracterisation in Atmospheric Limb Sounding) instruments on-board the high-altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysica during the flight of the PremierEx (PREMIER Experiment) campaign on 10 March 2010 from Kiruna, Sweden, for observation of the Arctic upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The cloud coverage observed along the flight provided representative test cases to evaluate the synergy in three different scenarios: low clouds in the first part, no clouds in the central part and high tropospheric clouds at the end. The calculation of synergistic profiles of four atmospheric targets (i.e., O3, HNO3, H2O and temperature) was performed using a posteriori combination of individual retrieved profiles, i.e., Level 2 (L2) data rather than simultaneous inversion of observed radiances, i.e., Level 1 (L1) data. An innovative method of data fusion, based on the Measurement Space Solution (MSS) was applied along with the standard approach of inversion of MARSCHALS spectral radiances using MIPAS-STR retrieval products as a priori

  15. Atmospheric influences on infrared-laser signals used for occultation measurements between Low Earth Orbit satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schweitzer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO is a new occultation technique between Low Earth Orbit (LEO satellites, which applies signals in the short wave infrared spectral range (SWIR within 2 μm to 2.5 μm. It is part of the LEO-LEO microwave and infrared-laser occultation (LMIO method that enables to retrieve thermodynamic profiles (pressure, temperature, humidity and altitude levels from microwave signals and profiles of greenhouse gases and further variables such as line-of-sight wind speed from simultaneously measured LIO signals. Due to the novelty of the LMIO method, detailed knowledge of atmospheric influences on LIO signals and of their suitability for accurate trace species retrieval did not yet exist. Here we discuss these influences, assessing effects from refraction, trace species absorption, aerosol extinction and Rayleigh scattering in detail, and addressing clouds, turbulence, wind, scattered solar radiation and terrestrial thermal radiation as well. We show that the influence of refractive defocusing, foreign species absorption, aerosols and turbulence is observable, but can be rendered small to negligible by use of the differential transmission principle with a close frequency spacing of LIO absorption and reference signals within 0.5%. The influences of Rayleigh scattering and terrestrial thermal radiation are found negligible. Cloud-scattered solar radiation can be observable under bright-day conditions, but this influence can be made negligible by a close time spacing (within 5 ms of interleaved laser-pulse and background signals. Cloud extinction loss generally blocks SWIR signals, except very thin or sub-visible cirrus clouds, which can be addressed by retrieving a cloud layering profile and exploiting it in the trace species retrieval. Wind can have a small influence on the trace species absorption, which can be made negligible by using a simultaneously retrieved or a moderately accurate background wind speed profile. We

  16. Dispersive infrared spectroscopy measurements of atmospheric CO₂ using a Fabry-Pérot interferometer sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L; Ning, Z; Westerdahl, D; Wong, K C; Sun, Y W; Hartl, A; Wenig, M O

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, we present the first dispersive infrared spectroscopic (DIRS) measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) using a new scanning Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) sensor. The sensor measures the optical spectra in the mid infrared (3,900 nm to 5,220 nm) wavelength range with full width half maximum (FWHM) spectral resolution of 78.8 nm at the CO2 absorption band (~4,280 nm) and sampling resolution of 20 nm. The CO2 concentration is determined from the measured optical absorption spectra by fitting it to the CO2 reference spectrum. Interference from other major absorbers in the same wavelength range, e.g., carbon monoxide (CO) and water vapor (H2O), was taken out by including their reference spectra in the fit as well. The detailed descriptions of the instrumental setup, the retrieval procedure, a modeling study for error analysis as well as laboratory validation using standard gas concentrations are presented. An iterative algorithm to account for the non-linear response of the fit function to the absorption cross sections due to the broad instrument function was developed and tested. A modeling study of the retrieval algorithm showed that errors due to instrument noise can be considerably reduced by using the dispersive spectral information in the retrieval. The mean measurement error of the prototype DIRS CO2 measurement for 1 minute averaged data is about ±2.5 ppmv, and down to ± 0.8ppmv for 10 minute averaged data. A field test of atmospheric CO2 measurements were carried out in an urban site in Hong Kong for a month and compared to a commercial non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) CO2 analyzer. 10 minute averaged data shows good agreement between the DIRS and NDIR measurements with Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of 0.99. This new method offers an alternative approach of atmospheric CO2 measurement featuring high accuracy, correction of non-linear absorption and interference of water vapor.

  17. A Software Tool for Atmospheric Correction and Surface Temperature Estimation of Landsat Infrared Thermal Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Tardy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST is an important variable involved in the Earth’s surface energy and water budgets and a key component in many aspects of environmental research. The Landsat program, jointly carried out by NASA and the USGS, has been recording thermal infrared data for the past 40 years. Nevertheless, LST data products for Landsat remain unavailable. The atmospheric correction (AC method commonly used for mono-window Landsat thermal data requires detailed information concerning the vertical structure (temperature, pressure and the composition (water vapor, ozone of the atmosphere. For a given coordinate, this information is generally obtained through either radio-sounding or atmospheric model simulations and is passed to the radiative transfer model (RTM to estimate the local atmospheric correction parameters. Although this approach yields accurate LST data, results are relevant only near this given coordinate. To meet the scientific community’s demand for high-resolution LST maps, we developed a new software tool dedicated to processing Landsat thermal data. The proposed tool improves on the commonly-used AC algorithm by incorporating spatial variations occurring in the Earth’s atmosphere composition. The ERA-Interim dataset (ECMWFmeteorological organization was used to retrieve vertical atmospheric conditions, which are available at a global scale with a resolution of 0.125 degrees and a temporal resolution of 6 h. A temporal and spatial linear interpolation of meteorological variables was performed to match the acquisition dates and coordinates of the Landsat images. The atmospheric correction parameters were then estimated on the basis of this reconstructed atmospheric grid using the commercial RTMsoftware MODTRAN. The needed surface emissivity was derived from the common vegetation index NDVI, obtained from the red and near-infrared (NIR bands of the same Landsat image. This permitted an estimation of LST for the entire

  18. Simulation of the infrared signature of transient luminous events in the middle atmosphere for a limb line of sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romand, Frédéric; Croizé, Laurence; Payan, Sébastien; Huret, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Transient Luminous Events (TLE) are electrical and optical events which occurs above thunderstorms. Visual signatures are reported since the beginning of the 20th century but the first picture is accidentally recorded from a television camera in 1989. Their occurrence is closely linked with the lightning activity below thunderstorms. TLEs are observed from the base of the stratosphere to the thermosphere (15 - 110 km). They are a very brief phenomenon which lasts from 1 to 300 milliseconds. At a worldwide scale, four TLEs occur each minute. The energy deposition, about some tenth of megajoules, is able to ionize, dissociate and excite the molecules of the atmosphere. Atmospheric discharges in the troposphere are important sources of NO and NO2. TLEs might have the same effects at higher altitudes, in the stratosphere. NOx then can affect the concentration of O3 and OH. Consequently, TLEs could be locally important contributors to the chemical budget of the middle atmosphere. The perturbation of the atmospheric chemistry induced by TLEs has the consequence to locally modify the radiations in the infrared during the minutes following the event. The interest of studying the infrared signature of a TLE is twofold. For the atmospheric sciences it allows to link the perturbed composition to the resulting infrared spectrum. Then, some Defense systems like detection and guiding devices are equipped with airborne infrared sensors so that the TLE infrared signature might disturb them. We want to obtain a quantitative and kinetic evaluation of the infrared signature of the atmosphere locally perturbed by a TLE. In order to do so we must model three phenomena. 1) The plasma/chemistry coupling, which describes how the different energetic levels of atmospheric molecules are populated by the energetic deposition of the TLE. This step lasts the time of the lightning itself. 2) The chemical kinetics which describes how these populations will evolve in the following minutes. 3) The

  19. Atmospheric Modelling for the Removal of Telluric Features from Infrared Planetary Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Cotton, Daniel V; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna

    2013-01-01

    The effects of telluric absorption on infrared spectra present a problem for the observer. Strong molecular absorptions from species whose concentrations vary with time can be particularly challenging to remove precisely. Yet removing these effects is key to accurately determining the composition of many astronomical objects, planetary atmospheres in particular. Here we present a method for removing telluric effects based on a modelling approach. The method relies only on observations usually made by the planetary astronomer, and so is directly comparable with current techniques. We use the modelling approach to process observations made of Jupiter, and Saturnian moon Titan and compare the results with those of the standard telluric division technique, finding the modelling approach to have distinct advantages even in conditions regarded as ideal for telluric division.

  20. Estimating the Retrievability of Temperature Profiles from Satellite Infrared Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A method is developed to assess retrievability, namely the retrieval potential for atmospheric temperature profiles, from satellite infrared measurements in clear-sky conditions. This technique is based upon generalized linear inverse theory and empirical orthogonal function analysis. Utilizing the NCEP global temperature reanalysis data in January and July from 1999 to 2003, the retrievabilities obtained with the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder/3 (HIRS/3)sounding channel data are derived respectively for each standard pressure level on a global scale. As an incidental result of this study, the optimum truncation number in the method of generalized linear inverse is deduced too. The results show that the retrievabilities of temperature obtained with the two datasets are similar in spatial distribution and seasonal change characteristics. As for the vertical distribution, the retrievabilities are low in the upper and lower atmosphere, and high between 400 hPa and 850 hPa. For the geographical distribution, the retrievabilities are low in the low-latitude oceanic regions and in some regions in Antarctica, and relatively high in mid-high latitudes and continental regions. Compared with the HIRS/3 data, the retrievability obtained with the AIRS data can be improved by an amount between 0.15 and 0.40.

  1. Contribution of ultraviolet and shortwave infrared observations to atmospheric correction of PACE ocean-color imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouin, Robert J.; Gross-Colzy, Lydwine S.

    2016-05-01

    The Pre-Aerosol, Cloud, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission will carry into space a spectrometer measuring at 5 nm resolution in the ultraviolet (UV) to near infrared (NIR) and at lower resolution in spectral bands in the NIR and shortwave infrared (SWIR). These observations have great potential for improving estimates of marine reflectance in the post-EOS era. In view of this, we evaluate, using simulations with a coupled radiation transfer code, the gain in marine reflectance accuracy expected by including observations in the UV and SWIR compared with just using observations in the visible to NIR. The study is performed for the PACE threshold aggregate bands with respect to the standard set of bands used to generate ocean color products. The top-of-atmosphere (TOA) signal measured by the PACE spectrometer is simulated for a variety of realistic atmospheric and oceanic conditions. The TOA reflectance and the marine reflectance of the simulated ensemble are decomposed into principal components, and the components of the TOA reflectance sensitive to the ocean signal identified. Inverse models are constructed to retrieve the principal components of the marine reflectance, allowing a reconstruction, therefore an estimation of the marine reflectance. Theoretical performance is quantified as a function of angular geometry, aerosol properties, and water type, showing a significant improvement in retrieval accuracy when using the extended spectral range. On average over all the situations considered (including sun glint), the RMS error is reduced from 0.0037 to 0.0024 at 412 nm, from 0.0013 to 0.0007 at 665 nm, and from 0.0010 to 0.0004 at 865 nm (Case 2 waters are better handled). The performance is degraded at large zenith angles and aerosol optical thickness, is better at scattering angles around 120-130 degrees, and exhibits little dependence on aerosol single scattering albedo and aerosol scale height.

  2. Technical Note: Interference errors in infrared remote sounding of the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sussmann

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Classical error analysis in remote sounding distinguishes between four classes: "smoothing errors," "model parameter errors," "forward model errors," and "retrieval noise errors". For infrared sounding "interference errors", which, in general, cannot be described by these four terms, can be significant. Interference errors originate from spectral residuals due to "interfering species" whose spectral features overlap with the signatures of the target species. A general method for quantification of interference errors is presented, which covers all possible algorithmic implementations, i.e., fine-grid retrievals of the interfering species or coarse-grid retrievals, and cases where the interfering species are not retrieved. In classical retrieval setups interference errors can exceed smoothing errors and can vary by orders of magnitude due to state dependency. An optimum strategy is suggested which practically eliminates interference errors by systematically minimizing the regularization strength applied to joint profile retrieval of the interfering species. This leads to an interfering-species selective deweighting of the retrieval. Details of microwindow selection are no longer critical for this optimum retrieval and widened microwindows even lead to reduced overall (smoothing and interference errors. Since computational power will increase, more and more operational algorithms will be able to utilize this optimum strategy in the future. The findings of this paper can be applied to soundings of all infrared-active atmospheric species, which include more than two dozen different gases relevant to climate and ozone. This holds for all kinds of infrared remote sounding systems, i.e., retrievals from ground-based, balloon-borne, airborne, or satellite spectroradiometers.

  3. Applications of High Resolution Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Atmospheric and Environmental Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscioli, Joseph R.; McManus, J. Barry; Nelson, David; Zahniser, Mark; Herndon, Scott C.; Shorter, Joanne; Yacovitch, Tara I.; Jervis, Dylan; Dyroff, Christoph; Kolb, Charles E.

    2016-06-01

    For the past 20 years, high resolution infrared spectroscopy has served as a valuable tool to measure gas-phase concentrations of ambient gas samples. We review recent advances in atmospheric sampling using direct absorption high resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy from the perspective of light sources, detectors, and optical designs. Developments in diode, quantum cascade and interband cascade laser technology have led to thermoelectrically-cooled single-mode laser sources capable of operation between 800 wn and 3100 wn, with 10 mW power. Advances in detector and preamplifier technology have yielded thermoelectriocally-cooled sensors capable of room-temperature operation with extremely high detectivities. Finally, novel spectrometer optical designs have led to robust multipass absorption cells capable of >400 m effective pathlength in a compact package. In combination with accurate spectroscopic databases, these developments have afforded dramatic improvements in measurement sensitivity, accuracy, precision, and selectivity. We will present several examples of the applications of high resolution mid-IR spectrometers in real-world field measurements at sampling towers and aboard mobile platforms such as vehicles and airplanes.

  4. Comparative Study Among Lease Square Method, Steepest Descent Method, and Conjugate Gradient Method for Atmopsheric Sounder Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Comparative study among Least Square Method: LSM, Steepest Descent Method: SDM, and Conjugate Gradient Method: CGM for atmospheric sounder data analysis (estimation of vertical profiles for water vapor is conducted. Through simulation studies, it is found that CGM shows the best estimation accuracy followed by SDM and LSM. Method dependency on atmospheric models is also clarified.

  5. Pyroelectricity Assisted Infrared-Laser Desorption Ionization (PAI-LDI) for Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wei, Zhenwei; Gong, Xiaoyun; Yang, Chengdui; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-08-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization method termed pyroelectricity-assisted infrared laser desorption ionization (PAI-LDI) was developed in this study. The pyroelectric material served as both sample target plate and enhancing ionization substrate, and an IR laser with wavelength of 1064 nm was employed to realize direct desorption and ionization of the analytes. The mass spectra of various compounds obtained on pyroelectric material were compared with those of other substrates. For the five standard substances tested in this work, LiNbO3 substrate produced the highest ion yield and the signal intensity was about 10 times higher than that when copper was used as substrate. For 1-adamantylamine, as low as 20 pg (132.2 fmol) was successfully detected. The active ingredient in (Compound Paracetamol and 1-Adamantylamine Hydrochloride Capsules), 1-adamantylamine, can be sensitively detected at an amount as low as 150 pg, when the medicine stock solution was diluted with urine. Monosaccharide and oligosaccharides in Allium Cepa L. juice was also successfully identified with PAI-LDI. The method did not require matrix-assisted external high voltage or other extra facility-assisted set-ups for desorption/ionization. This study suggested exciting application prospect of pyroelectric materials in matrix- and electricity-free atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry research.

  6. A Novel Miniaturised Infrared Imaging Spectrometer for the Measurement of Atmospheric Trace Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, A. H.

    2012-04-01

    A novel, ultra-compact Static Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer, SIFTS, with no moving parts has been developed for the remote and in-situ detection of atmospheric gases. This technique has previously been demonstrated in the visible spectral region (400 to 1100nm) using a CCD detector. This paper the author presents the results of the infrared version of the SIFTS instrument, which uses an uncooled microbolometer detector array to measure infrared spectra (7 to 14μm) with a resolution of up 4 cm-1 and temporal resolution of 30Hz. The technique is based on a static optical configuration whereby light is split into two paths and made to recombine along a focal plane producing an interference pattern. The spectral information is returned using a detector array to digitally capture the interferogram which can then be processed into a spectrum by the application of a Fourier transform. The novel optical design has reduced the optics required to only 3 optical components and the detector array, to generate and measure the interferogram. The experimental performance of the SIFTS instrument has verified the theoretical models, which has shown that the spectral resolution is for the infrared instrument is 4cm-1. The Connes advantage, inherent to the Michelson spectrometer Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), whereby the spectral wavelength accuracy is referenced to a stabilised laser has also been demonstrated in the SIFTS instrument. This has been implemented through the use of an expanded internal laser diode with Distributed Bragg Reflector (DFB) which acts as the calibration source used to maintain the wavelength stability of the SIFTS instrument. As there are no moving components, the instrument is compact, light and insensitive to mechanical vibration, additionally the speed of measurement is determined by the frame rate of the detector array. Thus, this instrument has a temporal advantage over common Michelson FTIR instruments. For example, this technique has

  7. Atmospheric influences on infrared-laser signals used for occultation measurements between Low Earth Orbit satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schweitzer

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO is a new occultation technique between Low Earth Orbit (LEO satellites, which applies signals in the short wave infrared spectral range (SWIR within 2 μm to 2.5 μm. It is part of the LEO-LEO microwave and infrared-laser occultation (LMIO method, recently introduced by Kirchengast and Schweitzer (2011, that enables to retrieve thermodynamic profiles (pressure, temperature, humidity and accurate altitude levels from microwave signals and profiles of greenhouse gases and further variables such as line-of-sight wind speed from simultaneously measured LIO signals. For enabling trace species retrieval based on differential transmission, the LIO signals are spectrally located as pairs, one in the centre of a suitable absorption line of a target species (absorption signal and one close by but outside of any absorption lines (reference signal. Due to the novelty of the LMIO method, detailed knowledge of atmospheric influences on LIO signals and of their suitability for accurate trace species retrieval did not yet exist. Here we discuss the atmospheric influences on the transmission and differential transmission of LIO signals. Refraction effects, trace species absorption (by target species, and cross-sensitivity to foreign species, aerosol extinction and Rayleigh scattering are studied in detail. The influences of clouds, turbulence, wind, scattered solar radiation and terrestrial thermal radiation are discussed as well. We show that the influence of defocusing, foreign species absorption, aerosols and turbulence is observable, but can be rendered small to negligible by use of the differential transmission principle and by a design with close frequency spacing of absorption and reference signals within 0.5 %. The influences of Rayleigh scattering and thermal radiation on the received signal intensities are found negligible. Cloud-scattered solar radiation can be observable under bright-day conditions but this

  8. Infrared/Terahertz double resonance spectroscopy of CH3F and CH3Cl at atmospheric pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, Dane J; De Lucia, Frank C; Everitt, Henry O

    2012-01-01

    A new method for highly selective remote sensing of atmospheric trace polar molecular gases is described. Based on infrared/terahertz double resonance spectroscopic techniques, the molecule- specific coincidence between the lines of a CO2 laser and rotational-vibrational molecular absorption transitions provide two dimensions of recognition specificity: infrared coincidence frequency and the corresponding terahertz frequency whose absorption strength is modulated by the laser. Atmospheric pressure broadening expands the molecular recognition "specificity matrix" by simultaneously relaxing the infrared coincidence requirement and strengthening the corresponding terahertz signature. Representative double resonance spectra are calculated for prototypical molecules CH3F and CH3Cl and their principal isotopomers, from which a heuristic model is developed to estimate the specificity matrix and double resonance signature strength for any polar molecule.

  9. Initial evaluation and assimilation of FY-3A atmospheric sounding data in the ECMWF System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU QiFeng

    2011-01-01

    Fengyuan 3A (FY-3A) was the first Chinese second-generation meteorological satellite.Most of the onboard sensors were used for the first time.Four of the eleven sensors [1] accumulated data for numerical weather forecasting:the Microwave Radiation Imager (MWRI,similar to the AMSR-E) and three vertical atmospheric sensors.The vertical sensors were the Microwave Temperature Sensor (MWTS,similar to the MSU or AMSU-A),the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MWHS,similar to the AMSU-B or MHS),and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder (IRAS,similar to the HIRS).It is necessary to objectively examine and evaluate the operational performance of the four FY-3A sensors,the quality of the data they provide,and their application potential in numerical weather forecasting to develop future FY-3 sensors and prompt the assimilation of FY-3 data in weather forecasting.

  10. An automated baseline correction protocol for infrared spectra of atmospheric aerosols collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmiakova, Adele; Dillner, Ann M.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    A growing body of research on statistical applications for characterization of atmospheric aerosol Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) samples collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters (e.g., Russell et al., 2011; Ruthenburg et al., 2014) and a rising interest in analyzing FT-IR samples collected by air quality monitoring networks call for an automated PTFE baseline correction solution. The existing polynomial technique (Takahama et al., 2013) is not scalable to a project with a large number of aerosol samples because it contains many parameters and requires expert intervention. Therefore, the question of how to develop an automated method for baseline correcting hundreds to thousands of ambient aerosol spectra given the variability in both environmental mixture composition and PTFE baselines remains. This study approaches the question by detailing the statistical protocol, which allows for the precise definition of analyte and background subregions, applies nonparametric smoothing splines to reproduce sample-specific PTFE variations, and integrates performance metrics from atmospheric aerosol and blank samples alike in the smoothing parameter selection. Referencing 794 atmospheric aerosol samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011, we start by identifying key FT-IR signal characteristics, such as non-negative absorbance or analyte segment transformation, to capture sample-specific transitions between background and analyte. While referring to qualitative properties of PTFE background, the goal of smoothing splines interpolation is to learn the baseline structure in the background region to predict the baseline structure in the analyte region. We then validate the model by comparing smoothing splines baseline-corrected spectra with uncorrected and polynomial baseline (PB)-corrected equivalents via three statistical applications: (1) clustering analysis, (2) functional group quantification

  11. Mesoscale Phenomenon Revealed by an Acoustic Sounder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Jensen, Niels Otto

    1976-01-01

    A particular phenomenon observed on an acoustic sounder record is analyzed, and is interpreted as being associated with the passing of a land breeze front. A simple physical explanation of the frontal movements is suggested. The actual existence of the land breeze is demonstrated by examination...

  12. Atmospheric compensation of thermal infrared hyperspectral imagery with the emissive empirical line method and the in-scene atmospheric compensation algorithms: a comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiStasio, Robert J., Jr.; Resmini, Ronald G.

    2010-04-01

    The in-scene atmospheric compensation (ISAC) algorithm of Young et al. (2002) [14] (and as implemented in the ENVI® software system [16] as 'Thermal Atm Correction') is commonly applied to thermal infrared multi- and hyperspectral imagery (MSI and HSI, respectively). ISAC estimates atmospheric transmissivity and upwelling radiance using only the scene data. The ISAC-derived transmissivity and upwelling radiance are compared to those derived from the emissive empirical line method (EELM), another in-scene atmospheric compensation algorithm for thermal infrared MSI and HSI data. EELM is based on the presence of calibration targets (e.g., panels, water pools) captured in the spectral image data for which the emissivity and temperature are well known at the moment of MSI/HSI data acquisition. EELM is similar in concept to the empirical line method (ELM) algorithm commonly applied to visible/near-infrared to shortwave infrared (VNIR/SWIR) spectral imagery and is implemented as a custom ENVI® plugin application. Both ISAC and EELM are in-scene methods and do not require radiative transfer modeling. ISAC and EELM have been applied to airborne longwave infrared (LWIR; ~7.5 μm to ~13.5 μm) HSI data. Captured in the imagery are calibration panels and/or water pools maintained at different temperatures facilitating the application of EELM. Overall, the atmospheric compensation parameters derived from the two methods are in close agreement: the EELM-derived ground-leaving radiance spectra generally contain fewer residual atmospheric spectral features, although ISAC sometimes produces smoother ground-leaving radiance spectra. Nonetheless, the agreement is viewed as validation of ISAC. ISAC is an effective atmospheric compensation algorithm that is readily available to the remote sensing community in the ENVI® software system. Thus studies such as the present testing and comparing ISAC to other methods are important. The ISAC and EELM algorithms are discussed as are the

  13. A Fourier transform infrared trace gas and isotope analyser for atmospheric applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. T. Griffith

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Concern in recent decades about human impacts on Earth's climate has led to the need for improved and expanded measurement capabilities of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. In this paper we describe in detail an in situ trace gas analyser based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy that is capable of simultaneous and continuous measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, carbon monoxide (CO, nitrous oxide (N2O and 13C in CO2 in air with high precision. High accuracy is established by reference to measurements of standard reference gases. Stable water isotopes can also be measured in undried airstreams. The analyser is automated and allows unattended operation with minimal operator intervention. Precision and accuracy meet and exceed the compatibility targets set by the World Meteorological Organisation – Global Atmosphere Watch for baseline measurements in the unpolluted troposphere for all species except 13C in CO2.

    The analyser is mobile and well suited to fixed sites, tower measurements, mobile platforms and campaign-based measurements. The isotopic specificity of the optically-based technique and analysis allows its application in isotopic tracer experiments, for example in tracing variations of 13C in CO2 and 15N in N2O. We review a number of applications illustrating use of the analyser in clean air monitoring, micrometeorological flux and tower measurements, mobile measurements on a train, and soil flux chamber measurements.

  14. Near infrared cavity enhanced absorption spectra of atmospherically relevant ether-1, 4-Dioxane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Satheesh; Varma, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    1, 4-Dioxane (DX) is a commonly found ether in industrially polluted atmosphere. The near infrared absorption spectra of this compound has been recorded in the region 5900-8230 cm- 1 with a resolution of 0.08 cm- 1 using a novel Fourier transform incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer (FT-IBBCEAS). All recorded spectra were found to contain regions that are only weakly perturbed. The possible combinations of fundamental modes and their overtone bands corresponding to selected regions in the measured spectra are tabulated. Two interesting spectral regions were identified as 5900-6400 cm- 1 and 8100-8230 cm- 1. No significant spectral interference due to presence of water vapor was observed suggesting the suitability of these spectral signatures for spectroscopic in situ detection of DX. The technique employed here is much more sensitive than standard Fourier transform spectrometer measurements on account of long effective path length achieved. Hence significant enhancement of weaker absorption lines above the noise level was observed as demonstrated by comparison with an available measurement from database.

  15. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy of Atmospheric Trace Gases HCl, NO and SO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridass, C.; Aw-Musse, A.; Dowdye, E.; Bandyopadhyay, C.; Misra, P.; Okabe, H.

    1998-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectral data have been recorded in the spectral region 400-4000/cm of hydrogen chloride and sulfur dioxide with I/cm resolution and of nitric oxide with 0.25 cm-i resolution, under quasi-static conditions, when the sample gas was passed through tubings of aluminum, copper, stainless steel and teflon. The absorbance was measured for the rotational lines of the fundamental bands of (1)H(35)Cl and (1)H(37)Cl for pressures in the range 100-1000 Torr and for the (14)N(16)O molecule in the range 100-300 Torr. The absorbance was also measured for individual rotational lines corresponding to the three modes of vibrations (upsilon(sub 1) - symmetric stretch, upsilon(sub 2) - symmetric bend, upsilon(sub 3) - anti-symmetric stretch) of the SO2 molecule in the pressure range 25-150 Torr. A graph of absorbance versus pressure was plotted for the observed rotational transitions of the three atmospherically significant molecules, and it was found that the absorbance was linearly proportional to the pressure range chosen, thereby validating Beer's law. The absorption cross-sections were determined from the graphical slopes for each rotational transition recorded for the HCl, NO and SO2 species. Qualitative and quantitative spectral changes in the FT-IR data will be discussed to identify and characterize various tubing materials with respect to their absorption features.

  16. Ground-based Infrared Observations of Water Vapor and Hydrogen Peroxide in the Atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, T.; Greathouse, T. K.; Bitner, M.; Kruger, A.; Richter, M. J.; Lacy, J. H.; Bézard, B.; Fouchet, T.; Lefevre, F.; Forget, F.; Atreya, S. K.

    2008-11-01

    Ground-based observations of water vapor and hydrogen peroxide have been obtained in the thermal infrared range, using the TEXES instrument at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, for different times of the seasonal cycle.

  17. Infrared atmospheric pressure MALDI ion trap mass spectrometry of frozen samples using a Peltier-cooled sample stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Seggern, Christopher E; Gardner, Ben D; Cotter, Robert J

    2004-10-01

    Infrared atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization on an ion trap mass spectrometer is used to analyze frozen samples generated using a Peltier-cooled sample stage. This allows for the analysis of samples in water without the addition of matrix, in near-native conditions, and with minimal loss of water due to evaporation. Analysis of frozen samples is extended to study peptides, carbohydrates, and glycolipids.

  18. GARLIC - A general purpose atmospheric radiative transfer line-by-line infrared-microwave code: Implementation and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Hedelt, Pascal; Hess, Michael; Mendrok, Jana; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2014-04-01

    A suite of programs for high resolution infrared-microwave atmospheric radiative transfer modeling has been developed with emphasis on efficient and reliable numerical algorithms and a modular approach appropriate for simulation and/or retrieval in a variety of applications. The Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code - GARLIC - is suitable for arbitrary observation geometry, instrumental field-of-view, and line shape. The core of GARLIC's subroutines constitutes the basis of forward models used to implement inversion codes to retrieve atmospheric state parameters from limb and nadir sounding instruments. This paper briefly introduces the physical and mathematical basics of GARLIC and its descendants and continues with an in-depth presentation of various implementation aspects: An optimized Voigt function algorithm combined with a two-grid approach is used to accelerate the line-by-line modeling of molecular cross sections; various quadrature methods are implemented to evaluate the Schwarzschild and Beer integrals; and Jacobians, i.e. derivatives with respect to the unknowns of the atmospheric inverse problem, are implemented by means of automatic differentiation. For an assessment of GARLIC's performance, a comparison of the quadrature methods for solution of the path integral is provided. Verification and validation are demonstrated using intercomparisons with other line-by-line codes and comparisons of synthetic spectra with spectra observed on Earth and from Venus.

  19. Error Consistency Analysis Scheme for Infrared Ultraspectral Sounding Retrieval Error Budget Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Strow, Larry, L.

    2013-01-01

    Great effort has been devoted towards validating geophysical parameters retrieved from ultraspectral infrared radiances obtained from satellite remote sensors. An error consistency analysis scheme (ECAS), utilizing fast radiative transfer model (RTM) forward and inverse calculations, has been developed to estimate the error budget in terms of mean difference and standard deviation of error in both spectral radiance and retrieval domains. The retrieval error is assessed through ECAS without relying on other independent measurements such as radiosonde data. ECAS establishes a link between the accuracies of radiances and retrieved geophysical parameters. ECAS can be applied to measurements from any ultraspectral instrument and any retrieval scheme with its associated RTM. In this manuscript, ECAS is described and demonstrated with measurements from the MetOp-A satellite Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). This scheme can be used together with other validation methodologies to give a more definitive characterization of the error and/or uncertainty of geophysical parameters retrieved from ultraspectral radiances observed from current and future satellite remote sensors such as IASI, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS).

  20. Atmospheric correction of thermal-infrared imagery of the 3-D urban environment acquired in oblique viewing geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Meier

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This research quantifies and discusses atmospheric effects that alter the radiance observed by a ground-based thermal-infrared (TIR camera mounted on top of a high-rise building in the city of Berlin, Germany. The study shows that atmospheric correction of ground-based TIR imagery of the three-dimensional (3-D urban environment acquired in oblique viewing geometry has to account for spatial variability of line-of-sight (LOS geometry. We present an atmospheric correction procedure that uses these spatially distributed LOS geometry parameters, the radiative transfer model MODTRAN 5.2 and atmospheric profile data derived from meteorological measurements in the field of view (FOV of the TIR camera. The magnitude of atmospheric effects varies during the analysed 24-hourly period (8 August 2009 and is particularly notable for surfaces showing a strong surface-to-air temperature difference. The differences between uncorrected and corrected TIR imagery reach up to 7.7 K at 12:00. Atmospheric effects are biased up to 4.3 K at 12:00 and up to 0.6 K at 24:00, if non-spatially distributed LOS parameters are used.

  1. Geostationary Microwave Sounders: Science, Applications and the Geostar Instrument Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Gaier, Todd; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Lim, Boon; Tanner, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Microwave atmospheric sounders have long provided some of the most imporant data for use in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and have played an important role in atmospheric weather and climate research. With 7 US satellites now carrying such sensors, we are in a 'golden age' of microwave remote sensing of the atmosphere. However, as this fleet ages and is replaced by a smaller number of new sensors in the coming yars, the main shortcoming of sensors in low Earth orbit -i.e. poor spacial and temporal converage and sampling - will become more apparent. Placing such sensors on geostationary satellites, enabling time-continuous views of large portions of the Earth disc, would solve this problem. but the GEO orbit is approximately 40 times higher than a typical LEO orbit, which requires antenna apertures also about 40 times larger than for LEO systems to maintain spatial resolution, and it has not been feasible to develop such systems. Recently, a solution to this problem has appeared in the form of aperture synthesis.

  2. Mid-Infrared Properties of Disk Averaged Observations of Earth with AIRS

    CERN Document Server

    Hearty, Thomas; Kim, Sam; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated mid-infrared spectra of Earth obtained by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on-board the AQUA spacecraft to explore the characteristics that may someday be observed in extrasolar terrestrial planets. We have used the AIRS infrared (R ~ 1200; 3.75-15.4 microns) spectra to construct directly-observed high-resolution spectra of the only known life bearing planet, Earth. The AIRS spectra are the first such spectra that span the seasons. We investigate the rotational and seasonal spectral variations that would arise due to varying cloud amount and viewing geometry and we explore what signatures may be observable in the mid-infrared by the next generation of telescopes capable of observing extrasolar terrestrial planets.

  3. Dispersive infrared spectroscopy measurements of atmospheric CO{sub 2} using a Fabry–Pérot interferometer sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, K.L. [School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Ning, Z., E-mail: zhining@cityu.edu.hk [School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Guy Carpenter Climate Change Centre, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Westerdahl, D. [Ability R and D Energy Research Centre, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wong, K.C. [School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Sun, Y.W. [Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Hartl, A. [School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wenig, M.O. [Meteorological Institute, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich (Germany)

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we present the first dispersive infrared spectroscopic (DIRS) measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) using a new scanning Fabry–Pérot interferometer (FPI) sensor. The sensor measures the optical spectra in the mid infrared (3900 nm to 5220 nm) wavelength range with full width half maximum (FWHM) spectral resolution of 78.8 nm at the CO{sub 2} absorption band (∼ 4280 nm) and sampling resolution of 20 nm. The CO{sub 2} concentration is determined from the measured optical absorption spectra by fitting it to the CO{sub 2} reference spectrum. Interference from other major absorbers in the same wavelength range, e.g., carbon monoxide (CO) and water vapor (H{sub 2}O), was taken out by including their reference spectra in the fit as well. The detailed descriptions of the instrumental setup, the retrieval procedure, a modeling study for error analysis as well as laboratory validation using standard gas concentrations are presented. An iterative algorithm to account for the non-linear response of the fit function to the absorption cross sections due to the broad instrument function was developed and tested. A modeling study of the retrieval algorithm showed that errors due to instrument noise can be considerably reduced by using the dispersive spectral information in the retrieval. The mean measurement error of the prototype DIRS CO{sub 2} measurement for 1 minute averaged data is about ± 2.5 ppmv, and down to ± 0.8 ppmv for 10 minute averaged data. A field test of atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements were carried out in an urban site in Hong Kong for a month and compared to a commercial non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) CO{sub 2} analyzer. 10 minute averaged data shows good agreement between the DIRS and NDIR measurements with Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of 0.99. This new method offers an alternative approach of atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurement featuring high accuracy, correction of non-linear absorption and interference of water

  4. Herbig stars' near-infrared excess: An origin in the protostellar disk's magnetically supported atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, N. J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Benisty, M.; Dullemond, C. P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Hirose, S., E-mail: neal.turner@jpl.nasa.gov [Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3173-25 Showamachi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 236-0001 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    Young stars with masses 2-8 times solar, the Herbig Ae and Be stars, often show a near-infrared excess too large to explain with a hydrostatically supported circumstellar disk of gas and dust. At the same time, the accretion flow carrying the circumstellar gas to the star is thought to be driven by magnetorotational turbulence, which, according to numerical MHD modeling, yields an extended low-density atmosphere supported by the magnetic fields. We demonstrate that the base of the atmosphere can be optically thick to the starlight and that the parts lying near 1 AU are tall enough to double the fraction of the stellar luminosity reprocessed into the near-infrared. We generate synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations with opacities for submicron silicate and carbonaceous grains. The synthetic SEDs closely follow the median Herbig SED constructed recently by Mulders and Dominik and, in particular, match the large near-infrared flux, provided the grains have a mass fraction close to interstellar near the disk's inner rim.

  5. Radiometric calibration of IR Fourier transform spectrometers - Solution to a problem with the High-Resolution Interferometer Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revercomb, Henry E.; Smith, William L.; Buijs, H.; Howell, Hugh B.; Laporte, D. D.

    1988-01-01

    A calibrated Fourier transform spectrometer, known as the High-Resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS), has been flown on the NASA U-2 research aircraft to measure the infrared emission spectrum of the earth. The primary use - atmospheric temperature and humidity sounding - requires high radiometric precision and accuracy (of the order of 0.1 and 1 C, respectively). To meet these requirements, the HIS instruments, the HIS instrument performs inflight radiometric calibration, using observations of hot and cold blackbody reference sources as the basis for two-point calibrations at each wavenumber. Initially, laboratory tests revealed a calibration problem with brightness temperature errors as large as 15 C between 600 and 900/cm. The symptom of the problem, which occurred in one of the three spectral bands of HIS, was a source-dependent phase response. Minor changes to the calibration equations completely eliminated the anomalous errors. The new analysis properly accounts for the situation in which the phase response for radiance from the instrument itself differs from that for radiance from an external source. The mechanism responsible for the dual phase response of the HIS instrument is identified as emission from the interferometer beam splitter.

  6. Validation of the Aura High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder geopotential heights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Smith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Global satellite observations from the EOS Aura spacecraft's High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS of temperature and geopotential height (GPH are discussed. The accuracy, resolution and precision of the HIRDLS version 7 algorithms are assessed and data screening recommendations are made. Comparisons with GPH from observations, reanalyses and models including European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim, National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis, Goddard Earth Observing System Model (GEOS version 5, and EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS illustrate the HIRDLS GPH have a precision ranging from 2 m to 30 m and an accuracy of ±100 m. Comparisons indicate HIRDLS GPH may have a slight low bias in the tropics and a slight high bias at high latitudes. Geostrophic winds computed with HIRDLS GPH qualitatively agree with winds from other data sources including ERA-Interim, NCEP and GEOS-5.

  7. Limits of Precipitation Detection from Microwave Radiometers and Sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchak, S. J.; Skofronick-Jackson, G.; Johnson, B. T.

    2012-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will unify and draw from numerous microwave conical scanning imaging radiometers and cross-track sounders, many of which already in operation, to provide near real-time precipitation estimates worldwide at 3-hour intervals. Some of these instruments were designed for primary purposes unrelated to precipitation remote sensing. Therefore it is worthwhile to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each set of channels with respect to precipitation detection to fully understand their role in the GPM constellation. The GPM radiometer algorithm will use an observationally-based Bayesian retrieval with common databases of precipitation profiles for all sensors. Since these databases are still under development and will not be truly complete until the GPM core satellite has completed at least one year of dual-frequency radar observations, a screening method based upon retrieval of non-precipitation parameters related to the surface and atmospheric state is used in this study. A cost function representing the departure of modeled radiances from their observed values plus the departure of surface and atmospheric parameters from the TELSEM emissivity atlas and MERRA reanalysis is used as an indicator of precipitation. Using this method, two datasets are used to evaluate precipitation detection: One year of matched AMSR-E and AMSU-B/MHS overpasses with CloudSat used as validation globally; and SSMIS overpasses over the United States using the National Mosaic and QPE (NMQ) as validation. The Heidke Skill Score (HSS) is used as a metric to evaluate detection skill over different surfaces, seasons, and across different sensors. Non-frozen oceans give the highest HSS for all sensors, followed by bare land and coasts, then snow-covered land and sea ice. Negligible skill is present over ice sheets. Sounders tend to have higher skill than imagers over complex surfaces (coast, snow, and sea ice), whereas imagers have higher skill

  8. The effects of atmospheric pressure on infrared reflectance spectra of Martian analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.; Pratt, Stephen F.; Patterson, William

    1993-01-01

    The use of terrestrial samples as analogs of Mars soils are complicated by the Martian atmosphere. Spectral features due to the Martian atmosphere can be removed from telescopic spectra of Mars and ISM spectra of Mars, but this does not account for any spectral differences resulting from atmospheric pressure or any interactions between the atmosphere and the surface. We are examining the effects of atmospheric pressure on reflectance spectra of powdered samples in the laboratory. Contrary to a previous experiment with granite, no significant changes in albedo or the Christiansen feature were observed from 1 bar pressure down to a pressure of 8 micrometers Hg. However, reducing the atmospheric pressure does have a pronounced affect on the hydration features, even for samples retained in a dry environment for years.

  9. Improving retrieval quality for airborne limb-sounders by horizontal regularisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ungermann

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern airborne infrared limb-sounders are capable of measuring profiles so fast that neighbouring profiles are very similar to one another. This can be exploited by retrieving whole 2-D cross-sections instead of simple 1-D profiles. By adding horizontal regularisation in addition to a potentially reduced vertical regularisation, vertical structures can be better retrieved while maintaining or reducing the general noise level.

    This paper presents algorithms that are able to perform such a retrieval and efficiently produce typical diagnostic quantities. The characteristics of produced retrieval results for a variety of parametrisations is discussed in a case study that analyses a cross-section measured by the CRISTA-NF instrument during the RECONCILE campaign between Spitsbergen and Kiruna, Sweden, in March 2010. It is shown that cross-section retrievals can either reduce noise or produce finer vertical structures while maintaining the same noise level. The presented methodology can also be applied in a straightforward way to improve the retrievals for both near-future satellite-borne limb-sounders and current air- and satellite-borne nadir sounder.

  10. The atmospheres of Saturn and Titan in the near-infrared: First results of Cassini/Vims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, K.H.; Momary, T.W.; Buratti, B.J.; Matson, D.L.; Nelson, R.M.; Drossart, P.; Sicardy, B.; Formisano, V.; Bellucci, G.; Coradini, A.; Griffith, C.; Brown, R.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Langevin, Y.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Jaumann, R.; McCordt, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sotin, C.

    2006-01-01

    The wide spectral coverage and extensive spatial, temporal, and phase-angle mapping capabilities of the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini-Huygens Orbiter are producing fundamental new insights into the nature of the atmospheres of Saturn and Titan. For both bodies, VIMS maps over time and solar phase angles provide information for a multitude of atmospheric constituents and aerosol layers, providing new insights into atmospheric structure and dynamical and chemical processes. For Saturn, salient early results include evidence for phosphine depletion in relatively dark and less cloudy belts at temperate and mid-latitudes compared to the relatively bright and cloudier Equatorial Region, consistent with traditional theories of belts being regions of relative downwelling. Additional Saturn results include (1) the mapping of enhanced trace gas absorptions at the south pole, and (2) the first high phase-angle, high-spatial-resolution imagery of CH4 fluorescence. An additional fundamental new result is the first nighttime near-infrared mapping of Saturn, clearly showing discrete meteorological features relatively deep in the atmosphere beneath the planet's sunlit haze and cloud layers, thus revealing a new dynamical regime at depth where vertical dynamics is relatively more important than zonal dynamics in determining cloud morphology. Zonal wind measurements at deeper levels than previously available are achieved by tracking these features over multiple days, thereby providing measurements of zonal wind shears within Saturn's troposphere when compared to cloudtop movements measured in reflected sunlight. For Titan, initial results include (1) the first detection and mapping of thermal emission spectra of CO, CO2, and CH3D on Titan's nightside limb, (2) the mapping of CH4 fluorescence over the dayside bright limb, extending to ??? 750 km altitude, (3) wind measurements of ???0.5 ms-1, favoring prograde, from the movement of a persistent

  11. Potential for the use of reconstructed IASI radiances in the detection of atmospheric trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Atkinson

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Principal component (PC analysis has received considerable attention as a technique for the extraction of meteorological signals from hyperspectral infra-red sounders such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS. In addition to achieving substantial bit-volume reductions for dissemination purposes, the technique can also be used to generate reconstructed radiances in which random instrument noise has been reduced. Studies on PC analysis of hyperspectral infrared sounder data have been undertaken in the context of numerical weather prediction, instrument monitoring and geophysical variable retrieval, as well as data compression. This study examines the potential of PC analysis for chemistry applications.

    A major concern in the use of PC analysis for chemistry is that the spectral features associated with trace gases may not be well represented in the reconstructed spectra, either due to deficiencies in the training set or due to the limited number of PC scores used in the radiance reconstruction. In this paper we show examples of reconstructed IASI radiances for several trace gases: ammonia, sulphur dioxide, methane and carbon monoxide. It is shown that care must be taken in the selection of spectra for the initial training set: an iterative technique, in which outlier spectra are added to a base training set, gives the best results. For the four trace gases examined, key features of the chemical signatures are retained in the reconstructed radiances, whilst achieving a substantial reduction in instrument noise.

    A new regional re-transmission service for IASI is scheduled to start in 2010, as part of the EUMETSAT Advanced Retransmission Service (EARS. For this EARS-IASI service it is intended to include PC scores as part of the data stream. The paper describes the generation of the reference eigenvectors for this new service.

  12. Physical Retrieval of Surface Emissivity Spectrum from Hyperspectral Infrared Radiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Weisz, Elisabeth; Zhou, Daniel K.

    2007-01-01

    Retrieval of temperature, moisture profiles and surface skin temperature from hyperspectral infrared (IR) radiances requires spectral information about the surface emissivity. Using constant or inaccurate surface emissivities typically results in large retrieval errors, particularly over semi-arid or arid areas where the variation in emissivity spectrum is large both spectrally and spatially. In this study, a physically based algorithm has been developed to retrieve a hyperspectral IR emissivity spectrum simultaneously with the temperature and moisture profiles, as well as the surface skin temperature. To make the solution stable and efficient, the hyperspectral emissivity spectrum is represented by eigenvectors, derived from the laboratory measured hyperspectral emissivity database, in the retrieval process. Experience with AIRS (Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder) radiances shows that a simultaneous retrieval of the emissivity spectrum and the sounding improves the surface skin temperature as well as temperature and moisture profiles, particularly in the near surface layer.

