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Sample records for atmospheric gas analyzer

  1. Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) Dispersant Data for BP Spil/Deepwater Horizon - August 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) buses are self-contained mobile laboratories that conduct instant-result monitoring of air quality at particular locations....

  2. Assessing Atmospheric CO2 Entrapped in Clay Nanotubes using Residual Gas Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sankar; Maity, Abhijit; Pradhan, Manik; Jana, Subhra

    2016-02-16

    A residual gas analyzer (RGA) coupled with a high-vacuum chamber has been explored to measure atmospheric CO2 entrapped in aminosilane-modified clay nanotubes. Ambient CO2 uptake efficacy together with stability of these novel adsorbents composed of both primary and/or secondary amine sites has been demonstrated at standard ambient temperature and pressure. The unprecedented sensitivity and accuracy of the RGA-based mass spectrometry technique toward atmospheric CO2 measurement has been substantiated with a laser-based optical cavity-enhanced integrated cavity output spectroscopy. The adsorption kinetics of atmospheric CO2 on amine-functionalized clay nanotubes followed the fractional-order kinetic model compared to that of the pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order rate equations. The efficiency along with stability of these novel adsorbents has also been demonstrated by their repetitive use for CO2 capture in the oxidative environment. Our findings thus point to a fundamental study on the atmospheric CO2 adsorption by amine-loaded adsorbents using an easy handling and low-cost benchtop RGA-based mass spectrometer, opening a new strategy for CO2 capture and sequestering study.

  3. Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Data for BP Spill/Deepwater Horizon - July 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) buses are self-contained mobile laboratories that conduct instant-result monitoring of air quality at particular locations....

  4. Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Data for BP Spill/Deepwater Horizon - May 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) buses are self-contained mobile laboratories that conduct instant-result monitoring of air quality at particular locations....

  5. Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Data for BP Spill/Deepwater Horizon - June 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) buses are self-contained mobile laboratories that conduct instant-result monitoring of air quality at particular locations....

  6. Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Data for BP Spill/Deepwater Horizon - August 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) buses are self-contained mobile laboratories that conduct instant-result monitoring of air quality at particular locations....

  7. Atmospheric pressure glow discharge generated in nitrogen-methane gas mixture: PTR-MS analyzes of the exhaust gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torokova, Lucie; Mazankova, Vera; Krcma, Frantisek; Mason, Nigel J.; Matejcik, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the results of an extensive study of with the in situ mass spectrometry analysis of gaseous phase species produced by an atmospheric plasma glow discharge in N2-CH4 gas mixtures (with methane concentrations ranging from 1% to 4%). The products are studied using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). HCN and CH3CN are identified as the main gaseous products. Hydrazine, methanimine, methyldiazene, ethylamine, cyclohexadiene, pyrazineacetylene, ethylene, propyne and propene are identified as minor compounds. All the detected compounds and their relative abundances are determined with respect to the experimental conditions (gas composition and applied power). The same molecules were observed by the Cassini-Huygens probe in Titan's atmosphere (which has same N2-CH4 gas mixtures). Such, experiments show that the formation of such complex organics in atmospheres containing C, N and H, like that of Titan, could be a source of prebiotic molecules. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  8. Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA): An Instrument to Characterize the Martian Soil Mineralogy and Atmosphere Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John H.; McKay, David S.; Ming, Douglas; Allen, Carlton C.; Hedgecock, Jud; Nienaber, Terry

    2000-01-01

    This abstract describes an instrument and experiment to be proposed for a future Mars surface mission to conduct basic research on environmental characterization. The Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA) experiment is designed to provide information on Mars surface material properties in preparation for human missions of exploration. The goals of the investigation are: 1) Define and determine surface mineralogy of soil and dust and their effects on humans and machines; and 2) Conduct in-situ investigations aimed at identifying possible evidence of past or present life on Mars.

  9. DOG optical gas analyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azbukin, A.A.; Buldakov, M.A.; Korolev, B.V.; Korolo' kov, V.A.; Matrosov, I.I. [Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Optical Monitoring

    2002-01-01

    Stationary gas analyzers for continuous monitoring of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in exhaust gases of electric power plants burning fossil fuels have been developed. The DOG series of gas-analyzers use non-laser UV radiation sources and the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurement technique. Operation of the gas-analyzers at Russian electric power plants showed their high efficiency, reliability, and easiness in operation at lower cost as compared to similar foreign devices. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John H.; Hedgecock, Jud; Nienaber, Terry; Cooper, Bonnie; Allen, Carlton; Ming, Doug

    2000-01-01

    The Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA) is a high-temperature furnace and mass spectrometer instrument for determining the mineralogical composition and reactivity of soil samples. REGA provides key mineralogical and reactivity data that is needed to understand the soil chemistry of an asteroid, which then aids in determining in-situ which materials should be selected for return to earth. REGA is capable of conducting a number of direct soil measurements that are unique to this instrument. These experimental measurements include: (1) Mass spectrum analysis of evolved gases from soil samples as they are heated from ambient temperature to 900 C; and (2) Identification of liberated chemicals, e.g., water, oxygen, sulfur, chlorine, and fluorine. REGA would be placed on the surface of a near earth asteroid. It is an autonomous instrument that is controlled from earth but does the analysis of regolith materials automatically. The REGA instrument consists of four primary components: (1) a flight-proven mass spectrometer, (2) a high-temperature furnace, (3) a soil handling system, and (4) a microcontroller. An external arm containing a scoop or drill gathers regolith samples. A sample is placed in the inlet orifice where the finest-grained particles are sifted into a metering volume and subsequently moved into a crucible. A movable arm then places the crucible in the furnace. The furnace is closed, thereby sealing the inner volume to collect the evolved gases for analysis. Owing to the very low g forces on an asteroid compared to Mars or the moon, the sample must be moved from inlet to crucible by mechanical means rather than by gravity. As the soil sample is heated through a programmed pattern, the gases evolved at each temperature are passed through a transfer tube to the mass spectrometer for analysis and identification. Return data from the instrument will lead to new insights and discoveries including: (1) Identification of the molecular masses of all of the gases

  11. Atmospheric gas phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Ulrich

    This chapter introduces the underlying physicochemical principles and the relevance of atmospheric gas phase reactions. In particular, reaction orders, the concept of elementary reactions, definition of and factors determining reaction rates (kinetic theory of chemical reactions), and photochemical reactions are discussed. Sample applications of the pertinent reaction pathways in tropospheric chemistry are presented, particularly reactions involving free radicals (OH, NO3, halogen oxides) and their roles in the self-cleaning of the troposphere. The cycles of nitrogen and sulfur species as well as the principles of tropospheric ozone formation are introduced. Finally, the processes governing the stratospheric ozone layer (Chapman Cycle and extensions) are discussed.

  12. Ultrasensitive Atmospheric Analyzer for Miniature UAVs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR Phase I effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop a highly-accurate, lightweight, low-power gas analyzer for quantification of water vapor...

  13. Deuterium Gas Analysis by Residual Gas Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, B. K.; Shukla, R.; Das, R.; Shyam, A.; Rao, A. D. P.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen gas is generated by electrolysis method in a compact hydrogen generator. A simple procedure reduces handling and storage of hydrogen cylinders for laboratory applications. In such a system, we are producing deuterium gas from heavy water by electrolysis method. After production of the deuterium gas, we have checked the purity level of the outgoing deuterium from the electrolyser. The test was carried out in a high vacuum system in which one residual gas analyser (RGA) was mounted. The deuterium gas was inserted by one manual gas leak valve in to the vacuum system. In this study, the effect of the emission current of the RGA on the detection of the deuterium was performed. In this paper, we will discuss the detail analysis of the deuterium gas and the effect of the emission current on the partial pressure measurement.

  14. Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This is a computer-aided drawing of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA, on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Fiber optic multiple blood gas analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademaker, Diane M.; Zimmerman, Donald E.; James, Kenneth A.; Quick, William H.

    1994-07-01

    Blood gas analysis has been shown to be the most critical factor in determining patient survivability in a trauma care environment. Present techniques of non-invasive measurement of blood gases in the trauma care unit such as optical pulse oximetry and transcutaneous electrodes are inadequate due to complexity and inaccuracy. The crux of the solution to this problem is the application of a recent, DOD/NASA developed micro-optic spectrophotometer to perform blood gas analysis via fiber optic transmission. The newly developed blood gas analyzer described here will not only overcome the aforementioned drawbacks but also be highly accurate, durable, and safe in hazardous environments: e.g., oxygen rich environments. This spectrophotometer is driven by a microprocessor based `Kalman filter' algorithm which not only controls the monitoring of all the patients in the care center but also separates the patient's superimposed blood gas spectra into its individual components to allow a number of gases critical for trauma care to be analyzed simultaneously.

  16. High Performance Nitrous Oxide Analyzer for Atmospheric Research Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project targets the development of a highly sensitive gas sensor to monitor atmospheric nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide is an important species in Earth science...

  17. Improving respiration measurements with gas exchange analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, R; Ribas-Carbó, M; Del Saz, N F; El Aou-Ouad, H; Berry, J A; Flexas, J; Bota, J

    2016-12-01

    Dark respiration measurements with open-flow gas exchange analyzers are often questioned for their low accuracy as their low values often reach the precision limit of the instrument. Respiration was measured in five species, two hypostomatous (Vitis Vinifera L. and Acanthus mollis) and three amphistomatous, one with similar amount of stomata in both sides (Eucalyptus citriodora) and two with different stomata density (Brassica oleracea and Vicia faba). CO2 differential (ΔCO2) increased two-fold with no change in apparent Rd, when the two leaves with higher stomatal density faced outside. These results showed a clear effect of the position of stomata on ΔCO2. Therefore, it can be concluded that leaf position is important to guarantee the improvement of respiration measurements increasing ΔCO2 without affecting the respiration results by leaf or mass units. This method will help to increase the accuracy of leaf respiration measurements using gas exchange analyzers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Blood Gas Analyzer Accuracy of Glucose Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yafen; Wanderer, Jonathan; Nichols, James H; Klonoff, David; Rice, Mark J

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the comparability of glucose levels measured with blood gas analyzers (BGAs) and by central laboratories (CLs). Glucose measurements obtained between June 1, 2007, and March 1, 2016, at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center were reviewed. The agreement between CL and BGA results were assessed using Bland-Altman, consensus error grid (CEG), and surveillance error grid (SEG) analyses. We further analyzed the BGAs' performance against the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 2014 draft guidance and 2016 final guidance for blood glucose monitoring and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 15197:2013 standard. We analyzed 2671 paired glucose measurements, including 50 pairs of hypoglycemic values (1.9%). Bland-Altman analysis yielded a mean bias of -3.1 mg/dL, with 98.1% of paired values meeting the 95% limits of agreement. In the hypoglycemic range, the mean bias was -0.8 mg/dL, with 100% of paired values meeting the 95% limits of agreement. When using CEG analysis, 99.9% of the paired values fell within the no risk zone. Similar results were found using SEG analysis. For the FDA 2014 draft guidance, our data did not meet the target compliance rate. For the FDA 2016 final guidance, our data partially met the target compliance rate. For the ISO standard, our data met the target compliance rate. In this study, the agreement for glucose measurement between common BGAs and CL instruments met the ISO 2013 standard. However, BGA accuracy did not meet the stricter requirements of the FDA 2014 draft guidance or 2016 final guidance. Fortunately, plotting these results on either the CEG or the SEG revealed no results in either the great or extreme clinical risk zones. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by a...

  20. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a gas...

  1. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon dioxide...

  2. 21 CFR 868.1700 - Nitrous oxide gas analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. 868.1700 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1700 Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrous oxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrous oxide...

  3. Mars Atmospheric Capture and Gas Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Anthony; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Gibson, Tracy; Devor, Robert; Captain, James

    2011-01-01

    The Mars atmospheric capture and gas separation project is selecting, developing, and demonstrating techniques to capture and purify Martian atmospheric gases for their utilization for the production of hydrocarbons, oxygen, and water in ISRU systems. Trace gases will be required to be separated from Martian atmospheric gases to provide pure C02 to processing elements. In addition, other Martian gases, such as nitrogen and argon, occur in concentrations high enough to be useful as buffer gas and should be captured as welL To achieve these goals, highly efficient gas separation processes will be required. These gas separation techniques are also required across various areas within the ISRU project to support various consumable production processes. The development of innovative gas separation techniques will evaluate the current state-of-the-art for the gas separation required, with the objective to demonstrate and develop light-weight, low-power methods for gas separation. Gas separation requirements include, but are not limited to the selective separation of: (1) methane and water from un-reacted carbon oxides (C02- CO) and hydrogen typical of a Sabatier-type process, (2) carbon oxides and water from unreacted hydrogen from a Reverse Water-Gas Shift process, (3) carbon oxides from oxygen from a trash/waste processing reaction, and (4) helium from hydrogen or oxygen from a propellant scavenging process. Potential technologies for the separations include freezers, selective membranes, selective solvents, polymeric sorbents, zeolites, and new technologies. This paper and presentation will summarize the results of an extensive literature review and laboratory evaluations of candidate technologies for the capture and separation of C02 and other relevant gases.

  4. Mobile Greenhouse Gas Flux Analyzer for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop highly-accurate, lightweight, low-power gas analyzers for measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O)...

  5. Mobile Greenhouse Gas Flux Analyzer for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR Phase I effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop a highly-accurate, lightweight, low-power gas analyzer for eddy flux covariance...

  6. A Comparison of Infrared Gas Analyzers Above a Subalpine Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, S. P.; Metzger, S.; Blanken, P.; Burba, G. G.; Swiatek, E.; Li, J.; Conrad, B.

    2014-12-01

    Infrared gas analyzers (IRGAs) are a key component in theeddy-covariance measurement of water vapor and carbon dioxide exchangebetween the surface and atmosphere. Historically, closed-path IRGAshave been used for the fast (> 10 Hz) measurement of atmospheric H2Oand CO2. In order to use them in the field, these IRGAs were typicallyhoused in temperature-controlled enclosures or buildings that weretens of meters away from the measurement location. This necessitatedthe use of long tubing and pumps to bring the air sample to the IRGAcell. Attenuation of H2O and CO2 fluctuations within the tubing was apersistent problem with such a setup, especially for H2O. As analternative, open-path IRGAs have frequently been utilized, but thekey trade-offs with the open-path design are: (i) precipitation anddew-related data gaps, and (ii) the need to account for WPL densityeffects. Over the past five years a new type of closed-path IRGA hasemerged which is weather-proof, compact, and low-maintenance. Becauseof its small size, short intake tubing can be used, which places thesampling cell close to the sonic anemometer and reduces high frequencysignal loss. Two such IRGAs are the LI-COR LI-7200 and the CampbellScientific EC155, which is part of the CPEC200 eddy covariance system.The Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux tower has used a LI-COR LI-6262 IRGA tomeasure CO2 fluxes above a subalpine forest since November, 1998.Starting in summer 2013, a LI-7200 (along with an open-path LI-7500)were deployed at 21.5 m on the AmeriFlux tower. In Fall 2013, aEC155/CPEC200 was added so that a side-by-side comparison between allfour IRGAs was possible. The preliminary results presented in ourstudy compare the CO2 and H2O mean and variance measured by each IRGA,the vertical wind statistics from three side-by-side sonicanemometers, as well as the corresponding spectra and cospectra fromthese sensors as well as other important aspects of systemperformance.

  7. Comparison of blood gas, electrolyte and metabolite results measured with two different blood gas analyzers and a core laboratory analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyanik, Metin; Sertoglu, Erdim; Kayadibi, Huseyin; Tapan, Serkan; Serdar, Muhittin A; Bilgi, Cumhur; Kurt, Ismail

    2015-04-01

    Blood gas analyzers (BGAs) are important in assessing and monitoring critically ill patients. However, the random use of BGAs to measure blood gases, electrolytes and metabolites increases the variability in test results. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the correlation of blood gas, electrolyte and metabolite results measured with two BGAs and a core laboratory analyzer. A total of 40 arterial blood gas samples were analyzed with two BGAs [(Nova Stat Profile Critical Care Xpress (Nova Biomedical, Waltham, MA, USA) and Siemens Rapidlab 1265 (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc., Tarrytown, NY, USA)) and a core laboratory analyzer [Olympus AU 2700 autoanalyzer (Beckman-Coulter, Inc., Fullerton, CA, USA)]. The results of pH, pCO₂, pO₂, SO₂, sodium (Na⁺), potassium (K⁺), calcium (Ca⁺²), chloride (Cl⁻), glucose, and lactate were compared by Passing-Bablok regression analysis and Bland-Altman plots. The present study showed that there was negligible variability of blood gases (pCO₂, pO₂, SO₂), K⁺ and lactate values between the blood gas and core laboratory analyzers. However, the differences in pH were modest, while Na⁺, Cl⁻, Ca²⁺ and glucose showed poor correlation according to the concordance correlation coefficient. BGAs and core laboratory autoanalyzer demonstrated variable performances and not all tests met minimum performance goals. It is important that clinicians and laboratories are aware of the limitations of their assays.

  8. Comparative study of gas-analyzing systems designed for continuous monitoring of TPP emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrat'eva, O. E.; Roslyakov, P. V.

    2017-06-01

    Determining the composition of combustion products is important in terms of both control of emissions into the atmosphere from thermal power plants and optimization of fuel combustion processes in electric power plants. For this purpose, the concentration of oxygen, carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and sulfur oxides in flue gases is monitored; in case of solid fuel combustion, fly ash concentration is monitored as well. According to the new nature conservation law in Russia, all large TPPs shall be equipped with continuous emission monitoring and measurement systems (CEMMS) into the atmosphere. In order to ensure the continuous monitoring of pollutant emissions, direct round-the-clock measurements are conducted with the use of either domestically produced or imported gas analyzers and analysis systems, the operation of which is based on various physicochemical methods and which can be generally used when introducing CEMMS. Depending on the type and purposes of measurement, various kinds of instruments having different features may be used. This article represents a comparative study of gas-analysis systems for measuring the content of polluting substances in exhaust gases based on various physical and physicochemical analysis methods. It lists basic characteristics of the methods commonly applied in the area of gas analysis. It is proven that, considering the necessity of the long-term, continuous operation of gas analyzers for monitoring and measurement of pollutant emissions into the atmosphere, as well as the requirements for reliability and independence from aggressive components and temperature of the gas flow, it is preferable to use optical gas analyzers for the aforementioned purposes. In order to reduce the costs of equipment comprising a CEMMS at a TPP and optimize the combustion processes, electrochemical and thermomagnetic gas analyzers may also be used.

  9. Polarized 3He Gas Circulating Technologies for Neutron Analyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watt, David [Xemed LLC, Durham, NH (United States); Hersman, Bill [Xemed LLC, Durham, NH (United States)

    2014-12-10

    We describe the development of an integrated system for quasi-continuous operation of a large volume neutron analyzer. The system consists of a non-magnetic diaphragm compressor, a prototype large volume helium polarizer, a surrogate neutron analyzer, a non-depolarizing gas storage reservoir, a non-ferrous valve manifold for handling gas distribution, a custom rubidium-vapor gas return purifier, and wire-wound transfer lines, all of which are immersed in a two-meter external magnetic field. Over the Phase II period we focused on three major tasks required for the successful deployment of these types of systems: 1) design and implementation of gas handling hardware, 2) automation for long-term operation, and 3) improvements in polarizer performance, specifically fabrication of aluminosilicate optical pumping cells. In this report we describe the design, implementation, and testing of the gas handling hardware. We describe improved polarizer performance resulting from improved cell materials and fabrication methods. These improvements yielded valved 8.5 liter cells with relaxation times greater than 12 hours. Pumping this cell with 1500W laser power with 1.25nm linewidth yielded peak polarizations of 60%, measured both inside and outside the polarizer. Fully narrowing this laser to 0.25nm, demonstrated separately on one stack of the four, would have allowed 70% polarization with this cell. We demonstrated the removal of 5 liters of polarized helium from the polarizer with no measured loss of polarization. We circulated the gas through a titanium-clad compressor with polarization loss below 3% per pass. We also prepared for the next phase of development by refining the design of the polarizer so that it can be engineer-certified for pressurized operation. The performance of our system far exceeds comparable efforts elsewhere.

  10. Torrefaction of empty fruit bunches under biomass combustion gas atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Yoshimitsu; Sellappah, Varsheta; Trinh, Thanh Hoai; Hassan, Suhaimi; Tanoue, Ken-Ichiro

    2017-11-01

    Torrefaction of oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) under combustion gas atmosphere was conducted in a batch reactor at 473, 523 and 573K in order to investigate the effect of real combustion gas on torrefaction behavior. The solid mass yield of torrefaction in combustion gas was smaller than that of torrefaction in nitrogen. This may be attributed to the decomposition enhancement effect by oxygen and carbon dioxide in combustion gas. Under combustion gas atmosphere, the solid yield for torrefaction of EFB became smaller as the temperature increased. The representative products of combustion gas torrefaction were carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide (gas phase) and water, phenol and acetic acid (liquid phase). By comparing torrefaction in combustion gas with torrefaction in nitrogen gas, it was found that combustion gas can be utilized as torrefaction gas to save energy and inert gas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 40 CFR 1065.308 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... may use a gas blending or mixing device to blend span gases. A gas blending or mixing device is... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers not continuously compensated for other gas...

  12. Modular enthalpy probe and gas analyzer for thermal plasma measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, W. D.; Fincke, J. R.; Haggard, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    The enthalpy or calorimetric probe is a water-cooled stagnation/sampling probe for studying the temperature, velocity, and composition of hot-gas flow fields. In order to derive the thermodynamic properties of complex flow fields such as plasma arc jets or high-velocity oxygen fuel jets, the specie concentration must be known accurately. To this end a differentially pumped quadrapole mass spectrometer has been integrated with a fully automated enthalpy probe system. An inexpensive modular probe is described along with the system and its theory of operation. Calibration and error are also discussed. Typical results are presented for the system operating in an argon/helium plasma arc jet in atmospheric pressure air. The maximum temperature measured is 13434 K on the center line of the jet, 5 mm from the exit, with a corresponding velocity of 1295 m/s. The utility in integrating the mass spectrometer to the enthalpy probe system is not only an accurate measurement of the gas mixture components for obtaining the correct property information, but also valuable information can be obtained about demixing diffusion and chemical reaction taking place in the plasma plume. The relative amount of argon to helium is shown to deviate from the nominal mixture by as much as 40% at the center of the plume.

  13. Customizing a CRDS Trace Gas Analyzer for Dark Matter Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jared; Keeter, Kara

    2010-10-01

    Some proposed dark matter detectors require large amounts of noble gases with ultra-low levels of impurities such as H2O, O2, and N2. There are no commercially available gas analyzers sensitive enough to detect these impurities at the low levels required by these detectors (light between two highly reflective super-mirrors placed on both sides of the sample chamber, leading to an extremely long (>1 km) effective path length through the sample. By comparing the decay rates of light intensity at a resonance frequency of the impurity with that of light that is off-resonance, the concentration of absorbing material (the impurity) is obtained. We will gain improved sensitivity over existing technology by lengthening the gas cavity, optimizing the gas-flow routes, and enhancing the laser and detection electronics. The BHSU CRDS system will first be used for the depleted argon-based dark matter detectors DARKSIDE and MAX. The system will then also be available for xenon-based dark matter detectors such as LUX. This system may also be of interest commercially.

  14. INGAS: Iranian Noble Gas Analyzing System for radioxenon measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doost-Mohammadi, V.; Afarideh, H.; Etaati, G. R.; Safari, M. J.; Rouhi, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, Iranian Noble Gas Analyzing System (INGAS) will be introduced. This system is based on beta-gamma coincidence technique and consists of a well-type NaI(Tl) as gamma or X radiation detector and a cylindrical plastic scintillator to detect beta or conversion electron. Standard NIM modules were utilized to detect coincidence events of detectors. Both the beta and gamma detectors were appropriately calibrated. The efficiency curve of gamma detector for volume geometry was obtained by comparing the results of gamma point sources measurements and simulations of GATE V7.0 Monte Carlo code. The performance of detection system was checked by injection of 222Rn and 131mXe gaseous source in the detection cell. The minimum detectable activity of the system for 133Xe is 1.240±0.024 mBq for 24 h measurement time.

  15. 40 CFR 1065.309 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... binary or multi-gas span gases. You may use a gas blending or mixing device to blend span gases. A gas blending or mixing device is recommended when blending span gases diluted in N2 with span gases diluted in... sealed vessel that humidifies the gas by bubbling it through distilled water and then mixing the gas with...

  16. An Ideal Gas Law Simulator for Atmospheric Gas Molecules ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ideal gas law which is the equation of state of a hypothetical ideal gas that allows us to gain useful insights into the behavior of most real gases at low densities was utilized in this work to conceptualize, design and develop the ideal gas law simulator in a 3 dimensional space using Microsoft Visual Studio, Microsoft ...

  17. The influence of water vapor on atmospheric exchange measurements with an ICOS* based Laser absorption analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Quan, Zhi; Wandel, Matthias; Yi, Zhigang; Bozem, Heiko; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl sulfide and carbon monoxide are both atmospheric trace gases of high interest. Recent advances in the field of spectroscopy have enabled instruments that measure the concentration of the above and other trace gases very fast and with good precision. Increasing the effective path length by reflecting the light between two mirrors in a cavity, these instruments reach impressive sensitivities. Often it is possible to measure the concentration of more than one trace gas at the same time. The OCS/CO2 Analyzer by LGR (Los Gatos Research, Inc.) measures the concentration of water vapor [H2O], carbonyl sulfide [COS], carbon dioxide [CO2] and carbon monoxide [CO] simultaneously. For that the cavity is saturated with light, than the attenuation of light is measured as in standard absorption spectroscopy. The instrument proved to be very fast with good precision and to be able to detect even very low concentrations, especially for COS (as low as 30ppt in the case of COS). However, we observed a rather strong cross sensitivity to water vapor. Altering the water vapor content of the sampled air with two different methods led to a change in the perceived concentration of COS, CO and CO2. This proved especially problematic for enclosure (cuvette) measurements, where the concentrations of one of the above species in an empty cuvette are compared to the concentration of another cuvette containing a plant whose exchange of trace gases with the atmosphere is of interest. There, the plants transpiration leads to a large difference in water vapor content between the cuvettes and that in turn produces artifacts in the concentration differences between the cuvettes for the other above mentioned trace gases. For CO, simultaneous measurement with a UV-Emission Analyzer (AL 5002, Aerolaser) and the COS/CO Analyzer showed good agreement of perceived concentrations as long as the sample gas was dry and an increasing difference in perceived concentration when the sample gas was

  18. Harsh Environment Gas Sensor Array for Venus Atmospheric Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Makel Engineering and the Ohio State University propose to develop a harsh environment tolerant gas sensor array for atmospheric analysis in future Venus missions....

  19. Analyzer for measuring gas contained in the pore space of rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudasik, Mateusz; Skoczylas, Norbert

    2017-10-01

    In the present paper, the authors discussed the functioning of their own analyzer for measuring gas contained in the pore space of high strength rocks. A sample is placed inside a hermetic measuring chamber, and then undergoes impact milling as a result of colliding with the vibrating blade of a knife which is rotationally driven by a high-speed brushless electric motor. The measuring chamber is equipped with all the necessary sensors, i.e. gas, pressure, and temperature sensors. Trial tests involving the comminution of dolomite and anhydrite samples demonstrated that the constructed device is able to break up rocks into grains so fine that they are measured in single microns, and the sensors used in the construction ensure balancing of the released gas. The tests of the analyzer showed that the metrological concept behind it, together with the way it was built, make it fit for measurements of the content and composition of selected gases from the rock pore space. On the basis of the conducted tests of balancing the gases contained in the two samples, it was stated that the gas content of Sample no. 1 was (0.055  ±  0.002) cm3 g-1, and Sample no. 2 contained gas at atmospheric pressure, composed mostly of air.

  20. Polarized 3He gas circulating technologies for neutron analyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watt, David W. [Xemed, LLC, Durham, NH (United States)

    2017-10-02

    We outline our project to develop a circulating polarized helium-3 system for developing of large, quasi-continuously operating neutron analyzers. The project consisted of four areas: 1) Development of robust external cavity narrowed diode laser output with spectral line width < 0.17 nm and power of 2000 W. 2) Development of large glass polarizing cells using cell surface treatments to obtain long relaxation lifetimes. 3) Refinements of the circulation system with an emphasis on gas purification and materials testing. 4) Design/fabrication of a new polarizer system. 5) Preliminary testing of the new polarizer. 1. Developed Robust High-Power Narrowed Laser The optical configuration of the laser was discussed in the proposal and will be reviewed in the body of this report. The external cavity is configured to mutually lock the wavelength of five 10-bar laser stacks. All the logistical milestones were been met and critical subsystems- laser stack manifold and power divider, external laser cavity, and output telescope- were assembled and tested at low power. Each individual bar is narrowed to ~0.05 nm; when combined the laser has a cumulative spectral width of 0.17 nm across the entire beam due to variations of the bars central wavelength by +/- 0.1 nm, which is similar to that of Volume Bragg Grating narrowed laser bars. This configuration eliminates the free-running “pedestal” that occurs in other external cavity diode lasers. The full-scale laser was completed in 2016 and was used in both the older and newer helium polarizers. This laser was operated at 75% power for periods of up to 8 hours. Once installed, the spectrum became slightly broader (~.25 nm) at full power; this is likely due to very slight misalignments that occurred during handling. 2. Developed the processes to create uniform sintered sol-gel coatings. Our work on cell development comprised: 1) Production of large GE180 cells and explore different means of cell preparation, and 2) Development of

  1. Blood-gas analyzer calibration and quality control using a precision gas-mixing instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, W D; Clark, J S; Cutler, C A

    1981-08-01

    We describe a new instrument that performs on-site mixing of oxygen (O2), carbon dioxide (CO2), and nitrogen (N2) to create compositions that can replace gases from standard premixed cylinders. This instrument yields accurate and predictable gas mixtures that can be used for two-point gas calibration of blood gas/pH analyzers or for liquid tonometry of either an aqueous buffer or blood used as quality-control material on blood-gas electrodes. The desired mixture of O2, CO2, and N2 is produced by microprocessor control of the sequential open-times on three solenoid valves that meter these pure gases through a common small-bore orifice. Any combination of O2 and CO2 can be chosen by dialing the front panel thumbwheels and pressing a button. Gas chromatographic evaluation of this gas-mixing instrument demonstrates its accuracy and precision to be better than +/- 0.1% absolute full scale for O2, CO2, and N2, making this instrument calibration and tonometry.

  2. Flared natural gas-based onsite atmospheric water harvesting (AWH) for oilfield operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikramanayake, Enakshi D.; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2016-03-01

    Natural gas worth tens of billions of dollars is flared annually, which leads to resource waste and environmental issues. This work introduces and analyzes a novel concept for flared gas utilization, wherein the gas that would have been flared is instead used to condense atmospheric moisture. Natural gas, which is currently being flared, can alternatively power refrigeration systems to generate the cooling capacity for large scale atmospheric water harvesting (AWH). This approach solves two pressing issues faced by the oil-gas industry, namely gas flaring, and sourcing water for oilfield operations like hydraulic fracturing, drilling and water flooding. Multiple technical pathways to harvest atmospheric moisture by using the energy of natural gas are analyzed. A modeling framework is developed to quantify the dependence of water harvest rates on flared gas volumes and ambient weather. Flaring patterns in the Eagle Ford Shale in Texas and the Bakken Shale in North Dakota are analyzed to quantify the benefits of AWH. Overall, the gas currently flared annually in Texas and North Dakota can harvest enough water to meet 11% and 65% of the water consumption in the Eagle Ford and the Bakken, respectively. Daily harvests of upto 30 000 and 18 000 gallons water can be achieved using the gas currently flared per well in Texas and North Dakota, respectively. In fifty Bakken sites, the water required for fracturing or drilling a new well can be met via onsite flared gas-based AWH in only 3 weeks, and 3 days, respectively. The benefits of this concept are quantified for the Eagle Ford and Bakken Shales. Assessments of the global potential of this concept are presented using data from countries with high flaring activity. It is seen that this waste-to-value conversion concept offers significant economic benefits while addressing critical environmental issues pertaining to oil-gas production.

  3. Dense gas dispersion in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Morten

    1998-09-01

    Dense gas dispersion is characterized by buoyancy induced gravity currents and reduction of the vertical mixing. Liquefied gas releases from industrial accidents are cold because of the heat of evaporation which determines the density for a given concentration and physical properties. The temperature deficit is moderated by the heat flux from the ground, and this convection is an additional source of turbulence which affects the mixing. A simple model as the soil heat flux is used to estimate the ability of the ground to sustain the heat flux during release. The initial enthalpy, release rate, initial entrainment and momentum are discussed for generic source types and the interaction with obstacles is considered. In the MTH project BA experiments source with and without momentum were applied. The continuously released propane gas passed a two-dimensional removable obstacle perpendicular to the wind direction. Ground-level gas concentrations and vertical profiles of concentration, temperature, wind speed and turbulence were measured in front of and behind the obstacle. Ultrasonic anemometers providing fast velocity and concentration signals were mounted at three levels on the masts. The observed turbulence was influenced by the stability and the initial momentum of the jet releases. Additional information were taken from the `Dessert tortoise` ammonia jet releases, from the `Fladis` experiment with transition from dense to passive dispersion, and from the `Thorney Island` continuous releases of isothermal freon mixtures. The heat flux was found to moderate the negative buoyancy in both the propane and ammonia experiments. The heat flux measurements are compared to an estimate by analogy with surface layer theory. (au) 41 tabs., 146 ills., 189 refs.

  4. An industrial FT-IR process gas analyzer for stack gas cems analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, G.M. [American instruments, Anacortes, WA (United States); Herman, B.E. [Applied Automation/Hartmann & Braun, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes utilizing Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) technology to meet and exceed EPA requirements to Continuously Monitor Carbon Monoxide (CO) and Sulfur Dioxide (SO){sub 2} in an oil refinery. The application consists of Continuous Emission Monitoring (CEMS) of two stacks from a Fluid Catalytic Cracking unit (FCCU). The discussion will follow the project from initial specifications, installation, start-up, certification results (RATA, 7 day drift), Cylinder Gas Audit (CGA) and the required maintenance. FT-IR is a powerful analytical tool suitable for measurement of stack component gases required to meet CEMS regulations, and allows simultaneous multi-component analysis of complex stack gas streams with a continuous sample stream flow through the measurement cell. The Michelson Interferometer in a unique {open_quotes}Wishbone{close_quotes} design and with a special alignment control enables standardized configuration of the analyzer for flue gas analysis. Normal stack gas pollutants: NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and CO; as well as water soluble pollutants such as NH{sub 3} and HCI may be accurately determined and reported even in the presence of 0-31 Vol % water vapor concentrations (hot and wet). This FT-IR analyzer has been operating with EPA Certification in an oil refinery environment since September 1994.

  5. Using coulometric gas analysers for detecting several atmospheric pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vol' verg, H.S.; Grishchenko, S.V.; Popov, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of the new electrochemical gas analyzers ''Atmosphera-1'' for SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S and ''Atmosphera-2'' for ozone and chlorine are given. The results of their analysis are given together with recommendations for calibrating gas analyzers and improving measurement selectivity.

  6. Portable Gas Analyzer Based on Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer for Patrolling and Examining Gas Exhaust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuntao Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aimed at monitoring emission of organic gases such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8, iso-C4H10, n-C4H10, C2H4, C3H6, C2H2, CO, and CO2, from coal mines, petroleum refineries, and other plants, a Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR spectrometer was used to develop a portable gas analyzer for patrolling and examining gas exhaust. Firstly, structure of the instrument was introduced. Then, a spectral analysis approach was presented. Finally, instrument was tested with standard gases and with actual gases emitted from a petroleum refinery. For the latter test, a gas chromatograph (GC was used as a reference instrument. The test results showed that the detection limit of every component of analyte was less than 10 × 10−6. The maximum test error of every analyte was less than 15 × 10−6 when its practical concentration was no more than 500 × 10−6. A final comparison showed that the result curves of analytes obtained with FT-IR spectrometer almost overlapped with those obtained with GC, and their resulting noise was less than 6.4% when the practical gas concentration was above 100 × 10−6. As a result, our instrument was suitable to be used as a portable instrument for monitoring exhaust gases.

  7. Atmosphere-ocean gas exchange based on radiocarbon data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byalko, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    In recent decades, the intensity of global atmospheric convection has accelerated faster than climate warming; it is possible to judge this process from indirect data. Increasing ocean salinity contrasts provide evidence that evaporation has intensified [1]; sea surface wind velocities and wave heights have increased [2]. The CO2 gas exchange between the atmosphere and ocean must also simultaneously increase. Monthly measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration have been published since 1958 [3], but directly measuring its fluxes from the atmosphere to the ocean and back is hardly possible. We show they can be reconstructed from 14C isotope concentration data. In the past century, two processes influenced the atmospheric 14C concentration in opposite directions: burning fossil fuels and testing nuclear weapons in the atmosphere. We compare the gas exchange theory with measurements of radiocarbon content in the atmosphere [4—6], which allows assessing the gas exchange quantitatively for the ocean to atmosphere and atmosphere to ocean fluxes separately for period 1960—2010 [7]. References 1. Durack P. J. and Wijffels S. E., J. Climate 23, 4342 (2010). 2. Young I. R., Sieger S., and Babanin A.V., Science 332, 451 (2011). 3. NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Data: ftp://ftp.cmdl.noaa.gov/ccg/co2/trends/co2_mm_mlo.txt. 4. Nydal R., Lövseth K. // J. Geophys. Res. 1983. V. 88. P. 3579. 5. Levin I., Kromer B. // Radiocarbon. 1997. V. 39. P. 205. 6. Miller J.B., Lehman S.J., Montzka S.A., et al. // J. Geophys. Res. 2012. V. 117. D08302. 7. Byalko A.V. Doklady Physics, 2013. V. 58, 267-271.

  8. The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Benna, Mehdi; King, Todd; Harpold, Daniel N.; Arvey, Robert; Barciniak, Michael; Bendt, Mirl; Carrigan, Daniel; Errigo, Therese; Holmes, Vincent; Johnson, Christopher S.; Kellogg, James; Kimvilakani, Patrick; Lefavor, Matthew; Hengemihle, Jerome; Jaeger, Ferzan; Lyness, Eric; Maurer, John; Melak, Anthony; Noreiga, Felix; Noriega, Marvin; Patel, Kiran; Prats, Benito; Raaen, Eric; Tan, Florence; Weidner, Edwin; Gundersen, Cynthia; Battel, Steven; Block, Bruce P.; Arnett, Ken; Miller, Ryan; Cooper, Curt; Edmonson, Charles; Nolan, J. Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) is designed to measure the composition, structure, and variability of the upper atmosphere of Mars. The NGIMS complements two other instrument packages on the MAVEN spacecraft designed to characterize the neutral upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars and the solar wind input to this region of the atmosphere. The combined measurement set is designed to quantify atmosphere escape rates and provide input to models of the evolution of the martian atmosphere. The NGIMS is designed to measure both surface reactive and inert neutral species and ambient ions along the spacecraft track over the 125-500 km altitude region utilizing a dual ion source and a quadrupole analyzer.

  9. The Atmospheric Pollution caused by the Technological Liquid Gas Evaporation,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-18

    and controlled gas exhaust into the atmosphere, mostly from industrial chimneys, is theoretically pretty well worked out giving details connected...secially vertexes. It is- o-.-amriified on tK’. :icture by Ynearv- of lii,:eninF7 the - hapie of the diffusinp cloud1 to the z=?m scinon Fi.&.2. The

  10. Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Liukang [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); McDermitt, Dayle [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Anderson, Tyler [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Riensche, Brad [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Komissarov, Anatoly [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Howe, Julie [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Robust, economical, low-power and reliable closed-path methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) analyzers suitable for long-term measurements are not readily available commercially. Such analyzers are essential for quantifying the amount of CH4 and CO2 released from various ecosystems (wetlands, rice paddies, forests, etc.) and other surface contexts (e.g. landfills, animal husbandry lots, etc.), and for understanding the dynamics of the atmospheric CH4 and CO2 budget and their impact on climate change and global warming. The purpose of this project is to develop a closed-path methane, carbon dioxide gas and water vapor analyzer capable of long-term measurements in remote areas for global climate change and environmental research. The analyzer will be capable of being deployed over a wide range of ecosystems to understand methane and carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide exchange need to be made all year-round with limited maintenance requirements. During this Phase II effort, we successfully completed the design of the electronics, optical bench, trace gas detection method and mechanical infrastructure. We are using the technologies of two vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, a multiple-pass Herriott optical cell, wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. We also have designed the instrument application software, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), along with partial completion of the embedded software. The optical bench has been tested in a lab setting with very good results. Major sources of optical noise have been identified and through design, the optical noise floor is approaching -60dB. Both laser modules can be temperature controlled to help maximize the stability of the analyzer. Additionally, a piezo electric transducer has been

  11. Eastern Mediterranean Natural Gas: Analyzing Turkey’s Stance

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Tanriverdi

    2013-01-01

    Recent large-scale natural gas discoveries in East Mediterranean have drawn attention to the region. The discoveries caused both hope and tension in the region. As stated, the new resources may serve as a new hope for all relevant parties as well as the region if managed in a collaborative and conciliatory way. Energy may be a remedy to Cyprus' financial predicament, initiate a process for resolving differences between Turkey and Cyprus, normalize Israel-Turkey relations and so on. On the con...

  12. Is Distant Pollution Contaminating Local Air? Analyzing the Origins of Atmospheric Aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Geng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the origin of aerosols in the atmosphere is important because of visual pollution, climate impacts, and deleterious health effects due to the inhalation of fine particles. This research analyzed aerosols characterized by their chloride, sulfate, and nitrate content as a function of size over a 3-month period. Due to wind patterns over coal-burning power plants, a higher concentration of local sulfate pollution was expected. Aerosols were harvested on the Purdue University campus using a high-volume air sampler with glass fiber filters and a five-stage impactor that separates the aerosols into five sizes. The filters were extracted in water to dissolve anions and the solution was analyzed using high-pressure liquid ion chromatography. Only trace amounts of chloride with no distinct patterns in size were detected. In total, nitrate content ranged from 0.12 to 2.10 μg/m3 and sulfate content ranged from 0.44 to 6.45 μg/m3 over a 3-month period. As for fine particles, a higher concentration of sulfate was observed. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model determines air mass origin, and in this study, higher total sulfate content was observed when the air mass moved out of the southwest, and higher total nitrate content was observed when the air mass originated from the southeast. The author concluded that small particles resulted in sulfate from sulfur dioxide, typically from gas to particle conversion. High sulfur dioxide levels are directly correlated with coal-burning power plant density. Small particulate sulfate found in West Lafayette, Indiana, was determined to originate primarily from power plants in southwest Indiana. Though the results do show a significant amount of potentially harmful aerosols in West Lafayette, there is still further research to be done concerning isotopic composition of those particles in attempts to better explain the chemical pathways.

  13. Advancement and application of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry techniques for atmospheric trace gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Brian M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) for compound specific stable isotope analysis is an underutilized technique because of the complexity of the instrumentation and high analytical costs. However stable isotopic data, when coupled with concentration measurements, can provide additional information on a compounds production, transformation, loss, and cycling within the biosphere and atmosphere. A GC-IRMS system was developed to accurately and precisely measure delta13C values for numerous oxygenated volatile organic compounds having natural and anthropogenic sources. The OVOCs include methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, 2-pentanone, and 3-pentanone. Guided by the requirements for analysis of trace components in air, the GC-IRMS system was developed with the goals of increasing sensitivity, reducing dead-volume and peak band broadening, optimizing combustion and water removal, and decreasing the split ratio to the IRMS. The technique relied on a two-stage preconcentration system, a low-volume capillary reactor and water trap, and a balanced reference gas delivery system. Measurements were performed on samples collected from two distinct sources (i.e. biogenic and vehicle emissions) and ambient air collected from downtown Miami and Everglades National Park. However, the instrumentation and the method have the capability to analyze a variety of source and ambient samples. The measured isotopic signatures that were obtained from source and ambient samples provide a new isotopic constraint for atmospheric chemists and can serve as a new way to evaluate their models and budgets for many OVOCs. In almost all cases, OVOCs emitted from fuel combustion were enriched in 13C when compared to the natural emissions of plants. This was particularly true for ethanol gas emitted in vehicle exhaust, which was observed to have a uniquely enriched isotopic signature that was attributed to ethanol's corn origin and use as an alternative

  14. Gas adsorption and desorption effects on high pressure small volume cylinders and their relevance to atmospheric trace gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satar, Ece; Nyfeler, Peter; Pascale, Céline; Niederhauser, Bernhard; Leuenberger, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Long term atmospheric monitoring of trace gases requires great attention to precision and accuracy of the measurement setups. For globally integrated and well established greenhouse gas observation networks, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has set recommended compatibility goals within the framework of its Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme [1]. To achieve these challenging limits, the measurement systems are regularly calibrated with standard gases of known composition. Therefore, the stability of the primary and secondary gas standards over time is an essential issue. Past studies have explained the small instabilities in high pressure standard gas cylinders through leakage, diffusion, regulator effects, gravimetric fractionation and surface processes [2, 3]. The latter include adsorption/desorption, which are functions of temperature, pressure and surface properties. For high pressure standard gas mixtures used in atmospheric trace gas analysis, there exists only a limited amount of data and few attempts to quantify the surface processes [4, 5]. Specifically, we have designed a high pressure measurement chamber to investigate trace gases and their affinity for adsorption on different surfaces over various temperature and pressure ranges. Here, we focus on measurements of CO2, CH4 and CO using a cavity ring down spectroscopy analyzer and quantify the concentration changes due to adsorption/desorption. In this study, the first results from these prototype cylinders of steel and aluminum will be presented. References [1] World Meteorological Organization (WMO), Global Atmosphere Watch.(GAW): Report No. 229, 18th WMO/IAEA Meeting on Carbon Dioxide, Other Greenhouse Gases and Related Tracers Measurement Techniques (GGMT-2015), 2016. [2] Keeling, R. F., Manning, A. C., Paplawsky, W. J., and Cox, A. C.: On the long-term stability of reference gases for atmospheric O2 /N2 and CO2 measurements, Tellus B, 59, 10.3402/tellusb.v59i1.16964, 2007. [3

  15. Ferrous alloys cast under high pressure gas atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirowski Z.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is describing the essence of the process of introducing nitrogen to the melt of ferrous alloys by application of overpressure above the metal bath. The problem was discussed in terms of both theory (the thermodynamic aspects of the process and practice (the technical and technological aspects, safety of the furnace stand operation, and technique of conducting the melt. The novel technique of melting under high pressure of the gas atmosphere (up to 5 MPa has not been used so far in the domestic industry, mainly because of the lack of proper equipment satisfyng the requirements of safe operation. Owing to cooperation undertaken with a partner from Bulgaria, a more detailed investigation of this technology has become possible and melting of selected ferrous alloys was conducted under the gas atmosphere at a pressure of about 3,5 MPa.

  16. Improvement of Cooling Technology through Atmosphere Gas Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renard, Michel; Dosogne, Edgaar; Crutzen, Jean Pierre; Raick, Jean Mare [DREVER INTERNATIONAL S.A., Liege (Belgium); Ji, Ma Jia; Jun, Lv; Zhi, Ma Bing [SHOUGANG Cold Rolling Mill Headquarter, Beijin (China)

    2009-12-15

    The production of advanced high strength steels requires the improvement of cooling technology. The use of high cooling rates allows relatively low levels of expensive alloying additions to ensure sufficient hardenability. In classical annealing and hot-dip galvanizing lines a mixing station is used to provide atmosphere gas containing 3-5% hydrogen and 97-95% nitrogen in the various sections of the furnace, including the rapid cooling section. Heat exchange enhancement in this cooling section can be insured by the increased hydrogen concentration. Driver international developed a patented improvement of cooling technology based on the following features: pure hydrogen gas is injected only in the rapid cooling section whereas the different sections of the furnace are supplied with pure nitrogen gas: the control of flows through atmosphere gas management allows to get high hydrogen concentration in cooling section and low hydrogen content in the other furnace zones. This cooling technology development insures higher cooling rates without additional expensive hydrogen gas consumption and without the use of complex sealing equipment between zones. In addition reduction in electrical energy consumption is obtained. This atmosphere control development can be combined with geometrical design improvements in order to get optimised cooling technology providing high cooling rates as well as reduced strip vibration amplitudes. Extensive validation of theoretical research has been conducted on industrial lines. New lines as well as existing lines, with limited modifications, can be equipped with this new development. Up to now this technology has successfully been implemented on 6 existing and 7 new lines in Europe and Asia.

  17. Atmospheric emission characterization of Marcellus shale natural gas development sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, J Douglas; Floerchinger, Cody; Fortner, Edward C; Wormhoudt, Joda; Massoli, Paola; Knighton, W Berk; Herndon, Scott C; Kolb, Charles E; Knipping, Eladio; Shaw, Stephanie L; DeCarlo, Peter F

    2015-06-02

    Limited direct measurements of criteria pollutants emissions and precursors, as well as natural gas constituents, from Marcellus shale gas development activities contribute to uncertainty about their atmospheric impact. Real-time measurements were made with the Aerodyne Research Inc. Mobile Laboratory to characterize emission rates of atmospheric pollutants. Sites investigated include production well pads, a well pad with a drill rig, a well completion, and compressor stations. Tracer release ratio methods were used to estimate emission rates. A first-order correction factor was developed to account for errors introduced by fenceline tracer release. In contrast to observations from other shale plays, elevated volatile organic compounds, other than CH4 and C2H6, were generally not observed at the investigated sites. Elevated submicrometer particle mass concentrations were also generally not observed. Emission rates from compressor stations ranged from 0.006 to 0.162 tons per day (tpd) for NOx, 0.029 to 0.426 tpd for CO, and 67.9 to 371 tpd for CO2. CH4 and C2H6 emission rates from compressor stations ranged from 0.411 to 4.936 tpd and 0.023 to 0.062 tpd, respectively. Although limited in sample size, this study provides emission rate estimates for some processes in a newly developed natural gas resource and contributes valuable comparisons to other shale gas studies.

  18. A New and Improved Carbon Dioxide Isotope Analyzer for Understanding Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y. W.; Berman, E. S.; Owano, T. G.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Oikawa, P. Y.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Still, C. J.; Gardner, A.; Baer, D. S.; Rastogi, B.

    2015-12-01

    Stable CO2 isotopes provide information on biogeochemical processes that occur at the soil-plant-atmosphere interface. While δ13C measurement can provide information on the sources of the CO2, be it photosynthesis, natural gas combustion, other fossil fuel sources, landfills or other sources, δ18O, and δ17O are thought to be determined by the hydrological cycling of the CO2. Though researchers have called for analytical tools for CO2 isotope measurements that are reliable and field-deployable, developing such instrument remains a challenge. The carbon dioxide isotope analyzer developed by Los Gatos Research (LGR) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology and incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for high sensitivity and optimal instrument stability. This new and improved analyzer measures CO2 concentration as well as δ13C, δ18O, and δ17O from CO2 at natural abundance (150-2500 ppm). The laboratory precision is ±200 ppb (1σ) in CO2 at 1 s, with a long-term (2 min) precision of ±20 ppb. The 1-second precision for both δ13C and δ18O is 0.7 ‰, and for δ17O is 1.8 ‰. The long-term (2 min) precision for both δ13C and δ18O is 0.08 ‰, and for δ17O is 0.18 ‰. The instrument has improved precision, stability and user interface over previous LGR CO2 isotope instruments and can be easily programmed for periodic referencing and sampling from different sources when coupled with LGR's multiport inlet unit (MIU). We have deployed two of these instruments at two different field sites, one at Twitchell Island in Sacramento County, CA to monitor the CO2 isotopic fluxes from an alfalfa field from 6/29/2015-7/13/2015, and the other at the Wind River Experimental Forest in Washington to monitor primarily the oxygen isotopes of CO2 within the canopy from 8/4/2015 through mid-November 2015. Methodology, laboratory development and testing and field performance are presented.

  19. Noble Gas Surface Flux Simulations And Atmospheric Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, Charles R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sun, Yunwei [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simpson, Matthew D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-30

    Signatures from underground nuclear explosions or UNEs are strongly influenced by the containment regime surrounding them. The degree of gas leakage from the detonation cavity to the surface obviously affects the magnitude of surface fluxes of radioxenon that might be detected during the course of a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty On-Site Inspection. In turn, the magnitude of surface fluxes will influence the downwind detectability of the radioxenon atmospheric signature from the event. Less obvious is the influence that leakage rates have on the evolution of radioxenon isotopes in the cavity or the downwind radioisotopic measurements that might be made. The objective of this letter report is to summarize our attempt to better understand how containment conditions affect both the detection and interpretation of radioxenon signatures obtained from sampling at the ground surface near an event as well as at greater distances in the atmosphere. In the discussion that follows, we make no attempt to consider other sources of radioactive noble gases such as natural backgrounds or atmospheric contamination and, for simplicity, only focus on detonation-produced radioxenon gases. Summarizing our simulations, they show that the decay of radioxenon isotopes (e.g., Xe-133, Xe-131m, Xe-133m and Xe-135) and their migration to the surface following a UNE means that the possibility of detecting these gases exists within a window of opportunity. In some cases, seeps or venting of detonation gases may allow significant quantities to reach the surface and be released into the atmosphere immediately following a UNE. In other release scenarios – the ones we consider here – hours to days may be required for gases to reach the surface at detectable levels. These release models are most likely more characteristic of “fully contained” events that lack prompt venting, but which still leak gas slowly across the surface for periods of months.

  20. Mars Phoenix Scout Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) Database: Thermal Database Development and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; Archer, D.; Niles, P. B.; Stein, T. C.; Hamara, D.; Boynton, W. V.; Ming, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Scout Lander mission in 2008 examined the history of water, searched for organics, and evaluated the potential for past/present microbial habitability in a martian arctic ice-rich soil [1]. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument measured the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2 and detected volatile bearing mineralogy (perchlorate, carbonate, hydrated mineral phases) in the martian soil [2-7]. The TEGA data are archived at the Planetary Data System (PDS) Geosciences Node but are reported in forms that require further processing to be of use to the non-TEGA expert. The soil and blank TEGA thermal data are reported as duty cycle and must be converted to differential power (mW) to allow for enthalpy calculations of exothermic/endothermic transitions. The exothermic/endothermic temperatures are also used to determine what phases (inorganic/organic) are present in the sample. The objectives of this work are to: 1) Describe how interpretable thermal data can be created from TEGA data sets on the PDS and 2) Provide additional thermal data interpretation of two Phoenix soils (Baby Bear, Wicked Witch) and include interpretations from three unreported soils (Rosy Red 1, 2, and Burning Coals).

  1. Atmospheric Impacts of Marcellus Shale Gas Activities in Southwestern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presto, A. A.; Lipsky, E. M.; Saleh, R.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Pittsburgh and the surrounding regions of southwestern Pennsylvania are subject to intensive natural gas exploration, drilling, and extraction associated with the Marcellus Shale formation. Gas extraction from the shale formation uses techniques of horizontal drilling followed by hydraulic fracturing. There are significant concerns about air pollutant emissions from the development and production of shale gas, especially methane emissions. We have deployed a mobile monitoring unit to investigate the atmospheric impacts of Marcellus Shale gas activities. The mobile sampling platform is a van with an on-board generator, a high-resolution GPS unit, cameras, and instrumentation for measuring methane, criteria gases (SO2, NOx, CO, O3), PM size distributions (scanning mobility particle sizer), black carbon mass (multi-angle absorption photometer), particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds (gas chromatograph with flame ionization detection), and meteorological data. A major advantage of the mobile sampling unit over traditional, stationary monitors is that it allows us to rapidly visit a variety of sites. Sampling at multiple sites allows us to characterize the spatial variability of pollutant concentrations related to Marcellus activity, particularly methane. Data collected from the mobile sampling unit are combined with GIS techniques and dispersion models to map pollutants related to Marcellus Shale operations. The Marcellus Shale gas activities are a major and variable source of methane. The background methane concentration in Pittsburgh is 2.1 +/- 0.2 ppm. However, two southwestern Pennsylvania counties with the highest density of Marcellus Shale wells, Washington and Greene Counties, have many areas of elevated methane concentration. Approximately 11% of the sampled sites in Washington County and nearly 50% of the sampled sites in Greene County have elevated (>2.3 ppm) methane concentrations, compared to 1.5% of sites with elevated

  2. Comparison of probability density functions for analyzing irradiance statistics due to atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclaren, Jason R W; Thomas, John C; Mackintosh, Jessica L; Mudge, Kerry A; Grant, Kenneth J; Clare, Bradley A; Cowley, William G

    2012-09-01

    A large number of model probability density functions (PDFs) are used to analyze atmospheric scintillation statistics. We have analyzed scintillation data from two different experimental setups covering a range of scintillation strengths to determine which candidate model PDFs best describe the experimental data. The PDFs were fitted to the experimental data using the method of least squares. The root-mean-squared fitting error was used to monitor the goodness of fit. The results of the fitting were found to depend strongly on the scintillation strength. We find that the log normally modulated Rician and the log normal PDFs are the best fit to the experimental data over the range of scintillation strengths encountered.

  3. Recuperated atmosphere SOFC/gas turbine hybrid cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Wayne

    2010-08-24

    A method of operating an atmospheric-pressure solid oxide fuel cell generator (6) in combination with a gas turbine comprising a compressor (1) and expander (2) where an inlet oxidant (20) is passed through the compressor (1) and exits as a first stream (60) and a second stream (62) the first stream passing through a flow control valve (56) to control flow and then through a heat exchanger (54) followed by mixing with the second stream (62) where the mixed streams are passed through a combustor (8) and expander (2) and the first heat exchanger for temperature control before entry into the solid oxide fuel cell generator (6), which generator (6) is also supplied with fuel (40).

  4. Recuperated atmospheric SOFC/gas turbine hybrid cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Wayne

    2010-05-04

    A method of operating an atmospheric-pressure solid oxide fuel cell generator (6) in combination with a gas turbine comprising a compressor (1) and expander (2) where an inlet oxidant (20) is passed through the compressor (1) and exits as a first stream (60) and a second stream (62) the first stream passing through a flow control valve (56) to control flow and then through a heat exchanger (54) followed by mixing with the second stream (62) where the mixed streams are passed through a combustor (8) and expander (2) and the first heat exchanger for temperature control before entry into the solid oxide fuel cell generator (6), which generator (6) is also supplied with fuel (40).

  5. CARVE: L2 Atmospheric Gas Concentrations, Tower-based Flasks, Alaska, 2012-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides atmospheric carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, molecular hydrogen, nitrous oxide, sulfur hexafluoride, and other trace gas mole...

  6. How reliable are electrolyte and metabolite results measured by a blood gas analyzer in the ED?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Emin; Acar, Yahya Ayhan; Kutur, Ahmet; Cevik, Erdem; Salman, Necati; Tezel, Onur

    2016-03-01

    Blood gas analysis is a frequently ordered test in emergency departments for many indications. It is a rapid technique that can analyze electrolyte and metabolites in addition to pH and blood gases. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of electrolyte and metabolite results measured by blood gas and core laboratory analyzers. This was a prospective, single-center observational study conducted in a tertiary care center's emergency department. All adult patients requiring arterial/venous blood gas analysis and core laboratory tests together for any purpose were consecutively included in the study between April 2014 and July 2015. Patients younger than 16 years, having any intravenous infusion or blood transfusion prior to sampling, or who were pregnant were excluded. A total of 1094 patients' (male = 547, female = 547) paired blood samples were analyzed. The mean age was 58.10 ± 21.35 years, and there was no difference between arterial and venous sampling groups by age, pH, or sex (P = .93, .56, and .41, respectively). Correlation coefficients for hemoglobin, hematocrit, glucose, potassium, sodium, and chloride levels measured by blood gas analyzer and core laboratory analyzers were 0.922, 0.896, 0.964, 0.823, 0.854, and 0.791, respectively. Blood gas analysis results were strongly correlated for hemoglobin, hematocrit, glucose, potassium, and sodium levels but were only moderately correlated for chloride levels. These parameters as measured by a blood gas analyzer seem reliable in critical decision making but must be validated by core laboratory results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigation of water adsorption and hygroscopicity of atmospherically relevant particles using a commercial vapor sorption analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenjun; Li, Yongjie; Zhu, Jianxi; Jia, Xiaohong; Lin, Qinhao; Zhang, Guohua; Ding, Xiang; Song, Wei; Bi, Xinhui; Wang, Xinming; Tang, Mingjin

    2017-10-01

    Water adsorption and hygroscopicity are among the most important physicochemical properties of aerosol particles, largely determining their impacts on atmospheric chemistry, radiative forcing, and climate. Measurements of water adsorption and hygroscopicity of nonspherical particles under subsaturated conditions are nontrivial because many widely used techniques require the assumption of particle sphericity. In this work we describe a method to directly quantify water adsorption and mass hygroscopic growth of atmospheric particles for temperature in the range of 5-30 °C, using a commercial vapor sorption analyzer. A detailed description of instrumental configuration and experimental procedures, including relative humidity (RH) calibration, is provided first. It is then demonstrated that for (NH4)2SO4 and NaCl, deliquescence relative humidities and mass hygroscopic growth factors measured using this method show good agreements with experimental and/or theoretical data from literature. To illustrate its ability to measure water uptake by particles with low hygroscopicity, we used this instrument to investigate water adsorption by CaSO4 ṡ 2H2O as a function of RH at 25 °C. The mass hygroscopic growth factor of CaSO4 ṡ 2H2O at 95 % RH, relative to that under dry conditions (RH < 1 %), was determined to be (0.450±0.004) % (1σ). In addition, it is shown that this instrument can reliably measure a relative mass change of 0.025 %. Overall, we have demonstrated that this commercial instrument provides a simple, sensitive, and robust method to investigate water adsorption and hygroscopicity of atmospheric particles.

  8. The utilization of physisorption analyzer for studying the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric relevant particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingxin; Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong

    2010-04-01

    The hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric aerosols has a significant effect on the global climate change. In this study, a physisorption analyzer was used to measure the water adsorption capacity of Al(2)O(3), NaCl, NH(4)NO(3), and (NH(4))(2)SO(4) particles at 273.6 K. Qualitative and quantitative information about water adsorption on these particles was obtained with changing the temperature and/or relative humidity (RH). Uptake of water on Al(2)O(3) showed a type-II BET adsorption isotherm with the monolayer formed at approximately 18% relative humidity (RH). The hygroscopic properties of NaCl, (NH(4))(2)SO(4), and NH(4)NO(3), including the deliquescence relative humidities (DRH), the temperature dependence of the DRH for NH(4)NO(3), and the growth factors of NaCl and (NH(4))(2)SO(4) were determined. All these results were in good agreement with the results obtained by other methods and/or theoretical prediction with a deviation less than 2%. For NaCl, the water adsorption amount increase rate exhibits three stages (65% RH) in the predeliquescence process and monolayer thin film water was formed at about 30% RH. It demonstrated that this instrument was practicable for studying the hygroscopic behavior of both soluble and insoluble but wettable atmospheric nonviolate aerosol particles.

  9. Pivotal roles of phyllosphere microorganisms at the interface between plant functioning and atmospheric trace gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringel, Françoise; Couée, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The phyllosphere, which lato sensu consists of the aerial parts of plants, and therefore primarily, of the set of photosynthetic leaves, is one of the most prevalent microbial habitats on earth. Phyllosphere microbiota are related to original and specific processes at the interface between plants, microorganisms and the atmosphere. Recent –omics studies have opened fascinating opportunities for characterizing the spatio-temporal structure of phyllosphere microbial communities in relation with structural, functional, and ecological properties of host plants, and with physico-chemical properties of the environment, such as climate dynamics and trace gas composition of the surrounding atmosphere. This review will analyze recent advances, especially those resulting from environmental genomics, and how this novel knowledge has revealed the extent of the ecosystemic impact of the phyllosphere at the interface between plants and atmosphere. Highlights • The phyllosphere is one of the most prevalent microbial habitats on earth. • Phyllosphere microbiota colonize extreme, stressful, and changing environments. • Plants, phyllosphere microbiota and the atmosphere present a dynamic continuum. • Phyllosphere microbiota interact with the dynamics of volatile organic compounds and atmospheric trace gasses. PMID:26052316

  10. Quartz Crystal Microbalance: A tool for analyzing loss of volatile compounds, gas sorption, and curing kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajric, Sendin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has recently procured a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Current popular uses are biological sensors, surface chemistry, and vapor detection. LANL has projects related to analyzing curing kinetics, measuring gas sorption on polymers, and analyzing the loss of volatile compounds in polymer materials. The QCM has yet to be employed; however, this review will cover the use of the QCM in these applications and its potential.

  11. Field intercomparison of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance flux measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Peltola

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Performances of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance measurements are assessed. The assessment and comparison was performed by analyzing eddy covariance data obtained during summer 2010 (1 April to 26 October at a pristine fen, Siikaneva, Southern Finland. High methane fluxes with pronounced seasonality have been measured at this fen. The four participating methane gas analyzers are commercially available closed-path units TGA-100A (Campbell Scientific Inc., USA, RMT-200 (Los Gatos Research, USA, G1301-f (Picarro Inc., USA and an early prototype open-path unit Prototype-7700 (LI-COR Biosciences, USA. The RMT-200 functioned most reliably throughout the measurement campaign, during low and high flux periods. Methane fluxes from RMT-200 and G1301-f had the smallest random errors and the fluxes agree remarkably well throughout the measurement campaign. Cospectra and power spectra calculated from RMT-200 and G1301-f data agree well with corresponding temperature spectra during a high flux period. None of the gas analyzers showed statistically significant diurnal variation for methane flux. Prototype-7700 functioned only for a short period of time, over one month, in the beginning of the measurement campaign during low flux period, and thus, its overall accuracy and season-long performance were not assessed. The open-path gas analyzer is a practical choice for measurement sites in remote locations due to its low power demand, whereas for G1301-f methane measurements interference from water vapor is straightforward to correct since the instrument measures both gases simultaneously. In any case, if only the performance in this intercomparison is considered, RMT-200 performed the best and is the recommended choice if a new fast response methane gas analyzer is needed.

  12. Field intercomparison of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, O.; Mammarella, I.; Haapanala, S.; Burba, G.; Vesala, T.