  13. Remote sensing of the earth's atmosphere by infrared absorption spectroscopy - An update of the ATMOS program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, R.; Gunson, M. R.; Farmer, C. B.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA's Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment was designed to address the requirements of the remote sensing of atmospheric composition on a four-dimensional basis (latitude, longitude, altitude, and time), necessary for understanding and predicting the effect of changes on the chemical balance of the atmosphere. This paper describes the ATMOS program, overviews the ATMOS instrument and its performance, and presents the results obtained during its first flight as part of the Spacelab 3 Space Shuttle mission (April 29 through May 6, 1985). Also discussed are prospects for further missions.

  14. Infrared Cloud Imager Development for Atmospheric Optical Communication Characterization, and Measurements at the JPL Table Mountain Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, P. W.; Shaw, J. A.; Piazzolla, S.

    2013-02-01

    The continuous demand for high data return in deep space and near-Earth satellite missions has led NASA and international institutions to consider alternative technologies for high-data-rate communications. One solution is the establishment of wide-bandwidth Earth-space optical communication links, which require (among other things) a nearly obstruction-free atmospheric path. Considering the atmospheric channel, the most common and most apparent impairments on Earth-space optical communication paths arise from clouds. Therefore, the characterization of the statistical behavior of cloud coverage for optical communication ground station candidate sites is of vital importance. In this article, we describe the development and deployment of a ground-based, long-wavelength infrared cloud imaging system able to monitor and characterize the cloud coverage. This system is based on a commercially available camera with a 62-deg diagonal field of view. A novel internal-shutter-based calibration technique allows radiometric calibration of the camera, which operates without a thermoelectric cooler. This cloud imaging system provides continuous day-night cloud detection with constant sensitivity. The cloud imaging system also includes data-processing algorithms that calculate and remove atmospheric emission to isolate cloud signatures, and enable classification of clouds according to their optical attenuation. Measurements of long-wavelength infrared cloud radiance are used to retrieve the optical attenuation (cloud optical depth due to absorption and scattering) in the wavelength range of interest from visible to near-infrared, where the cloud attenuation is quite constant. This article addresses the specifics of the operation, calibration, and data processing of the imaging system that was deployed at the NASA/JPL Table Mountain Facility (TMF) in California. Data are reported from July 2008 to July 2010. These data describe seasonal variability in cloud cover at the TMF site

  15. SHARC, A Model for Calculating Atmospheric and Infrared Radiation Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-24

    0 Is ’ I E U L b) U0 -cc ccI U . 1250 1350 1450 1550 FRIEQUENCY (cm-1) Figure 4. Quiescent Nighttime Limb Spectrum from the CIRRS-1A ExperimentO ...1974). 27. C.B. Ludwig, W. Malkmus, J.E. Reardon, and J.A. Thomson , Handbook of Infrared Radiation From Combustion Gases, SP-3080, Scientific and

  16. Estimation of propagation losses for infrared laser beam in turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaponov, A. E.; Sakharov, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    In present work, the radiation propagation in atmosphere from laser source to the receiver is considered by taking into account deviations of optical beam due to turbulence. The photon flux density on the receiver has been evaluated.

  17. Application of improved discrepancy principle in inversionof atmosphere infrared remote sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    With the use of techniques in nonlinear problems, the IDP (improved discrepancy prin-ciple) method has been proposed and applied to the optimal smooth factor (parameter y) in theinversion process of atmosphere profiles from satellite observation. This method has also beenused to inverse atmospheric parameters from the observation of new generation geostationaryoperational environmental satellite (GOES-8). Results show that this method is more accurate thanthat in use

  18. Further considerations of cosmic ray modulation of infra-red radiation in the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Aplin, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding effects of ionisation in the lower atmosphere is a new interdisciplinary area, crossing traditionally distinct scientific boundaries. Following the paper of Erlykin et al. (Astropart. Phys. 57--58 (2014) 26--29) we develop the interpretation of observed changes in long-wave (LW) radiation (Aplin and Lockwood, Env. Res. Letts. 8, 015026 (2013)), by taking account of cosmic ray ionisation yields and atmospheric radiative transfer. To demonstrate this, we show that the thermal structure of the whole atmosphere needs to be considered along with the vertical profile of ionisation. Allowing for ionisation by all components of a cosmic ray shower and not just by the muons, reveals that the effect we have detected is certainly not inconsistent with laboratory observations of the LW absorption cross section. The analysis presented here, although very different from that of Erlykin et al., does come to the same conclusion that the events detected were not caused by individual cosmic ray primaries -- not b...

  19. A Study on Retrieving Atmospheric Profiles from EOS/AIRS Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Li; ALLEN Huang; LI Jun

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the algorithms for retrieving atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles and surface skin temperature from the high-spectral-resolution Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) with a statistical technique based on principal component analysis. The synthetic regression coefficients for the statistical retrieval are obtained by using a fast radiative transfer model with atmospheric characteristics taken from a dataset of global radiosondes of atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles. Retrievals are evaluated by comparison with radiosonde observations and European Center of Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses. AIRS retrievals of temperature and moisture are in general agreement with the distributions from ECMWF analysis fields and radiosonde observations, but AIRS depicts more detailed structure due to its high spectral resolution (hence, high vertical spatial resolution).

  20. An application of the multibeam sounder for seabed backscattering analysis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Raju, Y.S.N.

    A theoretical analysis of vertical farfield pattern for a multibeam sounder is performed. The farfield pattern for different steered angles establish the usefulness of present multibeam arrays. An interaction effect of different steered multibeam...

  1. Freshness assessment of thawed and chilled cod fillets packed in modified atmosphere using near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøknæs, Niels; Jensen, K.N.; Andersen, Charlotte Møller;

    2002-01-01

    Near-infrared reflectance (NIR) spectra was recorded of 105 samples of cod mince prepared from chill stored thawed cod fillets of varying quality in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). Traditional chemical, physical, microbiological and sensory quality methods developed for assessing fresh fish...... of selected quality attributes as drip loss, water holding capacity and content of dimethylamine by NIR was evaluated. The results of the investigation were presented using multivariate modelling methods such as partial least- squares regression (PLSR) and discriminant partial least- squares regression (DPLSR......). Systematic differences in the NIR measurements on minced cod fillets were primarily due to the chill storage duration (days at 2 degreesC) on thawed-chilled MAP fillets. PLSR models based on wavelengths selected by a new Jack-knife method resulted in a correlation coefficient of 0.90 between measured...

  2. Statistical distribution of the OAM states of Bessel-Gaussian-Schell infrared beams in strong turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Donglin; Shan, Lei; Xia, Mingchao; Zhao, Yuanhang

    2016-05-01

    The effects of strong turbulence on the orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of infrared and non-diffraction beam propagation in a terrestrial atmosphere are investigated. A new probability density model for OAM states of Bessel-Gaussian-Schell beam in the paraxial and strong turbulent channel is modeled based on the modified Rytov approximation. We find that the normalization energy weight of signal OAM modes at each OAM level is approximate equivalence in strong turbulence regime, one can constitute multiple mode channels by choosing OAM modes with large energy level difference between modes to reduce mode interference, and one can utilize BGS beam with OAM modes increasing the channel capacity of optical communications.

  3. A non-LTE retrieval scheme for sounding the upper atmosphere of Mars in the infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; García-Comas, Maya; Funke, Bernd; Jimenez-Monferrer, Sergio; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Several instruments on board Mars Express have been sounding the upper atmosphere of Mars systematically in a limb geometry in the IR part of the spectrum. Two of them in particular, OMEGA and PFS, performed emission measurements during daytime and detected the strongest IR bands of species like CO2 and CO (Piccialli et al, JGRE, submitted). Similarly on Venus, the instrument VIRTIS carried out observations of CO2 and CO bands at 2.7, 4.3 and 4.7 um at high altitudes (Gilli et al, JGRE, 2009). All these daylight atmospheric emissions respond to fluorescent situations, a case of non-local thermodynamic equilibrum conditions (non-LTE), well understood nowadays using comprehensive non-LTE theoretical models and tools (Lopez-Valverde et al., Planet. Space Sci., 2011). However, extensive exploitation of these emissions has only been done in optically thin conditions to date (Gilli et al, Icarus, 2015) or in a broad range of altitudes if in nadir geometry (Peralta et al, Apj, 2015). Within the H2020 project UPWARDS we aim at performing retrievals under non-LTE conditions including optically thick cases, like those of the CO2 and CO strongest bands during daytime in the upper atmosphere of Mars. Similar effort will also be applied eventually to Venus. We will present the non-LTE scheme used for such retrievals, based on similar efforts performed recently in studies of the Earth's upper atmosphere using data from the MIPAS instrument, on board Envisat (Funke et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2009; Jurado-Navarro, PhD Thesis, Univ. Granada, 2015). Acknowledgemnt: This work is supported by the European Union's Horizon 2020 Programme under grant agreement UPWARDS-633127

  4. An infrared metamaterial selective absorber with emitter considering atmospheric absorption for low observability (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jagyeong; Han, Kiwook; Hahn, Jae W.

    2016-09-01

    Advancement in stealth technology is very crucial for the protection from enemy. Detection of IR electromagnetic wave is performed by detecting the IR radiation from aircraft fuselage or reflected laser by using laser guided missile. In this research, we designed the metamaterial selective absorber with emitter considering atmospheric absorption to minimize observability from these detecting system. The model is designed as T-asymmetric structure for dual-band absorption or emission, and these two parts can be independently tuned. One part is designed as emitter which emit the radiation in the wavelength region where atmospheric absorption is strong. In order to select the target wavelength region, we used the MODTRAN database to calculate the molecular absorption in the atmosphere and strong absorptions occurs at 2μm, 4μm and 5-8μm wavelength regions. The other part is designed as an absorber which absorbs the IR signal from laser guided missile at 1.064μm. Selective emission or absorption at these wavelength region can be achieved by tuning the geometry of the structure. These mechanisms suppose the thermal equilibrium state so that the Kirchhoff law is satisfied. FDTD simulations of the designed structure was conducted to confirm the electromagnetic resonance. Also, we calculated the detected energy from the designed structure and compared with that from conventional aircraft surface. According to the calculation results, the measured signal from the suggested structure decreases to 1/10 of the signal from conventional surface.

  5. Analysis of functional groups in atmospheric aerosols by infrared spectroscopy: sparse methods for statistical selection of relevant absorption bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, Satoshi; Ruggeri, Giulia; Dillner, Ann M.

    2016-07-01

    Various vibrational modes present in molecular mixtures of laboratory and atmospheric aerosols give rise to complex Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectra. Such spectra can be chemically informative, but they often require sophisticated algorithms for quantitative characterization of aerosol composition. Naïve statistical calibration models developed for quantification employ the full suite of wavenumbers available from a set of spectra, leading to loss of mechanistic interpretation between chemical composition and the resulting changes in absorption patterns that underpin their predictive capability. Using sparse representations of the same set of spectra, alternative calibration models can be built in which only a select group of absorption bands are used to make quantitative prediction of various aerosol properties. Such models are desirable as they allow us to relate predicted properties to their underlying molecular structure. In this work, we present an evaluation of four algorithms for achieving sparsity in FT-IR spectroscopy calibration models. Sparse calibration models exclude unnecessary wavenumbers from infrared spectra during the model building process, permitting identification and evaluation of the most relevant vibrational modes of molecules in complex aerosol mixtures required to make quantitative predictions of various measures of aerosol composition. We study two types of models: one which predicts alcohol COH, carboxylic COH, alkane CH, and carbonyl CO functional group (FG) abundances in ambient samples based on laboratory calibration standards and another which predicts thermal optical reflectance (TOR) organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) mass in new ambient samples by direct calibration of infrared spectra to a set of ambient samples reserved for calibration. We describe the development and selection of each calibration model and evaluate the effect of sparsity on prediction performance. Finally, we ascribe

  6. Application of improved discrepancy principle in inversionof atmosphere infrared remote sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Jun

    2001-01-01

    [1]Peixoto, J. , Oort, A. H., Physics of Climate, Am. Inst. of Phys., New York: Woodbury, 1992, 520.[2]Shukla. J., Mintz, Y., The influence of land surface evapotranspiration on Earth's climate, Science, 1982, 215: 1498-1501.[3]Dickinson. R. E, Henderson-Sellers, A., Kennedy, P. J. et al., Biosphere-atmosphere transfer scheme (BATS) for the NCAR community climate model, Boulder, Colorado, NCAR/TN-275+STR, 1986, 69.[4]Dickinson, R. E., Henderson-Sellers, A., Kennedy, P. J., Biosphere-atmosphere transfer scheme (BATSle) version le as coupled to the NCAR community climate model, NCAR Tech. Note NCAR/TN-387+STR, 1993, 72.[5]Sellers, P. J., Mintz, Y., Sud, Y. C. et al., A simple biosphere model (SiB) for use within general circulation models, J. Atmos. Sci., 1986, 43 (6): 505-531.[6]Xue, Y. K.. Sellers, P. J., Kinter, J. L. et al., A simplified biosphere model for global climate studies, J. Clim., 1991, 4:345-364.[7]Sun Lan, Wu Guoxiong , Sun Shufen, Numerical simulations of effects of land surface processes on climate—Implementing of SSiB in IAP/LASG AGCM and its Performance, Acta Meteorologica Sinica (in Chinese), 2000, 58 (2):179-193.[8]Wu Guoxiong, Zhang Huehong, Liu Hui et al., Global ocean-atmosphere-land system model of LASG (GOALS/LASG)and its performance in simulation study, Quarterly Journal of Applied Meteorology (in Chinese), 1997, 8 (Suppl.): 15-28.[9]Wu Guoxiong, Liu Hui, Zhao Y. C. et al, A nine-layer atmospheric general circulation model and its performance, Advanced in Atmospheric Sciences, 1996, 13 (1): 1-18.[10]Wu Guoxiong, Liu Yimin, Liu Ping, The effect of spatially nonuniform heating on the formation and variation of subtropical high I. scale analysis, Acta Meteorologica Sinica (in Chinese), 1999, 57(3): 257-263.

  7. Ozone Profile Retrieval from Satellite Observation Using High Spectral Resolution Infrared Sounding Instrument

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary result on the retrieval of atmospheric ozone profiles using an im proved regression technique and utilizing the data from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), a hyper-spectral instrument expected to be flown on the EOS-AQUA platform in 2002. Simulated AIRS spectra were used to study the sensitivity of AIRS radiance on the tropospheric and stratospheric ozone changes, and to study the impact of various channel combinations on the ozone profile retrieval. Sensitivity study results indicate that the AIRS high resolution spectral channels between the wavenumber 650- 800 cm-1 provide very useful information to accurately retrieve tropospheric and stratospheric ozone pro files. Eigenvector decomposition of AIRS spectra indicate that no more than 100 eigenvectors are needed to retrieve very accurate ozone profiles. The accuracy of the retrieved atmospheric ozone profile from the pres ent technique and utilizing the AIRS data was compared with the accuracy obtained from current Advanced TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (ATOVS) data aboard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Admini stration (NOAA) satellites. As expected, a comparison of retrieval results confirms that the ozone profile re trieved with the AIRS data is superior to that of ATOVS.

  8. PMP-1: A coordinated study of the behavior of the middle atmosphere in winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labitzke, K.

    1982-01-01

    The following observations of the middle atmosphere were available regularly: radiosonde data distributed through arrangements made by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO); radiosonde data; and the infrared radiances of the SSU (stratospheric sounding unit onboard the operational NOAA satellites). Other data of more experimental nature which are or will become available are, data from the Nimbus-7 satellite, especially from the Stratosphere and Mesospheric Sounder (SAMS) and the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS), but only for the winter of 1978 to 1979. These data are collected and integrated into the large-scale meteorological field analysis. Parameters necessary for the understanding of the large-scale dynamics of the middle atmosphere are derived.

  9. Infrared radiation and inversion population of CO2 laser levels in Venusian and Martian atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordiyets, B. F.; Panchenko, V. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Formation mechanisms of nonequilibrium 10 micron CO2 molecule radiation and the possible existence of a natural laser effect in the upper atmospheres of Venus and Mars are theoretically studied. An analysis is made of the excitation process of CO2 molecule vibrational-band levels (with natural isotropic content) induced by direct solar radiation in bands 10.6, 9.4, 4.3, 2.7 and 2.0 microns. The model of partial vibrational-band temperatures was used in the case. The problem of IR radiation transfer in vibrational-rotational bands was solved in the radiation escape approximation.

  10. Infrared radiative transfer modelling in a 3D scattering cloudy atmosphere: Application to limb sounding measurements of cirrus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewen, G.B.L. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: gewen@atm.ox.ac.uk; Grainger, R.G. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Lambert, A. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Baran, A.J. [Met Office, Exeter (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-15

    The Monte Carlo cloud scattering forward model (McClouds{sub F}M) has been developed to simulate limb radiative transfer in the presence of cirrus clouds, for the purposes of simulating cloud contaminated measurements made by an infrared limb sounding instrument, e.g. the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). A reverse method three-dimensional Monte Carlo transfer model is combined with a line-by-line model for radiative transfer through the non-cloudy atmosphere to explicitly account for the effects of multiple scattering by the clouds. The ice cloud microphysics are characterised by a size distribution of randomly oriented ice crystals, with the single scattering properties of the distribution determined by accurate calculations accounting for non-spherical habit. A comparison of McClouds{sub F}M simulations and real MIPAS spectra of cirrus shows good agreement. Of particular interest are several noticeable spectral features (i.e. H{sub 2}O absorption lines) in the data that are replicated in the simulations: these can only be explained by upwelling tropospheric radiation scattered into the line-of-sight by the cloud ice particles.

  11. Formation of the infrared emission lines of Mg I in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, E. S.; Avrett, E. H.; Noyes, R. W.; Loeser, R.; Mauas, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    A non-LTE radiative transfer investigation of the emission lines is conducted at 7 and 12 microns using a realistic atomic model for neutral magnesium. An average quiet sun atmospheric model is used to calculate emission-line profiles that resemble the observed ones, i.e., broad absorption troughs with narrow central emission, and significant limb brightening. The charge exchange rates are found to be significant, but the effects of high-n coupling between Mg and Mg(+) together with radiative low-n transitions are of greater importance. It is confirmed that the emission cores are formed no higher than the temperature minimum region, and that the emission is caused by non-LTE effects rather than by the chromospheric temperature rise. It is inferred from the model calculations that the line core is sensitive to magnetic fields located almost 400 km above those measured in ordinary magnetograms; the gas pressure decreases 20-fold between these two heights.

  12. Bottom pressure, vertical acoustic round-trip travel time, and near-bottom currents data collected by Current-and-Pressure-recording Inverted Echo Sounders (CPIES), as part of the Kuroshio Extension System Study (KESS), from 26 April 2004 to 25 June 2006 in the Kuroshio Extension east of Japan (NODC Accession 0073269)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains Current and Pressure recording Inverted Echo Sounder (CPIES) measurements collected during the Kuroshio Extension System Study (KESS) under...

  13. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Bering Sea from the SEA SOUNDER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 08 July 1977 to 29 July 1977 (NODC Accession 7700848)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Bering Sea from the SEA SOUNDER. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  14. Atmospheric Profile Retrieval with AIRS Data and Validation at the ARM CART Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The physical retrieval algorithm of atmospheric temperature and moisture distribution from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) radiances is presented. The retrieval algorithm is applied to AIRS clear-sky radiance measurements. The algorithm employs a statistical retrieval followed by a subsequent nonlinear physical retrieval. The regression coefficients for the statistical retrieval are derived from a dataset of global radiosonde observations (RAOBs) comprising atmospheric temperature, moisture, and ozone profiles. Evaluation of the retrieved profiles is performed by a comparison with RAOBs from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud And Radiation Testbed (CART) in Oklahoma,U. S. A.. Comparisons show that the physically-based AIRS retrievals agree with the RAOBs from the ARM CART site with a Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 1 K on average for temperature profiles above 850 hPa, and approximately 10% on average for relative humidity profiles. With its improved spectral resolution, AIRS depicts more detailed structure than the current Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) sounder when comparing AIRS sounding retrievals with the operational GOES sounding products.

  15. Modeling angular-dependent spectral emissivity of snow and ice in the thermal infrared atmospheric window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Masahiro; Aoki, Teruo; Tanikawa, Tomonori; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Sugiura, Konosuke; Kuchiki, Katsuyuki; Niwano, Masashi

    2013-10-20

    A model of angular-dependent emissivity spectra of snow and ice in the 8-14 μm atmospheric window is constructed. Past field research revealed that snow emissivity varies depending on snow grain size and the exitance angle. Thermography images acquired in this study further revealed that not only welded snow particles such as sun crust, but also disaggregated particles such as granular snow and dendrite crystals exhibit high reflectivity on their crystal facets, even when the bulk snow surface exhibits blackbody-like behavior as a whole. The observed thermal emissive behaviors of snow particles suggest that emissivity of the bulk snow surface can be expressed by a weighted sum of two emissivity components: those of the specular and blackbody surfaces. Based on this assumption, a semi-empirical emissivity model was constructed; it is expressed by a linear combination of specular and blackbody surfaces' emissivities with a weighting parameter characterizing the specularity of the bulk surface. Emissivity spectra calculated using the model succeeded in reproducing the past in situ measured directional spectra of various snow types by employing a specific weighting parameter for each snow type.

  16. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Nitrile Ices Relevant to Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carrie; Ferrante, Robert F.; Moore, W. James; Hudson, Reggie; Moore, Marla H.

    2011-01-01

    Spectra and optical constants of nitrile ices known or suspected to be in Titan?s atmosphere have been determined from 2.0 to 333.3 microns (approx.5000 to 30/cm). These results are relevant to the ongoing modeling of Cassini CIRS observations of Titan?s winter pole. Ices studied were: HCN, hydrogen cyanide; C2N2, cyanogen; CH3CN, acetonitrile; C2H5CN, propionitrile; and HC3N, cyanoacetylene. Optical constants were calculated, using Kramers-Kronig analysis, for each nitrile ice?s spectrum measured at a variety of temperatures, in both the amorphous- and crystalline phases. Spectra were also measured for many of the nitriles after quenching at the annealing temperature and compared with those of annealed ices. For each of these molecules we also measured the real component, n, of the refractive index for amorphous and crystalline phases at 670 nm. Several examples of the information contained in these new data sets and their usefulness in modeling Titan?s observed features will be presented (e.g., the broad emission feature at 160/cm; Anderson and Samuelson, 2011).

  17. Infrared Spectra, Index of Refraction, and Optical Constants of Nitrile Ices Relevant to Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Marla; Ferrante, Robert; Moore, William; Hudson, Reggie

    2010-01-01

    Spectra and optical constants of nitrite ices known or suspected to be in Titan's atmosphere are presented from 2.5 to 200 microns (4000 to 50 per cm ). These results are relevant to the ongoing modeling of Cassini CIRS observations of Titan's winter pole. Ices studied include: HCN, hydrogen cyanide; C2N2, cyanogen; CH3CN, acetonitrile; C 2H5CN, propionitrile; and HC3N, cyanoacetylene. For each of these molecules we report new measurements of the index of refraction, n, determined in both the amorphous- and crystallinephase at 670 nm. Spectra were measured and optical constants were calculated for each nitrite at a variety of temperatures including 20, 35, 50, 75, 95, and 110 K, in the amorphous- and crystalline-phase. This laboratory effort uses a dedicated FTIR spectrometer to record transmission spectra of thin-film ice samples. Laser interference is used to measure film thickness during condensation onto a transparent cold window attached to the tail section of a closed-cycle helium cryostat. Optical constants, real (n) and imaginary (k) refractive indices, are determined using Kramers-Kronig (K-K) analysis. Our calculation reproduces the complete spectrum, including all interference effects. Index of refraction measurements are made in a separate dedicated FTIR spectrometer where interference deposit fringes are measured using two 670 nm lasers at different angles to the ice substrate. A survey of these new measurements will be presented along with a discussion of their validation, errors, and application to Titan data.

  18. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder HCl Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froidevaux, L.; Jiang, Y. B.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Fuller, R. A.; Marcy, T. P.; Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Jucks, K. W.; Stachnik, R. A.; Toon, G. C.; Christensen, L. E.; Webster, C. R.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Walker, K. A.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Harwood, R. S.; Manney, G. L.; Schwartz, M. J.; Daffer, W. H.; Drouin, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite has provided daily global HCl profiles since August 2004. We provide a characterization of the resolution, random and systematic uncertainties, and known issues for the version 2.2 MLS HCl data. The MLS sampling allows for comparisons with many (1500 to more than 3000) closely matched profiles from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). These data sets provide HCl latitudinal distributions that are, overall, very similar to those from (coincident) MLS profiles, although there are some discrepancies in the upper stratosphere between the MLS and HALOE gradients. As found in previous work, MLS and ACE HCl profiles agree very well (within approximately 5%, on average), but the MLS HCl abundances are generally larger (by 10-20%) than HALOE HCl. The bias versus HALOE is unlikely to arise mostly from MLS, as a similar systematic bias (of order 15%) is not observed between average MLS and balloon-borne measurements of HCl, obtained over Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in 2004 and 2005. At the largest pressure (147 hPa) for MLS HCl, a high bias (approximately 0.2 ppbv) is apparent in analyses of low to midlatitude data versus in situ aircraft chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) HCl measurements from the Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) campaigns in 2004, 2005, and 2006; this bias is also observed in comparisons of MLS and aircraftHCl/O3 correlations. Good agreement between MLS and CIMS HCl is obtained at 100 to 68 hPa. The recommended pressure range for MLS HCl is from 100 to 0.15 hPa.

  19. Improved total atmospheric water vapour amount determination from near-infrared filter measurements with sun photometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mavromatakis

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we explore the effect of the contribution of the solar spectrum to the recorded signal in wavelengths outside the typical 940-nm filter's bandwidth. We use gaussian-shaped filters as well as actual filter transmission curves to study the implications imposed by the non-zero out-of-band contribution to the coefficients used to derive precipitable water from the measured water vapour band transmittance. The moderate-resolution SMARTS radiative transfer code is used to predict the incident spectrum outside the filter bandpass for different atmospheres, solar geometries and aerosol optical depths. The high-resolution LBLRTM radiative transfer code is used to calculate the water vapour transmittance in the 940 nm band. The absolute level of the out-of-band transmittance has been chosen to range from 10−6 to 10−4, and typical response curves of commercially available silicon photodiodes are included into the calculations. It is shown that if the out-of-band transmittance effect is neglected, as is generally the case, then the derived columnar water vapour is systematically underestimated by a few percents. The actual error depends on the specific out-of-band transmittance, optical air mass of observation and water vapour amount. We apply published parameterized transmittance functions to determine the filter coefficients. We also introduce an improved, three-parameter, fitting function that can describe the theoretical data accurately, with significantly less residual effects than with the existing functions. Further investigations will use experimental data from field campaigns to validate these findings.

  20. Thermal infrared laser heterodyne spectroradiometry for solar occultation atmospheric CO2 measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Alex; Macleod, Neil A.; Huebner, Marko; Weidmann, Damien

    2016-12-01

    This technology demonstration paper reports on the development, demonstration, performance assessment, and initial data analysis of a benchtop prototype quantum cascade laser heterodyne spectroradiometer, operating within a narrow spectral window of ˜ 1 cm-1 around 953.1 cm-1 in transmission mode and coupled to a passive Sun tracker. The instrument has been specifically designed for accurate dry air total column, and potentially vertical profile, measurements of CO2. Data from over 8 months of operation in 2015 near Didcot, UK, confirm that atmospheric measurements with noise levels down to 4 times the shot noise limit can be achieved with the current instrument. Over the 8-month period, spectra with spectral resolutions of 60 MHz (0.002 cm-1) and 600 MHz (0.02 cm-1) have been acquired with median signal-to-noise ratios of 113 and 257, respectively, and a wavenumber calibration uncertainty of 0.0024 cm-1.Using the optimal estimation method and RFM as the radiative transfer forward model, prior analysis and theoretical benchmark modelling had been performed with an observation system simulator (OSS) to target an optimized spectral region of interest. The selected narrow spectral window includes both CO2 and H2O ro-vibrational transition lines to enable the measurement of dry air CO2 column from a single spectrum. The OSS and preliminary retrieval results yield roughly 8 degrees of freedom for signal (over the entire state vector) for an arbitrarily chosen a priori state with relatively high uncertainty ( ˜ 4 for CO2). Preliminary total column mixing ratios obtained are consistent with GOSAT monthly data. At a spectral resolution of 60 MHz with an acquisition time of 90 s, instrumental noise propagation yields an error of around 1.5 ppm on the dry air total column of CO2, exclusive of biases and geophysical parameters errors at this stage.

  1. Lossless compression of 3D hyperspectral sounder data using the wavelet and Burrows-Wheeler transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Bormin

    2004-10-01

    Hyperspectral sounder data is used for retrieval of useful geophysical parameters which promise better weather prediction. It features two characteristics. First it is huge in size with 2D spatial coverage and high spectral resolution in the infrared region. Second it allows low tolerance of noise and error in retrieving the geophysical parameters where a mathematically ill-posed problem is involved. Therefore compression is better to be lossless or near lossless for data transfer and archive. Meanwhile medical data from X-ray computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques also possesses similar characteristics. It provides motivation to apply lossless compression schemes for medical data to the hyperspectral sounder data. In this paper, we explore the use of a wavelet-based lossless data compression scheme for the 3D hyperspectral data which uses in sequence a forward difference scheme, an integer wavelet transform, a Burrows-Wheeler transform and an arithmetic coder. Compared to previous work, our approach is shown to outperform the CALIC and 3D EZW schemes.

  2. Atmospheric lifetimes, infrared absorption spectra, radiative forcings and global warming potentials of NF3 and CF3CF2Cl (CFC-115)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totterdill, Anna; Kovács, Tamás; Feng, Wuhu; Dhomse, Sandip; Smith, Christopher J.; Gómez-Martín, Juan Carlos; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Forster, Piers M.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-09-01

    Fluorinated compounds such as NF3 and C2F5Cl (CFC-115) are characterised by very large global warming potentials (GWPs), which result from extremely long atmospheric lifetimes and strong infrared absorptions in the atmospheric window. In this study we have experimentally determined the infrared absorption cross sections of NF3 and CFC-115, calculated the radiative forcing and efficiency using two radiative transfer models and identified the effect of clouds and stratospheric adjustment. The infrared cross sections are within 10 % of previous measurements for CFC-115 but are found to be somewhat larger than previous estimates for NF3, leading to a radiative efficiency for NF3 that is 25 % larger than that quoted in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. A whole atmosphere chemistry-climate model was used to determine the atmospheric lifetimes of NF3 and CFC-115 to be (509 ± 21) years and (492 ± 22) years, respectively. The GWPs for NF3 are estimated to be 15 600, 19 700 and 19 700 over 20, 100 and 500 years, respectively. Similarly, the GWPs for CFC-115 are 6030, 7570 and 7480 over 20, 100 and 500 years, respectively.

  3. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Atmosphere and Surface Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Yang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) are all hyper-spectral satellite sensors with thousands of spectral channels. Top of atmospheric radiance spectra measured by these sensors contain high information content on atmospheric, cloud, and surface properties. Exploring high information content contained in these high spectral resolution spectra is a challenging task due to computation e ort involved in modeling thousands of spectral channels. Usually, only very small fractions (4{10 percent) of the available channels are included in physical retrieval systems or numerical weather forecast (NWP) satellite data assimilations. We will describe a method of simultaneously retrieving atmospheric temperature, moisture, cloud, and surface properties using all available spectral channels without sacrificing computational speed. The essence of the method is to convert channel radiance spectra into super-channels by an Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) transformation. Because the EOFs are orthogonal to each other, about 100 super-channels are adequate to capture the information content of the radiance spectra. A Principal Component-based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) developed at NASA Langley Research Center is used to calculate both the super-channel magnitudes and derivatives with respect to atmospheric profiles and other properties. There is no need to perform EOF transformations to convert super channels back to spectral space at each iteration step for a one-dimensional variational retrieval or a NWP data assimilation system. The PCRTM forward model is also capable of calculating radiative contributions due to multiple-layer clouds. The multiple scattering effects of the clouds are efficiently parameterized. A physical retrieval algorithm then performs an inversion of atmospheric, cloud, and surface properties in super channel domain directly therefore both reducing the

  4. Characterizing a Quantum Cascade Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS for measurements of atmospheric ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ellis

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A compact, fast-response Quantum Cascade Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS for measurements of ammonia has been evaluated under both laboratory and field conditions. Absorption of radiation from a pulsed, thermoelectrically cooled QC laser occurs at reduced pressure in a 0.5 L multiple pass absorption cell with an effective path length of 76 m. Detection is achieved using a thermoelectrically cooled Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe infrared detector. A novel sampling inlet was used, consisting of a short, heated, quartz tube with a hydrophobic coating to minimize the adsorption of ammonia to surfaces. The inlet contains a critical orifice that reduces the pressure, a virtual impactor for separation of particles, and additional ports for delivering ammonia-free background air and calibration gas standards. This instrument has been found to have a detection limit of 0.23 ppb at 1 Hz. The sampling technique has been compared to the results of a conventional lead salt Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer (TDLAS during a laboratory intercomparison. The effect of humidity and heat on the surface interaction of ammonia with sample tubing was investigated at mixing ratios ranging from 30–1000 ppb. Humidity was seen to worsen the ammonia time response and considerable improvement was observed when using a heated sampling line. A field intercomparison of the QC-TILDAS with a modified Thermo 42CTL chemiluminescence based analyzer was also performed at Environment Canada's Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE in the rural town of Egbert, ON between May–July 2008. Background tests and calibrations using two different permeation tube sources and an ammonia gas cylinder were regularly carried out throughout the study. Results indicate a very good correlation with 1 min time resolution (R2=0.93 between the two instruments at the beginning of the study, when regular background

  5. Characterizing a Quantum Cascade Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS for measurements of atmospheric ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ellis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A compact, fast-response Quantum Cascade Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS for measurements of ammonia (NH3 has been evaluated under both laboratory and field conditions. Absorption of radiation from a pulsed, thermoelectrically cooled QC laser occurs at reduced pressure in a 0.5 L multiple pass absorption cell with an effective path length of 76 m. Detection is achieved using a thermoelectrically-cooled Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe infrared detector. A novel sampling inlet was used, consisting of a short, heated, quartz tube with a hydrophobic coating to minimize the adsorption of NH3 to surfaces. The inlet contains a critical orifice that reduces the pressure, a virtual impactor for separation of particles, and additional ports for delivering NH3-free background air and calibration gas standards. The level of noise in this instrument has been found to be 0.23 ppb at 1 Hz. The sampling technique has been compared to the results of a conventional lead salt Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer (TDLAS during a laboratory intercomparison. The effect of humidity and heat on the surface interaction of NH3 with sample tubing was investigated at mixing ratios ranging from 30–1000 ppb. Humidity was seen to worsen the NH3 time response and considerable improvement was observed when using a heated sampling line. A field intercomparison of the QC-TILDAS with a modified Thermo 42CTL chemiluminescence-based analyzer was also performed at Environment Canada's Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE in the rural town of Egbert, ON between May–July 2008. Background tests and calibrations using two different permeation tube sources and an NH3 gas cylinder were regularly carried out throughout the study. Results indicate a very good correlation at 1 min time resolution (R2 = 0.93 between the two instruments at the

  6. Stratospheric and mesospheric pressure-temperature profiles from rotational analysis of CO2 lines in atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, G. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Lowes, L. L.; Abrams, M. C.; Raper, O. F.; Farmer, C. B.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1995-01-01

    A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument. The basis for this method is a rotational analysis of retrieved apparent abundances from CO2 rovibrational absorption lines, employing existing constituent concentration retrieval software used in the analysis of data returned by ATMOS. Pressure-temperature profiles derived from spectra acquired during the ATLAS 1 space shuttle mission of March-April 1992 are quantitatively evaluated and compared with climatological and meteorological data as a means of assessing the validity of this approach.

  7. For geological investigations with airborne thermal infrared multispectral images: Transfer of calibration from laboratory spectrometer to TIMS as alternative for removing atmospheric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.; Anderson, Donald L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an empirical method to correct TIMS (Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner) data for atmospheric effects by transferring calibration from a laboratory thermal emission spectrometer to the TIMS multispectral image. The method does so by comparing the laboratory spectra of samples gathered in the field with TIMS 6-point spectra for pixels at the location of field sampling sites. The transference of calibration also makes it possible to use spectra from the laboratory as endmembers in unmixing studies of TIMS data.

  8. A chemometrics approach applied to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for monitoring the spoilage of fresh salmon (Salmo salar) stored under modified atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, C; Vasconcelos, H; de Almeida, José M M M

    2017-01-16

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to detect and predict the bacterial load of salmon fillets (Salmo salar) stored at 3, 8 and 30°C under three packaging conditions: air packaging (AP) and two modified atmospheres constituted by a mixture of 50%N2/40%CO2/10%O2 with lemon juice (MAPL) and without lemon juice (MAP). Fresh salmon samples were periodically examined for total viable counts (TVC), specific spoilage organisms (SSO) counts, pH, FTIR and sensory assessment of freshness. Principal components analysis (PCA) allowed identification of the wavenumbers potentially correlated with the spoilage process. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of infrared spectral data was performed to support sensory data and to accurately identify samples freshness. The effect of the packaging atmospheres was assessed by microbial enumeration and LDA was used to determine sample packaging from the measured infrared spectra. It was verified that modified atmospheres can decrease significantly the bacterial load of fresh salmon. Lemon juice combined with MAP showed a more pronounced delay in the growth of Brochothrix thermosphacta, Photobacterium phosphoreum, psychrotrophs and H2S producers. Partial least squares regression (PLS-R) allowed estimates of TVC and psychrotrophs, lactic acid bacteria, molds and yeasts, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas spp. and H2S producer counts from the infrared spectral data. For TVC, the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) value was 0.78logcfug(-1) for an external set of samples. According to the results, FTIR can be used as a reliable, accurate and fast method for real time freshness evaluation of salmon fillets stored under different temperatures and packaging atmospheres.

  9. Venus' night side atmospheric dynamics using near infrared observations from VEx/VIRTIS and TNG/NICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota Machado, Pedro; Peralta, Javier; Luz, David; Gonçalves, Ruben; Widemann, Thomas; Oliveira, Joana

    2016-10-01

    We present night side Venus' winds based on coordinated observations carried out with Venus Express' VIRTIS instrument and the Near Infrared Camera (NICS) of the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG). With NICS camera, we acquired images of the continuum K filter at 2.28 μm, which allows to monitor motions at the Venus' lower cloud level, close to 48 km altitude. We will present final results of cloud tracked winds from ground-based TNG observations and from coordinated space-based VEx/VIRTIS observations.The Venus' lower cloud deck is centred at 48 km of altitude, where fundamental dynamical exchanges that help maintain superrotation are thought to occur. The lower Venusian atmosphere is a strong source of thermal radiation, with the gaseous CO2 component allowing radiation to escape in windows at 1.74 and 2.28 μm. At these wavelengths radiation originates below 35 km and unit opacity is reached at the lower cloud level, close to 48 km. Therefore, it is possible to observe the horizontal cloud structure, with thicker clouds seen silhouetted against the bright thermal background from the low atmosphere. By continuous monitoring of the horizontal cloud structure at 2.28 μm (NICS Kcont filter), it is possible to determine wind fields using the technique of cloud tracking. We acquired a series of short exposures of the Venus disk. Cloud displacements in the night side of Venus were computed taking advantage of a phase correlation semi-automated technique. The Venus apparent diameter at observational dates was greater than 32" allowing a high spatial precision. The 0.13" pixel scale of the NICS narrow field camera allowed to resolve ~3-pixel displacements. The absolute spatial resolution on the disk was ~100 km/px at disk center, and the (0.8–1") seeing-limited resolution was ~400 km/px. By co-adding the best images and cross-correlating regions of clouds the effective resolution was significantly better than the seeing-limited resolution. In order to correct for

  10. Improving Multi-Beam Echo Sounder Depth Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellen, M.; Ameele, J.J.P. van den; Biersteker, R.; Simons, D.G.

    2006-01-01

    An important research question is how to adequately correct multi-beam echo sounder (MBES) bathymetric data for refraction effects. This is especially relevant for survey areas, like the Maasgeul area off the Dutch coast, where the water column properties and thus the prevailing sound speed profile

  11. Characterization of Artifacts Introduced by the Empirical Volcano-Scan Atmospheric Correction Commonly Applied to CRISM and OMEGA Near-Infrared Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, S.M.; Arvidson, R.E.; Wolff, M. J.; Smith, M. D.; Seelos, F. P.; Morgan, F.; Murchie, S. L.; Mustard, J. F.; Morris, R. V.; Humm, D.; McGuire, P. C.

    2014-01-01

    The empirical volcano-scan atmospheric correction is widely applied to Martian near infrared CRISM and OMEGA spectra between 1000 and 2600 nanometers to remove prominent atmospheric gas absorptions with minimal computational investment. This correction method employs division by a scaled empirically-derived atmospheric transmission spectrum that is generated from observations of the Martian surface in which different path lengths through the atmosphere were measured and transmission calculated using the Beer-Lambert Law. Identifying and characterizing both artifacts and residual atmospheric features left by the volcano-scan correction is important for robust interpretation of CRISM and OMEGA volcano scan corrected spectra. In order to identify and determine the cause of spectral artifacts introduced by the volcano-scan correction, we simulated this correction using a multiple scattering radiative transfer algorithm (DISORT). Simulated transmission spectra that are similar to actual CRISM- and OMEGA-derived transmission spectra were generated from modeled Olympus Mons base and summit spectra. Results from the simulations were used to investigate the validity of assumptions inherent in the volcano-scan correction and to identify artifacts introduced by this method of atmospheric correction. We found that the most prominent artifact, a bowl-shaped feature centered near 2000 nanometers, is caused by the inaccurate assumption that absorption coefficients of CO2 in the Martian atmosphere are independent of column density. In addition, spectral albedo and slope are modified by atmospheric aerosols. Residual atmospheric contributions that are caused by variable amounts of dust aerosols, ice aerosols, and water vapor are characterized by the analysis of CRISM volcano-scan corrected spectra from the same location acquired at different times under variable atmospheric conditions.

  12. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesinger, R; Schade, U; Kleber, Ch; Schreiner, M

    2014-06-01

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  13. Data Assimilation of AIRS Water Vapor Profiles: Impact on Precipitation Forecasts for Atmospheric River Cases Affecting the Western of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Clay; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary; Wick, Gary; Neiman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric rivers are transient, narrow regions in the atmosphere responsible for the transport of large amounts of water vapor. These phenomena can have a large impact on precipitation. In particular, they can be responsible for intense rain events on the western coast of North America during the winter season. This paper focuses on attempts to improve forecasts of heavy precipitation events in the Western US due to atmospheric rivers. Profiles of water vapor derived from from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) observations are combined with GFS forecasts by a three-dimensional variational data assimilation in the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI). Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) forecasts initialized from the combined field are compared to forecasts initialized from the GFS forecast only for 3 test cases in the winter of 2011. Results will be presented showing the impact of the AIRS profile data on water vapor and temperature fields, and on the resultant precipitation forecasts.

  14. VARIABILITY OF ATMOSPHERIC CO2 OVER INDIA AND SURROUNDING OCEANS AND CONTROL BY SURFACE FLUXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Nayak

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, seasonal and inter-annual variability of atmospheric CO2 concentration over India and surrounding oceans during 2002–2010 derived from Atmospheric InfrarRed Sounder observation and their relation with the natural flux exchanges over terrestrial Indian and surrounding oceans were analyzed. The natural fluxes over the terrestrial Indian in the form of net primary productivity (NPP were simulated based on a terrestrial biosphere model governed by time varying climate parameters (solar radiation, air temperature, precipitation etc and satellite greenness index together with the land use land cover and soil attribute maps. The flux exchanges over the oceans around India (Tropical Indian Ocean: TIO were calculated based on a empirical model of CO2 gas dissolution in the oceanic water governed by time varying upper ocean parameters such as gradient of partial pressure of CO2 between ocean and atmosphere, winds, sea surface temperature and salinity. Comparison between the variability of atmospheric CO2 anomaly with the anomaly of surface fluxes over India and surrounding oceans suggests that biosphere uptake over India and oceanic uptake over the south Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of seasonal variability of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate. On inter-annual scale, flux exchanges over the tropical north Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate.

  15. Strategy for high-accuracy-and-precision retrieval of atmospheric methane from the mid-infrared FTIR network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sussmann

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a strategy (MIR-GBM v1.0 for the retrieval of column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of methane (XCH4 with a precision <0.3% (1-σ diurnal variation, 7-min integration and a seasonal bias <0.14% from mid-infrared ground-based solar FTIR measurements of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, comprising 22 FTIR stations. This makes NDACC methane data useful for satellite validation and for the inversion of regional-scale sources and sinks in addition to long-term trend analysis. Such retrievals complement the high accuracy and precision near-infrared observations of the younger Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON with time series dating back 15 years or so before TCCON operations began.

    MIR-GBM v1.0 is using HITRAN 2000 (including the 2001 update release and 3 spectral micro windows (2613.70–2615.40 cm−1, 2835.50–2835.80 cm−1, 2921.00–2921.60 cm−1. A first-order Tikhonov constraint is applied to the state vector given in units of per cent of volume mixing ratio. It is tuned to achieve minimum diurnal variation without damping seasonality. Final quality selection of the retrievals uses a threshold for the goodness of fit (χ2 < 1 as well as for the ratio of root-mean-square spectral noise and information content (<0.15%. Column-averaged dry-air mole fractions are calculated using the retrieved methane profiles and four-times-daily pressure-temperature-humidity profiles from National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP interpolated to the time of measurement.

    MIR-GBM v1.0 is the optimum of 24 tested retrieval strategies (8 different spectral micro-window selections, 3 spectroscopic line lists: HITRAN 2000, 2004, 2008. Dominant errors of the non-optimum retrieval strategies are systematic HDO/H2O-CH4 interference errors leading to a seasonal bias up to ≈5%. Therefore interference

  16. A comparison of minor trace gas retrievals from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Henze, D. K.; Millet, D. B.; Gombos, D.; Van Damme, M.; Clarisse, L.; Coheur, P. F.; Pommier, M.; Clerbaux, C.

    2014-12-01

    The advent of hyperspectral infrared instruments orbiting the Earth has allowed for detecting and measuring numerous trace gas species that play important roles in atmospheric chemistry and impact air quality, but for which there is a dearth of information on their distribution and temporal variability. Here we will present global and regional comparisons of measurements from the NASA TES and the European MetOp IASI instruments of three of these gases: ammonia (NH3), formic acid (HCOOH) and methanol (CH3OH). Ammonia is highly reactive and thus very variable in space and time, while the sources and sinks of methanol and formic acid are poorly quantified: thus space-based measurements have the potential of significantly increasing our knowledge of the emissions and distributions of these gases. IASI and TES have many similarities but some significant differences. TES has significantly higher spectral resolution (0.06 cm-1), and its equator crossing times are ~1:30 am and 1:30 pm, local time, while IASI has lower resolution (0.5 cm-1) and an earlier equator crossing time (9:30 am and 9:30 pm), which leads to lower thermal contrast; however IASI provides much greater temporal and spatial coverage due to its cross-track scanning. Added to the instrumental differences are the differences in retrieval algorithms. The IASI team uses simple but efficient methods to estimate total column amounts of the species above, while the TES team performs full optimal estimation retrievals. We will compare IASI and TES total column measurements averaged on a 2.5x2.5 degree global grid for each month in 2009, and we will examine the seasonal cycle in some regions of interest, such as South America, eastern China, and the Midwest and the Central Valley in the US. In regions where both datasets are in agreement this analysis will provide confidence that the results are robust and reliable. In regions where there is disagreement we will look for the causes of the discrepancies, which will

  17. Observation of the exhaust plume from the space shuttle main engine using the Microwave Limb Sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Pumphrey

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A space shuttle launch deposits 700 t of water in the atmosphere. Some of this water is released into the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere where it may be directly detected by a limb sounding satellite instrument. We report measurements of water vapour plumes from shuttle launches made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on the Aura satellite. Approximately 50% of shuttle launches are detected by MLS. The signal appears at a similar level across the upper 10 km of the MLS limb scan, suggesting that the bulk of the observed water is above the top of the scan. Only a small fraction at best of smaller launches (Ariane, Proton are detected. We conclude that the sensitivity of MLS is only just great enough to detect a shuttle sized launch, but that a suitably designed instrument of the same general type could detect the exhausts from a large proportion of heavy-lift launches.

  18. Observation of the exhaust plume from the space shuttle main engines using the microwave limb sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Pumphrey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A space shuttle launch deposits 700 tonnes of water in the atmosphere. Some of this water is released into the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere where it may be directly detected by a limb sounding satellite instrument. We report measurements of water vapour plumes from shuttle launches made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on the Aura satellite. Approximately 50%–65% of shuttle launches are detected by MLS. The signal appears at a similar level across the upper 10 km of the MLS limb scan, suggesting that the bulk of the observed water is above the top of the scan. Only a small fraction at best of smaller launches (Ariane 5, Proton are detected. We conclude that the sensitivity of MLS is only just great enough to detect a shuttle sized launch, but that a suitably designed instrument of the same general type could detect the exhausts from a large proportion of heavy-lift launches.

  19. The DST group ionospheric sounder replacement for JORN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T. J.; Quinn, A. D.; Pederick, L. H.

    2016-06-01

    The Jindalee Over-the-horizon Radar Network (JORN) is an integral part of Australia's national defense capability. JORN uses a real-time ionospheric model as part of its operations. The primary source of data for this model is a set of 13 vertical-incidence sounders (VIS) scattered around the Australian coast and inland locations. These sounders are a mix of Lowell digisonde portable sounder (DPS)-1 and DPS-4. Both of these sounders, the DPS-1 in particular, are near the end of their maintainable life. A replacement for these aging sounders was required as part of the ongoing sustainment program for JORN. Over the last few years the High-Frequency Radar Branch (HFRB) of the Defence Science and Technology (DST) Group, Australian Department of Defence, has been developing its own sounders based on its successful radar hardware technology. The DST Group VIS solution known as PRIME (Portable Remote Ionospheric Monitoring Equipment) is a 100% duty cycle, continuous wave system that receives the returned ionospheric signal while it is still transmitting and operates the receiver in the near field of the transmitter. Of considerable importance to a successful VIS is the autoscaling software, which takes the ionogram data and produces an ionogram trace (group delay as a function of frequency), and from that produces a set of ionospheric parameters that represent the (bottomside) overhead electron density profile. HFRB has developed its own robust autoscaling software. The performance of DST Group's PRIME under a multitude of challenging ionospheric conditions has been studied. In December 2014, PRIME was trialed at a JORN VIS site collocated with the existing Lowell Digisonde DPS-1. This side-by-side testing determined that PRIME was fit for purpose. A summary of the results of this comparison and example PRIME output will be discussed. Note that this paper compares PRIME with the 25 year old Lowell Digisonde DPS-1, which is planned to be replaced. Our future plans include

  20. A study of the atmospherically important reactions of dimethylsulfide (DMS) with I2 and ICl using infrared matrix isolation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccaceci, Sonya; Armata, Nerina; Ogden, J Steven; Dyke, John M; Rhyman, Lydia; Ramasami, Ponnadurai

    2012-02-21

    The reactions of dimethylsulfide (DMS) with molecular iodine (I(2)) and iodine monochloride (ICl) have been studied by infrared matrix isolation spectroscopy by co-condensation of the reagents in an inert gas matrix. Molecular adducts of DMS + I(2) and DMS + ICl have also been prepared using standard synthetic methods. The vapour above each of these adducts trapped in an inert gas matrix gave the same infrared spectrum as that recorded for the corresponding co-condensation reaction. In each case, the infrared spectrum has been interpreted in terms of a van der Waals adduct, DMS : I(2) and DMS : ICl, with the aid of infrared spectra computed for their minimum energy structures at the MP2 level. Computed relative energies of minima and transition states on the potential energy surfaces of these reactions were used to understand why they do not proceed further than the reactant complexes DMS : I(2) and DMS : ICl. The main findings of this research are compared with results obtained earlier for the DMS + Cl(2) and DMS + Br(2) reactions, and the atmospheric implications of the conclusions are also considered.

  1. Ultraspectral sounder data compression using the Tunstall coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Bormin; Gu, Lingjia

    2007-09-01

    In an error-prone environment the compression of ultraspectral sounder data is vulnerable to error propagation. The Tungstall coding is a variable-to-fixed length code which compresses data by mapping a variable number of source symbols to a fixed number of codewords. It avoids the resynchronization difficulty encountered in fixed-to-variable length codes such as Huffman coding and arithmetic coding. This paper explores the use of the Tungstall coding in reducing the error propagation for ultraspectral sounder data compression. The results show that our Tunstall approach has a favorable compression ratio compared with JPEG-2000, 3D SPIHT, JPEG-LS, CALIC and CCSDS IDC 5/3. It also has less error propagation compared with JPEG-2000.

  2. Next Generation Grating Spectrometer Sounders for LEO and GEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    AIRS and MODIS are widely used for weather, climate, composition, carbon cycle, cross-calibration, and applications. The community asking for new capability in the 2020 timeframe, capabilities desired: (1) Hyperspectral UV to LWIR, High Spatial ?1km IFOV (2) Maximize Synergies of Solar Reflected and IR. Synergies with OCO-2. We expect more users and applications of next gen LEO IR Sounder than GEO. These include: weather, climate, GHG monitoring, aviation, disaster response. There is a new direction for imagers and sounders: (1) Separate Vis/NIR/SWIR from MWIR/LWIR instruments reduces technology risk and complexity. (2) Expect Costs to be lower than CrIS & VIIRS Some additional ideas to reduce costs include: (1) minimum set of requirements (2) mini-grating spectrometers. supports constellation for higher revisit (3) new technology to reduce instrument size (large format fpa's) (4) hosted payloads

  3. Sonic depth sounder for laboratory and field use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, E.V.; Simons, Daryl B.; Posakony, G.J.

    1961-01-01

    The laboratory investigation of roughness in alluvial channels has led to the development of a special electronic device capable of mapping the streambed configuration under dynamic conditions. This electronic device employs an ultrasonic pulse-echo principle, similar to that of a fathometer, that utilizes microsecond techniques to give high accuracy in shallow depths. This instrument is known as the sonic depth sounder and was designed to cover a depth range of 0 to 4 feet with an accuracy of ? 0.5 percent. The sonic depth sounder is capable of operation at frequencies of 500, 1,000 and 2,000 kilocycles. The ultrasonic beam generated at the transducer is designed to give a minimum-diameter interrogating signal over the extended depth range. The information obtained from a sonic depth sounder is recorded on a strip-chart recorder. This permanent record allows an analysis to be made of the streambed configuration under different dynamic conditions. The model 1024 sonic depth sounder was designed principally as a research instrument to meet laboratory needs. As such, it is somewhat limited in its application as a field instrument on large streams and rivers. The principles employed in this instrument, however, have many potentials for field applications such as the indirect measurement of bed load when the bed roughness is ripples and (or) dunes, depth measurement, determination of bed configuration, and determination of depth of scour around bridge piers and abutments. For field application a modification of the present system into a battery-operated lightweight instrument designed to operate at a depth range of 0 to 30 feet is possible and desirable.

  4. Mid-Infrared Lasers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mid Infrared DIAL systems can provide vital data needed by atmospheric scientists to understand atmospheric chemistry. The Decadal Survey recommended missions, such...

  5. Testing Model Atmospheres for Young Very-low-mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs in the Infrared: Evidence for Significantly Underestimated Dust Opacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tottle, Jonathan; Mohanty, Subhanjoy

    2015-05-01

    We test state-of-the-art model atmospheres for young very-low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in the infrared, by comparing the predicted synthetic photometry over 1.2-24 μm to the observed photometry of M-type spectral templates in star-forming regions. We find that (1) in both early and late young M types, the model atmospheres imply effective temperatures ({{T}eff}) several hundred Kelvin lower than predicted by the standard pre-main sequence (PMS) spectral type-{{T}eff} conversion scale (based on theoretical evolutionary models). It is only in the mid-M types that the two temperature estimates agree. (2) The {{T}eff} discrepancy in the early M types (corresponding to stellar masses ≳ 0.4 {{M}⊙ } at ages of a few Myr) probably arises from remaining uncertainties in the treatment of atmospheric convection within the atmospheric models, whereas in the late M types it is likely due to an underestimation of dust opacity. (3) The empirical and model-atmosphere J-band bolometric corrections are both roughly flat, and similar to each other, over the M-type {{T}eff} range. Thus the model atmospheres yield reasonably accurate bolometric luminosities ({{L}bol}), but lead to underestimations of mass and age relative to evolutionary expectations (especially in the late M types) due to lower {{T}eff}. We demonstrate this for a large sample of young Cha I and Taurus sources. (4) The trends in the atmospheric model J-Ks colors, and their deviations from the data, are similar at PMS and main sequence ages, suggesting that the model dust opacity errors we postulate here for young ages also apply at field ages.

  6. A Module for Assimilating Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles into the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation System for Unique Forecasting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Blankenship, Clay

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral infrared sounder radiance data are assimilated into operational modeling systems however the process is computationally expensive and only approximately 1% of available data are assimilated due to data thinning as well as the fact that radiances are restricted to cloud-free fields of view. In contrast, the number of hyperspectral infrared profiles assimilated is much higher since the retrieved profiles can be assimilated in some partly cloudy scenes due to profile coupling other data, such as microwave or neural networks, as first guesses to the retrieval process. As the operational data assimilation community attempts to assimilate cloud-affected radiances, it is possible that the use of retrieved profiles might offer an alternative methodology that is less complex and more computationally efficient to solve this problem. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has assimilated hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles into Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) simulations using the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) System. Early research at SPoRT demonstrated improved initial conditions when assimilating Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) thermodynamic profiles into WRF (using WRF-Var and assigning more appropriate error weighting to the profiles) to improve regional analysis and heavy precipitation forecasts. Successful early work has led to more recent research utilizing WRF and GSI for applications including the assimilation of AIRS profiles to improve WRF forecasts of atmospheric rivers and assimilation of AIRS, Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) profiles to improve model representation of tropopause folds and associated non-convective wind events. Although more hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles can be assimilated into model forecasts, one disadvantage is the retrieved profiles have traditionally been assigned the

  7. Assignment of the Fundamental Modes of Hydroxyacetone Using Gas-Phase Infrared, Far-Infrared, Raman, and ab Initio Methods: Band Strengths for Atmospheric Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenmaier, Rodica; Tipton, Nicole; Sams, Robert L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Williams, Stephen D.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2016-08-04

    Hydroxyacetone (acetol) is a simple organic molecule of interest in both the astrophysical and atmospheric communities, having recently been observed in biomass burning events, as well as a known degradation product of isoprene oxidation. However, its vibrational assignment has never been fully completed, and few quantitative data are available for its detection via infrared spectroscopy. Our recent acquisition of both the pressure-broadened gas-phase data and the far-IR spectra now allow for unambiguous assignment of several (new) bands. In particular, the observed C-type bands of several fundamentals (particularly in the far-infrared) and a few combination bands demonstrate that the monomer is in a planar (Cs) conformation, at least a majority of the time. As suggested by other researchers, the monomer is a cis-cis conformer stabilized by an intramolecular O—H···O=C hydrogen bond forming a five-membered planar ring structure. Band assignments in the Cs point group are justified (at least for a good fraction of the molecules in the ensemble) by the presence of the C-type bands. The results and band assignments are well confirmed by both ab initio MP2-ccpvtz calculations as well as GAMESS (B3LYP) theoretical calculations. In addition, using vetted methods for quantitative measurements, we report the first IR absorption band strengths of acetol (also in electronic format) that can be used for atmospheric monitoring and other applications.

  8. Near-infrared spectro-interferometry of Mira variables and comparisons to 1D dynamic model atmospheres and 3D convection simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Wittkowski, M; Freytag, B; Scholz, M; Hoefner, S; Karovicova, I; Whitelock, P A

    2016-01-01

    We obtained a total of 20 near-infrared K-band spectro-interferometric snapshot observations of the Mira variables o Cet, R Leo, R Aqr, X Hya, W Vel, and R Cnc with a spectral resolution of about 1500. We compared observed flux and visibility spectra with predictions by CODEX 1D dynamic model atmospheres and with azimuthally averaged intensities based on CO5BOLD 3D dynamic model atmospheres including convection. Our visibility data confirm the presence of spatially extended molecular atmospheres located above the continuum radii with large-scale inhomogeneities or clumps that contribute a few percent of the total flux. The detailed structure of the inhomogeneities or clumps show a variability on time scales of 3 months and above. Both modeling attempts provided satisfactory fits to our data. In particular, they are both consistent with the observed decrease in the visibility function at molecular bands of water vapor and CO, indicating a spatially extended molecular atmosphere. Observational variability phase...

  9. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. IV. Oxygen diagnostics in extremely metal-poor red giants with infrared OH lines

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrovolskas, V; Bonifacio, P; Caffau, E; Ludwig, H -G; Steffen, M; Spite, M

    2015-01-01

    Context. Although oxygen is an important tracer of Galactic chemical evolution, measurements of its abundance in the atmospheres of the oldest Galactic stars are still scarce and rather imprecise. At the lowest end of the metallicity scale, oxygen can only be measured in giant stars and in most of cases such measurements rely on a single forbidden [O I] 630 nm line that is very weak and frequently blended with telluric lines. Although molecular OH lines located in the ultraviolet and infrared could also be used for the diagnostics, oxygen abundances obtained from the OH lines and the [O I] 630 nm line are usually discrepant to a level of ~0.3-0.4 dex. Aims. We study the influence of convection on the formation of the infrared (IR) OH lines and the forbidden [O I] 630 nm line in the atmospheres of extremely metal-poor (EMP) red giant stars. Methods. We used high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra of four EMP red giant stars obtained with the VLT CRIRES spectrograph. For each EMP star, 4-14 IR OH...

  10. Analysis on Infrared Spectrometer System Specification for Atmospheric Composition Detecting%大气成分探测红外光谱仪系统指标分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐卫红; 尉昊赟; 阴丽娜

    2013-01-01

    由温室气体引起的全球气候变化和环境污染已经受到全世界的广泛关注。进行大气成分探测,对于更好地了解温室效应产生的细节、大气分子的光化学性质对臭氧层的影响以及大气污染机制都具有重要意义。由于大气成分种类较多,其红外吸收光谱密集且复杂,因此大气成分探测仪器需要有较高的光谱分辨能力和信噪比。文章进行了大气成分探测的总体指标需求分析,并据此确定了大气成分探测红外光谱仪的主要技术指标。为了满足指标要求,该光谱仪采用傅里叶变换红外光谱仪的总体方案。通过仪器性能影响因素分析和系统优化,使得该仪器的最终设计结果满足指标要求。%Global climate change and environmental pollution caused by greenhouse gases has received ex-tensive attention all over the world. Detecting atmospheric composition is especial important for a better under-standing of the detail of the green house effect, the influences on the ozonosphere of atmospheric photochemistry, as well as the mechanism of the air pollution. Because the kinds of atmospheric composition and their infrared absorption spectral lines are very dense and complex, atmospheric composition instruments need to have high spectral resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This report briefly introduced the specification require-ment analysis for space atmospheric detecting, and the main specifications of the instrument for space atmospher-ic detecting are defined. For realizing the main specifications, the overall scheme of the instrument adopts Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIRS). The final design of the instrument meets the specifications through influence factor analysis and system optimization. Finally, the measurement result was given.

  11. The SARTre model for radiative transfer in spherical atmospheres and its application to the derivation of cirrus cloud properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendrock, J.

    2006-07-01

    Modeling of radiative transfer (RT) is one of the essentials of atmospheric remote sensing. It has been common to use separate models for the simulation of shortwave radiation dominated by scattering of sunlight and longwave radiation characterized by emission from trace gases. These days also shortwave instruments are operated in limb mode, which demand models taking the sphericity of the Earth and atmosphere into account. On the other hand, infrared and microwave sounders are increasingly being used for the observation of ice clouds, that necessitate the modeling of scattering by cloud particles. Both trends require RT models, that are capable of taking into account scattering as well as the sphericity of the atmosphere. This suggests a unified handling of short- and longwave radiation, which furthermore allows for a consistent evaluation of multispectral data. Focusing on these aspects, the RT-model SARTre ([Approximate] Spherical Atmospheric Radiative Transfer model) has been developed. To our knowledge, SARTre is the first model, that is capable of limb modeling in the ultraviolet, visible, near to far infrared, and microwave spectral region. Here, algorithm baseline, implementation, verification and validation of SARTre are presented. SARTre has been used to study effects of cirrus clouds on infrared limb emission spectra. An exemplary retrieval of cirrus parameters from MIPAS measurements is demonstrated, and the plausibility of the results is discussed. (orig.)

  12. Near-infrared spectro-interferometry of Mira variables and comparisons to 1D dynamic model atmospheres and 3D convection simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkowski, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Freytag, B.; Scholz, M.; Höfner, S.; Karovicova, I.; Whitelock, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We aim at comparing spectro-interferometric observations of Mira variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with the latest 1D dynamic model atmospheres based on self-excited pulsation models (CODEX models) and with 3D dynamic model atmospheres including pulsation and convection (CO5BOLD models) to better understand the processes that extend the molecular atmosphere to radii where dust can form. Methods: We obtained a total of 20 near-infrared K-band spectro-interferometric snapshot observations of the Mira variables o Cet, R Leo, R Aqr, X Hya, W Vel, and R Cnc with a spectral resolution of about 1500. We compared observed flux and visibility spectra with predictions by CODEX 1D dynamic model atmospheres and with azimuthally averaged intensities based on CO5BOLD 3D dynamic model atmospheres. Results: Our visibility data confirm the presence of spatially extended molecular atmospheres located above the continuum radii with large-scale inhomogeneities or clumps that contribute a few percent of the total flux. The detailed structure of the inhomogeneities or clumps show a variability on time scales of 3 months and above. Both modeling attempts provided satisfactory fits to our data. In particular, they are both consistent with the observed decrease in the visibility function at molecular bands of water vapor and CO, indicating a spatially extended molecular atmosphere. Observational variability phases are mostly consistent with those of the best-fit CODEX models, except for near-maximum phases, where data are better described by near-minimum models. Rosseland angular diameters derived from the model fits are broadly consistent between those based on the 1D and the 3D models and with earlier observations. We derived fundamental parameters including absolute radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities for our sources. Conclusions: Our results provide a first observational support for theoretical results that shocks induced by convection and pulsation in the

  13. Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Folmer, M. J.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), 32-km North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) interpolated to a 12-km grid, and 13-km Rapid Refresh analyses.

  14. Infrared limb emission measurements of aerosol in the troposphere and stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Griessbach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Altitude resolved aerosol detection in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS is a challenging task for remote sensing instruments. Here, we introduce a new method for detecting aerosol in the UTLS based on infrared limb emission measurements. The method applies an improved aerosol-cloud-index that indicates infrared limb spectra affected by aerosol and ice clouds. For the discrimination between aerosol and ice clouds we developed a new method based on brightness temperature difference correlations. The discrimination thresholds for the new method were derived from radiative transfer simulations (including scattering and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS/Envisat measurements obtained in 2011. The method not only reliably separates aerosol from ice clouds, but also provides characteristic yet overlapping correlation patterns for volcanic ash and sulfate aerosol. We demonstrate the value of the new approach for volcanic ash and sulfate aerosol originating from the Grímsvötn (Iceland, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (Chile and Nabro (Eritrea eruptions by comparing with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS volcanic ash and SO2 measurements.

  15. The Box Model and the Acoustic Sounder, a Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1979-01-01

    Concentrations of SO2 in a large city during a subsidence situation are predicted as a function of time by means of a simple box model and the predictions are compared to actual SO2 concentration measurements. The agreement between model results and measurements is found to be excellent. The model...... uses the height of the mixing layer as measured by means of an acoustic sounder. It is demonstrated that this height is a dominant factor in determining the variation of the SO2 concentration...

  16. Simulation of source intensity variations from atmospheric dust for solar occultation Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, K. S.; Toon, G. C.; Strong, K.

    2016-05-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer observing in solar occultation mode from orbit is ideally suited to detecting and characterizing vertical profiles of trace gases in the Martian atmosphere. This technique benefits from a long optical path length and high signal strength, and can have high spectral resolution. The Martian atmosphere is often subject to large quantities of suspended dust, which attenuates solar radiation along the line-of-sight. An instrument making solar occultation measurements scans the limb of the atmosphere continuously, and the optical path moves through layers of increasing or decreasing dust levels during a single interferogram acquisition, resulting in time-varying signal intensity. If uncorrected, source intensity variations (SIVs) can affect the relative depth of absorption lines, negatively impacting trace gas retrievals. We have simulated SIVs using synthetic spectra for the Martian atmosphere, and investigated different techniques to mitigate the effects of SIVs. We examined high-pass filters in the wavenumber domain, and smoothing methods in the optical path difference (OPD) domain, and conclude that using a convolution operator in the OPD domain can isolate the SIVs and be used to correct for it. We observe spectral residuals of less than 0.25% in both high- and low-dust conditions, and retrieved volume mixing ratio vertical profile differences on the order of 0.5-3% for several trace gases known to be present in the Martian atmosphere. These differences are smaller than those caused by adding realistic noise to the spectra. This work thus demonstrates that it should be possible to retrieve vertical profiles of trace gases in a dusty Martian atmosphere using solar occultation if the interferograms are corrected for the effects of dust.

  17. Inter-Comparison of Suomi NPP CrIS Radiances with AIRS and IASI toward Infrared Hyperspectral Benchmark Radiance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Chen, Y.; Jin, X.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on the newly-launched Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) and future Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) is a Fourier transform spectrometer that provides soundings of the atmosphere with 1305 spectral channels, over 3 wavelength ranges: LWIR (9.14 - 15.38 μm); MWIR (5.71 - 8.26 μm); and SWIR (3.92 - 4.64 μm). The SNPP CrIS, combined with the existed Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA Aqua and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on Metop-A and -B, will accumulate decades of hyperspectral spectral infrared measurements with high accuracy, which have potentials for climate monitoring and model assessments. In this presentation, we will 1) evaluate radiance consistency among AIRS, IASI, and CrIS, and 2) thus demonstrate that the CrIS SDR data from SNPP and JPSS can serve as a long-term reference benchmark for inter-calibration and climate-related study just like AIRS and IASI. In the first part of presentation, we will brief major postlaunch calibration and validation activities for SNPP CrIS performed by the NOAA STAR CrIS sensor data record (SDR) team, including the calibration parameter updates, instrument stability monitoring, and data processing quality assurance. Comprehensive assessments of the radiometric, spectral, geometric calibration of CrIS SDR will be presented. In addition, the preparation of CrIS SDR re-processing toward consistent Climate Data Records (CDRs) will be discussed. The purpose of this part is to provide a comprehensive overview of CrIS SDR data quality to the user community. In the second part, we will compare CrIS hyperspectral radiance measurements with the AIRS and IASI on Metop-A and -B to examine spectral and radiometric consistence and differences among three hyperspectral IR sounders. The SNPP CrIS, combined with AIRS and IASI, provide the first-ever inter-calibration opportunity because three hyperspectral IR sounders can observe the Earth and

  18. Cloud mask via cumulative discriminant analysis applied to satellite infrared observations: scientific basis and initial evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Amato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a classification method (Cumulative Discriminant Analysis of the Discriminant Analysis type to discriminate between cloudy and clear sky satellite observations in the thermal infrared. The tool is intended for the high spectral resolution infrared sounder (IRS planned for the geostationary METEOSAT (Meteorological Satellite Third Generation platform and uses IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer data as a proxy. The Cumulative Discriminant Analysis does not introduce biases intrinsic with the approximation of the probability density functions and is flexible enough to adapt to different strategies to optimize the cloud mask. The methodology is based on nine statistics computed from IASI spectral radiances, which exploit the high spectral resolution of the instrument and which effectively summarize information contained within the IASI spectrum. A Principal Component Analysis prior step is also introduced which makes the problem more consistent with the statistical assumptions of the methodology. An initial assessment of the scheme is performed based on global and regional IASI real data sets and cloud masks obtained from AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer and SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager imagers. The agreement with these independent cloud masks is generally well above 80%, except at high latitudes in their winter seasons.

  19. Cloud mask via cumulative discriminant analysis applied to satellite infrared observations: scientific basis and initial evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, U.; Lavanant, L.; Liuzzi, G.; Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Stuhlmann, R.; Tjemkes, S. A.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a classification method (cumulative discriminant analysis) of the discriminant analysis type to discriminate between cloudy and clear-sky satellite observations in the thermal infrared. The tool is intended for the high-spectral-resolution infrared sounder (IRS) planned for the geostationary METEOSAT (Meteorological Satellite) Third Generation platform and uses IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) data as a proxy. The cumulative discriminant analysis does not introduce biases intrinsic with the approximation of the probability density functions and is flexible enough to adapt to different strategies to optimize the cloud mask. The methodology is based on nine statistics computed from IASI spectral radiances, which exploit the high spectral resolution of the instrument and which effectively summarize information contained within the IASI spectrum. A principal component analysis prior step is also introduced, which makes the problem more consistent with the statistical assumptions of the methodology. An initial assessment of the scheme is performed based on global and regional IASI real data sets and cloud masks obtained from AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) imagers. The agreement with these independent cloud masks is generally well above 80 %, except at high latitudes in the winter seasons.

  20. Assessing the Atmospheric Impact of CF3CClH2 (HCFC-133a): Laboratory Measurements of OH Kinetics and UV and Infrared Absorption Spectra Combined with Model Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillen, M.; Bernard, F.; Fleming, E. L.; Jackman, C. H.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    CF3CClH2 (HCFC-133a) was recently detected in the atmosphere and its atmospheric mixing ratio has quadrupled over the last 10 years. As expected for this class of compound, HCFC-133a is both an ozone-depleting substance and a greenhouse gas. Precise knowledge of its atmospheric degradation and radiative efficiency is critical to understanding its effect upon the atmosphere. The predominant atmospheric loss process for HCFC-133a is via reaction with the OH radical, where the rate coefficient for this reaction is poorly constrained, especially below room temperature. UV photolysis is a minor loss process, although large discrepancies exist among the reported spectrum measurements. The infrared spectrum of HCFC-133a is presently not available in the literature. The primary focus of this work was to reduce the uncertainties in the atmospheric loss processes of HCFC-133a and its radiative efficiency. Rate coefficient measurements for the OH + HCFC-133a reaction over the temperature range 233-397 K will be reported. In addition, UV absorption spectrum measurements over the wavelength (184.95-240 nm) and temperature (213-323 K) ranges and infrared absorption measurements from 500-4000 cm-1 will be reported. These results are used in 2-D atmospheric model calculations to quantify the atmospheric loss processes, atmospheric lifetime, ozone depletion potential, radiative efficiency, and global warming potential of HCFC-133a. These important metrics will enable informed policy decisions regarding HCFC-133a.

  1. Thermal infrared cross-sections of C{sub 2}F{sub 6} at atmospheric temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Q.; Sun, C.; Nemtchinov, V.; Varanasi, P. E-mail: pvaranasi@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

    2004-01-15

    Spectral absorption cross-sections, k{sub {nu}} (cm{sup -1} atm{sup -1}), have been measured in the 8.0 and 8.95 {mu}m bands of C{sub 2}F{sub 6}. Temperature and total (N{sub 2}-broadening) pressure have been varied to represent the conditions specified in various models of the terrestrial atmosphere so that the absorption cross-sections can be applied directly to the optical remote-sensing of C{sub 2}F{sub 6} in the atmosphere. The measured absolute intensities of the 8.0 and the 8.95 {mu}m bands are (1.636{+-}0.003)x10{sup -16} and (0.467{+-}0.0018)x10{sup -16} cm molecule{sup -1}, respectively.

  2. Validation of the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder Temperature and Geopotential Height Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, M. J.; Lambert, A.; Manney, G. L.; Read, W. G.; Livesey, N. J.; Froidevaux, L.; Ao, C. O.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Cofield, R. E.; Daffer, W. H.; Drouin, B. J.; Fetzer, E. J.; Fuller, R. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Jiang, J. H.; Jiang, Y. B.; Knosp, B. W.; Krueger, K.; Li, J.-L. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Pawson, S.; Russell, J. M., III; Santee, M. L.; Snyder, W. V.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the retrievals algorithm used to determine temperature and height from radiance measurements by the Microwave Limb Sounder on EOS Aura. MLS is a "limbscanning" instrument, meaning that it views the atmosphere along paths that do not intersect the surface - it actually looks forwards from the Aura satellite. This means that the temperature retrievals are for a "profile" of the atmosphere somewhat ahead of the satellite. Because of the need to view a finite sample of the atmosphere, the sample spans a box about 1.5km deep and several tens of kilometers in width; the optical characteristics of the atmosphere mean that the sample is representative of a tube about 200-300km long in the direction of view. The retrievals use temperature analyses from NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) data assimilation system as a priori states. The temperature retrievals are somewhat deperrdezt on these a priori states, especially in the lower stratosphere. An important part of the validation of any new dataset involves comparison with other, independent datasets. A large part of this study is concerned with such comparisons, using a number of independent space-based measurements obtained using different techniques, and with meteorological analyses. The MLS temperature data are shown to have biases that vary with height, but also depend on the validation dataset. MLS data are apparently biased slightly cold relative to correlative data in the upper troposphere and slightly warm in the middle stratosphere. A warm MLS bias in the upper stratosphere may be due to a cold bias in GEOS-5 temperatures.

  3. Near-infrared brightness of the Galilean satellites eclipsed in Jovian shadow: A new technique to investigate Jovian upper atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsumura, K. [Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Arimatsu, K.; Matsuura, S.; Shirahata, M.; Wada, T. [Department of Space Astronomy and Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronoutical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Egami, E. [Department of Astronomy, Arizona University, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hayano, Y.; Minowa, Y. [Hawaii Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Honda, C. [Research Center for Advanced Information Science and Technology, Aizu Research Cluster for Space Science, The University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, Fukushima 965-8589 (Japan); Kimura, J. [Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Kuramoto, K.; Takahashi, Y. [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Nakajima, K. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Nakamoto, T. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Surace, J., E-mail: tsumura@astr.tohoku.ac.jp [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    Based on observations from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Subaru Telescope, we have discovered that Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto are bright around 1.5 μm even when not directly lit by sunlight. The observations were conducted with non-sidereal tracking on Jupiter outside of the field of view to reduce the stray light subtraction uncertainty due to the close proximity of Jupiter. Their eclipsed luminosity was 10{sup –6}-10{sup –7} of their uneclipsed brightness, which is low enough that this phenomenon has been undiscovered until now. In addition, Europa in eclipse was <1/10 of the others at 1.5 μm, a potential clue to the origin of the source of luminosity. Likewise, Ganymede observations were attempted at 3.6 μm by the Spitzer Space Telescope, but it was not detected, suggesting a significant wavelength dependence. It is still unknown why they are luminous even when in the Jovian shadow, but forward-scattered sunlight by hazes in the Jovian upper atmosphere is proposed as the most plausible candidate. If this is the case, observations of these Galilean satellites while eclipsed by the Jovian shadow provide us with a new technique to investigate the Jovian atmospheric composition. Investigating the transmission spectrum of Jupiter by this method is important for investigating the atmosphere of extrasolar giant planets by transit spectroscopy.

  4. Evidence of Convective Redistribution of Carbon Monoxide in Aura Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyin, Michael; Douglass, Anne; Schoeberl, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Vertical convective transport is a key element of the tropospheric circulation. Convection lofts air from the boundary layer into the free troposphere, allowing surface emissions to travel much further, and altering the rate of chemical processes such as ozone production. This study uses satellite observations to focus on the convective transport of CO from the boundary layer to the mid and upper troposphere. Our hypothesis is that strong convection associated with high rain rate regions leads to a correlation between mid level and upper level CO amounts. We first test this hypothesis using the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model. We find the correlation is robust and increases as the precipitation rate (the strength of convection) increases. We next examine three years of CO profiles from the Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instruments aboard EOS Aura. Rain rates are taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B-42 multi-satellite product. Again we find a correlation between mid-level and upper tropospheric CO, which increases with rain rate. Our result shows the critical importance of tropical convection in coupling vertical levels of the troposphere in the transport of trace gases. The effect is seen most clearly in strong convective regions such as the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone.

  5. Internal energy deposition and ion fragmentation in atmospheric-pressure mid-infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Peter; Huang, Hehua; Vertes, Akos

    2012-02-21

    Mid-infrared laser ablation of water-rich targets at the maximum of the 2.94 μm absorption band is a two-step process initiated by phase explosion followed by recoil pressure induced material ejection. Particulates and/or droplets ejected by this high temperature high pressure process can be ionized for mass spectrometry by charged droplets from an electrospray. In order to gauge the internal energy introduced in this laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI®) process, we apply the survival yield method and compare the results with electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). The results indicate that LAESI yields ions with internal energies indistinguishable from those produced by ESI. This finding is consistent with the recoil pressure induced ejection of low micrometre droplets that does not significantly change the internal energy of solute molecules.

  6. THE OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF THE SUPER-EARTH GJ 1214b: FURTHER EVIDENCE FOR A METAL-RICH ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, Jacob L.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Stalder, Brian; Berta, Zachory K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kabath, Petr [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Seager, Sara [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Miller-Ricci Kempton, Eliza [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Homeier, Derek [Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, UMR 5574, CNRS, Universite de Lyon, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, 46 Allee d' Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Walsh, Shane [Australian Astronomical Observatory and Curtin Institute of Radio Astronomy, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Seifahrt, Andreas, E-mail: jbean@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    We present an investigation of the transmission spectrum of the 6.5 M{sub Circled-Plus} planet GJ 1214b based on new ground-based observations of transits of the planet in the optical and near-infrared, and on previously published data. Observations with the VLT + FORS and Magellan + MMIRS using the technique of multi-object spectroscopy with wide slits yielded new measurements of the planet's transmission spectrum from 0.61 to 0.85 {mu}m, and in the J, H, and K atmospheric windows. We also present a new measurement based on narrow-band photometry centered at 2.09 {mu}m with the VLT + HAWKI. We combined these data with results from a reanalysis of previously published FORS data from 0.78 to 1.00 {mu}m using an improved data reduction algorithm, and previously reported values based on Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. All of the data are consistent with a featureless transmission spectrum for the planet. Our K-band data are inconsistent with the detection of spectral features at these wavelengths reported by Croll and collaborators at the level of 4.1{sigma}. The planet's atmosphere must either have at least 70% H{sub 2}O by mass or optically thick high-altitude clouds or haze to be consistent with the data.

  7. Infrared spectroscopy of methoxyphenols involved as atmospheric secondary organic aerosol precursors: Gas-phase vibrational cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisset, A.; Coeur, C.; Mouret, G.; Ahmad, W.; Tomas, A.; Pirali, O.

    2016-08-01

    Methoxyphenols are emitted in the atmosphere from biomass burning and recent works have shown the potential role of these oxygenated aromatic species in the formation of secondary organic aerosols. IR spectroscopic data that would enable their remote measurement in the atmosphere remain scarce in the literature. Room temperature Far-IR cross-sections of 4 methoxyphenols (2-methoxyphenol or guaiacol, 3-methoxyphenol, 4-methoxyphenol and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol or syringol) have been determined using the THz synchrotron radiation available at SOLEIL. Mid- and near-IR regions have also been investigated with a conventional Fourier transform IR setup and allowed to provide a set of vibrational cross-sections of the studied methoxyphenols. Finally, gas-phase cross sections of two nitroguaiacol isomers (4-nitroguaiacol and 5-nitroguaiacol), two intermediate products involved in the formation of secondary organic aerosols have been measured in the mid- and near-IR with a heated multi-pass cell. Harmonic and anharmonic density functional theory calculations were carried out for all the studied compounds and allowed a full assignment of the recorded rovibrational bands.

  8. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Zhang, X.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    Data assimilation has been demonstrated very useful in improving both global and regional numerical weather prediction. Alaska has very coarser surface observation sites. On the other hand, it gets much more satellite overpass than lower 48 states. How to utilize satellite data to improve numerical prediction is one of hot topics among weather forecast community in Alaska. The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at University of Alaska is conducting study on satellite data assimilation for WRF model. AIRS/CRIS sounder profile data are used to assimilate the initial condition for the customized regional WRF model (GINA-WRF model). Normalized standard deviation, RMSE, and correlation statistic analysis methods are applied to analyze one case of 48 hours forecasts and one month of 24-hour forecasts in order to evaluate the improvement of regional numerical model from Data assimilation. The final goal of the research is to provide improved real-time short-time forecast for Alaska regions.

  9. Design of a flexible and low-power ionospheric sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Alex

    Characterizing the structure of the ionosphere has practical applications for telecommunications and scientific applications for studies of the near-Earth space environment. Among several methods for measuring parameters of the ionosphere is ionospheric sounding, a radar technique that determines the electron content of the ionosphere as a function of height. Various research, military, and commercial institutions operate hundreds of ground-based ionosondes throughout the globe, and new ionosondes continue to be deployed in increasingly remote and distant locations. This thesis presents the design of an ionospheric sounder that reduces the power, size, and cost compared to existing systems. Key improvements include the use of an open-source software-defined radio platform and channel-aware dynamic sounding scheduling.

  10. The Radiative Impact of Water Ice Clouds from a Reanalysis of Mars Climate Sounder Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, L.; Lewis, S.; Patel, M.

    2014-12-01

    We use a data assimilation scheme coupled to a global climate model (GCM) to investigate the radiative impact of water ice clouds in the atmosphere of Mars. Temperature profiles from Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) are assimilated directly into the GCM. The water ice opacity profiles are used to build a four-dimensional time-space map of water ice clouds, which is then used by the GCM to produce the radiative forcing associated with clouds. This procedure allows clouds to be inserted into the model at the correct time and location, producing the most realistic state from which to analyse cloud radiative effects. The resulting data set allows a detailed study of the atmospheric state that is not possible using observations or models alone. The results show that tropical clouds have a greater impact on the local atmosphere than polar hood clouds, increasing diurnally-averaged temperatures at the 10 Pa level by around 10-15 K. The small radiative impact of the polar hood clouds may be caused by limitations of the MCS retrieval algorithm, meaning optically thick near-surface clouds are not retrieved. Tropical clouds also strengthen the meridional overturning circulation, leading to increased temperatures in the polar warmings by around 6-8 K, and increased temperatures in the tropics by around 2 K due to increased dust loading. The positions and wind speeds of the tropical and high-latitude jets are also modified through changes to the meridional temperature gradients. Work is ongoing to couple the assimilation of ice opacities to a model including an active water cycle.

  11. Ground-based Infrared Observations of Water Vapor and Hydrogen Peroxide in the Atmosphere of Mars Near Summer Solstice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, Therese; Greathouse, T. K.; Bitner, M.; Kruger, A.; Lacy, J. H.; Richter, M. J.; Bezard, B.; Fouchet, T.; Lefevre, F.; Forget, F.; Atreya, S. K.

    2008-09-01

    Observations of HDO and H2O2 martian lines have been made with the TEXES instrument (Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility near summer solstice on two separate occasions, in Feb. 2001 (Ls = 110 deg.) and June 2008 (Ls = 80 deg.). Maps of HDO have been obtained by ratioing the depth of a weak HDO transition to the depth of a nearby CO2 line of comparable intensity. Both maps clearly show the maximum water vapor content in the vicinity of the north pole. The H2O2 molecule was not detected during the Feb. 2001 run (Encrenaz et al. AA 396, 1037-1044, 2002), but was marginally detectable during the June 2008 run. In both cases, the inferred H2O2 abundance is lower than the predictions of the GCM. This conclusion agrees with other observations performed near equinox (Ls = 332 deg., Encrenaz et al. Icarus 195, 547, 2008) while, in contrast, the observations for Ls = 206 deg. (beginning of southern spring) were in good agreement with the models (Encrenaz et al. Icarus 170, 424, 2004). The seasonal behaviour of hydrogen peroxide on Mars is not well understood and requires further investigation.

  12. Planetcam: A Visible And Near Infrared Lucky-imaging Camera To Study Planetary Atmospheres And Solar System Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Rojas, J.; Hueso, R.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; de Bilbao, L.; Murga, G.; Ariño, J.; Mendikoa, I.

    2012-10-01

    PlanetCam is a two-channel fast-acquisition and low-noise camera designed for a multispectral study of the atmospheres of the planets (Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune) and the satellite Titan at high temporal and spatial resolutions simultaneously invisible (0.4-1 μm) and NIR (1-2.5 μm) channels. This is accomplished by means of a dichroic beam splitter that separates both beams directing them into two different detectors. Each detector has filter wheels corresponding to the characteristic absorption bands of each planetary atmosphere. Images are acquired and processed using the “lucky imaging” technique in which several thousand images of the same object are obtained in a short time interval, coregistered and ordered in terms of image quality to reconstruct a high-resolution ideally diffraction limited image of the object. Those images will be also calibrated in terms of intensity and absolute reflectivity. The camera will be tested at the 50.2 cm telescope of the Aula EspaZio Gela (Bilbao) and then commissioned at the 1.05 m at Pic-duMidi Observatory (Franca) and at the 1.23 m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory in Spain. Among the initially planned research targets are: (1) The vertical structure of the clouds and hazes in the planets and their scales of variability; (2) The meteorology, dynamics and global winds and their scales of variability in the planets. PlanetCam is also expected to perform studies of other Solar System and astrophysical objects. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by the Spanish MICIIN project AYA2009-10701 with FEDER funds, by Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07 and by Universidad País Vasco UPV/EHU through program UFI11/55.

  13. The Sentinel-4 Mission: Instrument Description and Atmospheric Composition Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veihelmann, Ben; Meijer, Yasjka; Ingmann, Paul; Koopman, Rob; Bazalgette Courrèges-Lacoste, Grégory; Stark, Hendrik

    2013-04-01

    The Sentinel-4 mission, together with Sentinel-5 and the Sentinel-5 Precursor missions, is part of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) space component covering the Earth's atmosphere. The primary objective of the Sentinel-4 mission is the observation of the diurnal cycle of tropospheric species in support of the air quality applications of GMES Atmosphere Services. The presentation focuses on the Sentinel-4/UVN instrument and its related Level-2 atmospheric composition products. The Sentinel-4 instrument is an Ultra-violet Visible Near infrared spectrometer (S4/UVN) which is embarked on the geostationary Meteosat Third Generation-Sounder (MTG-S) platforms. Key features of the S4/UVN instrument are the spectral range from 305 nm to 500 nm with a spectral resolution of 0.5 nm, and from 750 nm to 775 nm with a spectral resolution of 0.12 nm, in combination with a low polarization sensitivity and a high radiometric accuracy. The instrument shall observe Europe with a revisit time of one hour. The spatial sampling distance varies across the geographic coverage area and takes a value of 8 km at a reference location at 45˚ N. The expected launch date of the first MTG-S platform is 2019, and the expected lifetime is 15 years (two S4/UVN instruments in sequence on two MTG-S platforms). ESA will develop products based on the S4/UVN measurements for the key target species, which are NO2, O3, HCHO, SO2, aerosols, and CHOCHO, and for cloud and surface properties (mainly intermediate products). Also a synergetic O3 vertical profile product is foreseen based on observations from the S4/UVN and the MTG InfraRed Sounder (IRS) on-board the same platform. Synergetic aerosol and cloud products are foreseen based on observations from the S4/UVN and from the MTG Flexible Combined Imager (FCI) on-board the MTG-Imager (MTG-I) platform. Current pre-development studies are dedicated to a daily surface reflectance map product that treats the surface directionality as

  14. 3D Reconfigurable NoC Multiprocessor Portable Sounder for Plasmaspheric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    The paper describes the development of a prototype imaging sounder for studying the irregularities of the ionospheric plasma. Cutting edge three-dimensional reconfigurable logic has been implemented allowing highly-intensive scientific calculations to be performed in hardware. The new parallel processing algorithms implemented offer a significant amount of performance improvement in the range of 80% compared to existing digital sounder implementations. The current system configuration is taking into consideration the modern scientific needs for portability during scientific campaigns. The prototype acts as a digital signal processing experimentation platform for future larger-scale digital sounder instrumentations for measuring complex planetary plasmaspheric environments.

  15. New Collections of Aura Atmospheric data Products at the GES DISC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James; Ahmad, Suraiya; Gerasimov, Irina; Lepthoukh, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) is the primary archive of atmospheric composition data from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), Microwave Limb sounder (MLS), and High-Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) instruments. The most recent versions of Aura OMI, MLS and HIRDLS data are available free to the public (http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/Aura). TES data are at ASDC (http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov).