    2013-06-01

    Performances of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance measurements are assessed. The assessment and comparison was performed by analyzing eddy covariance data obtained during summer 2010 (1 April to 26 October) at a pristine fen, Siikaneva, Southern Finland. High methane fluxes with pronounced seasonality have been measured at this fen. The four participating methane gas analyzers are commercially available closed-path units TGA-100A (Campbell Scientific Inc., USA), RMT-200 (Los Gatos Research, USA), G1301-f (Picarro Inc., USA) and an early prototype open-path unit Prototype-7700 (LI-COR Biosciences, USA). The RMT-200 functioned most reliably throughout the measurement campaign, during low and high flux periods. Methane fluxes from RMT-200 and G1301-f had the smallest random errors and the fluxes agree remarkably well throughout the measurement campaign. Cospectra and power spectra calculated from RMT-200 and G1301-f data agree well with corresponding temperature spectra during a high flux period. None of the gas analyzers showed statistically significant diurnal variation for methane flux. Prototype-7700 functioned only for a short period of time, over one month, in the beginning of the measurement campaign during low flux period, and thus, its overall accuracy and season-long performance were not assessed. The open-path gas analyzer is a practical choice for measurement sites in remote locations due to its low power demand, whereas for G1301-f methane measurements interference from water vapor is straightforward to correct since the instrument measures both gases simultaneously. In any case, if only the performance in this intercomparison is considered, RMT-200 performed the best and is the recommended choice if a new fast response methane gas analyzer is needed.

  13. Portable blood gas and electrolyte analyzer evaluated in a multiinstitutional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Lindemans (Jan); P. Hoefkens (Peter); A.L. van Kessel; M. Bonnay; W.R. Kulpmann; J.D.E. van Suijlen

    1999-01-01

    textabstractA recently introduced blood gas/electrolyte analyzer (SenDx 100((R)), renamed ABL70) intended for point-of-care, near-patient, or stat laboratory use was evaluated simultaneously in four different institutions and compared with three different laboratory

  14. Hybrid recoil mass analyzer at IUAC–First results using gas-filled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hybrid recoil mass analyzer (HYRA) is a unique, dual-mode spectrometer designed to carry out nuclear reaction and structure studies in heavy and medium-mass nuclei using gas-filled and vacuum modes, respectively and has the potential to address newer domains in nuclear physics accessible using high energy, ...

  15. An experimental setup with ultrasonic gas analyzers and real time analysis of the composition of a binary gas mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doubek M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an automated measuring apparatus with an ultrasonic gas analyzer and realtime analysis of the composition of the gas. The apparatus is designed for preparing binary gas mixtures and making measurements in a wide range of pressures (from 0.8 bara to 15 bara and temperatures (between -15°C and 80°C. The apparatus was developed to determine the thermophysical properties of fluorocarbon mixtures for potential use in the cooling circuits of several Large Hadron Collider projects at CERN. The design of its control system took into account the safety and reliability o the gas analyzer, and the need to limit the presence of laboratory personnel. The control system was implemented in PVSS-II, the Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition standard chosen for LHC and its experiments at CERN. The second part of the paper describes the implementation and verification of the algorithm for continuous real-time determination of the composition of the refrigerant mixture. The algorithm is based on minimizing the quadratic norm fromthe measured data and from the pre-generated look-up tables acquired from the NIST REFPROP software package.

  16. Miniaturized Hollow-Waveguide Gas Correlation Radiometer (GCR) for Trace Gas Detection in the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, E. M.; Melroy, H. R.

    2012-01-01

    Gas correlation radiometry (GCR) has been shown to be a sensitive and versatile method for detecting trace gases in Earth's atmosphere. Here, we present a miniaturized and simplified version of this instrument capable of mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface. Reduction of the size and mass of the GCR instrument has been achieved by implementing a lightweight, 1 mm inner diameter hollow-core optical fiber (hollow waveguide) for the gas correlation cell. Based on a comparison with an Earth orbiting CO2 gas correlation instrument, replacement of the 10 meter mUltipass cell with hollow waveguide of equivalent pathlength reduces the cell mass from approx 150 kg to approx 0.5 kg, and reduces the volume from 1.9 m x 1.3 m x 0.86 m to a small bundle of fiber coils approximately I meter in diameter by 0.05 m in height (mass and volume reductions of >99%). This modular instrument technique can be expanded to include measurements of additional species of interest including nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) for a simultaneous measure of mass balance.

  17. Blood gas analyzer utility in evaluating oxygen kinetics of the aqueous humor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Ersan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To measure the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2 and carbon dioxide (PCO2 and the pH of aqueous humor (AH and arterial blood samples from rabbits using a blood gas analyzer. Methods: Twenty New Zealand rabbits were anesthetized intramuscularly with ketamine and xylazine and were then allowed to breathe room air. Using a gas blood analyzer, arterial blood and AH samples were analyzed for PO2, PCO2, and pH. Results: The mean arterial blood pressure was 87.14 ± 15.0 mmHg. The mean blood and AH PO2 were 95.18 ± 11.76 mmHg and 88.83 ± 9.92 mmHg, the mean blood and AH PCO2 were 25.86 ± 5.46 mmHg and 29.50 ± 5.36 mmHg, and the mean blood and AH pH were 7.38 ± 0.06 and 7.33 ± 0.09, respectively. Conclusion: Conclusions: The blood gas analyzer was easily employed to evaluate the aqueous humor in rabbits. When comparing the results of studies evaluating aqueous PO2, care should be taken to determine the methods used in these studies.

  18. Laboratory-based validation of the baseline sensors of the ITER diagnostic residual gas analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biewer, Theodore M. [ORNL; Marcus, Chris [ORNL; Klepper, C Christopher [ORNL; Andrew, Philip [ITER Organization, Cadarache, France; Gardner, W. L. [United States ITER Project Office; Graves, Van B. [ORNL; Hughes, Shaun [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France

    2017-10-01

    The divertor-specific ITER Diagnostic Residual Gas Analyzer (DRGA) will provide essential information relating to DT fusion plasma performance. This includes pulse-resolving measurements of the fuel isotopic mix reaching the pumping ducts, as well as the concentration of the helium generated as the ash of the fusion reaction. In the present baseline design, the cluster of sensors attached to this diagnostic's differentially pumped analysis chamber assembly includes a radiation compatible version of a commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer, as well as an optical gas analyzer using a plasma-based light excitation source. This paper reports on a laboratory study intended to validate the performance of this sensor cluster, with emphasis on the detection limit of the isotopic measurement. This validation study was carried out in a laboratory set-up that closely prototyped the analysis chamber assembly configuration of the baseline design. This includes an ITER-specific placement of the optical gas measurement downstream from the first turbine of the chamber's turbo-molecular pump to provide sufficient light emission while preserving the gas dynamics conditions that allow for \\textasciitilde 1 s response time from the sensor cluster [1].

  19. Laboratory-based validation of the baseline sensors of the ITER diagnostic residual gas analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepper, C. C.; Biewer, T. M.; Marcus, C.; Andrew, P.; Gardner, W. L.; Graves, V. B.; Hughes, S.

    2017-10-01

    The divertor-specific ITER Diagnostic Residual Gas Analyzer (DRGA) will provide essential information relating to DT fusion plasma performance. This includes pulse-resolving measurements of the fuel isotopic mix reaching the pumping ducts, as well as the concentration of the helium generated as the ash of the fusion reaction. In the present baseline design, the cluster of sensors attached to this diagnostic's differentially pumped analysis chamber assembly includes a radiation compatible version of a commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer, as well as an optical gas analyzer using a plasma-based light excitation source. This paper reports on a laboratory study intended to validate the performance of this sensor cluster, with emphasis on the detection limit of the isotopic measurement. This validation study was carried out in a laboratory set-up that closely prototyped the analysis chamber assembly configuration of the baseline design. This includes an ITER-specific placement of the optical gas measurement downstream from the first turbine of the chamber's turbo-molecular pump to provide sufficient light emission while preserving the gas dynamics conditions that allow for \\textasciitilde 1 s response time from the sensor cluster [1].

  20. Application of the can technique and radon gas analyzer for radon exhalation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal-ur-Rehman; Al-Jarallah, M I; Musazay, M S; Abu-Jarad, F

    2003-01-01

    A passive "can technique" and an active radon gas analyzer with an emanation container were applied for radon exhalation rate measurements from different construction materials, viz. five marble seven ceramic and 100 granite tiles used in Saudi Arabia. The marble and ceramic tiles did not show detectable radon exhalation using the active radon gas analyzer system. However the granite tiles showed relatively high radon exhalations, indicating a relatively high uranium content. A comparison of the radon exhalation rates measured by the two techniques showed a linear correlation coefficient of 0.57. The radon exhalation rates from the granites varied from 0.02 to 6.58 Bqm(-2)h(-1) with an average of 1.35+/-1.40 Bqm(-2)h(-1). The geometric mean and the geometric standard deviation of the frequency distribution were found to be 0.80 and 3.1, respectively. The track density found on the nuclear track detectors in the can technique exposed to the granites, having high exhalation rates, varied linearly with exposure time with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.99. This experimental finding agrees with the theoretical prediction. The can technique showed sensitivity to low radon exhalation rates from ceramic, marble and some granite over a period of 2 months, which were not detectable by the active radon gas analyzer system. The reproducibility of data with both measuring techniques was found to be within a 7% deviation.

  1. Application of the can technique and radon gas analyzer for radon exhalation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazal-ur-Rehman E-mail: fazalr@kfupm.edu.sa; Al-Jarallah, M.I.; Musazay, M.S.; Abu-Jarad, F

    2003-12-01

    A passive 'can technique' and an active radon gas analyzer with an emanation container were applied for radon exhalation rate measurements from different construction materials, viz. five marble seven ceramic and 100 granite tiles used in Saudi Arabia. The marble and ceramic tiles did not show detectable radon exhalation using the active radon gas analyzer system. However the granite tiles showed relatively high radon exhalations, indicating a relatively high uranium content. A comparison of the radon exhalation rates measured by the two techniques showed a linear correlation coefficient of 0.57. The radon exhalation rates from the granites varied from 0.02 to 6.58 Bq m{sup -2} h{sup -1} with an average of 1.35{+-}1.40 Bq m{sup -2} h{sup -1}. The geometric mean and the geometric standard deviation of the frequency distribution were found to be 0.80 and 3.1, respectively. The track density found on the nuclear track detectors in the can technique exposed to the granites, having high exhalation rates, varied linearly with exposure time with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.99. This experimental finding agrees with the theoretical prediction. The can technique showed sensitivity to low radon exhalation rates from ceramic, marble and some granite over a period of 2 months, which were not detectable by the active radon gas analyzer system. The reproducibility of data with both measuring techniques was found to be within a 7% deviation.

  2. Analyzing early exo-Earths with a coupled atmosphere biogeochemical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Stefanie; Grenfell, John Lee; Stock, Joachim; Lehmann, Ralph; Godolt, Mareike; von Paris, Philip; Rauer, Heike

    2017-04-01

    Investigating Earth-like extrasolar planets with atmospheric models is a central focus in planetary science. Taking the development of Earth as a reference for Earth-like planets we investigate interactions between the atmosphere, planetary surface and organisms. The Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is related to feedbacks between these three. Its origin and controlling mechanisms are not well defined - requiring interdisciplinary, coupled models. We present results from our newly-developed Coupled Atmosphere Biogeochemistry (CAB) model which is unique in the literature. Applying a unique tool (Pathway Analysis Program), ours is the first quantitative analysis of catalytic cycles governing O2 in early Earth's atmosphere near the GOE. Complicated oxidation pathways play a key role in destroying O2 whereas in the upper atmosphere, most O2 is formed abiotically via CO2 photolysis.

  3. Atmospheric Gas-Phase Reactions of Fluorinated Compounds and Alkenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerstrøm, Freja From

    for Atmospheric Research, Denmark. All setups consist of a chamber and uses UV light to initiate the experiments and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for the analysis of the data. The atmospheric chemistry of new chlorofluorocarbon replacements is discussed. Experimental studies have been performed on: (CF......Experimental studies have been performed using three different smog chamber setups to investigate the atmospheric chemistry of fluorinated compounds as well as alkenes. The three instruments were at Ford Motor Company, USA, National Center for Atmospheric Research, USA, and Copenhagen Center...

  4. Evaluation of NOx flue gas analyzers for accuracy and their applicability for low-concentration measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Gluck; Chuck Glenn; Tim Logan; Bac Vu; Mike Walsh; Pat Williams [Dow Chemical Co., Freeport, TX (USA)

    2003-06-01

    The requirements of the Texas State Implementation Plan of the U.S. Clean Air Act for the Houston-Galveston Ozone Nonattainment Area stipulate large reductions in oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions. A large number of sources at Dow Chemical Co. sites within the nonattainment area may require the addition of continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS) for online analysis of NOx, CO, and O{sub 2}. At the outset of this work, it was not known whether the analyzers could accurately measure NOx as low as 2 ppm. Therefore, NOx CEMS analyzers from five different companies were evaluated for their ability to reliably measure NOx in the 2-20 ppm range. Testing was performed with a laboratory apparatus that accurately simulated different mixtures of flue gas and, on a limited basis, simulated a dual-train sampling system on a gas turbine. The results indicate that this method is a reasonable approach for analyzer testing and reveal important technical performance aspects for accurate NOx measurements. Several commercial analyzers, if installed in a CEMS application with sampling conditioning components similar to those used in this study, can meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency s measurement data quality requirements for accuracy. 13 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Modified Atmosphere Packaging of tomatoes; controlling gas and humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evelo, R.G.; Horst, J.

    1996-01-01

    Modified atmosphere (MA) packaging technology is a modern technique of which the application is steadily growing. Its essence is to reduce the decay of perishable produce by creating a special atmosphere around the produce. The MA factors influencing the quality behaviour of the produce are oxygen

  6. Integrated and automatic mixing of whole blood: an evaluation of a novel blood gas analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenache, David G; Parker, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    A homogeneous whole blood specimen is essential to produce quality results from blood gas analysis, however achieving an adequately mixed specimen can be difficult due to the absence of any dead space in a blood gas syringe. This study evaluated the efficacy of an automatic mixing feature incorporated into the ABL800 FLEX blood gas analyzer and estimated the systematic error in tests performed by the instrument. Quantitative measurements of pH, PCO(2), PO(2), Na(+), K(+), Ca(+), glucose, lactate, and total hemoglobin were performed on 388 whole blood specimens collected into standard blood gas syringes or specific syringes designed to work in conjunction with the ABL800 FLEX. One hundred eighty specimens were manually or automatically mixed following horizontal storage for 10, 20, or 30 min and total hemoglobin was used as in indicator of specimen homogeneity. Two hundred eight specimens were used to estimate the systematic error of tests performed by the ABL800 FLEX. Manual mixing produced significantly more variation in paired hemoglobin measurements compared to automatic mixing at all three time points (pmixing, automatic mixing by the ABL800 FLEX consistently produces a homogeneous specimen.

  7. An economical method of analyzing transient motion of gas-lubricated rotor-bearing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenhagen, G. L.; Ayers, A. L.; Barsalou, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    A method of economically evaluating the hydrodynamic forces generated in a gas-lubricated tilting-pad bearing is presented. The numerical method consists of solving the case of the infinite width bearing and then converting this solution to the case of the finite bearing by accounting for end leakage. The approximate method is compared to the finite-difference solution of Reynolds equation and yields acceptable accuracy while running about one-hundred times faster. A mathematical model of a gas-lubricated tilting-pad vertical rotor systems is developed. The model is capable of analyzing a two-bearing-rotor system in which the rotor center of mass is not at midspan by accounting for gyroscopic moments. The numerical results from the model are compared to actual test data as well as analytical results of other investigators.

  8. Numerical simulation of detonation of an explosive atmosphere of liquefied petroleum gas in a confined space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niculae Serban Costin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The detonation of an explosive atmosphere from liquefied petroleum gas disseminated in air in a confined space is studied using numerical modeling with software product ANSYS AUTODYN.

  9. Demonstration of compatibility of multiple arterial blood gas syringes with current multi-parameter analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiberlich, Laura E; Cifaldi, Lisa M

    2014-07-01

    Since there is a lack of current evidence to support the compatibility of the most commonly used arterial blood gas syringes with the latest multi-parameter analyzers, the objective of this study was to assess the agreement of analyte values between three heparinized arterial blood gas syringes using three different analyzers. Venous blood from 25 healthy volunteers was drawn into the study syringes (BD Drihep A-Line, PICO50, and Portex Line Draw Plus) by four clinician volunteers in a random order (441 total) and immediately ( 0.05). For RAPIDPoint and i-STAT, the Ca(2+) value was significantly less for A-Line than for the other syringes. The value for Na(+) was significantly greater for the PICO50 than the A-Line and Line Draw syringes with the i-STAT. Both results were within two standard deviations of the mean of the other two syringes and are not considered clinically significant; however, comparisons were not made between the values from the different analyzers. Dry-balanced lithium heparin ABG syringes used for blood draws should provide reliable results, regardless of syringe type, provided that the clinicians use proper pre-analytical techniques.

  10. Locating hazardous gas leaks in the atmosphere via modified genetic, MCMC and particle swarm optimization algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji; Zhang, Ru; Yan, Yuting; Dong, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jun Ming

    2017-05-01

    Hazardous gas leaks in the atmosphere can cause significant economic losses in addition to environmental hazards, such as fires and explosions. A three-stage hazardous gas leak source localization method was developed that uses movable and stationary gas concentration sensors. The method calculates a preliminary source inversion with a modified genetic algorithm (MGA) and has the potential to crossover with eliminated individuals from the population, following the selection of the best candidate. The method then determines a search zone using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling, utilizing a partial evaluation strategy. The leak source is then accurately localized using a modified guaranteed convergence particle swarm optimization algorithm with several bad-performing individuals, following selection of the most successful individual with dynamic updates. The first two stages are based on data collected by motionless sensors, and the last stage is based on data from movable robots with sensors. The measurement error adaptability and the effect of the leak source location were analyzed. The test results showed that this three-stage localization process can localize a leak source within 1.0 m of the source for different leak source locations, with measurement error standard deviation smaller than 2.0.

  11. A feasibility study of a pocket-sized gas chromatographic air analyzer. Final contract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, S.C.; Jerman, J.H.

    1977-07-01

    The feasibility of producing a pocket-sized air contaminant monitor based upon a miniature gas chromatograph and an integrated microcomputer has been demonstrated and a practical design for the instrument is presented. This pocket-sized instrument is intended to be used as a personal exposure monitor which is unobtrusively carried by an industrial worker throughout the day. The proposed instrument is fully self-contained in an 8 cm x 4 cm x 15 cm package weighing approximately 0.6 kg. It is build around a miniature integrated gas chromatograph (GC) consisting of a capillary column, a sample injection valve, and detector. A state-of-the-art integrated circuit microcomputer is included in the instrument to handle control and data processing functions. The proposed instrument will be capable of sampling the atmosphere automatically once a minute for eight hours, measuring the concentrations of up to 10 different vapors simultaneously to within 10% accuracy, calculating and storing the time-weighted-average and peak concentrations for each of the gases, measuring concentrations at the 10 ppm level, displaying any of the stored concentrations upon demand, and sounding an alarm when any concentration exceeds a predetermined value. The desirable features of this instrument -- its small size, automatic operation, and ability to monitor multiple gases -- should make it a useful analytical tool and of significant use in the fields of industrial hygiene and occupational safety.

  12. Rarefied gas flows through meshes and implications for atmospheric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gumbel

    Full Text Available Meshes are commonly used as part of instruments for in situ atmospheric measurements. This study analyses the aerodynamic effect of meshes by means of wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulations. Based on the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method, a simple mesh parameterisation is described and applied to a number of representative flow conditions. For open meshes freely exposed to the flow, substantial compression effects are found both upstream and downstream of the mesh. Meshes attached to close instrument structures, on the other hand, cause only minor flow disturbances. In an accompanying paper, the approach developed here is applied to the quantitative analysis of rocket-borne density measurements in the middle atmosphere.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (instruments and techniques; middle atmosphere – composition and chemistry

  13. An automated analyzer to measure surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of water soluble inorganic aerosol compounds and reactive trace gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rick M; Trebs, Ivonne; Otjes, René; Jongejan, Piet A C; Ten Brink, Harry; Phillips, Gavin; Kortner, Michael; Meixner, Franz X; Nemitz, Eiko

    2009-03-01

    Here, we present a new automated instrument for semicontinuous gradient measurements of water-soluble reactive trace gas species (NH3, HNO3, HONO, HCl, and SO2) and their related aerosol compounds (NH4+, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-)). Gas and aerosol samples are collected simultaneously at two heights using rotating wet-annular denuders and steam-jet aerosol collectors, respectively. Online (real-time) analysis using ion chromatography (IC) for anions and flow injection analysis (FIA) for NH4+ and NH3 provide a half-hourly averaged gas and aerosol gradients within each hour. Through the use of syringe pumps, IC preconcentration columns, and high-quality purified water, the system achieves detection limits (3sigma-definition) under field conditions of typically: 136/207,135/114, 29/ 22,119/92, and 189/159 ng m(-3) for NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-, HONO/ NO2-, HCl/Cl- and SO2/SO4(2-), respectively. The instrument demonstrates very good linearity and accuracy for liquid and selected gas phase calibrations over typical ambient concentration ranges. As shown by examples from field experiments, the instrument provides sufficient precision (3-9%), even at low ambient concentrations, to resolve vertical gradients and calculate surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes undertypical meteorological conditions of the atmospheric surface layer using the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  14. The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia: Analyzing Regional Land Use Change Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Keller; Maria Assunção Silva-Dias; Daniel C. Nepstad; Meinrat O. Andreae

    2004-01-01

    The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is a multi-disciplinary, multinational scientific project led by Brazil. LBA researchers seek to understand Amazonia in its global context especially with regard to regional and global climate. Current development activities in Amazonia including deforestation, logging, cattle ranching, and agriculture...

  15. Extremely sensitive CWA analyzer based on a novel optical pressure sensor in photoacoustic gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Jyrki K.; Koskinen, Vesa; Uotila, Juho; Kauppinen, Ismo K.

    2004-12-01

    Major improvement into the sensitivity of broadband Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers, used in gas analysis, can be achieved by a photoacoustic detection system, which bases on a recently introduced optical pressure sensor. The sensor is a cantilever-type microphone with interferometric measurement of its free end displacement. By using a preliminary prototype of the photoacoustic gas detector, equipped with the proposed sensor and a black body radiation source, a detection limit in the sub-ppb range was obtained for e.g. methane gas. The limit, obtained in non-resonant operation mode, is very close to the best photoacoustic results achieved with powerfull laser sources and by exploiting the cell resonances. It is also orders of magnitude better than any measurement with a black body radiation source. Furthermore, the ultimate sensitivity leads on to very small detection limits also for several chemical warfare agents (CWA) e.g. sarin, tabun and mustard. The small size of the sensor and its great thermal stability enables the construction of an extremely sensitive portable CWA analyzer in the near future.

  16. Trace gas retrievals for the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter Atmospheric Chemistry Suite mid-infrared solar occultation spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, K. S.; Montmessin, F.; Fedorova, A.; Trokhimovskiy, A.; Korablev, O.

    2017-09-01

    Here we present preparations for retrieving trace gas volume mixing ratio vertical profiles from the Atmospheric Chemistry Suite (ACS) mid-infrared channel operating in solar occultation mode. ACS is a cross-dispersion spectrometer on the ESA/Roscosmos ExoMars Trace Gas orbiter which entered Mars orbit in October 2016. It is mid-way through an aerobreaking compaign and science operations will commence around March 2o18.

  17. Relating landfill gas emissions to atmospheric pressure using numerical modeling and state-space analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T.G.; Christophersen, Mette; Moldrup, P.

    2003-01-01

    Landfill gas (CO2 and CH4) concentrations and fluxes in soil adjacent to an old, unlined Danish municipal landfill measured over a 48-hour period during the passage of a low-pressure weather system were used to identify processes governing gas fluxes and concentrations. Two different approaches...... with rapidly decreasing atmospheric pressures resulting in emission of large amounts of CH4 during short periods of time. This effect, however, was less significant for the CO2 fluxes.......-water content, soil gas permeability, soil gas diffusion coefficients, and biological CH4 degradation rate upon landfill gas concentration and fluxes in the soil. Fluxes and concentrations were found to be most sensitive to variations in volumetric soil water content, atmospheric pressure variations and gas...

  18. Development of a Custom CRDS-based Trace Gas Analyzer for Argon and Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeter, K. J.; Durben, D.; Zehfus, M.; Galbiati, C.; Mei, D.; Sun, Y.; Alton, A.

    2010-03-01

    Noble liquid-based dark matter detectors are sensitive to parts-per-billion (ppb) concentrations of impurities of O2, N2, and H2O, which reduce the scintillation light yield and disrupt the ionization signal. In order to achieve an optimal light yield and collection of the ionization signal, DARKSIDE is designing a cryogenic distillation unit to achieve large quantities of depleted argon with a purity at sub-ppb levels. Critical to the success of the depleted argon dark matter detector will be the development of a system capable of analyzing these impurities at the sub-ppb level. A trace gas analyzer based on cw-Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) technology is being built at Black Hills State University that exceeds the current limits of commercially available systems. CRDS involves measuring the decay rate of the intensity of monochromatic light transmitted at the mirrors enclosing a cavity filled with a sample of gas. By comparing the decay rates for light at a resonance frequency of the contaminant of interest with that of light slightly off-resonance, a direct measurement of the amount of absorbing material (the contaminant) is obtained. Designed to measure ultra-low levels of elemental impurities, the BHSU system will be critical to such experiments as DARKSIDE and other dark matter searches based on liquid argon and xenon.

  19. Impact of Endogenous and Exogenous Interferences on Clinical Chemistry Parameters Measured on Blood Gas Analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieme, Caleb V; Voss, Dena R; Davis, Scott R; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of hemolysis, icterus, and lipemia (HIL) was determined for residual whole blood specimens analyzed for clinical chemistry parameters on blood gas analyzers. The frequency and potential impact of exogenous interference from iodide, salicylate, and thiocyanate (metabolite of sodium nitroprusside) on analysis of whole blood chloride was also assessed. Over an approximately two month period at an academic medical center, indices for HIL were determined on Roche cobas c502 analyzers for 1,986 residual whole blood specimens that had been previously analyzed for clinical chemistry parameters on Radiometer ABL90 FLEX blood gas analyzers. To examine exogenous interferences, retrospective analysis was performed over multiple years to ascertain whether patient samples analyzed for whole blood chloride were potentially affected by interference from iodide, salicylate, or thiocyanate. Some degree of hemolysis (defined as hemolysis index of greater than 60) was present in 9.7% of the whole blood specimens. Increasing rates of hemolysis were associated with higher whole blood potassium concentrations. Nearly 60% of specimens with potassium concentrations between 6.0 and 6.9 mEq/L had hemolysis indices of 100 or greater, and 75% of specimens with a potassium concentration of 7.0 mEq/L or greater were severely hemolyzed (hemolysis index of 300 or greater). In contrast to the hemolysis results, icterus and lipemia were determined to have minimal impact on patient results. For the exogenous interferences, we did not identify any patient samples where elevated salicylate levels or pharmaceutical iodide administration overlapped with whole blood chloride analysis (out of 75,887 and 169,229 total chloride measurements, respectively). We did, however, find that for patients receiving nitroprusside therapy in the inpatient setting, whole blood chloride concentrations were significantly higher during nitroprusside therapy [106.7 +/- 6.2 mEq/L (mean, SD)] compared to before

  20. Thermochromatography study of volatile polonium species in various gas atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Eichler, Robert; Piguet,David; Mendonça, Tania Melo; Stora, Thierry; Schumann, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Phenomena related to the volatilization of polonium and its compounds are critical issues for the safety assessment of the innovative lead–bismuth cooled type of nuclear reactor or accelerator driven systems. The formation and volatilization of different species of polonium and their interaction with fused silica was studied by thermochromatography using carrier gases with varied redox potential. The obtained results show that under inert and reducing conditions in the absence of moisture, elemental polonium is formed. Polonium compounds more volatile than elemental polonium can be formed if traces of moisture are present in both inert and reducing carrier gas. The use of dried oxygen as carrier gas leads to the formation of polonium oxides, which are less volatile than elemental polonium. It was also found that the volatility of polonium oxides increases with increasing oxidation state. In the presence of moisture in an oxidizing carrier gas, species are formed that are more volatile than the oxides and le...

  1. Biomass-Ash-Induced Agglomeration in a Fluidized Bed. Part 1: Experimental Study on the Effects of a Gas Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Teng; Fan, Chuigang; Hao, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    with quartz sand and fluidized by the gas mixtures of N2/CO2, N2/H2, and N2/steam or by air. At 550 °C, the bed temperature is increased at the rate of 3 °C/min until defluidization occurs. In this way, the defluidization temperature can be determined, which represents the agglomeration tendency....... Understanding of the agglomeration in various atmospheres is crucial to optimize the design and operation conditions. This study focuses on the effects of gases on agglomeration tendency with different types of biomass, including corn straw, rice straw, and wheat straw. The biomass ash samples are mixed....... The agglomerates are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy–energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM–EDS) for morphology and elemental composition. Significant differences are observed on the defluidization temperature (Td) and agglomeration mechanisms in different gas atmospheres. Td in H2 and steam...

  2. Validation protocol for multiple blood gas analyzers in accordance with laboratory accreditation programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérsio A. R. Ebner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction:The results of blood gas analysis using different instrumentation can vary widely due to the methodological differences, the calibration procedures and the use of different configurations for each type of instrument.Objective:The objective of this study was to evaluate multiple analytical systems for measurement of blood gases, electrolytes and metabolites in accordance with the accreditation program (PALC of Sociedade Brasileira de Patologia Clínica/Medicina Laboratorial (SBPC/ML.Materials and methods:20 samples were evaluated in three ABL800 Flex (Radiometer Medical ApS, Denmark blood gas analyzers, and the results were compared with those of the device in use, which was considered the reference. The analysis of variance (Anova was applied for statistical purposes, as well as the calculation of mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation.Results:The p values obtained in the statistical analysis were: pH = 0.983, pO2 = 0.991, pCO2 = 0.353, lactate = 0.584, glucose = 0.995, ionized calcium = 0.983, sodium = 0.991, potassium = 0.926, chlorine = 0.029.Conclusion:The evaluation of multiple analytical systems is an essential procedure in the clinical laboratory for quality assurance and accuracy of the results.

  3. Effect of feed-gas humidity on nitrogen atmospheric-pressure plasma jet for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl D; McLean, Robert J C; DeLeon, Gian; Melnikov, Vadim

    2016-11-14

    We investigate the effect of feed-gas humidity on the oxidative properties of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet using nitrogen gas. Plasma jets operating at atmospheric pressure are finding uses in medical and biological settings for sterilization and other applications involving oxidative stress applied to organisms. Most jets use noble gases, but some researchers use less expensive nitrogen gas. The feed-gas water content (humidity) has been found to influence the performance of noble-gas plasma jets, but has not yet been systematically investigated for jets using nitrogen gas. Low-humidity and high-humidity feed gases were used in a nitrogen plasma jet, and the oxidation effect of the jet was measured quantitatively using a chemical dosimeter known as FBX (ferrous sulfate-benzoic acid-xylenol orange). The plasma jet using high humidity was found to have about ten times the oxidation effect of the low-humidity jet, as measured by comparison with the addition of measured amounts of hydrogen peroxide to the FBX dosimeter. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using nitrogen as a feed gas have a greater oxidizing effect with a high level of humidity added to the feed gas.

  4. Effect of swirling desolvation gas flow in an atmospheric pressure ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savtchenko, Serguei; Ashgriz, Nasser; Jolliffe, Chuck; Cousins, Lisa; Gamble, Heather

    2014-09-01

    A numerical study is performed to examine the effect of introducing a swirling desolvation gas flow on the flow transport characteristics in an electrospray and an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) system. An ion source having three coaxial tubes is considered: (1) an inner capillary tube to inject the liquid sample, (2) a center coaxial tube to provide a room temperature gas flow to nebulize the liquid, referred to as the nebulizing gas flow, and (3) an outer coaxial tube having a converging exit to supply a high temperature gas for droplet desolvation, referred to as the desolvation gas flow. The results show that a swirling desolvation gas flow reduces the dispersion of the nebulizing gas and suppresses turbulent diffusion. The effect of swirling desolvation flow on the trajectory of a range of droplet sizes emitted from a source is also considered.

  5. Thermochromatography study of volatile tellurium species in various gas atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Neuhausen, Jörg; Eichler, Robert; Piguet, David; Schumann, Dorothea

    2014-09-01

    The adsorption interaction of tellurium species with fused silica was studied by thermochromatography. Trace amounts of tellurium were obtained by irradiating elemental tin with α-particles. Different tellurium species were obtained using carrier gases with varied redox potential. Adsorption enthalpies of the obtained species were calculated allowing for the identification of some species. Elemental tellurium or SnTe was deposited in thermochromatography experiments when using both dried and deoxygenated He and H2 as carrier gases. Tellurium dioxide was deposited in thermochromatography experiments when using dry oxygen as carrier gas. Tellurium dioxide was found to be significantly less volatile compared to elemental Te or SnTe. The deposition of a species with still lower volatility occurring under less oxidizing conditions was tentatively assigned to tellurium monoxide, TeO. Species more volatile than elemental tellurium or SnTe, most likely Te-hydroxides, were detected in experiments using moist H2 as carrier gas. In moist oxidizing gas, species more volatile than TeO2 were found, most likely Te-oxyhydroxides. The obtained results provide valuable input to design experiments for studying the volatility of tellurium's heavier homologue polonium and its compounds, which represent one of the major radiological concerns for the use of lead-bismuth-eutectic as coolant and target material for innovative accelerator-driven systems or spallation sources.

  6. Gravimetric Standard Gas Mixtures for Global Monitoring of Atmospheric SF6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong Sik; Lee, Jinbok; Moon, Dongmin; Kim, Jin Seog; Lee, Jeongsoon; Hall, Bradley D

    2017-11-21

    In this study, standard gas mixtures of SF 6 in synthetic air were gravimetrically developed as a suite consisting of 6 mixtures with mole fractions of SF 6 ranging from 5 to 15 pmol/mol. For precision in weighing the gas fills, an automatic weighing system coupled with a high sensitivity mass balance was used and a gravimetry precision of 3 mg (2σ) was achieved. Impurity profiles of the raw gases were determined by various analyzers. In particular, sub pmol/mol levels of SF 6 in the matrix components (N 2 , O 2 , and Ar) were carefully measured, since the mole fraction of SF 6 in the final step can be significantly biased by this trace amount of SF 6 in the raw gases of the matrix components. Gravimetric dilution of SF 6 by purity-assessed N 2 was performed in 6 steps to achieve a mole fraction of 440 pmol/mol. In the final step, O 2 and Ar were added to mimic the atmospheric composition. Gravimetric fractions of SF 6 and the associated standard uncertainty in each step were computed according to the ISO 6142 and JCGM 100:2008, respectively, and validated experimentally. Eventually, the SF 6 fraction uncertainty of the standard gas mixtures combined by uncertainties of gravimetric preparation and verification measurements were found to be nominally 0.08% at a 95% confidence interval. A comparison with independent calibration standards from NOAA shows agreement within 0.49%, satisfying the extended WMO compatibility goal, 0.05 ppt.

  7. High spectral resolution remote sensing detection system for atmosphere greenhouse gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da; Zheng, Yuquan

    2016-10-01

    Space-borne high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high spectral resolution spectral detection system with high detection accuracy (1-4ppm) is demonstrated under the application background of the detection of atmospheric carbon dioxide as the main component of greenhouse gases. According to greenhouse gas concentrations detection accuracy requirements and simulation of different spectral absorption spectrum of carbon dioxide, the reasonable spectral channel center wavelength, spectral bandwidth and spectral resolution is determined of the high spectral resolution carbon dioxide remote sensing system. Grating spectral imaging system using large area diffractive grating spectral as a core splitting element is to achieve fine spectrum splitting. By the application of large area array detector push-broom mode, the hyperspectral greenhouse gas detection system is developed with the spectrum center wavelength of 0.76um, 1.61um and 2.06um, spectral resolution indicators better than 0.047nm, 0.142nm and 0.182nm actually. The system components and working principle are described. Important parts involved in the system design such as spectral imaging system, large-array CCD visible-light detector, large-array HgCdTe infrared detectors, high SNR and low temperature drift imaging electronics, etc. are discussed. SNR indicators of three spectral ranges are estimated based on system parameters, in order to analyzing realizability of high detection accuracy of XCO2. The system performances are tested by taking fine spectral calibration and radiometric calibration methods in the laboratory. Spectral calibration results showed that: three spectral channels mean spectral resolutions of hyperspectral detection of greenhouse gases are better than 0.042 nm, 0.128nm and 0.17nm, three spectral channels average SNRs are up to 53dB, 48dB and 45dB respectively under the typical operating conditions of system. Development of this system successfully filled greenhouse gas detection systems

  8. SAInt - A Simulation Tool for analyzing the Consequences of Natural Gas Supply Disruptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pambour, Kwabena Addo; Dijkema, Gerhard; Bolado-Lavin, Ricardo

    The interruption of gas supply to the EU through Ukraine in January 2009 has been the largest gas crises in the EU ever. This was the triggering event to develop and finally enact Regulation 994/2010 on security of gas supply, nowadays of mandatory implementation by EU Member States (MS). According

  9. Gas Nonideality at One Atmosphere Revealed through Speed of Sound Measurements and Heat Capacity Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Arthur M.; Liu, Allen

    2008-01-01

    Using an easy-to-make cylindrical resonator, students can measure the speed of sound in a gas, u, with sufficiently high precision (by locating standing-wave Lissajous patterns on an oscilloscope) to observe real gas properties at one atmosphere and 300 K. For CO[subscript 2] and SF[subscript 6], u is found to be 268.83 and 135.25 m s[superscript…

  10. Gas Flow in the Capillary of the Atmosphere-to-Vacuum Interface of Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoblin, Michael; Chudinov, Alexey; Soulimenkov, Ilia; Brusov, Vladimir; Kozlovskiy, Viacheslav

    2017-10-01

    Numerical simulations of a gas flow through a capillary being a part of mass spectrometer atmospheric interface were performed using a detailed laminar flow model. The simulated interface consisted of atmospheric and forevacuum volumes connected via a thin capillary. The pressure in the forevacuum volume where the gas was expanding after passing through the capillary was varied in the wide range from 10 to 900 mbar in order to study the volume flow rate as well as the other flow parameters as functions of the pressure drop between the atmospheric and forevacuum volumes. The capillary wall temperature was varied in the range from 24 to 150 °C. Numerical integration of the complete system of Navier-Stokes equations for a viscous compressible gas taking into account the heat transfer was performed using the standard gas dynamic simulation software package ANSYS CFX. The simulation results were compared with experimental measurements of gas flow parameters both performed using our experimental setup and taken from the literature. The simulated volume flow rates through the capillary differed no more than by 10% from the measured ones over the entire pressure and temperatures ranges. A conclusion was drawn that the detailed digital laminar model is able to quantitatively describe the measured gas flow rates through the capillaries under conditions considered. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Gas Flow in the Capillary of the Atmosphere-to-Vacuum Interface of Mass Spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoblin, Michael; Chudinov, Alexey; Soulimenkov, Ilia; Brusov, Vladimir; Kozlovskiy, Viacheslav

    2017-10-01

    Numerical simulations of a gas flow through a capillary being a part of mass spectrometer atmospheric interface were performed using a detailed laminar flow model. The simulated interface consisted of atmospheric and forevacuum volumes connected via a thin capillary. The pressure in the forevacuum volume where the gas was expanding after passing through the capillary was varied in the wide range from 10 to 900 mbar in order to study the volume flow rate as well as the other flow parameters as functions of the pressure drop between the atmospheric and forevacuum volumes. The capillary wall temperature was varied in the range from 24 to 150 °C. Numerical integration of the complete system of Navier-Stokes equations for a viscous compressible gas taking into account the heat transfer was performed using the standard gas dynamic simulation software package ANSYS CFX. The simulation results were compared with experimental measurements of gas flow parameters both performed using our experimental setup and taken from the literature. The simulated volume flow rates through the capillary differed no more than by 10% from the measured ones over the entire pressure and temperatures ranges. A conclusion was drawn that the detailed digital laminar model is able to quantitatively describe the measured gas flow rates through the capillaries under conditions considered. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Validation of spectroscopic gas analyzer accuracy using gravimetric standard gas mixtures: impact of background gas composition on CO2 quantitation by cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong Sik; Park, Miyeon; Lee, Jinbok; Lee, Jeongsoon

    2017-12-01

    The effect of background gas composition on the measurement of CO2 levels was investigated by wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectrometry (WS-CRDS) employing a spectral line centered at the R(1) of the (3 00 1)III ← (0 0 0) band. For this purpose, eight cylinders with various gas compositions were gravimetrically and volumetrically prepared within 2σ = 0.1 %, and these gas mixtures were introduced into the WS-CRDS analyzer calibrated against standards of ambient air composition. Depending on the gas composition, deviations between CRDS-determined and gravimetrically (or volumetrically) assigned CO2 concentrations ranged from -9.77 to 5.36 µmol mol-1, e.g., excess N2 exhibited a negative deviation, whereas excess Ar showed a positive one. The total pressure broadening coefficients (TPBCs) obtained from the composition of N2, O2, and Ar thoroughly corrected the deviations up to -0.5 to 0.6 µmol mol-1, while these values were -0.43 to 1.43 µmol mol-1 considering PBCs induced by only N2. The use of TPBC enhanced deviations to be corrected to ˜ 0.15 %. Furthermore, the above correction linearly shifted CRDS responses for a large extent of TPBCs ranging from 0.065 to 0.081 cm-1 atm-1. Thus, accurate measurements using optical intensity-based techniques such as WS-CRDS require TPBC-based instrument calibration or use standards prepared in the same background composition of ambient air.

  13. Analyzing the Impact of Residential Building Attributes, Demographic and Behavioral Factors on Natural Gas Usage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, Olga V.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2011-03-03

    study attempts to bridge that gap by analyzing behavioral data and investigate the applicability of additive nonparametric regression to this task. This study evaluates the impact of 31 regressors on residential natural gas usage. The regressors include weather, economic variables, demographic and behavioral characteristics, and building attributes related to energy use. In general, most of the regression results were in line with previous engineering and economic studies in this area. There were, however, some counterintuitive results, particularly with regard to thermostat controls and behaviors. There are a number of possible reasons for these counterintuitive results including the inability to control for regional climate variability due to the data sanitization (to prevent identification of respondents), inaccurate data caused by to self-reporting, and the fact that not all relevant behavioral variables were included in the data set, so we were not able to control for them in the study. The results of this analysis could be used as an in-sample prediction for approximating energy demand of a residential building whose characteristics are described by the regressors in this analysis, but a certain combination of their particular values does not exist in the real world. In addition, this study has potential applications for benefit-cost analysis of residential upgrades and retrofits under a fixed budget, because the results of this study contain information on how natural gas consumption might change once a particular characteristic or attribute is altered. Finally, the results of this study can help establish a relationship between natural gas consumption and changes in behavior of occupants.

  14. Gas Atmosphere Formed in Casting by Full Mold Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocek J.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A test mold was designed to investigate the full mold process. Pressure changes in a gap developing between the pattern made of foamed polystyrene and the raising column of liquid alloy were determined. Studies were conducted pouring molds with cast iron and with AK11 silumin. It was found that pressure is significantly higher in the case of cast iron, due to a higher rate of pattern decomposition and more advanced dissociation of hydrocarbons. The increase in pressure was observed to have no significant effect on changes in the pouring rate as it was compensated by higher metallostatic pressure. The increase of pressure occurs immediately after the start of pouring, it reaches a maximum and then stabilizes or decreases smoothly as a result of the drop in metallostatic pressure. The temperature of pouring has a significant effect on the decomposition rate of hydrocarbons evolving from the metal. During pouring of cast iron, the presence of hydrogen was revealed. It was particularly evident across the gas-permeable coating, where the concentration has exceeded 40%. Hydrogen precipitation was accompanied by an evolution on the casting surface of considerable amounts of pyrolytic carbon. It was found that gases forming in the gap were totally free from oxygen.

  15. Simulation of the impact of thunderstorm activity on atmospheric gas composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Mareev, E. A.; Galin, V. Ya.

    2010-08-01

    A chemistry-climate model of the lower and middle atmosphere has been used to estimate the sensitivity of the atmospheric gas composition to the rate of thunderstorm production of nitrogen oxides at upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric altitudes. The impact that nitrogen oxides produced by lightning have on the atmospheric gas composition is treated as a subgrid-scale process and included in the model parametrically. The natural uncertainty in the global production rate of nitrogen oxides in lightning flashes was specified within limits from 2 to 20 Tg N/year. Results of the model experiments have shown that, due to the variability of thunderstorm-produced nitrogen oxides, their concentration in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere can vary by a factor of 2 or 3, which, given the influence of nitrogen oxides on ozone and other gases, creates the potential for a strong perturbation of the atmospheric gas composition and thermal regime. Model calculations have shown the strong sensitivity of ozone and the OH hydroxyl to the amount of lightning nitrogen oxides at different atmospheric altitudes. These calculations demonstrate the importance of nitrogen oxides of thunderstorm origin for the balance of atmospheric odd ozone and gases linked to it, such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals. Our results demonstrate that one important task is to raise the accuracy of estimates of the rate of nitrogen oxide production by lightning discharges and to use physical parametrizations that take into account the local lightning effects and feedbacks arising in this case rather than climatological data in models of the gas composition and general circulation of the atmosphere.

  16. An approach for verifying biogenic greenhouse gas emissions inventories with atmospheric CO2 concentration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen M Ogle; Kenneth Davis; Thomas Lauvaux; Andrew Schuh; Dan Cooley; Tristram O West; Linda S Heath; Natasha L Miles; Scott Richardson; F Jay Breidt; James E Smith; Jessica L McCarty; Kevin R Gurney; Pieter Tans; A Scott. Denning

    2015-01-01

    Verifying national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories is a critical step to ensure that reported emissions data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are accurate and representative of a country's contribution to GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Furthermore, verifying biogenic fluxes provides a check on estimated...

  17. Trace gas retrieval for limb DOAS under changing atmospheric conditions: The X-gas scaling method vs optimal estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueneke, Tilman; Grossmann, Katja; Knecht, Matthias; Raecke, Rasmus; Stutz, Jochen; Werner, Bodo; Pfeilsticker, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Changing atmospheric conditions during DOAS measurements from fast moving aircraft platforms pose a challenge for trace gas retrievals. Traditional inversion techniques to retrieve trace gas concentrations from limb scattered UV/vis spectroscopy, like optimal estimation, require a-priori information on Mie extinction (e.g., aerosol concentration and cloud cover) and albedo, which determine the atmospheric radiative transfer. In contrast to satellite applications, cloud filters can not be applied because they would strongly reduce the usable amount of expensively gathered measurement data. In contrast to ground-based MAX-DOAS applications, an aerosol retrieval based on O4 is not able to constrain the radiative transfer in air-borne applications due to the rapidly decreasing amount of O4 with altitude. Furthermore, the assumption of a constant cloud cover is not valid for fast moving aircrafts, thus requiring 2D or even 3D treatment of the radiative transfer. Therefore, traditional techniques are not applicable for most of the data gathered by fast moving aircraft platforms. In order to circumvent these limitations, we have been developing the so-called X-gas scaling method. By utilising a proxy gas X (e.g. O3, O4, …), whose concentration is either a priori known or simultaneously in-situ measured as well as remotely measured, an effective absorption length for the target gas is inferred. In this presentation, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the novel approach along with some sample cases. A particular strength of the X-gas scaling method is its insensitivity towards the aerosol abundance and cloud cover as well as wavelength dependent effects, whereas its sensitivity towards the profiles of both gases requires a priori information on their shapes.

  18. Brominated flame retardants in the urban atmosphere of Northeast China: Concentrations, temperature dependence and gas-particle partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Hong; Li, Wen-Long; Liu, Li-Yan; Song, Wei-Wei; Ma, Wan-Li, E-mail: mawanli002@163.com; Li, Yi-Fan, E-mail: ijrc_pts_paper@yahoo.com

    2014-09-01

    57 pairs of air samples (gas and particle phases) were collected using a high volume air sampler in a typical city of Northeast China. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) including 13 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, including BDEs 17, 28, 47, 49, 66, 85, 99, 100, 138, 153, 154, 183, and 209) and 9 alternative BFRs (p-TBX, PBBZ, PBT, PBEB, DPTE, HBBZ, γ-HBCD, BTBPE, and DBDPE) were analyzed. The annual average total concentrations of the 13 PBDEs and the 9 alternative BFRs were 69 pg/m{sup 3} and 180 pg/m{sup 3}, respectively. BDE 209 and γ-HBCD were the dominant congeners, according to the one-year study. The partial pressure of BFRs in the gas phase was significantly correlated with the ambient temperature, except for BDE 85, γ-HBCD and DBDPE, indicating the important influence of ambient temperature on the behavior of BFRs in the atmosphere. It was found that the gas–particle partitioning coefficients (logK{sub p}) for most low molecular weight BFRs were highly temperature dependent as well. Gas–particle partitioning coefficients (logK{sub p}) also correlated with the sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure (logP{sub L}{sup o}). Our results indicated that absorption into organic matter is the main control mechanism for the gas–particle partitioning of atmospheric PBDEs. - Highlights: • Both PBDEs and alternative BFRs were analyzed in the atmosphere of Northeast China. • Partial pressure of BFRs was significantly correlated with the ambient temperature. • A strong temperature dependence of gas-particle partitioning was found. • Absorption into organic matter was the control mechanism for G-P partitioning.

  19. Cold atmospheric gas plasma disinfection of chicken meat and chicken skin contaminated with Listeria innocua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, Estefanía; Shama, Gilbert; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario; Kong, Michael G

    2011-10-01

    Gas plasmas generated at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperatures offer a possible decontamination method for poultry products. The efficacy of cold atmospheric gas plasmas for decontaminating chicken skin and muscle inoculated with Listeria innocua was examined. Optimization of operating conditions for maximal bacterial inactivation was first achieved using membrane filters on which L. innocua had been deposited. Higher values of AC voltage, excitation frequency and the presence of oxygen in the carrier gas resulted in the greatest inactivation efficiency, and this was confirmed with further studies on chicken muscle and skin. Under optimal conditions, a 10 s treatment gave > 3 log reductions of L. innocua on membrane filters, an 8 min treatment gave 1 log reduction on skin, and a 4 min treatment gave > 3 log reductions on muscle. These results show that the efficacy of gas plasma treatment is greatly affected by surface topography. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of chicken muscle and skin revealed surface features wherein bacteria could effectively be protected from the chemical species generated within the gas plasma. The developments in gas plasma technology necessary for its commercial application to foods are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Under What Conditions Can Equilibrium Gas-Particle Partitioning Be Expected to Hold in the Atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Huajun; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-10-06

    The prevailing treatment of secondary organic aerosol formation in atmospheric models is based on the assumption of instantaneous gas-particle equilibrium for the condensing species, yet compelling experimental evidence indicates that organic aerosols can exhibit the properties of highly viscous, semisolid particles, for which gas-particle equilibrium may be achieved slowly. The approach to gas-particle equilibrium partitioning is controlled by gas-phase diffusion, interfacial transport, and particle-phase diffusion. Here we evaluate the controlling processes and the time scale to achieve gas-particle equilibrium as a function of the volatility of the condensing species, its surface accommodation coefficient, and its particle-phase diffusivity. For particles in the size range of typical atmospheric organic aerosols (∼50-500 nm), the time scale to establish gas-particle equilibrium is generally governed either by interfacial accommodation or particle-phase diffusion. The rate of approach to equilibrium varies, depending on whether the bulk vapor concentration is constant, typical of an open system, or decreasing as a result of condensation into the particles, typical of a closed system.

  1. Real-Time Gas Identification by Analyzing the Transient Response of Capillary-Attached Conductive Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Bahraminejad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the ability of the Capillary-attached conductive gas sensor (CGS in real-time gas identification was investigated. The structure of the prototype fabricated CGS is presented. Portions were selected from the beginning of the CGS transient response including the first 11 samples to the first 100 samples. Different feature extraction and classification methods were applied on the selected portions. Validation of methods was evaluated to study the ability of an early portion of the CGS transient response in target gas (TG identification. Experimental results proved that applying extracted features from an early part of the CGS transient response along with a classifier can distinguish short-chain alcohols from each other perfectly. Decreasing time of exposition in the interaction between target gas and sensing element improved the reliability of the sensor. Classification rate was also improved and time of identification was decreased. Moreover, the results indicated the optimum interval of the early transient response of the CGS for selecting portions to achieve the best classification rates.

  2. Atmospheric amines - Part II. Thermodynamic properties and gas/particle partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xinlei; Wexler, Anthony S.; Clegg, Simon L.

    2011-01-01

    Amines enter the atmosphere from a wide range of sources, but relatively little is known about their atmospheric behavior, especially their role in gas/particle partitioning. In Part I of this work ( Ge et al., 2011) a total of 154 amines, 32 amino acids and urea were identified as occurring in the atmosphere, based upon a survey of the literature. In this work we compile data for the thermodynamic properties of the amines which control gas/particle partitioning (Henry's Law constant, liquid vapor pressure, acid dissociation constant, activity coefficient and solubility in water), and also estimate the solid/gas dissociation constants of their nitrate and chloride salts. Prediction methods for boiling point, liquid vapor pressure, acid dissociation constant and the solubility of the amines in water are evaluated, and used to estimate values of the equilibrium constants where experimental data are lacking. Partitioning of amines into aqueous aerosols is strongly dependent upon pH and is greatest for acidic aerosols. For several common amines the tendency to partition to the particle phase is similar to or greater than that of ammonia. Our results are presented as tables of values of thermodynamic equilibrium constants, which are also incorporated into the Extended Aerosol Inorganics Model ( E-AIM, http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/aim.php) to enable gas/aerosol partitioning and other calculations to be carried out.

  3. The gas conversion of methane with oxygen at atmospheric pressure using a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Tom; Petrovic, Dragana; de Bie, Christophe; Bogaerts, Annemie; Brok, Wouter; van Dijk, Jan

    2008-10-01

    The conversion of methane to useful chemicals and liquid fuels currently requires steam reforming, which requires great amounts of energy input. We are currently investigating the possibilities of using a plasma activated system for this gas conversion. Due to the pulsed nature and the low operating temperature capabilities, we have chosen the atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge as a setup to investigate whether it can be used as a more efficient gas conversion reactor. For this purpose we have developed a CH4/O2 chemical reaction set and used it in a 2D fluid model of a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge, in which we also incorporate the influence of the gas flow. In this way we investigate whether we can optimize the production of methanol or formaldehyde. The parameters under study are the CH4/O2 ratio, the applied voltage characteristics, the gap width and the gas flow rate.

  4. A multivariate statistical analysis approach to analyze gas chromatography-olfactometry data of tangerine hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gas chromatography (GC) hyphenated with olfactometry (O) when a human subject smells the effluent of the GC is a useful technique to identify aroma activity of volatile compounds in a food. Many techniques have been developed, based on olfactory thresholds (CHARM analysis, AEDA), or based on psychop...

  5. Hybrid recoil mass analyzer at IUAC – First results using gas-filled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and the anode signal gives both the energy loss signal and start time for position. Figure 2. Schematic of focal plane detector system used in gas-filled mode of. HYRA showing gate valve, window foil to separate helium and isobutane sec- tions, MWPC detector, retractable shutter and silicon stop detector; residues.

  6. Analyzing transient closed chamber effects on canopy gas exchange for optimizing flux calculation timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langensiepen, M.; Kupisch, M.; Wijk, van M.T.; Ewert, F.

    2012-01-01

    Transient type canopy chambers are still the only currently available practical solution for rapid screening of gas-exchange in agricultural fields. The technique has been criticized for its effect on canopy microclimate during measurement which affects the transport regime and regulation of plant

  7. Gas analyzer for continuous monitoring of trace level methanethiol by microchannel collection and fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Kei; Kuwahara, Haruka; Kajiwara, Hidetaka; Hirota, Kazutoshi; Ohira, Shin-Ichi

    2014-09-02

    The highly odorous compound methanethiol, CH3SH, is commonly produced in biodegradation of biomass and industrial processes, and is classed as 2000 times more odorous than NH3. However, there is no simple analytical method for detecting low parts-per-billion in volume ratio (ppbv) levels of CH3SH. In this study, a micro gas analysis system (μGAS) was developed for continuous or near real time measurement of CH3SH at ppbv levels. In addition to a commercial fluorescence detector, a miniature high sensitivity fluorescence detector was developed using a novel micro-photomultiplier tube device. CH3SH was collected by absorption into an alkaline solution in a honeycomb-patterned microchannel scrubber and then mixed with the fluorescent reagent, 4-(N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl)-7-fluoro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (DBD-F). Gaseous CH3SH was measured without serious interference from other sulfur compounds or amines. The limits of detection were 0.2ppbv with the commercial detector and 0.3ppbv with the miniature detector. CH3SH produced from a pulping process was monitored with the μGAS system and the data agreed well with those obtained by collection with a silica gel tube followed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The portable system with the miniature fluorescence detector was used to monitor CH3SH levels in near-real time in a stockyard and it was shown that the major odor component, CH3SH, presented and its concentration varied dynamically with time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Gas and heat dynamics of a micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma reference jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Seán; Golda, Judith; Turner, Miles M.; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Gas and heat dynamics of the ‘Cooperation on Science and Technology (COST) Reference Microplasma Jet’ (COST-jet), a European lead reference device for low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma application, are investigated. Of particular interest to many biomedical application scenarios, the temperature characteristics of a surface impacted by the jet are revealed. Schlieren imaging, thermocouple measurements, infrared thermal imaging and numerical modelling are employed. Temperature spatial profiles in the gas domain reveal heating primarily of the helium fraction of the gas mixture. Thermocouple and model temporal data show a bounded exponential temperature growth described by a single characteristic time parameter to reach  ∼63% or (1-1/e) fraction of the temperature increase. Peak temperatures occurred in the gas domain where the carrier jet exits the COST-jet, with values ranging from ambient temperatures to in excess of 100 °C in ‘α-mode’ operation. In a horizontal orientation of the COST-jet a curved trajectory of the helium effluent at low gas flows results from buoyant forces. Gas mixture profiles reveal significant containment of the helium concentrations for a surface placed in close proximity to the COST-jet. Surface heating of a quartz plate follows a similar bounded exponential temporal temperature growth as device heating. Spatial profiles of surface heating are found to correlate strongly to the impacting effluent where peak temperatures occur in regions of maximum surface helium concentration.

  9. Discrepant post filter ionized calcium concentrations by common blood gas analyzers in CRRT using regional citrate anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Patrik; Kuhn, Sven-Olaf; Stracke, Sylvia; Gründling, Matthias; Knigge, Stephan; Selleng, Sixten; Helm, Maximilian; Friesecke, Sigrun; Abel, Peter; Kallner, Anders; Nauck, Matthias; Petersmann, Astrid

    2015-09-08

    Ionized calcium (iCa) concentration is often used in critical care and measured using blood gas analyzers at the point of care. Controlling and adjusting regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) involves measuring the iCa concentration in two samples: systemic with physiological iCa concentrations and post filter samples with very low iCa concentrations. However, modern blood gas analyzers are optimized for physiological iCa concentrations which might make them less suitable for measuring low iCa in blood with a high concentration of citrate. We present results of iCa measurements from six different blood gas analyzers and the impact on clinical decisions based on the recommendations of the dialysis' device manufacturer. The iCa concentrations of systemic and post filter samples were measured using six distinct, frequently used blood gas analyzers. We obtained iCa results of 74 systemic and 84 post filter samples from patients undergoing RCA for CRRT at the University Medicine of Greifswald. The systemic samples showed concordant results on all analyzers with median iCa concentrations ranging from 1.07 to 1.16 mmol/L. The medians of iCa concentrations for post filter samples ranged from 0.21 to 0.50 mmol/L. Results of >70% of the post filter samples would lead to major differences in decisions regarding citrate flow depending on the instrument used. Measurements of iCa in post filter samples may give misleading information in monitoring the RCA. Recommendations of the dialysis manufacturer need to be revised. Meanwhile, little weight should be given to post filter iCa. Reference methods for low iCa in whole blood containing citrate should be established.

  10. Design of a diagnostic residual gas analyzer for the ITER divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepper, C.C., E-mail: kleppercc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Biewer, T.M.; Graves, V.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Andrew, P. [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13067 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Lukens, P.C. [US ITER Project Office, 1055 Commerce Park Dr #1, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Marcus, C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Shimada, M., E-mail: shimada.michiya@jaea.go.jp [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13067 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Hughes, S.; Boussier, B. [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13067 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Johnson, D.W. [US ITER Diagnostics Office, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Gardner, W.L. [US ITER Project Office, 1055 Commerce Park Dr #1, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Hillis, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M. [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13067 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The divertor DRGA for ITER will measure neutral gas composition in the pumping ducts during plasma. • System must respond in timescales relevant to compositional changes in the divertor plasma. • It is shown that times can vary from 1 to 6 s for fuel (H2, D2, T2) up to 50 s for He (fusion reaction ash). • It is shown that present design delivers ∼ 1 s response even via an 8m long sampling pipe sampling. • Response time validated with VacTran{sup ®} over anticipated the 0.1–10 Pa pressure range in the ducts. - Abstract: One of the ITER diagnostics having reached an advanced design stage is a diagnostic RGA for the divertor, i.e. residual gas analysis system for the ITER divertor, which is intended to sample the divertor pumping duct region during the plasma pulse and to have a response time compatible with plasma particle and impurity lifetimes in the divertor region. Main emphasis is placed on helium (He) concentration in the ducts, as well as the relative concentration between the hydrogen isotopes (mainly in the form of diatomic molecules of H, D, and T). Measurement of the concentration of radiative gases, such as neon (Ne) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}), is also intended. Numerical modeling of the gas flow from the sampled region to the cluster of analysis sensors, through a long (∼8 m long, ∼110 mm diameter) sampling pipe originating from a pressure reducing orifice, confirm that the desired response time (∼1 s for He or D{sub 2}) is achieved with the present design.

  11. Analyzing PSU’s Performance: A Case from Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Nan Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The high economic growth in the past few years and increasing industrialization coupled with a burgeoning population have created a lot of concern for India’s energy scenario. India’s crude oil production has not shown significant growth in the last 10 or more years whereas its refining capacity has grown by more than 20% over the last 5 years. Oil consumption is growing at approximately 4.1% per year and natural gas consumption is growing at 68% per year. Therefore, evaluation performances and pushing energy companies to improve become important issues. The purpose of this research is of evaluation the performance of Indian energy industry under multiple different inputs and outputs criteria. The data envelopment analysis (DEA and grey theory are used to conduct this study. There are total 14 public sector undertakings (PSUs under this industry and no any private company. However, only 10 of them are mature enough to be published in India stock markets. Therefore, the realistic data of all 10 companies are used for this evaluation. The results demonstrate that Gas Authority of India Limited (GAIL, Chennai Petroleum Corporation Limited (CPCL, and Oil India Limited (OIL are the top 3 of ranking influences. This integrated numerical study gives a better “past-present-future” insights into evaluation performance in India energy industry.

  12. An intelligent prognostic system for analyzing patients with paraquat poisoning using arterial blood gas indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lufeng; Lin, Feiyan; Li, Huaizhong; Tong, Changfei; Pan, Zhifang; Li, Jun; Chen, Huiling

    The arterial blood gas (ABG) test is used to assess gas exchange in the lung, and the acid-base level in the blood. However, it is still unclear whether or not ABG test indexes correlate with paraquat (PQ) poisoning. This study investigates the predictive value of ABG tests in prognosing patients with PQ poisoning; it also identifies the most significant indexes of the ABG test. An intelligent machine learning-based system was established to effectively give prognostic analysis of patients with PQ poisoning based on ABG indexes. In the proposed system, an enhanced support vector machine combined with a feature selection strategy was developed to predict the risk status from a pool of 103 patients (56 males and 47 females); of these, 52 subjects were deceased and 51 patients were alive. The proposed method was rigorously evaluated against the real-life dataset in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. Additionally, the feature selection was investigated to identify correlating factors for the risk status. The results demonstrated that there were significant differences in ABG indexes between deceased and alive subjects (p-value <0.01). According to the feature selection, we found that the most important correlated indexes were associated with partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2). This study discovered the relationship between ABG test and poisoning degree to provide a new avenue for prognosing PQ poisoning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gas-phase degradation of the herbicide ethalfluralin under atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Amalia; Vera, Teresa; Ródenas, Milagros; Borrás, Esther; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Treacy, Jack; Sidebottom, Howard

    2014-01-01

    The gas-phase degradation of ethalfluralin, N-ethyl-α,α,α-trifluoro-N-(2-methylallyl)-2,6-dinitro-p-toluidine, a widely used herbicide, was investigated under atmospheric conditions at the large outdoor European simulation chamber (EUPHORE) in Valencia, Spain. The photolysis of ethalfluralin was investigated under solar radiation and the mean photolysis rate coefficient was determined: J(ethalfluralin)=(1.3±0.2)×10(-3) s(-1) (JNO2=8×10(-3) s(-1)). The rate coefficients for the reactions of hydroxyl radicals and ozone with ethalfluralin in the dark were also measured under atmospheric conditions using the relative rate and the absolute rate technique, respectively. The rate coefficients values for the reactions of kOH(ethalfluralin)=(3.5±0.9)×10(-11)cm(3)molecule(-1)s(-1), and kO3(ethalfluralin)=(1.6±0.4)×10(-17) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) were determined at 300±5 K and atmospheric pressure. The results show that removal of ethalfluralin from the atmosphere by reactions with OH radicals (τ ~ 4 h) or ozone (τ ~ 25 h) is slow compared to loss by photolysis. The available kinetic data suggest that the gas-phase tropospheric degradation of ethalfluralin will be controlled mainly by photolysis and provide an estimate for the tropospheric lifetime of approximately 12 min. The atmospheric implications of using ethalfluralin as a herbicide are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Can Rosetta Noble Gas and Isotopic Measurements Contribute to Understanding the Origin and Evolution of Venus' Atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandt, K. E.; Luspay-Kuti, A.; Mousis, O.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2017-11-01

    New observations of noble gas abundances and stable isotope ratios from comets provide important information on potential sources of volatiles for Venus. They can help refine current atmospheric evolution models and plan for future missions.

  15. Effects of cold atmospheric gas phase plasma on anthocyanins and color in pomegranate juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursać Kovačević, Danijela; Putnik, Predrag; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica; Pedisić, Sandra; Režek Jambrak, Anet; Herceg, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate effects of cold atmospheric gas phase plasma on anthocyanins and color in pomegranate juice. Outcomes of plasma treatment were observed at different operating conditions: (i) treatment time (3, 5, 7 min), (ii) treated juice volume (3, 4, 5 cm(3)), and (iii) gas flow (0.75, 1, 1.25 dm(3)/min). The greatest anthocyanin stability was found at: 3 min treatment time, 5 cm(3) sample volume, and 0.75 dm(3)/min gas flow. Plasma treatment yielded higher anthocyanin content from 21% to 35%. Multivariate analysis showed that total color change was not associated with sample volume and treatment time, however it declined with increased gas flow. The change of color increased in comparison treated vs. untreated pomegranate juice. Constructed mathematical equation confirmed that increase of anthocyanin content increased with gas flow, sample volume and change in color. In summary, this study showed that plasma treatment had positive influences on anthocyanins stability and color change in cloudy pomegranate juice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development and Validation of a Novel Gas Analyzer for Simultaneous Measurements of Methane, Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in Ambient Air at 20 Hz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, M.; Owano, T.; Fellers, R.; Dong, F.; Baer, D.