  16. New and improved infrared absorption cross sections for dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Harrison

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite its widespread commercial use throughout the twentieth century, primarily in the refrigeration industry, dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12 is now known to have the undesirable effect of depleting stratospheric ozone. As this long-lived molecule slowly degrades in the atmosphere, monitoring its vertical concentration profile using infrared sounders on satellite platforms crucially requires accurate laboratory spectroscopic data. This work describes new high-resolution infrared absorption cross sections of dichlorodifluoromethane over the spectral range 800–1270 cm−1, determined from spectra recorded using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer (Bruker IFS 125HR and a 26 cm-pathlength cell. Spectra of dichlorodifluoromethane/dry synthetic air mixtures were recorded at resolutions between 0.01 and 0.03 cm−1 (calculated as 0.9/MOPD; MOPD = maximum optical path difference over a range of temperatures and pressures (7.5–761 Torr and 190–294 K appropriate for atmospheric conditions. This new cross-section dataset improves upon the one currently available in the HITRAN and GEISA databases.

  17. Near-infrared Brightness of the Galilean Satellites Eclipsed in Jovian Shadow: A New Technique to Investigate Jovian Upper Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Tsumura, K; Egami, E; Hayano, Y; Honda, C; Kimura, J; Kuramoto, K; Matsuura, S; Minowa, Y; Nakajima, K; Nakamoto, T; Shirahata, M; Surace, J; Takahashi, Y; Wada, T

    2014-01-01

    We have discovered that Europa, Ganymede and Callisto are bright around 1.5 {\\mu}m even when not directly lit by sunlight, based on observations from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Subaru Telescope. The observations were conducted with non-sidereal tracking on Jupiter outside of the field of view to reduce the stray light subtraction uncertainty due to the close proximity of Jupiter. Their eclipsed luminosity was $10^{-6}$-$10^{-7}$ of their uneclipsed brightness, which is low enough that this phenomenon has been undiscovered until now. In addition, Europa in eclipse was <1/10 of the others at 1.5 {\\mu}m, a potential clue to the origin of the source of luminosity. Likewise, Ganymede observations were attempted at 3.6 {\\mu}m by the Spitzer Space Telescope but it was not detected, suggesting a significant wavelength dependence. The reason why they are luminous even when in the Jovian shadow is still unknown, but forward-scattered sunlight by haze in the Jovian upper atmosphere is proposed as the most pla...

  18. Design and characterization of the balloon-borne Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS-B2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl-Vallon, Felix; Maucher, Guido; Seefeldner, Meinhard; Trieschmann, Olaf; Kleinert, Anne; Lengel, Anton; Keim, Corneli; Oelhaf, Hermann; Fischer, Herbert

    2004-06-01

    MIPAS-B2 is a balloon-borne limb-emission sounder for atmospheric research. The heart of the instrument is a Fourier spectrometer that covers the mid-infrared spectral range (4-14 microns) and operates at cryogenic temperatures. Essential for this application is the sophisticated line-of-sight stabilization system, which is based on an inertial navigation system and is supplemented with an additional star reference system. The major scientific benefit of the instrument is the simultaneous detection of complete trace gas families in the stratosphere without restrictions concerning the time of day and viewing directions. The specifications, the design considerations, the actual realization of the instrument, and the results of characterization measurements that have been performed are described.

  19. Real Time Meteorological Applications Of The Geostationary Satellite Sounder On Goes-6: Battling The Computer, Code And Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, C. M.; Schreiner, J. S.

    1984-08-01

    From the beginning of December 1983 through mid-February 1984 the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) carried out an exercise to deliver temperature and moisture profiles, derived from the GOES-6 VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS), to the National Meteorological Center (NMC) in time for input to the operational forecast at 1330 GMT. The purpose was to provide meteorological data coverage over the data sparse eastern Pacific (FPAC) where timely polar orbiting satellite data are not available. Although a product was delivered only 40 percent of the time, the experiment successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a totally automated VAS retrieval procedure. Data reliability achieved at the EPAC scale appears to be good, though lack of independent verification data requires that forecast impact studies delineate their ultimate value.

  20. A sensitivity study for far infrared balloon-borne limb emission sounding of stratospheric trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a sensitivity study performed for trace gases retrieval from synthetic observations by TELIS (TErahertz and submillimeter LImb Sounder which is a stratospheric balloon-borne cryogenic heterodyne spectrometer. Issues pertaining to hydroxyl radical (OH retrieval from the far infrared measurements by the 1.8 THz channel are addressed. The study is conducted by a retrieval code PILS (Profile Inversion for Limb Sounding developed to solve the nonlinear inverse problems arising in the analysis of infrared/microwave limb sounding measurements. PILS combines a line-by-line forward model with automatic differentiation for computing Jacobians and employs regularized nonlinear least squares inversion. We examine the application of direct and iterative regularization methods and evaluate the performance of single- and multi-profile retrievals. Sensitivities to expected errors in calibration procedure, instrumental knowledge and atmospheric profiles have been analyzed. Nonlinearity effect, inaccurate sideband ratio, and pointing error turned out to be the dominant error sources. Furthermore, the capability of multi-channel simultaneous retrieval from the far infrared and submillimeter data has been investigated. The errors and averaging kernels infer that the quality of the obtained hydrogen chloride (HCl can be improved by significantly better exploitation of information from the observations.

  1. Deep thermal infrared imaging of HR 8799 bcde: new atmospheric constraints and limits on a fifth planet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currie, Thayne; Cloutier, Ryan; Jayawardhana, Ray [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Science, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Girard, Julien H. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Fukagawa, Misato [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Sorahana, Satoko [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kuchner, Marc [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kenyon, Scott J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Itoh, Yoichi [Nishi-Harima Astronomical Observatory, Center for Astronomy, University of Hyago, 407-2 Nishigaichi, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan); Matsumura, Soko [School of Engineering, Physics, and Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Pyo, Tae-Soo [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 N. Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We present new L' (3.8 μm) and Brα (4.05 μm) data and reprocessed archival L' data for the young, planet-hosting star HR 8799 obtained with Keck/NIRC2, VLT/NaCo, and Subaru/IRCS. We detect all four HR 8799 planets in each data set at a moderate to high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≳ 6-15). We fail to identify a fifth planet, 'HR 8799 f', at r < 15 AU at a 5σ confidence level: one suggestive, marginally significant residual at 0.''2 is most likely a point-spread function artifact. Assuming companion ages of 30 Myr and the Baraffe planet cooling models, we rule out an HR 8799 f with a mass of 5 M{sub J} (7 M{sub J} ), 7 M{sub J} (10 M{sub J} ), or 12 M{sub J} (13 M{sub J} ) at r {sub proj} ∼ 12 AU, 9 AU, and 5 AU, respectively. All four HR 8799 planets have red early T dwarf-like L' – [4.05] colors, suggesting that their spectral energy distributions peak in between the L' and M' broadband filters. We find no statistically significant difference in HR 8799 cde's color. Atmosphere models assuming thick, patchy clouds appear to better match HR 8799 bcde's photometry than models assuming a uniform cloud layer. While non-equilibrium carbon chemistry is required to explain HR 8799 b and c's photometry/spectra, evidence for it from HR 8799 d and e's photometry is weaker. Future, deep-IR spectroscopy/spectrophotometry with the Gemini Planet Imager, SCExAO/CHARIS, and other facilities may clarify whether the planets are chemically similar or heterogeneous.

  2. Technical Note: Improved total atmospheric water vapour amount determination from near-infrared filter measurements with sun photometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mavromatakis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we explore the effect of the contribution of the solar spectrum to the recorded signal in wavelengths outside the typical 940-nm filter's bandwidth. We employ gaussian-shaped filters as well as actual filter transmission curves, mainly AERONET data, to study the implications imposed by the non-zero out-of-band contribution to the coefficients used to derive precipitable water from the measured water vapour band transmittance. Published parameterized transmittance functions are applied to the data to determine the filter coefficients. We also introduce an improved, three-parameter, fitting function that can describe the theoretical data accurately, with significantly less residual effects than with the existing functions. The moderate-resolution SMARTS radiative transfer code is used to predict the incident spectrum outside the filter bandpass for different atmospheres, solar geometries and aerosol optical depths. The high-resolution LBLRTM radiative transfer code is used to calculate the water vapour transmittance in the 940-nm band. The absolute level of the out-of-band transmittance has been chosen to range from 10−6 to 10−4, and typical response curves of commercially available silicon photodiodes are included into the calculations.

    It is shown that if the out-of-band transmittance effect is neglected, as is generally the case, then the derived columnar water vapour is mainly underestimated by a few percents. The actual error depends on the specific out-of-band transmittance, optical air mass of observation and water vapour amount. Further investigations will use experimental data from field campaigns to validate these findings.

  3. The Sentinel-4 Mission and its Atmospheric Composition Producs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veihelmann, Ben; Meijer, Yasjka; Ingmann, Paul; Koopman, Rob; Wright, Norrie; Courreges-Lacoste, Gregory Bazalgette; Bagnasco, Glorgio

    2016-08-01

    The Sentinel-4 (S4) mission is an element of the Copernicus Space Component dedicated to atmospheric composition. The mission is implemented as an Ultra- violet Visible Near infrared spectrometer (S4/UVN) embarked on the geostationary Meteosat Third Generation-Sounder (MTG-S) platforms (see Fig. 1). The S4/UVN instrument measures Earth radiance and solar irradiance over Europe with a revisit time of one hour and a spatial sampling distance of 8 km (at the reference location at 45°N). The mission will provide hourly measurements of tropospheric amounts of NO2 (Nitrogen dioxide), O3 (Ozone), SO2 (Sulfur dioxide), HCHO (Formaldehyde), CHOCHO (glyoxal), and aerosols in support of the air quality applications of the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Services. Two S4/UVN instruments will be embarked on the geostationary MTG-S platforms. The Flight Acceptance Review of the first MTG-S satellite is expected to take place in the first quarter of 2021. The expected S4 mission lifetime spans 15 years.

  4. Accurate spectroscopic characterization of oxirane: A valuable route to its identification in Titan's atmosphere and the assignment of unidentified infrared bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzzarini, Cristina [Dipartimento di Chimica " Giacomo Ciamician," Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo, E-mail: cristina.puzzarini@unibo.it [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-04-20

    In an effort to provide an accurate spectroscopic characterization of oxirane, state-of-the-art computational methods and approaches have been employed to determine highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and rotational parameters. Available experimental data were used to assess the reliability of our computations, and an accuracy on average of 10 cm{sup –1} for fundamental transitions as well as overtones and combination bands has been pointed out. Moving to rotational spectroscopy, relative discrepancies of 0.1%, 2%-3%, and 3%-4% were observed for rotational, quartic, and sextic centrifugal-distortion constants, respectively. We are therefore confident that the highly accurate spectroscopic data provided herein can be useful for identification of oxirane in Titan's atmosphere and the assignment of unidentified infrared bands. Since oxirane was already observed in the interstellar medium and some astronomical objects are characterized by very high D/H ratios, we also considered the accurate determination of the spectroscopic parameters for the mono-deuterated species, oxirane-d1. For the latter, an empirical scaling procedure allowed us to improve our computed data and to provide predictions for rotational transitions with a relative accuracy of about 0.02% (i.e., an uncertainty of about 40 MHz for a transition lying at 200 GHz).

  5. Generation of highly charged peptide and protein ions by atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted infrared laser desorption/ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Simone; Kollas, Oliver; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2007-07-15

    We show that highly charged ions can be generated if a pulsed infrared laser and a glycerol matrix are employed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with a quadrupole ion trap. Already for small peptides like bradykinin, doubly protonated ions form the most abundant analyte signal in the mass spectra. The center of the charge-state distribution increases with the size of the analyte. For example, insulin is detected with a most abundant ion signal corresponding to a charge state of four, whereas for cytochrome c, the 10 times protonated ion species produces the most intense signal. Myoglobin is observed with up to 13 charges. The high m/z ratios allow us to use the Paul trap for the detection of MALDI-generated protein ions that are, owing to their high molecular weight, not amenable in their singly protonated charge state. Formation of multiple charges critically depends on the addition of diluted acid to the analyte-matrix solution. Tandem mass spectra generated by collision-induced dissociation of doubly charged peptides are also presented. The findings allow speculations about the involvement of electrospray ionization processes in these MALDI experiments.

  6. MIPAS: an instrument for atmospheric and climate research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fischer

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available MIPAS, the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding, is a mid-infrared emission spectrometer which is part of the core payload of ENVISAT. It is a limb sounder, i.e. it scans across the horizon detecting atmospheric spectral radiances which are inverted to vertical temperature, trace species and cloud distributions. These data can be used for scientific investigations in various research fields including dynamics and chemistry in the altitude region between upper troposphere and lower thermosphere.

    The instrument is a well calibrated and characterized Fourier transform spectrometer which is able to detect many trace constituents simultaneously. The different concepts of retrieval methods are described including multi-target and two-dimensional retrievals. Operationally generated data sets consist of temperature, H2O, O3, CH4, N2O, HNO3, and NO2 profiles. Measurement errors are investigated in detail and random and systematic errors are specified. The results are validated by independent instrumentation which has been operated at ground stations or aboard balloon gondolas and aircraft. Intercomparisons of MIPAS measurements with other satellite data have been carried out, too. As a result, it has been proven that the MIPAS data are of good quality.

    MIPAS can be operated in different measurement modes in order to optimize the scientific output. Due to the wealth of information in the MIPAS spectra, many scientific results have already been published. They include intercomparisons of temperature distributions with ECMWF data, the derivation of the whole NOy family, the study of atmospheric processes during the Antarctic vortex split in September 2002, the determination of properties of Polar Stratospheric Clouds, the downward transport of NOx in the middle atmosphere, the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, the influence of solar variability on the

  7. Wavelet-based coding of ultraspectral sounder data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Vilchez, Fernando; Serra-Sagrista, Joan; Auli-Llinas, Francesc

    2005-08-01

    In this paper we provide a study concerning the suitability of well-known image coding techniques originally devised for lossy compression of still natural images when applied to lossless compression of ultraspectral sounder data. We present here the experimental results of six wavelet-based widespread coding techniques, namely EZW, IC, SPIHT, JPEG2000, SPECK and CCSDS-IDC. Since the considered techniques are 2-dimensional (2D) in nature but the ultraspectral data are 3D, a pre-processing stage is applied to convert the two spatial dimensions into a single spatial dimension. All the wavelet-based techniques are competitive when compared either to the benchmark prediction-based methods for lossless compression, CALIC and JPEG-LS, or to two common compression utilities, GZIP and BZIP2. EZW, SPIHT, SPECK and CCSDS-IDC provide a very similar performance, while IC and JPEG2000 improve the compression factor when compared to the other wavelet-based methods. Nevertheless, they are not competitive when compared to a fast precomputed vector quantizer. The benefits of applying a pre-processing stage, the Bias Adjusted Reordering, prior to the coding process in order to further exploit the spectral and/or spatial correlation when 2D techniques are employed, are also presented.

  8. Fluvial Morphodynamics: advancing understanding using Multibeam Echo Sounders (MBES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Accurately and reliably determining riverbed morphology is key to understanding linkages between flow fields, sediment transport and bed roughness in a range of aquatic environments, including large fluvial channels. Modern shallow-water multibeam echo sounder (MBES) systems are now allowing us to acquire bathymetric data at unprecedented resolutions that are millimetric in precision and centimetric in accuracy. Such systems, and the morphological resolution they can supply, are capable of revealing the complex three-dimensional patterns in riverbed morphology that are facilitating a holistic examination of system morphodynamics, at the field scale, that was unimaginable just a few years ago. This paper presents a range of MBES acquired examples to demonstrate how the methodological developments in this technology are leading to advances in our substantive understanding of large river systems. This includes examples that show linkages across scales, and in particular the morphodynamics of superimposed bedforms and bars revealed by such high-resolution data, which have broad implications for a range of applications, including flood prediction, engineering design and reconstructing ancient sedimentary environments.

  9. ESA's atmospheric composition and dynamics mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, Thorsten; Laur, Henri; Hoersch, Bianca; Ingmann, Paul; Wehr, Tobias; Langen, Joerg; Veihelmann, Ben

    For almost 15 years, ESA is providing atmospheric chemistry and composition information to the user community. In 1995, this commitment started with the GOME instrument on-board ERS-2. This mission was continued and extended with the GOMOS, MIPAS and SCIAMACHY instruments on-board of ENVISAT launched in 2002. ESA is prepared to continue Envisat through 2013 in the frame of the mission extension. To respond to GMES requirements, ESA develops the Sentinel 5 Precursor mission to be launched in 2014, to continue and improve the European measurement capabilities initiated with GOME and SCIAMACHY, and continued with EUMETSAT's GOME-2 and the Dutch OMI instrument on the NASA Aura platform. In addition the Sentinel 4 and 5 missions are prepared, further improving the monitoring capabilities with geostationary observation capabilities and continuing the Low Earth Orbit Sentinel 5 Precursor well beyond 2025. At the same time, ESA is preparing two atmospheric Earth Explorer Missions. With ADM-Aeolus, a novel lidar system for the retrieval of wind speed vectors from space is being developed and planned to be launched in 2012. EarthCARE will investigate the Clouds-Aerosol-radiation-interaction with a lidar, cloud radar (provided by JAXA), multi-spectral imager and broad band radiometric instruments collocated on one platform. A major goal is the development of synergistic retrievals exploiting information from different sensors in one algorithm. The mission is planned to start in 2014. In parallel the Phase A studies for the ESA Earth Explorer 7 are ongoing. One of the three candidate missions is PREMIER, an infrared limb-imaging spectrometer and millimetre-wave limb-sounder planned to be launched in 2016. In addition the call of ideas for the Earth Explorer 8 has been published and the corresponding Letters of Intend have been received, including a number of proposals for mission in the atmospheric composition and dynamics domain. At the same time, the access to ESA Third

  10. Atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization using a 6-7 µm-band mid-infrared tunable laser and liquid water matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraguchi, Ryuji; Hazama, Hisanao; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    Due to the characteristic absorption peaks in the IR region, various molecules can be used as a matrix for infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (IR-MALDI). Especially in the 6-7 µm-band IR region, solvents used as the mobile phase for liquid chromatography have absorption peaks that correspond to their functional groups, such as O-H, C=O, and CH3. Additionally, atmospheric pressure (AP) IR-MALDI, which is applicable to liquid-state samples, is a promising technique to directly analyze untreated samples. Herein we perform AP-IR-MALDI mass spectrometry of a peptide, angiotensin II, using a mid-IR tunable laser with a tunable wavelength range of 5.50-10.00 µm and several different matrices. The wavelength dependences of the ion signal intensity of [M + H](+) of the peptide are measured using a conventional solid matrix, α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) and a liquid matrix composed of CHCA and 3-aminoquinoline. Other than the O-H stretching and bending vibration modes, the characteristic absorption peaks are useful for AP-IR-MALDI. Peptide ions are also observed from an aqueous solution of the peptide without an additional matrix, and the highest peak intensity of [M + H](+) is at 6.00 µm, which is somewhat shorter than the absorption peak wavelength of liquid water corresponding to the O-H bending vibration mode. Moreover, long-lasting and stable ion signals are obtained from the aqueous solution. AP-IR-MALDI using a 6-7 µm-band IR tunable laser and solvents as the matrix may provide a novel on-line interface between liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

  11. Evolution of microwave limb sounder ozone and the polar vortex during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manney, G. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.; Zurek, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of polar ozone observed by the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is described for the northern hemisphere (NH) winters of 1991/1992, 1992/1993, and 1993/1994 and the southern hemisphere (SH) winters of 1992 and 1993. Imterannual and interhemispheric variability in polar ozone evolution are closely related to differences in the polar vortex and to the frequency, duration and strength of stratospheric sudden warmings. Ozone in the midstratospheric vortices increases during the winter, with largest increases associated with stratospheric warmings and a much larger increase in the NH than in the SH. A smaller NH increase was observed in 1993/1994, when the middle stratospheric vortex was stronger. During strong stratospheric warmings in the NH, the upper stratospheric vortex may be so much eroded that it presents little barrier to poleward transport; in contrast, the SH vortex remains strong throughout the stratosphere during wintertime warmings, and ozone increases only below the mixing ratio peak, due to enhanced diabatic descent. Ozone mixing ratios decrease rapidly in the lower stratosphere in both SH late winters, as expected from chemical destruction due to enhanced reactive chlorine. The interplay between dynamics and chemistry is more complex in the NH lower stratosphere and interannual variability is greater. Evidence has previously been shown for chemical ozone destruction in the 1991/1992 and 1992/1993 winters. We show here evidence suggesting some chemical destruction in late February and early March 1994. In the NH late winter lower stratosphere the pattern of high-ozone values (typical of the vortex) seen in mid-latitudes is related to the strength of the lower-stratospheric vortex, with the largest areal extent of high ozone outside the vortex in 1994, when the lower stratospheric vortex is relatively weak, and the least extent in 1993 when the lower stratospheric vortex is strongest.

  12. Seasonal and diel patterns in sedimentary flux of krill fecal pellets recorded by an echo sounder

    KAUST Repository

    Røstad, Anders

    2013-11-01

    We used a moored upward-facing 200 kHz echo sounder to address sedimentation of fecal pellets (FPs) from dielly migrating Meganyctiphanes norvegica. The echo sounder was located on the bottom at 150 m depth in the Oslofjord, Norway, and was cabled to shore for continuous measurements during winter and spring. Records of sinking pellets were for the first time observed with an echo sounder. Seasonal patterns of sedimentation of krill FPs were strongly correlated with data from continuous measurement of fluorescence, which illustrate the development of the spring bloom. Sedimenting particles were first observed as fluorescence values started to increase at the end of February and continued to increase until the bloom suddenly culminated at the end of March. This collapse of the bloom was detected on the echo sounder as a pulse of slowly sinking acoustic targets over a 2 d period. Prior to this event, there was a strong diel pattern in sedimentation, which correlated, with some time lag, with the diel migration of krill foraging at night near the surface. Pellet average sinking speeds ranged between 423 m d−1 and 804 m d−1, with a strong relation to pellet target strength, which is an acoustic proxy for size. This novel approach shows that echo sounders may be a valuable tool in studies of vertical pellet flux and, thereby, carbon flux, providing temporal resolution and direct observation of the sedimentation process, which are not obtained from standard methods.

  13. Development of the new shape PZT ceramics sounder suitable for a sound source of artificial larynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooe, Katsutoshi; Kanetake, Ryota; Sugio, Yuuichi; Tanaka, Akimitsu

    2007-12-01

    Various speech production substitutes, which aim to reconstruct speech functions, have been developed and used practically by speech impaired individuals. However, conventional speech production substitutes have various drawbacks; therefore, perfect speech production substitutes are expected to be developed. We focused on the PZT ceramics sounder as a sound source in an electric drive artificial larynx. We first developed the artificial larynx that uses a PZT ceramic sounder and then evaluated its performance. The vocalized sound of the artificial larynx user shows good characteristics at the formant frequency, which is important for vowel discrimination. The characteristic feature of our artificial larynx is its individual structure, and this typical structure implies that the sound source and the implant are separated. This structure facilitates a high biocompatibility in our artificial larynx. In our previous work, the improvement in the acoustic characteristics of the sound source was described. The improvement is achieved by the optimization of the electric control and its structure. In this paper, we present the results of shape optimization and new shape PZT ceramics sounder evaluation. The optimized shape is decided on FEM analysis, and prototype PZT ceramics sounder based on above analysis is manufactured by way of trial. Additionally, the performance of prototype sounder is evaluated by acoustic analysis. Until now, we have researched about the immobilization of biomolecules onto the metal surface. It is believed that biomolecular immobilization on the sound source surface improves its biocompatibility. In the future, we aim to realize implantable sound sources that employ biomolecular immobilization technology.

  14. New and improved infrared absorption cross sections for chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.

    2016-06-01

    The most widely used hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) commercially since the 1930s has been chloro-difluoromethane, or HCFC-22, which has the undesirable effect of depleting stratospheric ozone. As this molecule is currently being phased out under the Montreal Protocol, monitoring its concentration profiles using infrared sounders crucially requires accurate laboratory spectroscopic data. This work describes new high-resolution infrared absorption cross sections of chlorodifluoromethane over the spectral range 730-1380 cm-1, determined from spectra recorded using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer (Bruker IFS 125HR) and a 26 cm pathlength cell. Spectra of chlorodifluoromethane/dry synthetic air mixtures were recorded at resolutions between 0.01 and 0.03 cm-1 (calculated as 0.9/MOPD; MOPD denotes the maximum optical path difference) over a range of temperatures and pressures (7.5-762 Torr and 191-295 K) appropriate for atmospheric conditions. This new cross-section dataset improves upon the one currently available in the HITRAN (HIgh-resolution TRANsmission) and GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques) databases; in particular it provides coverage over a wider range of pressures and temperatures, has more accurate wavenumber scales, more consistent integrated band intensities, improved signal-to-noise, is free of channel fringing, and additionally covers the ν2 and ν7 bands.

  15. Ultra-Wideband Channel Sounder – Design, Construction and Selected Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zetik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes construction, design, and application of a real-time ultra-wideband channel sounder. Its specific architecture allows measurements of time-variant radio propagation channels in different frequency bands. The sounder’s stimulation signal is the maximum length binary sequence. Synchronous multi-channel operation is supported by its excellent timing stability and by its low power consumption of miniature sized low temperature co-fired ceramics modules that comprise custom integrated SiGe circuits. This is a prerequisite to build a multiple-input-multiple-output sounder which is suitable for sounding even in distributed scenarios such as sensor networks. Selected application examples demonstrated the performance and possibilities of the sounder.

  16. Summer atmospheric circulation anomalies over the Arctic Ocean and their influences on September sea ice extent: A cautionary tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serreze, Mark C.; Stroeve, Julienne; Barrett, Andrew P.; Boisvert, Linette N.

    2016-10-01

    Numerous studies have addressed links between summer atmospheric circulation patterns and interannual variability and the downward trend in total September Arctic sea ice extent. In general, low extent is favored when the preceding summer is characterized by positive sea level pressure (SLP) anomalies over the central Arctic Ocean north of Alaska. High extent is favored when low pressure dominates. If such atmospheric patterns could be predicted several months out, these links provide an avenue for improved seasonal predictability of total September extent. We analyze detrended September extent time series (1979-2015), atmospheric reanalysis fields, ice age and motion, and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder data, to show that while there is merit to this summer circulation framework, it has limitations. Large departures in total September extent relative to the trend line are preceded by a wide range of summer circulation patterns. While patterns for the four years with the largest positive departures in September extent have below average SLP over the central Arctic Ocean, they differ markedly in the magnitude and location of pressure and air temperature anomalies. Differences in circulation for the four years with the largest negative departures are equally prominent. Circulation anomalies preceding Septembers with ice extent close to the trend also have a wide range of patterns. In turn, years (such as 2013 and 2014) with almost identical total September extent were preceded by very different summer circulation patterns. September ice conditions can also be strongly shaped by events as far back as the previous winter or spring.

  17. Laser Sounder for Measuring Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations: Progress Toward Ascends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, J. B.; Kawa, S. R.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Sun, X.; Stephen, M. A.; Wilson, E.; Burris, J. F.; Mao, J.

    2008-01-01

    The next generation of space-based, active remote sensing instruments for measurement of tropospheric CO2 promises a capability to quantify global carbon sources and sinks at regional scales. Active (laser) methods will extend CO2 measurement coverage in time, space, and perhaps precision such that the underlying mechanisms for carbon exchange at the surface can be understood with .sufficient detail to confidently project the future of carbon-climate interaction and the influence of remediative policy actions. The recent Decadal Survey for Earth Science by the US National Research Council has recommended such a mission called the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) for launch in 2013-2016. We have been developing a laser technique for measurement of tropospheric CO2 for a number of years. Our immediate goal is to develop and demonstrate the method and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance over a horizontal path and from aircraft at the few-ppmv level. Our longer-term goal is to demonstrate the required capabilities of the technique, develop a space mission approach, and design the instrument for an ASCENDS-type mission. Our approach is to use a dual channel laser absorption spectrometer (i.e., differential absorption in altimeter mode), which continuously measures from a near-polar circular orbit. We use several co-aligned tunable fiber laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of the absorption from a CO2 line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the oxygen A-band (near 765 nm), and aerosol backscatter in the same measurement path. We measure the energy of the laser echoes at nadir reflected from land and water surfaces, day and night. The lasers have spectral widths much narrower than the gas absorption lines and are turned on and off the selected CO2 and O2 lines at kHz rates. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on and off-line singnals via the DIAL technique. We used pulsed laser signals, photon counting detectors, and time gating to isolate the laser returns from the surface, and to reject photons scattered from thin clouds and aerosols. High signal-to-noise ratios are required and the CO2 estimates can be sensitive to small drifts or other errors in the instrument, so the absorption estimates need to be quite stable for hours. We have constructed a breadboard version of the CO2 sensor that uses a low power fiber laser and a 20 cm diameter telescope. We have used it to make measurements of CO2 absorption in the laboratory and over 200-m to 2-km long open horizontal paths. These have been done in several sessions extending over multiple days, which allows us to assess the measurement stability and to compare absorption variations to readings from an external in situ CO2 sensor. We have also calculated characteristics of the technique for space including its expected measurement performance for different modulation types, and have performed an initial space mission accommodation study. We sill describe these results in the presentation.

  18. Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) mapping - Validation, early results and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, Lee S.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Waters, Joe

    1992-01-01

    The results of limitation studies performed with the UARS MLS are presented. A consistent set of algorithms allows the extraction of the spectral coefficients in time and longitude from asynoptically sampled satellite data and the subsequent reconstruction of synoptic maps from that spectral information. In addition to providing synoptic maps, the asynoptic technique allows the use of standard spectral analysis tools such as autocorrelation and cross correlation.

  19. CIRS-lite as a lightweight atmospheric sounder for Earth trace-gas science Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CIRS-lite is a lightweight  version of the CIRS 43-kg Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) currently returning data from Saturn.  CIRS-lite is of interest...

  20. The portable echo sounder-register for sounding of iol and gas wells

    OpenAIRE

    Naumenko, I. Ya.; Kizima, V. I.

    1997-01-01

    In Desing Bureau "Storm" a new original development, intended for use in oil and gas recoveries, namely the portable research echo sounder-register (echo sounder) for sounding of working oil and gas wells was made by the order of Joint Stock Company "Ukrnafta". Similar devices are usually applied for such jobs as measurement of static and dynamic levels of a liquid in casing annulus, measurement of distance from a well mouth to a hole bottom; detection of flaws in casing, and also breakages a...

  1. Ground-based Measurements of Vertical Profiles and Columns of Atmospheric Trace Gases Over Toronto Using a New High-Resolution Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiacek, A.; Yashcov, D.; Strong, K.; Boudreau, L.; Rochette, L.; Roy, C.

    2002-12-01

    The University of Toronto Atmospheric Observatory (TAO) has recently been established at Toronto, Canada. TAO includes several instruments, with a DA8 Fourier Transform Spectrometer (DA8 FTS, manufactured by ABB Bomem Inc., Québec, Canada) serving as the primary instrument at the facility. The geographic position of TAO (43.66°N, 79.40°W) makes it well suited for long-term measurements of mid-latitude stratospheric ozone and related species, while its urban setting enables measurements of tropospheric pollution. The DA8 FTS is based on a Michelson interferometer with a maximum optical path difference of 250 cm, providing a maximum unapodized resolution of 0.0026 cm-1. It is currently equipped with KBr and CaF2 beamsplitters, and InSb and HgCdTe detectors, for coverage of the spectral range from 700 to 4100 cm-1. A new heliostat (manufactured by Aim Controls Inc., California, USA) provides active solar tracking, collecting the incoming solar radiation and directing it into the FTS. The TAO DA8 FTS incorporates a new optical design recently developed by ABB Bomem Inc., which results in a fixed optical axis through the beamsplitter (and a fixed focal point on the detector) as well as a more stable modulation efficiency. The new instrument optics will be discussed. Next, the performance of the instrument will be examined in the context of standard NDSC (Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change) trace gas column and vertical profile retrieval techniques, which use least squares fitting algorithms (SFIT, SFIT2). TAO has been operational (weather permitting) since October 2001. We have been retrieving columns and vertical profiles of HCl, HF, CH4, OCS, C2H6, CO, N2O and NO2 since May 2002. A detailed error analysis of retrieved columns and vertical profiles has been undertaken for the above species. Future plans for the TAO FTS include comparing our measurements with satellite measurements made by MOPITT, OSIRIS, and the upcoming ACE and MAESTRO instruments

  2. Study on atmospheric transmittance of thermal infrared remote sensing(I):derivation of atmospheric transmittance model%热红外遥感中大气透过率的研究(一):大气透过率模式的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚绍琦; 孙海波; 王少峰; 国文哲; 李云梅

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric transmittance is an important parameter in the thermal infrared remote sensing. A multi-variable lookup table of atmospheric transmittance which includes atmospheric model, aerosol model, water vapor content, visibility and view zenith angle was constructed based on the radiation transfer model MODTRAN, effect of different parameters on thermal infrared atmospheric transmittance spectrums was analyzed, the key variables of atmospheric transmittance were determined by the analysis of variance. According to different types of aerosol model, the multi-variable linear regression models of atmospheric transmittance models were deduced based on the water vapor content, visibility and view zenith angle for common thermal infrared sensor channels, which will solve the problem on calculating accurately the atmospheric transmittance for the thermal infrared remote sensing by satellite.%大气透过率是热红外。感中的一个重要参数。通过辐射传输模型MODTRAN模拟热红外波段的大气透过率,构建了基于大气模型、气溶胶模型、水汽量、能见度和观测天顶角等5个因素的大气透过率查找表,分析了不同参数对热红外大气透过率光谱曲线的影响,通过方差分析确定了影响大气透过率的关键因子,针对不同类型的气溶胶模型,构建了基于水汽量、能见度和观测天顶角的常用卫星传感器热红外通道的大气透过率经验模式,解决了卫星热红外。感中大气透过率精确计算的问题。

  3. Using multi-beam echo sounder backscatter data for sediment classification in very shallow water environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amiri-Simkooei, A.R.; Snellen, M.; Simons, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    In a recent work described in Ref. [1], an angle-independent methodology was developed to use the multi-beam echo sounder backscatter (MBES) data for the seabed sediment classification. The method employs the backscatter data at a certain angle to obtain the number of sediment classes and to discrim

  4. P-sounder: an airborne P-band ice sounding radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Skou, Niels; Kusk, Anders

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the top-level design of an airborne, P-band ice sounding radar under development at the Technical University of Denmark. The ice sounder is intended to provide more information on the electromagnetic properties of the Antarctic ice sheet at P-band. A secondary objective...

  5. Single Site Location with Ionospheric Specification from Oblique-Incidence Sounders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    the sounder network has been made. Several tasks remain in the analysis of SSL- ICT data. Several of the other time periods in the data base can be...0, - , . , * - - 6 Elt -,R W CL CL a. a. a. a. a. a. I I * et I, 14 -NAI.,N I if. APPENDIX C Plots of tinV2 vs. cosx

  6. High-powered Radar Sounders for the Investigation of Jupiter's Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaeinili, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Edelstein, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    This talk will address the main drivers in the design of a radar sounder for the JIMO mission and provide a potential solution that will optimize the chances of success in the detection of ice/water interface and sub-surface stratigraphy.

  7. Whisper, a resonance sounder and wave analyser: Performances and perspectives for the Cluster mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decreau, P.M.E.; Fergeau, P.; KrannoselsKikh, V.;

    1997-01-01

    The WHISPER sounder on the Cluster spacecraft is primarily designed to provide an absolute measurement of the total plasma density within the range 0.2-80 cm(-3). This is achieved by means of a resonance sounding technique which has already proved successful in the regions to be explored. The wav...

  8. Direct assimilation of Chinese FY-3C Microwave Temperature Sounder-2 radiances in the global GRAPES system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Liu, Guiqing

    2016-07-01

    FengYun-3C (FY-3C) is an operational polar-orbiting satellite carrying the new-generation microwave sounding instruments in China. This paper describes the assimilation of the FY-3C Microwave Temperature Sounder-2 (MWTS-2) radiances in the Global and Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System (GRAPES) of China Meteorological Administration. A quality control (QC) procedure for the assimilation of MWTS-2 radiance is proposed. Extensive monitoring before assimilation shows that MWTS-2 observations exhibit a clear striping pattern. A technique combining principal component analysis (PCA) and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) is applied to the observations to remove the striping noise. Cloudy field-of-views (FOVs) are identified by applying the Visible and InfrarRed Radiometer (VIRR) cloud fraction threshold of 76 %. Other QC steps are conducted in the follow order: (i) coastal FOVs are removed, (ii) eight outmost FOVs are not used, (iii) channel 5 data over sea ice and land are not used, (iv) channel 6 observations are not used if the terrain altitudes are higher than 500 m, and (v) outliers with large differences between observations and model simulations are removed. Approximately 83, 75, 40, and 40 % of the observations are removed by the proposed QC for channels 5-8, respectively. After QC, the global biases and standard deviations are reduced significantly. The assimilation of the MWTS-2 radiances shows a positive impact when the control experiment assimilates only conventional observations. The experiments also show that the analysis and forecast errors are slightly reduced when the striping noise is removed from the observations. The quality control scheme of extracting the striping noise may contribute to the analysis and forecast accuracy. The impact of MWTS-2 is neutral when the conventional data and other satellite data are all assimilated.

  9. Using airborne HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) to evaluate model and remote sensing estimates of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberg, Christian; Kulawik, Susan S.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Chevallier, Frédéric; Daube, Bruce; Kort, Eric A.; O'Dell, Christopher; Olsen, Edward T.; Osterman, Gregory

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, space-borne observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) have been increasingly used in global carbon-cycle studies. In order to obtain added value from space-borne measurements, they have to suffice stringent accuracy and precision requirements, with the latter being less crucial as it can be reduced by just enhanced sample size. Validation of CO2 column-averaged dry air mole fractions (XCO2) heavily relies on measurements of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). Owing to the sparseness of the network and the requirements imposed on space-based measurements, independent additional validation is highly valuable. Here, we use observations from the High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) flights from 01/2009 through 09/2011 to validate CO2 measurements from satellites (Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite - GOSAT, Thermal Emission Sounder - TES, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder - AIRS) and atmospheric inversion models (CarbonTracker CT2013B, Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) v13r1). We find that the atmospheric models capture the XCO2 variability observed in HIPPO flights very well, with correlation coefficients (r2) of 0.93 and 0.95 for CT2013B and MACC, respectively. Some larger discrepancies can be observed in profile comparisons at higher latitudes, in particular at 300 hPa during the peaks of either carbon uptake or release. These deviations can be up to 4 ppm and hint at misrepresentation of vertical transport. Comparisons with the GOSAT satellite are of comparable quality, with an r2 of 0.85, a mean bias μ of -0.06 ppm, and a standard deviation σ of 0.45 ppm. TES exhibits an r2 of 0.75, μ of 0.34 ppm, and σ of 1.13 ppm. For AIRS, we find an r2 of 0.37, μ of 1.11 ppm, and σ of 1.46 ppm, with latitude-dependent biases. For these comparisons at least 6, 20, and 50 atmospheric soundings have been averaged for GOSAT, TES, and AIRS

  10. Comparative analysis of land, marine, and satellite observations of methane in the lower Atmosphere in the Russian Arctic under conditions of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, O. A.; Kokorev, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    Land, marine, and satellite observations have been used to study changes in methane concentrations in the lower atmosphere during the warm months of the year (July through October) in Arctic regions having different potentials for methane production. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data for 2002-2013 are used to explore the interplay between local methane sources in the terrestrial region of the Eurasian Arctic and on the Arctic shelf over the warm period of the year. Linear trends in atmospheric methane concentrations over different Arctic regions are calculated, and a hypothesis of the relation of concentration variations to climatic parameters is tested. The combination of land, marine, and satellite observation is used to develop a conceptual model of the atmospheric methane field in the terrestrial part of the Russian Arctic and on the Arctic shelf. It is shown that the modern methane growth rate in the Arctic does not exceed the Northern Hemisphere mean. It is concluded that the methane emission in the Arctic has little effect on global climate compared to other factors.

  11. NIST Infrared Blackbody Calibration Support for Climate Change Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, L. M.; Zeng, J.; Mekhontsev, S.; Khromchenko, V.

    2012-12-01

    The National Institute of Technology (NIST) Sensor Science Division has established measurement capabilities in support of various existing and planned satellite programs, which monitor key parameters for the study of climate change, such as solar irradiance, earth radiance, and atmospheric effects. These capabilities include the characterization of infrared reference blackbody sources and cavity radiometers, as well as the materials used to coat the cavity surfaces. In order to accurately measure high levels of effective emissivity and absorptance of cavities, NIST has developed a laser- and integrating-sphere-based facility (the Complete Hemispherical Infrared Laser-based Reflectometer (CHILR)). The system is used for both radiometer and blackbody cavity characterization. Multiple laser sources with wavelengths ranging from 1.5 μm to 23 μm are used to perform reflectance (1 - emissivity (or absorptance)) measurements of radiometer cavities. Measurements have been performed for numerous instruments including the Internal Calibration Target (ICT)) blackbody source used for calibration of the Cross track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), and the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) instrument on the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE), both for the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS), as well as the Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM) instrument, and blackbodies constructed for prototyping of an infrared instrument on the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO). For a more comprehensive understanding of the measurement results, NIST has also measured samples of the coated surfaces of the cavities and associated baffles. This includes several types of reflectance measurements: specular, directional-hemispherical (diffuse), and bi-directional distribution function (BRDF). The first two are performed spectrally and provide information that enables estimation of the cavity performance where laser sources for CHILR are not available

  12. Atmospheric transport, clouds and the Arctic longwave radiation paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlar, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Clouds interact with radiation, causing variations in the amount of electromagnetic energy reaching the Earth's surface, or escaping the climate system to space. While globally clouds lead to an overall cooling radiative effect at the surface, over the Arctic, where annual cloud fractions are high, the surface cloud radiative effect generally results in a warming. The additional energy input from absorption and re-emission of longwave radiation by the clouds to the surface can have a profound effect on the sea ice state. Anomalous atmospheric transport of heat and moisture into the Arctic, promoting cloud formation and enhancing surface longwave radiation anomalies, has been identified as an important mechanism in preconditioning Arctic sea ice for melt. Longwave radiation is emitted equally in all directions, and changes in the atmospheric infrared emission temperature and emissivity associated with advection of heat and moisture over the Arctic should correspondingly lead to an anomalous signal in longwave radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). To examine the role of atmospheric heat and moisture transport into the Arctic on TOA longwave radiation, infrared satellite sounder observations from AIRS during 2003-2014 are analyzed for summer (JJAS). Thermodynamic metrics are developed to identify months characterized by a high frequency of warm and moist advection into the Arctic, and segregate the 2003-14 time period into climatological and anomalously warm, moist summer months. We find that anomalously warm, moist months result in a significant TOA longwave radiative cooling, which is opposite the forcing signal that the surface experiences during these months. At the timescale of the advective events, 3-10 days, the TOA cooling can be as large as the net surface energy budget during summer. When averaged on the monthly time scale, and over the full Arctic basin (poleward of 75°N), summer months experiencing frequent warm, moist advection events are

  13. An improved radiance simulation for hyperspectral infrared remote sensing of Asian dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyo-Jin; Sohn, Byung-Ju; Huang, Hung-Lung; Weisz, Elisabeth; Saunders, Roger; Takamura, Tamio

    2012-05-01

    The fast Radiative Transfer for Television Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS) Operational Vertical Sounder (RTTOV) (Version 9.3) model was used for simulating the effect of East Asian dust on top of atmosphere radiances. The size distribution of Asian dust was retrieved from nine years of sky radiometer measurements at Dunhunag located in the east of Taklimakan desert of China. The default surface emissivity in RTTOV was replaced by the geographically and monthly varying data from University of Wisconsin (UW)/Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) infrared surface spectral emissivities. For a given size distribution and surface emissivity, the effects of three refractive indices of Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) mineral aerosol, dust-like aerosol by Volz, and High Resolution Transmission (HITRAN) quartz were examined. Results indicate that the specification of surface emissivity using geographically and monthly varying UW/CIMSS data significantly improved the performance of the simulation of AIRS brightness temperature (TB) difference (BTD) between window channels, in comparison to the results from the use of default emissivity value of 0.98 in the RTTOV model, i.e., increase of the correlation coefficient from 0.1 to 0.83 for BTD between 8.9 μm and 11 μm, and from 0.31 to 0.61 for BTD between 3.8 μm and 11 μm. On the other hand, the use of Asian dust size distributions contributed to a general reduction of radiance biases over dust-sensitive window bands. A further improvement of the TB simulations has been made by considering the Volz refractive index, suggesting that hyperspectral infrared remote sensing of Asian dust can be improved using the proper optical properties of the dust and surface emissivity.

  14. New and improved infra-red absorption cross sections and ACE-FTS retrievals of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.; Boone, Christopher D.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is one of the species regulated by the Montreal Protocol on account of its ability to deplete stratospheric ozone. As such, the inconsistency between observations of its abundance and estimated sources and sinks is an important problem requiring urgent attention (Carpenter et al., 2014) [5]. Satellite remote-sensing has a role to play, particularly limb sounders which can provide vertical profiles into the stratosphere and therefore validate stratospheric loss rates in atmospheric models. This work is in two parts. The first describes new and improved high-resolution infra-red absorption cross sections of carbon tetrachloride/dry synthetic air over the spectral range 700-860 cm-1 for a range of temperatures and pressures (7.5-760 Torr and 208-296 K) appropriate for atmospheric conditions. This new cross-section dataset improves upon the one currently available in the HITRAN and GEISA databases. The second describes a new, preliminary ACE-FTS carbon tetrachloride retrieval that improves upon the v3.0/v3.5 data products, which are biased high by up to 20-30% relative to ground measurements. Making use of the new spectroscopic data, this retrieval also improves the microwindow selection, contains additional interfering species, and utilises a new instrumental lineshape; it will form the basis for the upcoming v4.0 CCl4 data product.