    2008-12-01

    Methane has increased significantly with human population levels. Pre-1750 ice core data indicates that pre- industrialization levels were about 700 ppbv, while current levels are over 1750 ppbv. In current budget estimates of atmospheric methane, major contributors include both natural (wetlands) and anthropogenic sources (energy, landfills, ruminants, biomass burning, rice agriculture). The strengths of these sources vary spatially and temporally. Estimates of emissions from wetlands are also uncertain due to the extreme variability of these ecosystems. Because methane lifetime is relatively long (8.4 years), atmospheric variations in concentration are small and accuracy in measurement is important for understanding spatial and temporal variability. Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and methane rose sharply in 2007. Global CO2 climbed by 0.6 percent, or 19 billion tons, in 2007. Methane increased by 27 million tons after nearly a decade with little or no increase. Atmospheric CO2 levels currently stand at 385 ppmv, or about 38 percent higher than pre- industrial levels and the rise in CO2 concentrations has been accelerating since the 1980s when annual increases were around 1.5 ppm per year. Last year the increase was 2.4 ppm. We report on the development, application and independent performance characterization of a novel gas analyzer based on cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy. The Analyzer provides simultaneous measurements of methane, carbon dioxide and water vapor in ambient air in the field for applications that require high data rates (eddy correlation flux), wide dynamic range (e.g., chamber flux and other applications with concentrations that are ten times typical ambient levels or higher) and highest accuracy (atmospheric monitoring stations). The Analyzer provides continuous measurements at data rates up to 20 Hz and with replicate precision of 1 ppbv for methane (1 second measurement time), 0.2 ppmv for carbon dioxide (1 second

  17. Microseepage of methane to the atmosphere from the Dawanqi oil-gas field, Tarim Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Junhong; Xu, Yue; Wang, Guojian; Etiope, Giuseppe; Han, Wei; Yao, Zhitong; Huang, Jingang

    2017-04-01

    The microseepage of natural gas from subsurface hydrocarbon reservoirs is a widespread process in petroleum basins. On a global scale, microseepage represents an important natural source of atmospheric methane (CH4). To date, microseepage CH4 flux data have been obtained from 20 petroleum systems in North America, Europe, and Asia. While the seasonal variations of gas flux due to soil methanotrophic activity are known, the role of geological factors in controlling gas fluxes has been poorly investigated. Here we present new microseepage data from the Dawanqi oil-gas field located within the Tarim Basin (China), a petroleum system characterized by intense faulting and shallow (<700 m) reservoirs. We measured CH4 fluxes from the ground at 51 sites along three transects by using a closed-chamber connected to a portable gas sensor using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy. Our results indicate that the highest CH4 fluxes occur over faults and/or shallow reservoirs, especially those that were not developed and that have higher fluid pressures. Microseeping CH4 is thermogenic, like that occurring within the Dawanqi reservoirs, as demonstrated by 13C enrichment (δ13C from -46.3‰ to -30.7‰) in the chamber. Mean and range microseepage values (17 mg m-2d-1; from -1.4 to 330 mg m-2d-1) are similar to those reported for other petroleum fields with active tectonics. Our results confirm that dry soil over petroleum fields can be a net source of atmospheric CH4 and its flux is primarily controlled by faulting, and reservoir depth and pressure. These factors shall be considered in global bottom-up seepage emission estimates.

  18. Fast-response CO2 mixing-ratio measurement with an open-path gas analyzer for eddy-flux applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoev, I.

    2014-12-01

    Infra-red gas analyzers operate on the principle of light absorption and measure the density of the gas in the sensing path. To account for density fluctuations caused by barometric pressure, thermal expansion and contraction, and water-vapor dilution, flux calculations using CO2 density measurements need to be corrected for sensible and latent heat transfer (also known as WPL corrections). In contrast, these corrections are not required if the flux calculation involves CO2 mixing ratio relative to dry air. Historically, CO2 mixing ratio measurements have been available only for analyzers with a closed-path where temperature fluctuations in the air sample are attenuated in the intake tubing to a level that they are adequately measured by a contact thermometer. Open-path gas analyzers are not able to make in situ CO2 mixing-ratio measurements because of the unavailability of a reliable, accurate and fast-response air-temperature sensor in the optical path. A newly developed eddy-flux system integrates an aerodynamic open-path gas analyzer with a sonic anemometer where the sensing volumes of the two instruments coincide. Thus the system has the ability to provide temporally and spatially synchronized fast-response measurements of the 3D wind vector, sonically derived air temperature, CO2 and water vapor densities. When these measurements are combined with a fast-response static pressure measurement an instantaneous in-situ CO2 mixing ratio can be calculated on-line, eliminating the need for density corrections in post-processing. In this study fluxes computed from CO2 mixing-ratio are compared to WPL corrected fluxes using CO2 density. Results from a field inter-comparison with an aspirated temperature probe suggest that accurate, fast response air temperature can be derived from humidity-corrected speed of sound measurements. Biases due to heat exchange with the analyzer surface are evaluated by comparing atmospheric sensible heat flux measurements with a

  19. Feasibility of capillary liquid chromatography/microchip atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry in analyzing anabolic steroids in urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonen, Linda L; Haapala, Markus; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2010-04-15

    We examined the feasibility of capillary liquid chromatography/microchip atmospheric pressure photoionization tandem mass spectrometry (capLC/microAPPI-MS/MS) for the analysis of anabolic steroids in human urine. The urine samples were pretreated by enzymatic hydrolysis (with beta-glucuronidase from Helix pomatia), and the compounds were liquid-liquid extracted with diethyl ether. After separation the compounds were vaporized by microchip APPI, photoionized by a 10 eV krypton discharge lamp, and detected by selected reaction monitoring. The capLC/microAPPI-MS/MS method showed good sensitivity with detection limits at the level of 1.0 ng mL(-1), good linearity with correlation coefficients between 0.9954 and 0.9990, and good repeatability with relative standard deviations below 10%. These results demonstrate that microchip APPI combined with capLC/MS/MS provides a new potential method for analyzing non-polar and neutral compounds in biological samples. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Improvement of saturation magnetization of Fe nanoparticles by post-annealing in a hydrogen gas atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kin, Masane, E-mail: masane-kin@denso.co.jp; Tanaka, Masaaki; Hayashi, Yasushi; Hasaegawa, Jun [Research Laboratories, DENSO CORPORATION, 500-1, Minamiyama, Komenoki-cho, Nisshin, Aichi 470-0111 (Japan); Kura, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Tomoyuki [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    Fe nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the thermal decomposition of Fe(CO){sub 5} and then post-annealing in a hydrogen gas atmosphere to produce highly monodisperse Fe NPs with high saturation magnetization (M{sub s}). The as-synthesized pre-anneal Fe NPs had an expanded α-Fe structure and M{sub s} was only 39% of that for bulk Fe because of the low crystallinity and the inclusion of a surfactant. Post-annealing of the Fe NPs in a hydrogen gas atmosphere at 200 °C improved the crystallinity of the Fe NPs from an amorphous-like structure to a body centered cubic (bcc) structure without any lattice expansion. This result indicates that hydrogen gas plays a significant role in improvement of the crystallinity of Fe NPs. Accompanying the improvement in crystallinity, M{sub s} for the Fe NPs increased from 86 to 190 emu/g{sub net} at 300 K, the values of which include the weight of surfactant. This enhanced M{sub s} is almost the same as that of bulk Fe (218 emu/{sub Fe}). It was concluded that the crystallinity has a significant influence on the M{sub s} of the Fe NPs because long-range ordering of the lattice can maintain strong direct exchange interactions between Fe atoms.

  1. Growth of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure for one-step gas sensor fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yanwu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanowalls (CNWs, two-dimensional "graphitic" platelets that are typically oriented vertically on a substrate, can exhibit similar properties as graphene. Growth of CNWs reported to date was exclusively carried out at a low pressure. Here, we report on the synthesis of CNWs at atmosphere pressure using "direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition" by taking advantage of the high electric field generated in a pin-plate dc glow discharge. CNWs were grown on silicon, stainless steel, and copper substrates without deliberate introduction of catalysts. The as-grown CNW material was mainly mono- and few-layer graphene having patches of O-containing functional groups. However, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies confirmed that most of the oxygen groups could be removed by thermal annealing. A gas-sensing device based on such CNWs was fabricated on metal electrodes through direct growth. The sensor responded to relatively low concentrations of NO2 (g and NH3 (g, thus suggesting high-quality CNWs that are useful for room temperature gas sensors. PACS: Graphene (81.05.ue, Chemical vapor deposition (81.15.Gh, Gas sensors (07.07.Df, Atmospheric pressure (92.60.hv

  2. Evaluation of GasmetTM DX-4015 Series Fourier Transform Infrared Gas Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Four Different Concentrations 14 10. Boron Trifluoride Data from Tier 2 Test at Four Different Concentrations 15 11. Carbon Monoxide Data at Four...Hydrogen Cyanide Phosgene Phosphine Chlorine Chlorine was initially added to Table 1 as a check component to verify the manufacturer’s claim that...the instrument cannot be used to analyze chlorine as a target compound or compound of interest. However, chlorine was not tested as the instrument

  3. The role of ozone atmosphere-snow gas exchange on polar, boundaru-layer tropospheric ozone - a review sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmig, D.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Butler, T.; Oltmans, S.

    2007-01-01

    Recent research on snowpack processes and atmosphere-snow gas exchange has demonstrated that chemical and physical interactions between the snowpack and the overlaying atmosphere have a substantial impact on the composition of the lower troposphere. These observations also imply that ozone

  4. Pulse-modulated dual-gas control subsystem for space cabin atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    An atmosphere control subsystem (ACS) was developed for use in a closed manned cabin, such as the Space Shuttle Orbiter. This subsystem uses the Perkin Elmer mass spectrometer for continuous measurement of major atmospheric constituents (H2, H2O, N2, O2, and CO2). The O2 and N2 analog signals are used as inputs to the controller, which produces a pulse-frequency-modulated output to operate the N2 gas admission solenoid valve and an on-off signal to operate the O2 valve. The proportional controller characteristic results in improved control accuracy as compared with previously used on-off controllers having significant dead-band. A 60-day evaluation test was performed on the ACS during which operation was measured at various values of control setpoint and simulated cabin leakage.

  5. Analyzing Drivers of Conflict in Energy Infrastructure Projects: Empirical Case Study of Natural Gas Pipeline Sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Young Park

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy infrastructure projects have caused various conflicts between stakeholders, particularly among the residents around construction sites and operators. The conflicts are largely due to the “Not in My Backyard” mentality associated with hazardous projects. In natural gas pipeline (NGP projects, conflicts have been increasing with the increase in a wider range of linear projects, and they have been worsening because of the lack of clear countermeasures. This study proposes an effective conflict management strategy for NGP projects in Korea. To achieve the objectives, 25 conflict drivers were identified and 143 case-based surveys were conducted to determine the causal relationship between the drivers and the level of conflict using structural equation modeling (SEM. The SEM results show that factors such as economic (e.g., decreased value of the land, construction-related (e.g., disturbance due to using the original route and site, and safety-related characteristics (e.g., concerns about explosions and accidents are the most important in understanding the causes of conflicts. Based on the causal relationship, five key strategies were proposed to manage the critical conflicts. This study can serve as a basis for implementing better conflict management plans in the future for a more sustainable project execution.

  6. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope with open sample space observes dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suga, Mitsuo, E-mail: msuga@jeol.co.jp [Clair Project, JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Konyuba, Yuji [Clair Project, JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Iwamatsu, Shinnosuke; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki [Yamagata Research Institute of Technology, 2-2-1, Matsuei, Yamagata, 990-2473 (Japan); Yoshiura, Chie; Ueda, Takumi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-4, Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Although conventional electron microscopy (EM) requires samples to be in vacuum, most chemical and physical reactions occur in liquid or gas. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM) can observe dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas under atmospheric pressure in real time. An electron-permeable window made of pressure-resistant 100 nm-thick silicon nitride (SiN) film, set into the bottom of the open ASEM sample dish, allows an electron beam to be projected from underneath the sample. A detector positioned below captures backscattered electrons. Using the ASEM, we observed the radiation-induced self-organization process of particles, as well as phenomena accompanying volume change, including evaporation-induced crystallization. Using the electrochemical ASEM dish, we observed tree-like electrochemical depositions on the cathode. In silver nitrate solution, we observed silver depositions near the cathode forming incidental internal voids. The heated ASEM dish allowed observation of patterns of contrast in melting and solidifying solder. Finally, to demonstrate its applicability for monitoring and control of industrial processes, silver paste and solder paste were examined at high throughput. High resolution, imaging speed, flexibility, adaptability, and ease of use facilitate the observation of previously difficult-to-image phenomena, and make the ASEM applicable to various fields. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atmospheric SEM (ASEM) observes dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas in open ASEM dish. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Random motion and radiation-induced self-organization were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tree-like electrochemical deposition of gold was observed on an electrode in situ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature-dependent phase transitions of solder were dynamically observed in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silver and solder pastes were easily and rapidly observed in air for process control.

  7. Analyzing the δ2H of atmospheric CH4 in the field with a NIR-CRDS coupled to a cryogenic pre-concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Tang, Y.; Lehmann, K. K.; Lacrampe Couloume, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; White, J. R.; Cadieux, S. B.; Goldman, A. E.; Pratt, L. M.; Onstott, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    The ASTEP-funded GETGAMM project has been documenting the CH4 dynamics of small lakes and soil on the ice-free margin of Greenland near Kangerlussuaq. A principal focus area for this project has been the development and comparison of portable spectroscopic instruments for quantifying CH4 concentrations and isotopic compositions from air, lake and borehole samples. The spectroscopic measurements made in the field or at the Kangerlussuaq International Science Support (KISS) facility are then compared to IRMS determinations at Indiana University. A portable NIR cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS) capable of measuring the δ13C of atmospheric CH4 with a precision of ×1.7‰ was coupled to a liquid N2 pre-concentrator constructed from a MVE XC 20/3V dry shipper (4 week freezing time) and a Hayesep D (Alltech) trap and operated at KISS. The NIR-CRDS system consisted of three DFB laser diodes, two of which were tuned to the absorption peaks of 12CH4, and 12CH3D, near 6054.425 cm-1 and 6108.507 cm-1, respectively. The third laser was tuned to 6050.760 cm-1 to estimate the ringdown time constant without absorption. A semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was used to as an optical switch for initializing ringdown events. The combination of the SOA and multiple laser design improved the long-term stability of the system and increased the data acquisition rate. The NIR-CRDS was operated at 50 Torr to reduce overlap between adjacent adsorption bands and a Nafion/Ascarite trap was used to remove H2O vapor and CO2, respectively. Under these conditions the system was capable of measuring the δ2H of 100 ppmv CH4 with a precision of ×5‰. After calibrating with CH4 standards from the University of Toronto, we typically pre-concentrated the CH4 from 1-3 Liters of atmosphere to obtain a few hundred ppmv of CH4. The results were comparable to flask-sample IRMS measurements reported by the SUMMIT CH4 monitoring program. Gas samples from the lakes were diluted to 1000 ppmv and

  8. Atmospheric CO{sub 2}, trace gas and CN concentrations in Vaerrioe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahonen, T.; Aalto, P.; Kulmala, M.; Rannik, U.; Vesala, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Hari, P.; Pohja, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    1995-12-31

    The Vaerrioe environmental measurement station is founded in 1991. The aim of the station is to obtain more information on air quality influenced by Kola industrial areas and effects of pollutants on photosynthesis in subarctic climate. In the station air quality and meteorological quantities are measured together with photosynthesis, which makes it quite unique in comparison with other measurement stations located in northern Finland. The measurements also provide information of aerosol and trace gas concentrations in order to study the direct and indirect aerosol effects on climate. These measurements also increase the knowledge of atmospheric chemistry and deposition in subarctic conditions

  9. Assessing Greenhouse Gas emissions in the Greater Toronto Area using atmospheric observations (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, F. R.; Chan, E.; Huang, L.; Levin, I.; Worthy, D.

    2013-12-01

    Urban areas are said to be responsible for approximately 75% of anthropogenic Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) emissions while comprising only two percent of the land area [1]. This limited spatial expansion should facilitate a monitoring of anthropogenic GHGs from atmospheric observations. As major sources of emissions, cities also have a huge potential to drive emissions reductions. To effectively manage emissions, cities must however, first measure and report these publicly [2]. Modelling studies and measurements of CO2 from fossil fuel burning (FFCO2) in densely populated areas does, however, pose several challenges: Besides continuous in-situ observations, i.e. finding an adequate atmospheric transport model, a sufficiently fine-grained FFCO2 emission model and the proper background reference observations to distinguish the large-scale from the local/urban contributions to the observed FFCO2 concentration offsets ( ΔFFCO2) are required. Pilot studies which include the data from two 'sister sites*' in the vicinity of Toronto, Canada helped to derive flux estimates for Non-CO2 GHGs [3] and improve our understanding of urban FFCO2 emissions. Our 13CO2 observations reveal that the contribution of natural gas burning (mostly due to domestic heating) account for 80%×7% of FFCO2 emissions in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) during winter. Our 14CO2 observations in the GTA, furthermore, show that the local offset of CO2 (ΔCO2) between our two sister sites can be largely attributed to urban FFCO2 emissions. The seasonal cycle of the observed ΔFFCO2 in Toronto, combined with high-resolution atmospheric modeling, helps to independently assess the contribution from different emission sectors (transportation, primary energy and industry, domestic heating) as predicted by a dedicated city-scale emission inventory, which deviates from a UNFCCC-based inventory. [1] D. Dodman. 2009. Blaming cities for climate change? An analysis of urban greenhouse gas emissions inventories

  10. Exploratory study of atmospheric methane enhancements derived from natural gas use in the Houston urban area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Nancy P.; Zheng, Chuantao; Ye, Weilin; Czader, Beata; Cohan, Daniel S.; Tittel, Frank K.; Griffin, Robert J.

    2018-03-01

    The extensive use of natural gas (NG) in urban areas for heating and cooking and as a vehicular fuel is associated with potentially significant emissions of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. Methane, a potent greenhouse gas that influences the chemistry of the atmosphere, can be emitted from different sources including leakage from NG infrastructure, transportation activities, end-use uncombusted NG, landfills and livestock. Although significant CH4 leakage associated with aging local NG distribution systems in the U.S. has been reported, further investigation is required to study the role of this infrastructure component and other NG-related sources in atmospheric CH4 enhancements in urban centers. In this study, neighborhood-scale mobile-based monitoring of potential CH4 emissions associated with NG in the Greater Houston area (GHA) is reported. A novel dual-gas 3.337 μm interband cascade laser-based sensor system was developed and mobile-mode deployed for simultaneous CH4 and ethane (C2H6) monitoring during a period of over 14 days, corresponding to ∼ 90 h of effective data collection during summer 2016. The sampling campaign covered ∼250 exclusive road miles and was primarily concentrated on eight residential zones with distinct infrastructure age and NG usage levels. A moderate number of elevated CH4 concentration events (37 episodes) with mixing ratios not exceeding 3.60 ppmv and associated with atmospheric background enhancements below 1.21 ppmv were observed during the field campaign. Source discrimination analyses based on the covariance between CH4 and C2H6 levels indicated the predominance of thermogenic sources (e.g., NG) in the elevated CH4 concentration episodes. The volumetric fraction of C2H6 in the sources associated with the thermogenic CH4 spikes varied between 2.7 and 5.9%, concurring with the C2H6 content in NG distributed in the GHA. Isolated CH4 peak events with significantly higher C2H6 enhancements (∼11%) were observed at industrial

  11. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet system for silicon etching without fluorocarbon gas feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Yasunori; Nagamatsu, Kenta

    2018-01-01

    We developed an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) system with a tungsten rod electrode coated with C2F4 particles of approximately 0.3 µm diameter for the surface treatment of a silicon wafer. The APPJ was generated by dielectric barrier discharge with a driving frequency of 22 kHz using a He gas flow. The characteristics of the APPJ were examined under various experimental conditions. The plasma jet length increased proportionally to the electric field. It was found that the treatment area of the silicon wafer was approximately 1 mm in diameter. By atomic force microscopy analysis, minute irregularities with a maximum length of about 600 nm and part of a ring-shaped trench were observed. A Si etching rate of approximately 400 nm/min was attained at a low power of 6 W and a He flow rate of 1 L/min without introducing molecular gas including F atoms.

  12. Gas mixing enhanced by power modulations in atmospheric pressure microwave plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voráč, J.; Potočňáková, L.; Synek, P.; Hnilica, J.; Kudrle, V.

    2016-04-01

    Microwave plasma jet operating in atmospheric pressure argon was power modulated by audio frequency sine envelope in the 102 W power range. Its effluent was imaged using interference filters and ICCD camera for several different phases of the modulating signal. The combination of this fast imaging with spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy provides useful insights into the plasmachemical processes involved. Phase-resolved schlieren photography was performed to visualize the gas dynamics. The results show that for higher modulation frequencies the plasma chemistry is strongly influenced by formation of transient flow perturbation resembling a vortex during each period. The perturbation formation and speed are strongly influenced by the frequency and power variations while they depend only weakly on the working gas flow rate. From application point of view, the perturbation presence significantly broadened lateral distribution of active species, effectively increasing cross-sectional area suitable for applications.

  13. Biosequestration of atmospheric CO2 and flue gas-containing CO2 by microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Wai Yan; Show, Pau Loke; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ling, Tau Chuan; Juan, Joon Ching

    2015-05-01

    The unceasing rise of greenhouse gas emission has led to global warming and climate change. Global concern on this phenomenon has put forward the microalgal-based CO2 sequestration aiming to sequester carbon back to the biosphere, ultimately reducing greenhouse effects. Microalgae have recently gained enormous attention worldwide, to be the valuable feedstock for renewable energy production, due to their high growth rates, high lipid productivities and the ability to sequester carbon. The photosynthetic process of microalgae uses atmospheric CO2 and CO2 from flue gases, to synthesize nutrients for their growth. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the efficiency of CO2 biosequestration by microalgae species, factors influencing microalgal biomass productions, microalgal cultivation systems, the potential and limitations of using flue gas for microalgal cultivation as well as the bio-refinery approach of microalgal biomass. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A method for determining atmospheric emissions from ruptured gas gathering systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milne, B. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada); Kenny, J. [ATECH Application Technology Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2000-06-01

    This paper described the development of a gas pipeline release-rate model that accounts for the effects of emergency shut down (ESD) valve activation and closure time. In order to assess the level of risk associated with operating a sour gas pipeline, it is necessary to know the atmospheric release-rate in the event of a rupture. Contrary to common belief that an ESD valve closes at the exact instant of a rupture, in most cases of small ruptures the valve activates only after a considerable amount of time has lapsed. This new pipeline depressurization model takes this into consideration and can accurately determine the cumulative emission volume and can therefore accurately assess the potential risk. The model also provides a means to determine the minimum size rupture that would be required to activate the ESD valves. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  15. Effect of growth regulators on 'Brookfield' apple gas diffusion and metabolism under controlled atmosphere storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auri Brackmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of growth regulators on gas diffusion and on metabolism of 'Brookfield' apple, and to determine their correlation with quality characteristics of fruit stored in controlled atmosphere. A completely randomized design was used with four replicates. After eight months of storage, the effects of water (control, aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG, AVG + ethephon, AVG + naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA, ethephon + NAA, sole NAA, 1-MCP, ethylene absorption by potassium permanganate (ABS, AVG + ABS, and of AVG + 1-MCP - applied at different rates and periods - were evaluated on: gas diffusion rate, ethylene production, respiratory rate, internal ethylene concentration, internal CO2 content, mealiness, and intercellular space. Fruit from the control and sole NAA treatments had the highest mealiness occurrence. Growth regulators significantly changed the gaseous diffusion through the pulp of 'Brookfield' apple, mainly in the treatment AVG + ABS, which kept the highest gas diffusion rate. NAA spraying in the field, with or without another growth regulator, increased ripening metabolism by rising ethylene production and respiration rate, and reduced gas diffusion during shelf life. AVG spraying cannot avoid the ethephon effect during the ripening process, and reduces both the internal space and mealiness incidence, but it is not able to induce ethylene production or to increase respiration rates.

  16. Effect of sheath gas in atmospheric-pressure plasma jet for potato sprouting suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, S.; Monma, M.; Sasaki, K.

    2016-09-01

    Recently, low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (APPJs) attract much interest for medical and agricultural applications. We try to apply APPJs for the suppression of potato sprouting in the long-term storage. In this study, we investigated the effect of sheath gas in APPJ on the suppression efficiency of the potato sprouting. Our APPJ was composed of an insulated thin wire electrode, a glass tube, a grounded electrode which was wound on the glass tube, and a sheath gas nozzle which was attached at the end of the glass tube. The wire electrode was connected to a rectangular-waveform power supply at a frequency of 3 kHz and a voltage of +/- 7 kV. Helium was fed through the glass tube, while we tested dry nitrogen, humid nitrogen, and oxygen as the sheath gas. Eyes of potatoes were irradiated by APPJ for 60 seconds. The sprouting probability was evaluated at two weeks after the plasma irradiation. The sprouting probability was 28% when we employed no sheath gases, whereas an improved probability of 10% was obtained when we applied dry nitrogen as the sheath gas. Optical emission spectroscopy was carried out to diagnose the plasma jet. It was suggested that reactive species originated from nitrogen worked for the efficient suppression of the potato sprouting.

  17. Studies of Gas Atmosphere Near the Metalmould Interface During Casting and Solidification of Ductile Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocek J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In sand moulds, at a distance of 3 mm from the metal- mould interface, the sensors of temperature, and of oxygen and hydrogen content were installed. Temperature and the evolution of partial gas pressure have been analysed in moulds bonded with bentonite with or without the addition of seacoal, water glass or furan resin. Moulds were poured with ductile iron. For comparison, also tests with the grey iron have been executed. It was found that the gas atmosphere near the interface depends mainly on the content of a carbonaceous substance in the mould. In the green sand moulds with 5% of seacoal or bonded with furan resin, after the mould filling, a sudden increase in the hydrogen content and the drop of oxygen is observed. This gas evolution results from the oxidation of carbon and reduction of water vapour in the mould material, and also from the reduction of water vapour and alloy reoxidation. In carbon-free sand, the evolution in the gas composition is slower because water vapour is reduced only at the interface. Changes of oxygen and hydrogen content in the controlled zone are determined by the transport phenomena.

  18. Atmospheric dispersion of natural gas from a rupture in a pressurized and valved subsea pipeline; Dispersao atmosferica de gas natural por ruptura em duto submarino pressurizado e valvulado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Fabio Coimbra Moreira de Macedo; Medeiros, Jose Luiz de; Araujo, Ofelia de Queiroz Fernandes [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica. Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2008-04-15

    This paper presents a simplified approach to the problem of transient atmospheric dispersion of natural gas released accidentally under the ocean, caused by leaks in pressurized subsea pipelines. The model aims to estimate the transient spatial distribution of gas concentration in the atmosphere for subsequent risk analysis. In this scenario, shut-off valves are used to rapidly isolate the damaged stretch of the gas pipeline (pipeline shutdown). The analysis considers the transient behavior of the remaining inventory inside the pipes through a release-by-leakage model, and the subsequent effect on the atmosphere surrounding the epicenter of release. There are also scenarios formulated with occurrences of numerous ruptures, synchronized or not, with known spatial distribution. The spatial-temporal model of atmospheric dispersion employed is based on the resolution of the tridimensional diffusion equation under turbulence in semi-infinite domains. The model includes appropriate resources to deal with: an ample range of atmospheric conditions; different wind velocities; transient conditions of gas released into the atmosphere (i.e., outflow, pressure, and temperature); many depths of emission; multi-source configuration of release. In this work a simulation tool in MATLAB environment was developed for the analyses of scenarios of transient dispersion of gas into the atmosphere. In the case of ruptures in subsea gas lines, this tool is useful to determine the conditions of maximum risk on production platforms situated close to the occurrence, as well as the impact of the localization of the shut-off valves in the release transient behavior. (author)

  19. Evolution of the gas atmosphere during filing the sand moulds with iron alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mocek

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of atmosphere of the mould cavity when pouring the cast iron has been analyzed. It was find that in dry sand mold the cavity is filled by air throughout the casting time. In green sand the air is removed by the water vapor the hydrogen or carbon oxides formed in contact with the liquid metal. The theoretical results have been confirmed experimentally.

  20. An approach for verifying biogenic greenhouse gas emissions inventories with atmospheric CO2 concentration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Stephen M.; Davis, Kenneth; Lauvaux, Thomas; Schuh, Andrew; Cooley, Dan; West, Tristram O.; Heath, Linda S.; Miles, Natasha L.; Richardson, Scott; Breidt, F. Jay; Smith, James E.; McCarty, Jessica L.; Gurney, Kevin R.; Tans, Pieter; Denning, A. Scott

    2015-03-01

    Verifying national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories is a critical step to ensure that reported emissions data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are accurate and representative of a country’s contribution to GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Furthermore, verifying biogenic fluxes provides a check on estimated emissions associated with managing lands for carbon sequestration and other activities, which often have large uncertainties. We report here on the challenges and results associated with a case study using atmospheric measurements of CO2 concentrations and inverse modeling to verify nationally-reported biogenic CO2 emissions. The biogenic CO2 emissions inventory was compiled for the Mid-Continent region of United States based on methods and data used by the US government for reporting to the UNFCCC, along with additional sources and sinks to produce a full carbon balance. The biogenic emissions inventory produced an estimated flux of -408 ± 136 Tg CO2 for the entire study region, which was not statistically different from the biogenic flux of -478 ± 146 Tg CO2 that was estimated using the atmospheric CO2 concentration data. At sub-regional scales, the spatial density of atmospheric observations did not appear sufficient to verify emissions in general. However, a difference between the inventory and inversion results was found in one isolated area of West-central Wisconsin. This part of the region is dominated by forestlands, suggesting that further investigation may be warranted into the forest C stock or harvested wood product data from this portion of the study area. The results suggest that observations of atmospheric CO2 concentration data and inverse modeling could be used to verify biogenic emissions, and provide more confidence in biogenic GHG emissions reporting to the UNFCCC.

  1. Performance testing of cross flow heat exchanger operating in the atmosphere of flue gas particulate with vapor condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuntaphan, A.

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Performance testing of a cross flow heat exchanger operating under the atmosphere of flue gas particulate from combustion was carried out in this work. This heat exchanger exchanges heat between flue gas from the fuel oil combustion and cold water. The heat exchanger is composed of a spiral finned tube bank having 3 rows and 8 tubes per row with a staggered arrangement. The fin spacings considered are 2.85 and 6.10 mm. The theories of thermodynamics and heat transfer are used for analyzing the performance of this system.In this experiment, the flue gas temperature of 200ºC from combustion having 0.35 kg/s mass flow rate flows along outside surface of the heat exchanger and transfers heat to the 25ºC cooling water having 0.15 kg/s mass flow rate flowing in the tube side. Each experiment uses 750 hr for testing. During the testing, part of flue gas condenses on the heat transfer surface.From the experiment, it was found that the heat transfer rate of both heat exchangers tended to decrease with time while the airside pressure drop increased. These results come from the fouling on the heat transfer surface. Moreover, it is found that the heat exchanger having 2.85 mm fin spacing has an approximately 4 times higher fouling resistance than that of the 6.10 mm fin spacing.In this work a model for calculating the fouling resistance is also developed as a the function of time. The model is developed from that of Kern and Seaton and the mean deviation of the model is 0.789.

  2. Effects of gas atmospheres on poly(lactic acid) film in acrylic acid plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yun, E-mail: yun.zhaotju@yahoo.com [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fina, Alberto [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino – sede di Alessandria, V. T. Michel 5, 15121 Alessandria (Italy); Venturello, Alberto; Geobaldo, Francesco [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Plasma polymerized acrylic acid (AA) coatings were deposited on poly(lactic acid) (PLA) films in various gas atmospheres during the pre-treatment of PLA and the deposition of AA, respectively. Therefore, this work was twofold: the argon pretreated PLA films followed by a deposition in argon were investigated against the mixture of argon and oxygen pretreated ones under the same deposition conditions; the plasma deposition of AA operating in different atmospheres (argon, oxygen and nitrogen) was employed to modify the pretreated PLA in oxygen. Chemical and physical changes on the plasma-treated surfaces were examined using contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-FTIR) analysis. The results showed that the discharge gas can have a significant influence on the chemical composition of the PLA surfaces: oxygen plasmas introduced oxygen-containing groups in company with surface etching in pretreatment and deposition, while argon discharges was able to achieve much better hydrophilic behavior and high retention ratio of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) coating before and after washing in water.

  3. Two generators to produce SI-traceable reference gas mixtures for reactive compounds at atmospheric levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, C.; Guillevic, M.; Ackermann, A.; Leuenberger, D.; Niederhauser, B.

    2017-12-01

    To answer the needs of air quality and climate monitoring networks, two new gas generators were developed and manufactured at METAS in order to dynamically generate SI-traceable reference gas mixtures for reactive compounds at atmospheric concentrations. The technical features of the transportable generators allow for the realization of such gas standards for reactive compounds (e.g. NO2, volatile organic compounds) in the nmol · mol‑1 range (ReGaS2), and fluorinated gases in the pmol ṡ mol‑1 range (ReGaS3). The generation method is based on permeation and dynamic dilution. The transportable generators have multiple individual permeation chambers allowing for the generation of mixtures containing up to five different compounds. This mixture is then diluted using mass flow controllers, thus making the production process adaptable to generate the required amount of substance fraction. All parts of ReGaS2 in contact with the gas mixture are coated to reduce adsorption/desorption processes. Each input parameter required to calculate the generated amount of substance fraction is calibrated with SI-primary standards. The stability and reproducibility of the generated amount of substance fractions were tested with NO2 for ReGaS2 and HFC-125 for ReGaS3. They demonstrate stability over 1–4 d better than 0.4% and 0.8%, respectively, and reproducibility better than 0.7% and 1%, respectively. Finally, the relative expanded uncertainty of the generated amount of substance fraction is smaller than 3% with the major contributions coming from the uncertainty of the permeation rate and/or of the purity of the matrix gas. These relative expanded uncertainties meet then the needs of the data quality objectives fixed by the World Meteorological Organization.

  4. Robotic Arm Camera Image of the South Side of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (Door TA4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is shown with one set of oven doors open and dirt from a sample delivery. After the 'seventh shake' of TEGA, a portion of the dirt sample entered the oven via a screen for analysis. This image was taken by the Robotic Arm Camera on Sol 18 (June 13, 2008), or 18th Martian day of the mission. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Gas chromatography–triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for the determination of atmospheric polychlorinated naphthalenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fang [Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Jin, Jing [Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Xiaoli [Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Xueli; Li, Yun; Shah, Syed Mazhar [Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Chen, Jiping, E-mail: chenjp@dicp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Atmospheric PCNs were detected by isotope-dilution GC–MS/MS. • The pollution levels of PCNs covering from mono- to octa-CNs were investigated comprehensively in air samples. • The dioxin-like toxicity and human exposure levels of PCNs in air samples were estimated. - Abstract: Atmospheric polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) ranging from mono-CNs to octa-CNs were detected using isotope-dilution gas chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC–MS/MS). The developed instrumental method was successfully applied to the determination of PCNs in technical products. It was observed that there were significant differences in concentrations, homologue profiles, chlorinated contents and total toxic equivalents (∑TEQs) of PCNs for four Halowax products. Subsequently, the validation of the analytical method was evaluated for the determination of PCNs in air samples in terms of method detection limit (MDL), recovery and matrix effect. The results demonstrated that this method could provide satisfactory sensitivity and adequate selectivity with lower cost. It was conducted to comprehensively evaluate the levels, composition patterns, ∑TEQs, and daily intake exposure of PCNs in indoor and outdoor air samples. Concentrations and ∑TEQs of PCNs in air samples ranged 47.7–832.7 pg m{sup −3} and 1.31–5.99 fg m{sup −3}, respectively, and the predominant homologues were di- and tri-CNs in the gas phase. The results indicated that this analytical method was useful for the accurate and specific evaluation of dioxin-like toxicity and human exposure levels of PCNs in the atmosphere.

  6. Investigations of the Mars Upper Atmosphere with ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Valverde, Miguel A.; Gerard, Jean-Claude; González-Galindo, Francisco; Vandaele, Ann-Carine; Thomas, Ian; Korablev, Oleg; Ignatiev, Nikolai; Fedorova, Anna; Montmessin, Franck; Määttänen, Anni; Guilbon, Sabrina; Lefevre, Franck; Patel, Manish R.; Jiménez-Monferrer, Sergio; García-Comas, Maya; Cardesin, Alejandro; Wilson, Colin F.; Clancy, R. T.; Kleinböhl, Armin; McCleese, Daniel J.; Kass, David M.; Schneider, Nick M.; Chaffin, Michael S.; López-Moreno, José Juan; Rodríguez, Julio

    2018-02-01

    The Martian mesosphere and thermosphere, the region above about 60 km, is not the primary target of the ExoMars 2016 mission but its Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) can explore it and address many interesting issues, either in-situ during the aerobraking period or remotely during the regular mission. In the aerobraking phase TGO peeks into thermospheric densities and temperatures, in a broad range of latitudes and during a long continuous period. TGO carries two instruments designed for the detection of trace species, NOMAD and ACS, which will use the solar occultation technique. Their regular sounding at the terminator up to very high altitudes in many different molecular bands will represent the first time that an extensive and precise dataset of densities and hopefully temperatures are obtained at those altitudes and local times on Mars. But there are additional capabilities in TGO for studying the upper atmosphere of Mars, and we review them briefly. Our simulations suggest that airglow emissions from the UV to the IR might be observed outside the terminator. If eventually confirmed from orbit, they would supply new information about atmospheric dynamics and variability. However, their optimal exploitation requires a special spacecraft pointing, currently not considered in the regular operations but feasible in our opinion. We discuss the synergy between the TGO instruments, specially the wide spectral range achieved by combining them. We also encourage coordinated operations with other Mars-observing missions capable of supplying simultaneous measurements of its upper atmosphere.

  7. Estimation of Flow Channel Parameters for Flowing Gas Mixed with Air in Atmospheric-pressure Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Saito, Hidetoshi

    2017-12-01

    When the working gas of an atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium (cold) plasma flows into free space, the diameter of the resulting flow channel changes continuously. The shape of the channel is observed through the light emitted by the working gas of the atmospheric-pressure plasma. When the plasma jet forms a conical shape, the diameter of the cylindrical shape, which approximates the conical shape, defines the diameter of the flow channel. When the working gas flows into the atmosphere from the inside of a quartz tube, the gas mixes with air. The molar ratio of the working gas and air is estimated from the corresponding volume ratio through the relationship between the diameter of the cylindrical plasma channel and the inner diameter of the quartz tube. The Reynolds number is calculated from the kinematic viscosity of the mixed gas and the molar ratio. The gas flow rates for the upper limit of laminar flow and the lower limit of turbulent flow are determined by the corresponding Reynolds numbers estimated from the molar ratio. It is confirmed that the plasma jet length and the internal plasma length associated with strong light emission increase with the increasing gas flow rate until the rate for the upper limit of laminar flow and the lower limit of turbulent flow, respectively. Thus, we are able to explain the increasing trend in the plasma lengths with the diameter of the flow channel and the molar ratio by using the cylindrical approximation.

  8. A gas chromatographic instrument for measurement of hydrogen cyanide in the lower atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Ambrose

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A gas-chromatographic (GC instrument was developed for measuring hydrogen cyanide (HCN in the lower atmosphere. The main features of the instrument are (1 a cryogen-free cooler for sample dehumidification and enrichment, (2 a porous polymer PLOT column for analyte separation, (3 a flame thermionic detector (FTD for sensitive and selective detection, and (4 a dynamic dilution system for calibration. We deployed the instrument for a ∼4 month period from January–June, 2010 at the AIRMAP atmospheric monitoring station Thompson Farm 2 (THF2 in rural Durham, NH. A subset of measurements made during 3–31 March is presented here with a detailed description of the instrument features and performance characteristics. The temporal resolution of the measurements was ~20 min, with a 75 s sample capture time. The 1σ measurement precision was <10% and the instrument response linearity was excellent on a calibration scale of 0.10–0.75 ppbv (±5%. The estimated method detection limit (MDL and accuracy were 0.021 ppbv and 15%, respectively. From 3–31 March 2010, ambient HCN mixing ratios ranged from 0.15–1.0 ppbv (±15%, with a mean value of 0.36 ± 0.16 ppbv (1σ. The approximate mean background HCN mixing ratio of 0.20 ± 0.04 ppbv appeared to agree well with tropospheric column measurements reported previously. The GC-FTD HCN measurements were strongly correlated with acetonitrile (CH3CN measured concurrently with a proton transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, as anticipated given our understanding that the nitriles share a common primary biomass burning source to the global atmosphere. The nitriles were overall only weakly correlated with carbon monoxide (CO, which is reasonable considering the greater diversity of sources for CO. However, strong correlations with CO were observed on several nights under stable atmospheric conditions and suggest regional combustion-based sources for the nitriles. These results demonstrate that

  9. Transboundary Atmospheric Pollution of Oil-Gas Industry Emissions from North Caspian region of Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakarin, E.; Balakay, L.; Mirkarimova, B.; Mahura, A.; Baklanov, A.; Sorensen, J. H.

    2012-04-01

    The Atyraus region (Republic of Kazahstan) is occupied with more than 60 oil-gas fields which are actively developing. Moreover, a new world largest field so-called Kashagan has been discovered on the Caspian Sea shelf and its exploitation is planned by the end of 2012. In our study, this region has been selected as a source region of sulphates emissions accounting about 15 tons (2009 estimates). Three locations have been chosen in the region covering adjacent Caspian Sea aquatoria, and emissions were equally distributed among these locations (with an emission rate of 4.72*10-4 kg/sec). From original sulphates emissions between 46-82% are subjected to atmospheric transport away from the sources. Releases were considered to be continuous. The long-term modelling of atmospheric transport, dispersion and deposition of sulphates was done employing the Lagrangian type model called DERMA, run at the NEC SX6 supercomputing facilities. After each day of release the atmospheric transport has been tracked for the next 2 week period. Input meteorological 3D fields were obtained from the ECMWF data archives. The generated output included air concentration (at model levels), time integrated air concentration, dry and wet deposition (at the surface). The results of dispersion modelling had been post-processed and integrated into GIS environment (using ArcGIS). These have been further used to calculate annual averaged and summary concentration and deposition fields for administrative regions, counties and cities of Kazakhstan, as well as territories of the neighboring countries. It has been found that on an annual scale, the dominating atmospheric transport of pollution from the Atyraus region is toward east and north-east, mostly due to prevailing westerlies. Although on a hemispheric scale, the wet deposition dominates over dry (63 vs. 37%), for Kazakhstan the wet deposition contribution is slightly larger (65%). For Turkmenistan, dry deposition is almost twice higher compared

  10. Design of a portable gas chromatography with a conducting polymer nanocomposite detector device and a method to analyze a gas mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirsa, Sajad

    2017-04-01

    A portable chromatography device and a method were developed to analyze a gas mixture. The device comprises a chromatographic column for separating components of a sample of the gas mixture. It has an air pump coupled to the inlet of a chromatographic column for pumping air and an injector coupled to the inlet of chromatographic column for feeding the sample using the air as a carrier gas. A detector is arranged downstream from and coupled to the outlet of the chromatographic column. The detector is a nanostructure semiconductive microfiber. The device further comprises an evaluation unit arranged and configured to evaluate each detected component to determine the concentration. The designed portable system was used for simultaneous detection of amines. The possibility of applying dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of analytes in trace levels is demonstrated. The reproducibility of this method is acceptable, and good standard deviations were obtained. The relative standard deviation value is less than 6% for all analytes. Finally, the method was successfully applied to the extraction and determination of analytes in water samples. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The Siberian Traps and the end-Permian event: Geology, geochemistry and atmospheric modeling of gas release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensen, Henrik; Stordal, Frode; Roscher, Marco; Sokalska, Ewa; Planke, Sverre

    2013-04-01

    The Siberian Traps were emplaces through sedimentary basins covering the Siberian Craton, passing thick accumulations of carbonates and evaporites. Contact metamorphism of the sedimentary rocks around dolerite sills and dikes generated greenhouse gases and halocarbons to such an extent that the process could be responsible for both the end-Permian carbon isotope excursion and the mass extinction. The key processes are suggested to be 1) metamorphism of oil-saturated rock salt sequences (halocarbon production), 2) methane generation from metamorphism of organic-rich shales (methane production), and 3) decarbonation of dolostones (carbon dioxide production). We have analyzed the petrography and geochemistry (including carbon isotopes) of contact metamorphic carbonates from outcrops, and can document the devolatilization processes. In addition, we have explored the potential global warming effects of CO2 and CH4 emissions to the end-Permian atmosphere from the volatile generation. We have constrained the effect of century scale degassing events using the atmospheric lifetime of CH4 and CO2, the pre-event atmospheric composition in terms of methane and carbon-dioxide as well as H2S, the gas flux to the atmosphere, the IR absorption efficiency, the radiative forcing and the climate sensitivity. Assuming rapid emplacement of one single major sill intrusion into the Tunguska Basin, and 100 year gas release with 60% CH4 and 40% CO2, the global annual mean temperature could rise by 2-5°C (best estimate ~3.5°C). In contrast, degassing from subaerial lava flows with the same magma volume as a sill has one order of magnitude lower influence on the global climate, resulting in a warming of about 0.1°C. Per molecule CH4 is much more efficient in absorbing and re-emitting IR radiation than CO2, yielding a much stronger greenhouse effect in the Earth's atmosphere. Considering that the heat trapped in the atmosphere over a 100 year period resulting from an emission of CH4 is

  12. The escaping "pneuma" - gas of ancient earthquake concepts in relation to animal, atmospheric and thermal precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmut, Tributsch

    2013-04-01

    The escaping "pneuma" - gas of ancient earthquake concepts in relation to animal, atmospheric and thermal precursors Helmut Tributsch Present affiliation: Carinthian University for Applied Sciences, Bio-mimetics program, Europastrasse 4, 9524 Villach, Austria, helmut.tributsch@alice.it Retired from: Free University Berlin, Institute for physical and theoretical chemistry, Takustr. 3, 14195 Berlin, Germany. For two thousand years ancient European and medieval (including islamic) natural philosophers have considered a dry, warm gas, the "pneuma" ( breath, exhalation), escaping from the earth, as precursor and trigger of earthquakes. Also in China an escaping gas or breath (the qi) was considered the cause of earthquake, first in a document from 780 BC. We know today that escaping gas is not causing earthquakes. But it may be that natural phenomena that supported such a pneuma-concept have again and again been observed. The unpolluted environment and the largely absence of distracting artificial stimuli may have allowed the recognition of distinct earthquake precursors, such as described by ancient observers: (1) the sun becomes veiled and has a dim appearance, turns reddish or dark (2) a narrow long stretched cloud becomes visible, like a line drawn by a ruler, (3) earthquakes preceded by a thin streak of cloud stretching over a wide space. (4) earthquakes in the morning sometimes preceded by a still and a strong frost, (5) a surf - line of the air sea is forming (near the horizon). The described phenomena may be interpreted as a kind of smog forming above the ground prior to an earthquake, a smog exhaled from the ground, which is triggering water condensation, releasing latent heat, changing visibility, temperature, heat conduction and radiation properties. This could perfectly match the phenomenon, which is at the origin of satellite monitored temperature anomalies preceding earthquakes. Based on a few examples it will be shown that the time window of temperature

  13. Miniaturized Gas Correlation Radiometer for the Detection of Trace Gases in the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melroy, H.; Wilson, E. L.; Georgieva, E.

    2012-12-01

    We present a miniaturized and simplified version of a gas correlation radiometer (GCR) capable of simultaneously mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface. Gas correlation radiometry (GCR) has been shown to be a sensitive and versatile method for detecting trace gases in Earth's atmosphere. Reduction of the size and mass of the GCR was achieved by implementing compact, light-weight 1 mm inner diameter hollow-core optical fibers (hollow waveguides) as the gas correlation cells. In a comparison with an Earth orbiting CO2 GCR instrument, exchanging the 10 m multipass cells with hollow waveguide gas correlation cells of equivalent pathlength reduces the mass from ~150 kg to ~0.5 kg, and reduces the volume from 1.9 m x 1.3 m x 0.86 m to a small bundle of fiber coils approximately 1 meter in diameter by 0.05 m in height (mass and volume reductions of >99%). A unique feature of this instrument is its stackable module design, with a single module for each trace gas. Each of the modules is self-contained, and fundamentally identical; differing by the bandpass filter wavelength range and gas mixtures inside the hollow-waveguide absorption cells. The current configuration contains four stacked modules for simultaneous measurements of methane (CH4), formaldehyde (H2CO), water vapor (H2O), and deuterated water vapor (HDO) but could easily be expanded to include measurements of additional species of interest including nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) for a simultaneous measure of mass balance. Preliminary results indicate that a 1 ppb detection limit is possible for both formaldehyde and methane with one second of averaging. Using non-optimized components, we have demonstrated an instrument sensitivity equivalent to ~30 ppb for formaldehyde, and ~500 ppb for methane. We expect custom bandpass filters and 6 m long waveguides to significantly improve these

  14. Two-dimensional gas chromatography with electron capture detection for the analysis of atmospheric ozone depleting halocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Hua, Hsi-Che; Chou, Yu-Chieh; Teng, Ming-Kai; Liu, Wen-Tzu; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2017-05-26

    This study is to develop a GC×GC method with electron capture detection (ECD) to analyze atmospheric halocarbons in the concentration range of parts per trillion by volume (pptv). To enrich atmospheric halocarbons a home-built thermal desorption (TD) device was coupled to the GC×GC-ECD. The technique of flow modulation was adopted using a Deans switch for GC×GC. Several column combinations of first and second dimensions were tested and the column set of DB-5×TG-1301 was found to show the best orthogonality for halocarbons. A series of modulation parameters were tested for their optimal settings. The modulation period (PM) was found to have minimal wrap-around when set at 3s. The modulation ratio (MR) was determined to be 7.82 to ensure reproducible results and maximum sensitivity. The modulation duty cycle (DC) was calculated to be approximately 0.17. Nine halocarbons were separated successfully and seven were calibrated with the use of a certified standard gas mixture. The correlation coefficients (R2) were greater than 0.9972. The reproducibility was better than 1.90% as expressed in relative standard deviation (RSD; N=30) and the detection limits were in the range of pptv for the target halocarbons. A field test by continuous analyzing ambient air with hourly resolution was performed to show the stability of the method as suggested by the homogeneity of certain halocarbons, while also reflecting concentration variation for others when emissions did arise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Atmospheric Detection of Perfluorotributyl Amine, an Uncharacterized Long-Lived Greenhouse Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, A. C.; Young, C. J.; Mabury, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are trace atmospheric constituents of radiative significance. In the atmosphere, PFASs may represent a class of potent long-lived greenhouse gases (LLGHGs) because they possess long lifetimes and exceptionally strong absorption bands in the infrared (IR) spectral region where other naturally occurring greenhouse gases (GHGs) do not absorb. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change determined the radiative forcing (RF) of halocarbons to be +0.337 [± 0.03] W m-2, accounting for 13 % of the total RF attributed to LLGHGs. Although this value claims high certainty, it does not represent the actual perturbation from all environmentally relevant PFASs. Here we present the radiative efficiency (RE) and atmospheric concentration of a previously uncharacterized and unreported PFAS, perfluorotributyl amine (PFBAm). To assess the radiative properties of PFBAm, IR spectra were acquired by Fourier transform spectroscopy at 0.25 cm-1 resolution over the spectral range 0-2500 cm-1 at 296 K. The total integrated band strength, 7.08 x 10-16 cm2 molec-1 cm-1, was used to derive the cloudy-sky, instantaneous RE assuming a 0 to 1 ppbv change in concentration.The RE of PFBAm is calculated to be 0.86 W m-2 ppb-1, exceeding the RE of SF5CF3, the most effective GHG on a per molecule basis as reported in the literature to date. To evaluate the RF of PFBAm, a highly sensitive and selective method for detection was developed and validated. PFBAm was cryogenically extracted and pre-concentrated from bulk air samples for the offline detection by a custom-designed manifold coupled to a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Quantitation was achieved by external calibration with a gravimetrically prepared, matrix-matched, authentic gaseous standard. Validation of the sampling method was performed by simultaneous measurement of several legacy chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons. Preliminary results indicate that PFBAm is present in the

  16. Brazing of Ti to stainless steel under Ar-gas atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Sano, Y.; Minoda, Y.; Ariga, T. [Tokai Univ., Kanagawa (Japan); Chang, C.S. [Engineered Materials Solutions, Attleboro (United States); Kanda, K. [Kanto YakinKogyo Co., Kanagawa (Japan); Takahashi, S. [Osaka Univ. (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Joining technology of CP-Titanium and Titanium alloy is very important for manufacturing field. In that case of titanium brazing, chemical compositions of brazing filler metal and brazing atmosphere are very important. In this study, Ti alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) / Stainless Steel (SUS630, PH stainless steel) were brazed with Ag-based brazing filler metal foil (Ag-Cu eutectic composition) and Ti-based laminated brazing filler metal foil by using continuous type furnace under Ar gas atmosphere containing extremely low oxygen. Laminated filler was fabricated by roll bonding technology. Whole chemical compositions of laminated filler metal used in this study were Ti-15Cu-15Ni and Ti-20Zr-20Cu-20Ni. Brazing condition employed in this study in that case of laminated brazing filler metal was 950 C and 30 min. and brazing conditions employed in this study in that case of Ag-based brazing filler metal were 830C 3min, 830C 30min, 860C 5min and 900C 5min. Joint characteristics were estimated by micro-structural observation at the joint and mechanical properties measurement. Sound joint was obtained in this study according to outside appearance of the specimen and cross-sectional microstructure. (orig.)

  17. Aerosol lidar observations of atmospheric mixing in Los Angeles: Climatology and implications for greenhouse gas observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, John; Kort, Eric A.; DeCola, Phil; Duren, Riley

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric observations of greenhouse gases provide essential information on sources and sinks of these key atmospheric constituents. To quantify fluxes from atmospheric observations, representation of transport—especially vertical mixing—is a necessity and often a source of error. We report on remotely sensed profiles of vertical aerosol distribution taken over a 2 year period in Pasadena, California. Using an automated analysis system, we estimate daytime mixing layer depth, achieving high confidence in the afternoon maximum on 51% of days with profiles from a Sigma Space Mini Micropulse LiDAR (MiniMPL) and on 36% of days with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. We note that considering ceilometer data on a logarithmic scale, a standard method, introduces, an offset in mixing height retrievals. The mean afternoon maximum mixing height is 770 m Above Ground Level in summer and 670 m in winter, with significant day-to-day variance (within season σ = 220m≈30%). Taking advantage of the MiniMPL's portability, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the detailed horizontal structure of the mixing layer by automobile. We compare our observations to planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from sonde launches, North American regional reanalysis (NARR), and a custom Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed for greenhouse gas (GHG) monitoring in Los Angeles. NARR and WRF PBL heights at Pasadena are both systematically higher than measured, NARR by 2.5 times; these biases will cause proportional errors in GHG flux estimates using modeled transport. We discuss how sustained lidar observations can be used to reduce flux inversion error by selecting suitable analysis periods, calibrating models, or characterizing bias for correction in post processing.

  18. Aerosol lidar observations of atmospheric mixing in Los Angeles: Climatology and implications for greenhouse gas observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, John; Kort, Eric A; DeCola, Phil; Duren, Riley

    2016-08-27

    Atmospheric observations of greenhouse gases provide essential information on sources and sinks of these key atmospheric constituents. To quantify fluxes from atmospheric observations, representation of transport-especially vertical mixing-is a necessity and often a source of error. We report on remotely sensed profiles of vertical aerosol distribution taken over a 2 year period in Pasadena, California. Using an automated analysis system, we estimate daytime mixing layer depth, achieving high confidence in the afternoon maximum on 51% of days with profiles from a Sigma Space Mini Micropulse LiDAR (MiniMPL) and on 36% of days with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. We note that considering ceilometer data on a logarithmic scale, a standard method, introduces, an offset in mixing height retrievals. The mean afternoon maximum mixing height is 770 m Above Ground Level in summer and 670 m in winter, with significant day-to-day variance (within season σ = 220m≈30%). Taking advantage of the MiniMPL's portability, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the detailed horizontal structure of the mixing layer by automobile. We compare our observations to planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from sonde launches, North American regional reanalysis (NARR), and a custom Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed for greenhouse gas (GHG) monitoring in Los Angeles. NARR and WRF PBL heights at Pasadena are both systematically higher than measured, NARR by 2.5 times; these biases will cause proportional errors in GHG flux estimates using modeled transport. We discuss how sustained lidar observations can be used to reduce flux inversion error by selecting suitable analysis periods, calibrating models, or characterizing bias for correction in post processing.

  19. Atmospheric Mercury in the Barnett Shale Area, Texas: Implications for Emissions from Oil and Gas Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xin; Talbot, Robert; Laine, Patrick; Torres, Azucena; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric mercury emissions in the Barnett Shale area were studied by employing both stationary measurements and mobile laboratory surveys. Stationary measurements near the Engle Mountain Lake showed that the median mixing ratio of total gaseous mercury (THg) was 138 ppqv (140 ± 29 ppqv for mean ± S.D.) during the June 2011 study period. A distinct diurnal variation pattern was observed in which the highest THg levels appeared near midnight, followed by a monotonic decrease until midafternoon. The influence of oil and gas (ONG) emissions was substantial in this area, as inferred from the i-pentane/n-pentane ratio (1.17). However, few THg plumes were captured by our mobile laboratory during a ∼3700 km survey with detailed downwind measurements from 50 ONG facilities. One compressor station and one natural gas condensate processing facility were found to have significant THg emissions, with maximum THg levels of 963 and 392 ppqv, respectively, and the emissions rates were estimated to be 7.9 kg/yr and 0.3 kg/yr, respectively. Our results suggest that the majority of ONG facilities in this area are not significant sources of THg; however, it is highly likely that a small number of these facilities contribute a relatively large amount of emissions in the ONG sector.

  20. Recent Developments in Film and Gas Research in Modified Atmosphere Packaging of Fresh Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Meng, Xiangyong; Bhandari, Bhesh; Fang, Zhongxiang

    2016-10-02

    Due to the rise of consumer's awareness of fresh foods to health, in the past few years, the consumption of fresh and fresh-cut produces has increased sturdily. Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) possesses a potential to become one of the most appropriate technologies for packaging fresh and fresh-cut produces. The MAP has advantages of extending the shelf-life, preserving or stabilizing the desired properties of fresh produces, and convenience in handing and distribution. The success of MAP-fresh foods depends on many factors including types of fresh foods, storage temperature and humidity, gas composition, and the characteristics of package materials. This paper reviews the recent developments highlighting the most critical factors of film and gas on the quality of MAP fresh foods. Although the innovations and development of food packaging technology will continue to promote the development of novel MAP, concentrated research and endeavors from scientists and engineers are still important to the development of MAP that focuses on consumers' requirements, enhancing product quality, environmental friendly design, and cost-effective application.

  1. Analyzing the kinetic response of tin oxide-carbon and tin oxide-CNT composites gas sensors for alcohols detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak Kamble

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tin oxide nanoparticles are synthesized using solution combustion technique and tin oxide – carbon composite thick films are fabricated with amorphous carbon as well as carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and porosity measurements show that the as-synthesized nanoparticles are having rutile phase with average crystallite size ∼7 nm and ∼95 m2/g surface area. The difference between morphologies of the carbon doped and CNT doped SnO2 thick films, are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The adsorption-desorption kinetics and transient response curves are analyzed using Langmuir isotherm curve fittings and modeled using power law of semiconductor gas sensors.

  2. Analyzing salvia divinorum and its active ingredient salvinorin a utilizing thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermain, John D; Evans, Hiram K

    2009-05-01

    In recent years, Salvia divinorum has become a major focus by state legislatures throughout the United States looking to prohibit the sale of the psychoactive plant. After researching testing procedures presented in the literature and those employed by crime laboratories throughout the country, it was decided that thin layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were the methods to use to analyze plant material for salvinorin A. With TLC, salvinorin A was detected from extracted plant material and was easily distinguishable from 13 other Salvia species as well as Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). When using GC/MS, salvinorin A was best extracted from plant material with chloroform at ambient temperature when using a nonpolar solvent and acetone at ambient temperature when using a polar solvent. By utilizing these techniques, criminalists are now able to confirm the presence of salvinorin A in a submitted plant material suspected to be Salvia divinorum.

  3. Fighting global warming by greenhouse gas removal: destroying atmospheric nitrous oxide thanks to synergies between two breakthrough technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Tingzhen; de Richter, Renaud; Shen, Sheng; Caillol, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    Even if humans stop discharging CO2 into the atmosphere, the average global temperature will still increase during this century. A lot of research has been devoted to prevent and reduce the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the atmosphere, in order to mitigate the effects of climate change. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is one of the technologies that might help to limit emissions. In complement, direct CO2 removal from the atmosphere has been proposed after the emissions have occurred. But, the removal of all the excess anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 will not be enough, due to the fact that CO2 outgases from the ocean as its solubility is dependent of its atmospheric partial pressure. Bringing back the Earth average surface temperature to pre-industrial levels would require the removal of all previously emitted CO2. Thus, the atmospheric removal of other greenhouse gases is necessary. This article proposes a combination of disrupting techniques to transform nitrous oxide (N2O), the third most important greenhouse gas (GHG) in terms of current radiative forcing, which is harmful for the ozone layer and possesses quite high global warming potential. Although several scientific publications cite "greenhouse gas removal," to our knowledge, it is the first time innovative solutions are proposed to effectively remove N2O or other GHGs from the atmosphere other than CO2.

  4. Postharvest quality changes in fresh-cut watercress stored under conventional and inert gas-enriched modified atmosphere packaging

    OpenAIRE

    Pinela, José; Barreira, João C.M.; Barros, Lillian; Antonio, Amilcar L.; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Oliveira, M.B.P.P.; Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the postharvest quality of fresh-cut watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.) stored at 4 ºC for 7 d was studied. A portion of watercress was immediately analyzed (non-stored control) and the remaining fresh material was stored packaged under atmospheres enriched with N2, Ar, air, or vacuum. The analyzed parameters included colour, total soluble solids, pH, macronutrients, the individual profiles of sugars, organic acids, tocopherols and f...

  5. Enrichment of radon and carbon dioxide in the open atmosphere of an Australian coal seam gas field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Douglas R; Santos, Isaac R; Maher, Damien T; Cyronak, Tyler J; Davis, Rachael J

    2013-04-02

    Atmospheric radon ((222)Rn) and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations were used to gain insight into fugitive emissions in an Australian coal seam gas (CSG) field (Surat Basin, Tara region, Queensland). (222)Rn and CO2 concentrations were observed for 24 h within and outside the gas field. Both (222)Rn and CO2 concentrations followed a diurnal cycle with night time concentrations higher than day time concentrations. Average CO2 concentrations over the 24-h period ranged from ~390 ppm at the control site to ~467 ppm near the center of the gas field. A ~3 fold increase in maximum (222)Rn concentration was observed inside the gas field compared to outside of it. There was a significant relationship between maximum and average (222)Rn concentrations and the number of gas wells within a 3 km radius of the sampling sites (n = 5 stations; p gas field related to both point (well heads, pipelines, etc.) and diffuse soil sources. Radon may be useful in monitoring enhanced soil gas fluxes to the atmosphere due to changes in the geological structure associated with wells and hydraulic fracturing in CSG fields.

  6. Increasing the speed of computational fluid dynamics procedure for minimization the nitrogen oxide polution from the premixed atmospheric gas burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotev Vasko G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents innovative method for increasing the speed of procedure which includes complex computational fluid dynamic calculations for finding the distance between flame openings of atmospheric gas burner that lead to minimal NO pollution. The method is based on standard features included in commercial computational fluid dynamic software and shortens computer working time roughly seven times in this particular case.

  7. Compilation and evaluation of gas phase diffusion coefficients of reactive trace gases in the atmosphere: volume 1. Inorganic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M. J.; Cox, R. A.; Kalberer, M.

    2014-09-01

    Diffusion of gas molecules to the surface is the first step for all gas-surface reactions. Gas phase diffusion can influence and sometimes even limit the overall rates of these reactions; however, there is no database of the gas phase diffusion coefficients of atmospheric reactive trace gases. Here we compile and evaluate, for the first time, the diffusivities (pressure-independent diffusion coefficients) of atmospheric inorganic reactive trace gases reported in the literature. The measured diffusivities are then compared with estimated values using a semi-empirical method developed by Fuller et al. (1966). The diffusivities estimated using Fuller's method are typically found to be in good agreement with the measured values within ±30%, and therefore Fuller's method can be used to estimate the diffusivities of trace gases for which experimental data are not available. The two experimental methods used in the atmospheric chemistry community to measure the gas phase diffusion coefficients are also discussed. A different version of this compilation/evaluation, which will be updated when new data become available, is uploaded online (google.com/site/mingjintang/home/diffusion"target="_blank">https://sites.google.com/site/mingjintang/home/diffusion).

  8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter provides atmospheric data during Aerobraking into its final orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedhem, Hakan; Vago, Jorge L.; Bruinsma, Sean; Müller-Wodarg, Ingo; ExoMars 2016 Team

    2017-10-01

    After the arrival of the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) at Mars on 19 October 2016 a number of initial orbit change manoeuvres were executed and the spacecraft was put in an orbit with a 24 hour period and 74 degrees inclination. The spacecraft and its four instruments were thoroughly checked out after arrival and a few measurements and images were taken in November 2016 and in Feb-March 2017. The solar occultation observations have however not yet been possible due to lack of the proper geometry.On 15 March a long period of aerobraking to reach the final 400km semi-circular frozen orbit (370x430km, with a fixed pericentre latitude). This orbit is optimised for the payload observations and for the communication relay with the ExoMars Rover, due to arrive in 2021.The aerobraking is proceeding well and the final orbit is expected to be reached in April 2018. A large data set is being acquired for the upper atmosphere of Mars, from the limit of the sensitivity of the accelerometer, down to lowest altitude of the aerobraking at about 105km. Initial analysis has shown a highly variable atmosphere with a slightly lower density then predicted by existing models. Until the time of the abstract writing no dust storms have been observed.The ExoMars programme is a joint activity by the European Space Agency(ESA) and ROSCOSMOS, Russia. ESA is providing the TGO spacecraft and Schiaparelli (EDM) and two of the TGO instruments and ROSCOSMOS is providing the Proton launcher and the other two TGO instruments. After the arrival of the ExoMars 2020 mission, consisting of a Rover and a Surface platform also launched by a Proton rocket, the TGO will handle the communication between the Earth and the Rover and Surface Platform through its (NASA provided) UHF communication system.

  9. A Fourier transform infrared trace gas and isotope analyser for atmospheric applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. T. Griffith

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Concern in recent decades about human impacts on Earth's climate has led to the need for improved and expanded measurement capabilities of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. In this paper we describe in detail an in situ trace gas analyser based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy that is capable of simultaneous and continuous measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, carbon monoxide (CO, nitrous oxide (N2O and 13C in CO2 in air with high precision. High accuracy is established by reference to measurements of standard reference gases. Stable water isotopes can also be measured in undried airstreams. The analyser is automated and allows unattended operation with minimal operator intervention. Precision and accuracy meet and exceed the compatibility targets set by the World Meteorological Organisation – Global Atmosphere Watch for baseline measurements in the unpolluted troposphere for all species except 13C in CO2.

    The analyser is mobile and well suited to fixed sites, tower measurements, mobile platforms and campaign-based measurements. The isotopic specificity of the optically-based technique and analysis allows its application in isotopic tracer experiments, for example in tracing variations of 13C in CO2 and 15N in N2O. We review a number of applications illustrating use of the analyser in clean air monitoring, micrometeorological flux and tower measurements, mobile measurements on a train, and soil flux chamber measurements.

  10. Gas heating dynamics during leader inception in long air gaps at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lipeng; Becerra, Marley

    2017-08-01

    The inception of leader discharges in long air gaps at atmospheric pressure is simulated with a thermo-hydrodynamic model and a detailed kinetic scheme for N2/O2/H2O mixtures. In order to investigate the effect of humidity, the kinetic scheme includes the most important reactions with the H2O molecule and its derivatives, resulting in a scheme with 45 species and 192 chemical reactions. The heating of a thin plasma channel in front of an anode electrode during the streamer to leader transition is evaluated with a detailed 1D radial model. The analysis includes the simulation of the corresponding streamer bursts, dark periods and aborted leaders that may occur prior to the inception of a propagating leader discharge. The simulations are performed using the time-varying discharge current in two laboratory discharge events of positive polarity reported in the literature as input. Excellent agreement between the simulated and the experimental time variation of the thermal radius for a 1 m rod-plate air gap discharge event reported in the literature has been found. The role of different energy transfer and loss mechanisms prior to the inception of a stable leader is also discussed. It is found that although a small percentage of water molecules can accelerate the vibrational-translational relaxation to some extent, this effect leads to a negligible temperature increase during the streamer-to-leader transition. It is also found that the gas temperature should significantly exceed 2000 K for the transition to lead to the inception of a propagating leader. Otherwise, the strong convection loss produced by the gas expansion during the transition causes a drop in the translational temperature below 2000 K, aborting the incepted leader. Furthermore, it is shown that the assumptions used by the widely-used model of Gallimberti do not hold when evaluating the streamer-to-leader transition.

  11. ObsPack: a framework for the preparation, delivery, and attribution of atmospheric greenhouse gas measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masarie, K. A.; Peters, W.; Jacobson, A. R.; Tans, P. P.

    2014-12-01

    Observation Package (ObsPack) is a framework designed to bring together atmospheric greenhouse gas observations from a variety of sampling platforms, prepare them with specific applications in mind, and package and distribute them in a self-consistent and well-documented product. Data products created using the ObsPack framework (called "ObsPack products") are intended to support carbon cycle modeling studies and represent a next generation of value-added greenhouse gas observation products modeled after the cooperative GLOBALVIEW products introduced in 1996. Depending on intended use, ObsPack products may include data in their original form reformatted using the ObsPack framework or may contain derived data consisting of averages, subsets, or smoothed representations of original data. All products include extensive ancillary information (metadata) intended to help ensure the data are used appropriately, their calibration and quality assurance history are clearly described, and that individuals responsible for the measurements (data providers or principal investigators (PIs)) are properly acknowledged for their work. ObsPack products are made freely available using a distribution strategy designed to improve communication between data providers and product users. The strategy includes a data usage policy that requires users to directly communicate with data providers and an automated e-mail notification system triggered when a product is accessed. ObsPack products will be assigned a unique digital object identifier (DOI) to ensure each product can be unambiguously identified in scientific literature. Here we describe the ObsPack framework and its potential role in supporting the evolving needs of both data providers and product users.

  12. Comparison of serum sodium levels measured by blood gas analyzer and biochemistry autoanalyzer in patients with hyponatremia, eunatremia, and hypernatremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Yalcin

    2016-08-01

    Blood gas analyzer (BGA) electrolyte measurements are frequently used in emergency departments (EDs) pending biochemistry laboratory autoanalyzer (BLA) results. There is lack of data in the literature in terms of agreement of these 2 measurement methods of sodium. We aimed to comprehensively evaluate the agreement in hyponatremia, eunatremia, and hypernatremia groups. Retrospectively, adult subjects who presented to ED of a tertiary care teaching hospital and had simultaneous BGA and BLA results were included in the study. Blood pairs were grouped into hyponatremia, eunatremia, and hypernatremia according to BLA results. Agreement of sodium measurements between the methods were evaluated by Bland-Altman plots and Passing and Bablok regression analysis. A total of 2557 blood pairs (1326 males [51.8%]) were included. Median age of the patients was 66 years (18-103). The numbers of patients with hyponatremia, eunatremia, and hypernatremia were 487 (19%), 1943 (76%), and 127 (5%), respectively. The minimum and maximum serum sodium levels measured by biochemistry analyzer were 106 and 171 mmol/L, respectively. The Pearson linear correlation coefficient between BGA and BLA for sodium measurements were 0.574, 0.358, and 0.562 in hyponatremia, eunatremia, and hypernatremia groups, respectively. The absolute mean difference for the 3 groups was greater than 4 mmol/L. Biochemistry laboratory autoanalyzer tended to measure serum sodium higher than BGA in all sodium groups. Passing and Bablok regression analysis showed significant differences between the 2 methods in all sodium groups. This is the first comprehensive evaluation of agreement between BGA and BLA in distinct sodium groups. Significant differences should be taken into account when these patients are managed in the ED. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A fast code for channel limb radiances with gas absorption and scattering in a spherical atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Uymin, Gennady; Flittner, David; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Mlawer, Eli; Henderson, John; Moncet, Jean-Luc; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Wolff, Michael

    2017-05-01

    We present a radiative transfer code capable of accurately and rapidly computing channel limb radiances in the presence of gaseous absorption and scattering in a spherical atmosphere. The code has been prototyped for the Mars Climate Sounder measuring limb radiances in the thermal part of the spectrum (200-900 cm-1) where absorption by carbon dioxide and water vapor and absorption and scattering by dust and water ice particles are important. The code relies on three main components: 1) The Gauss Seidel Spherical Radiative Transfer Model (GSSRTM) for scattering, 2) The Planetary Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (P-LBLRTM) for gas opacity, and 3) The Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS) for selecting a limited number of spectral points to simulate channel radiances and thus achieving a substantial increase in speed. The accuracy of the code has been evaluated against brute-force line-by-line calculations performed on the NASA Pleiades supercomputer, with satisfactory results. Additional improvements in both accuracy and speed are attainable through incremental changes to the basic approach presented in this paper, which would further support the use of this code for real-time retrievals and data assimilation. Both newly developed codes, GSSRTM/OSS for MCS and P-LBLRTM, are available for additional testing and user feedback.

  14. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on fresh produce by cold atmospheric gas plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, A; Noriega, E; Thompson, A

    2013-02-01

    Cold atmospheric gas plasma treatment (CAP) is an alternative approach for the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed food. In this study, the effects of growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime on the inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) by Nitrogen CAP were examined. Furthermore, the efficacy of CAP treatment for decontaminating lettuce and strawberry surfaces and potato tissue inoculated with S. Typhimurium was evaluated. It was found that the rate of inactivation of S. Typhimurium was independent of the growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime. Under optimal conditions, a 2 min treatment resulted in a 2.71 log-reduction of S. Typhimurium viability on membrane filters whereas a 15 min treatment was necessary to achieve 2.72, 1.76 and 0.94 log-reductions of viability on lettuce, strawberry and potato, respectively. We suggest that the differing efficiency of CAP treatment on the inactivation of S. Typhimurium on these different types of fresh foods is a consequence of their surface features. Scanning electron microscopy of the surface structures of contaminated samples of lettuce, strawberry and potato revealed topographical features whereby S. Typhimurium cells could be protected from the active species generated by plasma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Optical and application study of gas-liquid discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in atmospheric air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Wen-chun; Yang, De-zheng; Liu, Zhi-jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-10-15

    In this study, a bipolar nanosecond pulse with 20ns rising time is employed to generate air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma with room gas temperature in quartz tube at atmospheric pressure. The image of the discharge and optical emission spectra of active species in the plasma are recorded. The plasma gas temperature is determined to be approximately 390K by compared the experimental spectra with the simulated spectra, which is slightly higher than the room temperature. The result indicated that the gas temperature rises gradually with pulse peak voltage increasing, while decreases slightly with the electrode gap distance increasing. As an important application, bipolar nanosecond pulse discharge is used to sterilize the common microorganisms (Actinomycetes, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli) existing in drinking water, which performs high sterilization efficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Optical and application study of gas-liquid discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Wen-chun; Yang, De-zheng; Liu, Zhi-jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a bipolar nanosecond pulse with 20 ns rising time is employed to generate air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma with room gas temperature in quartz tube at atmospheric pressure. The image of the discharge and optical emission spectra of active species in the plasma are recorded. The plasma gas temperature is determined to be approximately 390 K by compared the experimental spectra with the simulated spectra, which is slightly higher than the room temperature. The result indicated that the gas temperature rises gradually with pulse peak voltage increasing, while decreases slightly with the electrode gap distance increasing. As an important application, bipolar nanosecond pulse discharge is used to sterilize the common microorganisms (Actinomycetes, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli) existing in drinking water, which performs high sterilization efficiency.

  17. Development of a Simulation Framework for Analyzing Security of Supply in Integrated Gas and Electric Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwabena Addo Pambour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas and power networks are tightly coupled and interact with each other due to physically interconnected facilities. In an integrated gas and power network, a contingency observed in one system may cause iterative cascading failures, resulting in network wide disruptions. Therefore, understanding the impacts of the interactions in both systems is crucial for governments, system operators, regulators and operational planners, particularly, to ensure security of supply for the overall energy system. Although simulation has been widely used in the assessment of gas systems as well as power systems, there is a significant gap in simulation models that are able to address the coupling of both systems. In this paper, a simulation framework that models and simulates the gas and power network in an integrated manner is proposed. The framework consists of a transient model for the gas system and a steady state model for the power system based on AC-Optimal Power Flow. The gas and power system model are coupled through an interface which uses the coupling equations to establish the data exchange and coordination between the individual models. The bidirectional interlink between both systems considered in this studies are the fuel gas offtake of gas fired power plants for power generation and the power supply to liquefied natural gas (LNG terminals and electric drivers installed in gas compressor stations and underground gas storage facilities. The simulation framework is implemented into an innovative simulation tool named SAInt (Scenario Analysis Interface for Energy Systems and the capabilities of the tool are demonstrated by performing a contingency analysis for a real world example. Results indicate how a disruption triggered in one system propagates to the other system and affects the operation of critical facilities. In addition, the studies show the importance of using transient gas models for security of supply studies instead of successions of

  18. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume IV – gas phase reactions of organic halogen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Atkinson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This article, the fourth in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data sheets evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of organic halogen species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in 2006/07. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and four appendices containing the data sheets, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  19. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume I - gas phase reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Atkinson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article, the first in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on GasKinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2001. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and five appendices containing the data sheets, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  20. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume II – gas phase reactions of organic species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Atkinson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article, the second in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Organic species, which were last published in 1999, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2002, and subsequently during the preparation of this article. The article consists of a summary table of the recommended rate coefficients, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and eight appendices containing the data sheets, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  1. Gas flow rate dependence of the discharge characteristics of a helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet interacting with a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wen; Economou, Demetre J.

    2017-10-01

    A 2D (axisymmetric) computational study of the discharge characteristics of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet as a function of gas flow rate was performed. The helium jet emerged from a dielectric tube, with an average gas flow velocity in the range 2.5-20 m s-1 (1 atm, 300 K) in a nitrogen ambient, and impinged on a substrate a short distance dowstream. The effect of the substrate conductivity (conductror versus insulator) was also studied. Whenever possible, simulation predictions were compared with published experimental observations. Discharge ignition and propagation in the dielectric tube were hardly affected by the He gas flow velocity. Most properties of the plasma jet, however, depended sensitively on the He gas flow velocity, which determined the concentration distributions of helium and nitrogen in the mixing layer forming in the gap between the tube exit and the substrate. At low gas flow velocity, the plasma jet evolved from a hollow (donut-shaped) feature to one where the maximum of electron density was on axis. When the gas flow velocity was high, the plasma jet maintained its hollow structure until it struck the substrate. For a conductive substrate, the radial ion fluxes to the surface were relatively uniform over a radius of ~0.4-0.8 mm, and the dominant ion flux was that of He+. For a dielectric substrate, the radial ion fluxes to the surface peaked on the symmetry axis at low He gas flow velocity, but a hollow ion flux distribution was observed at high gas flow velocity. At the same time, the main ion flux switched from N2+ to He2+ as the He gas flow velocity increased from a low to a high value. The diameter of the plasma ‘footprint’ on the substrate first increased with increasing He gas flow velocity, and eventually saturated with further increases in velocity.

  2. The structure of liquid UO2-x in reducing gas atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, O. L. G.; Benmore, C. J.; Weber, J. K. R.; Skinner, L. B.; Tamalonis, A. J.; Sendelbach, S.; Hebden, A.; Williamson, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    High energy X-ray diffraction experiments performed on hypostoichiometric UO2-x liquids in reducing gas mixtures of 95%Ar:5%CO and 95%Ar:5%H2 are compared to that conducted in a pure Ar atmosphere [Skinner et al., Science 346, 984 (2014)]. The measurements are pertinent to severe accident scenarios at nuclear reactors, where core melts can encounter reducing conditions and further shed light on the oxide chemistry of the low valence states of uranium, particularly U(III), which become stable only at very high temperatures and low oxygen potentials. The radioactive samples were melted by floating small spheres of material using an aerodynamic levitator and heating with a laser beam. In the more reducing environments, a 1.7% shift to lower Q-values is observed in the position of the principal peak of the measured X-ray structure factors, compared to the more oxidizing Ar environment. This corresponds to an equivalent elongation in the U-U nearest neighbor distances and the U-U periodicity. The U-O peak (modal) bond-length, as measured from the real-space total correlation functions, is also observed to expand by 0.9-1.6% under reducing conditions, consistent with the presence of 15-27% U3+ cations, assuming constant U-O coordination number. The slightly larger U-U elongation, as compared to the U-O elongation, is interpreted as a slight increase in U-O-U bond angles. Difficulties concerning the determination of the hypostoichiometry, x, are discussed, along with the future directions for related research.

  3. Gas chromatography interfaced with atmospheric pressure ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry by low-temperature plasma ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Asger W.; Kofoed-Sorensen, Vivi; Svensmark, Bo

    2013-01-01

    of mixtures of common volatile organic compounds. Amounts down to ca. 0.5 ng (on column) could be detected for most compounds and with a chromatographic performance comparable to that of GC/EIMS. In the positive mode, LTP ionization resulted in a compound specific formation of molecular ions M+center dot......A low temperature plasma (LTP) ionization interface between a gas chromatograph (GC) and an atmospheric pressure inlet mass spectrometer, was constructed. This enabled time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection of GC-eluting compounds. The performance of the setup was evaluated by injection......, protonated molecules [M + H](+), and adduct ions such as [(M + O) + H](+) and [M + NO](+). The ion patterns seemed unique for each of the analyzed compound classes and can therefore be useful for identification of functional groups. A total of 20 different compounds within 8 functional groups were analyzed....

  4. Observations of the atmospheric tide, mean wind, and sodium nightglow near the mesopause with the magneto- optic Doppler analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bifford Preston

    1997-09-01

    In this thesis, I (1) demonstrate a new instrument design that is capable of measuring winds and nightglow; (2) present measurements of the mean winds, tides, and sodium nightglow near the mesopause (ca. 90 km); (3) compare these wind results with those measured by other instruments and results of numerical and empirical models; and (4) compare the nightglow intensity measurements with the predictions of a comprehensive numerical model, to better understand the interaction of the tides with the mesopause-region chemistry. I designed, constructed and operated the Magneto-Optic Doppler Analyzer (MODA). For 1.5 years, Moda observed the sodium nightglow intensity variation and the horizontal wind integrated from ~86-96 km altitude at Niwot Ridge, Colorado (40.0o N, 105.5o W). The observed nightglow intensity showed a significant semidiurnal oscillation, with a 5 hr phase shift in the fall. The mean zonal wind peaked in the summer and winter with a minimum at the equinoxes. The meridional wind was slightly southward or near zero. The semidiurnal tide amplitude peaked in the early summer with a minimum in February. The phases were roughly in quadrature. The measured phase difference between the intensity and zonal wind indicated a seasonal variation of the tide-nightglow interaction. MODA wind results were compared with results from the Urbana Medium-Frequency (MF) Radar, the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI), the empirical Horizontal Wind Model 1993 (HWM93), and the theoretical Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM). The annual variation of the mean winds showed the same pattern amongst the instruments and models. MODA measured the smallest tidal amplitudes, possibly due to longitudinal differences. MODA semidiurnal phases agreed better with HRDI and HWM93 (1-2 hr difference), than with GSWM (~6 hr difference). The calculated semidiurnal sodium nightglow variation from the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere- Electrodynamics General Circulation Model for March shows a

  5. An Evaluation of Short Term Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Soil and Atmosphere Exchange in Response to Controlling Edaphic Factgors of Eucalyptus Plantation, Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A considerable amount of atmospheric GHG is produced and consumed through soil processes. Soils provide the largest terrestrial store for carbon (C as well as the largest atmospheric CO2 sources through autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms. Soils are also the greatest source (∼60% of CH4 and N2O through microbially mediated processes of methanogensis, nitrification and denitrification. Short term CO2, CH4 and N2O gas fluxes from soil under a Eucalyptus plantation in central Gujarat, Western India were measured for three month duration (February to April, 2013 at fifteen days interval using closed static chamber technique and gas chromatography method. Simultaneously soils were analyzed at 0.0-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm depth for pH, conductivity, organic carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, sulphate to correlate with gas emissions. The results showed that the soil in our study was a sink of atmospheric CO2, CH4 and N2O which the flux varied from -65.27 to 14.6, -0.005 to 0.07 and -0.03 to 0.33 mg m-2 h-1respectively. CO2 emissions were found maximum as compared to other two gases. Variations in soil N2O emissions could be primarily explained by litter C:N ratio and soil total N stock. Differences in soil CH4 uptake could be mostly attributed to the soil CO2 flux and water filled pore space (WFPS. Soil C:N ratio could largely account for variations in soil CO2 emissions. A strong positive relationship existed between CH4 flux and soil temperature. The N2O flux correlated with WFPS and the global warming potential of N2O is highest compared to other two principal gases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i3.11064 International Journal of Environment Vol.3(3 2014: 59-77

  6. An atmospheric air gas-liquid diffuse discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in quartz container used for water sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tang, Kai; Song, Ying

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we report that the air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in quartz container with different bottom structures at atmospheric pressure. Optical diagnostic measurements show that bountiful chemically and biologically active species, which are beneficial for effective sterilization in some areas, are produced. Such diffuse plasmas are then used to treat drinking water containing the common microorganisms (Candida albicans and Escherichia coli). It is found that these plasmas can sterilize the microorganisms efficiently.

  7. A Mathematical Model of the Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP System for the Gas Transmission Rate of Fruit Produce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model to predict oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapour exchanges in non-perforated and micro-perforated modified atmosphere packaging films has successfully been proposed. The transmission rate of gases was measured for films with thickness of 0.03 and 0.05 mm, perforation diameters of 0.5 and 2.0 mm, and temperatures of 0, 10 and 20 °C. Under most conditions, the increase in temperature and perforation diameter increased the transmission rate of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapour, whereas the increase in film thickness decreased the transmission rate of the various gases. Validation of the proposed modified atmosphere packaging model was found to yield good prediction for gas concentrations and percentage losses in the mass of the produce after comparison with the experimental results of modified atmosphere packaging for tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum.

  8. Development of a Simulation Framework for Analyzing Security of Supply in Integrated Gas and Electric Power Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pambour, Kwabena Addo; Erdener, Burcin Cakir; Bolado-Lavin, Ricardo; Dijkema, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    ... for the overall energy system. Although simulation has been widely used in the assessment of gas systems as well as power systems, there is a significant gap in simulation models that are able to address the coupling of both systems...

  9. Development of an Electrostatic Precipitator to Remove Martian Atmospheric Dust from ISRU Gas Intakes During Planetary Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, J. Sidney; Thompson, Samuel M.; Cox, Nathan D.; Johansen, Michael R.; Williams, Blakeley S.; Hogue, Michael D.; Lowder, M. Loraine; Calle, Carlos I.

    2011-01-01

    Manned exploration missions to Mars will need dependable in situ resource utilization (ISRU) for the production of oxygen and other commodities. One of these resources is the Martian atmosphere itself, which is composed of carbon dioxide (95.3%), nitrogen (2.7%), argon (1.6%), oxygen (0.13%), carbon monoxide (0.07%), and water vapor (0.03%), as well as other trace gases. However, the Martian atmosphere also contains relatively large amounts of dust, uploaded by frequent dust devils and high Winds. To make this gas usable for oxygen extraction in specialized chambers requires the removal of most of the dust. An electrostatic precipitator (ESP) system is an obvious choice. But with an atmospheric pressure just one-hundredth of Earth's, electrical breakdown at low voltages makes the implementation of the electrostatic precipitator technology very challenging. Ion mobility, drag forces, dust particle charging, and migration velocity are also affected because the low gas pressure results in molecular mean free paths that are approximately one hundred times longer than those at Earth .atmospheric pressure. We report here on our efforts to develop this technology at the Kennedy Space Center, using gases with approximately the same composition as the Martian atmosphere in a vacuum chamber at 9 mbars, the atmospheric pressure on Mars. We also present I-V curves and large particle charging data for various versions of wire-cylinder and rod-cylinder geometry ESPs. Preliminary results suggest that use of an ESP for dust collection on Mars may be feasible, but further testing with Martian dust simulant is required.

  10. Gas Sensing Properties of NiSb2O6 Micro- and Nanoparticles in Propane and Carbon Monoxide Atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica-M. Rodríguez-Betancourtt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro- and nanoparticles of NiSb2O6 were synthesized by the microwave-assisted colloidal method. Nickel nitrate, antimony chloride, ethylenediamine, and ethyl alcohol were used. The oxide was obtained at 600°C and was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD and Raman spectroscopy, showing a trirutile-type structure with cell parameters a = 4.641 Å, c = 9.223 Å, and a space group P42/mnm (136. Average crystal size was estimated at ~31.19 nm, according to the XRD-peaks. The microstructure was scrutinized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, observing microrods measuring ~3.32 μm long and ~2.71 μm wide, and microspheres with an average diameter of ~8 μm; the size of the particles shaping the microspheres was measured in the range of ~0.22 to 1.8 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed that nanoparticles were obtained with sizes in the range of 2 to 20 nm (~10.7 nm on average. Pellets made of oxide’s powders were tested in propane (C3H8 and carbon monoxide (CO atmospheres at different concentrations and temperatures. The response of the material increased significantly as the temperature and the concentration of the test gases rose. These results show that NiSb2O6 may be a good candidate for gas sensing applications.

  11. Final Report on Testing of Off-Gas Treatment Technologies for Abatement of Atmospheric Emissions of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarosch, T.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.A.; Raymond, R.; Young, J.E.; Lombard, K.H.

    1995-01-23

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the program for off-gas treatment of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program was funded through the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development`s VOC`s in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VNID). The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed (Looney et al., 1991). That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the United States to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate cost effective evaluation of the emerging technologies. Another motivation for the program is that many CVOCs will be regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and are already regulated by many state regulatory programs. Additionally, compounds such as TCE and PCE are pervasive subsurface environmental contaminants, and, as a result, a small improvement in terms of abatement efficiency or cost will significantly reduce CVOC discharges to the environment as well as costs to United States government and industry.

  12. Influence of gas flow velocity on the transport of chemical species in an atmospheric pressure air plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M. I.; Walsh, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports on a numerical study of the transport of reactive chemical species generated in an atmospheric-pressure air plasma discharge under the influence of a high velocity flowing gas. Using a 1D air plasma model, it is shown that the reactive species transported downstream of the discharge region can be categorized into three distinct groups based on their spatial distribution: (i) decaying downstream species, (ii) increasing downstream species and (iii) variable density species, where the density is a function of both spatial position and gas flow velocity. It is demonstrated that the gas flow velocity influences the dominant chemical reactions downstream of the discharge region, noticeably altering the composition of several key reactive chemical species transported to a given downstream location. As many emerging applications of atmospheric pressure plasma are driven by the flux of reactive chemical species, this study highlights the importance of gas flow velocity, not only as a means to enhance mass transport but also as a means to manipulate the very nature of the reactive plasma chemistry arriving at a given location.

  13. High Pressure Atmospheric Sampling Inlet System for Venus or the Gas Giants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thorleaf Research, Inc. proposes to develop a miniaturized high pressure atmospheric sampling inlet system for sample acquisition in extreme planetary environments,...

  14. Evaluation of a hand-held blood gas analyzer for rapid determination of blood gases, electrolytes and metabolites in intensive care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukkonen, Antti A M; Lehto, Tiina M; Hedberg, Pirjo S M; Vaskivuo, Tommy E

    2016-04-01

    Intensive care units, operating rooms, emergency departments, and neonatology units need rapid measurements of blood gases, electrolytes, and metabolites. These analyses can be performed in a central laboratory or at the clinic with traditional or compact cassette-type blood gas analyzers such as the epoc blood gas testing system for analyzing whole blood samples at the bedside. In this study, the performance and interchangeability of a hand-held epoc blood gas analyzer was evaluated. The analytical performance of the epoc analyzer was evaluated by determining within-and between-run precisions. The accuracy of the epoc analyzer was assessed by comparing patient results from the device with those obtained with the Siemens Rapidlab 1265 and Rapidpoint RP500 and Siemens Dimension Vista and Sysmex XE-2100 analyzers. The following parameters were measured: pH, pCO2, pO2, Hb (calc), Na+, K+, iCa2+, glucose, and lactate. The CV% of the epoc's between-day imprecision for the various parameters varied from 0.4 to 8.6. The within-run imprecision CV% varied from 0.6 to 5.2. The squared regression coefficient (R2) between the epoc and RL1265 varied from 0.94 to 0.99, with the exception of Na+ and Ca2+ (R2≥0.82). The correlation (R2) of Na+ and K+ between epoc and Dimension Vista was 0.73 and 0.89, respectively. The correlation (R2) of Hb between the epoc and the XE-2100 analyzer was 0.94. With most of the measured blood gas parameters, the epoc analyzer correlated well with reference techniques. The epoc analyzer is suitable for rapid measurement of the blood gases, the electrolytes, and the metabolites in the ICU.

  15. Effect of Fuel Composition on Vaporization Behavior in Gasoline Engines--Analyzing In-cylinder Gas Composition by High Speed Gas Sampling System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koji Oyama; Gen Shibata; Seiichi Nakano; Tohru Isoda

    2013-01-01

      To investigate the effect of fuel composition on mixture formation in the intake port-injection gasoline engine, engine tests with in-cylinder gas sampling were conducted using 10 types of model...

  16. Atmospheric degradation of lindane and 1,3-dichloroacetone in the gas phase. Studies at the EUPHORE simulation chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Teresa; Borrás, Esther; Chen, Jianmin; Coscollá, Clara; Daële, Véronique; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Ródenas, Milagros; Sidebottom, Howard; Sun, Xiaomin; Yusá, Vicent; Zhang, Xue; Muñoz, Amalia

    2015-11-01

    The gas-phase degradation of lindane (γ-isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane) towards OH radical was investigated under atmospheric conditions at the large outdoor European simulation chamber (EUPHORE) in Valencia, Spain. The rate coefficient for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with lindane was measured using a conventional relative rate technique leading to a value of kOH(lindane)=(6.4±1.6)×10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 300±5 K and atmospheric pressure. The results suggest that the tropospheric lifetime of lindane with respect to OH radicals is approximately 20 days. The product distribution studies on the OH-initiated oxidation of lindane provided evidence that the major initial carbon-containing oxidation product is pentachlorocyclohexanone. 1,3-Dichloroacetone was employed as a model compound for pentachlorocyclohexanone, and an investigation of its photolysis and reaction with OH radicals under atmospheric conditions was carried out. The data indicate that the atmospheric degradation of pentachlorocyclohexanone would be relatively rapid, and would not form persistent organic compounds. Theoretical study was also employed to calculate possible degradation pathways. Mechanism for reaction of lindane with OH radicals is proposed, and C-Cl bond cleavage is discussed. OH abstraction is considered to be a reasonable way for Cl to escape during degradation. The atmospheric implications of the use of lindane as an insecticide are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Is pH Paper an Acceptable, Low-Cost Alternative to the Blood Gas Analyzer for Determining Pleural Fluid pH?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lesho, Emil P; Roth, Bernard J

    1997-01-01

    ... to measure pleural fluid pH using pH paper instead of an arterial blood gas (ABG) analyzer. It is not known how many other centers use paper to determine pH, but it is probably not unique to our center. Our laboratory uses paper because in the past, inadvertent submission and subsequent analysis of purulent specimens has damaged the ABG analyzer. The pH p...

  18. Effect of Light Intensities and Atmospheric Gas Conditions on Biohydrogen Production of Microalgae Isolated from Fisheries Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujalin Pholchan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the fishery farming industry has been developed rapidly due to increasing demand and consumption as well as the depletion of wild fish resources. Production processes in the industry usually generate large amounts of wastewater containing high nutrients, posing a threat to downstream water. However, phytoplankton removal techniques commonly used to counteract the threat, though appearing to have low efficiency, are timeconsuming and less sustainable. Microalgae are photosynthetic microorganisms that convert solar energy into hydrogen. Using the isolated algae from fish farms as a source of renewable energy production could be a promising choice for handling fisheries wastewater in a more efficient manner. However, hydrogen production processes from algae still need more studies as their efficiencies vary between algae species and growth factors. In this work, the efficiency of hydrogen production from Scenedesmus accuminatus and Arthrospira platensis harvested from fish farms under three different light intensity conditions and three atmospheric gas conditions was determined. The results showed that the best conditions for hydrogen production from both species included 24 h darkness and carbon dioxide addition. Under the atmospheric gas combination of 99% argon and 1% carbon dioxide, S. accuminatus could produce hydrogen gas as high as 0.572 mol H2/mgCh h within 12 h, while the highest hydrogen production (0.348 mol H2/mgCh h obtained from A. platensis was found under the atmospheric gas mixture of 98% argon and 2% carbon dioxide. Interestingly, S. accuminatus appeared to produce more hydrogen than A. platensis under the same conditions.

  19. Implementation of the ABL-90 blood gas analyzer in a ground-based mobile emergency care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Wolsing-Hansen, Jonathan; Nybo, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Point-of Care analysis is increasingly being applied in the prehospital scene. Arterial blood gas analysis is one of many new initiatives adding to the diagnostic tools of the prehospital physician. In this paper we present a study on the feasibility of the Radiometer ABL-90 in a ground-based Mob......Point-of Care analysis is increasingly being applied in the prehospital scene. Arterial blood gas analysis is one of many new initiatives adding to the diagnostic tools of the prehospital physician. In this paper we present a study on the feasibility of the Radiometer ABL-90 in a ground...

  20. Analysis of reaction products formed in the gas phase reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with atmospheric oxidants: Reaction mechanisms and atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenar, I.; Martin, P.; Cabañas, B.; Salgado, S.; Martinez, E.

    2018-03-01

    An analysis of reaction products for the reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with chlorine atoms (Cl) and OH and NO3 radicals has been carried out at the first time with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the tropospheric reactivity of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with a Time of Flight detector (GC-TOFMS) were used to carry out the qualitative and/or quantitative analyses. Reaction products in gas and particulate phase were observed from the reactions of E,E-2,4- hexadienal with all oxidants. E/Z-Butenedial and maleic anhydride were the main products identified in gas phase. E-butenedial calculated molar yield ranging from 4 to 10%. A significant amount of multifunctional compounds (chloro and hydroxy carbonyls) was identified. These compounds could be formed in particulate phase explaining the ∼90% of unaccounted carbon in gas phase. The reaction with Cl atoms in the presence of NOx with a long reaction time gave Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate (PAN) as an additional product, which is known for being an important specie in the generation of the photochemical smog. Nitrated compounds were the major organic products from the reaction with the NO3 radical. Based on the identified products, the reaction mechanisms have been proposed. In these mechanisms a double bond addition of the atmospheric oxidant at C4/C5 of E,E-2,4-hexadienal is the first step for tropospheric degradation.

  1. Gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (GC-API-MS): review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Du-Xin; Gan, Lin; Bronja, Amela; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2015-09-03

    Although the coupling of GC/MS with atmospheric pressure ionization (API) has been reported in 1970s, the interest in coupling GC with atmospheric pressure ion source was expanded in the last decade. The demand of a "soft" ion source for preserving highly diagnostic molecular ion is desirable, as compared to the "hard" ionization technique such as electron ionization (EI) in traditional GC/MS, which fragments the molecule in an extensive way. These API sources include atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI), electrospray ionization (ESI) and low temperature plasma (LTP). This review discusses the advantages and drawbacks of this analytical platform. After an introduction in atmospheric pressure ionization the review gives an overview about the history and explains the mechanisms of various atmospheric pressure ionization techniques used in combination with GC such as APCI, APPI, APLI, ESI and LTP. Also new developments made in ion source geometry, ion source miniaturization and multipurpose ion source constructions are discussed and a comparison between GC-FID, GC-EI-MS and GC-API-MS shows the advantages and drawbacks of these techniques. The review ends with an overview of applications realized with GC-API-MS. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Atmospheric Gas Concentrations in the pre- and post-production Phases of an Unconventional Oil and Gas Recovery Operation at the MSEEL Test Site, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. P.; Reeder, M.; Pekney, N.; Osborne, J.; Risk, D. A.; McCawley, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Marcellus Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory (MSEEL) in West Virginia provides a unique opportunity in the field of unconventional energy research. By studying near-surface atmospheric chemistry over several phases of a hydraulic fracturing event, the project will help evaluate the impact of current practices, as well as new techniques and mitigation technologies. A total of 10 mobile surveys were conducted around the MSEEL site that contains 3 test wells (1 science well and 2 natural gas producing wells) and over several miles of nearby regional routes. Our surveying technique involved using a vehicle-mounted Los Gatos Research Ultraportable Methane/Acetylene Analyzer that provided geo-located measurements of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). The ratios of super-ambient concentrations of CO2 and CH4 were used to separate drilling- and fracturing-related observations from the natural background concentrations over the various well pad developmental stages. We found that regional background methane concentrations were elevated in all surveys, with a mean concentration of 3.21ppm (n = 99376), which simply reflected the mix of anthropogenic and natural CH4 sources in this riverine urban location. Over time and through successive stages of well development, we noted a progressive rise in the occurrence of enriched methane in the vicinity of the developed wells. While there was a moderate degree of variability over time, we did observe a higher occurrence of CH4-enriched observations during and after production began at the test site ( 25% of measurements within 500 meters of the test wells) compared to the baseline surveys (>10% of measurements). This change was expected, as we anticipated some level of increased emissions from the well pads as production began. However, we did not expect the rise to be so noticeable. The results of this study show that there is a statistically significant increase in the occurrence of enriched methane values in the

  3. New Frontiers Science at Venus from Orbit plus Atmospheric Gas Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, Suzanne; Dyar, Melinda; Hensley, Scott; Helbert, Joern; VOX Science and Engineering Teams

    2017-10-01

    Venus remains the most Earth-like body in terms of size, composition, surface age, and insulation. Venus Origins Explorer (VOX) determines how Earth’s twin diverged, and enables breakthroughs in our understanding of rocky planet evolution and habitability. At the time of the Decadal Survey the ability to map mineralogy from orbit (Helbert et al.) and present-day radar techniques to detect active deformation were not fully appreciated. VOX leverages these methods and in-situ noble gases to answer New Frontiers science objectives:1. Atmospheric physics/chemistry: noble gases and isotopes to constrain atmospheric sources, escape processes, and integrated volcanic outgassing; global search for current volcanically outgassed water.2. Past hydrological cycles: global tessera composition to determine the role of volatiles in crustal formation.3. Crustal physics/chemistry: global crustal mineralogy/chemistry, tectonic processes, heat flow, resolve the catastrophic vs. equilibrium resurfacing debate, active geologic processes and possible crustal recycling.4. Crustal weathering: surface-atmosphere weathering reactions from redox state and the chemical equilibrium of the near-surface atmosphere.5. Atmospheric properties/winds: map cloud particle modes and their temporal variations, and track cloud-level winds in the polar vortices.6. Surface-atmosphere interactions: chemical reactions from mineralogy; weathering state between new, recent and older flows; possible volcanically outgassed water.VOX’s Atmosphere Sampling Vehicle (ASV) dips into and samples the well-mixed atmosphere, using Venus Original Constituents Experiment (VOCE) to measure noble gases. VOX’s orbiter carries the Venus Emissivity Mapper (VEM) and the Venus Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (VISAR), and maps the gravity field using Ka-band tracking.VOX is the logical next mission to Venus because it delivers: 1) top priority atmosphere, surface, and interior science; 2) key global data for

  4. Particle size distribution and gas-particle partitioning of polychlorinated biphenyls in the atmosphere in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingqing; Zheng, Minghui; Liu, Guorui; Zhang, Xian; Dong, Shujun; Gao, Lirong; Liang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Size-fractionated samples of urban particulate matter (PM; ≤1.0, 1.0-2.5, 2.5-10, and >10 μm) and gaseous samples were simultaneously obtained to study the distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the atmosphere in Beijing, China. Most recent investigations focused on the analysis of gaseous PCBs, and much less attention has been paid to the occurrence of PCBs among different PM fractions. In the present study, the gas-particle partitioning and size-specific distribution of PCBs in atmosphere were investigated. The total concentrations (gas + particle phase fractions) of Σ12 dioxin-like PCBs, Σ7 indicator PCBs, and ΣPCBs were 1.68, 42.1, and 345 pg/m3, respectively. PCBs were predominantly in the gas phase (86.8-99.0 % of the total concentrations). The gas-particle partition coefficients (K p ) of PCBs were found to be a significant linear correlated with the subcooled liquid vapor pressures (P L0) (R 2 = 0.83, P particle partitioning of PCBs was affected both by the mechanisms of adsorption and absorption. In addition, the concentrations of PCBs increased as the particle size decreased (>10, 2.5-10, 1.0-2.5, and ≤1.0 μm), with most of the PCBs contained in the fraction of ≤1.0 μm (53.4 % of the total particulate concentrations). Tetra-CBs were the main homolog in the air samples in the gas phase and PM fractions, followed by tri-CBs. This work will contribute to the knowledge of PCBs among different PM fractions and fill the gap of the size distribution of particle-bound dioxin-like PCBs in the air.

  5. Particle-size distribution and gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric polybrominated diphenyl ethers in urban areas of Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandalakis, Manolis; Besis, Athanasios [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion-Voutes (Greece); Stephanou, Euripides G. [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion-Voutes (Greece)], E-mail: stephanou@chemistry.uoc.gr

    2009-04-15

    Ambient concentrations, gas/particle partitioning and particle-size distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were investigated in two urban areas (Athens and Heraklion) of Greece. Atmospheric (gas + particle) concentrations of {sigma}PBDE varied from 21 to 30 pg m{sup -3} in the center of Athens and from 4 to 44 pg m{sup -3} in the suburbs of Heraklion. A predominance of particulate PBDEs was observed in Athens (71-76% in particles), whereas the opposite was evident in Heraklion (69-92% in gas phase). In both urban areas, PBDE particle-size distribution featured a distinct enrichment in smaller particles. A similar trend was also observed in aerosols of a background marine site. For all sampling sites, more than 46% of {sigma}PBDE was associated with particles of <0.57 {mu}m in diameter. Our results imply that particulate PBDEs may have long atmospheric residence time and they may be capable of reaching the deeper parts of the human respiratory system. - Analysis of size-segregated aerosol samples indicates a predominance of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the small particle-size fraction.

  6. Atmospheric concentration characteristics and gas-particle partitioning of PCBs in a rural area of eastern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandalakis, Manolis [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (ECPL), Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece)]. E-mail: mandalakis@chemistry.uoc.gr; Stephanou, Euripides G. [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (ECPL), Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece)

    2007-05-15

    Atmospheric concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in 14 successive daytime and nighttime air samples collected from Melpitz, a rural site in eastern Germany. The average total concentration of PCBs was 110+/-80pgm{sup -3} and they were predominately present in the gas phase ({approx}95%). Composition of individual congeners closely resembled those of Clophen A30 and Aroclor 1232. Partial vapor pressures of PCBs were well correlated with temperature and the steep slopes obtained from Clausius-Clapeyron plots (-4500 to -8000) indicated that evaporation from adjacent land surfaces still controls the atmospheric levels of these pollutants. Particle-gas partitioning coefficients (K{sub P}) of PCBs were well correlated with the respective sub-cooled vapor pressures (P{sub L}{sup o}), but the slopes obtained from logK{sub P} versus logP{sub L}{sup o} plots (-0.16 to -0.59) deviated significantly from the expected value of -1. Overall, gas-particle partitioning of PCBs was better simulated by Junge-Pankow than octanol/air partition coefficient-based model.

  7. Gas/particle partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coastal atmosphere of the north Yellow Sea, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Ren, Peifang; Sun, Yan; Ma, Xindong; Liu, Xing; Na, Guangshui; Yao, Ziwei

    2013-08-01

    Samples of gas- and particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were collected at three sampling stations (Xiaomai Island, Laohutan, and Zhangzi Island) in the north Yellow Sea, China during November 2008 and September 2009 to study their atmospheric transport potential and the gas/particle distributions. The composition of PAHs was dominated by gaseous compounds. The percentages of the particle-phase PAHs to the total concentrations were found to be higher during the heating period than the non-heating period. The ratios of naphthalene and acenaphthene to phenanthrene, chrysene and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene showed an increasing trend from Xiaomai Island to Zhangzi Island, which can be called as the local atmospheric distillation of PAHs. Gas/particle partitioning coefficients (K p) and their relationship with the sub-cooled liquid vapor pressures (pºL) of PAHs were investigated. The regressions of logK p versus logpºL gave significant correlations for all samples of the three sites with r (2) values in the range 0.56-0.66 (p<0.01). Both Junge-Pankow adsorption model and octanol-air partition coefficient absorption model tended to underestimate the sorption for most PAHs, but the absorption model appeared to be more suitable for predicting the particle fraction of PAHs than the Junge-Pankow model.

  8. Surface modification of the titanium implant using TEA CO 2 laser pulses in controllable gas atmospheres - Comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciganovic, J.; Stasic, J.; Gakovic, B.; Momcilovic, M.; Milovanovic, D.; Bokorov, M.; Trtica, M.

    2012-01-01

    Interaction of a TEA CO2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm wavelength and pulse duration of 100 ns (FWHM), with a titanium implant in various gas atmospheres was studied. The Ti implant surface modification was typically studied at the moderate laser beam energy density/fluence of 28 J/cm2 in the surrounding of air, N2, O2 or He. The energy absorbed from the TEA CO2 laser beam is partially converted to thermal energy, which generates a series of effects, such as melting, vaporization of the molten material, shock waves, etc. The following titanium implant surface changes and phenomena were observed, depending on the gas used: (i) creation of cone-like surface structures in the atmospheres of air, N2 and O2, and dominant micro-holes/pores in He ambient; (ii) hydrodynamic features, most prominent in air; (iii) formation of titanium nitride and titanium oxide layers, and (iv) occurrence of plasma in front of the implant. It can be concluded from this study that the reported laser fluence and gas ambiences can effectively be applied for enhancing the titanium implant roughness and creation of titanium oxides and nitrides on the strictly localized surface area. The appearance of plasma in front of the implants indicates relatively high temperatures created above the surface. This offers a sterilizing effect, facilitating contaminant-free conditions.

  9. A Fast-Response Atmospheric Turbulence (FRAT) Probe with Gas-Sampling Ducts Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to design, construct and test a high-frequency-response air-data probe, the Fast Response Atmospheric Turbulence probe (FRAT probe)...

  10. CARVE: L2 Atmospheric Gas Concentrations, Airborne Flasks, Alaska, 2012-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), molecular hydrogen (H2), nitrous oxide (N2O), sulfur hexafluoride...

  11. Volatile Profiles of Emissions from Different Activities Analyzed Using Canister Samplers and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS Analysis: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santino Orecchio

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present study was to identify volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted from several sources (fuels, traffic, landfills, coffee roasting, a street-food laboratory, building work, indoor use of incense and candles, a dental laboratory, etc. located in Palermo (Italy by using canister autosamplers and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS technique. In this study, 181 VOCs were monitored. In the atmosphere of Palermo city, propane, butane, isopentane, methyl pentane, hexane, benzene, toluene, meta- and para-xylene, 1,2,4 trimethyl benzene, 1,3,5 trimethyl benzene, ethylbenzene, 4 ethyl toluene and heptane were identified and quantified in all sampling sites.

  12. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Jan; Kroll, Marius M.; Rathsack, Philipp; Otto, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS). Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols. PMID:27066076

  13. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zuber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS. Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols.

  14. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Jan; Kroll, Marius M; Rathsack, Philipp; Otto, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS). Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols.

  15. Russian contribution to ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter: Atmospheric Chemistry Suite (ACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakun, Alexey; Korablev, Oleg; Trokhimovskiy, Alexander; Grigoriev, Alexey; Anufreychik, Konstantin; Fedorova, Anna; Ignatiev, Nikolay; Ivanov, Yuriy; Moshkin, Boris; Kalinnikov, Yuriy; Montmessin, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric Chemistry Suite (ACS) is a part of science payload of Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), ExoMars mission. This project developed by European Space Agency (ESA) in collaboration with Russian Space Agency (Roscosmos). Russian contribution to ExoMars TGO is the Proton rocket and two science instruments ACS (three infrared spectrometers) and FREND (neutron detector). ACS consists of three infrared spectrometers (ACS/NIR, ACS/MIR and ACS/TIRVIM) capable to take spectral measurements from near to thermal infrared range simultaneously or separately. Spectrometric channels of ACS share common mechanical, electrical, and thermal interfaces. Electronic box (ACS/BE) provides to spectrometric channels power and data transfer interfaces. SpaceWire link is used for science data transfer and MIL-1553 link - for commanding and housekeeping data transfer. The NIR channel is an echelle spectrometer with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) for the selection of diffraction orders. ACS NIR is capable to perform nadir and occultation observations. NIR covers the spectral range of 0.7-1.7 μm with resolving power of ~25000. NIR will perform unique for TGO instruments nightglow science (searching for O2, OH, NO nightglow emissions on Mars). From the 1.38 μm band NIR will do water vapour mapping in nadir and H2O vertical profiling in solar occultations. High resolution NIR measurements of 1.27 μm O2(a1Δg) dayglow will supply indirect ozone observations on the dayside on nadir. In solar occultation mode, the O2 vertical profiles will be measured from the surface (in case of low dust activity) to the 40 km altitude based on 0.76 μm absorption band. Together with MIR channel in solar occultation NIR will support the measurements of CO2 density profiles (based on 1.43 μm band) and aerosols characterization from 0.7 to 4 μm. The wide spectral range will allow not just determine aerosol particle sizes and density at different altitudes, but also distinguish between dust and ice particles

  16. Effects of essential oil treatment, gas atmosphere, and storage temperature on Listeria monocytogenes in a model vegetable system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollard, Johann; Francis, Gillian A; O'Beirne, David

    2009-06-01

    Natural antimicrobials such as plant essential oils (EOs) may be useful for controlling pathogenic bacteria on fresh-cut vegetables. The antilisterial properties of EOs (thyme, oregano, and rosemary), in combination with different storage atmospheres (air, 5% CO2-2% O2-93% N2, and 20% CO2-1% O2-79% N2) and temperatures (4 and 80C), were examined using a gas flow-through system combined with a vegetable agar model. The antimicrobial effects of the EOs varied depending on the oil, the Listeria strain and species, the method of application, and the storage conditions tested. Using the disk diffusion assay, the antilisterial effectiveness of the oils was in the following order: thyme EO > oregano EO > rosemary EO. Volatiles released from the EOs resulted in very small antilisterial effects, indicating that the oils needed to be in direct contact with cultures in order to be effective. There were strain and species effects, with L. innocua NCTC 11288 exhibiting the strongest resistance to EOs, and L. monocytogenes NCTC 7973 being the most sensitive strain. In addition, the effectiveness of the EOs was influenced by storage atmosphere and temperature. Use of EOs in combination with a gas atmosphere of 20% CO2-1% O2-79% N2 had the greatest antilisterial effect, suggesting that high CO2 atmospheres enhanced the antilisterial properties of EOs. Lowering the storage temperature from 8 to 4OC improved the antilisterial activity of thyme oil. It is concluded that thyme and oregano EOs display strong inhibitory effects against Listeria and that increasing CO2 levels and lowering storage temperatures further enhance these antilisterial effects.

  17. Atmospheric hydrocarbon emissions and concentrations in the barnett shale natural gas production region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Sullivan, David W; Allen, David T

    2014-05-06

    Hourly ambient hydrocarbon concentration data were collected, in the Barnett Shale Natural Gas Production Region, using automated gas chromatography (auto-GC), for the period from April 2010 to December 2011. Data for three sites were compared: a site in the geographical center of the natural gas production region (Eagle Mountain Lake (EML)); a rural/suburban site at the periphery of the production region (Flower Mound Shiloh), and an urban site (Hinton). The dominant hydrocarbon species observed in the Barnett Shale region were light alkanes. Analyses of daily, monthly, and hourly patterns showed little variation in relative composition. Observed concentrations were compared to concentrations predicted using a dispersion model (AERMOD) and a spatially resolved inventory of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions from natural gas production (Barnett Shale Special Emissions Inventory) prepared by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), and other emissions information. The predicted concentrations of VOC due to natural gas production were 0-40% lower than background corrected measurements, after accounting for potential under-estimation of certain emission categories. Hourly and daily variations in observed, background corrected concentrations were primarily explained by variability in meteorology, suggesting that episodic emission events had little impact on hourly averaged concentrations. Total emissions for VOC from natural gas production sources are estimated to be approximately 25,300 tons/yr, when accounting for potential under-estimation of certain emission categories. This region produced, in 2011, approximately 5 bcf/d of natural gas (100 Gg/d) for a VOC to natural gas production ratio (mass basis) of 0.0006.

  18. A single gas chromatograph for accurate atmospheric mixing ratio measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6 and CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, S.; Neubert, R. E. M.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Simpson, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    We present an adapted gas chromatograph capable of measuring simultaneously and semi-continuously the atmospheric mixing ratios of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, N2O and SF6 and the trace gas CO with high precision and long-term stability. The novelty of our design is that all species are measured

  19. Gas transfer between the atmosphere and irrigated sugarcane plantation sites under different rainfall in Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Giambelluca, T. W.; Crow, S. E.; Mudd, R. G.; Youkhana, A.; Nullet, M.; Nakahata, M.

    2015-12-01

    Sugarcane plantation land cover is increasing in area in Brazil, South Asia and the Pacific Islands because of the growing demand for sugar and biofuel production. While a large portion of sugarcane cultivated in Brazil is rain-fed and experiences drought influences on gas exchange, sugarcane in Hawai'i is thought to be buffered from drought effects because it is drip irrigated. Knowledge about carbon sequestration and evapotranspiration rates is fundamental both for the prediction of sugar and biofuel production and for water resource management for the large plantations. To understand gas transfer under spatially and temporally heterogeneous environments, we investigated the leaf- soil- and stand-scale gas transfer processes at two irrigated sugarcane plantation study sites in Hawai'i with contrasting rainfall. Gas and energy transfers were monitored using eddy covariance systems for a full- and later half- crop cycle. Leaf ecophysiological traits were measured for stands of different ages to evaluate the effects of stand age on gas transfer. Carbon sequestration rates (Fc) showed a strong relationship with solar radiation with small differences between sites. Latent heat flux expressed as the evapotranspiration rates (ET) also had a strong relationship with solar radiation, but showed seasonality due to variations in biological control (surface conductance) and atmospheric evaporative demand. The difference in ET and its responses to environments was less clear partly buffered by the differences in the stand age and seasons. The stable Fc-solar radiation relationship despite the variation in surface conductance was partly due to the saturation of net photosynthetic rates with intercellular CO2 concentration and the low sensitivity of net photosynthesis to variations in surface conductance in sugarcane with the C4 photosynthesis pathway. The response of gas transfer to periodic irrigation, rainfall and age-related changes in leaf ecophysiological traits will be

  20. Studies of Gas Atmosphere Near the Metal-mould Interface During Casting and Solidification of Ductile Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mocek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In sand moulds, at a distance of 3 mm from the metal- mould interface, the sensors of temperature, and of oxygen and hydrogen content were installed. Temperature and the evolution of partial gas pressure have been analysed in moulds bonded with bentonite with or without the addition of seacoal, water glass or furan resin. Moulds were poured with ductile iron. For comparison, also tests with the grey iron have been executed. It was found that the gas atmosphere near the interface depends mainly on the content of a carbonaceous substance in the mould. In the green sand moulds with 5% of seacoal or bonded with furan resin, after the mould filling, a sudden increase in the hydrogen content and the drop of oxygen is observed. This gas evolution results from the oxidation of carbon and reduction of water vapour in the mould material, and also from the reduction of water vapour and alloy reoxidation. In carbon-free sand, the evolution in the gas composition is slower because water vapour is reduced only at the interface. Changes of oxygen and hydrogen content in the controlled zone are determined by the transport phenomena.

  1. Effect of Ammonia on the Gas-Phase Hydration of the Common Atmospheric Ion HSO4-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangqun Yu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydration directly affects the mobility, thermodynamic properties, lifetime and nucleation rates of atmospheric ions. In the present study, the role of ammonia on the formation of hydrogen bonded complexes of the common atmospheric hydrogensulfate (HSO4- ion with water has been investigated using the Density Functional Theory (DFT. Our findings rule out the stabilizing effect of ammonia on the formation of negatively charged cluster hydrates and show clearly that the conventional (classical treatment of ionic clusters as presumably more stable compared to neutrals may not be applicable to pre-nucleation clusters. These considerations lead us to conclude that not only quantitative but also qualitative assessment of the relative thermodynamic stability of atmospheric clusters requires a quantum-chemical treatment.

  2. Gas Hydrates of Coal Layers as a Methane Source in the Atmosphere and Mine Working

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyrdin Valery

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Living conditions of gas hydrates of a methane in a coal matrix as one of possible forms of finding of molecules of a methane in coal layers are considered. However, gas hydrates are formed not in all mineral coals even under the thermobaric conditions corresponding to their equilibrium state as the minimum humidity and the corresponding pore width are necessary for each brand of coal for formation of gas hydrate. It is shown that it depends on electric electrical dipole moment of a macromolecule of coal. Coals of brands K, D, Zh were considered. The electric field created by the surface of coal does not allow molecules of water to carry out threedimensional driving, and they keep on an internal surface of a time. By means of theoretical model operation a dipole - dipole interaction of molecules of water with the steam surface of coal values of energy of fiber interaction for various functional groups located in coal “fringe” which size for the first and second layers does not allow molecules of water to participate in formation of gas hydrates are received. For coals of brands K, Zh, D, considering distribution of a time on radiuses, the percent of moisture, which cannot share in education solid coal of gas solutions, is calculated.

  3. Gas Hydrates of Coal Layers as a Methane Source in the Atmosphere and Mine Working

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrdin, Valery; Shepeleva, Sofya; Kim, Tatiana

    2017-11-01

    Living conditions of gas hydrates of a methane in a coal matrix as one of possible forms of finding of molecules of a methane in coal layers are considered. However, gas hydrates are formed not in all mineral coals even under the thermobaric conditions corresponding to their equilibrium state as the minimum humidity and the corresponding pore width are necessary for each brand of coal for formation of gas hydrate. It is shown that it depends on electric electrical dipole moment of a macromolecule of coal. Coals of brands K, D, Zh were considered. The electric field created by the surface of coal does not allow molecules of water to carry out threedimensional driving, and they keep on an internal surface of a time. By means of theoretical model operation a dipole - dipole interaction of molecules of water with the steam surface of coal values of energy of fiber interaction for various functional groups located in coal "fringe" which size for the first and second layers does not allow molecules of water to participate in formation of gas hydrates are received. For coals of brands K, Zh, D, considering distribution of a time on radiuses, the percent of moisture, which cannot share in education solid coal of gas solutions, is calculated.

  4. The application of the statistical classifying models for signal evaluation of the gas sensors analyzing mold contamination of the building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerek, Dariusz; Guz, Łukasz; Suchorab, Zbigniew; Łagód, Grzegorz; Sobczuk, Henryk

    2017-07-01

    Mold that develops on moistened building barriers is a major cause of the Sick Building Syndrome (SBS). Fungal contamination is normally evaluated using standard biological methods which are time-consuming and require a lot of manual labor. Fungi emit Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) that can be detected in the indoor air using several techniques of detection e.g. chromatography. VOCs can be also detected using gas sensors arrays. All array sensors generate particular voltage signals that ought to be analyzed using properly selected statistical methods of interpretation. This work is focused on the attempt to apply statistical classifying models in evaluation of signals from gas sensors matrix to analyze the air sampled from the headspace of various types of the building materials at different level of contamination but also clean reference materials.

  5. An ensemble data assimilation system to estimate CO2 surface fluxes from atmospheric trace gas observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, W.; Miller, J.B.; Whitaker, J.; Denning, A.S.; Hirsch, A.; Krol, M.C.; Zupanski, D.; Bruhwiler, L.; Tans, P.P.

    2005-01-01

    We present a data assimilation system to estimate surface fluxes of CO2 and other trace gases from observations of their atmospheric abundances. The system is based on ensemble data assimilation methods under development for Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and is the first of its kind to be used

  6. Maximum likelihood estimation of covariance parameters for Bayesian atmospheric trace gas surface flux inversions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michalak, Anna M.; Hirsch, Adam; Bruhwiler, Lori; Gurney, Kevin R.; Peters, Wouter; Tans, Pieter P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces a Maximum Likelihood (ML) approach for estimating the statistical parameters required for the covariance matrices used in the solution of Bayesian inverse problems aimed at estimating surface fluxes of atmospheric trace gases. The method offers an objective methodology for

  7. Finger evolution of a gas bubble driven by atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Jia-Hau; Chu, Hong-Yu

    2016-12-01

    We report the generation and evolution of a finger-shaped bubble in liquid by dielectric discharge setup. The spherical gas bubble is deformed into a finger-shaped bubble after the ignition of plasma. The presence of the filamentary discharge in the bubble not only provides the local heating to the bubble, it also changes the distribution of the electric field in the bubble and the bubble mutually provides the pathway to the discharge. The reduced surface tension on the liquid-gas interface due to the rise of temperature by plasma heating and the nonuniform electric field caused by the presence of filamentary discharge might induce the concave-shaped bubble. We also observe the formation of the quasi-two-dimensional bubble, which is generated from the bubble and attached on one side of the electrodes. It is found that the discharge induces the growth of the periodic fluctuations in the thin layer of gas.

  8. Versatile, ultra-low sample volume gas analyzer using a rapid, broad-tuning ECQCL and a hollow fiber gas cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriesel, Jason M.; Makarem, Camille N.; Phillips, Mark C.; Moran, James J.; Coleman, Max; Christensen, Lance; Kelly, James F.

    2017-05-05

    We describe a versatile mid-infrared (Mid-IR) spectroscopy system developed to measure the concentration of a wide range of gases with an ultra-low sample size. The system combines a rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) with a hollow fiber gas cell. The ECQCL has sufficient spectral resolution and reproducibility to measure gases with narrow features (e.g., water, methane, ammonia, etc.), and also the spectral tuning range needed to measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs), (e.g., aldehydes, ketones, hydrocarbons), sulfur compounds, chlorine compounds, etc. The hollow fiber is a capillary tube having an internal reflective coating optimized for transmitting the Mid-IR laser beam to a detector. Sample gas introduced into the fiber (e.g., internal volume = 0.6 ml) interacts strongly with the laser beam, and despite relatively modest path lengths (e.g., L ~ 3 m), the requisite quantity of sample needed for sensitive measurements can be significantly less than what is required using conventional IR laser spectroscopy systems. Example measurements are presented including quantification of VOCs relevant for human breath analysis with a sensitivity of ~2 picomoles at a 1 Hz data rate.

  9. Directional molecular flow analysis and leak detection with a rotatable gas analyzer in a large space simulation chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, H. K. F.

    1972-01-01

    A system was developed and applied at the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center for measuring and analyzing directional molecular flows in a large thermal vacuum chamber in order to verify molecular environment and identify characteristic and abnormal test article and chamber conditions. The system is described, and some results obtained in over 1200 hours of operation are given.

  10. Inventory of gas flux measurements from volcanoes of the global Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, B.; Arellano, S.; Norman, P.; Conde, V.

    2012-04-01

    NOVAC, the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change, was initiated in 2005 as a 5-year-long project financed by the European Union. Its main purpose is to create a global network for the monitoring and research of volcanic atmospheric plumes and related geophysical phenomena by using state-of-the-art spectroscopic remote sensing technology. Up to 2012, 64 instruments have been installed at 24 volcanoes in 13 countries of Latin America, Italy, Democratic Republic of Congo, Reunion, Iceland, and Philippines, and efforts are being done to expand the network to other active volcanic zones. NOVAC has been a pioneer initiative in the community of volcanologists and embraces the objectives of the Word Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). In this contribution, we present the results of the measurements of SO2 gas fluxes carried out within NOVAC, which for some volcanoes represent a record of more than 7 years of continuous monitoring. The network comprises some of the most strongly degassing volcanoes in the world, covering a broad range of tectonic settings, levels of unrest, and potential risk. We show a global perspective of the output of volcanic gas from the covered regions, specific trends of degassing for a few selected volcanoes, and the significance of the database for further studies in volcanology and other geosciences.

  11. Study on the effect of atmospheric plasma processing using gas mixture on 3C-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Zulaika; Zaaba, S. K.; Nasir, N. F. Mohd; Mustaffa, M. T.; Arcena, Mayvinne; Zakaria, A.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric plasma processing are widely used for improving surfaces properties. Cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) is one of the material used as biosensor for their biocompatibility properties. In this work, we present the results of atmospheric plasma processing treatments using gas mixture on 3C-SiC surface. The 3C-SiC samples were treated at different duration and flow rate. Helium/Nitrogen and Argon/Nitrogen gas mixtures were used as plasma treatments and its effect on the surface was investigated. A significant increment of surface wettability were observed after plasma exposition. Investigation by surface morphological measurements was performed by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Contact angle measurement results showed a decreased in contact angle with increasing of treatment time and flow rate, and Argon/Nitrogen mixture promote more wettability compared to Helium/Nitrogen mixture. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 24 May 2017.

  12. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-16

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  13. Gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric aerosols: interplay of physical state, non-ideal mixing and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Zuend, Andreas; Bertram, Allan K; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-21

    Atmospheric aerosols, comprising organic compounds and inorganic salts, play a key role in air quality and climate. Mounting evidence exists that these particles frequently exhibit phase separation into predominantly organic and aqueous electrolyte-rich phases. As well, the presence of amorphous semi-solid or glassy particle phases has been established. Using the canonical system of ammonium sulfate mixed with organics from the ozone oxidation of α-pinene, we illustrate theoretically the interplay of physical state, non-ideality, and particle morphology affecting aerosol mass concentration and the characteristic timescale of gas-particle mass transfer. Phase separation can significantly affect overall particle mass and chemical composition. Semi-solid or glassy phases can kinetically inhibit the partitioning of semivolatile components and hygroscopic growth, in contrast to the traditional assumption that organic compounds exist in quasi-instantaneous gas-particle equilibrium. These effects have significant implications for the interpretation of laboratory data and the development of improved atmospheric air quality and climate models.

  14. Adopting European Network for Health Technology Assessments (EunetHTA) core model for diagnostic technologies for improving the accuracy and appropriateness of blood gas analyzers' assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchin, Tiziana; Faggiano, Francesco; Plebani, Mario; Muraca, Maurizio; De Vivo, Liliana; Derrico, Pietro; Ritrovato, Matteo

    2014-11-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is a successful methodology for meeting clinical expectations of rapid and accurate results. Scientific literature has moreover highlighted and confirmed the necessity of individuating the best technological solution, in accordance with clinical requirements and contextualized to the whole health organization, where it will be implemented. Health Technology Assessment (HTA) can assist in reaching an appropriate and contextualized decision on a health technology. The aim of this study is to adapt a HTA core model for improving the evaluation of a POCT technology: blood gas analyzers. The European Network for Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA) core model for diagnostic technologies was applied for evaluating globally marketed blood gas analyzers. Evaluation elements were defined according to available literature and validated using the Delphi method. A HTA model of 71 issues, subdivided into 26 topics and 10 domains, was obtained by interviewing 11 healthcare experts over two rounds of Delphi questionnaires. Ten context parameters were identified in order to define the initial scenario from which the technology assessment was to begin. The model presented offers a systematic and objective structure for the evaluation of blood gas analyzers, which may play a guidance role for healthcare operators approaching the evaluation of such technologies thus improving, in a contextualized fashion, the appropriateness of purchasing.

  15. Assessment of an atmospheric fluidized-bed coal-combustion gas-turbine cogeneration system for industrial application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, R. L.; Holcomb, R. S.; Tallackson, J. R.

    1979-10-01

    This study was initiated to provide information on the future potential industrial market for a cogeneration system consisting of a fluidized-bed coal combustor coupled to a gas-turbine (Brayton cycle) power system that uses air as the working fluid. In assessing the potential applications for the system, the process heat energy consumption by industry is identified, with special detail included on the six most energy-intensive industries. The potential impact on the nation's oil and natural gas consumption that would result from wide-spread utilization of coal for process heat is also estimated. The fraction of industrial process heat that the system could feasibly satisfy from a thermodynamic viewpoint is estimated, and the performance (potential fuel efficiency and heat/power ratio) of the atmospheric fluidized-bed gas-turbine system is calculated. Also treated are several specific case studies of industries in which the system could be incorporated. Major parameters are specified, and flow sheets are derived for systems that would satisfy the heat and power requirements of the process or industry. The overall fuel utilization efficiency, thermal power rating, and potential number of installations are specified for these case studies. The findings of the study indicate that there is a sizable potential market for the system, with over 1000 possible installations disclosed after reviewing only 8 specific industries from 6 major Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) groups. The potential displacement of oil and gas by coal in process heating is shown to be about 1.60 m/sup 3//sec (870,000 bbl/d) of oil and 4590 m/sup 3//sec (14.0 billion ft/sup 3//d) of natural gas for all industries combined. Continued development of the fluidized-bed coal combustor and power system is recommended so that this potential may be at least partially realized.