  15. Retrieval of HCFC-142b (CH3CClF2) from ground-based high-resolution infrared solar spectra: Atmospheric increase since 1989 and comparison with surface and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Emmanuel; Lejeune, Bernard; Bovy, Benoît; Servais, Christian; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Bernath, Peter F.; Boone, Christopher D.; Walker, Kaley A.; Reimann, Stefan; Vollmer, Martin K.; O'Doherty, Simon

    2017-01-01

    We have developed an approach for retrieving HCFC-142b (CH3CClF2) from ground-based high-resolution infrared solar spectra, using its ν7 band Q branch in the 900-906 cm-1 interval. Interferences by HNO3, CO2 and H2O have to be accounted for. Application of this approach to observations recorded within the framework of long-term monitoring activities carried out at the northern mid-latitude, high-altitude Jungfraujoch station in Switzerland (46.5°N, 8.0°E, 3580 m above sea level) has provided a total column times series spanning the 1989 to mid-2015 time period. A fit to the HCFC-142b daily mean total column time series shows a statistically-significant long-term trend of (1.23±0.08×1013 molec cm-2) per year from 2000 to 2010, at the 2-σ confidence level. This corresponds to a significant atmospheric accumulation of (0.94±0.06) ppt (1 ppt=1/1012) per year for the mean tropospheric mixing ratio, at the 2-σ confidence level. Over the subsequent time period (2010-2014), we note a significant slowing down in the HCFC-142b buildup. Our ground-based FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) results are compared with relevant data sets derived from surface in situ measurements at the Mace Head and Jungfraujoch sites of the AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment) network and from occultation measurements by the ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer) instrument on-board the SCISAT satellite.

  16. A multi-wavelength classification method for polar stratospheric cloud types using infrared limb spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, Reinhold; Hoffmann, Lars; Höpfner, Michael; Griessbach, Sabine; Müller, Rolf; Pitts, Michael C.; Orr, Andrew M. W.; Riese, Martin

    2016-08-01

    compared to the real fraction of ice within the PSC area in the polar vortex. The entire MIPAS measurement period was processed with the new classification approach. Examples like the detection of the Antarctic NAT belt during early winter, and its possible link to mountain wave events over the Antarctic Peninsula, which are observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument, highlight the importance of a climatology of 9 Southern Hemisphere and 10 Northern Hemisphere winters in total. The new dataset is valuable both for detailed process studies, and for comparisons with and improvements of the PSC parameterizations used in chemistry transport and climate models.

  17. Space Plasma Slab Studies using a new 3D Embedded Reconfigurable MPSoC Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents recent ionospheric slab thickness measurements using a new mobile digital sounder system. The datasets obtained have been compared to the results of existing sounders in operation. The data validity has been verified. The slab thickness data allow constant monitoring of the lower ionosphere revealing the dynamic trends of the physical processes being involved. The prototype offers a tremendous amount of hardware processing power and a previously unseen response time in servicing the input and output data interfaces. This has been enabled by incorporating the latest three-dimensional Ultrascale+ technologies available commercially from the reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) computing industry. Furthermore, a previously developed Network-on-Chip (NoC) design methodology has been incorporated for connecting and controlling the application driven multiprocessor network. The system determines electron distributions, aggregate electromagnetic field gradients and plasma current density.

  18. Spectral Interpretation of Radio Sounder-Stimulated Magnetospheric Plasma Resonances in Terms of Kappa Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Robert F.; Vinas, Adolfo, F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Purser, Carola M.; Galkin, Ivan A.; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetosphere sounders stimulate plasma resonances between the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency and above the upper-hybrid frequency. More than three decades ago they were recognized as equivalent to ionospheric topside-sounder-stimulated resonances, designated as Qn resonances a decade earlier, with one important difference: the magnetospheric Qn frequencies often indicated that the background electron-velocity distribution was non-Maxwellian. Interpretations based on bi-Maxwellian and kappa distributions have been proposed. Here we expand on the latter, which requires fewer free parameters, by comparing kappa-derived Qn frequencies with observations from the Radio Plasma Imager on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite.

  19. Ultraspectral sounder data compression using error-detecting reversible variable-length coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bormin; Ahuja, Alok; Huang, Hung-Lung; Schmit, Timothy J.; Heymann, Roger W.

    2005-08-01

    Nonreversible variable-length codes (e.g. Huffman coding, Golomb-Rice coding, and arithmetic coding) have been used in source coding to achieve efficient compression. However, a single bit error during noisy transmission can cause many codewords to be misinterpreted by the decoder. In recent years, increasing attention has been given to the design of reversible variable-length codes (RVLCs) for better data transmission in error-prone environments. RVLCs allow instantaneous decoding in both directions, which affords better detection of bit errors due to synchronization losses over a noisy channel. RVLCs have been adopted in emerging video coding standards--H.263+ and MPEG-4--to enhance their error-resilience capabilities. Given the large volume of three-dimensional data that will be generated by future space-borne ultraspectral sounders (e.g. IASI, CrIS, and HES), the use of error-robust data compression techniques will be beneficial to satellite data transmission. In this paper, we investigate a reversible variable-length code for ultraspectral sounder data compression, and present its numerical experiments on error propagation for the ultraspectral sounder data. The results show that the RVLC performs significantly better error containment than JPEG2000 Part 2.

  20. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, A.

    1980-01-01

    A heterodyne spectrometer was constructed and applied to problems in infrared astronomical spectroscopy. The instrument offers distinct observational advantages for the detection and analysis of individual spectral lines at Doppler-limited resolution. Observations of carbon dioxide in planetary atmospheres and ammonia in circumstellar environments demonstrate the substantial role that infrared heterodyne techniques will play in the astronomical spectroscopy of the future.

  1. Atmospheric parameters in a subtropical cloud regime transition derived by AIRS+MODIS – observed statistical variability compared to ERA-Interim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Schreier

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud occurrence, microphysical and optical properties and atmospheric profiles within a subtropical cloud regime transition in the northeastern Pacific Ocean are obtained from a synergistic combination of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS and the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS. The observed cloud parameters and atmospheric thermodynamic profile retrievals are binned by cloud type and analyzed based on their probability density functions (PDFs. Comparison of the PDFs to data from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting Re-analysis (ERA-Interim shows a strong difference in the occurrence of the different cloud types compared to clear sky. An increasing non-Gaussian behavior is observed in cloud optical thickness (τc, effective radius (re and cloud top temperature (Tc distributions from Stratocumulus to Trade Cumulus, while decreasing values of lower tropospheric stability are seen. However, variations in the mean, width and shape of the distributions are found. The AIRS potential temperature (θ and water vapor (q profiles in the presence of varying marine boundary layer (MBL cloud types show overall similarities to the ERA-Interim in the mean profiles, but differences arise in the higher moments at some altitudes. The differences between the PDFs from AIRS+MODIS and ERA-Interim make it possible to pinpoint systematic errors in both systems and helps to understand joint PDFs of cloud properties and coincident thermodynamic profiles from satellite observations.

  2. MIPAS: an instrument for atmospheric and climate research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fischer

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available MIPAS, the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding, is a mid-infrared emission spectrometer which is part of the core payload of ENVISAT. It is a limb sounder, i.e. it scans across the horizon detecting atmospheric spectral radiances which are inverted to vertical temperature, trace species and cloud distributions. These data can be used for scientific investigations in various research fields including dynamics and chemistry in the altitude region between upper troposphere and lower thermosphere.

    The instrument is a well calibrated and characterized Fourier transform spectrometer which is able to detect many trace constituents simultaneously. The different concepts of retrieval methods are described including multi-target and two-dimensional retrievals. Operationally generated data sets consist of temperature, H2O, O3, CH4, N2O, HNO3, and NO2 profiles. Measurement errors are investigated in detail and random and systematic errors are specified. The results are validated by independent instrumentation which has been operated at ground stations or aboard balloon gondolas and aircraft. Intercomparisons of MIPAS measurements with other satellite data have been carried out, too. As a result, it has been proven that the MIPAS data are of good quality.

    MIPAS can be operated in different measurement modes in order to optimize the scientific output. Due to the wealth of information in the MIPAS spectra, many scientific results have already been published. They include intercomparisons of temperature distributions with ECMWF data, the derivation of the whole NOy family, the study of atmospheric processes during the Antarctic vortex split in September~2002, the determination of properties of Polar Stratospheric Clouds, the downward transport of NOx in the middle atmosphere, the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, the influence of

  3. On the generation of electric field and infrared radiation in aerosol clouds due to radon emanation in the atmosphere before earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Liperovsky

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The non-stationary Frenkel model of the generator of spikes of the local electric field with time scales of 1–100 min in the atmosphere near seismic fracture regions some days before strong earthqukes is analysed. The model suggests an aerosol cloud, an increased ionisation velocity (e.g. by radon emanation, and an upward flow of air. It was found that during times of earthquake activity (that means a few days before an earthquake, for realistic increases of the ionization intensity of the atmosphere, mosaic-likely occurring and disappearing pulses of local electric fields with intensities of the order of 103−3×103 Vm−1 should be observable. These electric fields would also cause spikes of non-equilibrium IR emissions (0.7–20 μm and local spikes of the magnetic field. The authors propose to perform special complex Earth-based observations of the night-time emissions of the atmosphere in the IR region and of the magnetic as well as quasi-stationary electric fields at some points near to fracture regions in seismo-active belts.

  4. Physical inversion of the full IASI spectra: Assessment of atmospheric parameters retrievals, consistency of spectroscopy and forward modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liuzzi, G.; Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Venafra, S.; Camy-Peyret, C.

    2016-10-01

    Spectra observed by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) have been used to assess both retrievals and the spectral quality and consistency of current forward models and spectroscopic databases for atmospheric gas line and continuum absorption. The analysis has been performed with thousands of observed spectra over sea surface in the Pacific Ocean close to the Mauna Loa (Hawaii) validation station. A simultaneous retrieval for surface temperature, atmospheric temperature, H2O, HDO, O3 profiles and gas average column abundance of CO2, CO, CH4, SO2, N2O, HNO3, NH3, OCS and CF4 has been performed and compared to in situ observations. The retrieval system considers the full IASI spectrum (all 8461 spectral channels on the range 645-2760 cm-1). We have found that the average column amount of atmospheric greenhouse gases can be retrieved with a precision better than 1% in most cases. The analysis of spectral residuals shows that, after inversion, they are generally reduced to within the IASI radiometric noise. However, larger residuals still appear for many of the most abundant gases, namely H2O, CH4 and CO2. The H2O ν2 spectral region is in general warmer (higher radiance) than observations. The CO2ν2 and N2O/CO2ν3 spectral regions now show a consistent behavior for channels, which are probing the troposphere. Updates in CH4 spectroscopy do not seem to improve the residuals. The effect of isotopic fractionation of HDO is evident in the 2500-2760 cm-1 region and in the atmospheric window around 1200 cm-1.

  5. A statistical approach for rain intensity differentiation using Meteosat Second Generation-Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardelli, E.; Cimini, D.; Di Paola, F.; Romano, F.; Viggiano, M.

    2014-07-01

    This study exploits the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG)-Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) observations to evaluate the rain class at high spatial and temporal resolutions and, to this aim, proposes the Rain Class Evaluation from Infrared and Visible observation (RainCEIV) technique. RainCEIV is composed of two modules: a cloud classification algorithm which individuates and characterizes the cloudy pixels, and a supervised classifier that delineates the rainy areas according to the three rainfall intensity classes, the non-rainy (rain rate value retrievals based on Atmospheric Microwave Sounder Unit (AMSU)-B observations). RainCEIV's principal aim is that of supplying preliminary qualitative information on the rainy areas within the Mediterranean Basin where there is no radar network coverage. The results of RainCEIV have been validated against radar-derived rainfall measurements from the Italian Operational Weather Radar Network for some case studies limited to the Mediterranean area. The dichotomous assessment related to daytime (nighttime) validation shows that RainCEIV is able to detect rainy/non-rainy areas with an accuracy of about 97% (96%), and when all the rainy classes are considered, it shows a Heidke skill score of 67% (62%), a bias score of 1.36 (1.58), and a probability of detection of rainy areas of 81% (81%).

  6. Thermal Infrared Imaging and Atmospheric Modeling of VHS J125601.92-125723.9 b: Evidence for Moderately Thick Clouds and Equilibrium Carbon Chemistry in a Hierarchical Triple System

    CERN Document Server

    Rich, Evan A; Wisniewski, John P; Hashimoto, Jun; Brandt, Timothy D; Carson, Joseph C; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Uyama, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    We present and analyze Subaru/IRCS L' and M' images of the nearby M dwarf VHS J125601.92-125723.9 (VHS 1256), which was recently claimed to have a ~11 M_Jup companion (VHS 1256 b) at ~102 au separation. Our AO images partially resolve the central star into a binary, whose components are nearly equal in brightness and separated by 0.106" +/- 0.001". VHS 1256 b occupies nearly the same near-IR color-magnitude diagram position as HR 8799 bcde and has a comparable L' brightness. However, it has a substantially redder H - M' color, implying a relatively brighter M' flux density than for the HR 8799 planets and suggesting that non-equilibrium carbon chemistry may be less significant in VHS 1256 b. We successfully match the entire SED (optical through thermal infrared) for VHS 1256 b to atmospheric models assuming chemical equilibrium, models which failed to reproduce HR 8799 b at 5 microns. Our modeling favors slightly thick clouds in the companion's atmosphere, although perhaps not quite as thick as those favored ...

  7. A new synthetic library of the Near-Infrared CaII triplet indices. I.Index Definition, Calibration and Relations with stellar atmospheric parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Wei; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2011-01-01

    Adopting the SPECTRUM package, we have synthesized a set of 2,890 Near-InfraRed (NIR) synthetic spectra with a resolution and wavelength sampling similar to the SDSS and the forthcoming LAMOST spectra. During the synthesis, we have applied the `New grids of ATLAS9 Model Atmosphere' to provide a grid of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model atmospheres. This synthetic stellar library is composed of 1,350 solor scaled abundance (SSA) and 1,530 non-solar scaled abundance (NSSA) spectra, grounding on which we have defined a new set of NIR CaII triplet indices and an index CaT as the sum of the three. Then, these defined indices have been automatically measured on the synthetic spectra and calibrated with the indices computed on the observational spectra from the INDO-U.S. stellar library. In order to check the effect of alpha-element enhancement on the so-defined CaII indices, we have compared indices measured on the SSA spectra with those on the NSSA ones at the same terns of stellar parameters (Teff, log ...

  8. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    S. Fukao; Yokoyama, T.; Tayama, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Maruyama, T.; Saito, S.

    2006-01-01

    The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF), probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S) and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam obs...

  9. Assimilating synthetic hyperspectral sounder temperature and humidity retrievals to improve severe weather forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas A.; Koch, Steven; Li, Zhenglong

    2017-04-01

    Assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models has proven vital to generating accurate model analyses of tropospheric temperature and humidity where few conventional observations exist. Applications to storm-scale models are limited since the low temporal resolution provided by polar orbiting sensors cannot adequately sample rapidly changing environments associated with high impact weather events. To address this limitation, hyperspectral sounders have been proposed for geostationary orbiting satellites, but these have yet to be built and launched in part due to much higher engineering costs and a lack of a definite requirement for the data. This study uses an Observation System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) approach to simulate temperature and humidity profiles from a hypothetical geostationary-based sounder from a nature run of a high impact weather event on 20 May 2013. The simulated observations are then assimilated using an ensemble adjustment Kalman filter approach, testing both hourly and 15 minute cycling to determine their relative effectiveness at improving the near storm environment. Results indicate that assimilating both temperature and humidity profiles reduced mid-tropospheric both mean and standard deviation of analysis and forecast errors compared to assimilating conventional observations alone. The 15 minute cycling generally produced the lowest errors while also generating the best 2-4 hour updraft helicity forecasts of ongoing convection. This study indicates the potential for significant improvement in short-term forecasting of severe storms from the assimilation of hyperspectral geostationary satellite data. However, more studies are required using improved OSSE designs encompassing multiple storm environments and additional observation types such as radar reflectivity to fully define the effectiveness of assimilating geostationary hyperspectral observations for high impact weather forecasting

  10. 船用回声测深仪仿真设备%Marine Echo Sounder Simulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈大军; 任鸿翔

    2014-01-01

    In order to reduce the crew training equipment cost of using real echo sounder, and as a part of marine simulator, it is necessary to develop its simulation equipment. To achieve the highly consistent between real equipment and simulator in the operation and function, a seabed echo generation algorithm has been designed, and simulated the seabed echo and clutter echo to display. And then this paper designed a mouse can pull knob algorithms to simulate the operation of echo sounder. In addition, described the implementation of interface. On that basis, the GDS101 Echo Sounder of SKIPPER is simulated. Practice result shows that the function of the echo sounder can be fully realized by the simulator. And it has been applied in the navigational instruments intelligent assessment system.%为了减小船员培训中使用回声测深仪真实设备的成本,以及作为航海模拟器的一部分,开发回声测深仪的仿真设备很有必要。为了与真实设备在操作和功能上达到高度一致,设计了一种海底回波生成的算法,模拟了海底回波与杂波的显示,以及设计了一种能用鼠标拉动旋钮旋转的算法对回声测深仪真实设备的旋钮操作进行了模拟,并且对界面的实现进行了简单的阐述。在此基础上,利用Visual Studio 2010对SKIPPER公司GDS101型号的回声测深仪进行了仿真实现。实践表明该仿真设备可模拟回声测深仪的全部功能,仿真效果良好,并已应用在航海仪器智能评估系统中。

  11. A Method for the Removal of Ray Refraction Effects in Multibeam Echo Sounder Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Jisheng; ZHOU Xinghua; TANG Qiuhua

    2008-01-01

    To a multibeam echo sounder system (MBES), under water sound refraction plays an important role in depth measure-ment accuracy, and errors in sound velocity profile lead to inaccuracies in the measured depth (especially for outer beams). A method is developed to estimate the sound velocity profile based on the depth measured by vertical beam. Using this depth and other pa-rameters, such as t (sound pulse propagation time), 0 (beam inclination angle), etc. We can estimate a simple sound velocity profile with which the depth error has been reduced. This method has been tested with a real dataset acquired in the East China Sea.

  12. A method for the removal of ray refraction effects in multibeam echo sounder systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jisheng; Zhou, Xinghua; Tang, Qiuhua

    2008-05-01

    To a multibeam echo sounder system (MBES), under water sound refraction plays an important role in depth measurement accuracy, and errors in sound velocity profile lead to inaccuracies in the measured depth (especially for outer beams). A method is developed to estimate the sound velocity profile based on the depth measured by vertical beam. Using this depth and other parameters, such as t (sound pulse propagation time), θ (beam inclination angle), etc. We can estimate a simple sound velocity profile with which the depth error has been reduced. This method has been tested with a real dataset acquired in the East China Sea.

  13. Characterisation of Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSM/T-2) radiances using radiative transfer simulations from global atmospheric reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shinya; Poli, Paul; John, Viju O.

    2017-02-01

    The near-global and all-sky coverage of satellite observations from microwave humidity sounders operating in the 183 GHz band complement radiosonde and aircraft observations and satellite infrared clear-sky observations. The Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSM/T-2) of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program began operations late 1991. It has been followed by several other microwave humidity sounders, continuing today. However, expertise and accrued knowledge regarding the SSM/T-2 data record is limited because it has remained underused for climate applications and reanalyses. In this study, SSM/T-2 radiances are characterised using several global atmospheric reanalyses. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim), the first ECMWF reanalysis of the 20th-century (ERA-20C), and the Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55) are projected into SSM/T-2 radiance space using a fast radiative transfer model. The present study confirms earlier indications that the polarisation state of SSM/T-2 antenna is horizontal (not vertical) in the limit of nadir viewing. The study also formulates several recommendations to improve use of the SSM/T-2 measurement data in future fundamental climate data records or reanalyses. Recommendations are (1) to correct geolocation errors, especially for DMSP 14; (2) to blacklist poor quality data identified in the paper; (3) to correct for inter-satellite biases, estimated here on the order of 1 K, by applying an inter-satellite recalibration or, for reanalysis, an automated (e.g., variational) bias correction; and (4) to improve precipitating cloud filtering or, for reanalysis, consider an all-sky assimilation scheme where radiative transfer simulations account for the scattering effect of hydrometeors.

  14. Is Arcturus a well-understood K giant? Test of model atmospheres and potential companion detection by near-infrared interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Verhoelst, T; Perrin, G; Decin, L; Eriksson, K; Ridgway, S T; Schuller, P A; Traub, W A; Millan-Gabet, R; Lacasse, M G; Waelkens, C

    2005-01-01

    We present near-IR interferometric measurements of the K1.5 giant Arcturus (alpha Bootis), obtained at the IOTA interferometer with the FLUOR instrument, in four narrow filters with central wavelengths ranging from 2.03 to 2.39 micron. These observations were expected to allow us to quantify the wavelength dependence of the diameter of a typical K giant. They are compared to predictions from both plane-parallel and spherical model atmospheres. Unexpectedly, neither can explain the observed visibilities. We show how these data suggest the presence of a companion, in accordance with the Hipparcos data on this star, and discuss this solution with respect to Arcturus' single star status.

  15. Multi-decade Measurements of the Long-Term Trends of Atmospheric Species by High-Spectral-Resolution Infrared Solar Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Chiou, Linda; Goldman, Aaron; Hannigan, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Solar absorption spectra were recorded for the first time in 5 years with the McMath Fourier transform spectrometer at the US National solar Observatory on Kitt Peak in southern Arizona, USA (31.91 N latitude, 111.61 W longitude, 2.09 km altitude). The solar absorption spectra cover 750-1300 and 1850-5000 cm(sup -1) and were recorded on 20 days during March-June 2009. The measurements mark the continuation of a long-term record of atmospheric chemical composition measurements that have been used to quantify seasonal cycles and long-term trends of both tropospheric and stratospheric species from observations that began i 1977. Fits to the measured spectra have been performed, and they indicate the spectra obtained since return to operational status are nearly free of channeling and the instrument line shape function is well reproduced taking into account the measurement parameters. We report updated time series measurements of total columns for six atmospheric species and their analysis for seasonal cycles and long-term trends. An sn example, the time series fit shows a decrease in the annual increase rate i Montreal-Protocol-regulated chlorofluorocarbon CCL2F2 from 1.51 plus or minus 0.38% yr(sup -1) at the beginning of the time span to -1.54 plus or minus 1.28 yr(sup -1) at the end of the time span, 1 sigma, and hence provides evidence for the impact of those regulations on the trend.

  16. Mistic winds, a microsatellite constellation approach to high-resolution observations of the atmosphere using infrared sounding and 3d winds measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschhoff, K. R.; Polizotti, J. J.; Aumann, H. H.; Susskind, J.

    2016-10-01

    MISTiC Winds is an approach to improve short-term weather forecasting based on a miniature high resolution, wide field, thermal emission spectrometry instrument that will provide global tropospheric vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity at high (3-4 km) horizontal and vertical ( 1 km) spatial resolution. MISTiC's extraordinarily small size, payload mass of less than 15 kg, and minimal cooling requirements can be accommodated aboard a 27U-class CubeSat or an ESPA-Class micro-satellite. Low fabrication and launch costs enable a LEO sunsynchronous sounding constellation that would collectively provide frequent IR vertical profiles and vertically resolved atmospheric motion vector wind observations in the troposphere. These observations are highly complementary to present and emerging environmental observing systems, and would provide a combination of high vertical and horizontal resolution not provided by any other environmental observing system currently in operation. The spectral measurements that would be provided by MISTiC Winds are similar to those of NASA's AIRS that was built by BAE Systems and operates aboard the AQUA satellite. These new observations, when assimilated into high resolution numerical weather models, would revolutionize short-term and severe weather forecasting, save lives, and support key economic decisions in the energy, air transport, and agriculture arenas-at much lower cost than providing these observations from geostationary orbit. In addition, this observation capability would be a critical tool for the study of transport processes for water vapor, clouds, pollution, and aerosols. Key remaining technical risks are being reduced through laboratory and airborne testing under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program.

  17. MISTiC Winds: A micro-satellite constellation approach to high resolution observations of the atmosphere using infrared sounding and 3D winds measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschhoff, K. R.; Polizotti, J. J.; Aumann, H. H.; Susskind, J.

    2016-09-01

    MISTiCTM Winds is an approach to improve short-term weather forecasting based on a miniature high resolution, wide field, thermal emission spectrometry instrument that will provide global tropospheric vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity at high (3-4 km) horizontal and vertical ( 1 km) spatial resolution. MISTiC's extraordinarily small size, payload mass of less than 15 kg, and minimal cooling requirements can be accommodated aboard a 27U-class CubeSat or an ESPA-Class micro-satellite. Low fabrication and launch costs enable a LEO sunsynchronous sounding constellation that would collectively provide frequent IR vertical profiles and vertically resolved atmospheric motion vector wind observations in the troposphere. These observations are highly complementary to present and emerging environmental observing systems, and would provide a combination of high vertical and horizontal resolution not provided by any other environmental observing system currently in operation. The spectral measurements that would be provided by MISTiC Winds are similar to those of NASA's AIRS that was built by BAE Systems and operates aboard the AQUA satellite. These new observations, when assimilated into high resolution numerical weather models, would revolutionize short-term and severe weather forecasting, save lives, and support key economic decisions in the energy, air transport, and agriculture arenas-at much lower cost than providing these observations from geostationary orbit. In addition, this observation capability would be a critical tool for the study of transport processes for water vapor, clouds, pollution, and aerosols. Key remaining technical risks are being reduced through laboratory and airborne testing under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program.

  18. Status and future of hydrodynamical model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, H G

    2004-01-01

    Since about 25 years ago work has been dedicated to the development of hydrodynamical model atmospheres for cool stars (of A to T spectral type). Despite their obviously sounder physical foundation in comparison with standard hydrostatic models, their general application has been rather limited. In order to understand why this is, and how to progress, we review the present status of hydrodynamical modelling of cool star atmospheres. The development efforts were and are motivated by the theoretical interest of understanding the dynamical processes operating in stellar atmospheres. To show the observational impact, we discuss examples in the fields of spectroscopy and stellar structure where hydrodynamical modelling provided results on a level qualitatively beyond standard models. We stress present modelling challenges, and highlight presently possible and future observations that would be particularly valuable in the interplay between model validation and interpretation of observables, to eventually widen the ...

  19. A bat inspired technique for clutter reduction in radar sounder systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrer, L.; Bruzzone, L.

    2016-10-01

    Radar Sounders are valuable instruments for subsurface investigation. They are widely employed for the study of planetary bodies around the solar system. Due to their wide antenna beam pattern, off-nadir surface reflections (i.e. clutter) of the transmitted signal can compete with echoes coming from the subsurface thus masking them. Different strategies have been adopted for clutter mitigation. However, none of them proved to be the final solution for this specific problem. Bats are very well known for their ability in discriminating between a prey and unwanted clutter (e.g. foliage) by effectively employing their sonar. According to recent studies, big brown bats can discriminate clutter by transmitting two different carrier frequencies. Most interestingly, there are many striking analogies between the characteristics of the bat sonar and the one of a radar sounder. Among the most important ones, they share the same nadir acquisition geometry and transmitted signal type (i.e. linear frequency modulation). In this paper, we explore the feasibility of exploiting frequency diversity for the purpose of clutter discrimination in radar sounding by mimicking unique bats signal processing strategies. Accordingly, we propose a frequency diversity clutter reduction method based on specific mathematical conditions that, if verified, allow the disambiguation between the clutter and the subsurface signal to be performed. These analytic conditions depend on factors such as difference in central carrier frequencies, surface roughness and subsurface material properties. The method performance has been evaluated by different simulations of meaningful acquisition scenarios which confirm its clutter reduction effectiveness.

  20. Simulation of radar sounder echo from lunar surface and subsurface structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Space-borne high frequency (HF) radar sounder is an effective tool for investigation of lunar subsurface structure in lunar exploration. The primary strategy of radar sounder technology for subsurface structure detection is utilization of the nadir echoes time delay and intensity difference from the lunar surface and subsurface. It is important to fully understand electromagnetic wave propagation, scattering, and attenuation through the lunar media in order to retrieve information of lunar layering structure from weak nadir echoes of the subsurface, which is simultaneously interfered by strong off-nadir surface clutters. Based on the Kirchhoff approximation (KA) of rough surface scattering and the ray tracing of geometric optics, a numerical simulation of radar echoes from lunar layering structures is developed. According to the lunar surface feature, the topography of mare and highland surfaces is numerically generated, and the triangulated network is employed to make digital elevations of the whole lunar surface. Scattering from the lunar surface and subsurface is numerically calculated using KA approach. Radar echoes and its range images are numerically simulated, and their dependence on the parameters of lunar layering interfaces is discussed. The approach of this paper can also be utilized to investigate subsurface structures in Mars and other planetary exploration.

  1. Ultraspectral sounder data compression using the non-exhaustive Tunstall coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Bormin

    2008-08-01

    With its bulky volume, the ultraspectral sounder data might still suffer a few bits of error after channel coding. Therefore it is beneficial to incorporate some mechanism in source coding for error containment. The Tunstall code is a variable-to- fixed length code which can reduce the error propagation encountered in fixed-to-variable length codes like Huffman and arithmetic codes. The original Tunstall code uses an exhaustive parse tree where internal nodes extend every symbol in branching. It might result in assignment of precious codewords to less probable parse strings. Based on an infinitely extended parse tree, a modified Tunstall code is proposed which grows an optimal non-exhaustive parse tree by assigning the complete codewords only to top probability nodes in the infinite tree. Comparison will be made among the original exhaustive Tunstall code, our modified non-exhaustive Tunstall code, the CCSDS Rice code, and JPEG-2000 in terms of compression ratio and percent error rate using the ultraspectral sounder data.

  2. Counter electrojet features in the Brazilian sector: simultaneous observation by radar, digital sounder and magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Denardini

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work we show new results regarding equatorial counter electrojet (CEJ events in the Brazilian sector, based on the RESCO radar, two set of fluxgate magnetometer systems and a digital sounder. RESCO radar is a 50 MHz backscatter coherent radar installed in 1998 at São Luís (SLZ, 2.33° S, 44.60° W, an equatorial site. The Digital sounder routinely monitors the electron density profile at the radar site. The magnetometer systems are fluxgate-type installed at SLZ and Eusébio (EUS, 03.89° S, 38.44° W. From the difference between the horizontal component of magnetic field at SLZ station and the same component at EUS (EEJ ground strength several cases of westward morning electrojet and its normal inversion to the eastward equatorial electrojet (EEJ have been observed. Also, the EEJ ground strength has shown some cases of CEJ events, which been detected with the RESCO radar too. Detection of these events were investigated with respect to their time and height of occurrence, correlation with sporadic E (Es layers at the same time, and their spectral characteristics as well as the radar echo power intensity.

  3. Satellite observation of atmospheric methane: intercomparison between AIRS and GOSAT TANSO-FTS retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Mingmin; Xiong, Xiaozhen; Saitoh, Naoko; Warner, Juying; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Liangfu; Weng, Fuzhong; Fan, Meng

    2016-08-01

    Space-borne observations of atmospheric methane (CH4) have been made using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS/Aqua satellite since August 2002 and the Thermal and Near-infrared Sensor for Carbon Observation Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) on the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) since April 2009. This study compared the GOSAT TANSO-FTS thermal infrared (TIR) version 1.0 CH4 product with the collocated AIRS version 6 CH4 product using data from 1 August 2010 to 30 June 2012, including the CH4 mixing ratios and the total column amounts. The results show that at 300-600 hPa, where both AIRS and GOSAT-TIR CH4 have peak sensitivities, they agree very well, but GOSAT-TIR retrievals tend to be higher than AIRS in layer 200-300 hPa. At 300 hPa the CH4 mixing ratio from GOSAT-TIR is, on average, 10.3 ± 31.8 ppbv higher than that from AIRS, and at 600 hPa GOSAT-TIR retrieved CH4 is -16.2 ± 25.7 ppbv lower than AIRS CH4. Comparison of the total column amount of CH4 shows that GOSAT-TIR agrees with AIRS to within 1 % in the mid-latitude regions of the Southern Hemisphere and in the tropics. In the mid to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, comparison shows that GOSAT-TIR is ˜ 1-2 % lower than AIRS, and in the high-latitude regions of the Southern Hemisphere the difference of GOSAT from AIRS varies from -3 % in October to +2 % in July. The difference between AIRS and GOSAT TANSO-FTS retrievals is mainly due to the difference in retrieval algorithms and instruments themselves, and the larger difference in the high-latitude regions is associated with the low information content and small degrees of freedom of the retrieval. The degrees of freedom of GOSAT-TIR retrievals are lower than that of AIRS, which also indicates that the constraint in GOSAT-TIR retrievals may be too strong. From the good correlation between AIRS and GOSAT-TIR retrievals and the seasonal variation they observed, we are confident that the thermal infrared

  4. Intercomparison of polar ozone profiles by IASI/MetOp sounder with 2010 Concordiasi ozonesonde observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gazeaux

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Validation of ozone profiles measured from a nadir looking satellite instrument over Antarctica is a challenging task due to differences in their height sensitivity with ozonesonde measurements. In this paper we compare the ozone observations provided by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI instrument onboard the polar-orbiting satellite MetOp with ozone profiles collected between August and October 2010 at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, during the Concordiasi campaign. This campaign was aimed at satellite data validation and up to 20 zero-pressure sounding balloons carrying ozonesondes were launched during this period when the MetOp satellite was passing above McMurdo. This makes the dataset relevant for comparison, especially because those balloons covered the entire altitude range of IASI profiles. The validation methodology and the collocation criteria differ according to the availability of Global Positioning System auxiliary data with each Electro-Chemical Cell ozonesonde observation. We show that the relative mean difference depends on the altitude range investigated. The analysis shows a good agreement in the troposphere (below 10 km and middle stratosphere (25–40 km, where the differences are lower than 10%. However a significant positive bias of about 10–26% is estimated in the lower stratosphere at 10–25 km, depending on altitude. The positive bias in the 10–25 km range is consistent with previously reported studies comparing in-situ data with thermal infrared satellite measurements. This study allows a better characterization of the IASI products over the polar region when ozone depletion/recovery is occurring.

  5. High-sensitivity remote detection of atmospheric pollutants and greenhouse gases at low ppm levels using near-infrared tunable diode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anirban; Upadhyay, Abhishek; Chakraborty, Arup Lal

    2016-05-01

    The concentration of atmospheric pollutants and greenhouse gases needs to be precisely monitored for sustainable industrial development and to predict the climate shifts caused by global warming. Such measurements are made on a continuous basis in ecologically sensitive and urban areas in the advanced countries. Tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) is the most versatile non-destructive technology currently available for remote measurements of multiple gases with very high selectivity (low cross-sensitivity), very high sensitivity (on the order of ppm and ppb) and under hazardous conditions. We demonstrate absolute measurements of acetylene, methane and carbon dioxide using a fielddeployable fully automated TDLS system that uses calibration-free 2f wavelength modulation spectroscopy (2f WMS) techniques with sensitivities of low ppm levels. A 40 mW, 1531.52 nm distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser, a 10 mW, 1650 nm DFB laser and a 1 mW, 2004 nm vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) are used in the experiments to probe the P9 transition of acetylene, R4 transition of methane and R16 transition of carbon dioxide respectively. Data acquisition and on-board analysis comprises a Raspberry Pi-based embedded system that is controllable over a wireless connection. Gas concentration and pressure are simultaneously extracted by fitting the experimental signals to 2f WMS signals simulated using spectroscopic parameters obtained from the HITRAN database. The lowest detected concentration is 11 ppm for acetylene, 275 ppm for methane and 285 ppm for carbon dioxide using a 28 cm long single-pass gas cell.

  6. The thermodynamic state of the Arctic atmosphere observed by AIRS: comparisons during the record minimum sea-ice extents of 2007 and 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Devasthale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The record sea-ice minimum (SIM extents observed during the summers of 2007 and 2012 in the Arctic are stark evidence of accelerated sea ice loss during the last decade. Improving our understanding of the Arctic atmosphere and accurate quantification of its characteristics becomes ever more crucial, not least to improve predictions of such extreme events in the future. In this context, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite provides crucial insights due to its ability to provide 3-D information on atmospheric thermodynamics.

    Here, we facilitate comparisons in the evolution of the thermodynamic state of the Arctic atmosphere during these two SIM events using a decade long AIRS observational record (2003–2012. It is shown that the meteorological conditions during 2012 were not extreme but three factors in preconditioning from winter through early summer probably played an important role in accelerating sea-ice melt. First, the marginal sea-ice zones along the central Eurasian and North Atlantic sectors remained warm throughout winter and early spring in 2012 preventing thicker ice build-up. Second, the circulation pattern favoured efficient sea-ice transport out of the Arctic in the Atlantic sector during late spring and early summer in 2012 compared to 2007. Third, additional warming over the Canadian Archipelago and southeast Beaufort Sea from May onward further contributed to accelerated sea-ice melt. All these factors may have lead already thin and declining sea-ice cover to pass below the previous sea-ice extent minimum of 2007. In sharp contrast to 2007, negative surface temperature anomalies and increased cloudiness were observed over the East Siberian and Chukchi Seas in the summer of 2012. The results suggest that satellite-based monitoring of atmospheric preconditioning could be a critical source of information in predicting extreme sea-ice melting events in the Arctic.

  7. The thermodynamic state of the Arctic atmosphere observed by AIRS: comparisons during the record minimum sea ice extents of 2007 and 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Devasthale

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The record sea ice minimum (SIM extents observed during the summers of 2007 and 2012 in the Arctic are stark evidence of accelerated sea ice loss during the last decade. Improving our understanding of the Arctic atmosphere and accurate quantification of its characteristics becomes ever more crucial, not least to improve predictions of such extreme events in the future. In this context, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite provides crucial insights due to its ability to provide 3-D information on atmospheric thermodynamics. Here, we facilitate comparisons in the evolution of the thermodynamic state of the Arctic atmosphere during these two SIM events using a decade-long AIRS observational record (2003–2012. It is shown that the meteorological conditions during 2012 were not extreme, but three factors of preconditioning from winter through early summer played an important role in accelerating sea ice melt. First, the marginal sea ice zones along the central Eurasian and North Atlantic sectors remained warm throughout winter and early spring in 2012 preventing thicker ice build-up. Second, the circulation pattern favoured efficient sea ice transport out of the Arctic in the Atlantic sector during late spring and early summer in 2012 compared to 2007. Third, additional warming over the Canadian archipelago and southeast Beaufort Sea from May onward further contributed to accelerated sea ice melt. All these factors may have lead the already thin and declining sea ice cover to pass below the previous sea ice extent minimum of 2007. In sharp contrast to 2007, negative surface temperature anomalies and increased cloudiness were observed over the East Siberian and Chukchi seas in the summer of 2012. The results suggest that satellite-based monitoring of atmospheric preconditioning could be a critical source of information in predicting extreme sea ice melting events in the Arctic.

  8. ISIS Topside-Sounder Plasma-Wave Investigations as Guides to Desired Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO) Data Search Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fung, Shing F.

    2008-01-01

    Many plasma-wave phenomena, observed by space-borne radio sounders, cannot be properly explained in terms of wave propagation in a cold plasma consisting of mobile electrons and infinitely massive positive ions. These phenomena include signals known as plasma resonances. The principal resonances at the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency, the plasma frequency, and the upper-hybrid frequency are well explained by the warm-plasma propagation of sounder-generated electrostatic waves, Other resonances have been attributed to sounder-stimulated plasma instability and non-linear effects, eigenmodes of cylindrical electromagnetic plasma oscillations, and plasma memory processes. Data from the topside sounders of the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program played a major role in these interpretations. A data transformation and preservation effort at the Goddard Space Flight Center has produced digital ISIS topside ionograms and a metadata search program that has enabled some recent discoveries pertaining to the physics of these plasma resonances. For example, data records were obtained that enabled the long-standing question (several decades) of the origin of the plasma resonance at the fundamental electron cyclotron frequency to be explained [Muldrew, Radio Sci., 2006]. These data-search capabilities, and the science enabled by them, will be presented as a guide to desired data search capabilities to be included in the Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO).

  9. Improving riverbed sediment classification using backscatter and depth residual features of multi-beam echo-sounder systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleftherakis, D.; Amiri-Simkooei, A.; Snellen, M; Simons, D.G.

    2012-01-01

    Riverbed and seafloor sediment classification using acoustic remote sensing techniques is of high interest due to their high coverage capabilities at limited cost. This contribution presents the results of riverbed sediment classification using multi-beam echo-sounder data based on an empirical meth

  10. High-Power Radar Sounders for the Investigation of Jupiter Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaeinili, A.; Ostro, S.; Rodriquez, E.; Blankenship, D.; Kurth, W.; Kirchner, D.

    2005-01-01

    The high power and high data rate capability made available by a Prometheus class spacecraft could significantly enhance our ability to probe the subsurface of the planets/moons and asteroid/comets. The main technology development driver for our radar is the proposed Jupiter Icy Moon Orbiter (or JIMO) mission due to its harsh radiation environment. We plan to develop a dual-band radar at 5 and 50 MHz in response to the two major science requirements identified by the JIMO Science Definition Team: studying the near subsurface (less than 2 km) at high resolution and detection of the ice/ocean interface for Europa (depth up to 30 km). The 50-MHz band is necessary to provide high spatial resolution (footprint and depth) as required by the JIMO mission science requirements as currently defined. Our preliminary assessment indicates that the 50-MHz system is not required to be as high-power as the 5-MHz system since it will be more limited by the surface clutter than the Jupiter or galactic background noise. The low frequency band (e.g. 5 MHz), which is the focus of this effort, would be necessary to mitigate the performance risks posed by the unknown subsurface structure both in terms of unknown attenuation due to volumetric scattering and also the detection of the interface through the attenuative transition region at the ice/ocean interface. Additionally, the 5-MHz band is less affected by the surface roughness that can cause loss of coherence and clutter noise. However, since the Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) of the 5-MHz radar band is reduced due to Jupiter noise when operating in the Jupiter side of the moon, it is necessary to increase the radiated power. Our challenge is to design a high-power HF radar that can hnction in Jupiter's high radiation environment, yet be able to fit into spacecraft resource constraints such as mass and thermal limits. Our effort to develop the JIMO radar sounder will rely on our team's experience with planetary radar sounder design

  11. Infrared thermography

    CERN Document Server

    Meola, Carosena

    2012-01-01

    This e-book conveys information about basic IRT theory, infrared detectors, signal digitalization and applications of infrared thermography in many fields such as medicine, foodstuff conservation, fluid-dynamics, architecture, anthropology, condition monitoring, non destructive testing and evaluation of materials and structures.

  12. Jupiter Eruptions Captured in Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers. This infrared image shows two bright plume eruptions obtained by the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on April 5, 2007. Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena. According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vigorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  13. Direction-of-Arrival Analysis of Airborne Ice Depth Sounder Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik; Yan, Jie-Bang; Gogineni, Sivaprasad;

    2017-01-01

    -flowing Jakobshavn Glacier by analyzing the DOA of signals received with a five-element receive-antenna array. This allowed us to obtain ice thickness information, which is a key parameter when generating bed topography of glaciers. We also estimated ice–bed roughness and bed slope from the combined analysis......In this paper, we analyze the direction-of arrival(DOA) of the ice-sheet data collected over Jakobshavn Glacier with the airborne Multichannel Radar Depth Sounder (MCRDS) during the 2006 field season. We extracted weak ice–bed echoes buried in signals scattered by the rough surface of the fast...... of the DOA and radar waveforms. The bed slope is about 8° and the roughness in terms of rms slope is about 16°....

  14. Ultraspectral sounder data compression using a novel marker-based error-resilient arithmetic coder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bormin; Sriraja, Y.; Wei, Shih-Chieh

    2006-08-01

    Entropy coding techniques aim to achieve the entropy of the source data by assigning variable-length codewords to symbols with the code lengths linked to the corresponding symbol probabilities. Entropy coders (e.g. Huffman coding, arithmetic coding), in one form or the other, are commonly used as the last stage in various compression schemes. While these variable-length coders provide better compression than fixed-length coders, they are vulnerable to transmission errors. Even a single bit error in the transmission process can cause havoc in the subsequent decoded stream. To cope with it, this research proposes a marker-based sentinel mechanism in entropy coding for error detection and recovery. We use arithmetic coding as an example to demonstrate this error-resilient technique for entropy coding. Experimental results on ultraspectral sounder data indicate that the marker-based error-resilient arithmetic coder provides remarkable robustness to correct transmission errors without significantly compromising the compression gains.

  15. The Impact of Upper Tropospheric Humidity from Microwave Limb Sounder on the Midlatitude Greenhouse Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hua; Liu, W. Timothy

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of upper tropospheric humidity, as measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder, and the impact of the humidity on the greenhouse effect in the midlatitudes. Enhanced upper tropospheric humidity and an enhanced greenhouse effect occur over the storm tracks in the North Pacific and North Atlantic. In these areas, strong baroclinic activity and the large number of deep convective clouds transport more water vapor to the upper troposphere, and hence increase greenhouse trapping. The greenhouse effect increases with upper tropospheric humidity in areas with a moist upper troposphere (such as areas over storm tracks), but it is not sensitive to changes in upper tropospheric humidity in regions with a dry upper troposphere, clearly demonstrating that there are different mechanisms controlling the geographical distribution of the greenhouse effect in the midlatitudes.

  16. Preliminary Regional Analysis of the Kaguya Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) Data through Eastern Mare Imbrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, B.L.; Antonenko, I.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Osinski, G.; Ono, T.; Ku-mamoto, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) experiment on board the Kaguya spacecraft is observing the subsurface structure of the Moon, using ground-penetrating radar operating in the frequency range of 5 MHz [1]. Because LRS data provides in-formation about lunar features below the surface, it allows us to improve our understanding of the processes that formed the Moon, and the post-formation changes that have occurred (such as basin formation and volcanism). We look at a swath of preliminary LRS data, that spans from 7 to 72 N, and from 2 to 10 W, passing through the eastern portion of Mare Imbrium (Figure 1). Using software, designed for the mineral exploration industry, we produce a preliminary, coarse 3D model, showing the regional structure beneath the study area. Future research will involve smaller subsets of the data in regions of interest, where finer structures, such as those identified in [2], can be studied.

  17. On the Assimilation of Satellite Sounder Data in Cloudy Skies in Numerical Weather Prediction Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊; 王培; 李金龙; 郑婧

    2016-01-01

    Satellite measurements are an important source of global observations in support of numerical weather prediction (NWP). The assimilation of satellite radiances under clear skies has greatly improved NWP forecast scores. However, the application of radiances in cloudy skies remains a signifi cant challenge. In order to better assimilate radiances in cloudy skies, it is very important to detect any clear fi eld-of-view (FOV) accurately and assimilate cloudy radiances appropriately. Research progress on both clear FOV detection methodologies and cloudy radiance assimilation techniques are reviewed in this paper. Overview on approaches being implemented in the operational centers and studied by the satellite data assimilation research community is presented. Challenges and future directions for satellite sounder radiance assimilation in cloudy skies in NWP models are also discussed.