  16. On the Surface Chemistry of Iron Oxides in Reactive Gas Atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Smit, Emiel; van Schooneveld, Matti M.; Cinquini, Fabrizio; Bluhm, Hendrik; Sautet, Phillippe; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is based on the generation and subsequent combination of chemical species retained on the surface of a catalytic solid. Elementary reaction steps, that is, the dissociation of reactants and association to products, take place at the solid–gas or solid–liquid interface.

  17. High spatiotemporal resolution pollutant measurements of on-board vehicle emissions using ultra-fast response gas analyzers

    OpenAIRE

    Irwin, Martin; Bradley, Harry; Duckhouse, Matthew; Hammond, Matthew; Peckham, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Existing ultra-fast response engine exhaust emissions analyzers have been adapted for on-board vehicle use combined with GPS data. We present, for the first time, how high spatiotemporal resolution data products allow transient features associated with internal combustion engines to be examined in detail during on-road driving. Such data is both useful to examine the circumstances leading to high emissions, and reveals the accurate position of urban air quality “hot spots” as deposited by the...

  18. Snowpack-atmosphere gas exchanges of carbon dioxide, ozone, and nitrogen oxides at a hardwood forest site in northern Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Seok

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Snowpack-atmosphere gas exchanges of CO2, O3, and NOx (NO + NO2 were investigated at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS, a mid-latitude, low elevation hardwood forest site, during the 2007–2008 winter season. An automated trace gas sampling system was used to determine trace gas concentrations in the snowpack at multiple depths continuously throughout the snow-covered period from two adjacent plots. One natural plot and one with the soil covered by a Tedlar sheet were setup for investigating whether the primary source of measured trace gases was biogenic (i.e., from the soil or non-biogenic (i.e., from the snowpack. The results were compared with the “White on Green” study conducted at the Niwot Ridge (NWT Long Term Ecological Research site in Colorado. The average winter CO2 flux ± s.e. from the soil at UMBS was 0.54 ± 0.037 µmol m-2 s-1 using the gradient diffusion method and 0.71 ± 0.012 µmol m-2 s-1 using the eddy covariance method, and in a similar range as found for NWT. Observed snowpack-O3 exchange was also similar to NWT. However, nitrogen oxides (NOx fluxes from snow at UMBS were 10 times smaller than those at NWT, and fluxes were bi-directional with the direction of the flux dependent on NOx concentrations in ambient air. The compensation point for the change in the direction of NOx flux was estimated to be 0.92 nmol mol-1. NOx in snow also showed diurnal dependency on incident radiation. These NOx dynamics in the snow at UMBS were notably different compared to NWT, and primarily determined by snow-atmosphere interactions rather than by soil NOx emissions.

  19. Periodic modulation of gas giant magnetospheres by the neutral upper atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. A. Smith

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Periodic signatures present in the magnetospheres of both Jupiter and Saturn have yet to be fully explained. At Jupiter the unexplained signatures are related to emissions from the Io torus ("System IV"; at Saturn they are observed in emissions of kilometric radiation (SKR and in magnetometer data. These signatures are often interpreted in terms of magnetic field anomalies. This paper describes an alternative mechanism by which the neutral atmosphere may impose such periodic signatures on the magnetosphere. The mechanism invokes a persistent zonal asymmetry in the neutral wind field that rotates with the planet. This asymmetry must be coupled to substantial ionospheric conductivity. It is then able to drive divergent currents in the upper atmosphere that close in and perturb the magnetosphere. We estimate the conductivities and wind speeds required for these perturbations to be significant, and argue that they are most likely to be important at auroral latitudes where the conductivity may be enhanced by particle precipitation.

  20. A Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer for Greenhouse Gas Measurements in the Atmospheric Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Emily Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Laser Heterodyne Radiometry is a technique adapted from radio receiver technology has been used to measure trace gases in the atmosphere since the 1960s.By leveraging advances in the telecommunications industry, it has been possible to miniaturize this technology.The mini-LHR (Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer) has been under development at NASA Goddard Space flight Center since 2009. This sun-viewing instrument measures carbon dioxide and methane in the atmospheric column and operates in tandem with an AERONET sun photometer producing a simultaneous measure of aerosols. The mini-LHR has been extensively field tested in a range of locations ranging in the continental US as well as Alaska and Hawaii and now operates autonomously with sensitivities of approximately 0.2 ppmv and approximately10 ppbv, for carbon dioxide and methane respectively, for 10 averaged scans under clear sky conditions.

  1. Accounting for Parameter Uncertainty in Complex Atmospheric Models, With an Application to Greenhouse Gas Emissions Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallow, B.; Rigby, M. L.; Rougier, J.; Manning, A.; Thomson, D.; Webster, H. N.; Lunt, M. F.; O'Doherty, S.

    2016-12-01

    In order to understand underlying processes governing environmental and physical phenomena, a complex mathematical model is usually required. However, there is an inherent uncertainty related to the parameterisation of unresolved processes in these simulators. Here, we focus on the specific problem of accounting for uncertainty in parameter values in an atmospheric chemical transport model. Systematic errors introduced by failing to account for these uncertainties have the potential to have a large effect on resulting estimates in unknown quantities of interest. One approach that is being increasingly used to address this issue is known as emulation, in which a large number of forward runs of the simulator are carried out, in order to approximate the response of the output to changes in parameters. However, due to the complexity of some models, it is often unfeasible to run large numbers of training runs that is usually required for full statistical emulators of the environmental processes. We therefore present a simplified model reduction method for approximating uncertainties in complex environmental simulators without the need for very large numbers of training runs. We illustrate the method through an application to the Met Office's atmospheric transport model NAME. We show how our parameter estimation framework can be incorporated into a hierarchical Bayesian inversion, and demonstrate the impact on estimates of UK methane emissions, using atmospheric mole fraction data. We conclude that accounting for uncertainties in the parameterisation of complex atmospheric models is vital if systematic errors are to be minimized and all relevant uncertainties accounted for. We also note that investigations of this nature can prove extremely useful in highlighting deficiencies in the simulator that might otherwise be missed.

  2. Effect of nozzle profile on gas mixing in an atmospheric and low pressure DC plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmane, M.; Soucy, G.; Boulos, M.I. [Univ. of Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada); Henne, R. [Inst. for Technical Thermodynamics, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The study combines enthalpy probe and mass spectrometer measurements in a DC-plasma jet under atmospheric and low pressure conditions. Both, standard cylindrical and laval nozzle were used as anode profiles. A detailed description of the experimental technique is given together with preliminary results. These confirm the role by which enthalpy probe measurements can be used to bridge the gap in temperature range between emission spectroscopic techniques and standard thermocouple probing.

  3. Radiative ion-ion neutralization: a new gas-phase atmospheric pressure ion transduction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eric J; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H

    2012-06-05

    All atmospheric pressure ion detectors, including photo ionization detectors, flame ionization detectors, electron capture detectors, and ion mobility spectrometers, utilize Faraday plate designs in which ionic charge is collected and amplified. The sensitivity of these Faraday plate ion detectors are limited by thermal (Johnson) noise in the associated electronics. Thus approximately 10(6) ions per second are required for a minimal detection. This is not the case for ion detection under vacuum conditions where secondary electron multipliers (SEMs) can be used. SEMs produce a cascade of approximately 10(6) electrons per ion impinging on the conversion dynode. Similarly, photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) can generate approximately 10(6) electrons per photon. Unlike SEMs, however, PMTs are evacuated and sealed so that they are commonly used under atmospheric pressure conditions. This paper describes an atmospheric pressure ion detector based on coupling a PMT with light emitted from ion-ion neutralization reactions. The normal Faraday plate collector electrode was replaced with an electrode "needle" used to concentrate the anions as they were drawn to the tip of the needle by a strong focusing electric field. Light was emitted near the surface of the electrode when analyte ions were neutralized with cations produced from the anode. Although radiative-ion-ion recombination has been previously reported, this is the first time ions from separate ionization sources have been combined to produce light. The light from this radiative-ion-ion-neutralization (RIIN) was detected using a photon multiplier such that an ion mobility spectrum was obtained by monitoring the light emitted from mobility separated ions. An IMS spectrum of nitroglycerin (NG) was obtained utilizing RIIN for tranducing the mobility separated ions into an analytical signal. The implications of this novel ion transduction method are the potential for counting ions at atmospheric pressure and for obtaining ion

  4. Increases in Atmospheric Chlorine from Dichloromethane, a Gas Not Controlled by the Montreal Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montzka, S. A.; Hossaini, R.; Hall, B. D.; Hu, L.; Miller, B.; Siso, C.; Andrews, A. E.; Sweeney, C.; Elkins, J. W.; Chipperfield, M.

    2015-12-01

    Short-lived, anthropogenically produced chlorinated gases historically have not been controlled by the Montreal Protocol; their contribution to stratospheric halogen loading has been relatively small and constant. Since 2000, however, tropospheric mole fractions of dichloromethane (mean lifetime of 5 months) have increased by a factor of 2 at remote sites throughout the globe. Dichloromethane currently adds more chlorine to the atmosphere (~80 ppt) than either HCFC-141b or HCFC-142b, and the implied resulting increase in stratospheric chlorine in recent years is comparable to the increase in total Cl from HCFCs. Emissions driving this global increase have been estimated at 800 Gg/yr in 2012, which is more than half of the chlorine emitted from the three main CFCs during their peak emissions in the late 1980s. Although dichloromethane is used typically as a cleaning agent, solvent, and feedstock in the production of other chemicals, the cause of the recent atmospheric increase is not well understood. Here we will show that the substantial increase in emissions does not appear to be coming from the U.S., as our ongoing observations from tall towers and aircraft profiles over North America since 2005 show a decreasing trend in measured mole fractions in the continental boundary layer relative to the background atmosphere during this period. Instead, our data from remote sites across the Northern Hemisphere reveal a shift in the atmospheric distribution of dichloromethane since 2000 that implies increased emissions from lower latitudes in the northern hemisphere. These changing distributions will be presented and discussed, along with an exploration of the potential causes for the large inter-annual variations observed in the rate of increase and what the results suggest about the main loss mechanism for dichloromethane: oxidation by the hydroxyl radical.

  5. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  6. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady, E-mail: gennady@purdue.edu; Hassanein, Ahmed [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, and School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  7. Dependence of Ozone Generation on Gas Temperature Distribution in AC Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Go; Akashi, Haruaki

    AC atmospheric pressure multi-filament dielectric barrier discharge in oxygen has been simulated using two dimensional fluid model. In the discharge, three kinds of streamers have been obtained. They are primary streamers, small scale streamers and secondary streamers. The primary streamers are main streamers in the discharge and the small scale streamers are formed after the ceasing of the primary streamers. And the secondary streamers are formed on the trace of the primary streamers. In these streamers, the primary and the small scale streamers are very effective to generate O(3P) oxygen atoms which are precursor of ozone. And the ozone is generated mainly in the vicinity of the dielectrics. In high gas temperature region, ozone generation decreases in general. However, increase of the O(3P) oxygen atom density in high gas temperature region compensates decrease of ozone generation rate coefficient. As a result, amount of ozone generation has not changed. But if the effect of gas temperature was neglected, amount of ozone generation increases 10%.

  8. Use of thermocouples and argon line broadening for gas temperature measurement in a radio frequency atmospheric microplasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, S. J.; Xu, K. G.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the use of thermocouples and line broadening of argon 2p-1s emission lines for the measurement of gas temperature of an atmospheric argon microplasma jet. The measured temperatures are compared with rotational spectra fitting of OH (A-X) and N2 (C-B) emission. An rf microplasma jet with two electrical configurations and different temperature ranges was used. The calculated gas temperatures with thermocouples, argon lines, and OH ranged from 290 to 423 K and 393-510 K for the two configurations, depending on the rf power. The temperature from fitting the N2 spectra overestimated the gas temperatures in both configurations (593-680 and 664-853 K). The non-nitrogen temperature measurements agree well with each other within the measurement uncertainty. The results show that not all optical emission temperature methods are appropriate and the accuracy of argon line broadening is dependent on the device configuration. The results also show that conventional thermocouples are surprisingly accurate and viable for these plasmas.

  9. Cu-Doped ZnO Thin Films Deposited by a Sol-Gel Process Using Two Copper Precursors: Gas-Sensing Performance in a Propane Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heberto Gómez-Pozos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study on the propane gas-sensing properties of Cu-doped ZnO thin films is presented in this work. The films were deposited on glass substrates by sol-gel and dip coating methods, using zinc acetate as a zinc precursor, copper acetate and copper chloride as precursors for doping. For higher sensitivity values, two film thickness values are controlled by the six and eight dippings, whereas for doping, three dippings were used, irrespective of the Cu precursor. The film structure was analyzed by X-ray diffractometry, and the analysis of the surface morphology and film composition was made through scanning electron microscopy (SEM and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, respectively. The sensing properties of Cu-doped ZnO thin films were then characterized in a propane atmosphere, C3H8, at different concentration levels and different operation temperatures of 100, 200 and 300 °C. Cu-doped ZnO films doped with copper chloride presented the highest sensitivity of approximately 6 × 104, confirming a strong dependence on the dopant precursor type. The results obtained in this work show that the use of Cu as a dopant in ZnO films processed by sol-gel produces excellent catalysts for sensing C3H8 gas.

  10. Inter-comparison of 2 microm Heterodyne Differential Absorption Lidar, Laser Diode Spectrometer, LICOR NDIR analyzer and flasks measurements of near-ground atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Fabien; Joly, Lilian; Xuéref-Rémy, Irène; Schmidt, Martina; Royer, Adrien; Flamant, Pierre H; Ramonet, Michel; Parvitte, Bertrand; Durry, Georges; Zéninari, Virginie

    2009-01-01

    Remote sensing and in situ instruments are presented and compared in the same location for accurate CO(2) mixing ratio measurements in the atmosphere: (1) a 2.064 microm Heterodyne DIfferential Absorption Lidar (HDIAL), (2) a field deployable infrared Laser Diode Spectrometer (LDS) using new commercial diode laser technology at 2.68 microm, (3) LICOR NDIR analyzer and (4) flasks. LDS, LICOR and flasks measurements were made in the same location, LICOR and flasks being taken as reference. Horizontal HDIAL measurements of CO(2) absorption using aerosol backscatter signal are reported. Using new spectroscopic data in the 2 microm band and meteorological sensor measurements, a mean CO(2) mixing ratio is inferred by the HDIAL in a 1 km long path above the 15m height location of the CO(2) in situ sensors. We compare HDIAL and LDS measurements with the LICOR data for 30 min of time averaging. The mean standard deviation of the HDIAL and the LDS CO(2) mixing ratio results are 3.3 ppm and 0.89 ppm, respectively. The bias of the HDIAL and the LDS measurements are -0.54 ppm and -0.99 ppm, respectively.

  11. Development of an Atmospheric Dispersion Model for Heavier-Than-Air Gas Mixtures. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    and temperature difference AT are based on the average composition of the gas blanket. For forced convection after Treybal (1980), the Colburn analogy...is estimated to be 2.2 x 10- 9 in mks units, Fna 9.9 x 10 3 ) &T] (111-26) For forced convection, Treybal (1980) suggests that the Stanton number...34 Second International Symposium on Loss Prevention and Safety Promotion in the Process Industries, Heidelberg, Germany, 1977. K; 156 Treybal , R. E

  12. Direct evidence of mismatching effect on H emission in laser-induced atmospheric helium gas plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zener Sukra Lie; Koo Hendrik Kurniawan [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40 Srengseng Raya, Kembangan, Jakarta Barat 11630 (Indonesia); May On Tjia [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40 Srengseng Raya, Kembangan, Jakarta Barat 11630 (Indonesia); Physics of Magnetism and Photonics Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, 10 Ganesha, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Rinda, Hedwig [Department of Computer Engineering, Bina Nusantara University, 9 K.H. Syahdan, Jakarta 14810 (Indonesia); Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha [Research Center for Physics, Indonesia Institute of Sciences, Kawasan PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang Selatan 15314, Banten (Indonesia); Syahrun Nur Abdulmadjid; Nasrullah Idris [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, NAD (Indonesia); Alion Mangasi Marpaung [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Jakarta State University, Rawamangun, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia); Marincan Pardede [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Pelita Harapan, 1100 M.H. Thamrin Boulevard, Lippo Village, Tangerang 15811 (Indonesia); Jobiliong, Eric [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Pelita Harapan, 1100 M.H. Thamrin Boulevard, Lippo Village, Tangerang 15811 (Indonesia); Muliadi Ramli [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, NAD (Indonesia); Heri Suyanto [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Udayana University, Kampus Bukit Jimbaran, Denpasar 80361, Bali (Indonesia); Fukumoto, Kenichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

    2013-02-07

    A time-resolved orthogonal double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with helium surrounding gas is developed for the explicit demonstration of time mismatch between the passage of fast moving impurity hydrogen atoms and the formation of thermal shock wave plasma generated by the relatively slow moving major host atoms of much greater masses ablated from the same sample. Although this so-called 'mismatching effect' has been consistently shown to be responsible for the gas pressure induced intensity diminution of hydrogen emission in a number of LIBS measurements using different ambient gases, its explicit demonstration has yet to be reported. The previously reported helium assisted excitation process has made possible the use of surrounding helium gas in our experimental set-up for showing that the ablated hydrogen atoms indeed move faster than the simultaneously ablated much heavier major host atoms as signaled by the earlier H emission in the helium plasma generated by a separate laser prior to the laser ablation. This conclusion is further substantiated by the observed dominant distribution of H atoms in the forward cone-shaped target plasma.

  13. The impacts of recent permafrost thaw on land-atmosphere greenhouse gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Daniel J.; Kicklighter, David W.; McGuire, A. David; Chen, Min; Zhuang, Qianlai; Yuan, Fengming; Melillo, Jerry M.; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2014-01-01

    Permafrost thaw and the subsequent mobilization of carbon (C) stored in previously frozen soil organic matter (SOM) have the potential to be a strong positive feedback to climate. As the northern permafrost region experiences as much as a doubling of the rate of warming as the rest of the Earth, the vast amount of C in permafrost soils is vulnerable to thaw, decomposition and release as atmospheric greenhouse gases. Diagnostic and predictive estimates of high-latitude terrestrial C fluxes vary widely among different models depending on how dynamics in permafrost, and the seasonally thawed 'active layer' above it, are represented. Here, we employ a process-based model simulation experiment to assess the net effect of active layer dynamics on this 'permafrost carbon feedback' in recent decades, from 1970 to 2006, over the circumpolar domain of continuous and discontinuous permafrost. Over this time period, the model estimates a mean increase of 6.8 cm in active layer thickness across the domain, which exposes a total of 11.6 Pg C of thawed SOM to decomposition. According to our simulation experiment, mobilization of this previously frozen C results in an estimated cumulative net source of 3.7 Pg C to the atmosphere since 1970 directly tied to active layer dynamics. Enhanced decomposition from the newly exposed SOM accounts for the release of both CO2 (4.0 Pg C) and CH4 (0.03 Pg C), but is partially compensated by CO2 uptake (0.3 Pg C) associated with enhanced net primary production of vegetation. This estimated net C transfer to the atmosphere from permafrost thaw represents a significant factor in the overall ecosystem carbon budget of the Pan-Arctic, and a non-trivial additional contribution on top of the combined fossil fuel emissions from the eight Arctic nations over this time period.

  14. Role of microorganisms for cycling of atmospheric constituents, emphasizing the greenhouse gas methane (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, R.

    2013-12-01

    Microorganisms have contributed significantly to the formation of the atmosphere and the habitability of Earth. Microbial methanogenesis probably helped overcoming the faint sun problem on young Earth. Later on, cyanobacterial photosynthesis produced oxygen and thus restricted the life zone of methanogenic microbial communities, which nowadays contribute only about 1% to total carbon cycle. Nevertheless, methanogenesis still dominates the budget of atmospheric methane and contributes significantly to the greenhouse effect. There are numerous habitats, which exchange methane with the atmosphere, and even more in which methane is intensively cycled albeit little emitted. Methane can be a byproduct of chemical reactions in plant leaves, or of aerobic methyl phosphonate consumption in ocean water. Most commonly, however, methane is a stoichiometric catabolic product in the degradation of organic matter by anaerobic microorganisms. The degradation is achieved by a complex microbial community consisting of various species of hydrolytic and fermentative Bacteria that produce hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate as major end products, and of methanogenic Archaea that eventually convert these compounds to methane and carbon dioxide. The composition of such methanogenic microbial communities, the rates and paths of methane formation, and the isotopic composition of the produced methane all exhibit quite some variability across the different habitats in which methane is produced from organic matter decomposition, such as flooded soils, lake sediments, peatlands, animal gut systems. The structure of the microbial communities often strongly affects their function. It is a challenging task to understand the environmental and biochemical basis of the interactions of abiotic factors and microorganisms shaping the structure and function of the microbial communities in the different methanogenic habitats.

  15. New Broadband LIDAR for Greenhouse Carbon Dioxide Gas Sensing in the Earth's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Elena; Heaps, William S.; Huang,Wen

    2011-01-01

    We present demonstration of a novel broadband lidar technique capable of dealing with the atmospherically induced variations in CO2 absorption using a Fabry-Perot based detector and a broadband laser. The Fabry-Perot solid etalon in the receiver part is tuned to match the wavelength of several CO2 absorption lines simultaneously. The broadband technique tremendously reduces the requirement for source wavelength stability, instead putting this responsibility on the Fabry- Perot based receiver. The instrument technology we are developing has a clear pathway to space and realistic potential to become a robust, low risk space measurement system.

  16. Trace Gas Distributions and Correlations Observed In The Southern Ocean Atmosphere During the ORCAS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, E. L.; Schauffler, S.; Donets, V.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Hills, A. J.; Stephens, B. B.; Kort, E. A.; Sweeney, C.; Gierach, M.

    2016-12-01

    The biologically productive waters of the Southern Ocean are potentially a significant source and sink for trace gases that impact atmospheric chemistry and climate. However, relatively little is known about the variations and atmospheric vertical structures of trace gases in this region. During January/February, 2016, we participated in the O2/N2 Ratio and CO2 Airborne Southern Ocean (ORCAS) Study, an airborne mission that included the measurement of a wide range of trace gases. This presentation will focus on a selection of gases measured from the Whole Air Sampler and from an in-situ GC/MS system (TOGA). The gases measured by these instruments included a range of reactive halocarbons produced by marine organisms in the surface ocean (e.g., dimethyl sulfide, bromoform, methyl iodide), produced from marine surface photochemistry (e.g., methyl nitrate), and introduced to the region from long-range transport (e.g., chlorinated solvents, CFCs and HCFCs, non-methane hydrocarbons). Distributions of these gases should reflect the biological productivity of the region, the surface flux rates, and the rates of atmospheric transport and mixing. The concentrations of biogenic trace gases that we measured in the marine boundary layer showed significant regional differences in concentrations and different seasonal changes over the course of the experiment. Vertical profiles of biogenic trace gases could be related to the surface sources, exchange with the free troposphere, and the photochemical lifetime of the different gases. Because of the potential relationship of biogenic trace gases to biological productivity in the surface ocean, the measurements will be compared to distributions of chlorophyll a, as observed remotely from the GV aircraft and from satellites. For trace gases with a large interhemispheric gradient and primarily northern hemisphere source (e.g. mainly anthropogenic sources), atmospheric vertical profiles showed an average increase in mixing ratio with

  17. Influence of oil and gas emissions on ambient atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons in residential areas of Northeastern Colorado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea R. Thompson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Northern Front Range (NFR region of Colorado has experienced rapid expansion of oil and gas extraction from shale and tight sands reservoirs in recent years due to advances in hydraulic fracturing technology, with over 25,000 wells currently in operation. This region has also been designated as a federal ozone non-attainment area by the U.S. EPA. High ozone levels are a significant health concern, as are potential health impacts from chronic exposure to primary emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC for residents living near wells. From measurements of ambient atmospheric NMHC present in residential areas located in close proximity to wells in Erie, Colorado, we find that mean mole fractions of the C2–C5 alkanes are enhanced by a factor of 18–77 relative to the regional background, and present at higher levels than typically found in large urban centers. When combined with NMHC observations from downtown Denver and Platteville, it is apparent that these compounds are elevated across the NFR, with highest levels within the Greater Wattenberg Gas Field. This represents a large area source for ozone precursors in the NFR. The BTEX aromatic compounds in Erie were comparable to (e.g., benzene or lower than (e.g., toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene in large urban centers, however, benzene was significantly higher in Platteville, and within the range of chronic health-based exposure levels. An initial look at comparisons with data sets from previous years reveal that ambient levels for oil and gas-related NMHC in Erie, as well as further downwind in Boulder, have not decreased, but appear to have been increasing, despite tightening of emissions standards for the oil and gas industries in 2008.

  18. Integrating atmospheric and volcanic gas data in support of climate impact studies using semantic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, K.; Fox, P.; Raskin, R.; McGuinness, D.

    2008-05-01

    In support of a NASA-funded scientific application (SESDI; Semantically Enabled Science Data Integration Project; (http://sesdi.hao.ucar.edu/) that needs to share volcano and climate data to investigate statistical (e.g. height of the tropopause) relationships between volcanism and global climate, we have generated a volcano and plate tectonic ontologies and leveraged and re-factored the existing SWEET (Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology) ontoloy. To fulfil several goals we have developed set of packages for integrating the relevant ontologies (which are shared and reused by a broad community of users) to provide access to the key solid-earth (volcano) and atmospheric related databases. We present details on how ontologies are used in this science application setting, the methodologies employed to create the ontologies, register them to the underlying data and the implementation for use by scientists. SESDI is an NASA/ESTO/ACCESS-funded project involving the High Altitude Observatory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), McGuinness Associates Consulting, NASA/JPL and Virginia Polytechnic University.

  19. Shallow-ocean methane leakage and degassing to the atmosphere: Triggered by offshore oil-gas and methane hydrate explorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong eZHANG

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Both offshore oil-gas exploration and marine methane hydrate recovery can trigger massive CH4 release from seafloor. During upward transportation of CH4 plume through water column, CH4 is subjected to dissolution and microbial consumption despite the protection of hydrate and oil coating on bubbles surface. The ultimate CH4 degassing to the atmosphere appears to be water-depth dependent. In shallow oceans with water depth less than 100 m, the natural or human-induced leakages or both lead to significant sea-to-air CH4 degassing from 3.00 to 1.36 × 105 μmol m-2 d-1. To quantify the human-perturbation induced CH4 degassing, the combination of top-down modeling and bottom-up calculations is essential due to spatial and temporal variability of diffusion and ebullition at water-air interface.

  20. The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter NOMAD Spectrometer Suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation Observations of Mars' Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian; Carine Vandaele, Ann; López-Moreno, José Juan; Patel, Manish; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Drummond, Rachel; Neefs, Eduard; Depiesse, Cedric; Daerden, Frank; Rodriguez-Gómez, Julio; Neary, Lori; Robert, Séverine; Willame, Yannick; Mahieux, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    NOMAD (Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery) is one of four instruments on board the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, scheduled for launch in January 2016 and to begin nominal science mission around Mars in late 2017. It consists of a suite of three high-resolution spectrometers - Solar Occultation (SO), LNO (Limb Nadir and Occultation) and UVIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) - which will generate a huge dataset of Martian atmospheric observations during the mission, across a wide spectral range. Specifically, the SO spectrometer channel will perform occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-4.3μm at a resolution of 0.15cm-1, with 180-1000m vertical spatial resolution and an SNR of 1500-3000. LNO will perform limb scanning, nadir and occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-3.8μm at a resolution of 0.3cm-1. In nadir, global coverage will extend between ±74O latitude with an IFOV of 0.5x17km on the surface. This channel can also make occultation measurements should the SO channel fail. UVIS will make limb, nadir and occultation measurements between 200-650nm, at a resolution of 1nm. It will have 300-1000m vertical resolution during occultation and 5x60km ground resolution during 15s nadir observations. An order-of-magnitude increase in spectral resolution over previous instruments will allow NOMAD to map previously unresolvable gas species, such as important trace gases and isotopes. CO, CO2, H2O, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, H2CO, CH4, SO2, H2S, HCl, O3 and several isotopologues of methane and water will be detectable, providing crucial measurements of the Martian D/H and methane isotope ratios. It will also be possible to map the sources and sinks of these gases, such as regions of surface volcanism/outgassing and atmospheric production, over the course of an entire Martian year, to further constrain atmospheric dynamics and climatology. NOMAD will also continue to monitor the Martian water, carbon, ozone and dust cycles, extending existing datasets made by successive

  1. Effect of Additional Structure on Effective Stack Height of Gas Dispersion in Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenobu Michioka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wind-tunnel experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of additional structure (building, sea wall and banking on the effective stack height, which is usually used in safety analyses of nuclear power facilities in Japan. The effective stack heights were estimated with and without the additional structure in addition to the reactor building while varying several conditions such as the source height, the height of additional structure and the distance between the source position and the additional structure. When the source height is equivalent to the reactor building height, the additional structure enhances both the vertical and horizontal gas dispersion widths and decreases the ground gas concentration, and it means that the additional structure does not decrease the effective stack height. When the source height is larger than the reactor height, the additional structures might affect the effective stack height. As the distance between the source and the additional structure decreases, or as the height of the additional structure increases, the structure has a larger effect on the effective stack height.

  2. Water relations and gas exchange in poplar and willow under water stress and elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.D. [Washington State Univ., Intensive Forestry Program, Puyallup, WA (United States); Tognetti, R. [Universita del Molize, Dipartimento de Scienze Animali, Vegetali e dell' Ambiente, Compobasso (Italy); Pris, P. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Instituto per l' Agroselvicoltura, Porano (Italy)

    2002-05-01

    Predictions of shifts in rainfall patterns as atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] increases could impact the growth of fast growing trees such as Populus spp. and Salix spp. and the interaction between elevated CO{sub 2} and water stress in these species is unknown. The objectives of this study were to characterize the responses to elevated CO{sub 2} and water stress in these two species, and to determine if elevated CO{sub 2} mitigated drought stress effects. Gas exchange, water potential components, whole plant transpiration and growth response to soil drying and recovery were assessed in hybrid poplar (clone 53-246) and willow (Salix sagitta) rooted cuttings growing in either ambient (350 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) or elevated (700 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration ([CO{sub 2}]). Predawn water potential decreased with increasing water stress while midday water potentials remained unchanged (isohydric response). Turgor potentials at both predawn and midday increased in elevated [CO{sub 2}], indicative of osmotic adjustment. Gas exchange was reduced by water stress while elevated [CO{sub 2}] increased photosynthetic rates, reduced leaf conductance and nearly doubled instantaneous transpiration efficiency in both species. Dark respiration decreased in elevated [CO{sub 2}] and water stress reduced Rd in the trees growing in ambient [CO{sub 2}]. Willow had 56% lower whole plant hydraulic conductivity than poplar, and showed a 14% increase in elevated [CO{sub 2}] while poplar was unresponsive. The physiological responses exhibited by poplar and willow to elevated [CO{sub 2}] and water stress, singly, suggest that these species respond like other tree species. The interaction Of [CO{sub 2}] and water stress suggests that elevated [CO{sub 2}] did mitigate the effects of water stress in willow, but not in poplar. (au)

  3. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide effects on soybean and sorghum gas exchange in conventional and no-tillage systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, S A; Runion, G B; Rogers, H H; Arriaga, F J

    2010-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO(2) concentration has led to concerns about potential effects on production agriculture. In the fall of 1997, a study was initiated to compare the response of two crop management systems (conventional tillage and no-tillage) to elevated CO(2). The study used a split-plot design replicated three times with two management systems as main plots and two atmospheric CO(2) levels (ambient and twice ambient) as split plots using open-top chambers on a Decatur silt loam soil (clayey, kaolinitic, thermic Rhodic Paleudults). The conventional system was a grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.] and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotation with winter fallow and spring tillage practices. In the no-tillage system, sorghum and soybean were rotated, and three cover crops were used [crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.), sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.), and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)]. Over multiple growing seasons, the effect of management and CO(2) concentration on leaf-level gas exchange during row crop (soybean in 1999, 2001, and 2003; sorghum in 2000, 2002, and 2004) reproductive growth were evaluated. Treatment effects were fairly consistent across years. In general, higher photosynthetic rates were observed under CO(2) enrichment (more so with soybean) regardless of residue management practice. Elevated CO(2) led to decreases in stomatal conductance and transpiration, which resulted in increased water use efficiency. The effects of management system on gas exchange measurements were infrequently significant, as were interactions of CO(2) and management. These results suggest that better soil moisture conservation and high rates of photosynthesis can occur in both tillage systems in CO(2)-enriched environments during reproductive growth.

  4. Isotope ratio characteristics and sensitivity for uranium determinations using a liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge ion source coupled to an Orbitrap mass analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegg, Edward D.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The continued development of the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) microplasma as an ion source for diverse, elemental/isotopic analysis applications continues. To this end, characterization of the capabilities in performing precise and accurate isotope ratio (IR) determinations is essential. Based on past experience with the Thermo Exactive Orbitrap mass analyzer, the LS-APGD was interfaced with this instrument for these tests. While the Orbitrap platform has demonstrated excellent mass resolution and accuracy in “organic” mass spectrometry (MS) applications, work using an Orbitrap for IR analysis is very sparse. These efforts build off previous work in this coupling, where the importance of a few of the LS-APGD discharge parameters and Orbitrap data acquisition methods on IR precision and accuracy were probed. Presented here are the results of a study that evaluated the analytical precision for natural uranium sample (assumed 235U/238U = 0.0072) determinations. The instrumental parameters evaluated include the number of microscans and scans making up a data acquisition set, uranium concentration/signal level, sample make-up, and Fourier transform digitization window. Ultimately, a precision of 0.41% relative standard deviation (RSD) can be achieved for a single determination, with a reproducibility of 1.63 %RSD over 10 separate analytical measurements. A preliminary study of matrix effects on IR measurements of U is presented, highlighting the importance of pre-mass selection before injection into the Orbitrap. The analytical system sensitivity is suggested with the ability to produce a calibration function having an R2 value of >0.99 over a range of 4 orders of magnitude of concentration (~1 – 1000 ng mL-1). These efforts demonstrate the very promising pairing of the LS-APGD ionization source and the Orbitrap, pointing as well to definitive paths forward to better utilize both components in high quality isotope ratio

  5. Development and operation of an integrated sampling probe and gas analyzer for turbulent mixing studies in complex supersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiswall, John D.

    -temporal characteristic scales of the flow on the resulting time-area-averaged concentration measurements. Two series of experiments were performed to verify the probe's design; the first used Schlieren photography and verified that the probe sampled from the supersonic flowfield isokinetically. The second series involved traversing the probe across a free mixing layer of air and helium, to obtain both mean concentration and high frequency measurements. High-frequency data was statistically analyzed and inspection of the Probability Density Function (PDF) of the hot-film response was instrumental to interpret how well the resulting average mixing measurements represent these types of complex flows. The probe is minimally intrusive, has accuracy comparable to its predecessors, has an improved frequency response for mean concentration measurements, and samples from a very small area in the flowfield.

  6. Effects of background gas on sulfur hexafluoride removal by atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of background gases (He, Ar, N2 and air on SF6 removal in a dielectric barrier reactor were investigated at atmospheric pressure. A comparison among these background gases was performed in terms of discharge voltage, discharge power, mean electron energy, electron density, removal efficiency and energy yield for the destruction of SF6. Results showed that the discharge voltage of He and Ar was lower than that of N2 and air, but the difference of their discharge power was small. Compared with three other background gases, Ar had a relatively superior destruction and removal rate and energy yield since the mean electron energy and electron density in SF6/H2O/Ar plasma were both maintained at a high level. Complete removal of 2% SF6 could be achieved at a discharge power of 48.86 W with Ar and the corresponding energy yield can reach 4.8 g/kWh.

  7. Reactive trace gas emissions from stressed plants: a poorly characterized major source of atmospheric volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo

    2017-04-01

    Vegetation constitutes the greatest source of reactive volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere. The current emission estimates primarily rely on constitutive emissions that are present only in some plant species. However, all plant species can be induced to emit reactive volatiles by different abiotic and biotic stresses, but the stress-dependent emissions have been largely neglected in emission measurements and models. This presentation provides an overview of systematic screening of stress-dependent volatile emissions from a broad range of structurally and physiologically divergent plant species from temperate to tropical ecosystems. Ozone, heat, drought and wounding stress were the abiotic stresses considered in the screening, while biotic stress included herbivory, chemical elicitors simulating herbivory and fungal infections. The data suggest that any moderate to severe stress leads to significant emissions of a rich blend of volatiles, including methanol, green leaf volatiles (the lipoxygenase pathway volatiles, dominated by C6 aldehydes, alcohols and derivatives), different mono- and sesquiterpenes and benzenoids. The release of volatiles occurs in stress severity-dependent manner, although the emission responses are often non-linear with more severe stresses resulting in disproportionately greater emissions. Stress volatile release is induced in both non-constitutive and constitutive volatile emitters, whereas the rate of constitutive volatile emissions in constitutive emitters is often reduced under environmental and biotic stresses. Given that plants in natural conditions often experience stress, this analysis suggests that global volatile emissions have been significantly underestimated. Furthermore, in globally changing hotter climates, the frequency and severity of both abiotic and biotic stresses is expected to increase. Thus, the stress-induced volatile emissions are predicted to play a dominant role in plant-atmosphere interactions in near

  8. An Initial Investigation into the Use of a Flux Chamber Technique to Measure Soil-Atmosphere Gas Exchanges from Application of Biosolids to UK Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Donovan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While a significant amount of work has been conducted to assess the concentration of pollutants in soils and waterways near land that has been amended with biosolids, a relatively small body of research investigating emissions to atmosphere is available in the literature. Some studies have indicated that while the CO2 emissions from soils decrease with fertiliser application, the CH4 and N2O emissions might be increased, offsetting the benefit. The objective of the research presented in this paper was to address this gap, by the use of a flux chamber technique to measure soil-atmosphere gas exchanges from the application of biosolids to land. This was done by applying three different types of biosolids to soils and measuring gases at the soil-atmosphere interface. The measurements were taken on areas with three different types of vegetation. The gases were collected using a flux chamber technique and analysed by gas chromatography. The results presented here are preliminary findings of an ongoing experiment. Insignificant variation appeared to occur between different areas of vegetation; however, small variations in gas concentrations were observed indicating a need for continued monitoring of soil-atmosphere gas exchanges to determine the long-term impacts on the atmosphere and the environment.

  9. Feasibility of gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry in analysis of anabolic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintikka, Laura; Haapala, Markus; Franssila, Sami; Kuuranne, Tiia; Leinonen, Antti; Kostiainen, Risto

    2010-12-24

    Mass spectrometers equipped with atmospheric pressure ion sources (API-MS) have been designed to be interfaced with liquid chromatographs (LC) and have rarely been connected to gas chromatographs (GC). Recently, we introduced a heated nebulizer microchip and showed its potential to interface liquid microseparation techniques and GC with API-MS. This study demonstrates the feasibility of GC-microchip atmospheric pressure photoionization-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-μAPPI-MS/MS) in the analysis of underivatized anabolic steroids in urine. The APPI microchip provides high ionization efficiency and produces abundant protonated molecules or molecular ions with minimal fragmentation. The feasibility of GC-μAPPI-MS/MS in the analysis of six selected anabolic steroids in urine samples was studied with respect to intra-batch repeatability, linearity, linear range, and limit of detection (LOD). The method showed good sensitivity (LODs 0.2-1 ng/mL), repeatability (relative standard deviationanabolic steroids. Quantitative performance of the method was tested with two authentic urine samples, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained with conventional GC-electron ionization-MS after derivatization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Overview of gas flux measurements from volcanoes of the global Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, Bo; Arellano, Santiago; Conde, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    NOVAC, the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change, was initiated in 2005 as a 5-years-long project financed by the European Union. Its main purpose is to create a global network for the study of volcanic atmospheric plumes and related geophysical phenomena by using state-of-the-art spectroscopic remote sensing technology. Up to 2014, 67 instruments have been installed at 25 volcanoes in 13 countries of Latin America, Italy, Democratic Republic of Congo, Reunion, Iceland, and Philippines, and efforts are being done to expand the network to other active volcanic zones. NOVAC has been a pioneer initiative in the community of volcanologists and embraces the objectives of the Word Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). In this contribution, we present the results of the measurements of SO2 gas fluxes carried out within NOVAC, which for some volcanoes represent a record of more than 8 years of semi-continuous monitoring. The network comprises some of the most strongly degassing volcanoes in the world, covering a broad range of tectonic settings, levels of unrest, and potential risk. Examples of correlations with seismicity and other geophysical phenomena, environmental impact studies and comparisons with previous global estimates will be discussed as well as the significance of the database for further studies in volcanology and other geosciences.

  11. Trace determination of the flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A in the atmosphere by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Zhiyong [GKSS Research Centre, Institute for Coastal Research, Department of Environmental Chemistry, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany) and Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt at Main, Institute of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, Department of Analytical Environmental Chemistry, Georg-Voigt-Str. 14, 60054 Frankfurt (Germany)]. E-mail: zhiyong.xie@gkss.de; Ebinghaus, Ralf [GKSS Research Centre, Institute for Coastal Research, Department of Environmental Chemistry, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Lohmann, Rainer [Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI 02882-1197 (United States); Heemken, Olaf [LAVES, Philosophenweg 36/38, D-26121 Oldenburg (Germany); Caba, Armando [GKSS Research Centre, Institute for Coastal Research, Department of Environmental Chemistry, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Puettmann, Wilhelm [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt at Main, Institute of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, Department of Analytical Environmental Chemistry, Georg-Voigt-Str. 14, 60054 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2007-02-19

    A simple and effective method has been developed for analysis of the flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in environmental samples by using modified soxhlet extraction in combination with silica gel clean-up, derivatization with silylation reagent and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring mode (SIM). Satisfactory recoveries were achieved for the large volume sampling, soxhlet extraction and silica gel clean-up. The overall recovery is 79 {+-} 1%. The derivatization procedure is simple and fast, and produces stable TBBPA derivative. GC-MS with electronic impact (EI) ionization mode shows better detection power than using negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode. EI gives a method detection limit of 0.04 pg m{sup -3} and enables to determine trace TBBPA in ambient air in remote area. The method was successfully applied to the determination of TBBPA in atmospheric samples collected over land and coastal regions. The concentrations of TBBPA ranged from below the method detection limit (0.04 pg m{sup -3}) to 0.85 pg m{sup -3}. A declining trend with increasing latitude was present from the Wadden Sea to the Arctic. The atmospheric occurrence of TBBPA in the Arctic is significant and might imply that TBBPA has long-range transport potential.

  12. First retrieval of hourly atmospheric radionuclides just after the Fukushima accident by analyzing filter-tapes of operational air pollution monitoring stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ohara, Toshimasa; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2014-10-22

    No observed data have been found in the Fukushima Prefecture (FP) for the time-series of atmospheric radionuclides concentrations just after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FD1NPP) accident. Accordingly, current estimates of internal radiation doses from inhalation, and atmospheric radionuclide concentrations by atmospheric transport models are highly uncertain. Here, we present a new method for retrieving the hourly atmospheric (137)Cs concentrations by measuring the radioactivity of suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected on filter tapes in SPM monitors which were operated even after the accident. This new dataset focused on the period of March 12-23, 2011 just after the accident, when massive radioactive materials were released from the FD1NPP to the atmosphere. Overall, 40 sites of the more than 400 sites in the air quality monitoring stations in eastern Japan were studied. For the first time, we show the spatio-temporal variation of atmospheric (137)Cs concentrations in the FP and the Tokyo Metropolitan Area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPP. The comprehensive dataset revealed how the polluted air masses were transported to the FP and TMA, and can be used to re-evaluate internal exposure, time-series radionuclides release rates, and atmospheric transport models.

  13. Production of TiN thin films by N2-laser-ablated Ti atoms in nitrogen gas atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castell, R.; Ruiz, A.; Castell, C.; Suárez, C.

    Laser ablation has proven to be an important technique for thin film deposition because of the high velocity heating and quenching of materials. We have used a nitrogen laser, which is capable of producing nanosecond pulses of intense UV (337.1 nm) radiation to generate high-temperature and high-electron-density plasmas when strongly focused on titanium targets. Laser beam pulses with a peak energy of 32 J/cm2 and a power density of 1.6 GW/cm2 were used in this experiment. As ablated Ti species are allowed to expand further in a nitrogen atmosphere, they cool down and eventually dissipate. In this sequence, they meet a substrate where condensation, nucleation, and growth processes yield TiN thin films because of the reaction with the nitrogen gas. Thin film depositions were made on stainless steel (AISI 1020 and AISI 304) substrates at nitrogen gas pressures ranging from 10-1 Pa to 200 Pa and for different distances between the substrate and the spot where the laser beam was focused upon the target. For rather short distances (less than 7 mm), optical microscopy shows the effect of a further plasma-thin film interaction, while at larger distances, the depositions exhibit a regular film condensation from the vapor. Microstructure characterization of the thin film deposited was done by several techniques. The typical cubic TiN phase was identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS).

  14. Numerical simulation of ion transport in an atmosphere-to-vacuum interface taking into account gas dynamics and space charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoblin, Michael G; Chudinov, Alexey V; Sulimenkov, Ilia V; Brusov, Vladimir S; Makarov, Alexander A; Wouters, Eloy R; Kozlovskiy, Viacheslav I

    2017-08-01

    A two-step approach was developed for the study of ion transport in an atmospheric pressure interface. In the first step, the flow in the interface was numerically simulated using the standard gas dynamic package ANSYS CFX 15.0. In the second step, the calculated fields of pressure, temperature, and velocity were imported into a custom-built software application for simulation of ion motion under the influence of both gas dynamic and electrostatic forces. To account for space charge effects in axially symmetric interfaces an analytical expression was used for the Coulomb force. For all other types of interfaces, an iterative approach for the Coulomb force computation was developed. The simulations show that the influence of the space charge is the main contributor to the loss of ion current in the heated capillary. In addition, the maximum ion current which can be transmitted through the heated capillary (0.58 mm inner diameter and 58.5 mm length) is limited to ∼6 nA for ions with m/z = 508 Da and with reduced ion mobility 1.05 cm2V-1s-1. This limit remains practically constant and independent of the ion current at the entrance of the capillary. For a particular ion type, this limit depends on its m/z ratio and ion mobility.

  15. The influence of gas-particle partitioning and surface-atmosphere exchange on ammonia during BAQS-Met

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ellis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Border Air Quality and Meteorology study (BAQS-Met was an intensive field campaign conducted in Southwestern Ontario during the summer of 2007. The focus of BAQS-Met was determining the causes of the formation of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5, and of the regional significance of trans-boundary transport and lake breeze circulations on that formation. Fast (1 Hz measurements of ammonia were acquired using a Quantum Cascade Laser Tunable Infrared Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS at the Harrow supersite. Measurements of PM2.5 ammonium, sulfate and nitrate were made using an Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC with hourly time resolution. The median mixing ratio of ammonia was 2.5 ppb, with occasional high spikes at night resulting from local emissions. Measurements were used to assess major local emissions of NH3, diurnal profiles and gas-particle partitioning. The measurements were compared with results from A Unified Regional Air-quality Modelling System (AURAMS. While the fraction of total ammonia (NHx≡NH3 + NH4+ observed in the gas phase peaks between 0.1 and 0.8, AURAMS tended to predict fractions of either less than 0.05 or greater than 0.8. The model frequently predicted acidic aerosol, in contrast with observations wherein NHx almost always exceeded the observed equivalents of sulfate. One explanation for our observations is that the net flux of ammonia from the land surface to the atmosphere increases when aerosol sulfate is present, effectively buffering the mixing ratio of gas phase ammonia, a process not included in the model. A simple representation of an offline bi-directional flux parameterization using the ISORROPIA thermodynamic model was successful at reducing the population of zero gas fraction points, but not the higher gas fraction points.

  16. Changes in concentration, composition and source contribution of atmospheric organic aerosols by shifting coal to natural gas in Urumqi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Gehui; Wu, Can; Wang, Jiayuan; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Lu; Han, Yanni; Liu, Lang; Cao, Cong; Cao, Junji; He, Qing; Liu, Xinchun

    2017-01-01

    Size-segregated aerosols were collected in Urumqi, a megacity in northwest China, during two heating seasons, i.e., before (heating season І: January-March 2012) and after (heating season II: January-March 2014) the project "shifting coal to natural gas", and determined for n-alkanes, PAHs and oxygenated PAHs to investigate the impact of replacement of coal by natural gas on organic aerosols in the urban atmosphere. Our results showed that compared to those in heating season I concentrations of n-alkanes, PAHs and OPAHs decreased by 74%, 74% and 82% in heating season II, respectively. Source apportionment analysis suggested that coal combustion, traffic emission and biomass burning are the major sources of the determined organics during the heating seasons in Urumqi. Traffic emission is the main source for n-alkanes in the city. Coal combustion is the dominant source of PAHs and OPAHs in heating season І, but traffic emission becomes their major source in heating season ІI. Relative contributions of coal combustion to n-alkanes, PAHs and OPAHs in Urumqi decreased from 21 to 75% in heating season I to 4.0-21% in heating season II due to the replacement of coal with natural gas for house heating. Health risk assessment further indicated that compared with that in heating season I the number of lung cancer related to PAHs exposure in Urumqi decreased by 73% during heating season II due to the project implementation. Our results suggest that replacing coal by clean energy sources for house heating will significantly mitigate air pollution and improve human health in China.

  17. Uncertainties of fluxes and 13C / 12C ratios of atmospheric reactive-gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, Sergey; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Jöckel, Patrick

    2017-07-01

    We provide a comprehensive review of the proxy data on the 13C / 12C ratios and uncertainties of emissions of reactive carbonaceous compounds into the atmosphere, with a focus on CO sources. Based on an evaluated set-up of the EMAC model, we derive the isotope-resolved data set of its emission inventory for the 1997-2005 period. Additionally, we revisit the calculus required for the correct derivation of uncertainties associated with isotope ratios of emission fluxes. The resulting δ13C of overall surface CO emission in 2000 of -(25. 2 ± 0. 7) ‰ is in line with previous bottom-up estimates and is less uncertain by a factor of 2. In contrast to this, we find that uncertainties of the respective inverse modelling estimates may be substantially larger due to the correlated nature of their derivation. We reckon the δ13C values of surface emissions of higher hydrocarbons to be within -24 to -27 ‰ (uncertainty typically below ±1 ‰), with an exception of isoprene and methanol emissions being close to -30 and -60 ‰, respectively. The isotope signature of ethane surface emission coincides with earlier estimates, but integrates very different source inputs. δ13C values are reported relative to V-PDB.

  18. Commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullet and laying hen venous blood gas and chemistry profiles utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, T. P.; Arango, J.; Wolc, A.; Brady, J. V.; Fulton, J. E.; Rubinoff, I.; Ehr, I. J.; Persia, M. E.; O'Sullivan, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    Venous blood gas and chemistry reference ranges were determined for commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullets and laying hens utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer and CG8+ cartridges. A total of 632 samples were analyzed from birds between 4 and 110 wk of age. Reference ranges were established for pullets (4 to 15 wk), first cycle laying hens (20 to 68 wk), and second cycle (post molt) laying hens (70 to 110 wk) for the following traits: sodium (Na mmol/L), potassium (K mmol/L), ionized calcium (iCa mmol/L), glucose (Glu mg/dl), hematocrit (Hct% Packed Cell Volume [PCV]), pH, partial pressure carbon dioxide (PCO2 mm Hg), partial pressure oxygen (PO2 mm Hg), total concentration carbon dioxide (TCO2 mmol/L), bicarbonate (HCO3 mmol/L), base excess (BE mmol/L), oxygen saturation (sO2%), and hemoglobin (Hb g/dl). Data were analyzed using ANOVA to investigate the effect of production status as categorized by bird age. Trait relationships were evaluated by linear correlation and their spectral decomposition. All traits differed significantly among pullets and mature laying hens in both first and second lay cycles. Levels for K, iCa, Hct, pH, TCO2, HCO3, BE, sO2, and Hb differed significantly between first cycle and second cycle laying hens. Many venous blood gas and chemistry parameters were significantly correlated. The first 3 eigenvalues explained ∼2/3 of total variation. The first 2 principal components (PC) explained 51% of the total variation and indicated acid-balance and relationship between blood O2 and CO2. The third PC explained 16% of variation and seems to be related to blood iCa. Establishing reference ranges for pullet and laying hen blood gas and chemistry with the i-STAT®1 handheld unit provides a mechanism to further investigate pullet and layer physiology, evaluate metabolic disturbances, and may potentially serve as a means to select breeder candidates with optimal blood gas or chemistry levels on-farm. PMID:26706355

  19. Commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullet and laying hen venous blood gas and chemistry profiles utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, T P; Arango, J; Wolc, A; Brady, J V; Fulton, J E; Rubinoff, I; Ehr, I J; Persia, M E; O'Sullivan, N P

    2016-02-01

    Venous blood gas and chemistry reference ranges were determined for commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullets and laying hens utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer and CG8+ cartridges. A total of 632 samples were analyzed from birds between 4 and 110 wk of age. Reference ranges were established for pullets (4 to 15 wk), first cycle laying hens (20 to 68 wk), and second cycle (post molt) laying hens (70 to 110 wk) for the following traits: sodium (Na mmol/L), potassium (K mmol/L), ionized calcium (iCa mmol/L), glucose (Glu mg/dl), hematocrit (Hct% Packed Cell Volume [PCV]), pH, partial pressure carbon dioxide (PCO2 mm Hg), partial pressure oxygen (PO2 mm Hg), total concentration carbon dioxide (TCO2 mmol/L), bicarbonate (HCO3 mmol/L), base excess (BE mmol/L), oxygen saturation (sO2%), and hemoglobin (Hb g/dl). Data were analyzed using ANOVA to investigate the effect of production status as categorized by bird age. Trait relationships were evaluated by linear correlation and their spectral decomposition. All traits differed significantly among pullets and mature laying hens in both first and second lay cycles. Levels for K, iCa, Hct, pH, TCO2, HCO3, BE, sO2, and Hb differed significantly between first cycle and second cycle laying hens. Many venous blood gas and chemistry parameters were significantly correlated. The first 3 eigenvalues explained ∼2/3 of total variation. The first 2 principal components (PC) explained 51% of the total variation and indicated acid-balance and relationship between blood O2 and CO2. The third PC explained 16% of variation and seems to be related to blood iCa. Establishing reference ranges for pullet and laying hen blood gas and chemistry with the i-STAT®1 handheld unit provides a mechanism to further investigate pullet and layer physiology, evaluate metabolic disturbances, and may potentially serve as a means to select breeder candidates with optimal blood gas or chemistry levels on-farm. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University

  20. Catchment-Wide Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Exchange as Influenced by Land Use Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Mathias; Friborg, Thomas; Ringgaard, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    . The measurements also included the turbulent fl uxes of methane above the wet grassland and of nitrous oxide above the agricultural area and ran continuously throughout the year 2009. The highest CO2 uptake rates (around 30 µmol m-2 s-1) were observed at the agricultural site; however, the site was a CO2 sink only...... from April to June and a CO2 source during the rest of the year. Over the whole year the forest plantation fi xed about 1850 g CO2 m-2 compared to only 870 g m-2 at the agricultural site, and it remained a CO2 sink throughout all seasons. The wet grassland site was a CO2 sink from March to October......, and its annual CO2 fixation was only marginally higher than that of the agricultural site. The emission of CH4 from the wet grassland showed large seasonal variations. Its annual total corresponded to 276 g CO2 equivalents m-2 (based on a 100-yrtime horizon) and reduced the greenhouse gas sink strength...

  1. Climate and site management as driving factors for the atmospheric greenhouse gas exchange of a restored wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Herbst

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG budget of a restored wetland in western Denmark was established for the years 2009–2011 from eddy covariance measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 fluxes. The water table in the wetland, which was restored in 2002, was unregulated, and the vegetation height was limited through occasional grazing by cattle and grass cutting. The annual net CO2 uptake varied between 195 and 983 g m−2 and the annual net CH4 release varied between 11 and 17 g m−2. In all three years the wetland was a carbon sink and removed between 42 and 259 g C m−2 from the atmosphere. However, in terms of the full annual GHG budget (assuming that 1 g CH4 is equivalent to 25 g CO2 with respect to the greenhouse effect over a time horizon of 100 years the wetland was a sink in 2009, a source in 2010 and neutral in 2011. Complementary observations of meteorological factors and management activities were used to explain the large inter-annual variations in the full atmospheric GHG budget of the wetland. The largest impact on the annual GHG fluxes, eventually defining their sign, came from site management through changes in grazing duration and animal stocking density. These changes accounted for half of the observed variability in the CO2 fluxes and about two thirds of the variability in CH4 fluxes. An unusually long period of snow cover in 2010 had the second largest effect on the annual CO2 flux, whose interannual variability was larger than that of the CH4 flux. Since integrated CO2 and CH4 flux data from restored wetlands are still very rare, it is concluded that more long-term flux measurements are needed to quantify the effects of ecosystem disturbance, in terms of management activities and exceptional weather patterns, on the atmospheric GHG budget more

  2. On the Application of Hall Thruster Working with Ambient Atmospheric Gas for Orbital Station-Keeping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Duhopel'nikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the application of the Hall thruster using the ambient atmospheric air for orbital station keeping. This is a relevant direction at the up-to-date development stage of propulsion systems. Many teams of designers of electric rocket thrusters evaluate the application of different schemes of particle acceleration at the low-earth orbit. Such technical solution allows us to abandon the storage systems of the working agent on the spacecraft board. Thus, lifetime of such a system at the orbit wouldn`t be limited by fuel range. The paper suggests a scheme of the propulsion device with a parabolic confuser that provides a required compression ratio of the ambient air for correct operation. Formulates physical and structural restrictions on ambient air to be used as a working agent of the thruster. Pointes out that the altitudes from 200 to 300 km are the most promising for such propulsion devices. Shows that for operation at lower altitudes are required the higher capacities that are not provided by modern onboard power supply systems. For the orbit heightening the air intakes with significant compression rate are of necessity. The size of such air intakes would exceed nose fairing of exploited space launch systems. To perform further design calculations are shown dependencies that allow us to calculate an effective diameter of the thruster channel and a critical voltage to be desirable for thrust force excess over air resistance. The dependencies to calculate minimal and maximal fluxes of neutral particles of oxygen and nitrogen, that are necessary for normal thruster operation, are also shown. Calculation results of the propulsion system parameters for the spacecrafts with cross-sectional area within 1 - 3 m2 and inlet diameter of air intake within 1 - 3 m are demonstrated. The research results have practical significance in design of advanced propulsion devices for lowaltitude spacecrafts. The work has been supported by the RFFR

  3. Soil-atmosphere trace gas exchange from tropical oil palm plantations on peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arn Teh, Yit; Manning, Frances; Zin Zawawi, Norliyana; Hill, Timothy; Chocholek, Melanie; Khoon Kho, Lip

    2015-04-01

    Oil palm is the largest agricultural crop in the tropics, accounting for 13 % of all tropical land cover. Due to its large areal extent, oil palm cultivation may have important implications not only for terrestrial stores of C and N, but may also impact regional and global exchanges of material and energy, including fluxes of trace gases and water vapor. In particular, recent expansion of oil palm into tropical peatlands has raised concerns over enhanced soil C emissions from degradation of peat, and elevated N-gas fluxes linked to N fertilizer application. Here we report our preliminary findings on soil carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from a long-term, multi-scale project investigating the C, N and greenhouse gas (GHG) dynamics of oil palm ecosystems established on peat soils in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Flux chamber measurements indicate that soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes averaged 20.0 ± 16.0 Mg CO2-C ha-1 yr-1, 37.4 ± 29.9 kg CH4-C ha-1 yr-1 and 4.7 ± 4.2 g N2O-N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Soil CO2 fluxes were on par with other drained tropical peatlands; whereas CH4 fluxes exceeded observations from similar study sites elsewhere. Nitrous oxide fluxes were in a similar range to fluxes from other drained tropical peatlands, but lower than emissions from mineral-soil plantations by up to three orders of magnitude. Fluxes of soil CO2 and N2O were spatially stratified, and contingent upon the distribution of plants, deposited harvest residues, and soil moisture. Soil CO2 fluxes were most heavily influenced by the distribution of palms and their roots. On average, autotrophic (root) respiration accounted for approximately 78 % of total soil CO2 flux, and total soil respiration declined steeply away from palms; e.g. soil CO2 fluxes in the immediate 1 m radius around palms were up to 6 times greater than fluxes in inter-palm spaces due to higher densities of roots. Placement of harvest residues played an important - but secondary

  4. Use of a blood gas analyzer and a laboratory autoanalyzer in routine practice to measure electrolytes in intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budak Yasemin U

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrolyte values are measured in most critically ill intensive care unit (ICU patients using both an arterial blood gas analyzer (ABG and a central laboratory auto-analyzer (AA. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether electrolyte levels assessed using an ABG and an AA were equivalent; data on sodium and potassium ion concentrations were examined. Methods We retrospectively studied patients hospitalized in the ICU between July and August 2011. Of 1,105 test samples, we identified 84 instances of simultaneous sampling of arterial and venous blood, where both Na+ and K+ levels were measured using a pHOx Stat Profile Plus L blood gas analyzer (Nova Biomedical, Waltham MA, USA and a Roche Modular P autoanalyzer (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany. Statistical measures employed to compare the data included Spearman's correlation coefficients, paired Student’s t-tests, Deming regression analysis, and Bland-Altman plots. Results The mean sodium concentration was 138.1 mmol/L (SD 10.2 mmol/L using the ABG and 143.0 mmol/L (SD 10.5 using the AA (p + and Na+, with biases of 0.150-0.352 and −0.97-10.05 respectively; the associated correlation coefficients were 0.88 and 0.90. Conclusions We conclude that the ABG and AA do not yield equivalent Na+ and K+ data. Concordance between ABG and AA should be established prior to introduction of new ABG systems.

  5. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry in the identification of organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols from coniferous forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallio, M.; Jussila, M.; Rissanen, T.; Anttila, P.; Hartonen, K.; Reissell, A.; Vreuls, R.J.J.; Adahchour, M.; Hyotylainen, T.

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOF-MS) was applied in the identification of organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols from coniferous forest. The samples were collected at Hyytiälä, Finland, as part of the QUEST campaign, in

  6. Electrical and optical properties of thin indium tin oxide films produced by pulsed laser ablation in oxygen or rare gas atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup, B.; Schou, Jørgen; Nordskov, A.

    1999-01-01

    Films of indium tin oxide (ITO) have been produced in different background gases by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The Films deposited in rare gas atmospheres on room temperature substrates were metallic, electrically conductive, but had poor transmission of visible light. For substrate...

  7. Application of gas chromatography–(triple quadrupole) massspectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for thedetermination of multiclass pesticides in fruits and vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cherta, L.; Portoles, T.; Beltran, J.; Pitarch, E.; Mol, J.G.J.; Hernandez, F.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-residue method for the determination of 142 pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables has been developed using a new atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for coupling gas chromatography (GC) to tandem mass spectrometry (MS). Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode has

  8. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portoles, T.; Mol, J.G.J.; Sancho, J.V.; Lopez, F.J.; Hernandez, F.

    2014-01-01

    A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target

  9. Space and time analysis of the nanosecond scale discharges in atmospheric pressure air: I. Gas temperature and vibrational distribution function of N2 and O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, A.; Cessou, A.; Boubert, P.; Vervisch, P.

    2014-03-01

    Reliable experimental data on nanosecond discharge plasmas in air become more and more crucial considering their interest in a wide field of applications. However, the investigations on such nonequilibrium plasmas are made difficult by the spatial non-homogeneities, in particular under atmospheric pressure, the wide range of time scales, and the complexity of multi-physics processes involved therein. In this study, we report spatiotemporal experimental analysis on the gas temperature and the vibrational excitation of N2 and O2 in their ground electronic state during the post-discharge of an overvoltage nanosecond-pulsed discharge generated in a pin-to-plane gap of air at atmospheric pressure. The gas temperature during the pulsed discharge is measured by optical emission spectroscopy related to the rotational bands of the 0-0 vibrational transition N2(C 3 Πu, v = 0) → N2(B3 Πg, v = 0) of nitrogen. The results show a rapid gas heating up to 700 K in tens of nanoseconds after the current rise. This fast gas heating leads to a high gas temperature up to 1000 K measured at 150 ns in the first stages of the post-discharge using spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS). The spatiotemporal measurements of the gas temperature and the vibrational distribution function of N2 and O2, also obtained by SRS, over the post-discharge show the spatial expansion of the high vibrational excitation of N2, and the gas heating during the post-discharge. The present measurements, focused on thermal and energetic aspect of the discharge, provide a base for spatiotemporal analysis of gas number densities of N2, O2 and O atoms and hydrodynamic effects achieved during the post-discharge in part II of this investigation. All these results provide space and time database for the validation of plasma chemical models for nanosecond-pulsed discharges at atmospheric pressure air.

  10. Influence of gas atmospheres and ceria on the stability of nanoporous gold studied by environmental electron microscopy and In situ ptychography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baier, Sina; Wittstock, Arne; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    2016-01-01

    A novel complementary approach of electron microscopy/environmental TEM and in situ hard X-ray ptychography was used to study the thermally induced coarsening of nanoporous gold under different atmospheres, pressures and after ceria deposition. The temperature applied during ptychographic imaging...... was determined by IR thermography. While using elevated temperatures (room temperature - 400 °C) and realistic gas atmospheres (1 bar) we achieved for the first time a spatial resolution of about 20 nm during hard X-ray ptychography. The annealing of pure and ceria stabilized nanoporous gold in different...... of ceria on the nanoporous gold led to an improvement of the stability, but did not alleviate the influence of the gas atmosphere. Different behaviors were observed, such as coarsening and even material loss or migration. The results suggest that additional mechanisms beyond surface diffusion need...