  18. A Field Method for Backscatter Calibration Applied to NOAA's Reson 7125 Multibeam Echo-Sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Briana

    Acoustic seafloor backscatter measurements made by multiple Reson multibeam echo-sounders (MBES) used for hydrographic survey are observed to be inconsistent, affecting the quality of data products and impeding large-scale processing efforts. A method to conduct a relative inter and intea sonar calibration in the field using dual frequency Reson 7125 MBES has been developed, tested, and evaluated to improve the consistency of backscatter measurements made from multiple MBES systems. The approach is unique in that it determines a set of corrections for power, gain, pulse length, and an angle dependent calibration term relative to a single Reson 7125 MBES calibrated in an acoustic test tank. These corrections for each MBES can then be applied during processing for any acquisition setting combination. This approach seeks to reduce the need for subjective and inefficient manual data or data product manipulation during post processing, providing a foundation for improved automated seafloor characterization using data from more than one MBES system.

  19. A Match-based approach to the estimation of polar stratospheric ozone loss using Aura Microwave Limb Sounder observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Livesey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The well-established "Match" approach to quantifying chemical destruction of ozone in the polar lower stratosphere is applied to ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on NASA's Aura spacecraft. Quantification of ozone loss requires distinguishing transport- and chemically induced changes in ozone abundance. This is accomplished in the Match approach by examining cases where trajectories indicate that the same airmass has been observed on multiple occasions. The method was pioneered using ozone sonde observations, for which hundreds of matched ozone observations per winter are typically available. The dense coverage of the MLS measurements, particularly at polar latitudes, allows matches to be made to thousands of observations each day. This study is enabled by recently developed MLS Lagrangian Trajectory Diagnostic (LTD support products. Sensitivity studies indicate that the largest influence on the ozone loss estimates are the value of potential vorticity (PV used to define the edge of the polar vortex (within which matched observations must lie and the degree to which the PV of an airmass is allowed to vary between matched observations. Applying Match calculations to MLS observations of nitrous oxide, a long-lived tracer whose expected rate of change on these timescales is negligible, enables quantification of the impact of transport errors on the Match-based ozone loss estimates. Our loss estimates are generally in agreement with previous estimates for selected Arctic winters, though indicating smaller losses than many other studies. Arctic ozone losses are greatest during the 2010/11 winter, as seen in prior studies, with 2.0 ppmv (parts per million by volume loss estimated at 450 K potential temperature. As expected, Antarctic winter ozone losses are consistently greater than those for the Arctic, with less interannual variability (e.g., ranging between 2.3 and 3.0 ppmv at 450 K. This study exemplifies the insights into

  20. A Match-based approach to the estimation of polar stratospheric ozone loss using Aura Microwave Limb Sounder observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesey, N. J.; Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.

    2015-09-01

    The well-established "Match" approach to quantifying chemical destruction of ozone in the polar lower stratosphere is applied to ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA's Aura spacecraft. Quantification of ozone loss requires distinguishing transport- and chemically induced changes in ozone abundance. This is accomplished in the Match approach by examining cases where trajectories indicate that the same air mass has been observed on multiple occasions. The method was pioneered using ozonesonde observations, for which hundreds of matched ozone observations per winter are typically available. The dense coverage of the MLS measurements, particularly at polar latitudes, allows matches to be made to thousands of observations each day. This study is enabled by recently developed MLS Lagrangian trajectory diagnostic (LTD) support products. Sensitivity studies indicate that the largest influence on the ozone loss estimates are the value of potential vorticity (PV) used to define the edge of the polar vortex (within which matched observations must lie) and the degree to which the PV of an air mass is allowed to vary between matched observations. Applying Match calculations to MLS observations of nitrous oxide, a long-lived tracer whose expected rate of change is negligible on the weekly to monthly timescales considered here, enables quantification of the impact of transport errors on the Match-based ozone loss estimates. Our loss estimates are generally in agreement with previous estimates for selected Arctic winters, though indicating smaller losses than many other studies. Arctic ozone losses are greatest during the 2010/11 winter, as seen in prior studies, with 2.0 ppmv (parts per million by volume) loss estimated at 450 K potential temperature (~ 18 km altitude). As expected, Antarctic winter ozone losses are consistently greater than those for the Arctic, with less interannual variability (e.g., ranging between 2.3 and 3.0 ppmv at 450 K). This

  1. A Match-based approach to the estimation of polar stratospheric ozone loss using Aura Microwave Limb Sounder observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Livesey

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The well-established "Match" approach to quantifying chemical destruction of ozone in the polar lower stratosphere is applied to ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on NASA's Aura spacecraft. Quantification of ozone loss requires distinguishing transport- and chemically induced changes in ozone abundance. This is accomplished in the Match approach by examining cases where trajectories indicate that the same air mass has been observed on multiple occasions. The method was pioneered using ozonesonde observations, for which hundreds of matched ozone observations per winter are typically available. The dense coverage of the MLS measurements, particularly at polar latitudes, allows matches to be made to thousands of observations each day. This study is enabled by recently developed MLS Lagrangian trajectory diagnostic (LTD support products. Sensitivity studies indicate that the largest influence on the ozone loss estimates are the value of potential vorticity (PV used to define the edge of the polar vortex (within which matched observations must lie and the degree to which the PV of an air mass is allowed to vary between matched observations. Applying Match calculations to MLS observations of nitrous oxide, a long-lived tracer whose expected rate of change is negligible on the weekly to monthly timescales considered here, enables quantification of the impact of transport errors on the Match-based ozone loss estimates. Our loss estimates are generally in agreement with previous estimates for selected Arctic winters, though indicating smaller losses than many other studies. Arctic ozone losses are greatest during the 2010/11 winter, as seen in prior studies, with 2.0 ppmv (parts per million by volume loss estimated at 450 K potential temperature (~ 18 km altitude. As expected, Antarctic winter ozone losses are consistently greater than those for the Arctic, with less interannual variability (e.g., ranging between 2.3 and 3.0 ppmv at

  2. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Simon; Taylor, Fredric; Ade, Peter; Kunde, Virgil; Jennings, Donald

    1992-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) is a remote sensing instrument to be flown on the Cassini orbiter. It contains two Fourier transform spectrometers covering wavelengths of 7-1000 microns. The instrument is expected to have higher spectral resolution, smaller field of view, and better signal-to-noise performance than its counterpart, IRIS, on the Voyager missions. These improvements allow the study of the variability of the composition and temperature of the atmospheres of both Saturn and Titan with latitude, longitude and height, as well as allowing the possibility of discovery of previously undetected chemical species in these atmospheres. The long wavelengths accessible to CIRS allow sounding deeper into both atmospheres than was possible with IRIS.

  3. Progress in developing GeoSTAR: a microwave sounder for GOES-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrigtsen, B. H.; Brown, S. T.; Dinardo, S. J.; Kangaslahti, P. P.; Tanner, A. B.; Wilson, W. J.

    2005-08-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) is a new concept for a microwave sounder, intended to be deployed on NOAA's next generation of geostationary weather satellites, GOES-R. A ground based prototype has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, under NASA Instrument Incubator Program sponsorship, and is currently undergoing tests and performance characterization. The initial space version of GeoSTAR will have performance characteristics equal to those of the AMSU system currently operating on polar orbiting environmental satellites, but subsequent versions will significantly outperform AMSU. In addition to all-weather temperature and humidity soundings, GeoSTAR will also provide continuous rain mapping, tropospheric wind profiling and real time storm tracking. In particular, with the aperture synthesis approach used by GeoSTAR it is possible to achieve very high spatial resolutions without having to deploy the impractically large parabolic reflector antenna that is required with the conventional approach. GeoSTAR therefore offers both a feasible way of getting a microwave sounder in GEO as well as a clear upgrade path to meet future requirements. GeoSTAR offers a number of other advantages relative to real-aperture systems as well, such as 2D spatial coverage without mechanical scanning, system robustness and fault tolerance, operational flexibility, high quality beam formation, and open ended performance expandability. The technology and system design required for GeoSTAR are rapidly maturing, and it is expected that a space demonstration mission can be developed before the first GOES-R launch. GeoSTAR will be ready for operational deployment 2-3 years after that.

  4. A statistical approach for rain class evaluation using Meteosat Second Generation-Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardelli, E.; Cimini, D.; Di Paola, F.; Romano, F.; Viggiano, M.

    2013-11-01

    Precipitation measurements are essential for short term hydrological and long term climate studies. Operational networks of rain gauges and weather radars provide fairly accurate rain rate measurements, but they leave large areas uncovered. Because of this, satellite remote sensing is a useful tool for the detection and characterization of the raining areas in regions where this information remains missing. This study exploits the Meteosat Second Generation - Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (MSG-SEVIRI) observations to evaluate the rain class at high spatial and temporal resolutions. The Rain Class Evaluation from Infrared and Visible (RainCEIV) observations technique is proposed. The purpose of RainCEIV is to supply continuous monitoring of convective as well as of stratiform rainfall events. It applies a supervised classifier to the spectral and textural features of infrared and visible MSG-SEVIRI images to classify the cloudy pixels as non rainy, light to moderate rain, or heavy to very heavy rain. The technique considers in input also the water vapour channels brightness temperatures differences for the MSG-SEVIRI images acquired 15/30/45 min before the time of interest. The rainfall rates used in the training phase are obtained with the Precipitation Estimation at Microwave frequencies (PEMW), an algorithm for rain rate retrievals based on Atmospheric Microwave Sounder Unit (AMSU)-B observations. The results of RainCEIV have been validated against radar-derived rainfall measurements from the Italian Operational Weather Radar Network for some case studies limited to the Mediterranean area. The dichotomous assessment shows that RainCEIV is able to detect rainy areas with an accuracy of about 91%, a Heidke skill score of 56%, a Bias score of 1.16, and a Probability of Detection of rainy areas of 66%.

  5. Interferometric vs Spectral IASI Radiances: Effective Data-Reduction Approaches for the Satellite Sounding of Atmospheric Thermodynamical Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Grieco

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Two data-reduction approaches for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer satellite instrument are discussed and compared. The approaches are intended for the purpose of devising and implementing fast near real time retrievals of atmospheric thermodynamical parameters. One approach is based on the usual selection of sparse channels or portions of the spectrum. This approach may preserve the spectral resolution, but at the expense of the spectral coverage. The second approach considers a suitable truncation of the interferogram (the Fourier transform of the spectrum at points below the nominal maximum optical path difference. This second approach is consistent with the Shannon-Whittaker sampling theorem, preserves the full spectral coverage, but at the expense of the spectral resolution. While the first data-reduction acts within the spectraldomain, the second can be performed within the interferogram domain and without any specific need to go back to the spectral domain for the purpose of retrieval. To assess the impact of these two different data-reduction strategies on retrieval of atmospheric parameters, we have used a statistical retrieval algorithm for skin temperature, temperature, water vapour and ozone profiles. The use of this retrieval algorithm is mostly intended for illustrative purposes and the user could choose a different inverse strategy. In fact, the interferogram-based data-reduction strategy is generic and independent of any inverse algorithm. It will be also shown that this strategy yields subset of interferometric radiances, which are less sensitive to potential interfering effects such as those possibly introduced by the day-night cycle (e.g., the solar component, and spectroscopic effect induced by sun energy and unknown trace gases variability.

  6. Lessons Learned from the Deployment and Integration of a Microwave Sounder Based Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Surface Wind Estimation Algorithm into NOAA/NESDIS Satellite Product Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmore, S. P.; Knaff, J. A.; Schumacher, A.; Dostalek, J.; DeMaria, R.; Chirokova, G.; Demaria, M.; Powell, D. C.; Sigmund, A.; Yu, W.

    2014-12-01

    The Colorado State University (CSU) Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) has recently deployed a tropical cyclone (TC) intensity and surface wind radii estimation algorithm that utilizes Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) from the NOAA18, NOAA19 and METOPA polar orbiting satellites for testing, integration and operations for the Product System Development and Implementation (PSDI) projects at NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS). This presentation discusses the evolution of the CIRA NPP/AMSU TC algorithms internally at CIRA and its migration and integration into the NOAA Data Exploitation (NDE) development and testing frameworks. The discussion will focus on 1) the development cycle of internal NPP/AMSU TC algorithms components by scientists and software engineers, 2) the exchange of these components into the NPP/AMSU TC software systems using the subversion version control system and other exchange methods, 3) testing, debugging and integration of the NPP/AMSU TC systems both at CIRA/NESDIS and 4) the update cycle of new releases through continuous integration. Lastly, a discussion of the methods that were effective and those that need revision will be detailed for the next iteration of the NPP/AMSU TC system.

  7. A new method for continuous measurements of oceanic and atmospheric N2O, CO and CO2: performance of off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS coupled to non-dispersive infrared detection (NDIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Arévalo-Martínez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new system for continuous, highly-resolved oceanic and atmospheric measurements of N2O, CO and CO2 is described. The system is based upon off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS and a non-dispersive infrared analyzer (NDIR both coupled to a Weiss-type equilibrator. Performance of the combined setup was evaluated by testing its precision, accuracy, long-term stability, linearity and response time. Furthermore, the setup was tested during two oceanographic campaigns in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean in order to explore its potential for autonomous deployment onboard voluntary observing ships (VOS. Improved equilibrator response times for N2O (2.5 min and CO (45 min were achieved in comparison to response times from similar chamber designs used by previous studies. High stability of the OA-ICOS analyzer was demonstrated by low optimal integration times of 2 and 4 min for N2O and CO respectively, as well as detection limits of −1/2. Results from a direct comparison of the method presented here and well-established discrete methods for oceanic N2O and CO2 measurements showed very good consistency. The favorable agreement between underway atmospheric N2O, CO and CO2 measurements and monthly means at Ascension Island (7.96° S 14.4° W further suggests a reliable operation of the underway setup in the field. The potential of the system as an improved platform for measurements of trace gases was explored by using continuous N2O and CO2 data to characterize the development of the seasonal equatorial upwelling in the Atlantic Ocean during two R/V Maria S. Merian cruises. A similar record of high-resolution CO measurements was simultaneously obtained offering for the first time the possibility of a comprehensive view on the distribution and emissions of these climate relevant gases on the area. The relatively simple underway N2O/CO/CO2 setup is suitable for long-term deployment on board of research and commercial vessels although

  8. Atmospheric inertia-gravity waves retrieved from level-2 data of the satellite microwave limb sounder Aura/MLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocke, Klemens; Lainer, Martin; Moreira, Lorena; Hagen, Jonas; Fernandez Vidal, Susana; Schranz, Franziska

    2016-09-01

    The temperature profiles of the satellite experiment Aura/MLS are horizontally spaced by 1.5° or 165 km along the satellite orbit. These level-2 data contain valuable information about horizontal fluctuations in temperature, which are mainly induced by inertia-gravity waves. Wave periods of 2-12 h, horizontal wavelengths of 200-1500 km, and vertical wavelengths of 6-30 km efficiently contribute to the standard deviation of the horizontal temperature fluctuations. The study retrieves and discusses the global distributions of inertia-gravity waves in the stratosphere and mesosphere during July 2015 and January 2016. We find many patterns that were previously present in data of TIMED/SABER, Aura/HIRDLS, and ECMWF analysis. However, it seems that Aura/MLS achieves a higher vertical resolution in the gravity wave maps since the maps are derived from the analysis of horizontal fluctuations along the orbit of the sounding volume. The zonal mean of the inertia-gravity wave distribution shows vertical modulations with scales of 10-20 km. Enhanced wave amplitudes occur in regions of increased zonal wind or in the vicinity of strong wind gradients. Further, we find a banana-like shape of enhanced inertia-gravity waves above the Andes in the winter mesosphere. We find areas of enhanced inertia-gravity wave activity above tropical deep convection zones at 100 hPa (z ˜ 13 km). Finally, we study the temporal evolution of inertia-gravity wave activity at 100 hPa in the African longitude sector from December 2015 to February 2016.

  9. Atmospheric Laser and Infrared Transmission Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    relative to the beam, and d is beam diameter, brings Equation A-46 to Q dT wT dcw kTq t T dcw k refpp +∇ ρ =∇⋅+ ∂ ∂ ρ 2r . [Eq. A-49] In Equation...provided that 1<< ρ dcw k p , or, equivalently, that dc kw pρ >> . For a representative case, k = 2.55×1A-4 joule/(sec cm oK), ρ = 1.225×10-3 g/cm3, cp

  10. Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchi, W.; Lawson, P.; Absil, O.; Akeson, R.; Bally, J.; Barry, R.; Beichman, C.; Belu, A.; Boyce, M.; Breckinridge, J.; Burrows, A.; Chen, C.; Cole, D.; Crisp, D.; Danner, R.; Deroo, P.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Defrère, D.; Ebbets, D.; Falkowski, P.; Gappinger, R.; Haugabook, I.; Hanot, C.; Henning, T.; Hinz, P.; Hollis, J.; Hunyadi, S.; Hyland, D.; Johnston, K.; Kaltenegger, L.; Kasting, J.; Kenworthy, M.; Ksendzov, A.; Lane, B.; Laughlin, G.; Lay, O.; Liseau, R.; Lopez, B.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Martin, S.; Mawet, D.; Mennesson, B.; Monnier, J.; Murakami, N.; Noecker, C.; Nishikawa, J.; Pesesen, M.; Peters, R.; Quillen, A.; Ragland, S.; Rinehart, S.; Rottgering, H.; Scharf, D.; Serabyn, G.; Tamura, M.; Tehrani, M.; Traub, W.; Unwin, S.; Wilner, D.; Woilliez, J.; Woolf, N.; Zhao, M.

    2009-03-01

    A mid-infrared mission would enable the detection of biosignatures of Earth-like exoplanets around more than 150 nearby stars. The mid-infrared spectral region is attractive for characterizing exoplanets because contrast with the parent star brightness is more favorable than in the visible (10 million vs. 10 billion), and because mid-infrared light probes deep into a planet's troposphere. Furthermore, the mid-infrared offers access to several strong molecular features that are key signs of life, and also provides a measure of the effective temperature and size of a planet. Taken together, an infrared mission plus a visible one would provide a nearly full picture of a planet, including signs of life; with a measure of mass from an astrometric mission, we would have a virtually complete picture. A small infrared mission would have several telescopes that are rigidly connected, with a science return from the detection and characterization of super-Earth sized to larger planets near the HZ, plus a direct measure of the exozodi brightness in the HZ. In a large infrared mission, with formation-flying telescopes, planets from an Earth-twin and upwards in mass could be detected and characterized, as well as the exozodi. If proceeded by an astrometric mission, the detection phase could be skipped and the mission devoted to characterization, as in the visible case; lacking an astrometric mission, an infrared one could proceed alone, as was discussed for a visible coronograph, and with similar caveats. The technology needed for a large formation-flying mission is similar to that for a small connected-element one (e.g., cryogenics and detectors), with the addition of formationflying technology. The technology is now in hand to implement a probe-scale mission; starlight suppression has even been demonstrated to meet the requirements of a flagship mission. However, additional development of formation-flying technology is needed, particularly in-space testing of sensors and

  11. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Monthly Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR), Version 2.2-1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) of monthly mean High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) flux at the top of the atmosphere...

  12. Power-Budget Equations and Calibration Factors for Fish Abundance Estimation Using Scientific Echo Sounder and Sonar Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Lunde

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic methods used in fish abundance estimation constitute a key part of the analytic assessment that makes the basis for abundance estimation of marine resources. The methods rely on power-budget equations and calibrated systems. Different formulations of power-budget equations and calibration factors have been proposed for use in scientific echo sounder and sonar systems. There are unresolved questions and apparent inconsistencies in prior literature related to this field. A generic (instrument independent and unifying theory is presented that attempts to explain the different power-budget and calibration factor formulations proposed and used in prior literature, and how these are mutually related. Deviations and apparent inconsistencies in this literature appear to be explained and corrected. This also includes different (instrument specific formulations employed in important modern scientific echo sounder systems, and their relationship to the generic theory of abundance estimation. Prior literature is extended to provide more complete power-budget equations for fish abundance estimation and species identification, by accounting for echo integration, electrical termination, and the full range of electrical and acoustical echo sounder parameters. The expressions provide a consistent theoretical basis for improved understanding of conventional methods and instruments used today, also enabling improved sensitivity and error analyses, and correction possibilities.

  13. Effects of the surface alb edo on short-wave infrared detection of atmospheric CO2%地表反照率对短波红外探测大气CO2的影响∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洁; 张淳民; 王鼎益; 张兴赢; 王舒鹏; 栗彦芬; 刘冬冬; 荣飘

    2015-01-01

    The greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, for which short-wave infrared remote sensing detection is carried out by using satellite sensors to measure the Earth’s atmosphere scattering solar radiation, and makes use of the inversion algorithm to achieve measurements. Most of the solar radiation enter the satellite sensors after surface reflection, so the surface albedo which reflects the surface features is one of the important parameters which affect the accuracy of the detection. Aiming at the great demands of high precision carbon dioxide for greenhouse gas, this study first investigate the effects of the Earth’s surface albedo on the observed spectra. Simulation results show that the increase in the surface albedo will enhance the observed spectral intensity, especially larger in the O2-A band than in the 1.6 µm band. In other words, the surface albedo has a greater impact on O2-A ban. In the actual satellite inversio, the surface types of actual observation pointare uncertain, which will result in the error of surface albedo. Effect of surface albedo on the inverted XCO2 is analyzed when the surface albedo is changed by changing the type of surfac. Two observation cases are analyzed in detail. One is on April 23, 2009 for the desert surface, and another on May 21, 2013 for the grass surfac. Results show that when the O2-A band surface albedo approximates to the real surface albedo valu, the relative error of the inverted XCO2 is the smaller. If the relative changes of the O2-A band surface albedo exceed 0.25 in the grass surfac or 0.35 in the desert surface, the relative error of the inverted XCO2 will be greater than 1%, not satisfying the design requirement of the inversion system. In contrast, the changesin 1.6 µm band surface albedo have negligible effect on the inverted XCO2. This study shows the importance of surface albedo in the process of satellite remote sensin, and provides an important theoretical basis and guidance for improving the accuracy of

  14. Some results of analysis of inverted echo-sounder records from the Atlantic Equatorial region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto dos Santos Franco

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available The tidal analysis of data from the Equatorial region, given by inverted echo-sounders, show considerable residuals in the frequency band of approximately 2 cycles per day. In the even harmonics of 4 and 6 cycles per day, tidal components statistically not negligible are also identified. Spectral analysis of temperature series from the same area show, on the other hand, variabilities in the same frequency bands, which suggests the occurrence of internal waves with energy distributed in these frequency bands, in the Atlantic Equatorial area.Análises de dados de maré, da zona equatorial, obtidos com ecobatímetros invertidos, mostram consideráveis resíduos na faixa de freqüências com aproximadamente dois ciclos por dia. Nos harmônicos pares com 4 e 6 ciclos por dia são também identificadas componentes de maré estatisticamente não desprezíveis. Análises espectrais de séries de temperatura obtidas na mesma área mostram, 218 por outro lado, variabilidades na mesma faixa de freqüências, o que sugere a ocorrência, na área equatorial Atlântica, de ondas internas com energia distribuída nessas faixas espectrais.

  15. THz Limb Sounder (TLS) for Lower Thermospheric Wind, Oxygen Density, and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.; Yee, Jeng-Hwa; Schlecht, Erich; Mehdi, Imran; Siles, Jose; Drouin, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutral winds are one of the most critical measurements in the lower thermosphere and E region ionosphere (LTEI) for understanding complex electrodynamic processes and ion-neutral interactions. We are developing a high-sensitivity, low-power, noncryogenic 2.06 THz Schottky receiver to measure wind profiles at 100-140 km. The new technique, THz limb sounder (TLS), aims to measure LTEI winds by resolving the wind-induced Doppler shift of 2.06 THz atomic oxygen (OI) emissions. As a transition between fine structure levels in the ground electronic state, the OI emission is in local thermodynamic equilibrium(LTE) at altitudes up to 350km. This LTE property, together with day-and-night capability and small line-of-sight gradient, makes the OI limb sounding a very attractive technique for neutral wind observations. In addition to the wind measurement, TLS can also retrieve [OI] density and neutral temperature in the LTEI region. TLS leverages rapid advances in THz receiver technologies including subharmonically pumped (SHP)mixers and Schottky-diode-based power multipliers. Current SHP Schottky receivers have produced good sensitivity for THz frequencies at ambient environment temperatures (120-150 K), which are achievable through passively cooling in spaceflight. As an emerging technique, TLS can fill the critical data gaps in the LTEI neutral wind observations to enable detailed studies on the coupling and dynamo processes between charged and neutral molecules.

  16. An algorithm for retrieval of precipitation using microwave humidity sounder channels around 183 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, A. K.; Piyush, D. N.

    2016-05-01

    An algorithm is developed to identify precipitation affected pixels and quantitatively measure the precipitation using Megha-Tropiques humidity sounder (SAPHIR) channels around water vapor absorption line at 183 GHz. Based on observed brightness temperatures at all the six channels of the SAPHIR, a probabilistic rain identification algorithm is proposed. The rain thus identified is subjected to intensive testing using SAPHIR and PR collocated dataset, that showed that false alarm and missing rain is below 0.9 mm/h. Further a radiative transfer simulations supported rain retrieval algorithm is developed that explained a correlation of 0.7 and rmse of 0.81 mm/h. When both precipitation detection and retrieval algorithms are applied the correlation marginally deteriorates but rmse reduces to 0.55 mm/h. Further comparisons are made of monthly, daily and instantaneous rain over different geographical regions from SAPHIR with corresponding rain values from GSMap, TRMM-3B42 V7 and TRMM-TMI/PR, etc. The paper provides details of algorithm development and validation results.

  17. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hamidouche, M; Marcum, P; Krabbe, A

    2010-01-01

    We present one of the new generations of observatories, the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This is an airborne observatory consisting of a 2.7-m telescope mounted on a modified Boeing B747-SP airplane. Flying at an up to 45,000 ft (14 km) altitude, SOFIA will observe above more than 99 percent of the Earth's atmospheric water vapor allowing observations in the normally obscured far-infrared. We outline the observatory capabilities and goals. The first-generation science instruments flying on board SOFIA and their main astronomical goals are also presented.

  18. Biogeochemical aspects of atmospheric methane

    OpenAIRE

    Cicerone, RJ; Oremland, RS

    1988-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant organic chemical in Earth's atmosphere, and its concentration is increasing with time, as a variety of independent measurements have shown. Photochemical reactions oxidize methane in the atmosphere; through these reactions, methane exerts strong influence over the chemistry of the troposphere and the stratosphere and many species including ozone, hydroxyl radicals, and carbon monoxide. Also, through its infrared absorption spectrum, methane is an important greenho...

  19. Online data base of satellite sounder and insitu measurements covering two solar cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitza, D.; Reinisch, B.; Benson, R.; Grebowsky, J.; Papitashvili, N.; Huang, X.; Schar, W.; Hills, K.

    Accurate descriptions of the solar cycle variations of ionospheric parameters are an important goal of ionospheric modeling. Reliable predictions of these variations are of essential importance for almost all applications of ionospheric models. Unfortunately there are very few global data sources that cover a solar cycle or more. In an effort to expand the solar cycle coverage of data readily available for ionospheric modeling, we have processed a large number of satellite data sets from the sixties, seventies, and early eighties and have made them online accessible as part of NSSDC's ftp archive (http://nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov/spacecraft data/) and it's ATMOWeb retrieval and plotting system (http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/atmoweb/). We report about two data restoration efforts supported through NASA's Applied Information Systems Research Program (AISRP). The first project deals with insitu data from a large number of US, Canadian, Japanese and German satellites that measured ionospheric densities and temperatures from 1964 to 1983. The accumulated data base includes data from the BE-B, DME-A, AE-B, Alouette 2, ISIS 1, 2, OGO-6, AEROS A, AE-C, -D, -E, Hinotori, ISS-b and DE-2 satellite missions. The second project involves the production of digital topside sounder ionograms from the ISIS 1 and 2 satellites and their subsequent inversion to produce electron-density profiles. Approximately 340,000 ionograms are available from NSSDC as of July 2002. An automatic topside ionogram scaler with true height algorithm (TOPIST) was developed as part of this project and is now being used to obtain electron density profiles from these ionograms. Providing global coverage over more than two solar cycles the database established by this two projects is a valuable asset for improvements of the International Reference Ionosphere model and for ionospheric research.

  20. Space weather and HF propagation along different paths of the Russian chirp sounders network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkin, V. I.; Litovkin, G. I.; Matyushonok, S. M.; Vertogradov, G. G.; Ivanov, V. A.; Poddelsky, I. N.; Rozanov, S. V.; Uryadov, V. P.

    This paper presents experimental data obtained on long paths (from 2200 km to 5700 km range) of Russian frequency modulated continues wave (chirp) sounders network for the period from 1998 to 2003. Four transmitters (near Magadan, Khabarovsk, Irkutsk, Norilsk) and four receivers (near Irkutsk, Yoshkar-Ola, Nizhny Novgorod, Rostov-on-Don) were combined into single network to investigate a influence of geomagnetic storms and substorms on HF propagation in Asian region of Russia. In this region the geographic latitudes are in greatest excess of magnetic latitudes. As a consequence, elements of the large-scale structure, such as the main ionospheric trough, and the zone of auroral ionization, are produced in the ionosphere at the background of a low electron ionization. Coordinated experiments were carried out using 3-day Solar-Geophysical activity forecast presented by NOAA Space Environment Center in Internet. Sounding operations were conducted in the frequency band 4 -- 30 MHz on a round-the-clock basis at 15-min intervals. Oblique-incidence sounding (OIS) ionograms were recorded during 5-7 days every season for some years. The comparison between experimental data and simulation of OIS ionograms using International Reference Ionospheric model (IRI-2001) allowed to estimate the forecast of HF propagation errors both under quiet condition and during geomagnetic disturbances. Strong deviations from median values of maximum observed frequencies on mid-latitude paths in daytime present a real challenge to ionospheric forecast. Subauroral and mid-latitude chirp-sounding paths run, respectively, near the northward and southward walls of the main ionospheric trough. This make sit possible to study the dynamics of the trough's boundaries under different geophysical conditions and assess the influence of ionization gradients and small-scale turbulence on HF signal characteristics. The signals off-great circle propagation were registered over a wide frequency range and for

  1. Ex situ echo sounder target strengths of ice krill Euphausia crystallorophias

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Hyoung Sul; Lee, Hyungbeen; Kang, Donhyug; Lee, SangHoon; Shin, Hyoung Chul

    2015-05-01

    Ice krill is the keystone species in the neritic ecosystem in the Southern Ocean, where it replaces the more oceanic Antarctic krill. It is essential to understand the variation of target strength (TS in dB re 1 m2) with the different body size to accurately estimate ice krill stocks. However, there is comparatively little knowledge of the acoustic backscatter of ice krill. The TS of individual, formalin-preserved, tethered ice krill was measured in a freshwater test tank at 38, 120, and 200 kHz with a calibrated split-beam echo sounder system. Mean TS was obtained from 21 individual ice krill with a broad range of body lengths ( L: 13-36 mm). The length ( L, mm) to wet weight ( W; mg) relationship for ice krill was W=0.001218×103 × L 3.53 ( R 2 =0.96). The mean TS-to-length relationship were TS38 kHz =-177.4+57log10 ( L), ( R 2 = 0.86); TS120 kHz = -129.9+31.56log10 ( L), ( R 2 =0.87); and TS200 kHz =-117.6+24.66log10 ( L), ( R 2 =0.84). Empirical estimates of the relationship between the TS and body length of ice krill were established at 38, 120, and 200 kHz and compared with predictions obtained from both the linear regression model of Greene et al. (1991) and the Stochastic Distorted Wave Born Approximation (SDWBA) model. This result might be applied to improve acoustic detection and density estimation of ice krill in the Southern Ocean. Further comparative studies are needed with in situ target strength including various body lengths of ice krill.

  2. Interrelated variations of O3, CO and deep convection in the tropical/subtropical upper troposphere observed by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS during 2004–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Froidevaux

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The interrelated geographical and temporal variability seen in more than seven years of tropical and subtropical upper tropospheric (215 hPa ozone, carbon monoxide and cloud ice water content (IWC observations by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS are presented. Observed ozone abundances and their variability (geographical and temporal agree to within 10–15 ppbv with records from sonde observations. MLS complements these (and other observations with global coverage and simultaneous measurements of related parameters. Previously-reported phenomena such as the ozone "wave one" feature are clearly seen in the MLS observations, as is a double peak in ozone abundance over tropical East Africa, with enhanced abundances in both May to June and September to November. While repeatable seasonal cycles are seen in many regions, they are often accompanied by significant interannual variability. Ozone seasonal cycles in the southern tropics and subtropics tend to be more distinct (i.e., annually repeatable than in the northern. By contrast, carbon monoxide shows distinct seasonal cycles in many northern subtropical regions, notably from India to the Eastern Pacific. Deep convection (as indicated by large values of IWC is typically associated with reductions in upper tropospheric ozone. Convection over polluted regions is seen to significantly enhance upper tropospheric carbon monoxide. While some regions show statistically significant correlations among ozone, carbon monoxide and IWC, simple correlations fall well short of accounting for the observed variability. The observed interrelated variations and metrics of annual and interannual variability described here represent a new resource for validation of atmospheric chemistry models.

  3. Interrelated variations of O3, CO and deep convection in the tropical/subtropical upper troposphere observed by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS during 2004–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Froidevaux

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interrelated geographic and temporal variability seen in more than seven years of tropical and subtropical upper tropospheric (215 hPa ozone, carbon monoxide and cloud ice water content (IWC observations by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS are presented. Observed ozone abundances and their variability (geographic and temporal agree to within 10–15 ppbv with records from sonde observations. MLS complements these (and other observations with global coverage and simultaneous measurements of related parameters. Previously-reported phenomena such as the ozone "wave one" feature are clearly seen in the MLS observations, as is a double peak in ozone abundance over tropical East Africa, with enhanced abundances in both May to June and September to November. While repeatable seasonal cycles are seen in many regions, they are often accompanied by significant interannual variability. Ozone seasonal cycles in the southern tropics and subtropics tend to be more distinct (i.e., annually repeatable than in the northern. By contrast, carbon monoxide shows distinct seasonal cycles in many northern subtropical regions, notably from India to the Eastern Pacific. Deep convection (as indicated by large values of IWC is typically associated with reductions in upper tropospheric ozone. Convection over polluted regions is seen to significantly enhance upper tropospheric carbon monoxide. While some regions show statistically significant correlations among ozone, carbon monoxide and IWC, simple correlations fall well short of accounting for the observed variability. The observed interrelated variations and metrics of annual and interannual variability described here represent a new resource for validation of atmospheric chemistry models.

  4. Infrared retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Tyo, J. Scott; Jang, Woo-Yong

    2011-12-06

    Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

  5. Determination of Cloud Ice Water Content and Geometrical Thickness Using Microwave and Infrared Radiometric Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Man-Li C.

    1987-08-01

    Cloud ice water content and cloud geometrical thickness have been determined using a combination of near-infrared, thermal infrared and thermal microwave radiometric measurements. The radiometric measurements are from a Multispectral Cloud Radiometer, which has seven channels ranging from visible to thermal infrared, and an Advanced Microwave Moisture Sounder, which has four channels ranging from 90 to 183 GHz. Studies indicate that the microwave brightness temperatures depend not only on the amount of ice water content but also on the vertical distribution of ice water content. Studies also show that the low brightness temperature at 92 GHz for large ice water content is due to cloud reflection which reflects most of the irradiance incident at the cloud base downward. Therefore the 92 GHz channel detects a low brightness temperature at the cloud top.

  6. Mid-infrared Semiconductor Optoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Krier, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    The practical realisation of optoelectronic devices operating in the 2–10 µm (mid-infrared) wavelength range offers potential applications in a variety of areas from environmental gas monitoring around oil rigs and landfill sites to the detection of pharmaceuticals, particularly narcotics. In addition, an atmospheric transmission window exists between 3 µm and 5 µm that enables free-space optical communications, thermal imaging applications and the development of infrared measures for "homeland security". Consequently, the mid-infrared is very attractive for the development of sensitive optical sensor instrumentation. Unfortunately, the nature of the likely applications dictates stringent requirements in terms of laser operation, miniaturisation and cost that are difficult to meet. Many of the necessary improvements are linked to a better ability to fabricate and to understand the optoelectronic properties of suitable high-quality epitaxial materials and device structures. Substantial progress in these m...

  7. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...... localities of tensions between matter and the immaterial, the practical and the ideal, and subject and object. In the colloquial language there can, moreover, often seem to be something authentic or genuine about atmosphere, juxtaposing it to staging, which is implied to be something simulated or artificial....... This introduction seeks to outline how a number of scholars have addressed the relationship between staged atmospheres and experience, and thus highlight both the philosophical, social and political aspects of atmospheres...

  8. Atmospheric Laser Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer(, Kenneth W.; Witiw, Michael R.; Baars+, Jeffrey A.; Oke, T. R.

    2004-05-01

    Atmospheric laser communication, often referred to as free-space optics (FSO) or free-space laser (FSL) communication, is similar to fiber optic cable in terms of carrier wavelength and bandwidth capability, but data are transmitted directly through the atmosphere via laser beams over paths from a few meters to 4 km or longer. FSL uses lasers in the near-infrared spectrum, typically at wavelengths of 850 or 1550 nm. Given these wavelengths, atmospheric attenuation must be considered, and an adequate margin of optical power (dB) must exist to support high system availability (the percentage of time that an FSL link is in operation, typically 99.9%). A visual range of 100 m can attenuate a laser beam at a rate of nearly 130 dB km-1. For short links (rain, and snow frequently become issues. To address these issues, long-term climate data are analyzed to determine the frequency of occurrence of low visibilities and low-cloud ceilings. To estimate availability at a site of interest, adjustments to airport climate data are made to accommodate differences in altitude, geography, and the effects of the urban heat island. In sum, communication via FSL is a feasible alternative to fiber optic cable when atmospheric conditions are considered and properly analyzed.(Current affiliation: The Boeing Company, Seattle, Washington+Current affiliation: Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

  9. Greenhouse effect in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2016-04-01

    Average optical atmospheric parameters for the infrared spectrum range are evaluated on the basis of the Earth energetic balance and parameters of the standard atmosphere. The average optical thickness of the atmosphere is u ≈ 2.5 and this atmospheric emission is originated at altitudes below 10 km. Variations of atmospheric radiative fluxes towards the Earth and outward are calculated as a function of the concentration of \\text{CO}2 molecules for the regular model of molecular spectrum. As a result of doubling of the \\text{CO}2 concentration the change of the global Earth temperature is (0.4 +/- 0.2) \\text{K} if other atmospheric parameters are conserved compared to the value (3.0 +/- 1.5) \\text{K} under real atmospheric conditions with the variation of the amount of atmospheric water. An observed variation of the global Earth temperature during the last century (0.8 ^\\circ \\text{C}) follows from an increase of the mass of atmospheric water by 7% or by conversion of 1% of atmospheric water in aerosols.

  10. Climatology and first-order composition estimates of mesospheric clouds from Mars Climate Sounder limb spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefton-Nash, E.; Teanby, N. A.; Montabone, L.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Hurley, J.; Calcutt, S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Mesospheric clouds have been previously observed on Mars in a variety of datasets. However, because the clouds are optically thin and most missions have performed surface-focussed nadir sounding, geographic and seasonal coverage is sparse. We present new detections of mesospheric clouds using a limb spectra dataset with global coverage acquired by NASA's Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Mesospheric aerosol layers, which can be CO2 ice, water ice or dust clouds, cause high radiances in limb spectra, either by thermal emission or scattering of sunlight. We employ an object recognition and classification algorithm to identify and map aerosol layers in limb spectra acquired between December 2006 and April 2011, covering more than two Mars years. We use data from MCS band A4, to show thermal signatures of day and nightside features, and A6, which is sensitive to short wave IR and visible daytime features only. This large dataset provides several thousand detections of mesospheric clouds, more than an order of magnitude more than in previous studies. Our results show that aerosol layers tend to occur in two distinct regimes. They form in equatorial regions (30°S-30°N) during the aphelion season/northern hemisphere summer (Ls 150°) a greater number of features are observed and are distributed in two mid-latitude bands, with a southern hemisphere bias. We observe temporal and longitudinal clustering of cloud occurrence, which we suggest is consistent with a formation mechanism dictated by interaction of broad temperature regimes imposed by global circulation and the propagation to the mesosphere of small-scale dynamics such as gravity waves and thermal tides. Using calculated frost point temperatures and a parameterization based on synthetic spectra we find that aphelion clouds are present in generally cooler conditions and are spectrally more consistent with H2O or CO2 ice. A significant fraction has nearby temperature retrievals that are

  11. Calibration and brightness temperature algorithm of CE-1 Lunar Microwave Sounder (CELMS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    CE-1 Lunar Microwave Sounder (CELMS) is the first passive microwave radiometer in the world to sound the surface of the Moon in the lunar orbit at altitude of 200 km. The scientific objective of CELMS is to obtain global brightness temperature (TB) of the Moon, to retrieve information on lunar regolith, and to evaluate the distribution of helium-3 on the Moon implanted by solar wind. Before launch of CELMS, a series of experiments were carried out in laboratories to test the performances of the systems, and to calibrate the responses between the input of TB and the output of voltage from the receivers. However, the thermal condition exposed to CELMS is more complicated in lunar orbit than on the Earth, which makes the temperatures of different parts of CELMS wave vary greatly, and the cosmic background is not very clean due to the pointing of cold space antenna to the direction of the satellite running, which brings uncertainties into data-processing of CELMS when the temperature of cold space is used as a calibrator. Furthermore, the lack of knowledge on the lunar ingredients and compositions, distributions of physical temperatures, and properties on lunar microwave radiation leads to difficulties in validating the measurements and retrievals of CELMS. By analyzing the results of ground experiments and the measurements of CELMS in-orbit, along with our knowledge of the properties of lunar surface, here we give algorithms on calibration and antenna pattern correction (APC) of CELMS. We also describe in detail the principle of microwave transfer among the elements of CELMS, and discuss the method on testing calibration parameters of the system. In addition, the theory and model on correction antenna pattern of CELMS are developed by comparing antenna temperatures by CELMS with those simulated by microwave radiative transfer models. The global distribution of TB is given and the features of TB are analyzed. Our results show rich information included in TB on the

  12. GHRSST Level 2P Global skin Sea Surface Temperature from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the Metop-A satellite (GDS V2) produced by OSI SAF (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A global 1 km Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 2P dataset based on multi-channel sea surface temperature (SST) retrievals generated...

  13. GHRSST Level 2P Global skin Sea Surface Temperature from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the Metop-B satellite (GDS V2) produced by OSI SAF (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 2P dataset based on multi-channel sea surface temperature (SST) retrievals generated in real-time...

  14. Identification of natural plasma emissions observed close to the plasmapause by the Cluster-Whisper relaxation sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Canu

    Full Text Available We use the data collected by the Whisper instrument onboard the Cluster spacecraft for a first test of its capabilities in the identification of the natural plasma waves observed in the Earth’s magnetosphere. The main signatures observed at the plasma frequency, upper hybrid frequency, and electron Bernstein modes were often difficult to be reliably recognized on previous missions. We use here the characteristic frequencies provided by the resonances triggered by the relaxation sounder of Whisper to identify with good confidence the various signatures detected in the complex wave spectra collected close to the plasmapause. Coupled with the good sensitivity, frequency and time resolution of Whisper, the resonances detected by the sounder allow one to precisely spot these natural emissions. This first analysis seems to confirm the interpretation of Geos observations: the natural emissions observed in Bernstein modes above the plasma frequency, now widely observed onboard Cluster, are not modeled by a single Maxwellian electrons distribution function. Therefore, multi-temperature electron distribution functions should be considered.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (active perturbation experiments; waves and instabilities; instrument and techniques

  15. Impact of advanced technology microwave sounder data in the NCMRWF 4D-VAR data assimilation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, S. Indira; Srinivas, D.; Mallick, Swapan; George, John P.

    2016-05-01

    This study demonstrates the added benefits of assimilating the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) radiances from the Suomi-NPP satellite in the NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM). ATMS is a cross-track scanning microwave radiometer inherited the legacy of two very successful instrument namely, Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS). ATMS has 22 channels: 11 temperature sounding channels around 50-60 GHz oxygen band and 6 moisture sounding channels around the 183GHz water vapour band in addition to 5 channels sensitive to the surface in clear conditions, or to water vapour, rain, and cloud when conditions are not clear (at 23, 31, 50, 51 and 89 GHz). Before operational assimilation of any new observation by NWP centres it is standard practice to assess data quality with respect to NWP model background (short-forecast) fields. Quality of all channels is estimated against the model background and the biases are computed and compared against that from the similar observations. The impact of the ATMS data on global analyses and forecasts is tested by adding the ATMS data in the NCUM Observation Processing system (OPS) and 4D-Var variational assimilation (VAR) system. This paper also discusses the pre-operational numerical experiments conducted to assess the impact of ATMS radiances in the NCUM assimilation system. It is noted that the performance of ATMS is stable and it contributes to the performance of the model, complimenting observations from other instruments.

  16. Space Electron Density Gradient Studies using a 3D Embedded Reconfigurable Sounder and ESA/NASA CLUSTER Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides a direct comparison between data captured by a new embedded reconfigurable digital sounder, different ground-based ionospheric sounders spread around Europe and the ESA/NASA CLUSTER mission. The CLUSTER mission consists of four identical space probes flying in a formation that allows measurements of the electron density gradient in the local magnetic field. Both the ground-based and the spacecraft instrumentations assist in studying the motion, geometry and boundaries of the plasmasphere. The comparison results are in accordance to each other. Some slight deviations among the captured data were expected from the beginning of this investigation. These small discrepancies are reasonable and seriatim analyzed. The results of this research are significant, since the level of the plasma's ionization, which is related to the solar activity, dominates the propagation of electromagnetic waves through it. Similarly, unusually high solar activity presents serious hazards to orbiting satellites, spaceborne instrumentation, satellite communications and infrastructure located on the Earth's surface. Long-term collaborative study of the data is required to continue, in order to identify and determine the enhanced risk in advance. This would allow scientists to propose an immediate cure.

  17. Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S

    2010-01-01

    At the dawn of the first discovery of exoplanets orbiting sun-like stars in the mid-1990s, few believed that observations of exoplanet atmospheres would ever be possible. After the 2002 Hubble Space Telescope detection of a transiting exoplanet atmosphere, many skeptics discounted it as a one-object, one-method success. Nevertheless, the field is now firmly established, with over two dozen exoplanet atmospheres observed today. Hot Jupiters are the type of exoplanet currently most amenable to study. Highlights include: detection of molecular spectral features; observation of day-night temperature gradients; and constraints on vertical atmospheric structure. Atmospheres of giant planets far from their host stars are also being studied with direct imaging. The ultimate exoplanet goal is to answer the enigmatic and ancient question, "Are we alone?" via detection of atmospheric biosignatures. Two exciting prospects are the immediate focus on transiting super Earths orbiting in the habitable zone of M-dwarfs, and u...

  18. Infrared heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    The transfer of energy by radiation whose limits lie between 1 mm and 400 mm is indicated. The radiation used lies practically completely in the infrared region. Its use therefore depends on the thermal radiation laws (black body or integral receiver laws). These laws were derived mathematically in accordance with the properties of an ideal body, the so-called ""integral receiver'' (formerly black body). According to definition this integral receiver has the property of absorbing completely all incident electromagnetic radiation. From these the following laws were deduced: (1) All bodies with a temperature above absolute zero emit a radiation. (2) The energy emitted by the integral receiver is proportional to the 4th power of the absolute temperature. (3) The emission theoretically comprizes the whole radiation. (4) The radiation comprizing the emission spectrum does not transport the same amount of energy at every wavelength.

  19. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki Kajita

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses...

  20. Articulating Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily...... experience in space, presented as middle ground experience. In the field of HCI, middle ground experiences complete the unarticulated spectrum between designing for foreground of attention or background awareness. When “Articulating Atmospheres through Middle Ground Experiences in Interaction Design...

  1. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses atmospheric neutrino experiments and the neutrino oscillation studies with these neutrinos.

  2. Atmospheric electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, J Alan

    1957-01-01

    Atmospheric Electricity brings together numerous studies on various aspects of atmospheric electricity. This book is composed of 13 chapters that cover the main problems in the field, including the maintenance of the negative charge on the earth and the origin of the charges in thunderstorms. After a brief overview of the historical developments of atmospheric electricity, this book goes on dealing with the general principles, results, methods, and the MKS system of the field. The succeeding chapters are devoted to some aspects of electricity in the atmosphere, such as the occurrence and d

  3. AIRS/Aqua Level 1B HSB geolocated and calibrated brightness temperatures V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a facility instrument aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In combination...

  4. AIRS/Aqua Level 2G Precipitation Estimate V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a facility instrument aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In combination...

  5. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Intersatellite Calibrated Clear-Sky HIRS Channel 12 Brightness Temperature, Version 2.6

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Inter-Satellite Calibrated Clear-Sky High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) Channel 12 brightness temperatures...

  6. NESDIS Total Ozone from Analysis of Stratospheric and Tropospheric components (TOAST)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TOAST combines UV and IR ozone retrievals from an algorithm using the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Version 2 (SBUV/2) and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS)...

  7. Atmospheric effects on laser beams. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, B.

    1980-08-01

    The compilation cites recent research on laser beam transmission through the atmosphere. Studies on molecular attenuation turbulence, thermal blooming atmospheric window flows, atmospheric composition, aerosols, infrared lasers, computerized simulation, and water vapor are included. The effects of attenuation on optical radar, optical communications, and infrared detection are covered. This updated bibliography contains 260 citations, 14 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  8. Modeling of atmospheric-coupled Rayleigh waves on planets with atmosphere: From Earth observation to Mars and Venus perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lognonné, Philippe; Karakostas, Foivos; Rolland, Lucie; Nishikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic coupling between solid Earth and atmosphere has been observed since the 1960s, first from ground-based seismic, pressure, and ionospheric sensors and since 20 years with various satellite measurements, including with global positioning system (GPS) satellites. This coupling leads to the excitation of the Rayleigh surface waves by local atmospheric sources such as large natural explosions from volcanoes, meteor atmospheric air-bursts, or artificial explosions. It contributes also in the continuous excitation of Rayleigh waves and associated normal modes by atmospheric winds and pressure fluctuations. The same coupling allows the observation of Rayleigh waves in the thermosphere most of the time through ionospheric monitoring with Doppler sounders or GPS. The authors review briefly in this paper observations made on Earth and describe the general frame of the theory enabling the computation of Rayleigh waves for models of telluric planets with atmosphere. The authors then focus on Mars and Venus and give in both cases the atmospheric properties of the Rayleigh normal modes and associated surface waves compared to Earth. The authors then conclude on the observation perspectives especially for Rayleigh waves excited by atmospheric sources on Mars and for remote ionospheric observations of Rayleigh waves excited by quakes on Venus.

  9. Temperate Ice Depth-Sounder: A proved concept for temperate ice sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Olivares, V. A.; Rodriguez-Morales, F.; Leuschen, C.; Ayyangar, H.; Gogineni, P. S.

    2010-12-01

    Observations of glaciers and snow cover are important to the understanding and prediction of both ablation ratio and the overall impact reductions in ice formation will have on the cryosphere. The extent of the coverage of these observations still remains limited in some regions due to natural geographic accidents that make it problematic for human in-situ exploration. Instruments with the capability to estimate the composition and thickness of ice formations are a suitable compliment to enhance the quality and extent of the data currently available. Radar instruments can be used to provide information on the internal and basal conditions of ice masses. For temperate ice, the high water content produces volume scattering and attenuation in propagating radar waves. The volume scattering appears as clutter masking weak bedrock echoes. At the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) we have developed an HF dual-frequency Temperate-Ice Depth Sounder radar (TIDSoR) for systematic surveys of the thickness and sub-glacial topography of temperate-ice. This radar has successfully sounded 1-km thick ice near Jakobshavn, Greenlad glacier and 2-km thick cold ice near Byrd camp, Antarctica. TIDSoR operates at two different center frequencies: 7.5 MHz and 14 MHz, with a maximum peak output power of 20 W. It also can be programmed to operate at other frequencies in the HF spectrum. The transmitted waveform is a digitally generated pulse with a programmable repetition frequency of up to 20 kHz. The frequencies of operation were selected based on three main criteria: (a) the ability to overcome volume scattering produced by the ice inclusions, such as water pockets, with at least 10 dB power of a backscattered signal and up to 3 km depth; (b) compatibility with high frequency aviation radio systems, which are mostly used for voice communications; and (c) portability, lower power consumption, and interface with a portable computer. The radar consists of three functional

  10. An inter-comparison of sediment classification methods based on multi-beam echo-sounder backscatter and sediment natural radioactivity data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellen, M.; Eleftherakis, S.; Amiri-Simkooei, A.; Koomans, R.L.; Simons, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    This contribution presents sediment classification results derived from different sources of data collected at the Dordtse Kil river, the Netherlands. The first source is a multi-beam echo-sounder (MBES). The second source is measurements taken with a gamma-ray scintillation detector, i.e., the Mult

  11. A model-based method for reducing the sound speed induced errors in multi-beam echo-sounder bathymetric measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellen, M.; Siemes, K.; Simons, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for accurately estimating the bathymetry from multi-beam echo-sounder (MBES) travel-time measurements in environments with large variations in the water column sound speeds (both temporally and spatially). In this type of environments the water column sound speeds at the time of

  12. Atmospheric materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    experience and, consequently, to the conceptual and methodological shifts in the production of space, and hence in the way we think about materiality. In this context, architectural space is understood as a contingent construction – a space of engagement that appears to us as a result of continuous...... characteristics of atmosphere as a spatial phenomenon, the aim of this text is to illustrate these associations and draw out design protocols, focusing on ways in which atmosphere can be conditioned architecturally. In other words, the objective is to trace the conceptual contours of ‘atmospheric materiality’....

  13. Remote sensing of atmospheric chemistry; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 1-3, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, James L. (Editor); Mcneal, Robert J. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on remote sensing of atmospheric chemistry discusses special remote sensing space observations and field experiments to study chemical change in the atmosphere, network monitoring for detection of stratospheric chemical change, stratospheric chemistry studies, and the combining of model, in situ, and remote sensing in atmospheric chemistry. Attention is given to the measurement of tropospheric carbon monoxide using gas filter radiometers, long-path differential absorption measurements of tropospheric molecules, air quality monitoring with the differential optical absorption spectrometer, and a characterization of tropospheric methane through space-based remote sensing. Topics addressed include microwave limb sounder experiments for UARS and EOS, an overview of the spectroscopy of the atmosphere using an FIR emission experiment, the detection of stratospheric ozone trends by ground-based microwave observations, and a FIR Fabry-Perot spectrometer for OH measurements.

  14. Acoustic seabed classification using QTC IMPACT on single-beam echo sounder data from the Norwegian Channel, northern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidem, Ellen Johanne; Landmark, Knut

    2013-10-01

    Sediment mapping is important for understanding the physical processes, the impact of human activity, and the conditions for marine life on the seabed. For this purpose, the seabed classification tool QTC IMPACT analyses statistical variations in single-beam echo sounder data. QTC was applied in a large and physically diverse area of the Norwegian Channel, between 59°30‧N and 61°N, to produce a new sediment map and to verify the QTC algorithm. The results were interpreted using ground truth (grain size analyses of 40 gravity cores and five grab samples), multi-beam echo sounder bathymetry (MBES), and seismo-acoustic profiles. Surficial sediments were divided into five classes: (1) mud and silt, (2) a variety of clay, silt and sand, (3) sandy mud with gravel, (4) sand with gravel, and (5) clay and sandy clay. Along the Norwegian coast, where MBES imagery shows evidence of glacial erosion, the surficial sediment distribution is variable. The echo shape analysis of QTC did not produce a natural partition of the data, and statistical assumptions did not always hold. Sediment classification was therefore sensitive to the choice of cluster algorithm. However, QTC produced the most physically plausible results on a large scale compared to other cluster algorithms. Class boundaries were consistent with supporting data. One exception is a transition from muddy to sandy sediments not visible in seismo-acoustic data. A possible explanation is that seabed fluid seepage and water current erosion cause sand particle transport into the western part of the channel. The study confirms the capability of QTC in a complex environment, but there are some possible improvements.

  15. First theoretical global line lists of ethylene (12C2H4) spectra for the temperature range 50-700 K in the far-infrared for quantification of absorption and emission in planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, M.; Delahaye, T.; Nikitin, A. V.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.

    2016-10-01

    We present the construction of complete and comprehensive ethylene line lists for the temperatures 50-700 K based on accurate ab initio potential and dipole moment surfaces and extensive first-principle calculations. Three lists spanning the [0-6400] cm-1 infrared region were built at T = 80, 160, and 296 K, and two lists in the range [0-5200] cm-1 were built at 500 and 700 K. For each of these five temperatures, we considered possible convergence problems to ensure reliable opacity calculations. Our final list at 700 K was computed up to J = 71 and contains almost 60 million lines for intensities I > 5 × 10-27 cm/molecule. Comparisons with experimental spectra carried out in this study showed that for the most active infrared bands, the accuracy of band centers in our theoretical lists is better on average than 0.3 cm-1, and the integrated absorbance errors in the intervals relevant for spectral analyses are about 1-3%. These lists can be applied to simulations of absorption and emission spectra, radiative and non-LTE processes, and opacity calculations for planetary and astrophysical applications. The lists are freely accessible through the TheoReTS information system at http://theorets.univ-reims.fr and http://theorets.tsu.ru

  16. Atmospheric Dispositifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    , the conceptual foundations and protocols for the production of atmosphere in architecture might be found beneath the surface of contemporary debates. In this context, the notion of atmospheric dispositif – illustrated through an oeuvre of the German architect Werner Ruhnau and its theoretical and historical...... as a spatial phenomenon, exploring a multiplicity of conditions that constitute their resonant origins – i.e. the production sites from and within they have emerged. The intention is also to argue that despite the fact that atmosphere as an aesthetic category has crystallised over the last few decades...... contextualisation – provides a platform for revealing productive entanglements between heterogeneous elements, disciplines and processes. It also allows rendering atmosphere as a site of co-production open to contingencies and affective interplay on multiples levels: at the moment of its conceptualisation...

  17. Atmospheric composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The earth's atmosphere is made up of a number of gases in different relative amounts. Near sea level and up to about 90 km, the amount of these atmospheric gases in clean, relatively dry air is practically constant. Four of these gases, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide, make up 99.99 percent by volume of the atmosphere. Two gases, ozone and water vapor, change in relative amounts, but the total amount of these two is very small compared to the amount of the other gases. The atmospheric composition shown in a table can be considered valid up to 90 km geometric altitude. Above 90 km, mainly because of molecular dissociation and diffusive separation, the composition changes.

  18. Impact of temperature field inhomogeneities on the retrieval of atmospheric species from MIPAS IR limb emission spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kiefer

    2010-04-01

    general 1-D retrievals of infrared limb sounders, if the line of sight of the instrument has a significant component in the direction of the horizontal temperature variation.

  19. Examining Traveling Waves in Mars Atmosphere Reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greybush, Steven J.; Wilson, R. John

    2015-11-01

    Synoptic-scale eddies (traveling waves) are a key feature of the variability of Mars atmosphere weather in the extratropics, and are linked to the initiation of dust storms. Mars reanalyses, which combine satellite observations with simulations from a Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM), provide a four-dimensional picture of the evolution of these waves in terms of temperature, winds, pressure, and aerosol fields. The Ensemble Mars Atmosphere Reanalysis System (EMARS) has created multiple years of Mars weather maps through the assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) temperature profiles using the ensemble Kalman filter and the GFDL MGCM. We investigate the robustness of the synoptic eddies to changes in the aerosol fields, model parameters, data assimilation system design, and observation dataset (TES vs. MCS). We examine the evolution of wavenumber regimes, their seasonal evolution, and interannual variability. Finally, reanalysis fields are combined with spacecraft visible imagery (e.g. MGS Mars Orbital Camera), demonstrating the link between meteorological fields (temperature, pressure, and wind) and dust fronts.

  20. Observing the Impact of the Anthropocene from Space: the Evolution of Atmospheric Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, John P.

    2016-04-01

    From the Neolithic revolution to the industrial revolution over ~ 10 000 years, the earth's population rose from several millions to 1 Billion powered by energy from a mixture of biofuels, water and solar power and a limited amount of the combustion of coal. The industrial revolution began in the UK in the late 18th century, and has been fuelled by the combustion of fossil fuels, initially coal but then oil and gas. This has led to a dramatic rise in both the human population, now comprising over 7 Billion with more than 50% living in urban areas, and its standard of living. The expectation is that by 2050 population will be of the order of 10 Billion with 75% dwelling in urban areas. Anthropogenic activity has resulted in pollution from the local to the global scale, changes in land use, the destruction of stratospheric ozone, the modification of biogeochemical cycling, the destruction of species, ecosystems and ecosystem services and climate change. The earth has entered a new geological epoch the anthropocene. The observation of atmospheric composition provides a unique early warning of the natural and anthropogenic origins of change. Consistent and consolidated measurements from the local to the global scale are required to test our knowledge of the biogeochemical cycles, which determine atmospheric composition, and to assess and attribute accurately their modification by anthropogenic activity. To achieve global measurements of atmospheric constituents (trace gases, aerosol and cloud parameters) the SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY), Project was initiated in the early 1980s. This was the first passive remote sensing space based instrumentation, designed to make simultaneous contiguous measurements of the solar upwelling radiation at the top of the atmosphere from the ultraviolet to the shortwave infrared. The SCIAMACHY project resulted in measurements of the instruments GOME, originally called SCIA-mini, on ESA

  1. Low-Resolution Near-infrared Stellar Spectra Observed by the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Gyu; Lee, Hyung Mok; Arai, Toshiaki; Bock, James; Cooray, Asantha; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Kim, Seong Jin; Korngut, Phillip; Lanz, Alicia; Lee, Dae Hee; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Nam, Uk Won; Onishi, Yosuke; Shirahata, Mai; Smidt, Joseph; Tsumura, Kohji; Yamamura, Issei; Zemcov, Michael

    2017-02-01

    We present near-infrared (0.8–1.8 μm) spectra of 105 bright ({m}J < 10) stars observed with the low-resolution spectrometer on the rocket-borne Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment. As our observations are performed above the Earth's atmosphere, our spectra are free from telluric contamination, which makes them a unique resource for near-infrared spectral calibration. Two-Micron All-Sky Survey photometry information is used to identify cross-matched stars after reduction and extraction of the spectra. We identify the spectral types of the observed stars by comparing them with spectral templates from the Infrared Telescope Facility library. All the observed spectra are consistent with late F to M stellar spectral types, and we identify various infrared absorption lines.

  2. Correction of detector nonlinearity for the balloonborne Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Anne

    2006-01-20

    The detectors used in the cryogenic limb-emission sounder MIPAS-B2 (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) show a nonlinear response, which leads to radiometric errors in the calibrated spectra if the nonlinearity is not taken into account. In the case of emission measurements, the dominant error that arises from the nonlinearity is the changing detector responsivity as the incident photon load changes. The effect of the distortion of a single interferogram can be neglected. A method to characterize the variable responsivity and to correct for this effect is proposed. Furthermore, a detailed error estimation is presented.

  3. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  4. Steps Toward a Common Near-Infrared Photometric System

    CERN Document Server

    Tokunaga, A T

    2007-01-01

    The proliferation of near-infrared (1--5 $\\mu$m) photometric systems over the last 30 years has made the comparison of photometric results difficult. In an effort to standardize infrared filters in use, the Mauna Kea Observatories near-infrared filter set has been promoted among instrument groups through combined filter production runs. The characteristics of this filter set are summarized, and some aspects of the filter wavelength definitions, the flux density for zero magnitude, atmospheric extinction coefficients, and color correction to above the atmosphere are discussed.

  5. Atmospheric thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarne, J V

    1973-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the atmosphere is the subject of several chapters in most textbooks on dynamic meteorology, but there is no work in English to give the subject a specific and more extensive treatment. In writing the present textbook, we have tried to fill this rather remarkable gap in the literature related to atmospheric sciences. Our aim has been to provide students of meteorology with a book that can playa role similar to the textbooks on chemical thermodynamics for the chemists. This implies a previous knowledge of general thermodynamics, such as students acquire in general physics courses; therefore, although the basic principles are reviewed (in the first four chapters), they are only briefly discussed, and emphasis is laid on those topics that will be useful in later chapters, through their application to atmospheric problems. No attempt has been made to introduce the thermodynamics of irreversible processes; on the other hand, consideration of heterogeneous and open homogeneous systems permits a...

  6. Spectroscopy of the earth's atmosphere and interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, KN

    1992-01-01

    Spectroscopy of the Earth's Atmosphere and Interstellar Medium focuses on the characteristics of the electromagnetic spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere in the far-infrared and microwave regions. It discusses the modes of observation in field measurements and reviews the two techniques used in the spectral region. Organized into six chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the effect of water-vapor absorption, followed by a discussion on the two frequently used method for deriving atmospheric parameters from high-resolution infrared atmospheric spectra, namely, the equivalent width

  7. Microwave Limb Sounder/El Nino Watch - 1997 Research Data Reveal Clues about El Nino's Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This image displays wind measurements taken by the satellite-borne NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) during the last 10 days of May 1997, showing the relationship between the ocean and the atmosphere at the onset of the 1997-98 El Nino condition. The data have helped scientists confirm that the event began as an unusual weakening of the trade winds that preceded an increase in sea surface temperatures. The arrows represent wind speed and direction while the colors indicate sea surface temperature. The sea surface temperatures were measured by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, a joint mission of NASA and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The trade winds normally blow from east to west, but the small arrows in the center of the image show the winds have changed direction and are blowing in the opposite direction. The areas shown in red are above normal sea surface temperatures -- along the equator, off the west coast of the U.S., and along the west coast of Mexico. This image also shows an unusual low pressure system with cyclonic (counterclockwise) circulation near the western North American coast. NSCAT also observed that winds associated with this circulation pattern branched off from the equator, bypassed Hawaii, and brought heat and moisture from the tropical ocean towards San Francisco, in what is often called the 'pineapple express.'

  8. Methane present in an extrasolar planet atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Swain, Mark R; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    Molecules present in exoplanetary atmospheres are expected to strongly influence the atmospheric radiation balance, trace dynamical and chemical processes, and indicate the presence of disequilibrium effects. Since molecules have the potential to reveal the exoplanet atmospheric conditions and chemistry, searching for them is a high priority. The rotational-vibrational transition bands of water, carbon monoxide, and methane are anticipated to be the primary sources of non-continuum opacity in hot-Jovian planets. Since these bands overlap in wavelength, and the corresponding signatures from them are weak, decisive identification requires precision infrared spectroscopy. Here we report on a near-infrared transmission spectrum of the planet HD 189733b showing the presence of methane. Additionally, a resolved water-vapour band at 1.9 microns confirms the recent claim of water in this object. On thermochemical grounds, carbon-monoxide is expected to be abundant in the upper atmosphere of hot-Jovian exoplanets; thu...

  9. Infrared Studies on the Jet Exhaust of a Turbojet Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Ray

    1971-10-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to evaluate the effective Infrared radiant energy from a conical jet exhaust of a jet aircraft, infrared emission characteristics have been worked out with special reference to guidance and decoy purpose.Suitable infrared absorbing materials used for shielding the infrared emitting skin of the radiating part have also been discussed.attempts have also been made to evaluate the effective radiation on a detecting system after allowing for allowing for the solar radiant heat and also atmospheric absorption.

  10. Handbook of infrared standards II with spectral coverage between

    CERN Document Server

    Meurant, Gerard

    1993-01-01

    This timely compilation of infrared standards has been developed for use by infrared researchers in chemistry, physics, engineering, astrophysics, and laser and atmospheric sciences. Providing maps of closely spaced molecular spectra along with their measured wavenumbers between 1.4vm and 4vm, this handbook will complement the 1986 Handbook of Infrared Standards that included special coverage between 3 and 2600vm. It will serve as a necessary reference for all researchers conducting spectroscopic investigations in the near-infrared region.Key Features:- Provides all new spec

  11. Atmospheric Refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Calculations of atmospheric refraction are generally based on a simplified model of atmospheric density in the troposphere which assumes that the temperature decreases at a constant lapse rate from sea level up to a height equal to eleven km, and that afterwards it remains constant. In this model, the temperature divided by the lapse rate determines the length scale in the calculations for altitudes less than this height. But daily balloon measurements across the U.S.A. reveal that in some cases the air temperature actually increases from sea level up to a height of about one km, and only after reaching a plateau, it decreases at an approximately constant lapse rate. Moreover, in three examples considered here, the temperature does not remain constant at eleven km , but continues to decreases to a minimum at about sixteen kilometers , and then increases at higher altitudes at a lower rate. Calculations of atmospheric refraction based on this atmospheric data is compared with the results of simplified models.

  12. Use of INSAT-3D sounder and imager radiances in the 4D-VAR data assimilation system and its implications in the analyses and forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indira Rani, S.; Taylor, Ruth; George, John P.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2016-05-01

    INSAT-3D, the first Indian geostationary satellite with sounding capability, provides valuable information over India and the surrounding oceanic regions which are pivotal to Numerical Weather Prediction. In collaboration with UK Met Office, NCMRWF developed the assimilation capability of INSAT-3D Clear Sky Brightness Temperature (CSBT), both from the sounder and imager, in the 4D-Var assimilation system being used at NCMRWF. Out of the 18 sounder channels, radiances from 9 channels are selected for assimilation depending on relevance of the information in each channel. The first three high peaking channels, the CO2 absorption channels and the three water vapor channels (channel no. 10, 11, and 12) are assimilated both over land and Ocean, whereas the window channels (channel no. 6, 7, and 8) are assimilated only over the Ocean. Measured satellite radiances are compared with that from short range forecasts to monitor the data quality. This is based on the assumption that the observed satellite radiances are free from calibration errors and the short range forecast provided by NWP model is free from systematic errors. Innovations (Observation - Forecast) before and after the bias correction are indicative of how well the bias correction works. Since the biases vary with air-masses, time, scan angle and also due to instrument degradation, an accurate bias correction algorithm for the assimilation of INSAT-3D sounder radiance is important. This paper discusses the bias correction methods and other quality controls used for the selected INSAT-3D sounder channels and the impact of bias corrected radiance in the data assimilation system particularly over India and surrounding oceanic regions.

  13. Infrared Detectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The end goal of this project is to develop proof-of-concept infrared detectors which can be integrated in future infrared instruments engaged in remote...

  14. Feldspar, Infrared Stimulated Luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars.......This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars....

  15. A solid state laser development program for remote atmospheric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of NASA Langley efforts to develop solid-state lasers for use in the Lidar Atmospheric Sounder and Altimeter (LASA) of the Space Station Earth Observing System is surveyed. The types of observations to be performed with LASA are listed, and the parameters of presently available lasers are compared with the LASA baseline goals: 2 kW output power; 500 kg weight; tunability to 727, 760, and 943 nm to within 500 fm; high spectral purity; efficiency greater than 3 percent; energy about 1 J/pulse, pulse length less than 100 nsec, and lifetime greater than 108 shots. The use of sensitized flashlamp-pumped laser materials or diode-laser pumping to improve performance is discussed, and particular attention is given to materials research on Ti:sapphire lasers, studies of higher-efficiency detectors, and the LASE and LITE airborne lidar and DIAL experiments.

  16. Analysis of Information Content in High-Spectral Resolution Sounders using Subset Selection Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez-Reyes, Miguel; Joiner, Joanna

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize the results of the sensitivity analysis and data reduction carried out to determine the information content of AIRS and IASI channels. The analysis and data reduction was based on the use of subset selection techniques developed in the linear algebra and statistical community to study linear dependencies in high dimensional data sets. We applied the subset selection method to study dependency among channels by studying the dependency among their weighting functions. Also, we applied the technique to study the information provided by the different levels in which the atmosphere is discretized for retrievals and analysis. Results from the method correlate well with intuition in many respects and point out to possible modifications for band selection in sensor design and number and location of levels in the analysis process.

  17. Exact results in modeling planetary atmospheres-II. Semi-gray atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutily, B. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Chevallier, L. [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Laboratoire LUTH, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon cedex (France); Pelkowski, J. [Institut fuer Atmosphaere und Umwelt, J.W. Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Campus Riedberg, Altenhaferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt a.M. (Germany)], E-mail: Pelkowski@meteor.uni-frankfurt.de; Bergeat, J. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France)

    2008-01-15

    We solve the radiative transfer equation for a semi-gray planetary atmosphere in radiative equilibrium, in an attempt to define an entirely analytical non-gray model atmosphere of finite optical thickness. The salient feature of the model is that the incident solar radiation is partitioned between two adjacent spectral domains-the 'visible' and the 'infrared'-in each of which the atmosphere's (effective) opacity is assumed to be independent of frequency (the semi-gray assumption). We envisage a plane-parallel atmosphere illuminated by a beam of parallel radiation and bounded below by a partially reflecting and emitting ground. The former emits infrared radiation, induced by the absorption of radiation both visible and infrared, deriving from the external irradiation as well as from the emission of the planet's surface layer. For an atmosphere with given single-scattering albedos and optical thicknesses in both the visible and infrared domains, we compute the temperature at every depth of the atmosphere, as well as the ground's temperature.

  18. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K

    2016-01-01

    In view of the observation by IceCube of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos, it is important to quantify the uncertainty in the background of atmospheric neutrinos. There are two sources of uncertainty, the imperfect knowledge of the spectrum and composition of the primary cosmic rays that produce the neutrinos and the limited understanding of hadron production, including charm, at high energy. This paper is an overview of both aspects.

  19. Infrared detectors for Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, K.; Davis, R. P.; Knowles, P.; Shorrocks, N.

    2016-05-01

    IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer), developed by CNES and launched since 2006 on the Metop satellites, is established as a major source of data for atmospheric science and weather prediction. The next generation - IASI NG - is a French national contribution to the Eumetsat Polar System Second Generation on board of the Metop second generation satellites and is under development by Airbus Defence and Space for CNES. The mission aim is to achieve twice the performance of the original IASI instrument in terms of sensitivity and spectral resolution. In turn, this places very demanding requirements on the infrared detectors for the new instrument. Selex ES in Southampton has been selected for the development of the infrared detector set for the IASI-NG instruments. The wide spectral range, 3.6 to 15.5 microns, is covered in four bands, each served by a dedicated detector design, with a common 4 x 4 array format of 1.3 mm square macropixels. Three of the bands up to 8.7 microns employ photovoltaic MCT (mercury cadmium telluride) technology and the very long wave band employs photoconductive MCT, in common with the approach taken between Airbus and Selex ES for the SEVIRI instrument on Second Generation Meteosat. For the photovoltaic detectors, the MCT crystal growth of heterojunction photodiodes is by the MOVPE technique (metal organic vapour phase epitaxy). Novel approaches have been taken to hardening the photovoltaic macropixels against localised crystal defects, and integrating transimpedance amplifiers for each macropixel into a full-custom silicon read out chip, which incorporates radiation hard design.

  20. Design of Transmitter for CDM Based 2×2 Multiple Input Multiple Output Channel Sounder for Multipath Delay Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Ullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO wireless communication system is an innovative solution to improve the bandwidth efficiency by exploiting multipath-richness of the propagation environment. The degree of multipath-richness of the channel will determine the capacity gain attainable by MIMO deployment. Approach: Therefore, it is very important to have accurate knowledge of the propagation environment/radio channel before MIMO implement. The radio channel behavior can be anticipated by channel measurement or channel sounding. Code Division Multiplexing (CDM is one of the channel sounding techniques that allow accurate measurement at the cost of hardware complexity. CDM based channel sounder, requires code with excellent auto-correlation and cross-correlation properties which generally difficult to be achieved simultaneously. Results: In this study, an efficient transmitter for CDM-based 2×2 MIMO channel sounding technique with Loosely Synchronous (LS codes is designed. Simulation results shows that the channel sounding scheme using LS codes gives very good performance for measuring 2×2 MIMO channel behavior. The BPSK transmitter is designed using MATLAB, Verilog and Xilinx system generator blocks. Conclusion: The whole design is simulated as a single ISE project by using ModelSim simulation tool and compiled using ISE 9.2. However the proposed design of transmitter using LS code of length 8190 bits can measure multipath delay of minimum 0.13 μs and maximum 520 μs.

  1. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder O3 and CO Observations in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesey, N. J.; Filipiak, M. J.; Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Lambert, A.; Santee, J. L.; Jiang, J. H.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Waters, J. W.; Cofield, R. E.; Cuddy, D. T.; Daffer, W. H.; Drouin, B. J.; Fuller, R. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Jiang, Y. B.; Knosp, B. W.; Li, Q. B.; Perun, V. S.; Schwartz, M. J.; Snyder, W. V.; Stek, P. C.; Thurstans, R. P.; Wagner, P. A.; Avery, M.

    2008-01-01

    Global satellite observations of ozone and carbon monoxide from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the EOS Aura spacecraft are discussed with emphasis on those observations in the 2 15 - 100 hPa region (the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere). The precision, resolution and accuracy of the data produced by the MLS "version 2.2" processing algorithms are discussed and quantified. O3 accuracy is estimated at approx.40 ppbv +5% (approx.20 ppbv +20% at 215 hPa) while the CO accuracy is estimated at approx.30 ppbv +30% for pressures of 147 hPa and less. Comparisons with expectations and other observations show good agreements for the O3 product, generally consistent with the systematic errors quoted above. In the case of COY a persistent factor of approx.2 high bias is seen at 215 hPa. However, the morphology is shown to be realistic, consistent with raw MLS radiance data, and useful for scientific study. The MLS CO data at higher altitudes are shown to be consistent with other observations.

  2. Aura Microwave Limb Sounder Observations of Dynamics and Transport During the Record-Breaking 2009 Arctic Stratospheric Major Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manney, Gloria L.; Schwartz, Michael J.; Krueger, Kirstin; Santee, Michelle L.; Pawson, Steven; Lee, Jae N.; Daffer, William H.; Fuller, Ryan A.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.

    2009-01-01

    A major stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) in January 2009 was the strongest and most prolonged on record. Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) observations are used to provide an overview of dynamics and transport during the 2009 SSW, and to compare with the intense, long-lasting SSW in January 2006. The Arctic polar vortex split during the 2009 SSW, whereas the 2006 SSW was a vortex displacement event. Winds reversed to easterly more rapidly and reverted to westerly more slowly in 2009 than in 2006. More mixing of trace gases out of the vortex during the decay of the vortex fragments, and less before the fulfillment of major SSW criteria, was seen in 2009 than in 2006; persistent well-defined fragments of vortex and anticyclone air were more prevalent in 2009. The 2009 SSW had a more profound impact on the lower stratosphere than any previously observed SSW, with no significant recovery of the vortex in that region. The stratopause breakdown and subsequent reformation at very high altitude, accompanied by enhanced descent into a rapidly strengthening upper stratospheric vortex, were similar in 2009 and 2006. Many differences between 2006 and 2009 appear to be related to the different character of the SSWs in the two years.

  3. Lake Tahoe Bottom Characteristics Extracted from SHOALS Lidar Waveform Data and Compared to Backscatter Data From a Multibeam Echo Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, G. R.; Gardner, J. V.

    2002-12-01

    The waveforms recorded by airborne lidar bathymetry (ALB) systems are currently processed only for depth information. In addition to bathymetry, multibeam echo sounder (MBES) systems provide backscatter data in which regions of different acoustic properties are distinguishable. These regions can often be correlated to different bottom types. Initial attempts to extract equivalent data from the ALB waveforms have confirmed the expectation that such information is encoded in those waveforms. Water clarity, bathymetry, and bottom type control the detailed shapes of ALB waveforms in different ways. Specific features of a bottom-reflected signal can be identified, for example its rise-time and amplitude, and used for clustering and classifying the individual data points. Two data sets from Lake Tahoe are available for comparison: ALB data from the SHOALS (scanning hydrographic operational airborne lidar survey) system of the US Army Corps of Engineers, and Simrad EM1000 MBES data from the USGS. Feature extraction, clustering, and classification of the SHOALS data reveals changes in the optical bottom reflectance characteristics that are echoed in the acoustic bottom backscatter properties.

  4. Composition of the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone: Climatology and variability from 10 years of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santee, Michelle; Manney, Gloria; Livesey, Nathaniel; Neu, Jessica; Schwartz, Michael; Read, William

    2016-04-01

    Satellite measurements are invaluable for investigating the composition of the upper troposphere / lower stratosphere (UTLS) in the region of the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone, which has been sparsely sampled by other means. The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), launched as part of NASA's Aura mission in July 2004, makes simultaneous co-located measurements of trace gases and cloud ice water content (IWC, a proxy for deep convection) in the UTLS on a daily basis. Here we exploit the dense spatial and temporal coverage, long-term data record, and extensive measurement suite of Aura MLS to characterize the climatological composition of the ASM anticyclone and quantify its considerable spatial, seasonal, and interannual variability. We relate the observed trace gas behavior to various meteorological quantities, such as the size and strength of the ASM anticyclone, the extent and intensity of deep convection, and variations in the tropopause and the upper tropospheric jets in that region. Multiple species of both tropospheric and stratospheric origin are examined to help assess whether the observed variability arises from variations in transport processes or changes in the strength or location of surface emissions.

  5. Simulations on the influence of lunar surface temperature profiles on CE-1 lunar microwave sounder brightness temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Surface temperature profile is an important parameter in lunar microwave remote sensing. Based on the analysis of physical properties of the lunar samples brought back by the Apollo and Luna missions, we modeled temporal and spatial variation of lunar surface temperature with the heat conduction equation, and produced temperature distribution in top 6.0 m of lunar regolith of the whole Moon surface. Our simulation results show that the profile of lunar surface temperature varies mainly within the top 20 cm, except at the lunar polar regions where the changes can reach to about 1.0 m depth. The temperature is stable beyond that depth. The variations of lunar surface temperature lead to main changes in brightness temperature (TB) at different channels of the lunar microwave sounder (CELMS) on Chang’E-1 (CE-1). The results of this paper show that the temperature profile influenced CELMS TB, which provides strong validation on the CELMS data, and lays a solid basis for future interpretation and utilization of the CELMS data.

  6. Microwave Limb Sounder observations of biomass-burning products from the Australian bush fires of February 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Pumphrey

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The large bush fires which occurred in southeast Australia in February 2009 were unusually destructive. However, they were also unusual in the amounts of various combustion products which were injected directly into the stratosphere. We report the observations by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS instrument on the Aura satellite of some of these combustion products. The highest quality observations are of CO; these clearly show a large region of enhanced mixing ratios to the north of New Zealand which remains in that region for about ten days before drifting westwards and finally dissipating over the Atlantic about a month after the fire. Back trajectories run from the points where MLS observes enhanced CO pass close to the site of the fire. The MLS observations of CH3CN and HCN resemble those of CO except for their poorer vertical resolution and more limited vertical range. An apparent enhancement in ClO is also observed by MLS, but detailed analysis of the measured radiances reveals this feature to be a signature of CH3OH, which is not currently retrieved by the MLS data processing system. The fires of February 2009 are the only event of this type and magnitude in the 6-yr MLS record.

  7. Microwave Limb Sounder observations of biomass-burning products from the Australian bush fires of February 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Pumphrey

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The large bush fires which occurred in southeast Australia in February 2009 were unusually destructive. However, they were also unusual in the amounts of various combustion products which were injected directly into the stratosphere. We report the observations by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS instrument on the Aura satellite of some of these combustion products. The highest quality observations are of CO; these clearly show a large region of enhanced mixing ratios to the north of New Zealand which remains in that region for about ten days before drifting westwards and finally dissipating over the Atlantic about a month after the fire. The region of enhanced CO ascends from the tropopause to 46 hPa during this period. Back trajectories run from the points where MLS observes enhanced CO pass close to the site of the fire. The MLS observations of CH3CN and HCN resemble those of CO except for their poorer vertical resolution and more limited vertical range. An apparent enhancement in ClO is also observed by MLS, but detailed analysis of the measured radiances reveals this feature to be a signature of CH3OH, which is not currently retrieved by the MLS data processing system. The fires of February 2009 are the only event of this type and magnitude in the 7-yr MLS record.

  8. Quantifying and monitoring convection intensity from mm-wave sounder observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Ziad S.; Sawaya, Randy S.; Kacimi, Sahra; Sy, Ousmane O.; Steward, Jeffrey L.

    2016-05-01

    Few systematic attempts to interpret the measurements of mm-wave radiometers over clouds and precipitation have been made to date because the scattering signatures of hydrometeors at these frequencies are very difficult to model. The few algorithms that have been developed try to retrieve surface precipitation, to which the observations are partially correlated but not directly sensitive. In fact, over deep clouds, mm-wave radiometers are most sensitive to the scattering from solid hydrometeors within the upper levels of the cloud. In addition, mm-wave radiometers have a definite advantage over the lower-frequency window-channel radiometers in that they have finer resolution and can therefore explicitly resolve deep convection. Preliminary analyses (in particular of NOAA's MHS brightness temperatures, as well as Megha-Tropiques's SAPHIR observations) indicate that the measurements are indeed very sensitive to the depth and intensity of convection. The challenge is to derive a robust approach to make quantitative estimates of the convection, for example the height and depth of the condensed water, directly from the mm-wave observations, as a function of horizontal location. To avoid having to rely on a specific set of microphysical assumptions, this analysis exploits the substantial amount of nearly- simultaneous coincident observations by mm-wave radiometers and orbiting atmospheric profiling radars in order to enforce unbiased consistency between the calculated brightness temperatures and the radar and radiometer observations.

  9. Impact of horizontal and vertical localization scales on microwave sounder SAPHIR radiance assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, C.; Balaji, C.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, the effect of horizontal and vertical localization scales on the assimilation of direct SAPHIR radiances is studied. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has been used as a surrogate for the forward radiative calculations. The training input dataset for ANN consists of vertical layers of atmospheric pressure, temperature, relative humidity and other hydrometeor profiles with 6 channel Brightness Temperatures (BTs) as output. The best neural network architecture has been arrived at, by a neuron independence study. Since vertical localization of radiance data requires weighting functions, a ANN has been trained for this purpose. The radiances were ingested into the NWP using the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) technique. The horizontal localization has been taken care of, by using a Gaussian localization function centered around the observed coordinates. Similarly, the vertical localization is accomplished by assuming a function which depends on the weighting function of the channel to be assimilated. The effect of both horizontal and vertical localizations has been studied in terms of ensemble spread in the precipitation. Aditionally, improvements in 24 hr forecast from assimilation are also reported.

  10. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  11. Monitoring Atmospheric Transmission with FLAME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Peter C.; McGraw, J. T.; Zirzow, D. C.; Koppa, M.; Buttler-Pena, K.

    2014-01-01

    Calibration of ground-based observations in the optical and near-infrared requires precise and accurate understanding of atmospheric transmission, at least as precise and accurate as that required for the spectral energy distributions of science targets. Traditionally this has used the Langley extrapolation method, observing targets and calibrators over a range of airmass and extrapolating to zero airmass by assuming a plane-parallel homogeneous atmosphere. The technique we present uses direct measurements of the atmosphere to derive the transmission along the line of sight to science targets at a few well-chosen wavelengths. The Facility Lidar Atmospheric Monitor of Extinction (FLAME) is a 0.5m diameter three Nd:YAG wavelength (355nm, 532nm & 1064nm) elastic backscatter lidar system. Laser pulses are transmitted into the atmosphere in the direction of the science target. Photons scattered back toward the receiver by molecules, aerosols and clouds are collected and time-gated so that the backscatter intensity is measured as a function of range to the scattering volume. The system is housed in a mobile calibration lab, which also contains auxiliary instrumentation to provide a NIST traceable calibration of the transmitted laser power and receiver efficiency. FLAME was designed to create a million photons per minute signal from the middle stratosphere, where the atmosphere is relatively calm and dominated by molecules of the well-mixed atmosphere (O2 & N2). Routine radiosonde measurements of the density at these altitudes constrain the scattering efficiency in this region and, combined with calibration of the transmitter and receiver, the only remaining unknown quantity is the two-way transmission to the stratosphere. These measurements can inform atmospheric transmission models to better understand the complex and ever-changing observatory radiative transfer environment. FLAME is currently under active development and we present some of our ongoing measurements.

  12. Spectroscopic detection and characterisation of planetary atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collier Cameron A.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Space based broadband infrared observations of close orbiting extrasolar giant planets at transit and secondary eclipse have proved a successful means of determining atmospheric spectral energy distributions and molecular composition. Here, a ground-based spectroscopic technique to detect and characterise planetary atmospheres is presented. Since the planet need not be transiting, this method enables a greater sample of systems to be studied. By modelling the planetary signature as a function of phase, high resolution spectroscopy has the potential to recover the signature of molecules in planetary atmospheres.

  13. OCCIMA: Optical Channel Characterization in Maritime Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, Steve; Tsintikidis, Dimitri; deGrassie, John; Reinhardt, Colin; McBryde, Kevin; Hallenborg, Eric; Wayne, David; Gibson, Kristofor; Cauble, Galen; Ascencio, Ana; Rudiger, Joshua

    2015-05-01

    The Navy is actively developing diverse optical application areas, including high-energy laser weapons and free- space optical communications, which depend on an accurate and timely knowledge of the state of the atmospheric channel. The Optical Channel Characterization in Maritime Atmospheres (OCCIMA) project is a comprehensive program to coalesce and extend the current capability to characterize the maritime atmosphere for all optical and infrared wavelengths. The program goal is the development of a unified and validated analysis toolbox. The foundational design for this program coordinates the development of sensors, measurement protocols, analytical models, and basic physics necessary to fulfill this goal.

  14. UV and infrared absorption spectra, atmospheric lifetimes, and ozone depletion and global warming potentials for CCl2FCCl2F (CFC-112), CCl3CClF2 (CFC-112a), CCl3CF3 (CFC-113a), and CCl2FCF3 (CFC-114a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Maxine E.; Bernard, François; McGillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Burkholder, James B.

    2016-07-01

    The potential impact of CCl2FCF3 (CFC-114a) and the recently observed CCl2FCCl2F (CFC-112), CCl3CClF2 (CFC-112a), and CCl3CF3 (CFC-113a) chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) on stratospheric ozone and climate is presently not well characterized. In this study, the UV absorption spectra of these CFCs were measured between 192.5 and 235 nm over the temperature range 207-323 K. Precise parameterizations of the UV absorption spectra are presented. A 2-D atmospheric model was used to evaluate the CFC atmospheric loss processes, lifetimes, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs), and the associated uncertainty ranges in these metrics due to the kinetic and photochemical uncertainty. The CFCs are primarily removed in the stratosphere by short-wavelength UV photolysis with calculated global annually averaged steady-state lifetimes (years) of 63.6 (61.9-64.7), 51.5 (50.0-52.6), 55.4 (54.3-56.3), and 105.3 (102.9-107.4) for CFC-112, CFC-112a, CFC-113a, and CFC-114a, respectively. The range of lifetimes given in parentheses is due to the 2σ uncertainty in the UV absorption spectra and O(1D) rate coefficients included in the model calculations. The 2-D model was also used to calculate the CFC ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) with values of 0.98, 0.86, 0.73, and 0.72 obtained for CFC-112, CFC-112a, CFC-113a, and CFC-114a, respectively. Using the infrared absorption spectra and lifetimes determined in this work, the CFC global warming potentials (GWPs) were estimated to be 4260 (CFC-112), 3330 (CFC-112a), 3650 (CFC-113a), and 6510 (CFC-114a) for the 100-year time horizon.

  15. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fukao

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF, probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam observations with the EAR. The ESF plumes drifted eastward while keeping distances of several hundred to a thousand kilometers. Comparing the occurrence of the plumes and the F-layer uplift measured by the FM-CW sounders, plumes were initiated within the scanned area around sunset only, when the F-layer altitude rapidly increased. Therefore, the PreReversal Enhancement (PRE is considered as having a zonal variation with the scales mentioned above, and this variation causes day-to-day variability, which has been studied for a long time. Modulation of the underlying E-region conductivity by gravity waves, which causes inhomogeneous sporadic-E layers, for example, is a likely mechanism to determine the scale of the PRE.

  16. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukao, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Tayama, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Maruyama, T.; Saito, S.