  11. Analysis of bias in measurements of potassium, sodium and hemoglobin by an emergency department-based blood gas analyzer relative to hospital laboratory autoanalyzer results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian Bo; Lin, Ji; Zhao, Xiao Dong

    2015-01-01

    The emergency departments (EDs) of Chinese hospitals are gradually being equipped with blood gas machines. These machines, along with the measurement of biochemical markers by the hospital laboratory, facilitate the care of patients with severe conditions who present to the ED. However, discrepancies have been noted between the Arterial Blood Gas (ABG) analyzers in the ED and the hospital laboratory autoanalyzer in relation to electrolyte and hemoglobin measurements. The present study was performed to determine whether the ABG and laboratory measurements of potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels are equivalent, and whether ABG analyzer results can be used to guide clinical care before the laboratory results become available. Study power analyses revealed that 200 consecutive patients who presented to our ED would allow this prospective single-center cohort study to detect significant differences between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels. Paired arterial and venous blood samples were collected within 30 minutes. Arterial blood samples were measured in the ED by an ABL 90 FLEX blood gas analyzer. The biochemistry and blood cell counts of the venous samples were measured in the hospital laboratory. The potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin concentrations obtained by both methods were compared by using paired Student's t-test, Spearman's correlation, Bland-Altman plots, and Deming regression. The mean ABG and laboratory potassium values were 3.77±0.44 and 4.2±0.55, respectively (P<0.0001). The mean ABG and laboratory sodium values were 137.89±5.44 and 140.93±5.50, respectively (P<0.0001). The mean ABG and laboratory Hemoglobin values were 12.28±2.62 and 12.35±2.60, respectively (P = 0.24). Although there are the statistical difference and acceptable biases between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium and sodium, the biases do not exceed USCLIA-determined limits. In parallel, there are no statistical differences and biases

  12. Analysis of bias in measurements of potassium, sodium and hemoglobin by an emergency department-based blood gas analyzer relative to hospital laboratory autoanalyzer results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Bo Zhang

    Full Text Available The emergency departments (EDs of Chinese hospitals are gradually being equipped with blood gas machines. These machines, along with the measurement of biochemical markers by the hospital laboratory, facilitate the care of patients with severe conditions who present to the ED. However, discrepancies have been noted between the Arterial Blood Gas (ABG analyzers in the ED and the hospital laboratory autoanalyzer in relation to electrolyte and hemoglobin measurements. The present study was performed to determine whether the ABG and laboratory measurements of potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels are equivalent, and whether ABG analyzer results can be used to guide clinical care before the laboratory results become available.Study power analyses revealed that 200 consecutive patients who presented to our ED would allow this prospective single-center cohort study to detect significant differences between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels. Paired arterial and venous blood samples were collected within 30 minutes. Arterial blood samples were measured in the ED by an ABL 90 FLEX blood gas analyzer. The biochemistry and blood cell counts of the venous samples were measured in the hospital laboratory. The potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin concentrations obtained by both methods were compared by using paired Student's t-test, Spearman's correlation, Bland-Altman plots, and Deming regression.The mean ABG and laboratory potassium values were 3.77±0.44 and 4.2±0.55, respectively (P<0.0001. The mean ABG and laboratory sodium values were 137.89±5.44 and 140.93±5.50, respectively (P<0.0001. The mean ABG and laboratory Hemoglobin values were 12.28±2.62 and 12.35±2.60, respectively (P = 0.24.Although there are the statistical difference and acceptable biases between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium and sodium, the biases do not exceed USCLIA-determined limits. In parallel, there are no statistical differences and

  13. Gas-phase carbon exchange between mangrove forests and the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayment, Mark

    2013-04-01

    .03 (wet) - 0.06 (dry) mol mol-1). Dark respiration rates were broadly similar when the tide was out (8.3 μmol m-2 s-1 (Rhizophora), 7.3 μmol m-2 s-1 (Avicennia)), but high tide reduced respiration much more in Avicennia (0.5 μmol m-2 s-1) than in Rhizophora (7.5 μmol m-2 s-1). Methane exchange between the Rhizophora ecosystem and the atmosphere was small and dependant on tidal state, varying between a methane consumption of around 0.2 mg (C) m-2 hr-1 at low and incoming tide to a methane production of around 2.5 mg (C) m-2 hr-1 during outgoing tides. The Avicennia ecosystem was consistently a small consumer of methane (ca. 0.2 mg (C) m-2 hr-1).

  14. Potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source in gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the screening of urinary exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raro, M; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Sancho, J V; Hernández, F; Garrostas, L; Marcos, J; Ventura, R; Segura, J; Pozo, O J

    2016-02-04

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis has been evaluated for the screening of 16 exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) in urine. The sample treatment is based on the strategy currently applied in doping control laboratories i.e. enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and derivatization to form the trimethylsilyl ether-trimethylsilyl enol ether (TMS) derivatives. These TMS derivatives are then analyzed by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using a triple quadrupole instrument (GC-QqQ MS/MS) under selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The APCI promotes soft ionization with very little fragmentation resulting, in most cases, in abundant [M + H](+) or [M + H-2TMSOH](+) ions, which can be chosen as precursor ions for the SRM transitions, improving in this way the selectivity and sensitivity of the method. Specificity of the transitions is also of great relevance, as the presence of endogenous compounds can affect the measurements when using the most abundant ions. The method has been qualitatively validated by spiking six different urine samples at two concentration levels each. Precision was generally satisfactory with RSD values below 25 and 15% at the low and high concentration level, respectively. Most the limits of detection (LOD) were below 0.5 ng mL(-1). Validation results were compared with the commonly used method based on the electron ionization (EI) source. EI analysis was found to be slightly more repeatable whereas lower LODs were found for APCI. In addition, the applicability of the developed method has been tested in samples collected after the administration of 4-chloromethandienone. The highest sensitivity of the APCI method for this compound, allowed to increase the period in which its administration can be detected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH+, MOH+, and MO2H+, respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH+ sharply decreased, that of MOH+ increased once and then decreased, and that of MO2H+ sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO2H+ at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH+ and 100 times higher than that of MOH+ in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO2H+ signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m3, which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m3, which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m3 vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  16. Validation of Ammonia Diffusive and Active Samplers in a Controlled Atmosphere Test Facility Using Traceable Primary Standard Gas Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, N. A.; Ferracci, V.; Cassidy, N.; Hook, J.; Battersby, R. M.; Tang, Y. S.; Stevens, A. C. M.; Jones, M. R.; Braban, C. F.; Gates, L.; Hangartner, M.; Sacco, P.; Pagani, D.; Hoffnagle, J.

    2016-12-01

    Intensive farming, the increased use of fertilizers, and certain industrial processes are believed to be responsible for increases in the amount fraction of ammonia (NH3) found in Europe. NH3 contributes to eutrophication and acidification of land and freshwater, leading to a loss of biodiversity, undesirable changes to the ecosystem, and to secondary particulate matter (PM) formation. Measurements of ambient ammonia over a wide geographical area, are principally carried out with low-cost diffusive samplers or by active sampling with denuders, with each technique delivering time-integrated values over the monitoring period. The goal of this work was to measure the NH3 diffusive sampling rates of five different designs of commercial diffusive samplers (FSM Radiello radial sampler, Gradko diffusion tube, Gradko DIFRAM-400, Passam ammonia sampler, and CEH ALPHA sampler), together with validation tests with a denuder sampler (CEH DELTA denuder). The would deliver validated improvements in the accuracy of ambient measurements of NH3 in the field through the establishment of metrological traceability using new stable ammonia Primary Standard Gas Mixtures (PSMs), developed by gravimetry at NPL. All devices were simultaneously exposed in a controlled atmosphere test facility (CATFAC) containing traceable amount fractions of ammonia applicable to a range of ambient monitoring conditions, with well-defined conditions of temperature, relative humidity and wind speed. Online continuous monitoring of the test atmospheres was carried out with a calibrated cavity ring-down spectrometer modified to account for cross interference by water. Exposed samplers were analysed by individual manufacturers for ammonium using traceable wet chemical techniques. The measured diffusive sampling rates were then applied to field measurements carried out at the Whim Bog experimental station in Scotland, where there is a facility in place for controlled releases of NH3 and also a background site.

  17. The Atmospheric Chemistry Suite (ACS) of Three Spectrometers for the ExoMars 2016 Trace Gas Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korablev, O.; Montmessin, F.; Trokhimovskiy, A.; Fedorova, A. A.; Shakun, A. V.; Grigoriev, A. V.; Moshkin, B. E.; Ignatiev, N. I.; Forget, F.; Lefèvre, F.; Anufreychik, K.; Dzuban, I.; Ivanov, Y. S.; Kalinnikov, Y. K.; Kozlova, T. O.; Kungurov, A.; Makarov, V.; Martynovich, F.; Maslov, I.; Merzlyakov, D.; Moiseev, P. P.; Nikolskiy, Y.; Patrakeev, A.; Patsaev, D.; Santos-Skripko, A.; Sazonov, O.; Semena, N.; Semenov, A.; Shashkin, V.; Sidorov, A.; Stepanov, A. V.; Stupin, I.; Timonin, D.; Titov, A. Y.; Viktorov, A.; Zharkov, A.; Altieri, F.; Arnold, G.; Belyaev, D. A.; Bertaux, J. L.; Betsis, D. S.; Duxbury, N.; Encrenaz, T.; Fouchet, T.; Gérard, J.-C.; Grassi, D.; Guerlet, S.; Hartogh, P.; Kasaba, Y.; Khatuntsev, I.; Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Lellouch, E.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Luginin, M.; Määttänen, A.; Marcq, E.; Martin Torres, J.; Medvedev, A. S.; Millour, E.; Olsen, K. S.; Patel, M. R.; Quantin-Nataf, C.; Rodin, A. V.; Shematovich, V. I.; Thomas, I.; Thomas, N.; Vazquez, L.; Vincendon, M.; Wilquet, V.; Wilson, C. F.; Zasova, L. V.; Zelenyi, L. M.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2018-02-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Suite (ACS) package is an element of the Russian contribution to the ESA-Roscosmos ExoMars 2016 Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) mission. ACS consists of three separate infrared spectrometers, sharing common mechanical, electrical, and thermal interfaces. This ensemble of spectrometers has been designed and developed in response to the Trace Gas Orbiter mission objectives that specifically address the requirement of high sensitivity instruments to enable the unambiguous detection of trace gases of potential geophysical or biological interest. For this reason, ACS embarks a set of instruments achieving simultaneously very high accuracy (ppt level), very high resolving power (>10,000) and large spectral coverage (0.7 to 17 μm—the visible to thermal infrared range). The near-infrared (NIR) channel is a versatile spectrometer covering the 0.7-1.6 μm spectral range with a resolving power of ˜20,000. NIR employs the combination of an echelle grating with an AOTF (Acousto-Optical Tunable Filter) as diffraction order selector. This channel will be mainly operated in solar occultation and nadir, and can also perform limb observations. The scientific goals of NIR are the measurements of water vapor, aerosols, and dayside or night side airglows. The mid-infrared (MIR) channel is a cross-dispersion echelle instrument dedicated to solar occultation measurements in the 2.2-4.4 μm range. MIR achieves a resolving power of >50,000. It has been designed to accomplish the most sensitive measurements ever of the trace gases present in the Martian atmosphere. The thermal-infrared channel (TIRVIM) is a 2-inch double pendulum Fourier-transform spectrometer encompassing the spectral range of 1.7-17 μm with apodized resolution varying from 0.2 to 1.3 cm-1. TIRVIM is primarily dedicated to profiling temperature from the surface up to ˜60 km and to monitor aerosol abundance in nadir. TIRVIM also has a limb and solar occultation capability. The technical concept of

  18. Analyzing the Performance of a Dual Loop Organic Rankine Cycle System for Waste Heat Recovery of a Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baofeng Yao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A dual loop organic Rankine cycle (DORC system is designed to recover waste heat from a heavy-duty compressed natural gas engine (CNGE, and the performance of the DORC–CNGE combined system is simulated and discussed. The DORC system includes high-temperature (HT and low-temperature (LT cycles. The HT cycle recovers energy from the exhaust gas emitted by the engine, whereas the LT cycle recovers energy from intake air, engine coolant, and the HT cycle working fluid in the preheater. The mathematical model of the system is established based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The characteristics of waste heat energy from the CNGE are calculated according to engine test data under various operating conditions. Moreover, the performance of the DORC–CNGE combined system is simulated and analyzed using R245fa as the working fluid. Results show that the maximum net power output and the maximum thermal efficiency of the DORC system are 29.37 kW and 10.81%, respectively, under the rated power output condition of the engine. Compared with the original CNG engine, the maximum power output increase ratio and the maximum brake specific fuel consumption improvement ratio are 33.73% and 25%, respectively, in the DORC–CNGE combined system.

  19. Hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method to analyze bisphenol A and other plasticizer metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Miriany A Moreira; André, Leiliane Coelho; Cardeal, Zenilda de Lourdes

    2017-01-20

    Phthalates and bisphenol A are important environmental pollutants due to their toxicity for humans and animals, including actions in the endocrine system. Their metabolites in urine can be used as biomarkers to assess human exposure. This paper describes the development of a new method to determine bisphenol A and eight phthalate metabolites in urine samples using hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This method showed linearity, precision, limits of detection, and quantification suitable to analyze these compounds at low concentration levels in urine. Limits of detection ranged from 0.777 to 23.3μgL-1, showing sensitivity for evaluating environmental exposure. Relative standard deviation (RSD) ranged from 11.7 to 19.7%. The developed method presented a good biomarker alternative for evaluating environmental exposure to bisphenol A and phthalates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Selected Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Surong; Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing; Du, Zhenxia

    2017-03-01

    Emerging brominated flame retardants (eBFRs) other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and their derivatives in foods have been in focus in recent years due to their increasing production volumes, indefinite information on toxicities and the lack of data on occurrence in environments, foods as well as humans. In this study, gas chromatography was coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) for the analysis of six eBFRs in pork, chicken, egg, milk and fish. A short section of unpacked capillary column coupled to the end of the analytical column was applied to improve the chromatographic behaviors of high boiling point compounds. The method was comprehensively validated with method limit of quantification (mLOQ) lower than 8 pg/g wet weight (w.w.). Samples from Chinese Total Diet study were quantified following the validated APGC-MS/MS method. 2,3,4,5-pentabromo-6-ethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were most frequently detected in samples. The highest concentration was found in fish with 351.9 pg/g w.w. of PBT. This is the first report on the presence of PBT in food samples with non-ignorable concentrations and detection rate.

  1. Filtration efficiency validation of glass wool during thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis of fine atmospheric particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Liang; Wu, Dapeng; Ding, Kun; Meng, Hu; Yan, Xiaohui; Guan, Yafeng

    2015-02-06

    Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TD-GC-MS) technique has been widely used for analysis of semi-violate organic compounds on atmospheric aerosol. To prevent GC column from being damaged by fine solid particles during thermal desorption process, glass wool as filter mat is indispensible. However, the filtration efficiency has never been validated. In this paper, the most penetrating particle size and the minimum packing thickness of glass wool were calculated based on classical filtration theory. According to the calculation results, packing parameters of glass wool were optimized experimentally using silica particles. It is demonstrated that glass wool with a packing thickness of 30 mm, solidity of 0.039 can effectively block these fine solid particles from penetrating at normal thermal desorption conditions (T=300°C, u=0.4-4 cm/s). Finally, the filtration efficiency of glass wool was further confirmed with real PM2.5 samples. Under the validated filtration condition, TD-GC-MS was applied for the analysis of non-polar organic compounds on real PM2.5 samples, and very good results were obtained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of phenolic compounds in coal tar by gas chromatography/negative-ion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sutian; Ma, Chao; Qian, Kejun; Zhou, Yasong; Shi, Quan

    2016-08-15

    Phenolic compounds are commonly found in fossel fuels and bio-oils, and have a detrimental effect on the chemical stability of the fuels. A selective analytical method is needed to characterize the phenolic compounds in complex hydrocarbon mixtures. Gas chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC/APCI-MS) was used to characterize the phenolic compounds in a low-temperature coal tar and its narrow distillate fractions. Negative-ion APCI selectively ionized phenolic compounds in the coal tar. The [M-H](-) and [M-H + O](-) ions were derived from monohydric phenols, while [M-H](-) , [M-2H](-) , and [M-2H + O](-) were from benzenediols. Monohydric phenolic compounds with 1-4 aromatic rings and some dihydric phenolic compounds were identified. The results from GC/APCI-MS were validated by those from negative electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FTICRMS). Negative-ion GC/APCI-MS was proposed and successfully used to characterize phenolic compounds in coal tar samples. This technique can potentially be used for the characterization of phenolic compounds in other complex hydrocarbon systems. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Murphree efficiency for calculating column height in CO{sub 2} absorption from atmospheric gas using amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oi, L.E. [Telemark Univ. College, Porsgrunn (Norway)

    2009-07-01

    Murphree efficiencies (EMURPHREE) are used to improve the calculation of column height for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) removal. This presentation reported on a study in which EMURPHREE was calculated for typical conditions for CO{sub 2} absorption into monoethanol amine (MEA) from atmospheric exhaust using a structured packing with specific area 250 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3}. When the inlet gas and liquid temperature was 40 degrees C, the temperatures at top stage and bottom stage conditions were 44 and 42 degrees C. The EMURPHREE calculations were based on a pseudo first order reaction between CO{sub 2} and MEA. The calculated EMURPHREE increased as temperature increased. EMURPHREE was also calculated with approximation methods from literature. The deviation in calculated EMURPHREE was less than 5 per cent when the inlet temperature was 40 degrees C. The deviation increased with temperature and CO{sub 2} loading. It was concluded that Murphree efficiencies are as accurate as more rigorous models, as long as the absorption is in the pseudo first order regime. A more rigorous model has the same uncertainties in estimation of effective specific area, CO{sub 2} solubilities and in the concentration of molecular amine in the bulk liquid. Murphree efficiencies for CO{sub 2} absorption calculations have an advantage because they can be used in robust stage by stage column models that are currently used in commercial process simulation programs.

  4. Quantification of methane fluxes from hydrocarbon seeps to the ocean and atmosphere: Development of an in situ and online gas flux measuring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Pengfei; Chen, Qinghua; Chen, Duofu

    2017-06-01

    Natural hydrocarbon seeps in the marine environment are important contributors to greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Such gases include methane, which plays a significant role in global carbon cycling and climate change. To accurately quantify the methane flux from hydrocarbon seeps on the seafloor, a specialized in situ and online gas flux measuring (GFM) device was designed to obtain high-resolution time course gas fluxes using the process of equal volume exchange. The device consists of a 1.0-m diameter, 0.9-m tall, inverted conical tent and a GFM instrument that contains a solenoid valve, level transducer, and gas collection chamber. Rising gas bubbles from seeps were measured by laboratory-calibrated GFM instruments attached to the top of the tent. According to the experimental data, the optimal anti-shake time interval was 5 s. The measurement range of the device was 0-15 L min-1, and the relative error was ± 1.0%. The device was initially deployed at an active seep site in the Lingtou Promontory seep field in South China Sea. The amount of gas released from a single gas vent was 30.5 m3 during the measurement period, and the gas flow rate ranged from 22 to 72 L h-1, depending on tidal period, and was strongly negatively correlated with water depth. The measurement results strongly suggest that oceanic tides and swells had a significant forcing effect on gas flux. Low flow rates were associated with high tides and vice versa. The changes in gas volume escaping from the seafloor seeps could be attributed to the hydrostatic pressure induced by water depth. Our findings suggest that in the marine environment, especially in the shallow shelf area, sea level variation may play an important role in controlling methane release into the ocean. Such releases probably also affect atmospheric methane levels.

  5. Signal processing of diurnal and semidiurnal variations in radon and atmospheric pressure: A new tool for accurate in situ measurement of soil gas velocity, pressure gradient, and tortuosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinault, Jean-Louis; Baubron, Jean-Claude

    1997-08-01

    Signal processing of diurnal and semidiurnal variations of both atmospheric pressure and radon concentration in soil gases is shown to be useful for estimating soil gas transport parameters. The two daily-cycle peaks at 12- and 24-hour periods in the Power Spectral Density (PSD) of atmospheric pressure seem to be present everywhere on Earth's surface, and it is the effect of these regular pressure variations on the radon concentration in soil gases that makes it possible to determine three soil gas transport parameters which can be used to estimate real gas velocity; i.e. tortuosity τ, the ratio k/n between intrinsic permeability and effective porosity (that part of porosity involved in gas transport), and the pressure gradient α. The parameters k and n can be determined independently if the gas flux at the surface is measured at the same time. The method is robust, representative, and accurate: since it allows reliable estimation of transport parameters, it can provide relevant information about the depth of the radon source and the time it takes for information to reach the surface when radon bursts occur at depth. Radon is an appropriate soil gas tracer because it exists in all soils. Moreover, the measurement of radon concentration requires only passive sensors that do not hamper the rising gas column. Gas flux data obtained in Andalusia, Spain, in connection with mineral exploration are processed as examples. Determining the complete set of transport parameters helps in the interpretation of recorded radon outbursts, which are found to be correlated with regional seismic activity.

  6. Gas-chromatographic analysis of the chemical composition of the Venusian atmosphere on the descent modules of the Venera-13 and Venera-14 probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhin, L. M.; Gelman, B. G.; Lamonov, N. I.; Melnikov, V. V.; Nenarokov, D. F.; Okhotnikov, B. P.; Rotin, V. A.; Khokhlov, V. N.

    1983-03-01

    The Sigma-2 gas-chromatograph developed for the analysis of the chemical composition of the Venusian atmosphere on the Venera 13, 14 descent modules is described, and a block diagram of Sigma-2 is presented. The presence of analysis channels with neon and electron-capture detectors made it possible to duplicate the analysis of several components and to determine the content of oxygen and argon in the atmosphere without chromatographic separation of these components. Volume concentrations (matched to heights of sampling) are presented for H2, O2, Kr, H2O, H2S, COS, and SF6 (N2O).

  7. Validation of ammonia diffusive and active samplers in a controlled atmosphere test facility using traceable Primary Standard Gas Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicholas A.; Ferracci, Valerio; Cassidy, Nathan; Hook, Josh; Battersby, Ross M.; Tang, Yuk S.; Stevens, Amy C. M.; Jones, Matthew R.; Braban, Christine F.; Gates, Linda; Hangartner, Markus; Stoll, Jean-Marc; Sacco, Paolo; Pagani, Diego; Hoffnagle, John A.

    2017-04-01

    Intensive animal farming, the increased use of fertilizers, and certain industrial processes are believed to be responsible for the observed increases in the amount fraction of ammonia (NH3) found in Europe. NH3 contributes to eutrophication and acidification of land and freshwater, potentially leading to a loss of biodiversity and undesirable changes to the ecosystem. It also contributes to the formation of secondary particulate matter (PM) formation, which is associated with poor air quality and adverse health outcomes. Measurements of ambient ammonia are principally carried out with low-cost diffusive samplers or by active sampling with denuders, with each method delivering time-integrated values over the monitoring period. However, such techniques have not yet been extensively validated. The goal of this work was to provide improvements in the metrological traceability through the determination of NH3 diffusive sampling rates. Five different designs of commercial diffusive samplers (FSM Radiello radial sampler, Gradko diffusion tube, Gradko DIFRAM-400, Passam ammonia sampler, and CEH ALPHA sampler) were employed, together with a pumped denuder sampler (CEH DELTA denuder) for comparison. All devices were simultaneously exposed for either 28 days or 14 days (dependent on sampler type) in a controlled atmosphere test facility (CATFAC) containing traceable amount fractions of humidified ammonia using new stable ammonia Primary Standard Gas Mixtures developed by gravimetry at NPL, under a wide range of conditions that are relevant to ambient monitoring. Online continuous monitoring of the ammonia test atmospheres was carried out by extractive sampling, employing a calibrated cavity ring-down spectrometer, which had been modified to account for cross interference by water vapour. Each manufacturer extracted the captured ammonia on the exposed samplers in the form of ammonium (NH4+) using their own accredited traceable wet chemical techniques, and then reported data

  8. Structures of Yb nanoparticle thin films grown by deposition in He and N(2) gas atmospheres: AFM and x-ray reflectivity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerab, Martin; Sakurai, Kenji

    2010-12-01

    Nanoparticles of lanthanide metals and their compounds are important from the viewpoint of both basic research and application to many functional devices. In the present work, a gas deposition technique was employed to prepare thin films composed of ytterbium (Z = 70) nanoparticles on a glass substrate. The influence of deposition conditions such as deposition temperature, time and gas pressure was studied in detail. In addition to an ordinary inert gas such as He, the possible use of N(2) was investigated. As a result of combined analysis using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and x-ray reflectivity, it was found that spherical nanoparticles of around 1-140 nm in diameter can be obtained upon deposition in both He and N(2) atmospheres. The thin film is not amorphous but fcc crystals of metallic ytterbium with a small amount of hcp phase are mainly formed. When exposed to air, the top surface is covered by an oxide layer due to natural oxidation. The thickness and density were in the range of 5-30 nm and 4-9 g cm(-3), respectively, depending on the deposition conditions. As only small amounts of nitrides were formed during deposition in an N(2) atmosphere in many cases, it was concluded that the use of N(2) can be a feasible alternative to the ordinary gas deposition method with an inert gas. Finally, some self-organized hexagonally shaped structures, which are more frequently observed upon deposition in N(2), are reported.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban atmosphere of Guangzhou, China: Size distribution characteristics and size-resolved gas-particle partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huan; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2012-07-01

    Size distributions of thirteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), elemental carbon (EC), and organic carbon (OC) in the range of 0.01-18 μm were measured using a nano Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (nano-MOUDI) in an urban location in Guangzhou, China in July 2006. PAH size distributions were fit with five modes and the respective mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) are: Aitken mode (MMAD: ˜0.05 μm), three accumulation modes AMI, AMII, AMIII (MMAD: 0.13-0.17 μm, 0.4-0.45 μm, and 0.9-1.2 μm, respectively), and coarse mode (MMAD: 4-6 μm). Seven-ring PAH was mainly in AMII and AMIII. Five- and six-ring PAHs were found to be abundant in all the three AM. Three- and four-ring PAHs had a significant presence in the coarse mode in addition to the three AM. Size-resolved gas-particle partition coefficients of PAHs (Kp) were estimated using measured EC and OC data. The Kp values of a given PAH could differ by a factor of up to ˜7 on particles in different size modes, with the highest Kp associated with the AMI particles and the lowest Kp associated with the coarse mode particles. Comparison of calculated overall Kp with measured Kp values in Guangzhou by Yang et al. (2010) shows that adsorption on EC appeared to be the dominant mechanism driving the gas-particle partitioning of three- and four-ring PAHs while absorption in OM played a dominant role for five- and six-ring PAHs. The calculated equilibrium timescales of repartitioning indicate that five- to seven-ring PAHs could not achieve equilibrium partitioning within their typical residence time in urban atmospheres, while three- and four-ring PAHs could readily reach new equilibrium states in particles of all sizes. A partitioning flux is therefore proposed to replace the equilibrium assumption in modeling PAH transport and fate.

  10. Responses of sap flow, leaf gas exchange and growth of hybrid aspen to elevated atmospheric humidity under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niglas, Aigar; Kupper, Priit; Tullus, Arvo; Sellin, Arne

    2014-05-15

    An increase in average air temperature and frequency of rain events is predicted for higher latitudes by the end of the 21st century, accompanied by a probable rise in air humidity. We currently lack knowledge on how forest trees acclimate to rising air humidity in temperate climates. We analysed the leaf gas exchange, sap flow and growth characteristics of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × P. tremuloides) trees growing at ambient and artificially elevated air humidity in an experimental forest plantation situated in the hemiboreal vegetation zone. Humidification manipulation did not affect the photosynthetic capacity of plants, but did affect stomatal responses: trees growing at elevated air humidity had higher stomatal conductance at saturating photosynthetically active radiation (gs sat) and lower intrinsic water-use efficiency (IWUE). Reduced stomatal limitation of photosynthesis in trees grown at elevated air humidity allowed slightly higher net photosynthesis and relative current-year height increments than in trees at ambient air humidity. Tree responses suggest a mitigating effect of higher air humidity on trees under mild water stress. At the same time, trees at higher air humidity demonstrated a reduced sensitivity of IWUE to factors inducing stomatal closure and a steeper decline in canopy conductance in response to water deficit, implying higher dehydration risk. Despite the mitigating impact of increased air humidity under moderate drought, a future rise in atmospheric humidity at high latitudes may be disadvantageous for trees during weather extremes and represents a potential threat in hemiboreal forest ecosystems. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  11. Effect of flue gas composition on deposit induced high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions mimicking biomass firing. Part I: Exposures in oxidizing and chlorinating atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kiamehr, Saeed; Montgomery, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    In biomass fired power plants, deposition of alkali chlorides on superheaters, aswell as the presence of corrosive flue gas species, give rise to fast corrosion ofsuperheaters. In order to understand the corrosion mechanism under thiscomplex condition, the influence of the flue gas composition...... bothoxidizing and oxidizing-chlorinating atmospheres, and the resulting corrosionproducts were comprehensively studied with scanning electron microscopy(SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD)techniques. The results show that deposit-free samples suffer grain boundaryattack...... only in an oxidizing-chlorinating atmosphere, otherwise corrosionresults in formation of a duplex oxide. Corrosion attack on deposit-coatedsamples was higher than on deposit-free samples irrespective of the gaseousatmosphere. Specifically, severe volatilization of alloying elements occurred ondeposit...

  12. Gas-particle interactions above a Dutch heathland: II. Concentrations and surface exchange fluxes of atmospheric particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nemitz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Size-dependent particle number fluxes measured by eddy-covariance (EC and continuous fluxes of ammonium (NH4+ measured with the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM are reported for a Dutch heathland. Daytime deposition velocities (Vd by EC with peak values of 5 to 10 mm s-1 increased with particle diameter (dp over the range 0.1–0.5 µm, and are faster than predicted by current models. With a mean Vd of 2.0 mm s-1 (daytime: 2.7; night-time 0.8 mm s-1 NH4+ fluxes by AGM are overall in agreement with former measurements and NH4+-N dry deposition amounts to 20% of the dry input of NH3-N over the measurement period. These surface exchange fluxes are analyzed together with simultaneous gas-phase flux measurements for indications of gas-particle interactions. On warm afternoons the apparent fluxes of acids and aerosol above the heathland showed several coinciding anomalies, all of which are consistent with NH4+ evaporation during deposition: (i canopy resistances for HNO3 and HCl of up to 100 s m-1, (ii simultaneous particle emission of small particles (DpDp>0.18 µm, (iii NH4+ deposition faster than derived from size-distributions and size-segregated EC particle fluxes. These observations coincide with the observations of (i surface concentration products of NH3 and HNO3 well below the thermodynamic equilibrium value and (ii Damköhler numbers that indicate chemical conversion to be sufficiently fast to modify exchange fluxes. The measurements imply a removal rate of volatile NH4+ of 3−30×10-6 s-1 averaged over the 1 km boundary-layer, while NH3 deposition is underestimated by typically 20 ng m-2 s-1 (28% and flux reversal may occur.

  13. Non-isothermal compositional liquid gas Darcy flow: formulation, soil-atmosphere boundary condition and application to high energy geothermal simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Beaude, Laurence; Brenner, Konstantin; Lopez, Simon; Masson, Roland; Smai, Farid

    2018-01-01

    This article deals with the modelling and formulation of compositional gas liquid Darcy flow. Our model includes an advanced boundary condition at the interface between the porous medium and the atmosphere accounting for convective mass and energy transfer, liquid evaporation and liquid outflow. The formulation is based on a fixed set of unknowns whatever the set of present phases. The thermody-namic equilibrium is expressed as complementary constraints. The model and its formulation are appl...

  14. Effects of Blade Boundary Layer Transition and Daytime Atmospheric Turbulence on Wind Turbine Performance Analyzed with Blade-Resolved Simulation and Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Tarak Nath

    Relevant to utility scale wind turbine functioning and reliability, the present work focuses on enhancing our understanding of wind turbine responses from interactions between energy-dominant daytime atmospheric turbulence eddies and rotating blades of a GE 1.5 MW wind turbine using a unique data set from a GE field experiment and computer simulations at two levels of fidelity. Previous studies have shown that the stability state of the lower troposphere has a major impact on the coherent structure of the turbulence eddies, with corresponding differences in wind turbine loading response. In this study, time-resolved aerodynamic data measured locally at the leading edge and trailing edge of three outer blade sections on a GE 1.5 MW wind turbine blade and high-frequency SCADA generator power data from a daytime field campaign are combined with computer simulations that mimic the GE wind turbine within a numerically generated atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow field which is a close approximation of the atmospheric turbulence experienced by the wind turbine in the field campaign. By combining the experimental and numerical data sets, this study describes the time-response characteristics of the local loadings on the blade sections in response to nonsteady nonuniform energetic atmospheric turbulence eddies within a daytime ABL which have spatial scale commensurate with that of the turbine blade length. This study is the first of its kind where actuator line and blade boundary layer resolved CFD studies of a wind turbine field campaign are performed with the motivation to validate the numerical predictions with the experimental data set, and emphasis is given on understanding the influence of the laminar to turbulent transition process on the blade loadings. The experimental and actuator line method data sets identify three important response time scales quantified at the blade location: advective passage of energy-dominant eddies (≈25 - 50 s), blade rotation (1P

  15. Periodic DFT study of acidic trace atmospheric gas molecule adsorption on Ca and Fe doped MgO (001) surface basic sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Courtney; Orlando, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The electronic properties of undoped and Ca or Fe doped MgO (001) surfaces, as well as their propensity towards atmospheric acidic gas (CO2, SO2 and NO2) uptake was investigated with an emphasis on gas adsorption on the basic MgO oxygen surface sites, Osurf, using periodic Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. Adsorption energy calculations show that MgO doping will provide stronger interactions of the adsorbate with the Osurf sites than the undoped MgO for a given adsorbate molecule. Charge transfer from the iron atom in Fe doped MgO (001) to NO2 was shown to increase the binding interaction between adsorbate by an order of magnitude, when compared to that of undoped and Ca doped MgO (001) surfaces. Secondary binding interactions of adsorbate oxygen atoms were observed with surface magnesium sites at distances close to those of the Mg-O bond within the crystal. These interactions may serve as a preliminary step for adsorption and facilitate further adsorbate transformations into other binding configurations. Impacts on global atmospheric chemistry are discussed as these adsorption phenomena can affect atmospheric gas budgets via altered partitioning and retention on mineral aerosol surfaces. PMID:22775293

  16. Conditions for the formation and atmospheric dispersion of a toxic, heavy gas layer during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits by sill intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Michael; Hankin, Robin K. S.

    2010-05-01

    There is compelling evidence for massive discharge of volatiles, including toxic species, into the atmosphere at the end of the Permian. It has been argued that most of the gases were produced during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits in the East Siberia Tunguska basin following sill intrusion (Retallack and Jahren, 2008; Svensen et al., 2009). The release of the volatiles has been proposed as a major cause of environmental and extinction events at the end of the Permian, with venting of carbon gases and halocarbons to the atmosphere leading to global warming and atmospheric ozone depletion (Svensen et al., 2009) Here we consider the conditions required for the formation and dispersion of toxic, heavier than air, gas plumes, made up of a mixture of CO2, CH4, H2S and SO2 and formed during the thermal metamorphism of C- and S- rich sediments. Dispersion models and density considerations within a range of CO2/CH4 ratios and volatile fluxes and temperatures, for gas discharge by both seepage and from vents, allow the possibility that following sill emplacement much of the vast East Siberia Tunguska basin was - at least intermittently - covered by a heavy, toxic gas layer that was unfavorable for life. Dispersion scenarios for a heavy gas layer beyond the Siberian region during end-Permian times will be presented. REFERENCES G. J. Retallack and A. H. Jahren, Methane release from igneous intrusion of coal during Late Permian extinction events, Journal of Geology, volume 116, 1-20, 2008 H. Svensen et al., Siberian gas venting and the end-Permian environmental crisis, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, volume 277, 490-500, 2009

  17. Methods of gas purification and effect on the ion composition in an RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet investigated by mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse-Kreul, Simon; Huebner, Simon; Schneider, Simon; Keudell, Achim von; Benedikt, Jan [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institute for Experimental Physics II, Bochum (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    The analysis of the ion chemistry of atmospheric pressure plasmas is essential to evaluate ionic reaction pathways during plasma-surface or plasma-analyte interactions. In this contribution, the ion chemistry of a radio-frequency atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ) operated in helium is investigated by mass spectrometry (MS). It is found, that the ion composition is extremely sensitive to impurities such as N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Without gas purification, protonated water cluster ions of the form H{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} are dominating downstream the positive ion mass spectrum. However, even after careful feed gas purification to the sub-ppm level using a molecular sieve trap and a liquid nitrogen trap as well as operation of the plasma in a controlled atmosphere, the positive ion mass spectrum is strongly influenced by residual trace gases. The observations support the idea that species with a low ionization energy serve as a major source of electrons in atmospheric pressure helium plasmas. Similarly, the neutral density of atomic nitrogen measured by MS in a He/N{sub 2} mixture is varying up to a factor 3, demonstrating the significant influence of impurities on the neutral species chemistry as well. (orig.)

  18. Design and application of a mobile ground-based observatory for continuous measurements of atmospheric trace gas and criteria pollutant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, S. E.; Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Lai, C.-T.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-08-01

    Ground-based measurements of atmospheric trace gas species and criteria pollutants are essential for understanding emissions dynamics across space and time. Gas composition in the lower 50 m of the atmosphere has the greatest direct impacts on human health as well as ecosystem processes; hence data at this level are necessary for addressing carbon-cycle- and public-health-related questions. However, such surface data are generally associated with stationary measurement towers, where spatial representation is limited due to the high cost of establishing and maintaining an extensive network of measurement stations. We describe here a compact mobile laboratory equipped to provide high-precision, high-frequency, continuous, on-road synchronous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O, NOx, O3, aerosol, meteorological, and geospatial position data. The mobile laboratory has been deployed across the western USA. In addition to describing the vehicle and its capacity, we present data that illustrate the use of the laboratory as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial structure of urban trace gas emissions and criteria pollutants at spatial scales ranging from single streets to whole ecosystem and regional scales. We assess the magnitude of known point sources of CH4 and also identify fugitive urban CH4 emissions. We illustrate how such a mobile laboratory can be used to better understand emissions dynamics and quantify emissions ratios associated with trace gas emissions from wildfire incidents. Lastly, we discuss additional mobile laboratory applications in health and urban metabolism.

  19. Effects of gas temperature in the plasma layer on RONS generation in array-type dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung-Young; Yi, Changho; Eom, Sangheum; Park, Seungil; Kim, Seong Bong; Ryu, Seungmin; Yoo, Suk Jae

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we studied the control of plasma-produced species under a fixed gas composition (i.e., ambient air) in a 10 kHz-driven array-type dielectric barrier atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge. Instead of the gas composition, only the gas velocity was controlled. Thus, the plasma-maintenance cost was considerably lower than methods such as external N2 or O2 injection. The plasma-produced species were monitored using Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. The discharge properties were measured using a voltage probe, current probe, infrared camera, and optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed that the major plasma products largely depend on the gas temperature in the plasma discharge layer. The gas temperature in the plasma discharge layer was significantly different to the temperature of the ceramic adjacent to the plasma discharge layer, even in the small discharge power density of ˜15 W/cm2 or ˜100 W/cm3. Because the vibrational excitation of N2 was suppressed by the higher gas flow, the major plasma-produced species shifted from NOx in low flow to O3 in high flow.

  20. Potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source in gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the screening of urinary exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raro, M.; Portolés, T.; Pitarch, E.; Sancho, J.V.; Hernández, F. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, E-12071 Castellón (Spain); Garrostas, L. [Bioanalysis Research Group, IMIM, Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Marcos, J.; Ventura, R.; Segura, J. [Bioanalysis Research Group, IMIM, Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Experimental and Health Sciencies, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Pozo, O.J., E-mail: opozo@imim.es [Bioanalysis Research Group, IMIM, Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-02-04

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis has been evaluated for the screening of 16 exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) in urine. The sample treatment is based on the strategy currently applied in doping control laboratories i.e. enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid–liquid extraction (LLE) and derivatization to form the trimethylsilyl ether-trimethylsilyl enol ether (TMS) derivatives. These TMS derivatives are then analyzed by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using a triple quadrupole instrument (GC-QqQ MS/MS) under selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The APCI promotes soft ionization with very little fragmentation resulting, in most cases, in abundant [M + H]{sup +} or [M + H-2TMSOH]{sup +} ions, which can be chosen as precursor ions for the SRM transitions, improving in this way the selectivity and sensitivity of the method. Specificity of the transitions is also of great relevance, as the presence of endogenous compounds can affect the measurements when using the most abundant ions. The method has been qualitatively validated by spiking six different urine samples at two concentration levels each. Precision was generally satisfactory with RSD values below 25 and 15% at the low and high concentration level, respectively. Most the limits of detection (LOD) were below 0.5 ng mL{sup −1}. Validation results were compared with the commonly used method based on the electron ionization (EI) source. EI analysis was found to be slightly more repeatable whereas lower LODs were found for APCI. In addition, the applicability of the developed method has been tested in samples collected after the administration of 4-chloromethandienone. The highest sensitivity of the APCI method for this compound, allowed to increase the period in which its administration can be detected. - Highlights: • APCI source has been evaluated for the screening of 16 exogenous AAS in urine. • Suitable

  1. High-precision quasi-continuous atmospheric greenhouse gas measurements at Trainou tower (Orléans forest, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Lopez, M.; Yver Kwok, C.; Messager, C.; Ramonet, M.; Wastine, B.; Vuillemin, C.; Truong, F.; Gal, B.; Parmentier, E.; Cloué, O.; Ciais, P.

    2014-07-01

    Results from the Trainou tall tower measurement station installed in 2006 are presented for atmospheric measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, CO, H2 mole fractions and radon-222 activity. Air is sampled from four sampling heights (180, 100, 50 and 5 m) of the Trainou 200 m television tower in the Orléans forest in France (47°57'53" N, 2°06'45" E, 131 m a.s.l.). The station is equipped with a custom-built CO2 analyser (CARIBOU), which is based on a commercial non-dispersive, infrared (NDIR) analyser (Licor 6252), and a coupled gas chromatography (GC) system equipped with an electron capture detector (ECD) and a flame ionization detector (FID) (HP6890N, Agilent) and a reduction gas detector (PP1, Peak Performer). Air intakes, pumping and air drying system are shared between the CARIBOU and the GC systems. The ultimately achieved short-term repeatability (1 sigma, over several days) for the GC system is 0.05 ppm for CO2, 1.4 ppb for CH4, 0.25 ppb for N2O, 0.08 ppb for SF6, 0.88 ppb for CO and 3.8 for H2. The repeatability of the CARIBOU CO2 analyser is 0.06 ppm. In addition to the in situ measurements, weekly flask sampling is performed, and flask air samples are analysed at the Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE) central laboratory for the same species as well for stable isotopes of CO2. The comparison between in situ measurements and the flask sampling showed averaged differences of 0.08 ± 1.40 ppm for CO2, 0.7 ± 7.3 ppb for CH4, 0.6 ± 0.6 ppb for N2O, 0.01 ± 0.10 ppt for SF6, 1.5± 5.3 ppb for CO and 4.8± 6.9 ppb for H2 for the years 2008-2012. At Trainou station, the mean annual increase rates from 2007 to 2011 at the 180 m sampling height were 2.2 ppm yr-1 for CO2, 4 ppb yr-1 for CH4, 0.78 ppb yr-1 for N2O and 0.29 ppt yr-1 for SF6. For all species, the 180 m sampling level showed the smallest diurnal variation. Mean diurnal gradients between the 50 m and the 180 m sampling level reached up to 30 ppm CO2, 15 ppm CH4 or 0.5 ppb N2

  2. A standalone decay heat removal device for the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor for intermediate to atmospheric pressure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epiney, A., E-mail: aaron@epiney.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland); Alpy, N., E-mail: nicolas.alpy@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Service d' Etudes des Systemes Innovants, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Mikityuk, K., E-mail: konstantin.mikityuk@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Chawla, R., E-mail: rakesh.chawla@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An analytical model predicting Brayton cycle off-design steady states, is developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model is used to design an autonomous decay heat removal system for the GFR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Predictions of the analytical model are verified using CATHARE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CATHARE code is used to simulate a set of GFR safety depressurization transients using this device. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Convenient turbo-machine designs exist for the targeted autonomous decay heat removal for a wide pressure range. - Abstract: This paper reports a design study for a Brayton cycle machine, which would constitute a dedicated, standalone decay heat removal (DHR) device for the Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). In comparison to the DHR reference strategy developed by the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique during the GFR pre-conceptual design phase (which was completed at the end of 2007), the salient feature of this alternative device would be to combine the energetic autonomy of the natural convection process - which is foreseen for operation at high and medium pressures - with the efficiency of the forced convection process which is foreseen for operation down to very low pressures. An analytical model, the so-called 'Brayton scoping model', is described first. This is based on simplified thermodynamic and aerodynamic equations, and was developed to highlight design choices. Two different machine designs are analyzed: a Brayton loop turbo-machine working with helium, and a second one working with nitrogen, since nitrogen is the heavy gas foreseen to be injected into the primary system to enhance the natural convection under loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) conditions. Simulations of the steady-state and transient behavior of the proposed device have then been carried out using the CATHARE code. These serve to confirm the insights obtained from usage of the

  3. Determination of volatile organic compounds in water by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry with triple quadrupole analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervera, M.I. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain); Beltran, J., E-mail: joaquim.beltran@uji.es [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain); Lopez, F.J.; Hernandez, F. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {yields} Employing a statistical optimization improves results reducing experiments. {yields} Use of MS (QqQ) allows high sensitivity determination and improves identification capabilities. {yields} Using Q/q intensity ratios is a powerful tool to ensure compound identification. {yields} HS SPME GC-MS/MS method allows determination of VOCs in complex matrix water samples. - Abstract: In the present work, a rapid method with little sample handling has been developed for determination of 23 selected volatile organic compounds in environmental and wastewater samples. The method is based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) determination using triple quadrupole analyzer (QqQ) in electron ionization mode. The best conditions for extraction were optimised with a factorial design taking into account the interaction between different parameters and not only individual effects of variables. In the optimized procedure, 4 mL of water sample were extracted using a 10 mL vial and adding 0.4 g NaCl (final NaCl content of 10%). An SPME extraction with carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane 75 {mu}m fiber for 30 min at 50 deg. C (with 5 min of previous equilibration time) with magnetic stirring was applied. Chromatographic determination was carried out by GC-MS/MS working in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode. For most analytes, two MS/MS transitions were acquired, although for a few compounds it was difficult to obtain characteristic abundant fragments. In those cases, a pseudo selected reaction monitoring (pseudo-SRM) with three ions was used instead. The intensity ratio between quantitation (Q) and confirmation (q) signals was used as a confirmatory parameter. The method was validated by means of recovery experiments (n = 6) spiking mineral water samples at three concentration levels (0.1, 5 and 50 {mu}g L{sup -1}). Recoveries between 70% and 120% were generally obtained with

  4. A Fast Atmospheric Trace Gas Retrieval for Hyperspectral Instruments Approximating Multiple Scattering—Part 1: Radiative Transfer and a Potential OCO-2 XCO2 Retrieval Setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Reuter

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Satellite retrievals of the atmospheric dry-air column-average mole fraction of CO 2 (XCO 2 based on hyperspectral measurements in appropriate near (NIR and short wave infrared (SWIR O 2 and CO 2 absorption bands can help to answer important questions about the carbon cycle but the precision and accuracy requirements for XCO 2 data products are demanding. Multiple scattering of light at aerosols and clouds can be a significant error source for XCO 2 retrievals. Therefore, so called full physics retrieval algorithms were developed aiming to minimize scattering related errors by explicitly fitting scattering related properties such as cloud water/ice content, aerosol optical thickness, cloud height, etc. However, the computational costs for multiple scattering radiative transfer (RT calculations can be immense. Processing all data of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2 can require up to thousands of CPU cores and the next generation of CO 2 monitoring satellites will produce at least an order of magnitude more data. Here we introduce the Fast atmOspheric traCe gAs retrievaL FOCAL including a scalar RT model which approximates multiple scattering effects with an analytic solution of the RT problem of an isotropic scattering layer and a Lambertian surface. The computational performance is similar to an absorption only model and currently determined by the convolution of the simulated spectra with the instrumental line shape function (ILS. We assess FOCAL’s quality by confronting it with accurate multiple scattering vector RT simulations using SCIATRAN. The simulated scenarios do not cover all possible geophysical conditions but represent, among others, some typical cloud and aerosol scattering scenarios with optical thicknesses of up to 0.7 which have the potential to survive the pre-processing of a XCO 2 algorithm for real OCO-2 measurements. Systematic errors of XCO 2 range from −2.5 ppm (−6.3‰ to 3.0 ppm (7.6‰ and are usually

  5. Positioning of the Precursor Gas Inlet in an Atmospheric Dielectric Barrier Reactor, and its Effect on the Quality of Deposited TiOx Thin Film Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Píchal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin film technology has become pervasive in many applications in recent years, but it remains difficult to select the best deposition technique. A further consideration is that, due to ecological demands, we are forced to search for environmentally benign methods. One such method might be the application of cold plasmas, and there has already been a rapid growth in studies of cold plasma techniques. Plasma technologies operating at atmospheric pressure have been attracting increasing attention. The easiest way to obtain low temperature plasma at atmospheric pressure seems to be through atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (ADBD. We used the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD method applying atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (ADBD plasmafor TiOx thin films deposition, employing titanium isopropoxide (TTIP and oxygen as reactants, and argon as a working gas. ADBD was operated in filamentary mode. The films were deposited on glass. We studied the quality of the deposited TiOx thin film surface for various precursor gas inlet positions in the ADBD reactor. The best thin films quality was achieved when the precursor gases were brought close to the substrate surface directly through the inlet placed in one of the electrodes.High hydrophilicity of the samples was proved by contact angle tests (CA. The film morphology was tested by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The thickness of the thin films varied in the range of (80 ÷ 210 nm in dependence on the composition of the reactor atmosphere. XPS analyses indicate that composition of the films is more like the composition of TiOxCy.

  6. Exposure of unsuspecting workers to deadly atmospheres in below-ground confined spaces and investigation of related whole-air sample composition using adsorption gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip A; Lockhart, Bonnie; Besser, Brett W; Michalski, Michael A R

    2014-01-01

    Hazardous atmospheres in confined spaces may be obvious when a source of air contamination or oxygen (O2) deficiency is recognized. Such is often the case in general industry settings, especially with work processes which create hazardous atmospheres that may be anticipated. Hazards present in active sewers are also well recognized; but the possibility that O2 deficiency or high airborne contaminant concentrations may exist in new construction sewers or storm drains has been repeatedly ignored with deadly results. Low O2 and high carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations may exist in new construction manholes that have not yet been connected to an active sewer or drain system, and these concentrations have been shown to vary over time. A recent incident is described where workers repeatedly entered such a confined space without incident, but subsequent entry resulted in a fatality and a near-miss for a co-worker rescuer. Additional cases are discussed, with an emphasis placed on elevated CO2 concentrations as a causative factor. A description is provided for the adsorptive gas chromatography whole-air analysis methodology used to quantitatively determine atmospheric conditions present at this type of fatality site or others after an incident, and for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method used to provide confirmation of analyte identity with high certainty. Many types of confined spaces may be encountered in addition to the underground varieties discussed, and many possible atmospheric hazards are possible. The definitive whole-air analysis approach described here may be of use and should be considered to investigate many confined space fatality and near-miss cases, and to better understand the causes of dangerous atmosphere conditions that may arise in confined spaces.

  7. A laboratory flow reactor with gas particle separation and on-line MS/MS for product identification in atmospherically important reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Bennett

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A system to study the gas and particle phase products from gas phase hydrocarbon oxidation is described. It consists of a gas phase photochemical flow reactor followed by a diffusion membrane denuder to remove gases from the reacted products, or a filter to remove the particles. Chemical analysis is performed by an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. A diffusion membrane denuder is shown to remove trace gases to below detectable limits so the particle phase can be studied. The system was tested by examining the products of the oxidation of m-xylene initiated by HO radicals. Dimethylphenol was observed in both the gas and particle phases although individual isomers could not be identified. Two furanone isomers, 5-methyl-2(3Hfuranone and 3-methyl-2(5Hfuranone were identified in the particulate phase, but the isobaric product 2,5 furandione was not observed. One isomer of dimethyl-nitrophenol was identified in the particle phase but not in the gas phase.

  8. Influence of the flux composition and state of the gas atmosphere over the kinetics of nitrogen absorption by steels and alloys at the arc slag remelting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medovar, B.I.; Medovar, L.B.; Saenko, V.Ya.; Pomarin, Yu.M.; Chernets, A.V. [Academy of Sci., Kiev (Ukraine). Sci. and Eng. Center of Electroslag Technol.

    1999-07-01

    In the work are represented the results of fundamental investigations of the kinetics of nitrogen absorption depending on state of the gas atmosphere and composition of the flux applied at the induction and arc melting. Are given the calculated and experimental relations of nitrogen absorption by liquid metal from the gas phase within the atmosphere of nitrogen with different concentration of oxygen, performed on the basis of application of modern methods of levitation and arc meltings. It is shown that along with increasing of the oxygen content in the gas phase reduces the speed of nitrogen absorption independently from the applied means of melting (the induction or arc one). The data obtained on the grounds of the theoretical calculations and laboratory investigations have been confirmed by the results of the experimental and industrial testing with respect the arc slag remelting technology (ASR). It is shown that chemical composition of the flux considerably influences over the kinetics of nitrogen absorption by liquid metal, and along with increasing the quantity of oxides in it reduces the speed of nitrogen absorption by metal. It has been also established the dependence of the grade of metal saturation with nitrogen at the ASR for different depth of the slag pool. The investigations having been carried out allowed detect and precise the extent of influence of different technological parameters over saturation of metal with nitrogen and showed that keeping to optimum technological schedules of remelting it is possible alloy metal by nitrogen from the gas phase until the concentrations close to standard solubility and confirmed high effectiveness of the means of nitrogen alloying immediately from the gas phase within the ASR process. (orig.)

  9. Influence of Gas Atmosphere Dew Point on the Selective Oxidation and the Reactive Wetting During Hot Dip Galvanizing of CMnSi TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Lawrence; Lee, Seok Jae; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Young Ha; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2013-01-01

    The selective oxidation and reactive wetting of intercritically annealed Si-bearing CMnSi transformation-induced plasticity steels were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In a N2 + 10 pct H2 gas atmosphere with a dew point (DP) ranging from 213 K to 278 K (-60 °C to 5 °C), a continuous layer of selective oxides was formed on the surface. Annealing in a higher DP gas atmosphere resulted in a thinner layer of external oxidation and a greater depth of internal oxidation. The hot dipping was carried out in a Zn bath containing 0.22 mass pct Al, and the bath temperature was 733 K (460 °C). Coarse and discontinuous Fe2Al5- x Zn x grains and Fe-Zn intermetallics (ζ and δ) were observed at the steel/coating interface after the hot dip galvanizing (HDG) of panels were annealed in a low DP atmosphere 213 K (-60 °C). The Fe-Zn intermetallics were formed both in areas where the Fe2Al5- x Zn x inhibition layer had not been formed and on top of non-stoichiometric Fe-Al-Zn crystals. Poor wetting was observed on panels annealed in a low DP atmosphere because of the formation of thick film-type oxides on the surface. After annealing in higher DP gas atmospheres, i.e., 263 K and 278 K (-10 °C and 5 °C), a continuous and fine-grained Fe2Al5- x Zn x layer was formed. No Fe-Zn intermetallics were formed. The small grain size of the inhibition layer was attributed to the nucleation of the Fe2Al5- x Zn x grains on small ferrite sub-surface grains and the presence of granular surface oxides. A high DP atmosphere can therefore significantly contribute to the decrease of Zn-coating defects on CMnSi TRIP steels processed in HDG lines.

  10. New technique for the direct analysis of food powders confined in a small hole using transversely excited atmospheric CO(2) laser-induced gas plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumaeni, Ali; Ramli, Muliadi; Deguchi, Yoji; Lee, Yong Inn; Idris, Nasrullah; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2008-12-01

    Taking advantage of the differences between the interactions of transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO(2) lasers with metal and with organic powder, a new technique for the direct analysis of food powder samples has been developed. In this technique, the powder samples were placed into a small hole with a diameter of 2 mm and a depth of 3 mm and covered by a metal mesh. The TEA CO(2) laser (1500 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the powder sample surfaces, passing through the metal mesh, at atmospheric pressure in nitrogen gas. It is hypothesized that the small hole functions to confine the powder particles and suppresses the blowing-off of sample, while the metal mesh works as the source of electrons to initiate the strong gas breakdown plasma. The confined powder particles are then ablated by laser irradiation and the ablated particles move into the strong gas breakdown plasma region to be atomized and excited; this method cannot be applied for the case of Nd:YAG lasers because in such case the metal mesh itself was ablated by the laser irradiation. A quantitative analysis of a milk powder sample containing different concentrations of Ca was successfully demonstrated, resulting in a good linear calibration curve with high precision.

  11. Adsorption of volatile polonium and bismuth species on metals in various gas atmospheres. Pt. I. Adsorption of volatile polonium and bismuth on gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Neuhausen, Joerg; Dressler, Rugard; Piguet, David; Voegele, Alexander; Schumann, Dorothea [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Radiochemistry; Eichler, Robert [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Radiochemistry; Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. for Chemistry and Biochemistry; Rijpstra, Kim [Ghent Univ., Zwijnaarde (Belgium). Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM); Cottenier, Stefaan [Ghent Univ., Zwijnaarde (Belgium). Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM); Ghent Univ., Zwijnaarde (Belgium). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2016-07-01

    Polonium isotopes are considered the most hazardous radionuclides produced during the operation of accelerator driven systems (ADS) when lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is used as the reactor coolant and as the spallation target material. In this work the use of gold surfaces for capturing polonium from the cover gas of the ADS reactor was studied by thermochromatography. The results show that gaseous monoatomic polonium, formed in dry hydrogen, is adsorbed on gold at 1058 K. Its adsorption enthalpy was calculated as -250±7 kJ mol{sup -1}, using a Monte Carlo simulation code. Highly volatile polonium species that were observed in similar experiments in fused silica columns in the presence of moisture in both inert and reducing gas were not detected in the experiments studying adsorption on gold surfaces. PoO{sub 2} is formed in both dry and moist oxygen, and its interaction with gold is characterized by transport reactions. The interaction of bismuth, present in large amounts in the atmosphere of the ADS, with gold was also evaluated. It was found that bismuth has a higher affinity for gold, compared to polonium, in an inert, reducing, and oxidizing atmosphere. This fact must be considered when using gold as a material for filtering polonium in the cover gas of ADS.

  12. Technical Note: A minimally invasive experimental system for pCO2 manipulation in plankton cultures using passive gas exchange (atmospheric carbon control simulator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Brooke A.; Olson, M. Brady; Wuori, Tristen

    2017-05-01

    As research into the biotic effects of ocean acidification has increased, the methods for simulating these environmental changes in the laboratory have multiplied. Here we describe the atmospheric carbon control simulator (ACCS) for the maintenance of plankton under controlled pCO2 conditions, designed for species sensitive to the physical disturbance introduced by the bubbling of cultures and for studies involving trophic interaction. The system consists of gas mixing and equilibration components coupled with large-volume atmospheric simulation chambers. These chambers allow gas exchange to counteract the changes in carbonate chemistry induced by the metabolic activity of the organisms. The system is relatively low cost, very flexible, and when used in conjunction with semi-continuous culture methods, it increases the density of organisms kept under realistic conditions, increases the allowable time interval between dilutions, and/or decreases the metabolically driven change in carbonate chemistry during these intervals. It accommodates a large number of culture vessels, which facilitate multi-trophic level studies and allow the tracking of variable responses within and across plankton populations to ocean acidification. It also includes components that increase the reliability of gas mixing systems using mass flow controllers.

  13. Occurrence of gaseous and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the urban atmosphere: study of sources and ambient temperature effect on the gas/particle concentration and distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsapakis, Manolis [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (ECPL), Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, EL-71409 Heraklion (Greece); Stephanou, Euripides G. [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (ECPL), Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, EL-71409 Heraklion (Greece)]. E-mail: stephanou@chemistry.uoc.gr

    2005-01-01

    The presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an urban region (Heraklion, Greece) and processes that govern their atmospheric fate were studied from November 2000 until February 2002. Sixteen samples were collected, by using an artifact-free sampling device, on a monthly basis and the concentration of PAHs in gas and particulate phase was determined. The most abundant members (gas + particles) were phenanthrene (20.0 {+-} 7.0 ng m{sup -3}), fluoranthene (6.5 {+-} 1.7 ng m{sup -3}), pyrene (6.6 {+-} 2.4 ng m{sup -3}), and chrysene (3.1 {+-} 1.5 ng m{sup -3}). Total concentration (gas + particulate) of PAH ranged from 44.3 to 129.2 ng m{sup -3}, with a mean concentration of 79.3 ng m{sup -3}. Total concentration of PAHs in gas phase ranged from 31.4 to 84.7 ng m{sup -3} with non-observable seasonal variation. Conversely, maximum PAH concentrations in the particulate phase occurred during winter months. Particulate concentration varied from 11.4 to 44.9 ng m{sup -3}, with an average of 25.2 ng m{sup -3}. PAH distribution between gas and particulate phase was in agreement with the sub-cooled vapor pressure. Shift in gas/particle distribution due to difference in ambient temperature elucidated to some extent the seasonal variation of the concentration of PAHs in particles. - Capsule: Ambient PAH partitioning between gas and particle phases vary between compounds and with environmental conditions.

  14. Rapid Detection of Gas Hazards and Leaks with an Atmospheric Sampling, High Resolution, Mass Spectrometer with Low Pumping Requirements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Miniaturization of mass spectrometers is restricted almost exclusively by the ability of small vacuum pumps to remove gas loads during operation of the instrument....

  15. Tunable diode laser IR spectrometer for in situ measurements of the gas phase composition and particle size distribution of Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Christopher R.; Sander, Stanley P.; Beer, Reinhard; May, Randy D.; Knollenberg, Robert G.

    1990-01-01

    A new instrument, the Probe Infrared Laser Spectrometer (PIRLS), is described for in situ sensing of the gas composition and particle size distribution of Titan's atmosphere on the NASA/ESA Cassini mission. For gas composition measurements, several narrow-band (0.0001/cm) tunable lead-salt diode lasers operating near 80 K at selected mid-IR wavelengths are directed over a path length defined by a small reflector extending over the edge of the probe spacecraft platform; volume mixing ratios of 10 to the -9th should be measurable for several species of interest. A cloud-particle-size spectrometer using a diode laser source at 780 nm shares the optical path and deployed reflector; a combination of imaging and light scattering techniques is used to determine sizes of haze and cloud particles and their number density as a function of altitude.

  16. Effect of flue gas composition on deposit induced high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions mimicking biomass firing. Part I: Exposures in oxidizing and chlorinating atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kiamehr, Saeed; Montgomery, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    In biomass fired power plants, deposition of alkali chlorides on superheaters, aswell as the presence of corrosive flue gas species, give rise to fast corrosion ofsuperheaters. In order to understand the corrosion mechanism under thiscomplex condition, the influence of the flue gas composition...... on hightemperature corrosion of an austenitic superheater material under laboratoryconditions mimicking biomass firing is investigated in this work. Exposuresinvolving deposit (KCl)-coated and deposit-free austenitic stainless steel (TP347H FG) samples were conducted isothermally at 560 8C for 72 h, under...... only in an oxidizing-chlorinating atmosphere, otherwise corrosionresults in formation of a duplex oxide. Corrosion attack on deposit-coatedsamples was higher than on deposit-free samples irrespective of the gaseousatmosphere. Specifically, severe volatilization of alloying elements occurred ondeposit...

  17. Design and application of a mobile ground-based observatory for continuous measurements of atmospheric trace-gas and criteria pollutant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, S. E.; Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Lai, C.-T.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of atmospheric trace gas species and criteria pollutants are essential for understanding emissions dynamics across space and time. Gas composition in the surface 50 m has the greatest direct impacts on human health as well as ecosystem processes, hence data at this level is necessary for addressing carbon cycle and public health related questions. However, such surface data are generally associated with stationary measurement towers, where spatial representation is limited due to the high cost of establishing and maintaining an extensive network of measurement stations. We describe here a compact mobile laboratory equipped to provide high-precision, high-frequency, continuous, on-road synchronous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O, NOx, O3, aerosol, meteorological, and geospatial position data. The mobile laboratory has been deployed across the western USA. In addition to describing the vehicle and its capacity, we present data that illustrate the use of the laboratory as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial structure of urban trace gas emissions and criteria pollutants at spatial scales ranging from single streets to whole ecosystem and regional scales. We identify fugitive urban CH4 emissions and assess the magnitude of CH4 emissions from known point sources. We illustrate how such a mobile laboratory can be used to better understand emissions dynamics and quantify emissions ratios associated with trace gas emissions from wildfire incidents. Lastly, we discuss additional mobile laboratory applications in health and urban metabolism.

  18. Meteorological and trace gas factors affecting the number concentration of atmospheric Aitken (Dp = 50 nm particles in the continental boundary layer: parameterization using a multivariate mixed effects model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Facchini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of aerosol size distribution and different gas and meteorological parameters, made in three polluted sites in Central and Southern Europe: Po Valley, Italy, Melpitz and Hohenpeissenberg in Germany, were analysed for this study to examine which of the meteorological and trace gas variables affect the number concentration of Aitken (Dp= 50 nm particles. The aim of our study was to predict the number concentration of 50 nm particles by a combination of in-situ meteorological and gas phase parameters. The statistical model needs to describe, amongst others, the factors affecting the growth of newly formed aerosol particles (below 10 nm to 50 nm size, but also sources of direct particle emissions in that size range. As the analysis method we used multivariate nonlinear mixed effects model. Hourly averages of gas and meteorological parameters measured at the stations were used as predictor variables; the best predictive model was attained with a combination of relative humidity, new particle formation event probability, temperature, condensation sink and concentrations of SO2, NO2 and ozone. The seasonal variation was also taken into account in the mixed model structure. Model simulations with the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP indicate that the parameterization can be used as a part of a larger atmospheric model to predict the concentration of climatically active particles. As an additional benefit, the introduced model framework is, in theory, applicable for any kind of measured aerosol parameter.

  19. Statistical atmospheric inversion of local gas emissions by coupling the tracer release technique and local-scale transport modelling: a test case with controlled methane emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ars

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new concept for estimating the pollutant emission rates of a site and its main facilities using a series of atmospheric measurements across the pollutant plumes. This concept combines the tracer release method, local-scale atmospheric transport modelling and a statistical atmospheric inversion approach. The conversion between the controlled emission and the measured atmospheric concentrations of the released tracer across the plume places valuable constraints on the atmospheric transport. This is used to optimise the configuration of the transport model parameters and the model uncertainty statistics in the inversion system. The emission rates of all sources are then inverted to optimise the match between the concentrations simulated with the transport model and the pollutants' measured atmospheric concentrations, accounting for the transport model uncertainty. In principle, by using atmospheric transport modelling, this concept does not strongly rely on the good colocation between the tracer and pollutant sources and can be used to monitor multiple sources within a single site, unlike the classical tracer release technique. The statistical inversion framework and the use of the tracer data for the configuration of the transport and inversion modelling systems should ensure that the transport modelling errors are correctly handled in the source estimation. The potential of this new concept is evaluated with a relatively simple practical implementation based on a Gaussian plume model and a series of inversions of controlled methane point sources using acetylene as a tracer gas. The experimental conditions are chosen so that they are suitable for the use of a Gaussian plume model to simulate the atmospheric transport. In these experiments, different configurations of methane and acetylene point source locations are tested to assess the efficiency of the method in comparison to the classic tracer release technique in coping

  20. Oxygenated volatile organic carbon in the western Pacific convective center: ocean cycling, air-sea gas exchange and atmospheric transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlundt, Cathleen; Tegtmeier, Susann; Lennartz, Sinikka T.; Bracher, Astrid; Cheah, Wee; Krüger, Kirstin; Quack, Birgit; Marandino, Christa A.