    2006-07-01

    The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF), probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S) and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam observations with the EAR. The ESF plumes drifted eastward while keeping distances of several hundred to a thousand kilometers. Comparing the occurrence of the plumes and the F-layer uplift measured by the FM-CW sounders, plumes were initiated within the scanned area around sunset only, when the F-layer altitude rapidly increased. Therefore, the PreReversal Enhancement (PRE) is considered as having a zonal variation with the scales mentioned above, and this variation causes day-to-day variability, which has been studied for a long time. Modulation of the underlying E-region conductivity by gravity waves, which causes inhomogeneous sporadic-E layers, for example, is a likely mechanism to determine the scale of the PRE.

  17. Alarming atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Kinch, Sofie

    2014-01-01

    . As a response to this situation, our design artefact, the interactive furniture Kidkit, invites children to become accustomed to the alarming sounds sampled from the ward while they are waiting in the waiting room. Our design acknowledges how atmospheres emerge as temporal negotiations between the rhythms......, a familiar relationship with the alarming sounds in the ward, enabling her to focus later more on the visit with the relative. The article discusses the proposed design strategy behind this solution and the potentiality for its use in hospital environments in general....

  18. Galileo infrared imaging spectroscopy measurements at venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R.W.; Baines, K.H.; Encrenaz, Th.; Taylor, F.W.; Drossart, P.; Kamp, L.W.; Pollack, James B.; Lellouch, E.; Collard, A.D.; Calcutt, S.B.; Grinspoon, D.; Weissman, P.R.; Smythe, W.D.; Ocampo, A.C.; Danielson, G.E.; Fanale, F.P.; Johnson, T.V.; Kieffer, H.H.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    During the 1990 Galileo Venus flyby, the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer investigated the night-side atmosphere of Venus in the spectral range 0.7 to 5.2 micrometers. Multispectral images at high spatial resolution indicate substantial cloud opacity variations in the lower cloud levels, centered at 50 kilometers altitude. Zonal and meridional winds were derived for this level and are consistent with motion of the upper branch of a Hadley cell. Northern and southern hemisphere clouds appear to be markedly different. Spectral profiles were used to derive lower atmosphere abundances of water vapor and other species.

  19. A Mariner's Insights into Titan's Hydrology: Glassy Seas, Depth Sounders, and Mystery Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Alexander; Lorenz, Ralph

    Within the past year, the Cassini spacecraft has made several groundbreaking discoveries regarding Titan’s lakes and seas. These observations restrict the surface of Ligeia Mare to smoother than approximately 1 mm, directly measure a bathymetric profile through a Titan sea, constrain the volume of the exposed liquid inventory, determine liquid composition to be nearly pure methane and ethane, and place constraints on the formation and evolution of polar basins. We will review these recent discoveries and discuss their impact on our knowledge of Titan’s Hydrologic System. Titan’s polar terrain can be broadly described as consisting of smooth undulating plains, dissected uplands, and more heavily dissected labyrinthic morphologies. Inset into the undulating plains are broad and steep-sided depressions, each of which are found in varying states of liquid fill (dry, bottom-wet, and filled). Titan’s northern seas (Kraken, Ligeia, and Punga) are examples of liquid-filled broad depression while the smaller lakes predominantly consist of liquid-filled steep-sided depressions. Collectively, these features account for 1.1% of Titan’s globally observed surface area, while Kraken, Ligeia, and Punga Mare account for 80% of all liquid-filled features by area. Until recently, it was unknown how many of the brighter lacustrine features observed by RADAR were in fact filled with liquid. The VIMS and ISS instruments, which observe at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, and are thus sensitive to tens of micrometer-deep pools of liquid hydrocarbon (as opposed to RADAR which can see through approximately 100 m of liquid methane/ethane), had limited visibility of the north polar terrain during Titan’s northern winter. As Titan approaches northern summer solstice, the VIMS and ISS instruments are obtaining high-quality data of the lake district. We use these newly available datasets to determine the fill-state of observed features and present a complete map of Titan

  20. Infrared astronomy - Scientific/military thrusts and instrumentation; Proceedings of the Meeting, Washington, DC, April 21, 22, 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggess, N. W. (Editor); Stears, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    A series of papers on infrared astronomy is presented. Among the topics discussed are those concerning programs, such as NASA's planning, the Cosmic Background Explorer and a cryogenic infrared radiance instrument for the Space Shuttle. Articles on infrared astronomy technology include those on an infrared camera for 10-micron astronomy, bulk and integrated acousto-optic spectrometers for molecular astronomy with heterodyne spectrometers, and airborne measurements of infrared atmospheric radiance and sky noise. Several papers on infrared astronomy spectroscopy are included, such as infrared heterodyne spectroscopy and infrared lines from shocked galactic gases. Among the articles on infrared astronomy catalogues and operations are discussions of groundbased infrared measurements using the AMOS/MOTIF facility and the prediction of infrared celestial source counts.

  1. A Search for Magnesium in Europa's Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Horst, Sarah M

    2013-01-01

    Europa's tenuous atmosphere results from sputtering of the surface. The trace element composition of its atmosphere is therefore related to the composition of Europa's surface. Magnesium salts are often invoked to explain Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer spectra of Europa's surface, thus magnesium may be present in Europa's atmosphere. We have searched for magnesium emission in Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph archival spectra of Europa's atmosphere. Magnesium was not detected and we calculate an upper limit on the magnesium column abundance. This upper limit indicates that either Europa's surface is depleted in magnesium relative to sodium and potassium, or magnesium is not sputtered as efficiently resulting in a relative depletion in its atmosphere.

  2. Titan's atmosphere from DISR

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert

    This abstract distills information about Titan's atmosphere described in detail in a paper by M. G. Tomasko, L. Doose, S. Engel, L. E. Dafoe, R. West, M. Lemmon, E. Karkoschka and C. See, ‘A model of Titan's aerosols based on measurements made inside the atmosphere', Planetary and Space Sciences, in press, 2008. The Descent Imager Spectral Radiometer (DISR) observed Titan's sky and surface during the descent of the Huygens Probe in January, 2005. Measurements were made over the altitude range 160 Km to the surface near latitude -10 degrees. The DISR instrument package included several components to measure the radiation state as a function of altitude. These include upward and downward-looking visible and near-infrared spectrometers covering the wavelength range 450 to 1600 nm, an ultraviolet photometer, a solar aureole camera with polarizers, and a sun sensor. Measurements were made at a variety of azimuthal angles relative to the sun azimuth. Due to unanticipated behavior of the probe (reverse spin and high-amplitude, chaotic tip and tilt) the retrieval process has required more effort than was planned and the total science return is less than expected. Nevertheless the data yielded unsurpassed and unique information which constrain the optical and physical properties of the photochemical haze aerosols and condensate particles. The principal findings are (1) between 80 Km and 160 Km the photochemical haze is well mixed with the gas with a scale height of about 65 Km, (2) between 80 Km and the surface the particle optical depth is a linear function of altitude with a break in slope near 30 Km altitude, (3) optical properties of the haze do not depend much on altitude above 80 Km although more recent work by Tomasko and colleagues suggest a gradient in the stratosphere; below 80 Km there are changes in optical behavior which suggest that condensation plays a role, (4) the data confirm previous results which proposed a particle structure of aggregates of small

  3. Recent divergences in stratospheric water vapor measurements by frost point hygrometers and the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Dale F.; Read, William G.; Vömel, Holger; Selkirk, Henry B.; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Davis, Sean M.; Hall, Emrys G.; Jordan, Allen F.; Oltmans, Samuel J.

    2016-09-01

    Balloon-borne frost point hygrometers (FPs) and the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) provide high-quality vertical profile measurements of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). A previous comparison of stratospheric water vapor measurements by FPs and MLS over three sites - Boulder, Colorado (40.0° N); Hilo, Hawaii (19.7° N); and Lauder, New Zealand (45.0° S) - from August 2004 through December 2012 not only demonstrated agreement better than 1 % between 68 and 26 hPa but also exposed statistically significant biases of 2 to 10 % at 83 and 100 hPa (Hurst et al., 2014). A simple linear regression analysis of the FP-MLS differences revealed no significant long-term drifts between the two instruments. Here we extend the drift comparison to mid-2015 and add two FP sites - Lindenberg, Germany (52.2° N), and San José, Costa Rica (10.0° N) - that employ FPs of different manufacture and calibration for their water vapor soundings. The extended comparison period reveals that stratospheric FP and MLS measurements over four of the five sites have diverged at rates of 0.03 to 0.07 ppmv year-1 (0.6 to 1.5 % year-1) from ˜ 2010 to mid-2015. These rates are similar in magnitude to the 30-year (1980-2010) average growth rate of stratospheric water vapor ( ˜ 1 % year-1) measured by FPs over Boulder (Hurst et al., 2011). By mid-2015, the FP-MLS differences at some sites were large enough to exceed the combined accuracy estimates of the FP and MLS measurements.

  4. Global characteristics of the upper transition height derived from the topside Alouette/ISIS topside sounder electron density profiles, the Formosat-3/COSMIC density profiles and the IRI ion composition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlik, Vladimir; Triskova, Ludmila; Benson, Robert; Bilitza, Dieter; Chu, Philip; Richards, Phil G.; Wang, Yongli

    The upper transition height (Ht) (the altitude of the transition from heavy atomic ions to light ions or in the simplest form the transition from O+ to H+) is an important parameter, representing the boundary between the ionosphere and the plasmasphere. Ht is very sensitive to various geophysical parameters, like solar and magnetic activity and strongly depends on latitude and local time. There were numerous studies of this parameter in past decades. In spite of these efforts, no model satisfactorily represents this parameter so far. Moreover, surprising evidence of very low transition heights during the last prolonged solar minimum, of a level never obtained before, have been reported. We investigate the upper transition height on the global scale. We made progress in processing large data sets of Ht deduced from the Alouette/ISIS topside sounder and from the Formosat-3/COSMIC vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h) using the theoretical Global Plasma Ionosphere Density (GPID) model (Webb and Essex, 2004) and a revised non-linear function describing the scale height vs. altitude (Titheridge, 1976) to fit the vertical density profiles to the observed profiles and to determine the upper transition height. Since both methods require the plasma temperatures and their gradients as input, these are calculated using the IRI2012 model. Both methods are verified using a large amount of electron and ion density profiles simulated by the FLIP theoretical model and their accuracy is discussed. We compare the results from Alouette/ISIS and Formosat-3/COSMIC and present a global distribution of the calculated Ht and its dependence on geophysical parameters. Finally we compare it with Ht calculated using the IRI ion composition model. Titheridge, J.E., 1976. Ion Transition Heights from Topside Electron-Density Profiles. Planetary and Space Science 24 (3), 229-245. Webb, P.A., Essex, E.A., 2004. A dynamic global model of the plasmasphere. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar

  5. Exact results in modeling planetary atmospheres-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelkowski, J. [Institut fuer Atmosphaere und Umwelt, J.W. Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Campus Riedberg, Altenhoferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt a.M. (Germany)], E-mail: Pelkowski@meteor.uni-frankfurt.de; Chevallier, L. [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Laboratoire LUTH, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon cedex (France); Rutily, B. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Titaud, O. [Centro de Modelamiento Matematico, UMI 2807 CNRS-UChile, Blanco Encalada 2120 - 7 Piso, Casilla 170 - Correo 3, Santiago (Chile)

    2008-01-15

    We apply the semi-gray model of our previous paper to the particular case of the Earth's atmosphere, in order to illustrate quantitatively the inverse problem associated with the direct problem we dealt with before. From given climatological values of the atmosphere's spherical albedo and transmittance for visible radiation, the single-scattering albedo and the optical thickness in the visible are inferred, while the infrared optical thickness is deduced for given global average surface temperature. Eventually, temperature distributions in terms of the infrared optical depth will be shown for a terrestrial atmosphere assumed to be semi-gray and, locally, in radiative and thermodynamic equilibrium.

  6. Land and Atmosphere Near-Real-Time Capability for Earth Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    LANCE (Land, Atmosphere Near-Real-Time Capability for EOS) in 2009. LANCE consists of special processing elements, co-located with selected EOSDIS data centers and processing facilities. A primary goal of LANCE is to bring multiple near-real-time systems under one umbrella, offering commonality in data access, quality control, and latency. LANCE now processes and distributes data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) instruments within 3 hours of satellite observation. The Rapid Response System and the Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS) capabilities will be incorporated into LANCE in 2011. LANCE maintains a central website to facilitate easy access to data and user services. LANCE products are extensively tested and compared with science products before being made available to users. Each element also plans to implement redundant network, power and server infrastructure to ensure high availability of data and services. Through the user registration system, users are informed of any data outages and when new products or services will be available for access. Building on a significant investment by NASA in developing science algorithms and products, LANCE creates products that have a demonstrated utility for applications requiring near-real-time data. From lower level data products such as calibrated geolocated radiances to higher-level products such as sea ice extent, snow cover, and cloud cover, users have integrated LANCE data into forecast models and decision support systems. The table above shows the current near-real-time product categories by instrument. The ESDIS Project continues to improve the LANCE system and use the experience gained through practice to seek adjustments to improve the quality and performance of the system. For example, an

  7. Polymer optics for the passive infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claytor, Richard N.

    2016-10-01

    An important, but largely invisible, area of polymer optics involves sensing the motion of warm objects. It can be further subdivided into optics for security, for energy conservation, and for convenience; the area has become known as optics for the passive infrared. The passive infrared is generally known as the 8 to 14 μm region of the optical spectrum. The region's roots are in the traditional infrared technology of many decades ago; there is a coincident atmospheric window, although that has little relevance to many short-range applications relevant to polymer optics. Regrettably, there is no polymer material ideally suited to the passive infrared, but one material is generally superior to other candidates. The inadequacy of this material makes the Fresnel lens important. Polymer optics for the passive infrared were first introduced in the 1970s. Patents from that period will be shown, as well as early examples. The unfamiliar names of the pioneering companies and their technical leaders will be mentioned. The 1980s and 90s brought a new and improved lens type, and rapid growth. Pigments for visible-light appearance and other reasons were introduced; one was a spectacular failure. Recent advances include faster lenses, a new groove structure, additional pigments, and lens-mirror combinations. New sensor types are also being introduced. Finally, some unique and inventive applications will be discussed.

  8. Infrared design examples

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, William L

    1999-01-01

    This tutorial covers infrared design examples in considerable detail, building on principles presented in an earlier text, 'Introduction to Infrared System Design' (SPIE PRESS Vol. TT24). The text explores a range of problems illustrating several design issues, with applications in military, industry, aeronautics, space, and medicine, among others.

  9. Atmospheric Research 2014 Technical Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric research in the Earth Sciences Division (610) consists of research and technology development programs dedicated to advancing knowledge and understanding of the atmosphere and its interaction with the climate of Earth. The Division's goals are to improve understanding of the dynamics and physical properties of precipitation, clouds, and aerosols; atmospheric chemistry, including the role of natural and anthropogenic trace species on the ozone balance in the stratosphere and the troposphere; and radiative properties of Earth's atmosphere and the influence of solar variability on the Earth's climate. Major research activities are carried out in the Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Laboratory, the Climate and Radiation Laboratory, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, and the Wallops Field Support Office. The overall scope of the research covers an end-to-end process, starting with the identification of scientific problems, leading to observation requirements for remote-sensing platforms, technology and retrieval algorithm development; followed by flight projects and satellite missions; and eventually, resulting in data processing, analyses of measurements, and dissemination from flight projects and missions. Instrument scientists conceive, design, develop, and implement ultraviolet, infrared, optical, radar, laser, and lidar technology to remotely sense the atmosphere. Members of the various Laboratories conduct field measurements for satellite sensor calibration and data validation, and carry out numerous modeling activities. These modeling activities include climate model simulations, modeling the chemistry and transport of trace species on regional-to-global scales, cloud resolving models, and developing the next-generation Earth system models. Satellite missions, field campaigns, peer-reviewed publications, and successful proposals are essential at every stage of the research process to meeting our goals and maintaining leadership of the

  10. Comparison of modelled and empirical atmospheric propagation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, J. R.; Biegel, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The radiometric integrity of TM thermal infrared channel data was evaluated and monitored to develop improved radiometric preprocessing calibration techniques for removal of atmospheric effects. Modelled atmospheric transmittance and path radiance were compared with empirical values derived from aircraft underflight data. Aircraft thermal infrared imagery and calibration data were available on two dates as were corresponding atmospheric radiosonde data. The radiosonde data were used as input to the LOWTRAN 5A code which was modified to output atmospheric path radiance in addition to transmittance. The aircraft data were calibrated and used to generate analogous measurements. These data indicate that there is a tendancy for the LOWTRAN model to underestimate atmospheric path radiance and transmittance as compared to empirical data. A plot of transmittance versus altitude for both LOWTRAN and empirical data is presented.

  11. Infrared /IR/ spectroscopy in support of atmospheric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    In general, the data required for the more abundant species are: (1) linewidths as a function of temperature; (2) line strength measurements obtained at various temperatures when since quantum assignments for the lines are unknown the lower state energy levels are unknown; and (3) line strength measurements of the 'hot' bands and bands of the isotopic species. It is pointed out that an extensive list of line center frequencies and line strengths from 2400 to 3200 per cm of (CH4)4 has recently been added to the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory compilation. Since many of the lines in the list could not be assigned, the laboratory research required measurements of samples at various temperatures in order to experimentally determine the temperature dependence on the line strengths. The 'hot' band here refers to transitions arising from vibrational states other than the ground state. 'Hot' bands are usually near the parent band (arising from the ground state). Very few 'hot' bands are without parent bands.

  12. Infrared Solar Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Penn

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The infrared solar spectrum contains a wealth of physical data about our Sun, and is explored using modern detectors and technology with new ground-based solar telescopes. The scientific motivation behind exploring these wavelengths is presented, along with a brief look at the rich history of observations here. Several avenues of solar physics research exploiting and benefiting from observations at infrared wavelengths from roughly 1000 nm to 12 400 nm are discussed, and the instrument and detector technology driving this research is briefly summarized. Finally, goals for future work at infrared wavelengths are presented in conjunction with ground and space-based observations.

  13. Top Sounder Ice Penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Sweeney, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Ice draft measurements are made as part of normal operations for all US Navy submarines operating in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine ice draft data are unique in providing high resolution measurements over long transects of the ice covered ocean. The data has been used to document a multidecadal drop in ice thickness, and for validating and improving numerical sea-ice models. A submarine upward-looking sonar draft measurement is made by a sonar transducer mounted in the sail or deck of the submarine. An acoustic beam is transmitted upward through the water column, reflecting off the bottom of the sea ice and returning to the transducer. Ice thickness is estimated as the difference between the ship's depth (measured by pressure) and the acoustic range to the bottom of the ice estimated from the travel time of the sonar pulse. Digital recording systems can provide the return off the water-ice interface as well as returns that have penetrated the ice. Typically, only the first return from the ice hull is analyzed. Information regarding ice flow interstitial layers provides ice age information and may possibly be derived with the entire return signal. The approach being investigated is similar to that used in measuring bottom sediment layers and will involve measuring the echo level from the first interface, solving the reflection loss from that transmission, and employing reflection loss versus impedance mismatch to ascertain ice structure information.

  14. Infrared processing of foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infrared (IR) processing of foods has been gaining popularity over conventional processing in several unit operations, including drying, peeling, baking, roasting, blanching, pasteurization, sterilization, disinfection, disinfestation, cooking, and popping . It has shown advantages over conventional...

  15. Optically triggered infrared photodetector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiro, Íñigo; Martí, Antonio; Antolín, Elisa; López, Esther; Datas, Alejandro; Luque, Antonio; Ripalda, José M; González, Yolanda

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate a new class of semiconductor device: the optically triggered infrared photodetector (OTIP). This photodetector is based on a new physical principle that allows the detection of infrared light to be switched ON and OFF by means of an external light. Our experimental device, fabricated using InAs/AlGaAs quantum-dot technology, demonstrates normal incidence infrared detection in the 2-6 μm range. The detection is optically triggered by a 590 nm light-emitting diode. Furthermore, the detection gain is achieved in our device without an increase of the noise level. The novel characteristics of OTIPs open up new possibilities for third generation infrared imaging systems ( Rogalski, A.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 105 (9), 091101).

  16. Mid infrared emission spectroscopy of carbon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Laszlo; Brown, Ei Ei; Yang, Clayton S.-C.; Hommerich, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Mid infrared time-resolved emission spectra were recorded from laser-induced carbon plasma. These spectra constitute the first study of carbon materials LIB spectroscopy in the mid infrared range. The carbon plasma was induced using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. The laser beam was focused to high purity graphite pellets mounted on a translation stage. Mid infrared emission from the plasma in an atmospheric pressure background gas was detected by a cooled HgCdTe detector in the range 4.4-11.6 μm, using long-pass filters. LIB spectra were taken in argon, helium and also in air. Despite a gate delay of 10 μs was used there were strong backgrounds in the spectra. Superimposed on this background broad and noisy emission bands were observed, the form and position of which depended somewhat on the ambient gas. The spectra were digitally smoothed and background corrected. In argon, for instance, strong bands were observed around 4.8, 6.0 and 7.5 μm. Using atomic spectral data by NIST it could be concluded that carbon, argon, helium and nitrogen lines from neutral and ionized atoms are very weak in this spectral region. The width of the infrared bands supports molecular origin. The infrared emission bands were thus compared to vibrational features of carbon molecules (excluding C2) of various sizes on the basis of previous carbon cluster infrared absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses in the literature and quantum chemical calculations. Some general considerations are given about the present results.

  17. Mid infrared emission spectroscopy of carbon plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Laszlo; Brown, Ei Ei; S-C Yang, Clayton; Hommerich, Uwe

    2017-01-05

    Mid infrared time-resolved emission spectra were recorded from laser-induced carbon plasma. These spectra constitute the first study of carbon materials LIB spectroscopy in the mid infrared range. The carbon plasma was induced using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. The laser beam was focused to high purity graphite pellets mounted on a translation stage. Mid infrared emission from the plasma in an atmospheric pressure background gas was detected by a cooled HgCdTe detector in the range 4.4-11.6μm, using long-pass filters. LIB spectra were taken in argon, helium and also in air. Despite a gate delay of 10μs was used there were strong backgrounds in the spectra. Superimposed on this background broad and noisy emission bands were observed, the form and position of which depended somewhat on the ambient gas. The spectra were digitally smoothed and background corrected. In argon, for instance, strong bands were observed around 4.8, 6.0 and 7.5μm. Using atomic spectral data by NIST it could be concluded that carbon, argon, helium and nitrogen lines from neutral and ionized atoms are very weak in this spectral region. The width of the infrared bands supports molecular origin. The infrared emission bands were thus compared to vibrational features of carbon molecules (excluding C2) of various sizes on the basis of previous carbon cluster infrared absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses in the literature and quantum chemical calculations. Some general considerations are given about the present results.

  18. Atmosphere: Power, Critique, Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    This paper hans three interrelated parts. First, atmosphere is approached through the concept of power. Atmospheres 'grip' us directly or mediate power indirectly by manipulating moods and evoking emotions. How does atmosphere relate to different conceptions of power? Second, atmospheric powers m...... be critiqued. Which conception of critique can be involved? Third, critiquing atmospheric powers can generate political conflict. How does atmospheric disputes relate to conceptions of politics and the political?...

  19. Photoacoustic Experimental System to Confirm Infrared Absorption Due to Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Fumitoshi; Monjushiro, Hideaki; Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Kasai, Toshio; Harris, Harold H.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental system for detecting infrared absorption using the photoacoustic (PA) effect is described. It is aimed for use at high-school level to illustrate the difference in infrared (IR) absorption among the gases contained in the atmosphere in connection with the greenhouse effect. The experimental system can be built with readily…

  20. Infrared Semiconductor Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0310 Infrared Semiconductor Metamaterials Jon Schuller UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA BARBARA 3227 CHEADLE HL SANTA BARBARA, CA...From - To) 15-07-2013 to 14-07-2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Infrared Semiconductor Metamaterials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-13-1-0182 5b. GRANT...program are 1) establishing an approach for widely tunable resonators and metasurfaces 2) experimentally demonstrating widely tunable semiconductor

  1. Infrared radiation simulation of exhaust system by coupling FVM with narrow band k-distribution%Infrared radiation simulation of exhaust system by coupling FVM with narrow band k-distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xi-juan; Eriqitai; LI Xi-xi; WANG Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional infrared radiation code for exhaust system was developed by the finite vol- ume method coupled with narrow band k-distribution in non-gray absorbing-emitting media. The final infrared signature had considered the atmosphere effect, and the simulation values were favorably consistent with tes- ting ones. The results indicate that the relative errors considering the effect of atmosphere compared with that of the contrary condition reduce by 31%, it shows that when simulating the infrared radiation of the target which is received by the infrared detectors, even the calculation band is in atmospheric windows 3--5 μm, the effect of atmospheric transmission on infrared signature of the target should not be neglected.

  2. A tenuous carbon dioxide atmosphere on Jupiter's moon Callisto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    An off-limb scan of Callisto was conducted by the Galileo near-infrared mapping spectrometer to search for a carbon dioxide atmosphere. Airglow in the carbon dioxide nu3 band was observed up to 100 kilometers above the surface and indicates the presence of a tenuous carbon dioxide atmosphere with surface pressure of 7.5 x 10(-12) bar and a temperature of about 150 kelvin, close to the surface temperature. A lifetime on the order of 4 years is suggested, based on photoionization and magnetospheric sweeping. Either the atmosphere is transient and was formed recently or some process is currently supplying carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.

  3. Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Saturn and Titan from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Brasunas, J. C.; Carlson, R. C.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Mamoutkine, A. A.; Nixon, A.; Pearl, J. C.; Romani, P. N.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.

    2009-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft completed its nominal mission at Saturn in 2008 and began its extended mission. Cassini carries the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS); a Fourier transform spectrometer that measures the composition, thermal structure and dynamics of the atmospheres of Saturn and Titan, and also the temperatures of other moons and the rings.

  4. $\\alpha$ Centauri A in the far infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Liseau, R; Olofsson, G; Bryden, G; Marshall, J P; Ardila, D; Aran, A Bayo; Danchi, W C; del Burgo, C; Eiroa, C; Ertel, S; Fridlund, M C W; Krivov, A V; Pilbratt, G L; Roberge, A; Thébault, P; Wiegert, J; White, G J

    2012-01-01

    Chromospheres and coronae are common phenomena on solar-type stars. Understanding the energy transfer to these heated atmospheric layers requires direct access to the relevant empirical data. Study of these structures has, by and large, been limited to the Sun thus far. The region of the temperature reversal can be directly observed only in the far infrared and submm. We aim at the determination of the characteristics of the atmosphere in the region of the temperature minimum of the solar sister star alpha Cen A. For the nearby binary system alpha Centauri, stellar parameters are known with high accuracy from measurements. For the basic model parameters Teff, log g and [Fe/H], we interpolate in the grid of GAIA/PHOENIX stellar model atmospheres and compute the corresponding model for the G2 V star alpha Cen A. Comparison with photometric measurements shows excellent agreement between observed photospheric data in the optical and infrared. For longer wavelengths, the modelled spectral energy distribution is co...

  5. High resolution spectroscopy in the microwave and far infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, Herbert M.

    1990-01-01

    High resolution rotational spectroscopy has long been central to remote sensing techniques in atmospheric sciences and astronomy. As such, laboratory measurements must supply the required data to make direct interpretation of data for instruments which sense atmospheres using rotational spectra. Spectral measurements in the microwave and far infrared regions are also very powerful tools when combined with infrared measurements for characterizing the rotational structure of vibrational spectra. In the past decade new techniques were developed which have pushed high resolution spectroscopy into the wavelength region between 25 micrometers and 2 mm. Techniques to be described include: (1) harmonic generation of microwave sources, (2) infrared laser difference frequency generation, (3) laser sideband generation, and (4) ultrahigh resolution interferometers.

  6. Oxygen Chemistry in Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, E. H.; Atreya, S. K.

    2002-09-01

    Oxygen chemistry in the atmosphere of Titan is controlled by the presence of CO and a likely influx of extraplanetary oxygen. The presence of water vapor, corroborated by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) stratospheric detection [1], combined with CO induces the formation of CO2, which has also been observed [2]. However, the high CO/H2O ratio in Titan's atmosphere causes the propagation of oxygen chemistry to follow a different path than what is predicted for the Jovian planets. Specifically, the efficient CO recycling mechanisms serve to inhibit significant formation of larger oxygen compounds such as CH3OH (methanol) and CH2CO (ketene). The results of a 1-D photochemical model are presented in the context of identifying possible oxygen compounds that might be detected by the Cassini/Huygens mission which will arrive at Titan in 2004. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program and by the GCMS Project of the Cassini/Huygens mission. [1] A. Coustenis et al., Astron. Astrophys., 336, L85-L89, 1998. [2] A. Coustenis et al., Icarus, 80, 54-76, 1989.

  7. Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Based Sensitivity Analysis of the Atmospheric and the Ocean Parameters on Top of the Atmosphere Radiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo Ray Tracing: MCRT based sensitivity analysis of the geophysical parameters (the atmosphere and the ocean on Top of the Atmosphere: TOA radiance in visible to near infrared wavelength regions is conducted. As the results, it is confirmed that the influence due to the atmosphere is greater than that of the ocean. Scattering and absorption due to aerosol particles and molecules in the atmosphere is major contribution followed by water vapor and ozone while scattering due to suspended solid is dominant contribution for the ocean parameters.

  8. The Infrared Hunter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2 This image composite compares infrared and visible views of the famous Orion nebula and its surrounding cloud, an industrious star-making region located near the hunter constellation's sword. The infrared picture is from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, and the visible image is from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, headquartered in Tucson, Ariz. In addition to Orion, two other nebulas can be seen in both pictures. The Orion nebula, or M42, is the largest and takes up the lower half of the images; the small nebula to the upper left of Orion is called M43; and the medium-sized nebula at the top is NGC 1977. Each nebula is marked by a ring of dust that stands out in the infrared view. These rings make up the walls of cavities that are being excavated by radiation and winds from massive stars. The visible view of the nebulas shows gas heated by ultraviolet radiation from the massive stars. Above the Orion nebula, where the massive stars have not yet ejected much of the obscuring dust, the visible image appears dark with only a faint glow. In contrast, the infrared view penetrates the dark lanes of dust, revealing bright swirling clouds and numerous developing stars that have shot out jets of gas (green). This is because infrared light can travel through dust, whereas visible light is stopped short by it. The infrared image shows light captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Light with wavelengths of 8 and 5.8 microns (red and orange) comes mainly from dust that has been heated by starlight. Light of 4.5 microns (green) shows hot gas and dust; and light of 3.6 microns (blue) is from starlight.

  9. A Climatology of Tropospheric CO over the Central and Southeastern United States and the Southwestern Pacific Ocean Derived from Space, Air, and Ground-based Infrared Interferometer Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillian, W. Wallace; Strow, L. Larrabee; Revercomb, H.; Knuteson, R.; Thompson, A.

    2003-01-01

    This final report summarizes all research activities and publications undertaken as part of NASA Atmospheric Chemistry and Modeling Analysis Program (ACMAP) Grant NAG-1-2022, 'A Climatology of Tropospheric CO over the Central and Southeastern United States and the Southwestern Pacific Ocean Derived from Space, Air, and Ground-based Infrared Interferometer Spectra'. Major project accomplishments include: (1) analysis of more than 300,000 AERI spectra from the ARM SGP site yielding a 5-year (1998-2002) timeseries of CO retrievals from the Lamont, OK AERI; (2) development of a prototype CO profile retrieval algorithm for AERI spectra; (3) validation and publication of the first CO retrievals from the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (SHIS); and (4) development of a prototype AERI tropospheric O3 retrieval algorithm. Compilation and publication of the 5-year Lamont, OK timeseries is underway including a new collaboration with scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Public access to this data will be provided upon article submission. A comprehensive CO analysis of the archive of HIS spectra of remains as the only originally proposed activity with little progress. The greatest challenge faced in this project was motivating the University of Wisconsin Co-Investigators to deliver their archived HIS and AERIOO data along with the requisite temperature and water vapor profiles in a timely manner. Part of the supplied HIS dataset from ASHOE may be analyzed as part of a Master s Thesis under a separate project. Our success with the SAFARI 2000 SHIS CO analysis demonstrates the utility of such aircraft remote sensing data given the proper support from the instrument investigators. In addition to the PI and Co-I s, personnel involved in this CO climatology project include one Post Doctoral Fellow, one Research Scientist, two graduate students, and two undergraduate students. A total of fifteen presentations regarding research related to this

  10. Surface Clutter Cancellation in Planet Subsurface Sounder%星球次表层探测中地杂波抑制技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹志国; 常文革; 李召阳; 向巍; 于丹茹

    2013-01-01

    星球次表层探测雷达一般采用偶极子天线,由于偶极子天线波束较宽,雷达同时接收到来自星下点和非星下点的回波,尤其是次表层回波会和表面非星下点回波同时到达,对获取次表层回波造成困难,因此有必要开展表面非星下点杂波抑制方面的研究。首先针对星载双天线系统,详细分析了双天线杂波抑制的原理,随后提出了采用递归自适应滤波(RLS)算法的双天线杂波抑制方法,最后,通过仿真对 RLS杂波抑制方法及其性能进行了验证。根据仿真结果分析,该方法取得了较好的性能,可以有效地应用于星球次表层探测系统。%Planet subsurface sounder usually uses dipole antenna which has large beamwidth.It will re-ceive both nadir and off-nadir echoes.It is difficult to extract the subsurface echo when the off-nadir echo is very strong,so it is necessary to do research on clutter cancellation.Focused on the space-borne radio sound-er with dual-antenna,the mathematic model is analyzed firstly,and then,a clutter cancellation approach using RLS algorithm is presented,Finally,simulations are carried out to prove the validity of the proposed method,and its performance is also examined.Simulation results show that the approach achieves excellent performance,and can be applied effectively in the planet subsurface sounder.

  11. Infrared Observations of Late Type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    Substantive mass loss resulting in appreciable circumstellar dust envelopes is common in late-type stars. The evolutionary history and physical state of a cool star determine the chemistry within the outer stellar atmosphere mirrored by the molecular and particulate material present in the envelope. The observational consequences of this debris determined by moderate spectral resolution infrared spectrophotometry are reviewed. Significant information is provided by observations of the emergent energy flux of both the cool stellar photosphere and of the circumstellar dust envelope. The observation suggests that mass-loss occurs to some degree throughout late stellar evolutionary phases and that occasional periods of high mass loss are not uncommon.

  12. Infrared observations of comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanner, Martha S.

    1991-01-01

    Selected comets are observed in the near infrared (1 to 2.2 micron) and thermal infrared (3.5 to 20 micron) with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and other telescopes as appropriate, in order to characterize the physical properties of the dust grains; their composition, size distribution, emissivity, and albedo. Systematic variations in these properties among comets are looked for, in order to understand the heterogeneity of comet nuclei. Spectrophotometry of the 10 micron silicate emission feature is particularly emphasized. The rate of dust production from the nucleus and its temporal variability are also determined. Knowledge of the dust environment is essential to S/C design and mission planning for NASA's CRAF mission.

  13. Infrared source test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, L.

    1994-11-15

    The purpose of the Infrared Source Test (IRST) is to demonstrate the ability to track a ground target with an infrared sensor from an airplane. The system is being developed within the Advance Technology Program`s Theater Missile Defense/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) section. The IRST payload consists of an Amber Radiance 1 infrared camera system, a computer, a gimbaled mirror, and a hard disk. The processor is a custom R3000 CPU board made by Risq Modular Systems, Inc. for LLNL. The board has ethernet, SCSI, parallel I/O, and serial ports, a DMA channel, a video (frame buffer) interface, and eight MBytes of main memory. The real-time operating system VxWorks has been ported to the processor. The application code is written in C on a host SUN 4 UNIX workstation. The IRST is the result of a combined effort by physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists.

  14. Variable waveband infrared imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Scott R.

    2013-06-11

    A waveband imager includes an imaging pixel that utilizes photon tunneling with a thermally actuated bimorph structure to convert infrared radiation to visible radiation. Infrared radiation passes through a transparent substrate and is absorbed by a bimorph structure formed with a pixel plate. The absorption generates heat which deflects the bimorph structure and pixel plate towards the substrate and into an evanescent electric field generated by light propagating through the substrate. Penetration of the bimorph structure and pixel plate into the evanescent electric field allows a portion of the visible wavelengths propagating through the substrate to tunnel through the substrate, bimorph structure, and/or pixel plate as visible radiation that is proportional to the intensity of the incident infrared radiation. This converted visible radiation may be superimposed over visible wavelengths passed through the imaging pixel.

  15. Connecting Surface Emissions, Convective Uplifting, and Long-Range Transport of Carbon Monoxide in the Upper Troposphere: New Observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Su, Hui; Neary, Lori; McConnell, John C.; Richards, Nigel A. D.

    2007-01-01

    Two years of observations of upper tropospheric (UT) carbon monoxide (CO) from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder are analyzed; in combination with the CO surface emission climatology and data from the NCEP analyses. It is shown that spatial distribution, temporal variation and long-range transport of UT CO are closely related to the surface emissions, deep-convection and horizontal winds. Over the Asian monsoon region, surface emission of CO peaks in boreal spring due to high biomass burning in addition to anthropogenic emission. However, the UT CO peaks in summer when convection is strongest and surface emission of CO is dominated by anthropogenic source. The long-range transport of CO from Southeast Asia across the Pacific to North America, which occurs most frequently during boreal summer, is thus a clear imprint of Asian anthropogenic pollution influencing global air quality.

  16. Potential of the future thermal infrared space-borne sensor IASI-NG to monitor lower tropospheric ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sellitto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The lower tropospheric (LT ozone concentration is a key factor for air quality (AQ. Observing efficiently LT ozone from space is crucial to monitor and better understand pollution phenomena occurring from inter-continental to local scales, and that have a proven noxious effect on the human health and the biosphere. The Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI flies on MetOp-A spacecraft and is planned to be launched in the next future as part of the other MetOp modules, i.e. MetOp-B and C. IASI has demonstrated to have the capability to single out the LT ozone signal only at favourable conditions, i.e. in presence of high thermal contrast scenarios. New generation satellite instruments are being designed to address several pressing geophysical issues, including a better observation capability of LT ozone. IASI-NG (New Generation, now having reached the accomplishment of design phase-A for launch in the 2020 timeframe as part of the EPS-SG (EUMETSAT Polar System-Second Generation, formerly post-EPS mission, may render feasible a better observation of AQ in terms of LT ozone. To evaluate the added-value brought by IASI-NG in this context, we developed a pseudo-observation simulator, including a direct simulator of thermal infrared spectra and a full inversion scheme to retrieve ozone concentration profiles. We produced one month (August 2009 of tropospheric ozone pseudo-observations based on both IASI and IASI-NG instrumental configurations. We compared the pseudo-observations and we found a clear improvement of LT ozone (up to 6 km altitude pseudo-observations quality for IASI-NG. The estimated total error is expected to be more than 35% smaller at 5 km, and 20% smaller for the LT ozone column. The total error on the LT ozone column is, on average, lower than 10% for IASI-NG. IASI-NG is expected to have a significantly better vertical sensitivity (monthly average degrees of freedom surface-6 km of 0.70 and to be sensitive at lower

  17. Powerful infrared emitting diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogan L. M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Powerful infrared LEDs with emission wavelength 805 ± 10, 870 ± 20 and 940 ± 10 nm developed at SPC OED "OPTEL" are presented in the article. The radiant intensity of beam diode is under 4 W/sr in the continuous mode and under 100 W/sr in the pulse mode. The radiation power of wide-angle LEDs reaches 1 W in continuous mode. The external quantum efficiency of emission IR diodes runs up to 30%. There also has been created infrared diode modules with a block of flat Fresnel lenses with radiant intensity under 70 W/sr.

  18. An Evaluation of the Nonlinearity Correction Applied to Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Data Collected by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D. D. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Knuteson, R. O. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Revercomb, H. E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Dedecker, R. G. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Feltz, W. F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) detectors provide excellent sensitivity to infrared radiation and are used in passive infrared remote sensors such as the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). However, MCT detectors have a nonlinear response and thus this nonlinearity must be characterized and corrected to provide accurate infrared radiance observations. This paper discusses the significance of the nonlinearity correction applied to AERI data and its impacts on the parameters retrieved from the AERI spectra. It also evaluates the accuracy of the scheme used to determine the nonlinearity of the MCT detectors used in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s AERIs.

  19. Lunar absorption spectrophotometer for measuring atmospheric water vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querel, Richard R; Naylor, David A

    2011-02-01

    A novel instrument has been designed to measure the nighttime atmospheric water vapor column abundance by near-infrared absorption spectrophotometry of the Moon. The instrument provides a simple, effective, portable, and inexpensive means of rapidly measuring the water vapor content along the lunar line of sight. Moreover, the instrument is relatively insensitive to the atmospheric model used and, thus, serves to provide an independent calibration for other measures of precipitable water vapor from both ground- and space-based platforms.

  20. Evaporation of urea at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Andreas M; Czekaj, Izabela; Elsener, Martin; Wokaun, Alexander; Kröcher, Oliver

    2011-03-31

    Aqueous urea solution is widely used as reducing agent in the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) (SCR). Because reports of urea vapor at atmospheric pressure are rare, gaseous urea is usually neglected in computational models used for designing SCR systems. In this study, urea evaporation was investigated under flow reactor conditions, and a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of gaseous urea was recorded at atmospheric pressure for the first time. The spectrum was compared to literature data under vacuum conditions and with theoretical spectra of monomolecular and dimeric urea in the gas phase calculated with the density functional theory (DFT) method. Comparison of the spectra indicates that urea vapor is in the monomolecular form at atmospheric pressure. The measured vapor pressure of urea agrees with the thermodynamic data obtained under vacuum reported in the literature. Our results indicate that considering gaseous urea will improve the computational modeling of urea SCR systems.

  1. The Radiation Environment of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L. Linsky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Exoplanets are born and evolve in the radiation and particle environment created by their host star. The host star’s optical and infrared radiation heats the exoplanet’s lower atmosphere and surface, while the ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet and X-radiation control the photochemistry and mass loss from the exoplanet’s upper atmosphere. Stellar radiation, especially at the shorter wavelengths, changes dramatically as a host star evolves leading to changes in the planet’s atmosphere and habitability. This paper reviews the present state of our knowledge concerning the time-dependent radiation emitted by stars with convective zones, that is stars with spectral types F, G, K, and M, which comprise nearly all of the host stars of detected exoplanets.

  2. Atmospheric composition change: Ecosystems-Atmosphere interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fowler, D.; Pilegaard, K.; Sutton, M.A.; Ambus, P.; Raivonen, M.; Duyzer, J.; Simpson, D.; Fagerli, H.; Fuzzi, S.; Schjoerring, J.K.; Granier, C.; Neftel, A.; Isaksen, I.S.A.; Laj, P.; Maione, M.; Monks, P.S.; Burkhardt, J.; Daemmgen, U.; Neirynck, J.; Personne, E.; Wichink Kruit, R.J.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Flechard, C.; Tuovinen, J.P.; Coyle, M.; Gerosa, G.; Loubet, B.; Altimir, N.; Gruenhage, L.; Ammann, C.; Cieslik, S.; Paoletti, E.; Mikkelsen, T.N.; Ro-Poulsen, H.; Cellier, P.; Cape, J.N.; Horvath, L.; Loreto, F.; Niinemets, U.; Palmer, P.I.; Rinne, J.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Nilsson, D.; Pryor, S.; Gallagher, M.W.; Vesala, T.; Skiba, U.; Brueggemann, N.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.; Williams, J.; O'Dowd, C.; Facchini, M.C.; Leeuw, de G.; Flossman, A.; Chaumerliac, N.; Erisman, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystems and the atmosphere: This review describes the state of understanding the processes involved in the exchange of trace gases and aerosols between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. The gases covered include NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, NH3, SO2, DMS, Biogenic VOC, O-3, CH4, N2O and particles i

  3. Seasonal Evolution of Titan's Atmospheric Polar Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teanby, Nicholas A.; Irwin, P. G.; Nixon, C. A.; de Kok, R.; Vinatier, S.; Coustenis, A.; Sefton-Nash, E.; Calcutt, S. B.; Flasar, F. M.

    2013-10-01

    Titan is the largest satellite of Saturn and is the only moon in our solar system to have a significant atmosphere. Titan's middle-atmosphere circulation usually comprises a single hemisphere-to-hemisphere meridional circulation cell, with upwelling air in the summer hemisphere and subsiding air at the winter pole with an associated winter polar vortex. Titan has an axial tilt (obliquity) of 26.7degrees, so during its 29.5 Earth year annual cycle pronounced seasonal effects are expected as the relative solar insolation in each hemisphere changes. The most dramatic of these changes is predicted to be the reversal in global meridional circulation as the peak solar heating switches hemispheres after an equinox. Since northern spring equinox in mid-2009, Titan's atmosphere has demonstrated dramatic changes in temperature, composition, and aerosol distribution. These changes indicate major changes to the atmospheric circulation pattern have indeed occurred. Here we use nine years of Cassini/CIRS infrared spectra to determine the temperature and composition evolution of the atmosphere through northern-fall to northern-spring. Particularly dramatic changes are observed at the poles, where a new south polar hot-spot/vortex has been forming. The north polar vortex also appears to be weakening throughout this period. Furthermore, the meridional circulation reversal, predicted by numerical models, occurred a mere six months after equinox, showing that despite Titan's long annual cycle, rapid changes are possible. This gives us new insight into vortex formation processes and atmospheric dynamics.

  4. The Dynamic Infrared Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, Mansi M.; SPIRITS (Spitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey) Team

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic infrared sky is hitherto largely unexplored. I will present the SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey (SPIRITS) --- a systematic search of 194 nearby galaxies within 30 Mpc, on timescales ranging between a week to a year, to a depth of 20 mag with Spitzer's IRAC camera. SPIRITS has already uncovered over 95 explosive transients and over 1200 strong variables. Of these, 37 infrared transients are especially interesting as they have no optical counterparts whatsoever even with deep limits from Keck and HST. Interpretation of these new discoveries may include (i) the birth of massive binaries that drive shocks in their molecular cloud, (ii) stellar mergers with dusty winds, (iii) 8--10 solar mass stars experiencing e-capture induced collapse in their cores, (iv) enshrouded supernovae, or (v) formation of stellar mass black holes. SPIRITS reveals that the infrared sky is not just as dynamic as the optical sky; it also provides access to unique, elusive signatures in stellar astrophysics.

  5. The infrared retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Sanjay

    2009-12-01

    As infrared imaging systems have evolved from the first generation of linear devices to the second generation of small format staring arrays to the present 'third-gen' systems, there is an increased emphasis on large area focal plane arrays (FPAs) with multicolour operation and higher