    2017-09-01

    A suite of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs - acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, butanal and butanone) were measured concurrently in the surface water and atmosphere of the South China Sea and Sulu Sea in November 2011. A strong correlation was observed between all OVOC concentrations in the surface seawater along the entire cruise track, except for acetaldehyde, suggesting similar sources and sinks in the surface ocean. Additionally, several phytoplankton groups, such as haptophytes or pelagophytes, were also correlated to all OVOCs, indicating that phytoplankton may be an important source of marine OVOCs in the South China and Sulu seas. Humic- and protein-like fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) components seemed to be additional precursors for butanone and acetaldehyde. The measurement-inferred OVOC fluxes generally showed an uptake of atmospheric OVOCs by the ocean for all gases, except for butanal. A few important exceptions were found along the Borneo coast, where OVOC fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere were inferred. The atmospheric OVOC mixing ratios over the northern coast of Borneo were relatively high compared with literature values, suggesting that this coastal region is a local hotspot for atmospheric OVOCs. The calculated amount of OVOCs entrained into the ocean seemed to be an important source of OVOCs to the surface ocean. When the fluxes were out of the ocean, marine OVOCs were found to be enough to control the locally measured OVOC distribution in the atmosphere. Based on our model calculations, at least 0.4 ppb of marine-derived acetone and butanone can reach the upper troposphere, where they may have an important influence on hydrogen oxide radical formation over the western Pacific Ocean.

  1. Oxygenated volatile organic carbon in the western Pacific convective center: ocean cycling, air–sea gas exchange and atmospheric transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schlundt

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A suite of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs – acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, butanal and butanone were measured concurrently in the surface water and atmosphere of the South China Sea and Sulu Sea in November 2011. A strong correlation was observed between all OVOC concentrations in the surface seawater along the entire cruise track, except for acetaldehyde, suggesting similar sources and sinks in the surface ocean. Additionally, several phytoplankton groups, such as haptophytes or pelagophytes, were also correlated to all OVOCs, indicating that phytoplankton may be an important source of marine OVOCs in the South China and Sulu seas. Humic- and protein-like fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM components seemed to be additional precursors for butanone and acetaldehyde. The measurement-inferred OVOC fluxes generally showed an uptake of atmospheric OVOCs by the ocean for all gases, except for butanal. A few important exceptions were found along the Borneo coast, where OVOC fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere were inferred. The atmospheric OVOC mixing ratios over the northern coast of Borneo were relatively high compared with literature values, suggesting that this coastal region is a local hotspot for atmospheric OVOCs. The calculated amount of OVOCs entrained into the ocean seemed to be an important source of OVOCs to the surface ocean. When the fluxes were out of the ocean, marine OVOCs were found to be enough to control the locally measured OVOC distribution in the atmosphere. Based on our model calculations, at least 0.4 ppb of marine-derived acetone and butanone can reach the upper troposphere, where they may have an important influence on hydrogen oxide radical formation over the western Pacific Ocean.

  2. Impact of nitrogen fertilization on soil-Atmosphere greenhouse gas exchanges in eucalypt plantations with different soil characteristics in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Zheng, Hua; Chen, Falin; Li, Ruida; Yang, Miao; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Lan, Jun; Xiang, Xuewu

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization is necessary to sustain productivity in eucalypt plantations, but it can increase the risk of greenhouse gas emissions. However, the response of soil greenhouse gas emissions to N fertilization might be influenced by soil characteristics, which is of great significance for accurately assessing greenhouse gas budgets and scientific fertilization in plantations. We conducted a two-year N fertilization experiment (control [CK], low N [LN], middle N [MN] and high N [HN] fertilization) in two eucalypt plantations with different soil characteristics (higher and lower soil organic carbon sites [HSOC and LSOC]) in Guangxi, China, and assessed soil-atmosphere greenhouse gas exchanges. The annual mean fluxes of soil CO2, CH4, and N2O were separately 153-266 mg m-2 h-1, -55 --40 μg m-2 h-1, and 11-95 μg m-2 h-1, with CO2 and N2O emissions showing significant seasonal variations. N fertilization significantly increased soil CO2 and N2O emissions and decreased CH4 uptake at both sites. There were significant interactions of N fertilization and SOC level on soil CO2 and N2O emissions. At the LSOC site, the annual mean flux of soil CO2 emission was only significantly higher than the CK treatment in the HN treatment, but, at the HSOC site, the annual mean flux of soil CO2 emission was significantly higher for both the LN (or MN) and HN treatments in comparison to the CK treatment. Under the CK and LN treatments, the annual mean flux of N2O emission was not significantly different between HSOC and LSOC sites, but under the HN treatment, it was significantly higher in the HSOC site than in the LSOC site. Correlation analysis showed that changes in soil CO2 and N2O emissions were significantly related to soil dissolved organic carbon, ammonia, nitrate and pH. Our results suggested significant interactions of N fertilization and soil characteristics existed in soil-atmosphere greenhouse gas exchanges, which should be considered in assessing greenhouse gas

  3. Climate and site management as driving factors for the atmospheric greenhouse gas exchange of a restored wetland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Mathias; Friborg, Thomas; Schelde, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    and management activities were used to explain the large inter-annual variations in the full atmospheric GHG budget of the wetland. The largest impact on the annual GHG fluxes, eventually defining their sign, came from site management through changes in grazing duration and animal stocking density. These changes...

  4. Climate and site management as driving factors for the atmospheric greenhouse gas exchange of a restored wetland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Mathias; Friborg, Thomas; Schelde, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    to explain the large inter-annual variations in the full atmospheric GHG budget of the wetland. It is shown that the largest impacts on the annual GHG fluxes, eventually defining their sign, came from site management through changes in grazing duration and animal stocking density and from extreme weather...

  5. U.S. Natural Gas System Methane Emissions: State of Knowledge from LCAs, Inventories, and Atmospheric Measurements (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, G.

    2014-04-01

    Natural gas (NG) is a potential "bridge fuel" during transition to a decarbonized energy system: It emits less carbon dioxide during combustion than other fossil fuels and can be used in many industries. However, because of the high global warming potential of methane (CH4, the major component of NG), climate benefits from NG use depend on system leakage rates. Some recent estimates of leakage have challenged the benefits of switching from coal to NG, a large near-term greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction opportunity. During this presentation, Garvin will review evidence from multiple perspectives - life cycle assessments (LCAs), inventories and measurements - about NG leakage in the US. Particular attention will be paid to a recent article in Science magazine which reviewed over 20 years of published measurements to better understand what we know about total methane emissions and those from the oil and gas sectors. Scientific and policy implications of the state of knowledge will be discussed.

  6. Photoacoustic Multicomponent Analyzer for Atmospheric Compounds Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to build a compact, rugged field-deployable laser photoacoustic spectrometric (LPAS) sensor for continuous, real-time measurements of multiple chemical...

  7. Atmospheric measurements of gas-phase HNO3 and SO2 using chemical ionization mass spectrometry during the MINATROC field campaign 2000 on Monte Cimone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hanke

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The EU-project MINATROC (MINeral dust And TROpospheric Chemistry aims at enabling an estimation of the influence of mineral dust, a major, but to date largely ignored component of tropospheric aerosol, on tropospheric oxidant cycles. Within the scope of this project continuous atmospheric measurements of gas-phase HNO3 and SO2 were conducted in June and July 2000 at the CNR WMO station, situated on Monte Cimone (MTC (44°11' N --10°42' E, 2165 m asl, Italy. African air transporting dust is occasionally advected over the Mediterranean Sea to the site, thus mineral aerosol emitted from Africa will encounter polluted air masses and provide ideal conditions to study their interactions. HNO3 and SO2 were measured with an improved CIMS (chemical ionization mass spectrometry system for ground-based measurements that was developed and built at MPI-K Heidelberg. Since HNO3  is a very sticky compound special care was paid for the air-sampling and background-measurement system. Complete data sets could be obtained before, during and after major dust intrusions. For the first time these measurements might provide a strong observational indication of efficient uptake of gas-phase HNO3 by atmospheric mineral-dust aerosol particles.

  8. A Critical Review of Published Data on the Gas Temperature and the Electron Density in the Electrolyte Cathode Atmospheric Glow Discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Cserfalvi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrolyte Cathode Discharge (ELCAD spectrometry, a novel sensitive multielement direct analytical method for metal traces in aqueous solutions, was introduced in 1993 as a new sensing principle. Since then several works have tried to develop an operational mechanism for this exotic atmospheric glow plasma technique, however these attempts cannot be combined into a valid model description. In this review we summarize the conceptual and technical problems we found in this upcoming research field of direct sensors. The TG gas temperature and the ne electron density values published up to now for ELCAD are very confusing. These data were evaluated by three conditions. The first is the gas composition of the ELCAD plasma, since TG was determined from the emitted intensity of the N2 and OH bands. Secondly, since the ELCAD is an atmospheric glow discharge, thus, the obtained TG has to be close to the Te electron temperature. This can be used for the mutual validation of the received temperature data. Thirdly, as a consequence of the second condition, the values of TG and ne have to agree with the Engel-Brown approximation of the Saha-equation related to weakly ionized glow discharge plasmas. Application of non-adequate experimental methods and theoretical treatment leads to unreliable descriptions which cannot be used to optimize the detector performance.

  9. Six years of high-precision quasi-continuous atmospheric greenhouse gas measurements at Trainou Tower (Orléans Forest, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Lopez, M.; Yver Kwok, C.; Messager, C.; Ramonet, M.; Wastine, B.; Vuillemin, C.; Truong, F.; Gal, B.; Parmentier, E.; Cloué, O.; Ciais, P.

    2014-01-01

    Results from the Trainou tall tower measurement station installed in 2006, are presented for atmospheric measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, CO, H2 mole fractions and Radon-222 activity. Air is sampled from four sampling heights (180 m, 100 m, 50 m and 5 m) of the Trainou 200 m television tower in the Orléans forest in France (47°57'53'' N, 2°06'45'' E, 131 m a.s.l.). The station is equipped with a custom-build CO2 analyzer (CARIBOU), which is based on a commercial NDIR analyser (Licor 6252), and a coupled gas chromatographic GC system equipped with ECD and FID (HP6890N, Agilent) and a reduction gas detector (PP1, Peak Performer). Air intakes, pumping and air drying system are shared between the CARIBOU and the GC systems. After some initial problems, we achieved short-term repeatability (1 sigma, over several days) for the GC system of of 0.05 ppm for CO2, 1.4 ppb for CH4, 0.25 ppb for N2O, 0.08 ppb for SF6, 0.88 ppb for CO and 3.8 for H2. The repeatability of the CARIBOU CO2 analyser is 0.06 ppm. In addition to the in-situ measurements, weekly flask sampling is performed, and flask air samples are analysed at the LSCE central laboratory for the same species as well for stable isotopes of CO2. The comparison between in-situ measurements and the flask sampling showed averaged differences of 0.08 ± 1.4 ppm CO2, 0.69 ± 7.3 ppb CH4, 0.64 ± 0.62 ppb N2O, 0.01 ± 0.1 ppt SF6 and 1.5 ± 5.3 ppb CO for the years 2008-2012. At Trainou station, the mean annual increase rates from 2007 to 2011 at the 180 m sampling height were 2.2 ppm yr-1 for CO2, 4 ppb yr-1 for CH4, 0.78 ppb yr-1 for N2O and 0.29 ppt yr-1 for SF6 respectively. For all species the 180 m sampling level showed the smallest diurnal variation. Mean diurnal gradients between the 50 m and the 180 m sampling level reached up to 30 ppm CO2, 15 ppm CH4 or 0.5 ppb N2O during night whereas the mean gradients are smaller than 0.5 ppm for CO2 and 1.5 ppb for CH4 during afternoon.

  10. Implications of Low Volatility SOA and Gas-Phase Fragmentation Reactions on SOA Loadings and their Spatial and Temporal Evolution in the Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, Dan; Easter, Richard C.; Beranek, Josef; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2013-04-27

    Recent laboratory and field measurements by a number of groups show that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) evaporates orders of magnitude slower than traditional models assume. In addition, chemical transport models using volatility basis set (VBS) SOA schemes neglect gas-phase fragmentation reactions, which are known to be extremely important. In this work, we present modeling studies to investigate the implications of non-evaporating SOA and gas-phase fragmentation reactions. Using the 3-D chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, we show that previous parameterizations, which neglect fragmentation during multi-generational gas-phase chemistry of semi-volatile/inter-mediate volatility organics ("aging SIVOC"), significantly over-predict SOA as compared to aircraft measurements downwind of Mexico City. In sharp contrast, the revised models, which include gas-phase fragmentation, show much better agreement with measurements downwind of Mexico City. We also demonstrate complex differences in spatial SOA distributions when we transform SOA to non-volatile secondary organic aerosol (NVSOA) to account for experimental observations. Using a simple box model, we show that for same amount of SOA precursors, earlier models that do not employ multi-generation gas-phase chemistry of precursors ("non-aging SIVOC"), produce orders of magnitude lower SOA than "aging SIVOC" parameterizations both with and without fragmentation. In addition, traditional absorptive partitioning models predict almost complete SOA evaporation at farther downwind locations for both "non-aging SIVOC" and "aging SIVOC" with fragmentation. In contrast, in our revised approach, SOA transformed to NVSOA implies significantly higher background concentrations as it remains in particle phase even under highly dilute conditions. This work has significant implications on understanding the role of multi-generational chemistry and NVSOA formation on SOA evolution in the atmosphere.

  11. Advantages of Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization in Gas Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Pyrethroid Insecticides as a Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portolés, T.; Mol, J.G.J.; Sancho, J.V.; Hernández, F.

    2012-01-01

    Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been extensively applied for determination of volatile, nonpolar, compounds in many applied fields like food safety, environment, or toxicology. The wide majority of methods reported use electron ionization (EI), which may result in

  12. A growth inhibitory model with SOx influenced effective growth rate for estimation of algal biomass concentration under flue gas atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    A theoretical model for the prediction of biomass concentration under real flue gas emission has been developed. The model considers the CO2 mass transfer rate, the critical SOx concentration and its role on pH based inter-conversion of bicarbonate in model building. The calibration and subsequent v...

  13. Carbon Disulfide (CS2) Mechanisms in Formation of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Formation from Unconventional Shale Gas Extraction and Processing Operations and Global Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Alisa L; Patel, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS2) has been historically associated with the production of rayon, cellophane, and carbon tetrachloride. This study identifies multiple mechanisms by which CS2 contributes to the formation of CO2 in the atmosphere. CS2 and other associated sulfide compounds were found by this study to be present in emissions from unconventional shale gas extraction and processing (E&P) operations. The breakdown products of CS2; carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are indirect greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to CO2 levels in the atmosphere. The heat-trapping nature of CO2 has been found to increase the surface temperature, resulting in regional and global climate change. The purpose of this study is to identify five mechanisms by which CS2 and the breakdown products of CS2 contribute to atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The five mechanisms of CO2 formation are as follows: Chemical Interaction of CS2 and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) present in natural gas at high temperatures, resulting in CO2 formation;Combustion of CS2 in the presence of oxygen producing SO2 and CO2;Photolysis of CS2 leading to the formation of COS, CO, and SO2, which are indirect contributors to CO2 formation;One-step hydrolysis of CS2, producing reactive intermediates and ultimately forming H2S and CO2;Two-step hydrolysis of CS2 forming the reactive COS intermediate that reacts with an additional water molecule, ultimately forming H2S and CO2. CS2 and COS additionally are implicated in the formation of SO2 in the stratosphere and/or troposphere. SO2 is an indirect contributor to CO2 formation and is implicated in global climate change.

  14. Removal of the potent greenhouse gas NF3 by reactions with the atmospheric oxidants O(1D), OH and O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Terry J; Vereecken, Luc; Horowitz, Abraham; Khamaganov, Victor; Crowley, John N; Lelieveld, Jos

    2011-11-07

    Nitrogen trifluoride, NF(3), a trace gas of purely anthropogenic origin with a large global warming potential is accumulating in the Earth's atmosphere. Large uncertainties are however associated with its atmospheric removal rate. In this work, experimental and theoretical kinetic tools were used to study the reactions of NF(3) with three of the principal gas-phase atmospheric oxidants: O((1)D), OH and O(3). For reaction (R2) with O((1)D), rate coefficients of k(2)(212-356 K) = (2.0 ± 0.3) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) were obtained in direct competitive kinetics experiments, and experimental and theoretical evidence was obtained for F-atom product formation. These results indicate that whilst photolysis in the stratosphere remains the principal fate of NF(3), reaction with O((1)D) is significant and was previously underestimated in atmospheric lifetime calculations. Experimental evidence of F-atom production from 248 nm photolysis of NF(3) was also obtained, indicating that quantum yields for NF(3) destruction remain significant throughout the UV. No evidence was found for reaction (R3) of NF(3) with OH indicating that this process makes little or no contribution to NF(3) removal from the atmosphere. An upper-limit of k(3)(298 K) true rate coefficient is more than ten orders of magnitude smaller. An upper-limit of k(4)(296 K) < 3 × 10(-25) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained in experiments to investigate O(3) + NF(3) (R4). Altogether these results underpin calculations of a long (several hundred year) lifetime for NF(3). In the course of this work rate coefficients (in units of 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) for removal of O((1)D) by n-C(5)H(12), k(6) = (50 ± 5) and by N(2), k(7) = (3.1 ± 0.2) were obtained. Uncertainties quoted throughout are 2σ precision only. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  15. SI-traceable and dynamic reference gas mixtures for water vapour at polar and high troposphere atmospheric levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillevic, Myriam; Pascale, Céline; Mutter, Daniel; Wettstein, Sascha; Niederhauser, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of METAS' AtmoChem-ECV project, new facilities are currently being developed to generate reference gas mixtures for water vapour at concentrations measured in the high troposphere and polar regions, in the range 1-20 µmol/mol (ppm). The generation method is dynamic (the mixture is produced continuously over time) and SI-traceable (i.e. the amount of substance fraction in mole per mole is traceable to the definition of SI-units). The generation process is composed of three successive steps. The first step is to purify the matrix gas, nitrogen or synthetic air. Second, this matrix gas is spiked with the pure substance using a permeation technique: a permeation device contains a few grams of pure water in liquid form and loses it linearly over time by permeation through a membrane. In a third step, to reach the desired concentration, the first, high concentration mixture exiting the permeation chamber is then diluted with a chosen flow of matrix gas with one or two subsequent dilution steps. All flows are piloted by mass flow controllers. All parts in contact with the gas mixture are passivated using coated surfaces, to reduce adsorption/desorption processes as much as possible. The mixture can eventually be directly used to calibrate an analyser. The standard mixture produced by METAS' dynamic setup was injected into a chilled mirror from MBW Calibration AG, the designated institute for absolute humidity calibration in Switzerland. The used chilled mirror, model 373LX, is able to measure frost point and sample pressure and therefore calculate the water vapour concentration. This intercomparison of the two systems was performed in the range 4-18 ppm water vapour in synthetic air, at two different pressure levels, 1013.25 hPa and 2000 hPa. We present here METAS' dynamic setup, its uncertainty budget and the first results of the intercomparison with MBW's chilled mirror.

  16. Interactions of Gas-Phase Nitric/Nitrous Acids and Primary Organic Aerosol in the Atmosphere of Houston, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Whitlow, S. I.; Lefer, B. L.; Flynn, J.; Rappenglück, B.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of aerosol and gas-phase pollutants were measured on the roof of an 18-story building during the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project (TRAMP) from August 15 through September 28, 2006. Aerosol measurements included size-resolved, non-refractory mass concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, chloride, and organic aerosol in submicron particles using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS). Particulate water-soluble organic carbon (PWSOC) was quantified using a mist chamber/total organic carbon analysis system. Concentration data for gas-phase pollutants included those for nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), and hydrochloric acid (HCl) collected using a mist chamber/ion chromatographic technique, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) collected using a chemiluminescent method, and carbon monoxide (CO) collected using an infrared gas correlation wheel instrument. Coincident increases in nitrate and organic aerosol mass concentrations were observed on many occasions throughout the measurement campaign, most frequently during the morning rush hour. Based on the lack of organic aerosol processing (defined by the ratio of m/z = 44/57 in the Q-AMS spectra), strong correlation with NOx and CO, and a lack of significant increase in PWSOC concentration, the spikes in organic aerosol were likely associated with primary organic aerosol (POA). During these events, gas-phase HNO3 concentration decreases were observed simultaneously with increases in gas-phase HONO concentrations. These data likely indicate uptake of HNO3 and subsequent heterogeneous conversion to HONO involving POA. Preliminary calculations show that HNO3 partitioning could account for the majority of the observed HONO and aerosol nitrate concentrations during these events. Q-AMS chloride and HCl data also indicate uptake of chloride by particles during these events. This phenomenon was also observed during the night, but these nocturnal events were less

  17. Experimental Investigation of Gas/Slag/Matte/Tridymite Equilibria in the Cu-Fe-O-S-Si System in Controlled Gas Atmospheres: Experimental Results at 1473 K (1200 °C) and P(SO2) = 0.25 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hidayat, Taufiq; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2017-08-01

    Experimental studies were undertaken to determine the gas/slag/matte/tridymite equilibria in the Cu-Fe-O-S-Si system at 1473 K (1200 °C), P(SO2) = 0.25 atm, and a range of P(O2)'s. The experimental methodology involved high-temperature equilibration using a substrate support technique in controlled gas atmospheres (CO/CO2/SO2/Ar), rapid quenching of equilibrium phases, followed by direct measurement of the chemical compositions of the phases with Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPMA). The experimental data for slag and matte were presented as a function of copper concentration in matte (matte grade). The data provided are essential for the evaluation of the effect of oxygen potential under controlled atmosphere on the matte grade, liquidus composition of slag and chemically dissolved copper in slag. The new data provide important accurate and reliable quantitative foundation for improvement of the thermodynamic databases for copper-containing systems.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Gas/Slag/Matte/Tridymite Equilibria in the Cu-Fe-O-S-Si System in Controlled Gas Atmospheres: Experimental Results at 1473 K (1200 °C) and P(SO2) = 0.25 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hidayat, Taufiq; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2017-12-01

    Experimental studies were undertaken to determine the gas/slag/matte/tridymite equilibria in the Cu-Fe-O-S-Si system at 1473 K (1200 °C), P(SO2) = 0.25 atm, and a range of P(O2)'s. The experimental methodology involved high-temperature equilibration using a substrate support technique in controlled gas atmospheres (CO/CO2/SO2/Ar), rapid quenching of equilibrium phases, followed by direct measurement of the chemical compositions of the phases with Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPMA). The experimental data for slag and matte were presented as a function of copper concentration in matte (matte grade). The data provided are essential for the evaluation of the effect of oxygen potential under controlled atmosphere on the matte grade, liquidus composition of slag and chemically dissolved copper in slag. The new data provide important accurate and reliable quantitative foundation for improvement of the thermodynamic databases for copper-containing systems.

  19. New phase equilibrium analyzer for determination of the vapor-liquid equilibrium of carbon dioxide and permanent gas mixtures for carbon capture and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Jie; Parrott, Andrew J; Sanchez-Vicente, Yolanda; Fields, Peter; Wilson, Richard; Drage, Trevor C; Poliakoff, Martyn; George, Michael W

    2014-08-01

    A high-pressure, phase equilibrium analyzer incorporating a fiber-optic reflectometer is described. The analyzer has been designed for measuring the vapor-liquid equilibrium data of multi-component mixtures of carbon dioxide and permanent gases, providing a novel tool to acquire of a large number of phase equilibrium data for the development of the new carbon capture and storage technologies. We demonstrate that the analyzer is suitable for determining both the bubble- and dew-point lines at temperature from 253 K and pressure up to 25 MPa using pure CO2 and two binary mixtures of CO2 + N2 and CO2 + H2.

  20. Electronic quenching of OH(A) by water in atmospheric pressure plasmas and its influence on the gas temperature determination by OH(A-X) emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Schram, Daan C [Department of Applied Physics, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Iza, Felipe; Kong, Michael G [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Guns, Peter; Lauwers, Daniel; Leys, Christophe [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Jozef Plateaustraat 22, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Gonzalvo, Yolanda Aranda [Plasma and Surface Analysis Division, Hiden Analytical Ltd, 420 Europa Boulevard, Warrington WA5 7UN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: p.j.bruggeman@tue.nl

    2010-02-15

    In this paper it is shown that electronic quenching of OH(A) by water prevents thermalization of the rotational population distribution of OH(A). This means that the observed ro-vibrational OH(A-X) emission band is (at least partially) an image of the formation process and is determined not only by the gas temperature. The formation of negative ions and clusters for larger water concentrations can contribute to the non-equilibrium. The above is demonstrated in RF excited atmospheric pressure glow discharges in He-water mixtures in a parallel metal plate reactor by optical emission spectroscopy. For this particular case a significant overpopulation of high rotational states appears around 1000 ppm H{sub 2}O in He. The smallest temperature parameter of a non-Boltzmann (two-temperature) distribution fitted to the experimental spectrum of OH(A-X) gives a good representation of the gas temperature. Only the rotational states with the smallest rotational numbers (J {<=} 7) are thermalized and representative for the gas temperature.

  1. The effect of different gas permeability of packaging on physicochemical and microbiological parameters of pork loin storage under high O2modified atmosphere packaging conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkowska-Lesiak, Monika; Poławska, Ewa; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of different packaging materials on meat quality during cold storage. Therefore pork loins (m. longissimus thoracis et lumborum) obtained from crossbred pigs (Polish Landrance x Duroc, n = 6) were stored at 2 ℃ in modified atmosphere packs (80% O 2 , 20% CO 2 ) in four types of trays, which differ in gas permeability. Physicochemical (headspace gas composition, pH, colour, drip loss, cooking loss, shear force, the basic composition and fatty acid profile) and microbiological ( Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli, Enterobacteriaceae, total aerobic plates count, total psychrotrophic bacteria count, the number of lactic acid bacteria, Pseudomonas spp., the general amount of yeast and mold) parameters were monitored for up to 12 days. At the end of the storage period no differences in most physicochemical properties of pork loin due to type of packaging were found, however trays with high gas permeability had the greatest impact on total aerobic plates count and Pseudomonas spp. growth.

  2. Comparison of optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and gas chromatography for ground-based and airborne measurements of atmospheric CO concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrillard, Irène; Xueref-Remy, Irène; Schmidt, Martina; Yver Kwok, Camille; Faïn, Xavier; Romanini, Daniele

    2017-05-01

    We present the first comparison of carbon monoxide (CO) measurements performed with a portable laser spectrometer that exploits the optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) technique, against a high-performance automated gas chromatograph (GC) with a mercuric oxide reduction gas detector (RGD). First, measurements of atmospheric CO mole fraction were continuously collected in a Paris (France) suburb over 1 week. Both instruments showed an excellent agreement within typically 2 ppb (part per billion in volume), fulfilling the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) recommendation for CO inter-laboratory comparison. The compact size and robustness of the OF-CEAS instrument allowed its operation aboard a small aircraft employed for routine tropospheric air analysis over the French Orléans forest area. Direct OF-CEAS real-time CO measurements in tropospheric air were then compared with later analysis of flask samples by the gas chromatograph. Again, a very good agreement was observed. This work establishes that the OF-CEAS laser spectrometer can run unattended at a very high level of sensitivity ( < 1 ppb) and stability without any periodic calibration.

  3. Summer-winter concentrations and gas-particle partitioning of short chain chlorinated paraffins in the atmosphere of an urban setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Thanh; Han, Shanlong; Yuan, Bo; Zeng, Lixi; Li, Yingming; Wang, Yawei; Jiang, Guibin

    2012-12-01

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are semi-volatile chemicals that are considered persistent in the environment, potential toxic and subject to long-range transport. This study investigates the concentrations and gas-particle partitioning of SCCPs at an urban site in Beijing during summer and wintertime. The total atmospheric SCCP levels ranged 1.9-33.0 ng/m(3) during wintertime. Significantly higher levels were found during the summer (range 112-332 ng/m(3)). The average fraction of total SCCPs in the particle phase (ϕ) was 0.67 during wintertime but decreased significantly during the summer (ϕ = 0.06). The ten and eleven carbon chain homologues with five to eight chlorine atoms were the predominant SCCP formula groups in air. Significant linear correlations were found between the gas-particle partition coefficients and the predicted subcooled vapor pressures and octanol-air partition coefficients. The gas-particle partitioning of SCCPs was further investigated and compared with both the Junge-Pankow adsorption and K(oa)-based absorption models. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A range of newly developed mobile generators to dynamically produce SI-traceable reference gas mixtures for reactive compounds at atmospheric concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuenberger, Daiana; Pascale, Céline; Guillevic, Myriam; Ackermann, Andreas; Niederhauser, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Three new mobile facilities have been developed at METAS to dynamically generate SI-traceable reference gas mixtures for a variety of reactive compounds at atmospheric amount of substance fractions and at very low levels of uncertainty (Ux designed and manufactured at METAS in the framework of the three EMRP projects MetNH3, KEY-VOCs and HIGHGAS. The method is based on permeation and subsequent dynamic dilution: A permeation tube containing the pure substance (e.g. NH3) is stored in the permeation chamber at constant temperature, pressure and matrix gas flow (N2, purified air, synthetic air). Under such conditions the pure substance permeates at constant rate into the matrix gas and can be diluted thereafter to the desired amount fractions in one or two subsequent steps. The permeation rate (mass loss over time) of the permeation tube is precisely calibrated in a fully traceable magnetic suspension balance. The carrier gas is previously purified from the compounds of interest using commercially available purification cartridges. The permeation chambers of ReGaS2 and ReGaS3 have multiple individual cells allowing for the generation of mixtures containing up to 5 different components if required. ReGaS1 allows for the generation of one-component mixtures only. These primary mixtures are then diluted to the required amount of substance fractions using thermal mass flow controllers for full flexibility and adaptability of the generation process over the entire range of possible concentrations. In order to considerably reduce adsorption/desorption processes and thus stabilisation time, all electro-polished stainless steel parts of ReGaS1 and ReGaS2 in contact with the reference gas mixtures are passivated with SilcoNert2000® surface coating. These three state-of-the-art mobile reference gas generators are applicable under both, laboratory and field conditions. Moreover the dynamic generation method can be adapted and applied to a large variety of molecules (e.g. BTEX

  5. Analyzing natural gas distribution in Brazil through EVA (Economic Value Added); Analise economico-financeira da industria de distribuicao de gas natural brasileiro sob a otica da geracao de valor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Fernando Rodrigues; Parente, Virginia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia

    2008-07-01

    Although the Brazilian gas market has been showing steady growth and positive news regarding new discoveries, it is not immune to be questioned about its capacity of value generation, and, in particular, if the new companies, operating in distribution have generated it. Value creation, and its management, has become one of the main activities of the modern corporation in order to align the management and shareholders interests. Despite its advancements, the Brazilian NG industry can be considered at its early stages when compared to those of other countries whose industry is more traditional and mature. The process of unbundling of the gas industry, as well as of the public utilities, has become one of the icons of the Brazilian government policies since the mid 90's. Taking into account regulatory change which had only allowed in the last couple of decades the participation of private ownership into the domestic gas market, a follow up of these companies' performances is of interest. Following the concept of value generation, the present study examines the Brazilian gas distribution sector. Based on a detailed analysis of the financial statements of some of the main companies in the sector, that together represent around 68% of the total Brazilian market, this paper verifies whether the gas distribution sector have presented a positive or negative EVA{sup R}, in other words, if, during the period from 2002 to 2007, these newly companies in the gas industry have created or destroyed value in Brazil. (author)

  6. Mars Molniya Orbit Atmospheric Resource Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Braun, Robert D.; Sibille, Laurent; Sforzo, Brandon; Gonyea, Keir; Ali, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    This NIAC (NASA Advanced Innovative Concepts) work will focus on Mars and will build on previous efforts at analyzing atmospheric mining at Earth and the outer solar system. Spacecraft systems concepts will be evaluated and traded, to assess feasibility. However the study will primarily examine the architecture and associated missions to explore the closure, constraints and critical parameters through sensitivity studies. The Mars atmosphere consists of 95.5 percent CO2 gas which can be converted to methane fuel (CH4) and Oxidizer (O2) for chemical rocket propulsion, if hydrogen is transported from electrolyzed water on the Mars surface or from Earth. By using a highly elliptical Mars Molniya style orbit, the CO2 atmosphere can be scooped, ram-compressed and stored while the spacecraft dips into the Mars atmosphere at periapsis. Successive orbits result in additional scooping of CO2 gas, which also serves to aerobrake the spacecraft, resulting in a decaying Molniya orbit.

  7. Development of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the determination of pesticides in gaseous and particulate phases in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borras, E.; Sanchez, P.; Munoz, A. [Instituto Universitario Centro de Estudios Ambientales del Mediterraneo CEAM-UMH (Fundacion CEAM-UMH), 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Tortajada-Genaro, L.A., E-mail: luitorge@qim.upv.es [Instituto IDM, Departamento de Quimica, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Cami de Vera s/n 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} An efficient method for the determination of sixteen pesticides in atmospheric samples. {yields} XAD-4 is an interesting support for collecting gas-phase pesticides, with similar performances than the conventional XAD-2. {yields} The ultrasonic extraction is cheaper, less aggressive and time-consuming with excellent analytical parameters. {yields} The method has been successfully tested by using high volume atmospheric simulation chamber and field campaigns. - Abstract: A reliable multi-residue method for determining gaseous and particulate phase pesticides in atmospheric samples has been developed. This method, based on full scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), allowed the proper determination of sixteen relevant pesticides, in a wide range of concentrations and without the influence of interferences. The pesticides were benfluralin, bitertanol, buprofezin, chlorfenvinphos, chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-methyl, ethalfluralin, fenthion, lindane, malathion, methidathion, propachlor, propanil, pyriproxifen, tebuconazol and trifluralin. Comparisons of two types of sampling filters (quartz and glass fibre) and four types of solid-phase cartridges (XAD-2, XAD-4, Florisil and Orbo-49P) showed that the most suitable supports were glass fibre filter for particulate pesticides and XAD-2 and XAD-4 cartridges for gaseous pesticides (>95% recovery). Evaluations of elution solvents for ultrasonic-assisted extraction demonstrated that isooctane is better than ethylacetate, dichloromethane, methanol or a mixture of acetone:hexane (1:1). Recovery assays and the standard addition method were performed to validate the proposed methodology. Moreover, large simulator chamber experiments allowed the best study of the gas-particle partitioning of pesticides for testing the sampling efficiency for the validation of an analytical multiresidue method for pesticides in air. Satisfactory analytical parameters were obtained, with a repeatability of 5 {+-} 1%, a

  8. Automatic on-line monitoring of atmospheric volatile organic compounds: Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection as complementary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blas, Maite de, E-mail: maite.deblas@ehu.es [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, University College of Technical Mining and Civil Engineering, University of the Basque Country, Colina de Beurco s/n, 48902 Barakaldo (Spain); Navazo, Marino; Alonso, Lucio; Durana, Nieves [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering, University of the Basque Country, Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Iza, Jon [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of the Basque Country, Paseo de la Universidad, 7, 01006, Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Traditionally air quality networks have been carrying out the continuous, on-line measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in ambient air with GC-FID. In this paper some identification and coelution problems observed while using this technique in long-term measurement campaigns are described. In order to solve these problems a GC-MS was set up and operated simultaneously with a GC-FID for C{sub 2}-C{sub 11} VOCs measurement. There are few on-line, unattended, long term measurements of atmospheric VOCs performed with GC-MS. In this work such a system has been optimized for that purpose, achieving good repeatability, linearity, and detection limits of the order of the GC-FID ones, even smaller in some cases. VOC quantification has been made by using response factors, which is not frequent in on-line GC-MS. That way, the identification and coelution problems detected in the GC-FID, which may led to reporting erroneous data, could be corrected. The combination of GC-FID and GC-MS as complementary techniques for the measurement of speciated VOCs in ambient air at sub-ppbv levels is proposed. Some results of the measurements are presented, including concentration values for some compounds not found until now on public ambient air VOC databases, which were identified and quantified combining both techniques. Results may also help to correct previously published VOC data with wrongly identified compounds by reprocessing raw chromatographic data.

  9. Determination of volatiles in volcanic rocks and minerals with a Directly Coupled Evolved Gas Analyzing System (DEGAS -Part I: Interpretation of degassing profiles (DEGAS-profiles of minerals and rocks on the basis of melting experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Schmidt

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Volatile components in magma strongly influence many physical properties of melts and minerals. The temperature resolved degassing analysis of volcanic crystalline and vitreous rocks gives detailed information about volatile compounds in the melt. Aspecial high-temperature mass-spectrometry device in combination with a thermo-balance allows a quantitative determination of different volatile species. It enables a differentiation between the primary gas content in the magma and the gas released from decomposition of secondary alteration products. The gas release profiles give the following indications: i during the littoral explosions of Pahoehoe lava the content of volatiles is not changed by interaction with air or sea water; ii the degassing profiles of vitreous black sand verify the primary content of volatiles in the erupted melt, only CO2 was detected; iii the oxygen release profile gives significant indications for oxygen undersaturation of the erupted magma; iv remelting of black sand in air at 1450°C for 0.45 h causes an oxygen saturation of the basaltic melt; v remelting of black sand in argon atmosphere confirms the oxygen undersaturation of the melt; vi remelting of black sand-black shale mixtures affects a significant change in the degassing profiles, especially in CO2-release. With the first investigations we can demonstrate that gas release curves of volcanic rocks are qualified for a detection of the primary gas content of erupted magma; b detection of alteration processes of the igneous glass; c detection of contamination of the magma with adjacent rocks.

  10. Bullet-shaped ionization front of plasma jet plumes driven by microwave pulses at atmospheric gas pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaoquan; Xia, Guangqing; Zou, Changlin; Liu, Xiaodong; Feng, Deren; Li, Ping; Hu, Yelin; Stepanova, Olga; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Ionization waves (propagating bullet-shaped plasma) are always present in atmospheric-pressure plasma jets generated by a pulsed DC power supply or low-frequency voltages. Nevertheless, whether these ionization waves exist for pulsed microwave plasma jets remains unclear. In this paper, a coaxial transmission line resonator driven by microwave pulses is capable of generating atmospheric pressure plasma jet plumes. Depending on the discharges, these plasma jet plumes exhibit distinctive characteristics, such as bullet-shaped ionization fronts for argon plasma and ball-shaped for helium plasma. Fast images show argon plasma plumes generating several small branches but only one dominant ionization front travels more distance along the jet axis. Both ionization-wave images and electromagnetic simulation results indicate that the bullet-shaped ionization front forms a plasma jet plume immediately. The dominant ionization wave is resonantly excited by the local enhanced electric field, which originates from the local net charge of the streamer plus surface plasmon polariton located at the open end of the resonator.

  11. Formaldehyde vapor produced from hexamethylenetetramine and pesticide: Simultaneous monitoring of formaldehyde and ozone in chamber experiments by flow-based hybrid micro-gas analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanaga, Akira; Hozumi, Naruto; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Hasegawa, Asako; Toda, Kei

    2016-02-01

    Simultaneous analysis of HCHO and O3 was performed by the developed flow analysis system to prove that HCHO vapor is produced from solid pesticide in the presence of O3. HCHO is produced in many ways, including as primary emissions from fuel combustion and in secondary production from anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds by photochemical reactions. In this work, HCHO production from pesticides was investigated for the first time. Commonly pesticide contains surfactant such as hexamethylenetetramine (HMT), which is a heterocyclic compound formed from six molecules of HCHO and four molecules of NH3. HMT can react with gaseous oxidants such as ozone (O3) to produce HCHO. In the present study, a flow analysis system was developed for simultaneous analysis of HCHO and O3, and this system was used to determine if solid pesticides produced HCHO vapor in the presence of O3. HMT or the pesticide jimandaisen, which contains mancozeb as the active ingradient and HMT as a stabilizer was placed at the bottom of a 20-L stainless steel chamber. Air in the chamber was monitored using the developed flow system. Analyte gases were collected into an absorbing solution by a honeycomb-patterned microchannel scrubber that was previously developed for a micro gas analysis system (μGAS). Subsequently, indigotrisulfonate, a blue dye, was added to the absorbing solution to detect O3, which discolored the solution. HCHO was detected after mixing with the Hantzsch reaction reagent. Both gases could be detected at concentrations ranging from parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 1000 ppbv with good linearity. Both HMT and jimandaisen emitted large amount of HCHO in the presence of O3. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. THE IMPACT OF SELECTED PROCESSES AND TECHNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS ON THE GEOMETRY OF THE WELD POOL WHEN WELDING IN SHIELS GAS ATMOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Bradáč

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on welding with a consumable electrode in a gas shield atmosphere and its main aim is to show the influence of selected processes and technological parameters on the geometry of the weld pool in terms of theoretical and experimental views. For this purpose, the parametric areas defined by the change of the welding current and welding rate were determined. Apart from the influence of these parametric areas, the influence of other technological input variables, including the wire diameter and preheating temperature, was also studied. The experimentally obtained geometric data of the weld pool can be used for technological welding procedures WPS and especially for simulation calculations to obtain a more accurate numerical model of the heat source. This makes it possible to get accurate simulation results and to better understand the impact of other variables that influence the welding process. This all helps to the optimization of the welding process for several applications.

  13. Atmospheric chemistry of dimethyl sulfide. Kinetics of the CH3SCH2O2 + NO2 reaction in the gas phase at 296 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.J.; Sehested, J.; Wallington, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    The pulse radiolysis of SF6/CH3SCH3/O-2/NO2 gas mixtures was used to generate CH3SCH2O2 radicals in the presence of NO2. By monitoring the rate of NO2 decay using its absorption at 400 nm, rate constants for the reaction of CH3SCH2O2 radicals with NO2 were measured to be (9.2 +/- 0.9) x 10(-12) a......(-12) and (7.1 +/- 0.9) X 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at room temperature in 1000 and 300 mbar of SF6 diluent, respectively. Results are discussed with respect to the atmospheric chemistry of dimethyl sulfide....

  14. Experimental Investigation of Gas/Slag/Matte/Tridymite Equilibria in the Cu-Fe-O-S-Si System in Controlled Atmospheres: Development of Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hidayat, Taufiq; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2017-12-01

    The majority of primary pyrometallurgical copper making processes involve the formation of two immiscible liquid phases, i.e., matte product and the slag phase. There are significant gaps and discrepancies in the phase equilibria data of the slag and the matte systems due to issues and difficulties in performing the experiments and phase analysis. The present study aims to develop an improved experimental methodology for accurate characterisation of gas/slag/matte/tridymite equilibria in the Cu-Fe-O-S-Si system under controlled atmospheres. The experiments involve high-temperature equilibration of synthetic mixtures on silica substrates in CO/CO2/SO2/Ar atmospheres, rapid quenching of samples into water, and direct composition measurement of the equilibrium phases using Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPMA). A four-point-test procedure was applied to ensure the achievement of equilibrium, which included the following: (i) investigation of equilibration as a function of time, (ii) assessment of phase homogeneity, (iii) confirmation of equilibrium by approaching from different starting conditions, and (iv) systematic analysis of the reactions specific to the system. An iterative improved experimental methodology was developed using this four-point-test approach to characterize the complex multi-component, multi-phase equilibria with high accuracy and precision. The present study is a part of a broader overall research program on the characterisation of the multi-component (Cu-Fe-O-S-Si-Al-Ca-Mg), multi-phase (gas/slag/matte/metal/solids) systems with minor elements (Pb, Zn, As, Bi, Sn, Sb, Ag, and Au).

  15. Experimental Investigation of Gas/Slag/Matte/Tridymite Equilibria in the Cu-Fe-O-S-Si System in Controlled Atmospheres: Development of Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hidayat, Taufiq; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2017-08-01

    The majority of primary pyrometallurgical copper making processes involve the formation of two immiscible liquid phases, i.e., matte product and the slag phase. There are significant gaps and discrepancies in the phase equilibria data of the slag and the matte systems due to issues and difficulties in performing the experiments and phase analysis. The present study aims to develop an improved experimental methodology for accurate characterisation of gas/slag/matte/tridymite equilibria in the Cu-Fe-O-S-Si system under controlled atmospheres. The experiments involve high-temperature equilibration of synthetic mixtures on silica substrates in CO/CO2/SO2/Ar atmospheres, rapid quenching of samples into water, and direct composition measurement of the equilibrium phases using Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPMA). A four-point-test procedure was applied to ensure the achievement of equilibrium, which included the following: (i) investigation of equilibration as a function of time, (ii) assessment of phase homogeneity, (iii) confirmation of equilibrium by approaching from different starting conditions, and (iv) systematic analysis of the reactions specific to the system. An iterative improved experimental methodology was developed using this four-point-test approach to characterize the complex multi-component, multi-phase equilibria with high accuracy and precision. The present study is a part of a broader overall research program on the characterisation of the multi-component (Cu-Fe-O-S-Si-Al-Ca-Mg), multi-phase (gas/slag/matte/metal/solids) systems with minor elements (Pb, Zn, As, Bi, Sn, Sb, Ag, and Au).

  16. A single gas chromatograph for accurate atmospheric mixing ratio measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6 and CO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. J. Meijer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an adapted gas chromatograph capable of measuring simultaneously and semi-continuously the atmospheric mixing ratios of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, N2O and SF6 and the trace gas CO with high precision and long-term stability. The novelty of our design is that all species are measured with only one device, making it a very cost-efficient system. No time lags are introduced between the measured mixing ratios. The system is designed to operate fully autonomously which makes it ideal for measurements at remote and unmanned stations. Only a small amount of sample air is needed, which makes this system also highly suitable for flask air measurements. In principle, only two reference cylinders are needed for daily operation and only one calibration per year against international WMO standards is sufficient to obtain high measurement precision and accuracy. The system described in this paper is in use since May 2006 at our atmospheric measurement site Lutjewad near Groningen, The Netherlands at 6°21´ E, 53°24´N, 1 m a.s.l. Results show the long-term stability of the system. Observed measurement precisions at our remote research station Lutjewad were: ±0.04 ppm for CO2, ±0.8 ppb for CH4, ±0.8 ppb for CO, ±0.3 ppb for N2O, and ±0.1 ppt for SF6. The ambient mixing ratios of all measured species as observed at station Lutjewad for the period of May 2007 to August 2008 are presented as well.

  17. Atmospheric pressure gas chromatography quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for simultaneous determination of fifteen organochlorine pesticides in soil and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhipeng; Dong, Fengshou; Xu, Jun; Liu, Xingang; Wu, Xiaohu; Chen, Zenglong; Pan, Xinglu; Zheng, Yongquan

    2016-02-26

    In this study, the application of atmospheric pressure gas chromatography quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (APGC-QTOF-MS) has been investigated for simultaneous determination of fifteen organochlorine pesticides in soil and water. Soft ionization of atmospheric pressure gas chromatography was evaluated by comparing with traditional more energetic electron impact ionization (EI). APGC-QTOF-MS showed a sensitivity enhancement by approximately 7-305 times. The QuEChERs (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) method was used to pretreat the soil samples and solid phase extraction (SPE) cleanup was used for water samples. Precision, accuracy and stability experiments were undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of the method. The results showed that the mean recoveries for all the pesticides from the soil samples were 70.3-118.9% with 0.4-18.3% intra-day relative standard deviations (RSD) and 1.0-15.6% inter-day RSD at 10, 50 and 500 μg/L levels, while the mean recoveries of water samples were 70.0-118.0% with 1.1-17.8% intra-day RSD and 0.5-12.2% inter-day RSD at 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 μg/L levels. Excellent linearity (0.9931 ≦ r(2)≤ 0.9999) was obtained for each pesticides in the soil and water matrix calibration curves within the range of 0.01-1.0mg/L. The limits of detection (LOD) for each of the 15 pesticides was less than 3.00 μg/L, while the limit of quantification (LOQ) was less than 9.99 μg/L in soil and water. Furthermore, the developed method was successfully applied to monitor the targeted pesticides in real soil and water samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Contribution of oil and natural gas production to renewed increase in atmospheric methane (2007–2014: top–down estimate from ethane and methane column observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hausmann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Harmonized time series of column-averaged mole fractions of atmospheric methane and ethane over the period 1999–2014 are derived from solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR measurements at the Zugspitze summit (47° N, 11° E; 2964 m a.s.l. and at Lauder (45° S, 170° E; 370 m a.s.l.. Long-term trend analysis reveals a consistent renewed methane increase since 2007 of 6.2 [5.6, 6.9] ppb yr−1 (parts-per-billion per year at the Zugspitze and 6.0 [5.3, 6.7] ppb yr−1 at Lauder (95 % confidence intervals. Several recent studies provide pieces of evidence that the renewed methane increase is most likely driven by two main factors: (i increased methane emissions from tropical wetlands, followed by (ii increased thermogenic methane emissions due to growing oil and natural gas production. Here, we quantify the magnitude of the second class of sources, using long-term measurements of atmospheric ethane as a tracer for thermogenic methane emissions. In 2007, after years of weak decline, the Zugspitze ethane time series shows the sudden onset of a significant positive trend (2.3 [1.8, 2.8]  ×  10−2 ppb yr−1 for 2007–2014, while a negative trend persists at Lauder after 2007 (−0.4 [−0.6, −0.1]  ×  10−2 ppb yr−1. Zugspitze methane and ethane time series are significantly correlated for the period 2007–2014 and can be assigned to thermogenic methane emissions with an ethane-to-methane ratio (EMR of 12–19 %. We present optimized emission scenarios for 2007–2014 derived from an atmospheric two-box model. From our trend observations we infer a total ethane emission increase over the period 2007–2014 from oil and natural gas sources of 1–11 Tg yr−1 along with an overall methane emission increase of 24–45 Tg yr−1. Based on these results, the oil and natural gas emission contribution (C to the renewed methane increase is deduced using three different emission scenarios with dedicated EMR ranges

  19. Estimating greenhouse gas emissions at the soil-atmosphere interface in forested watersheds of the US Northeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Joshua; Vidon, Philippe; Gross, Jordan; Beier, Colin; Caputo, Jesse; Mitchell, Myron

    2016-05-01

    Although anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG: CO2, CH4, N2O) are unequivocally tied to climate change, natural systems such as forests have the potential to affect GHG concentration in the atmosphere. Our study reports GHG emissions as CO2, CH4, N2O, and CO2eq fluxes across a range of landscape hydrogeomorphic classes (wetlands, riparian areas, lower hillslopes, upper hillslopes) in a forested watershed of the Northeastern USA and assesses the usability of the topographic wetness index (TWI) as a tool to identify distinct landscape geomorphic classes to aid in the development of GHG budgets at the soil atmosphere interface at the watershed scale. Wetlands were hot spots of GHG production (in CO2eq) in the landscape owing to large CH4 emission. However, on an areal basis, the lower hillslope class had the greatest influence on the net watershed CO2eq efflux, mainly because it encompassed the largest proportion of the study watershed (54 %) and had high CO2 fluxes relative to other land classes. On an annual basis, summer, fall, winter, and spring accounted for 40, 27, 9, and 24 % of total CO2eq emissions, respectively. When compared to other approaches (e.g., random or systematic sampling design), the TWI landscape classification method was successful in identifying dominant landscape hydrogeomorphic classes and offered the possibility of systematically accounting for small areas of the watershed (e.g., wetlands) that have a disproportionate effect on total GHG emissions. Overall, results indicate that soil CO2eq efflux in the Archer Creek Watershed may exceed C uptake by live trees under current conditions.

  20. Atmospheric concentrations, sources and gas-particle partitioning of PAHs in Beijing after the 29th Olympic Games

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Wanli [International Joint Research Center for Persistent Toxic Substances (IJRC-PTS), State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Sun Dezhi [International Joint Research Center for Persistent Toxic Substances (IJRC-PTS), State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083 (China); Shen Weiguo [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083 (China); Yang Meng [IJRC-PTS, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian (China); Qi Hong; Liu Liyan; Shen Jimin [International Joint Research Center for Persistent Toxic Substances (IJRC-PTS), State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Li Yifan, E-mail: ijrc_pts_paper@yahoo.com [International Joint Research Center for Persistent Toxic Substances (IJRC-PTS), State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario M3H5T4 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    A comprehensive sampling campaign was carried out to study atmospheric concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Beijing and to evaluate the effectiveness of source control strategies in reducing PAHs pollution after the 29th Olympic Games. The sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure (logP{sub L}{sup o})-based model and octanol-air partition coefficient (K{sub oa})-based model were applied based on each seasonal dateset. Regression analysis among log K{sub P}, logP{sub L}{sup o} and log K{sub oa} exhibited high significant correlations for four seasons. Source factors were identified by principle component analysis and contributions were further estimated by multiple linear regression. Pyrogenic sources and coke oven emission were identified as major sources for both the non-heating and heating seasons. As compared with literatures, the mean PAH concentrations before and after the 29th Olympic Games were reduced by more than 60%, indicating that the source control measures were effective for reducing PAHs pollution in Beijing. - Highlights: > This is the first comprehensive study of PAHs in atmosphere after the 29th Olympics in Beijing, China. > The air quality before and after 29th Olympics has attracted much attention worldwide. > The study was helpful for other countries to understand how the Olympics affected PAHs emissions. > The study would act as a case study to know the effects that big events can impose on the host cities. - The source control measures implemented before and during the 29th Olympic Games were effective for reducing the emissions of air pollutants in Beijing.

  1. Analysis of anabolic steroids in urine by gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry with chlorobenzene as dopant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintikka, Laura; Haapala, Markus; Kuuranne, Tiia; Leinonen, Antti; Kostiainen, Risto

    2013-10-18

    A gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure photoionization-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-μAPPI-MS/MS) method was developed for the analysis of anabolic androgenic steroids in urine as their trimethylsilyl derivatives. The method utilizes a heated nebulizer microchip in atmospheric pressure photoionization mode (μAPPI) with chlorobenzene as dopant, which provides high ionization efficiency by producing abundant radical cations with minimal fragmentation. The performance of GC-μAPPI-MS/MS was evaluated with respect to repeatability, linearity, linear range, and limit of detection (LOD). The results confirmed the potential of the method for doping control analysis of anabolic steroids. Repeatability (RSD<10%), linearity (R(2)≥0.996) and sensitivity (LODs 0.05-0.1ng/mL) were acceptable. Quantitative performance of the method was tested and compared with that of conventional GC-electron ionization-MS, and the results were in good agreement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Isomer separation and effect of the polymerization degree on the gas-phase structure of chondroitin sulfate oligosaccharides analyzed by ion mobility-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyer, Salomé; Lopin-Bon, Chrystel; Jacquinet, Jean-Claude; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Daniel, Régis

    2017-09-12

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) glycosaminoglycans are bioactive sulfated polysaccharides comprising repeating units of uronic acid and N-acetyl galactose sulfated at various positions. The optimal length and sulfation pattern of the CS bioactive sequences remain elusive so that structure-activity relationship cannot be easily established. Development of efficient analytical methods allowing the differentiation of the various sulfation patterns of CS sequences is therefore of particular importance to correlate their biological functions to the sulfation pattern. Discrimination of different oligomers (dp2 to dp6) of synthetic chondroitin sulfate isomers was evaluated by electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) in the negative-ion mode from deprotonated and alkali adducts species. In addition, ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) was used to study the influence of both the polymerization degree and sulfate group location onto the gas-phase conformation of CS oligomers. ESI-MS/MS spectra of chondroitin sulfate isomers show characteristic product ions exclusively from alkali adduct species (Li, Na, K and Cs). Whatever the alkali adducts studied, MS/MS of chondroitin oligosaccharides sulfated at position 6 yields a specific product ion at m/z 139 while CS oligosaccharides sulfated at position 4 show a specific product ion at m/z 154. Being observed for the different CS oligomers di-, tetra- and hexa-saccharides, these fragment ions are considered as diagnostic ions for chondroitin 6-O-sulfate and chondroitin 4-O-sulfate, respectively. IMS-MS experiments reveal that collision cross sections (CCS) of CS oligomers with low charge states evolved linearly with polymerization degrees indicating a similar gas-phase conformation. This study allows the fast and unambiguous differentiation of CS isomers sulfated at position 6 or 4 for both saturated and unsaturated analogues from tandem mass spectrometry experiments. In addition, the CCS linear evolution of CS

  3. Inefficient charging for delivered gas by local gas distributors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Bikić

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this region, especially in Serbia, common belief is that local distributors of gas used by households don’t charge for gas properly. It is suspected that there are two sources for improper ways of gas charging. Local distributors charge for delivered gas only, according to flow rat but not according to gas quality. It is usual that local distributors deliver gas of different quality than one signed in contract. In this work will be considered only one of aspects inefficient charging for delivered gas by local gas distributors, which is connected to variable atmospheric pressure. There is doubt, that local distributors make mistakes during accounting for delivered gas to costumers in regard atmospheric pressure. At the beginning of every investigation, problem has to be located and recognized. Authors are going to collect as much as possible available data, to elaborate and analyze data by scientific methods and to represent conclusions. So, the aim of this work is to diagnose current state and to approve or disapprove above mentioned suspicions. In our region this theme is very interesting, both because of energy efficiency and air pollution control. In this way both consumer and distributor will know, how mush energy they have really spent.

  4. Simultaneous determination of 16 brominated flame retardants in food and feed of animal origin by fast gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichon, E; Guiffard, I; Vénisseau, A; Lesquin, E; Vaccher, V; Brosseaud, A; Marchand, P; Le Bizec, B

    2016-08-12

    A gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation was developed for the monitoring of 16 brominated flame retardants (7 usually monitored polybromodiphenylethers (PBDEs) and BDE #209 and 8 additional emerging and novel BFRs) in food and feed of animal origin. The developed analytical method has decreased the run time by three compared to conventional strategies, using a 2.5m column length (5% phenyl stationary phase, 0.1mm i.d., 0.1μmf.t.), a pulsed split injection (1:5) with carrier gas helium flow rate at 0.48mLmin(-1) in one run of 20 min. For most BFRs, analytical data were compared with the current analytical strategy relying on GC/EI/HRMS (double sector, R=10000 at 10% valley). Performances in terms of sensitivity were found to meet the Commission recommendation (118/2014/EC) for nBFRs. GC/APCI/MS/MS represents a promising alternative for multi-BFRs analysis in complex matrices, in that it allows the monitoring of a wider list of contaminants in a single injection and a shorter run time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of helium plasma gas flow rate on the properties of WC-12 wt.%Co coatings sprayed by atmospheric plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailo R. Mrdak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The cermet coatings of WC-12wt.%Co are extensively used to improve the wear resistance of a wide range of technical components. This paper analyses the influence of the plasma gas flow of helium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of WC-12wt.%Co coatings deposited by plasma spraying at atmospheric pressure (APS. In order to obtain homogeneous and denser coatings, three different flows of He ( 8 l/min., 16 l/min. and 32 l/min were used in the research. With the application of He, coatings achieved higher values of hardness due to less degradation of the primary WC carbides. The main goal was to deposit dense and homogeneous layers of WC-12wt.%Co coatings with improved wear resistance for different applications. The test results of the microstructure of the layers were evaluated under a light microscope. The analysis of the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the deposited layers was made in accordance with the standard of Pratt-Whitney. The morphology of the powder particles and the microstructure of the best coating was examined on the SEM (scanning electron microscope. The evaluation of the mechanical properties of the layers was done by applying the HV0.3 method for microhardness testing and by applying tensile testing to test the bond strength. The research has shown that the flow of He plasma gas significantly affects the microstructure, the mechanical properties and the structure of WC-12 wt.%Co coatings.

  6. Gas-phase reactivity of peptide thiyl (RS•), perthiyl (RSS•), and sulfinyl (RSO•) radical ions formed from atmospheric pressure ion/radical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lei; Xia, Yu

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the formation of gas-phase peptide perthiyl (RSS•) and thiyl (RS•) radical ions besides sulfinyl radical (RSO•) ions from atmospheric pressure (AP) ion/radical reactions of peptides containing inter-chain disulfide bonds. The identity of perthiyl radical was verified from characteristic 65 Da (•SSH) loss in collision-induced dissociation (CID). This signature loss was further used to assess the purity of peptide perthiyl radical ions formed from AP ion/radical reactions. Ion/molecule reactions combined with CID were carried out to confirm the formation of thiyl radical. Transmission mode ion/molecule reactions in collision cell (q2) were developed as a fast means to estimate the population of peptide thiyl radical ions. The reactivity of peptide thiyl, perthiyl, and sulfinyl radical ions was evaluated based on ion/molecule reactions toward organic disulfides, allyl iodide, organic thiol, and oxygen, which followed in order of thiyl (RS•) > perthiyl (RSS•) > sulfinyl (RSO•). The gas-phase reactivity of these three types of sulfur-based radicals is consistent with literature reports from solution studies.

  7. Comparison of net CO2 fluxes measured with open- and closed-path infrared gas analyzers in an urban complex environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järvi, L.; Mammarella, I.; Eugster, W.

    2009-01-01

    and their suitability to accurately measure CO2 exchange in such non-ideal landscape. In addition, this study examined the effect of open-path sensor heating on measured fluxes in urban terrain, and these results were compared with similar measurements made above a temperate beech forest in Denmark. The correlation...... improved the performance of the open-path analyzer by reducing discrepancies in NSE at the urban site to 2% and decreasing the difference in NSE from 67% to 7% at the forest site. Overall, the site-specific approach gave the best results at both sites and, if possible, it should be preferred in the sensor...

  8. The impact of energy production on the atmosphere: Laboratory and field studies of emissions from oil and gas production and their chemical transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui

    Over the past decades, the rapid development of energy production in the U.S. has led to significant changes in atmospheric emissions and transformation of trace gas and particles, which are still very uncertain and poorly understood. Through laboratory, modeling and field experiments we hope to better understand the trace gas emission and their contribution to secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formation in the oil and natural gas (O&NG) operations. A fast time-response Oxidation Flow Reactor (OFR) is used for the study of SOA formation from oil vapors. The radical chemistry and quantification of OH exposure (OHexp) in the reactor under various conditions were investigated using a photochemical kinetic model. An OHexp estimation equation derived from the model was shown to agree with measurements in several field campaigns. This work further establishes the usefulness of such reactors in atmospheric studies. Motivated from the SOA observations of Gulf of Mexico oil spill, the SOA formation from organic compounds of different volatility in the oil vapors was studied in the laboratory using OFR. We use the evaporation time dependence on volatility of the precursors to quantify their contribution to total SOA formation. This study shows (1) organic compounds of intermediate volatility contribute the large majority of SOA mass formed, (2) the mass spectral signature of SOA shows good agreement with that of ambient SOA formed during oil spill. These results in O&NG operations, the air toxic hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) can be released at wellheads, separation and storage tanks. Here, quantitative, fast time-response measurements of H2S using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass-Spectrometry (PTR-MS) instruments in an O&NG field are presented. A laboratory calibration study was performed to measure the humidity dependent sensitivities of H2S. The close correlation between H2S and CH4 and significant H2S levels downwind of storage tanks suggest that H2S emissions associated with O

  9. Green analyzer for the measurement of total arsenic in drinking water: electrochemical reduction of arsenate to arsine and gas phase chemiluminescence with ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Mrinal K; Sawalha, Maather F; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Idowu, Ademola D; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2010-05-01

    We describe matrix-isolated, reaction chemistry based measurement of arsenic in water down to submicrograms per liter levels in a system that requires only air, water, electricity, and dilute sulfuric acid, the bulk of the latter being recycled. Gas phase chemiluminescence (GPCL) measurement of arsenic is made in an automated batch system with arsenic in situ electroreduced to arsine that is reacted with ozone to emit light. The ozone is generated from oxygen that is simultaneously anodically produced. Of 22 different electrode materials studied, graphite was chosen as the cathode. As(V) is reduced much less efficiently to AsH(3) than As(III). Prereducing all As to As(III) is difficult in the field and tedious. Oxidizing all As to As(V) is simple (e.g., with NaOCl) but greatly reduces subsequent conversion to AsH(3) and hence sensitivity. The rate of the AsH(3)-O(3) GPCL reaction and hence signal intensity increases with [O(3)]. Using oxygen to feed the ozonizer produces higher [O(3)] and substantial signal enhancement. This makes it practical to measure all arsenic as As(V). The system exhibits an LOD (S/N = 3) for total arsenic as As(V) of 0.36 microg/L (5 mL sample). Comparison of total As results in native and spiked water samples with those from inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and other techniques show high correlation (r(2) = 0.9999) and near unity slopes.

  10. Atmospheric concentrations of PAHs, their possible sources and gas-to-particle partitioning at a residential site of Bursa, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, Fatma; Tasdemir, Yücel; Vardar, Nedim

    Atmospheric PAH concentrations were determined in Gulbahce district of Bursa, Turkey between August 2004 and April 2005. Measured PAH concentrations were classified as heating and non-heating season samples. The concentrations of total PAHs in heating season were almost ten times higher than those in non-heating season. Diagnostic ratios and factor analysis results show that in the heating season traffic along with residential heating emissions heavily influence PAH concentrations. The plot of log Kp versus log PL0 for all the data set of heating and non-heating season samples gave significantly different slopes. The slope for the heating season samples (- 0.92) was steeper than the one for the non-heating season samples (- 0.78). The partitioning results for individual samples further indicated that slope values varied depending on air parcel trajectories. Air parcels traveled over water (either over the Black Sea or Aegean Sea) prior to arriving at the sampling site had less steep slopes. Partitioning of PAHs was also investigated by comparing experimentally determined Kp values with the results obtained both from octanol-based model ( Kp(Oct.)) and soot and octanol-based model ( Kp (Soot + Oct.)). Both models were useful in predicting the experimental Kp values. However, they did not explain the observed variability in the experimental Kp values.

  11. Mechanistic model coupling gas exchange dynamics and Listeria monocytogenes growth in modified atmosphere packaging of non respiring food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, E; Broyart, B; Couvert, O; Guillaume, C; Gontard, N; Guillard, V

    2015-10-01

    A mechanistic model coupling O2 and CO2 mass transfer (namely diffusion and solubilisation in the food itself and permeation through the packaging material) to microbial growth models was developed aiming at predicting the shelf life of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) systems. It was experimentally validated on a non-respiring food by investigating concomitantly the O2/CO2 partial pressure in packaging headspace and the growth of Listeria monocytogenes (average microbial count) within the food sample. A sensitivity analysis has revealed that the reliability of the prediction by this "super-parametrized" model (no less than 47 parameters were required for running one simulation) was strongly dependent on the accuracy of the microbial input parameters. Once validated, this model was used to decipher the role of O2/CO2 mass transfer on microbial growth and as a MAP design tool: an example of MAP dimensioning was provided in this paper as a proof of concept. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Measurement of atmospheric vinyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lande, S S

    1979-02-01

    Methods for atmospheric vinyl chloride measurement have been reviewed. The lowest detection limits and most specific measurement are achieved by scrubbing atmospheric samples with activated charcoal, desorbing the vinyl chloride, and assaying it by gas chromatography (GC). NIOSH currently recommends collecting samples using tubes packed with 150 mg of coconut shell charcoal, desorbing with carbon disulfide, and analyzing by GC equipped with flame-ionization detection (FID); the method is capable of detecting less than 1 ppm vinyl chloride and has an apparent recovery of abo the ppb level with no loss of accuracy or precision. Some field methods, such as infrared analysis and conductivity measurement, are capable of detecting 1 ppm or lower but are subject to interferences by other contaminants; th-y could be useful for evaluating sources of vinyl chloride leaks and for continuous monitoring. Permeation tubes are superior to gravimetric or volumetric methods for generating atmospheres of known vinyl chloride concentration.

  13. Fast gas chromatographic residue analysis in animal feed using split injection and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienstra, M; Portolés, T; Hernández, F; Mol, J G J

    2015-11-27

    Significant speed improvement for instrumental runtime would make GC–MS much more attractive for determination of pesticides and contaminants and as complementary technique to LC–MS. This was the trigger to develop a fast method (time between injections less than 10 min) for the determination of pesticides and PCBs that are not (or less) amenable to LC–MS. A key factor in achieving shorter analysis time was the use of split injection (1:10) which allowed the use of a much higher initial GC oven temperature. A shorter column (15 m), higher temperature ramp, and higher carrier gas flow rate (6 mL/min) further contributed to analysis-time reduction. Chromatographic resolution was slightly compromised but still well fit-for-purpose. Due to the high sensitivity of the technique used (GC–APCI-triple quadrupole MS/MS), quantification and identification were still possible down to the 10 μg/kg level, which was demonstrated by successful validation of the method for complex feed matrices according to EU guidelines. Other advantages of the method included a better compatibility of acetonitrile extracts (e.g. QuEChERS) with GC, and a reduced transfer of co-extractants into the GC column and mass spectrometer.

  14. Life-Cycle Analysis of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Water Consumption – Effects of Coal and Biomass Conversion to Liquid Fuels as Analyzed with the GREET Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qianfeng [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cai, Hao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Han, Jeongwoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The vast reserves of coal in the U.S. provide a significant incentive for the development of processes for coal conversion to liquid fuels (CTL). Also, CTL using domestic coal can help move the U.S. toward greater energy independence and security. However, current conversion technologies are less economically competitive and generate greater greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions than production of petroleum fuels. Altex Technologies Corporation (Altex, hereinafter) and Pennsylvania State University have developed a hybrid technology to produce jet fuel from a feedstock blend of coal and biomass. Collaborating with Altex, Argonne National Laboratory has expanded and used the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET®) model to assess the life-cycle GHG emissions and water consumption of this hybrid technology. Biomass feedstocks include corn stover, switchgrass, and wheat straw. The option of biomass densification (bales to pellets) is also evaluated in this study. The results show that the densification process generates additional GHG emissions as a result of additional biomass process energy demand. This process coproduces a large amount of char, and this study investigates two scenarios to treat char: landfill disposal (Char-LF) and combustion for combined heat and power (CHP). Since the CHP scenarios export excess heat and electricity as coproducts, two coproduct handling methods are used for well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis: displacement (Char-CHP-Disp) and energy allocation (Char-CHP-EnAllo). When the feedstock contains 15 wt% densified wheat straw and 85 wt% lignite coal, WTWa GHG emissions of the coal-and-biomass-to-liquid pathways are 116, 97, and 137 gCO2e per megajoule (MJ) under the Char-LF, Char-CHP-Disp, and Char-CHP-EnAllo scenarios, respectively, as compared to conventional jet fuel production at 84 gCO2e/MJ. WTWa water consumption values are 0.072, -0.046, and 0.044 gal/MJ for Char-LF, Char-CHP-Disp, and Char

  15. Emission of gas and atmospheric dispersion of SO2 during the December 2013 eruption at San Miguel volcano (El Salvador)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Giuseppe G.; Granieri, Domenico; Liuzzo, Marco; La Spina, Alessandro; Giuffrida, Giovanni B.; Caltabiano, Tommaso; Giudice, Gaetano; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Montalvo, Francisco; Burton, Michael; Papale, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    San Miguel volcano, also known as Chaparrastique, is a basaltic volcano along the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA). Volcanism is induced by the convergence of the Cocos Plate underneath the Caribbean Plate, along a 1200-km arc, extending from Guatemala to Costa Rica and parallel to the Central American Trench. The volcano is located in the eastern part of El Salvador, in proximity to the large communities of San Miguel, San Rafael Oriente, and San Jorge. Approximately 70,000 residents, mostly farmers, live around the crater and the city of San Miguel, the second largest city of El Salvador, ten km from the summit, has a population of ~180,000 inhabitants. The Pan-American and Coastal highways cross the north and south flanks of the volcano.San Miguel volcano has produced modest eruptions, with at least 28 VEI 1-2 events between 1699 and 1967 (datafrom Smithsonian Institution http://www.volcano.si.edu/volcano.cfm?vn=343100). It is characterized by visible milddegassing from a summit vent and fumarole field, and by intermittent lava flows and Strombolian activity. Since the last vigorous fire fountaining of 1976, San Miguel has only experienced small steam explosions and gas emissions, minor ash fall and rock avalanches. On 29 December 2013 the volcano erupted producing an eruption that has been classified as VEI 2. While eruptions tend to be low-VEI, the presence of major routes and the dense population in the surrounding of the volcano increases the risk that weak explosions with gas and/or ash emission may pose. In this study, we present the first inventory of SO2, CO2, HCl, and HF emission rates on San Miguel volcano, and an analysis of the hazard from volcanogenic SO2 discharged before, during, and after the December 2013 eruption. SO2 was chosen as it is amongst the most critical volcanogenic pollutants, which may cause acute and chronicle disease to humans. Data were gathered by the geochemical monitoring network managed by the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente

  16. Atmospheric gas records from Taylor Glacier, Antarctica, reveal ancient ice with ages spanning the entire last glacial cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baggenstos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Old ice for paleo-environmental studies, traditionally accessed through deep core drilling on domes and ridges on the large ice sheets, can also be retrieved at the surface from ice sheet margins and blue ice areas. The practically unlimited amount of ice available at these sites satisfies a need in the community for studies of trace components requiring large sample volumes. For margin sites to be useful as ancient ice archives, the ice stratigraphy needs to be understood and age models need to be established. We present measurements of trapped gases in ice from Taylor Glacier, Antarctica, to date the ice and assess the completeness of the stratigraphic section. Using δ18O of O2 and methane concentrations, we unambiguously identify ice from the last glacial cycle, covering every climate interval from the early Holocene to the penultimate interglacial. A high-resolution transect reveals the last deglaciation and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM in detail. We observe large-scale deformation in the form of folding, but individual stratigraphic layers do not appear to have undergone irregular thinning. Rather, it appears that the entire LGM–deglaciation sequence has been transported from the interior of the ice sheet to the surface of Taylor Glacier relatively undisturbed. We present an age model that builds the foundation for gas studies on Taylor Glacier. A comparison with the Taylor Dome ice core confirms that the section we studied on Taylor Glacier is better suited for paleo-climate reconstructions of the LGM due to higher accumulation rates.

  17. DEVELOPING ATMOSPHERIC RETRIEVAL METHODS FOR DIRECT IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY OF GAS GIANTS IN REFLECTED LIGHT. I. METHANE ABUNDANCES AND BASIC CLOUD PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupu, Roxana E. [BAER Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Lewis, Nikole [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Line, Michael [Univ. California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Traub, Wesley A., E-mail: Roxana.E.Lupu@nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Upcoming space-based coronagraphic instruments in the next decade will perform reflected light spectroscopy and photometry of cool directly imaged extrasolar giant planets. We are developing a new atmospheric retrieval methodology to help assess the science return and inform the instrument design for such future missions, and ultimately interpret the resulting observations. Our retrieval technique employs a geometric albedo model coupled with both a Markov chain Monte Carlo Ensemble Sampler ( emcee ) and a multimodal nested sampling algorithm ( MultiNest ) to map the posterior distribution. This combination makes the global evidence calculation more robust for any given model and highlights possible discrepancies in the likelihood maps. As a proof of concept, our current atmospheric model contains one or two cloud layers, methane as a major absorber, and a H{sub 2}–He background gas. This 6-to-9 parameter model is appropriate for Jupiter-like planets and can be easily expanded in the future. In addition to deriving the marginal likelihood distribution and confidence intervals for the model parameters, we perform model selection to determine the significance of methane and cloud detection as a function of expected signal-to-noise ratio in the presence of spectral noise correlations. After internal validation, the method is applied to realistic spectra of Jupiter, Saturn, and HD 99492c, a model observing target. We find that the presence or absence of clouds and methane can be determined with high confidence, while parameter uncertainties are model dependent and correlated. Such general methods will also be applicable to the interpretation of direct imaging spectra of cloudy terrestrial planets.

  18. Rapid and long-term effects of water deficit on gas exchange and hydraulic conductance of silver birch trees grown under varying atmospheric humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellin, Arne; Niglas, Aigar; Õunapuu-Pikas, Eele; Kupper, Priit

    2014-03-24

    Effects of water deficit on plant water status, gas exchange and hydraulic conductance were investigated in Betula pendula under artificially manipulated air humidity in Eastern Estonia. The study was aimed to broaden an understanding of the ability of trees to acclimate with the increasing atmospheric humidity predicted for northern Europe. Rapidly-induced water deficit was imposed by dehydrating cut branches in open-air conditions; long-term water deficit was generated by seasonal drought. The rapid water deficit quantified by leaf (ΨL) and branch water potentials (ΨB) had a significant (P gas exchange parameters, while inclusion of ΨB in models resulted in a considerably better fit than those including ΨL, which supports the idea that stomatal openness is regulated to prevent stem rather than leaf xylem dysfunction. Under moderate water deficit (ΨL≥-1.55 MPa), leaf conductance to water vapour (gL), transpiration rate and leaf hydraulic conductance (KL) were higher (P < 0.05) and leaf temperature lower in trees grown in elevated air humidity (H treatment) than in control trees (C treatment). Under severe water deficit (ΨL<-1.55 MPa), the treatments showed no difference. The humidification manipulation influenced most of the studied characteristics, while the effect was to a great extent realized through changes in soil water availability, i.e. due to higher soil water potential in H treatment. Two functional characteristics (gL, KL) exhibited higher (P < 0.05) sensitivity to water deficit in trees grown under increased air humidity. The experiment supported the hypothesis that physiological traits in trees acclimated to higher air humidity exhibit higher sensitivity to rapid water deficit with respect to two characteristics - leaf conductance to water vapour and leaf hydraulic conductance. Disproportionate changes in sensitivity of stomatal versus leaf hydraulic conductance to water deficit will impose greater risk of desiccation-induced hydraulic

  19. Enhanced levels of atmospheric low-molecular weight monocarboxylic acids in gas and particulates over Mt. Tai, North China, during field burning of agricultural wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Nakamura, Shinnosuke; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2017-12-01

    To understand the source and atmospheric behaviour of low molecular weight monocarboxylic acids (monoacids), gaseous (G) and particulate (P) organic acids were collected at the summit of Mt. Tai in the North China Plain (NCP) during field burning of agricultural waste (wheat straw). Particulate organic acids were collected with neutral quartz filter whereas gaseous organic acids were collected with KOH-impregnated quartz filter. Normal (C1-C10), branched (iC4-iC6), hydroxy (lactic and glycolic), and aromatic (benzoic) monoacids were determined with a capillary gas chromatography employing p-bromophenacyl esters. We found acetic acid as the most abundant gas-phase species whereas formic acid is the dominant particle-phase species. Concentrations of formic (G/P 1 570/1 410 ng m-3) and acetic (3 960/1 120 ng m-3) acids significantly increased during the enhanced field burning of agricultural wastes. Concentrations of formic and acetic acids in daytime were found to increase in both G and P phases with those of K+, a field-burning tracer (r = 0.32-0.64). Primary emission and secondary formation of acetic acid is linked with field burning of agricultural wastes. In addition, we found that particle-phase fractions (Fp = P/(G + P)) of formic (0.50) and acetic (0.31) acids are significantly high, indicating that semi-volatile organic acids largely exist as particles. Field burning of agricultural wastes may play an important role in the formation of particulate monoacids in the NCP. High levels (917 ng m-3) of particle-phase lactic acid, which is characteristic of microorganisms, suggest that microbial activity associated with terrestrial ecosystem significantly contributes to the formation of organic aerosols.

  20. Analysis of aldehydes in beer by gas-diffusion microextraction: characterization by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Luís Moreira; Magalhães, Paulo Jorge; Valente, Inês Maria; Pacheco, João Grosso; Dostálek, Pavel; Sýkora, David; Rodrigues, José António; Barros, Aquiles Araújo

    2010-06-11

    In this work, a recently developed extraction technique for sample preparation aiming the analysis of volatile and semi-volatile compounds named gas-diffusion microextraction (GDME) is applied in the chromatographic analysis of aldehydes in beer. Aldehydes-namely acetaldehyde (AA), methylpropanal (MA) and furfural (FA)-were simultaneously extracted and derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), then the derivatives were separated and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with spectrophotometric detection (HPLC-UV). The identity of the eluted compounds was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass-spectrometry detection in the negative ion mode (HPLC-APCI-MS). The developed methodology showed good repeatability (ca. 5%) and linearity as well as good limits of detection (AA-12.3, FA-1.5 and MA 5.4microgL(-1)) and quantification (AA-41, FA-4.9 and MA 18microgL(-1)); it also appears to be competitive in terms of speed and cost of analysis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined dispersive solid-phase extraction-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction-derivatization for gas chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of aliphatic amines on atmospheric fine particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majedi, Seyed Mohammad; Lee, Hian Kee

    2017-02-24

    Short-chain aliphatic amines are ubiquitous in the atmospheric environment. They play an important role in the formation and growth of atmospheric particles. As such, there is a pressing need to monitor these particle-bound compounds present at trace quantities. The present work describes an efficient, one-step microextraction technique for the preconcentration and detection of trace levels of 10 aliphatic amines on fine particles (particulate matter of 2.5μm or less (PM2.5)) in the atmosphere. After extraction of amines from particles in acidified water samples, carbon-based sorbents (in dispersive solid-phase extraction mode), and vortex agitation were utilized for simultaneous derivatization-extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. The approach significantly increased the recoveries and enrichment of the amine derivatives. This one-step, combined technique is proposed for the first time. Several influential factors including type and concentration of derivatization reagent (for gas chromatographic separation), type of buffer, sample pH, types and volumes of extraction and disperser solvents, type and amount of sorbent, vortex time and temperature, desorption solvent type and volume, and salt content were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, high enrichment factors (in the range of between 307 and 382) and good reproducibility (relative standard deviations, below 7.0%, n=5) were achieved. The linearity ranged from 0.1μg/L-100μg/L, and from 0.5μg/L-100μg/L, depending on the analytes. The limits of detection were between 0.02μg/L (corresponding to ∼0.01ng/m(3) in air) and 0.09μg/L (corresponding to ∼0.04ng/m(3) in air). The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of PM2.5 samples collected by air sampling through polytetrafluoroethylene filters. The concentration levels of amines ranged from 1.04 to 4.16ng/m(3) in the air sampled. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. International Space Station Major Constituent Analyzer On-Orbit Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Ben D.; Erwin, Phillip M.; Cougar, Tamara; Ulrich, BettyLynn

    2017-01-01

    The Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) is a mass spectrometer based system that measures the major atmospheric constituents on the International Space Station. A number of limited-life components require periodic change-out, including the ORU 02 analyzer and the ORU 08 Verification Gas Assembly. The most recent ORU 02 and ORU 08 assemblies in the LAB MCA are operating nominally. For ORU 02, the ion source filaments and ion pump lifetime continue to be key determinants of MCA performance. Finally, the Node 3 MCA is being brought to an operational configuration.

  3. Effects of Gas Composition in the Modified Atmosphere Packaging on the Shelf-life of Longissimus dorsi of Korean Native Black Pigs-Duroc Crossbred during Refrigerated Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlisin; Panjono; Kim, Dong Soo; Song, Yeong Rae; Lee, Sung-Jin; Lee, Jeong Koo; Lee, Sung Ki

    2014-08-01

    This study was conducted to observe the effects of gas composition in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the shelf-life of Longissimus dorsi of Korean Native Black Pigs-Duroc Crossbred (KNP×D) during refrigerated storage. Muscle sample was obtained from the left side of carcass of seven months old of KNP×D barrow. The sample was sliced into 1 cm in thickness, placed on trays (two slices/tray) and filled with different gas composition, i.e. 0:20:80/O2:CO2:N2 (MAP1), 30:20:50/O2:CO2:N2 (MAP2) and 70:20:10/O2:CO2:N2 (MAP3). Other slices of sample were vacuum packed (VP) as a control. All packs were stored at 5±1°C. At 12 d of storage, pH value of MAP2 and MAP3 were higher (p<0.05) than that of MAP1 and pH value of MAP1 was higher (p<0.05) than that of VP. At 6 d of storage, redness (a*) value of MAP2 and MAP3 were higher (p<0.05) than that of VP and MAP1 and, at 9 and 12 d of storage, redness value of MAP3 was higher (p<0.05) than that of VP, MAP1, and MAP2. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 d of storage, the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) value of MAP3 was higher than that of MAP2 and TBARS value of MAP2 was higher than that of VP and MAP1. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 d of storage, volatile basic nitrogen values of MAP2 and MAP3 were higher (p<0.05) than those of VP and MAP1. At 3 d of storage, total aerobic plate counts of MAP2 and MAP3 were higher (p<0.05) than those of VP and MAP1 and, at 6 d of storage, total aerobic plate counts of MAP3 was higher (p<0.05) than that of MAP1 and MAP2. However, there was no significant different total aerobic plate count among MAP1, MAP2, and MAP3 at 9 and 12 d of storage. There was no significant different total anaerobic plate count among MAP1, MAP2, and MAP3 during storage. It is concluded that the MAP containing 30:20:50/O2:CO2:N2 gas composition (MAP2) might be ideal for better meat quality for KNP×D meat.

  4. Effects of Gas Composition in the Modified Atmosphere Packaging on the Shelf-life of of Korean Native Black Pigs-Duroc Crossbred during Refrigerated Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhlisin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to observe the effects of gas composition in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP on the shelf-life of Longissimus dorsi of Korean Native Black Pigs-Duroc Crossbred (KNP×D during refrigerated storage. Muscle sample was obtained from the left side of carcass of seven months old of KNP×D barrow. The sample was sliced into 1 cm in thickness, placed on trays (two slices/tray and filled with different gas composition, i.e. 0:20:80/O2:CO2:N2 (MAP1, 30:20:50/O2:CO2:N2 (MAP2 and 70:20:10/O2:CO2:N2 (MAP3. Other slices of sample were vacuum packed (VP as a control. All packs were stored at 5±1°C. At 12 d of storage, pH value of MAP2 and MAP3 were higher (p<0.05 than that of MAP1 and pH value of MAP1 was higher (p<0.05 than that of VP. At 6 d of storage, redness (a* value of MAP2 and MAP3 were higher (p<0.05 than that of VP and MAP1 and, at 9 and 12 d of storage, redness value of MAP3 was higher (p<0.05 than that of VP, MAP1, and MAP2. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 d of storage, the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS value of MAP3 was higher than that of MAP2 and TBARS value of MAP2 was higher than that of VP and MAP1. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 d of storage, volatile basic nitrogen values of MAP2 and MAP3 were higher (p<0.05 than those of VP and MAP1. At 3 d of storage, total aerobic plate counts of MAP2 and MAP3 were higher (p<0.05 than those of VP and MAP1 and, at 6 d of storage, total aerobic plate counts of MAP3 was higher (p<0.05 than that of MAP1 and MAP2. However, there was no significant different total aerobic plate count among MAP1, MAP2, and MAP3 at 9 and 12 d of storage. There was no significant different total anaerobic plate count among MAP1, MAP2, and MAP3 during storage. It is concluded that the MAP containing 30:20:50/O2:CO2:N2 gas composition (MAP2 might be ideal for better meat quality for KNP×D meat.

  5. Effects of Gas Composition in the Modified Atmosphere Packaging on the Shelf-life of Longissimus dorsi of Korean Native Black Pigs-Duroc Crossbred during Refrigerated Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlisin; Panjono; Kim, Dong Soo; Song, Yeong Rae; Lee, Sung-Jin; Lee, Jeong Koo; Lee, Sung Ki

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe the effects of gas composition in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the shelf-life of Longissimus dorsi of Korean Native Black Pigs-Duroc Crossbred (KNP×D) during refrigerated storage. Muscle sample was obtained from the left side of carcass of seven months old of KNP×D barrow. The sample was sliced into 1 cm in thickness, placed on trays (two slices/tray) and filled with different gas composition, i.e. 0:20:80/O2:CO2:N2 (MAP1), 30:20:50/O2:CO2:N2 (MAP2) and 70:20:10/O2:CO2:N2 (MAP3). Other slices of sample were vacuum packed (VP) as a control. All packs were stored at 5±1°C. At 12 d of storage, pH value of MAP2 and MAP3 were higher (p<0.05) than that of MAP1 and pH value of MAP1 was higher (p<0.05) than that of VP. At 6 d of storage, redness (a*) value of MAP2 and MAP3 were higher (p<0.05) than that of VP and MAP1 and, at 9 and 12 d of storage, redness value of MAP3 was higher (p<0.05) than that of VP, MAP1, and MAP2. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 d of storage, the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) value of MAP3 was higher than that of MAP2 and TBARS value of MAP2 was higher than that of VP and MAP1. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 d of storage, volatile basic nitrogen values of MAP2 and MAP3 were higher (p<0.05) than those of VP and MAP1. At 3 d of storage, total aerobic plate counts of MAP2 and MAP3 were higher (p<0.05) than those of VP and MAP1 and, at 6 d of storage, total aerobic plate counts of MAP3 was higher (p<0.05) than that of MAP1 and MAP2. However, there was no significant different total aerobic plate count among MAP1, MAP2, and MAP3 at 9 and 12 d of storage. There was no significant different total anaerobic plate count among MAP1, MAP2, and MAP3 during storage. It is concluded that the MAP containing 30:20:50/O2:CO2:N2 gas composition (MAP2) might be ideal for better meat quality for KNP×D meat. PMID:25083110

  6. Kinetics and dynamics of nanosecond streamer discharge in atmospheric-pressure gas bubble suspended in distilled water under saturated vapor pressure conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Ashish

    2016-09-08

    We perform computational studies of nanosecond streamer discharges generated in helium bubbles immersed in distilled water under atmospheric pressure conditions. The model takes into account the presence of water vapor in the gas bubble for an accurate description of the discharge kinetics. We find that the dynamic characteristics of the streamer discharge are different at low and high positive trigger voltages with the axial streamer evolution dominant for low voltages and a surface hugging mode favored for high voltages. We also find a substantial difference in initiation, transition and evolution stages of discharge for positive and negative trigger voltages with the volumetric distribution of species in the streamer channel much more uniform for negative trigger voltages on account of the presence of multiple streamers. We observe that the presence of water vapor does not affect the breakdown voltage even for oversaturated conditions but significantly influences the composition of dominant species in the trail of the streamer as well as the flux of the dominant species on the bubble surface. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. The SPIRIT airborne instrument: a three-channel infrared absorption spectrometer with quantum cascade lasers for in situ atmospheric trace-gas measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catoire, Valéry; Robert, Claude; Chartier, Michel; Jacquet, Patrick; Guimbaud, Christophe; Krysztofiak, Gisèle

    2017-09-01

    An infrared absorption spectrometer called SPIRIT (SPectromètre Infra-Rouge In situ Toute altitude) has been developed for airborne measurements of trace gases in the troposphere. At least three different trace gases can be measured simultaneously every 1.6 s using the coupling of a single Robert multipass optical cell with three Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs), easily interchangeable to select species depending on the scientific objectives. Absorptions of the mid-infrared radiations by the species in the cell at reduced pressure (path lengths adjustable up to 167.78 m, are quantified using an HgCdTe photodetector cooled by Stirling cycle. The performances of the instrument are assessed: a linearity with a coefficient of determination R 2 > 0.979 for the instrument response is found for CO, CH4, and NO2 volume mixing ratios under typical tropospheric conditions. In-flight comparisons with calibrated gas mixtures allow to show no instrumental drift correlated with atmospheric pressure and temperature changes (when vertical profiling) and to estimate the overall uncertainties in the measurements of CO, CH4, and NO2 to be 0.9, 22, and 0.5 ppbv, respectively. In-flight precision (1 σ) for these species at 1.6 s sampling is 0.3, 5, and 0.3 ppbv, respectively.

  8. Gas Permeability and Permselectivity of Poly(L-Lactic Acid)/SiOx Film and Its Application in Equilibrium-Modified Atmosphere Packaging for Chilled Meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tungalag; Song, Shuxin; Liang, Min; Wang, Yu; Qi, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yuqin; Yun, Xueyan; Jin, Ye

    2017-01-01

    A layer of SiOx was deposited on the surface of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) film to fabricate a PLLA/SiOx layered film, by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. PLLA/SiOx film showed Young's modulus and tensile strength increased by 119.2% and 91.6%, respectively, over those of neat PLLA film. At 5 °C, the oxygen (O2 ) and carbon dioxide (CO2 ) permeability of PLLA/SiOx film decreased by 78.7% and 71.7%, respectively, and the CO2 /O2 permselectivity increased by 32.5%, compared to that of the neat PLLA film. When the PLLA/SiOx film was applied to the equilibrium-modified atmosphere packaging of chilled meat, the gas composition in packaging reached a dynamic equilibrium with 6% to 11% CO2 and 8% to 13% O2 . Combined with tea polyphenol pads, which effectively inhibited the microbial growth, the desirable color of meat was maintained and an extended shelf life of 52 d was achieved for the chilled meat. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  9. The investigation of the microstructure behavior of the spray distances and argon gas flow rates effects on the aluminum coating using self-generated atmospheric plasma spray system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandanjou, Sh.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Saviz, Sh.

    2017-09-01

    In the present paper, our aims are the investigation of the effects of the spray parameters of the aluminum-coated layer on the microstructure and mechanical properties. For this purpose, we use the self-generated atmospheric plasma spray system for coating of aluminum on the carbon steel substrate to protect it against corrosion degradation. This system allows us to achieve the best choice for parameters. In this paper, the effects of spray distance and argon flow rate on the characteristics of aluminum coating are investigated. To obtain the results, the analyses are used such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, micro hardness of the coating by Vickers method, and adhesion strength behaviors by pull-off test. The results show that the porosity increases with increasing distance. This phenomenon reduces the hardness and adhesion, which is clearly evident in our results. The other important conclusion is that, if the gas flow rate increases, the porosity decreases. It is shown that the best adhesion strength is obtained at the special value of the spraying distance.

  10. Kinetics and dynamics of nanosecond streamer discharge in atmospheric-pressure gas bubble suspended in distilled water under saturated vapor pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashish; Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cha, Min Suk

    2016-10-01

    We perform computational studies of nanosecond streamer discharges generated in helium bubbles immersed in distilled water under atmospheric pressure conditions. The model takes into account the presence of water vapor in the gas bubble for an accurate description of the discharge kinetics. We find that the dynamic characteristics of the streamer discharge are different at low and high positive trigger voltages with the axial streamer evolution dominant for low voltages and a surface hugging mode favored for high voltages. We also find a substantial difference in initiation, transition and evolution stages of discharge for positive and negative trigger voltages with the volumetric distribution of species in the streamer channel much more uniform for negative trigger voltages on account of the presence of multiple streamers. We observe that the presence of water vapor does not affect the breakdown voltage even for oversaturated conditions but significantly influences the composition of dominant species in the trail of the streamer as well as the flux of the dominant species on the bubble surface.

  11. Effect of high carbon dioxide atmosphere packaging and soluble gas stabilization pre-treatment on the shelf-life and quality of chicken drumsticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nehlawi, A; Saldo, J; Vega, L F; Guri, S

    2013-05-01

    The effects of an aerobic modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) (70% CO2, 15% O2 and 15% N2) with and without a CO2 3-h soluble gas stabilization (SGS) pre-treatment of chicken drumsticks were determined for various package and product quality characteristics. The CO2 dissolved into drumsticks was determined. The equilibrium between CO2 dissolved in drumsticks and CO2 in head space was reached within 48h after packaging, showing highest values of CO2 in SGS pre-treated samples. This greater availability of CO2 resulted in lower counts of TAB and Pseudomonas in SGS than in MAP drumsticks. Package collapse was significantly reduced in SGS samples. The average of CO2 dissolved in the MAP treatment was 567mg CO2kg(-1) of chicken and, 361mg CO2kg(-1) of chicken during the MAP treatment, in SGS pre-treated samples. This difference could be the quantity of CO2 dissolved during SGS pre-treatment. These results highlight the advantages of using SGS versus traditional MAP for chicken products preservation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Kundt's Tube: An Acoustic Gas Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristov, Natasha; Habekost, Gehsa; Habekost, Achim

    2011-01-01

    A Kundt tube is normally used to measure the speed of sound in gases. Therefore, from known speeds of sound, a Kundt tube can be used to identify gases and their fractions in mixtures. In these experiments, the speed of sound is determined by measuring the frequency of a standing sound wave at a fixed tube length, temperature, and pressure. This…

  13. Comparison of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Electron Ionization and Negative-Ion Chemical Ionization for Analyses of Pesticides at Trace Levels in Atmospheric Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Raina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of detection limits of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS in selected reaction monitoring (SRM mode with both electron ionization (EI and negative-ion chemical ionization (NCI are presented for over 50 pesticides ranging from organochlorines (OCs, organophosphorus pesticides (OPs and pre-emergent herbicides used in the Canadian prairies (triallate, trifluralin, ethalfluralin. The developed GC-EI/SIM, GC-NCI/SIM, and GC-NCI/SRM are suitable for the determination of pesticides in air sample extracts at concentrations <100 pg µL−1 (<100 pg m−3 in air. No one method could be used to analyze the range of pre-emergent herbicides, OPs, and OCs investigated. In general GC-NCI/SIM provided the lowest method detection limits (MDLs commonly 2.5–10 pg µL−1 along with best confirmation (<25% RSD of ion ratio, while GC-NCI/SRM is recommended for use where added selectivity or confirmation is required (such as parathion-ethyl, tokuthion, carbofenothion. GC-EI/SRM at concentration <100 pg µL−1 was not suitable for most pesticides. GC-EI/SIM was more prone to interference issues than NCI methods, but gave good sensitivity (MDLs 1–10 pg µL−1 for pesticides with poor NCI response (OPs: sulfotep, phorate, aspon, ethion, and OCs: alachlor, aldrin, perthane, and DDE, DDD, DDT.

  14. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of Radiative Transfer Equation: Temperature and Gas Mixing Ratio Weighting Functions for Remote Sensing of Scattering Atmospheres in Thermal IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, E.

    1999-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis based on using of the adjoint equation of radiative transfer is applied to the case of atmospheric remote sensing in the thermal spectral region with non-negligeable atmospheric scattering.

  15. Atmospheric Circulation of Exoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    Showman, Adam P.; Cho, James Y-K.; Menou, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    We survey the basic principles of atmospheric dynamics relevant to explaining existing and future observations of exoplanets, both gas giant and terrestrial. Given the paucity of data on exoplanet atmospheres, our approach is to emphasize fundamental principles and insights gained from Solar-System studies that are likely to be generalizable to exoplanets. We begin by presenting the hierarchy of basic equations used in atmospheric dynamics, including the Navier-Stokes, primitive, shallow-wate...

  16. Description and evaluation of the Multiscale Online Nonhydrostatic AtmospheRe CHemistry model (NMMB-MONARCH) version 1.0: gas-phase chemistry at global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Alba; Jorba, Oriol; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Dabdub, Donald; Pérez García-Pando, Carlos; Hilboll, Andreas; Gonçalves, María; Janjic, Zavisa

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive description and benchmark evaluation of the tropospheric gas-phase chemistry component of the Multiscale Online Nonhydrostatic AtmospheRe CHemistry model (NMMB-MONARCH), formerly known as NMMB/BSC-CTM, that can be run on both regional and global domains. Here, we provide an extensive evaluation of a global annual cycle simulation using a variety of background surface stations (EMEP, WDCGG and CASTNET), ozonesondes (WOUDC, CMD and SHADOZ), aircraft data (MOZAIC and several campaigns), and satellite observations (SCIAMACHY and MOPITT). We also include an extensive discussion of our results in comparison to other state-of-the-art models. We note that in this study, we omitted aerosol processes and some natural emissions (lightning and volcano emissions). The model shows a realistic oxidative capacity across the globe. The seasonal cycle for CO is fairly well represented at different locations (correlations around 0.3-0.7 in surface concentrations), although concentrations are underestimated in spring and winter in the Northern Hemisphere, and are overestimated throughout the year at 800 and 500 hPa in the Southern Hemisphere. Nitrogen species are well represented in almost all locations, particularly NO2 in Europe (root mean square error - RMSE - below 5 ppb). The modeled vertical distributions of NOx and HNO3 are in excellent agreement with the observed values and the spatial and seasonal trends of tropospheric NO2 columns correspond well to observations from SCIAMACHY, capturing the highly polluted areas and the biomass burning cycle throughout the year. Over Asia, the model underestimates NOx from March to August, probably due to an underestimation of NOx emissions in the region. Overall, the comparison of the modeled CO and NO2 with MOPITT and SCIAMACHY observations emphasizes the need for more accurate emission rates from anthropogenic and biomass burning sources (i.e., specification of temporal variability). The resulting

  17. Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill Turner

    2006-11-28

    A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

  18. Investigation of time-resolved atmospheric conditions and indoor/outdoor particulate matter concentrations in homes with gas and biomass cook stoves in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Heather A; Pardyjak, Eric R

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports findings from a case study designed to investigate indoor and outdoor air quality in homes near the United States-Mexico border During the field study, size-resolved continuous particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured in six homes, while outdoor PM was simultaneously monitored at the same location in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, during March 14-30, 2009. The purpose of the experiment was to compare PM in homes using different fuels for cooking, gas versus biomass, and to obtain a spatial distribution of outdoor PM in a region where local sources vary significantly (e.g., highway, border crossing, unpaved roads, industry). Continuous PM data were collected every 6 seconds using a valve switching system to sample indoor and outdoor air at each home location. This paper presents the indoor PM data from each home, including the relationship between indoor and outdoor PM. The meteorological conditions associated with elevated ambient PM events in the region are also discussed. Results indicate that indoor air pollution has a strong dependence on cooking fuel, with gas stoves having hourly averaged median PM3 concentrations in the range of 134 to 157 microg m(-3) and biomass stoves 163 to 504 microg m(-1). Outdoor PM also indicates a large spatial heterogeneity due to the presence of microscale sources and meteorological influences (median PM3: 130 to 770 microg m(-3)). The former is evident in the median and range of daytime PM values (median PM3: 250 microg m(-3), maximum: 9411 microg m(-3)), while the meteorological influences appear to be dominant during nighttime periods (median PM3: 251 microg m(-3), maximum: 10,846 microg m(-3)). The atmospheric stability is quantified for three nighttime temperature inversion episodes, which were associated with an order of magnitude increase in PM10 at the regulatory monitor in Nogales, AZ (maximum increase: 12 to 474 microg m(-3)). Implications: Regulatory air quality standards are based on outdoor

  19. The nitrogen cycle: Atmosphere interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric interactions involving the nitrogen species are varied and complex. These interactions include photochemical reactions, initiated by the absorption of solar photons and chemical kinetic reactions, which involve both homogeneous (gas-to-gas reactions) and heterogeneous (gas-to-particle) reactions. Another important atmospheric interaction is the production of nitrogen oxides by atmospheric lightning. The nitrogen cycle strongly couples the biosphere and atmosphere. Many nitrogen species are produced by biogenic processes. Once in the atmosphere nitrogen oxides are photochemically and chemically transformed to nitrates, which are returned to the biosphere via precipitation, dry deposition and aerosols to close the biosphere-atmosphere nitrogen cycle. The sources, sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of the nitrogen species; atmospheric nitrogen species; souces and sinks of nitrous oxide; sources; sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of ammonia; seasonal variation of the vertical distribution of ammonia in the troposphere; surface and atmospheric sources of the nitrogen species, and seasonal variation of ground level ammonia are summarized.

  20. Description and Evaluation of the Multiscale Online Nonhydrostatic AtmospheRe CHemistry Model (NMMB-MONARCH) Version 1.0: Gas-Phase Chemistry at Global Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Alba; Jorba, Oriol; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Dabdub, Donald; Garcia-Pando, Carlos Perez; Hilboll, Andreas; Goncalves, Maria; Janjic, Zavisa

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive description and benchmark evaluation of the tropospheric gas-phase chemistry component of the Multiscale Online Nonhydrostatic AtmospheRe CHemistry model (NMMBMONARCH), formerly known as NMMB/BSC-CTM, that can be run on both regional and global domains. Here, we provide an extensive evaluation of a global annual cycle simulation using a variety of background surface stations (EMEP, WDCGG and CASTNET), ozonesondes (WOUDC, CMD and SHADOZ), aircraft data (MOZAIC and several campaigns), and satellite observations (SCIAMACHY and MOPITT).We also include an extensive discussion of our results in comparison to other state-of-the-art models. We note that in this study, we omitted aerosol processes and some natural emissions (lightning and volcano emissions). The model shows a realistic oxidative capacity across the globe. The seasonal cycle for CO is fairly well represented at different locations (correlations around 0.3-0.7 in surface concentrations), although concentrations are underestimated in spring and winter in the Northern Hemisphere, and are overestimated throughout the year at 800 and 500 hPa in the Southern Hemisphere. Nitrogen species are well represented in almost all locations, particularly NO2 in Europe (root mean square error - RMSE - below 5 ppb). The modeled vertical distributions of NOx and HNO3 are in excellent agreement with the observed values and the spatial and seasonal trends of tropospheric NO2 columns correspond well to observations from SCIAMACHY, capturing the highly polluted areas and the biomass burning cycle throughout the year. Over Asia, the model underestimates NOx from March to August, probably due to an underestimation of NOx emissions in the region. Overall, the comparison of the modeled CO and NO2 with MOPITT and SCIAMACHY observations emphasizes the need for more accurate emission rates from anthropogenic and biomass burning sources (i.e., specification of temporal variability).

  1. An integrated systems calculation of a steam generator tube rupture in a modular prismatic HTGR (high-temperature gas-cooled reactor) conceptual design using ATHENA (Advanced Thermal-Hydraulic Energy Network Analyzer)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beelman, R.J. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The capability to perform integrated systems calculations of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) transients has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) using the Advanced Thermal-Hydraulic Energy Network Analyzer (ATHENA) computer code. A scoping calculation of a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) water ingress event in a prismatic 2 {times} 350-MW(thermal) MHTGR conceptual design has been completed at INEL using ATHENA. The proposed MHTGR design incorporates dual, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, 350-MW(thermal), annular prismatic core concept reactor plants, each configured with an individual helical once-through steam generator steaming a common 280-MW(electric) turbine generator set.

  2. Quantification of urban atmospheric boundary layer greenhouse gas dry mole fraction enhancements in the dormant season: Results from the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha L. Miles

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We assess the detectability of city emissions via a tower-based greenhouse gas (GHG network, as part of the Indianapolis Flux (INFLUX experiment. By examining afternoon-averaged results from a network of carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, and carbon monoxide (CO mole fraction measurements in Indianapolis, Indiana for 2011–2013, we quantify spatial and temporal patterns in urban atmospheric GHG dry mole fractions. The platform for these measurements is twelve communications towers spread across the metropolitan region, ranging in height from 39 to 136 m above ground level, and instrumented with cavity ring-down spectrometers. Nine of the sites were deployed as of January 2013 and data from these sites are the focus of this paper. A background site, chosen such that it is on the predominantly upwind side of the city, is utilized to quantify enhancements caused by urban emissions. Afternoon averaged mole fractions are studied because this is the time of day during which the height of the boundary layer is most steady in time and the area that influences the tower measurements is likely to be largest. Additionally, atmospheric transport models have better performance in simulating the daytime convective boundary layer compared to the nighttime boundary layer. Averaged from January through April of 2013, the mean urban dormant-season enhancements range from 0.3 ppm CO2 at the site 24 km typically downwind of the edge of the city (Site 09 to 1.4 ppm at the site at the downwind edge of the city (Site 02 to 2.9 ppm at the downtown site (Site 03. When the wind is aligned such that the sites are downwind of the urban area, the enhancements are increased, to 1.6 ppm at Site 09, and 3.3 ppm at Site 02. Differences in sampling height affect the reported urban enhancement by up to 50%, but the overall spatial pattern remains similar. The time interval over which the afternoon data are averaged alters the calculated urban enhancement by an average of 0.4 ppm

  3. Can intense forest fertilization be considered a sustainable management practice in the context of greenhouse gas exchange between soils and the atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquist, Mats G.; Egnell, Gustaf; Nilsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    The demand for forest biomass is increasing and there is large potential for increasing biomass production of northern forest ecosystems by various management strategies involving N fertilization. Increased biomass production also leads to more atmospheric carbon sequestration that potentially can mitigate climate change. N fertilization has been shown to increase biomass production and to decrease soil respiration rates. However, the potential increase in N2O emissions following N addition may counteract the sustainability of such management practices in terms of its impact on the sink/source relationship of greenhouse gases. Here we evaluate the effect of various N addition intensities on the soil-atmosphere exchange of CO2 and N2O in a long-term field experiment in a boreal Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest stand. The stand was planted in 1953 and the experiment was established in 1974 with annual N addition at four levels (N0, N1, N2, and N3 receiving 0, 35, 70, and 110 kg N ha-1 year-1, respectively) organized in a randomized block design (n=3) in plots of 30x30m. The high (N3) and intermediate (N2) N addition levels were terminated in 1990 and 2006, respectively, and offered an opportunity to investigate recovery of greenhouse gas exchange following high N loading. Soil-atmosphere exchange of GHGs were estimated weekly during 2010-2011 based on static chamber measurements during the snow free period and snow concentration gradients during winter. In the ongoing treatment (N1) the annual N2O emissions were 25 mg N2O m-2 yr-1, as compared to 6 mg N2O m-2 yr-1 in the control plots, representing a ca 4-fold significant increase due to N-addition. The N2O-N loss from the treatment corresponded to ca 0.5% of the annually added N (35 kg N ha-1). In the N2 treatment (terminated in 2006) annual N2O emissions were 15 mg N2O m-2 yr-1, while in the N3 treatment N2O emissions were the same as in the control plots with no N-additions. Thus the system has capacity to

  4. Simplified prediction of soot emissions in the exhaust of gas turbines operated at atmospheric pressure; Prediction simplifiee des emissions de suie a la sortie des chambres de combustion des turbines a gaz operees a la pression atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsogo, J. [College de la garde cotiere du Canada, Departement de genie maritime, Sydney (Canada); Kretschmer, D. [Universite Laval, Departement de genie mecanique, Quebec (Canada)

    2010-04-15

    In previous works [1, 2], a correlation for the prediction of soot in gas turbine exhaust has been presented. The development of the correlation is based on 300 of experimental data for a total of 19 fuels burned both at atmospheric and high pressure (0.1 to 0.9 MPa) and two scales (1/2 and 1/3) of a Laval type combustion chamber. With the wide range of fuels burned in the experiment giving a smoke number variation from 0 to 100, the accuracy of the correlation (Standard Deviation of 40%) is acceptable for most purposes Later on the correlation has been improved using data from the full scaled combustion chamber as shown in [3]. A detailed analysis of the correlation is undertaken within the present work for the case of the experiments at atmospheric pressure. The result is a simplification of the correlation presented in [3] without a major deterioration of the standard deviation. This result leads to a simplification of the previous proposed soot formation and oxidation model within gas turbine combustors (operated at atmospheric pressure) and limits the analysis of the phenomenon on essential functional parameters as well. Gas turbines are generally used in aircraft, ships, and in stationary production of electricity, heat and vapor. (author)

  5. Comprehensive Retrieval of Spatio-temporal Variations in Atmospheric Radionuclides just after the Fukushima Accident by Analyzing Filter-tapes of Operational Air Pollution Monitoring Stations in Eastern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ohara, Toshimasa; Moriguchi, Yuichi; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2016-04-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FD1NPS) accident on March 11, 2011, many datasets have been available of deposition density of radionuclides in soils in eastern Japan. By contrast, no time-series data of atmospheric radionuclides has been measured in the Fukushima prefecture (FP), although very limited data is available in the Tokyo metropolitan area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPS. As a result, atmospheric transport models simulating the atmospheric concentrations and surface deposition of radionuclides have large uncertainty, as well as the estimate of release rate of source terms and of internal exposure from inhalation. One year after the accident, we collected the used filter-tapes installed in Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) monitors with beta-ray attenuation method operated by local governments in the air pollution monitoring network of eastern Japan. The SPM monitoring stations are mostly located in the urban and/or industrial area to measure the hourly mass concentration of SPM less than 10 μm in diameter for health effect due to atmospheric aerosols. By measuring radionuclides in SPM on the filter-tapes, we retrieved hourly atmospheric Cs-134 and Cs-137 concentrations during March 12-23, 2011, when atmospheric, aquatic, and terrestrial environments were seriously suffered in most of eastern Japan. Until now, we measured hourly radiocesium at around 100 SPM sites in the southern Tohoku region (ST) including the FP and in the TMA. By analysing the dataset, about 10 plumes/polluted air masses with Cs-137 concentrations higher than 10 Bq m-3 were found, and some plumes were newly detected in this study. And the spatio-temporal distributions of atmospheric Cs-137 were clearly shown for all the plumes. The east coast area of the FP where the FD1NPS was located in the centre was attacked several times by the plumes, and suffered the highest time-integrated Cs-137 concentration during the period among the ST and TMA

  6. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...

  7. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 6. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S

    2007-09-05

    Throughout fifty-three years of operations, an estimated 792,000 Ci (29,300 TBq) of tritium have been released to the atmosphere at the Livermore site of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); about 75% was tritium gas (HT) primarily from the accidental releases of 1965 and 1970. Routine emissions contributed slightly more than 100,000 Ci (3,700 TBq) HT and about 75,000 Ci (2,800 TBq) tritiated water vapor (HTO) to the total. A Tritium Dose Reconstruction was undertaken to estimate both the annual doses to the public for each year of LLNL operations and the doses from the few accidental releases. Some of the dose calculations were new, and the others could be compared with those calculated by LLNL. Annual doses (means and 95% confidence intervals) to the potentially most exposed member of the public were calculated for all years using the same model and the same assumptions. Predicted tritium concentrations in air were compared with observed mean annual concentrations at one location from 1973 onwards. Doses predicted from annual emissions were compared with those reported in the past by LLNL. The highest annual mean dose predicted from routine emissions was 34 {micro}Sv (3.4 mrem) in 1957; its upper confidence limit, based on very conservative assumptions about the speciation of the release, was 370 {micro}Sv (37 mrem). The upper confidence limits for most annual doses were well below the current regulatory limit of 100 {micro}Sv (10 mrem) for dose to the public from release to the atmosphere; the few doses that exceeded this were well below the regulatory limits of the time. Lacking the hourly meteorological data needed to calculate doses from historical accidental releases, ingestion/inhalation dose ratios were derived from a time-dependent accident consequence model that accounts for the complex behavior of tritium in the environment. Ratios were modified to account for only those foods growing at the time of the releases. The highest dose from an

  8. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portolés, T. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, 12071 Castellón (Spain); RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Akkermaalsbos 2, 6708 WB Wageningen (Netherlands); Mol, J.G.J. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Akkermaalsbos 2, 6708 WB Wageningen (Netherlands); Sancho, J.V.; López, Francisco J. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, 12071 Castellón (Spain); Hernández, F., E-mail: hernandf@uji.es [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, 12071 Castellón (Spain)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Applicability of GC-(APCI)QTOF MS as new tool for wide-scope screening of pesticides in fruits and vegetables demonstrated. • Validation of screening method according to SANCO/12571/2013. • Detection of the pesticides based on the presence of M+·/MH+ in most cases. • Screening detection limit 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} for 77% of the pesticides investigated. • Successful identification at 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} for 70% of the pesticides/matrix combinations. - Abstract: A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target acquisition was performed through two alternating scan events: one at low collision energy and another at a higher collision energy ramp (MS{sup E}). In this way, both protonated molecule and/or molecular ion together with fragment ions were obtained in a single run. Validation was performed according to SANCO/12571/2013 by analysing 20 samples (10 different commodities in duplicate), fortified with a test set of 132 pesticides at 0.01, 0.05 and 0.20 mg kg{sup −1}. For screening, the detection was based on one diagnostic ion (in most cases the protonated molecule). Overall, at the 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} level, 89% of the 2620 fortifications made were detected. The screening detection limit for individual pesticides was 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} for 77% of the pesticides investigated. The possibilities for identification according to the SANCO criteria, requiring two ions with a mass accuracy ≤±5 ppm and an ion-ratio deviation ≤±30%, were investigated. At the 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} level, identification was possible for 70% of the pesticides detected during screening. This increased to 87% and 93% at the 0.05 and 0.20 mg kg{sup −1} level, respectively. Insufficient sensitivity for the second

  9. Relationship of Ambient Atmosphere and Biological Aerosol Responses from a Fielded Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Ion Mobility Spectrometry Bioanalytical Detector

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, A

    2003-01-01

    .... A pyrolysis-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry stand-alone bioaerosol system was interfaced to an aerosol concentrator to collect ambient background aerosols and produce bioanalytical...

  10. Volcanic Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often escape continuously into the atmosphere from the soil, volcanic vents , fumaroles , and hydrothermal systems. By far the ... after falling into a snow depression surrounding a volcanic fumarole and filled ... of CO 2 gas in soils can also damage or destroy vegetation, as is ...

  11. Effect of flue gas composition on deposit induced high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions mimicking biomass firing. Part II: Exposures in SO2 containing atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kiamehr, Saeed; Montgomery, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    )-coatedand deposit-free austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG) samples to gas mixturescontaining SO2 was carried out, under conditions relevant to biomass-firing.Exposures were conducted isothermally at 560 8C for 72 h, in oxidizingsulphidizing,and oxidizing-sulphidizing-chlorinating gas mixtures containing60 ppmv......In biomass fired power plants, the fast corrosion of superheaters is facilitatedby the presence of corrosive flue gas species, for example, SO2, which arereleased during combustion. To understand the role of the gas species on thecorrosion process, comparative laboratory exposures of deposit (KCl...... broad pits containing sulphides and oxides. The severepitting attack was decreased by the presence of HCl in the gas mixture....

  12. On the Fast Evaluation Method of Temperature and Gas Mixing Ratio Weighting Functions for Remote Sensing of Planetary Atmospheres in Thermal IR and Microwave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, E. A.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of weighting functions in the atmospheric remote sensing is usually the most computer-intensive part of the inversion algorithms. We present an analytic approach to computations of temperature and mixing ratio weighting functions that is based on our previous results but the resulting expressions use the intermediate variables that are generated in computations of observable radiances themselves. Upwelling radiances at the given level in the atmosphere and atmospheric transmittances from space to the given level are combined with local values of the total absorption coefficient and its components due to absorption of atmospheric constituents under study. This makes it possible to evaluate the temperature and mixing ratio weighting functions in parallel with evaluation of radiances. This substantially decreases the computer time required for evaluation of weighting functions. Implications for the nadir and limb viewing geometries are discussed.

  13. Effect of flue gas composition on deposit induced high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions mimicking biomass firing. Part II: Exposures in SO2 containing atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kiamehr, Saeed; Montgomery, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    In biomass fired power plants, the fast corrosion of superheaters is facilitatedby the presence of corrosive flue gas species, for example, SO2, which arereleased during combustion. To understand the role of the gas species on thecorrosion process, comparative laboratory exposures of deposit (KCl......)-coatedand deposit-free austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG) samples to gas mixturescontaining SO2 was carried out, under conditions relevant to biomass-firing.Exposures were conducted isothermally at 560 8C for 72 h, in oxidizingsulphidizing,and oxidizing-sulphidizing-chlorinating gas mixtures containing60 ppmv...... SO2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-rayspectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques werecomplimentarily applied to characterize the resulting corrosion products. Apartially molten K2SO4-layer formed on KCl coated specimens, and corrosionresulted in localized...

  14. Data reduction analysis and application technique development for atmospheric trace gas constituents derived from remote sensors on satellite or airborne platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, J. C.; Campbell, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    The applicability of the gas filter correlation radiometer (GFCR) to the measurement of tropospheric carbon monoxide gas was investigated. An assessment of the GFRC measurement system to a regional measurement program was conducted through extensive aircraft flight-testing of several versions of the GFRC. Investigative work in the following areas is described: flight test planning and coordination, acquisition of verifying CO measurements, determination and acquisition of supporting meteorological data requirements, and development of supporting computational software.

  15. Comparison of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Electron Ionization and Negative-Ion Chemical Ionization for Analyses of Pesticides at Trace Levels in Atmospheric Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Raina; Patricia Hall

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of detection limits of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with both electron ionization (EI) and negative-ion chemical ionization (NCI) are presented for over 50 pesticides ranging from organochlorines (OCs), organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and pre-emergent herbicides used in the Canadian prairies (triallate, trifluralin, ethalflurali...

  16. Relationship of atmospheric pollution characterized by gas (NO2) and particles (PM10) to microbial communities living in bryophytes at three differently polluted sites (rural, urban, and industrial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Caroline; Gilbert, Daniel; Gaudry, André; Franchi, Marielle; Nguyen, Hung Viet; Fabure, Juliette; Bernard, Nadine

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pollution has become a major problem for modern societies owing to its fatal effects on both human health and ecosystems. We studied the relationships of nitrogen dioxide atmospheric pollution and metal trace elements contained in atmospheric particles which were accumulated in bryophytes to microbial communities of bryophytes at three differently polluted sites in France (rural, urban, and industrial) over an 8-month period. The analysis of bryophytes showed an accumulation of Cr and Fe at the rural site; Cr, Fe, Zn, Cu, Al, and Pb at the urban site; and Fe, Cr, Pb, Al, Sr, Cu, and Zn at the industrial site. During this study, the structure of the microbial communities which is characterized by biomasses of microbial groups evolved differently according to the site. Microalgae, bacteria, rotifers, and testate amoebae biomasses were significantly higher in the rural site. Cyanobacteria biomass was significantly higher at the industrial site. Fungal and ciliate biomasses were significantly higher at the urban and industrial sites for the winter period and higher at the rural site for the spring period. The redundancy analysis showed that the physico-chemical variables ([NO(2)], relative humidity, temperature, and site) and the trace elements which were accumulated in bryophytes ([Cu], [Sr], [Pb]) explained 69.3% of the variance in the microbial community data. Moreover, our results suggest that microbial communities are potential biomonitors of atmospheric pollution. Further research is needed to understand the causal relationship underlined by the observed patterns.

  17. Permeation tubes. Their use in the preparation of controlled gas atmospheres; Tubos de permeacion. su empleo en la preparaciond e atmosferas contoladas de gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galianos, J. A.; Palomares, F.

    1981-07-01

    In this paper, the state of the art on the nature, construction and properties of the permeation tubes Is reviewed; after describing the main calibration procedures In use, examples of their application in the area of the atmospheric pollution are given, especially in the case of sulfur dioxides. (Author) 38 refs.

  18. Nitrogen gas flushing can be bactericidal: The temperature-dependent destiny of Bacillus weihenstephanensis KBAB4 under a pure N2 atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eMunsch-Alatossava

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tremendous food spoilage on one side and increased concern about the incidence of food-borne pathogens on the other side urge the development of additional steps to ensure food safety and quality. In previous studies, nitrogen (N2 gas flushing treatments of raw and pasteurized milk at cold chain-temperatures inhibited bacterial spoilage and highlighted different susceptibilities to the N2 treatment with the exclusion of certain bacterial types. Gram-negative Pseudomonas and Gram-positive Bacillus are the most common spoilage bacteria in raw and pasteurised milk, respectively. Here, we investigated the effects of pure N2 gas flushing on representative strains of these genera grown in mono- or co-cultures at 15°C and 25°C. Bacillus weihenstephanensis, which is a frequent inhabitant of fluid dairy products, is represented by the genome-sequenced KBAB4 strain. Among Pseudomonas, P. tolaasii LMG 2342T and strain C1, a raw milk psychrotroph, were selected. The N2 gas flushing treatment revealed: 1 temperature-dependent responses; 2 inhibition of the growth of both pseudomonads; 3 emergence of small colony variants for B. weihenstephanensis strain KBAB4 at 15°C induced by the N2 treatment or when grown in co-culture with Pseudomonas strains; 4 N2 gas flushing modulates (suppressed or stimulated bacterial antagonistic reactions in co-cultures; 5 most importantly, SEM and TEM analyses revealed that at 25°C the majority of the KBAB4 cells were killed by pure N2 gas flushing. This observation constitutes the first evidence that N2 gas flushing has bactericidal effects.

  19. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 2. LLNL Annual Site-specific Data, 1953 - 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S R

    2005-03-07

    It is planned to use the tritium dose model, DCART (Doses from Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium), to reconstruct dose to the hypothetical maximally exposed individual from annual routine releases of tritiated water (HTO) and tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) from all Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) facilities and from the Sandia National (SNL) Laboratory's Tritium Research Laboratory over the last fifty years. DCART has been described in Part 1 of ''Historical Doses From Tritiated Water And Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released To The Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)'' (UCRL-TR-205083). This report (Part 2) summarizes information about annual routine releases of tritium from LLNL (and SNL) since 1953. Historical records were used to derive facility-specific annual data (e.g., source terms, dilution factors, ambient air concentrations, meteorological data, including absolute humidity and rainfall, etc.) and their associated uncertainty distributions. These data will be used as input to DCART to calculate annual dose for each year of LLNL operations. Sources of information are carefully referenced, and assumptions are documented. Confidence on all data post-1974 is quite high. Prior to that, further adjustment to the estimated uncertainty may have to be made if more information comes to light.

  20. EPA Air Method, Toxic Organics - 15 (TO-15): Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Air Collected in Specially-Prepared Canisters and Analyzed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Method T)-15 describes procedures for for preparation and analysis of air samples containing volatile organic compounds collected in specially-prepared canisters, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  1. Atmospheric Habitable Zones in Y Dwarf Atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, Jack S.; Palmer, Paul I. [School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Biller, Beth; Cockell, Charles S., E-mail: j.s.yates@ed.ac.uk [Centre for Exoplanet Science, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-20

    We use a simple organism lifecycle model to explore the viability of an atmospheric habitable zone (AHZ), with temperatures that could support Earth-centric life, which sits above an environment that does not support life. To illustrate our model, we use a cool Y dwarf atmosphere, such as WISE J085510.83–0714442.5, whose 4.5–5.2 μ m spectrum shows absorption features consistent with water vapor and clouds. We allow organisms to adapt to their atmospheric environment (described by temperature, convection, and gravity) by adopting different growth strategies that maximize their chance of survival and proliferation. We assume a constant upward vertical velocity through the AHZ. We found that the organism growth strategy is most sensitive to the magnitude of the atmospheric convection. Stronger convection supports the evolution of more massive organisms. For a purely radiative environment, we find that evolved organisms have a mass that is an order of magnitude smaller than terrestrial microbes, thereby defining a dynamical constraint on the dimensions of life that an AHZ can support. Based on a previously defined statistical approach, we infer that there are of the order of 10{sup 9} cool Y brown dwarfs in the Milky Way, and likely a few tens of these objects are within 10 pc from Earth. Our work also has implications for exploring life in the atmospheres of temperate gas giants. Consideration of the habitable volumes in planetary atmospheres significantly increases the volume of habitable space in the galaxy.

  2. Secondary Atmospheres on HD 219134 b and c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Caroline; Heng, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    We analyze the interiors of HD 219134 b and c, which are among the coolest super-Earths detected thus far. Without using spectroscopic measurements, we aim at constraining if the possible atmospheres are hydrogen-rich or hydrogen-poor. In the first step, we employ a full probabilistic Bayesian inference analysis to rigorously quantify the degeneracy of interior parameters given the data of mass, radius, refractory element abundances, semimajor axes, and stellar irradiation. We obtain constraints on structure and composition for core, mantle, ice layer, and atmosphere. In the second step, we aim to draw conclusions on the nature of possible atmospheres by considering atmospheric escape. Specifically, we compare the actual possible atmospheres to a threshold thickness above which a primordial (H2-dominated) atmosphere can be retained against evaporation over the planet’s lifetime. The best-constrained parameters are the individual layer thicknesses. The maximum radius fraction of possible atmospheres are 0.18 and 0.13 R (radius), for planets b and c, respectively. These values are significantly smaller than the threshold thicknesses of primordial atmospheres: 0.28 and 0.19 R, respectively. Thus, the possible atmospheres of planets b and c are unlikely to be H2-dominated. However, whether possible volatile layers are made of gas or liquid/solid water cannot be uniquely determined. Our main conclusions are (1) the possible atmospheres for planets b and c are enriched and thus possibly secondary in nature, and (2) both planets may contain a gas layer, whereas the layer of HD 219134 b must be larger. HD 219134 c can be rocky.

  3. Atmospheric concentrations and air–soil gas exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in remote, rural village and urban areas of Beijing–Tianjin region, North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentao; Simonich, Staci; Giri, Basant; Chang, Ying; Zhang, Yuguang; Jia, Yuling; Tao, Shu; Wang, Rong; Wang, Bin; Li, Wei; Cao, Jun; Lu, Xiaoxia

    2013-01-01

    Forty passive air samplers were deployed to study the occurrence of gas and particulate phase PAHs in remote, rural village and urban areas of Beijing–Tianjin region, North China for four seasons (spring, summer, fall and winter) from 2007 to 2008. The influence of emissions on the spatial distribution pattern of air PAH concentrations was addressed. In addition, the air–soil gas exchange of PAHs was studied using fugacity calculations. The median gaseous and particulate phase PAH concentrations were 222 ng/m3 and 114 ng/m3, respectively, with a median total PAH concentration of 349 ng/m3. Higher PAH concentrations were measured in winter than in other seasons. Air PAH concentrations measured at the rural villages and urban sites in the northern mountain region were significantly lower than those measured at sites in the southern plain during all seasons. However, there was no significant difference in PAH concentrations between the rural villages and urban sites in the northern and southern areas. This urban–rural PAH distribution pattern was related to the location of PAH emission sources and the population distribution. The location of PAH emission sources explained 56%–77% of the spatial variation in ambient air PAH concentrations. The annual median air–soil gas exchange flux of PAHs was 42.2 ng/m2/day from soil to air. Among the 15 PAHs measured, acenaphthylene (ACY) and acenaphthene (ACE) contributed to more than half of the total exchange flux. Furthermore, the air–soil gas exchange fluxes of PAHs at the urban sites were higher than those at the remote and rural sites. In summer, more gaseous PAHs volatilized from soil to air because of higher temperatures and increased rainfall. However, in winter, more gaseous PAHs deposited from air to soil due to higher PAH emissions and lower temperatures. The soil TOC concentration had no significant influence on the air–soil gas exchange of PAHs. PMID:21669328

  4. Method comparison and validation of a prototype device for measurement of ionized calcium concentrations cow-side against a point-of-care instrument and a benchtop blood-gas analyzer reference method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, R C; Stokol, T; Bach, K D; McArt, J A A

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess an optimized ion-selective electrode Ca-module prototype as a potential cow-side device for ionized Ca (iCa) measurements in bovine blood. A linearity experiment showed no deviation from linearity over a range of iCa concentrations compared with a commercial point-of-care (POC) device commonly used in the field (POC VS ; VetScan i-STAT, Abaxis North America, Union City, CA) and a laboratory gold standard benchtop blood-gas analyzer [reference analyzer (RA); ABL-800 FLEX, Radiometer Medical, Copenhagen, Denmark]. Coefficient of variation on 3 samples with high, within-range, and low iCa concentrations ranged from 1.0 to 3.9% for the prototype. A follow-up validation experiment was performed, in which our objectives were to (1) assess the performance of the prototype cow-side against the POC VS (farm gold-standard) using fresh non-anticoagulated whole-blood samples; (2) assess the performance of the prototype and the POC VS against the RA in a diagnostic laboratory using blood collected in a heparin-balanced syringe; and (3) assess the agreement of the prototype and POC VS on-farm (fresh non-anticoagulated whole blood) against the RA on heparin-balanced blood. Finally, sensitivity and specificity of the results obtained by the prototype and the POC VS cow-side compared with the results obtained by the laboratory RA using 3 different iCa cut points for classification of subclinical hypocalcemia were calculated. A total of 101 periparturient Holstein cows from 3 dairy farms in New York State were used for the second experiment. Ionized Ca results from the prototype cow-side were, on average, 0.06 mmol/L higher than the POC VS . With heparin-balanced samples under laboratory conditions, the prototype and POC VS measured an average 0.04 mmol/L higher and lower, respectively, compared with the RA. Results from the prototype and POC VS cow-side were 0.01 mmol/L higher and 0.05 mmol/L lower, respectively, compared with results from

  5. Atmospheric Transport Studies Using In-situ Airborne Gas Chromatograph Measurements: An Overview of the NOAA Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) Contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, F.; Dutton, G.; Elkins, J.; Hall, B.; Hurst, D.; Nance, D.; Ray, E.; Romashkin, P.; Thompson, T.; Volk, C. M.

    2005-12-01

    Accurate models of atmospheric transport are crucial to our current understanding of ozone production/loss and its coupling with climate change. Over the last ``20 years'', improvements in the ability to predict ``The Antarctic Ozone Hole and Polar Ozone Loss'' have tracked improvements in transport models. Data taken from the NOAA/CMDL airborne in-situ GC's (ACATS, LACE, PANTHER, and UCATS) have and will continue to play key roles in quantifying many aspects of stratospheric transport. Our data have been used in many of the model assessments to date. We will display an overview of the transport issues studied over the years using our data. They include descent with mixing within and into the polar vortex, entrainment of mid-latitude air across the vortex edge, upwelling and entrainment in the tropical pipe, isentropic transport across the tropopause into the lowermost stratosphere, mean ages of air parcels in the stratosphere, and stratospheric path distributions. ACATS - Airborne Chromatograph for Atmospheric Trace Species LACE - Lightweight Airborne Chromatograph Experiment PANTHER - PAN and Other Trace Hydrohalocarbons ExpeRiment UCATS - Unmanned aerial systems Chromatograph for Atmospheric Trace Species