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Sample records for atmospheric exposure chambers

  1. Exposure chambers for studying the partitioning of atmospheric PAHs in environmental compartments: validation and calibration using experimental and computational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalme, Dorine; Roy, Jean-Claude; Binet, Philippe; Chiapusio, Geneviève; Gilbert, Daniel; Toussaint, Marie-Laure; Girardot, Laurent; Bernard, Nadine

    2013-08-01

    The environmental partitioning of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) conditions their entry into food chains and subsequent risks for human health. The need for new experimental exposure devices for elucidating the mechanisms governing ecosystemic PAH transfer motivated the elaboration of an original small-scale exposure chamber (EC). A dual approach pairing experimentation and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was selected to provide comprehensive validation of this EC as a tool to study the transfer and biological effects of atmospheric PAH pollution in microsystems. Soil samples and passive air samplers (PASs) were exposed to atmospheric pollution by phenanthrene (PHE), a gaseous PAH, for 2 weeks in examples of the EC being tested, set up under different conditions. Dynamic concentrations of atmospheric PHE and its uptake by PASs were simulated with CFD, results showing homogeneous distribution and constant atmospheric PHE concentrations inside the ECs. This work provides insight into the setting of given concentrations and pollution levels when using such ECs. The combination of experimentation and CFD is a successful ECs calibration method that should be developed with other semivolatile organic pollutants, including those that tend to partition in the aerosol phase.

  2. A new plant chamber facility PLUS coupled to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    OpenAIRE

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; S. Andres; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; A. Wahner; R. Wegener; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-01-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been build and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees are mixed with synthetic air and are transferred to the SAPHIR chamber ...

  3. A new plant chamber facility PLUS coupled to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hohaus

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber has been build and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees are mixed with synthetic air and are transferred to the SAPHIR chamber where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important enviromental parameters (e.g. temperature, PAR, soil RH etc. are well-controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leafes of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to FEP Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces only to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 LED panels which have an emission strength up to 800 μmol m−2 s−1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOC through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light and temperature dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus Ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus Ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental set up and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  4. A new plant chamber facility PLUS coupled to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-11-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been build and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees are mixed with synthetic air and are transferred to the SAPHIR chamber where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important enviromental parameters (e.g. temperature, PAR, soil RH etc.) are well-controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leafes of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to FEP Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces only to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 LED panels which have an emission strength up to 800 μmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOC) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light and temperature dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus Ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus Ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental set up and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  5. Vapor chambers for an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, G. L.; Scollon, T. R., Jr.; Loose, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The methanol/stainless steel vapor chambers (flat-plate heat pipes) discussed in this paper were developed for use in spaceborne atmospheric cloud chambers. This application imposed stringent thermal and mechanical requirements on the design. Flatness, low thermal mass, vibration, and structural integrity requirements were achieved in addition to precision temperature uniformity and thermal transport. Heat transfer coefficients on the order of 0.34 to 0.40 W/sq cm -C were measured. The vapor chambers are capable of transporting 170 W-cm per cm of width in either the axial or side-to-side direction.

  6. Design of viewing windows for controlled-atmosphere chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A guide to the design of safe viewing windows is presented. Design criteria, the properties of materials, the problems of structural design in unreliable materials such as glass, the mathematics of reliability and redundance, and problems associated with testing windows are discussed, and formulas are presented for the design of windows. Criteria adopted at ORNL for controlled-atmosphere chambers are presented, a program for surveying and upgrading the safety of existing facilities is described, and the results of this program are reported

  7. Dosimetry, instrumentation and exposure chambers for dc magnetic field studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1979-03-01

    The principal objective of this report is to describe in detail an exposure chamber that was developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for automated, noninvasive studies of rodent physiology during exposure to high DC magnetic fields. A second objective is to discuss some of the unique instrumentation problems that must be overcome in order to record bioelectric signals from laboratory animals in the presence of a magnetic field. Finally, a description will be given of the various dosimetry techniques that can be employed for quantitation of magnetic field strength.

  8. Dosimetry, instrumentation and exposure chambers for dc magnetic field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal objective of this report is to describe in detail an exposure chamber that was developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for automated, noninvasive studies of rodent physiology during exposure to high DC magnetic fields. A second objective is to discuss some of the unique instrumentation problems that must be overcome in order to record bioelectric signals from laboratory animals in the presence of a magnetic field. Finally, a description will be given of the various dosimetry techniques that can be employed for quantitation of magnetic field strength

  9. Laser Welding Test Results with Gas Atmospheres in Welding Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Hong, Jin-Tae; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Heo, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seo-Yun; Yang, Tae-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The weld beads of specimens welded under identical conditions in the helium and argon gas were cleaner, more regular, and steadier than those in a vacuum. The penetration depth of the FZ in the vacuum was much deeper than those in the helium and argon gas. To measure the irradiation properties of nuclear fuel in a test reactor, a nuclear fuel test rod instrumented with various sensors must be fabricated with assembly processes. A laser welding system to assemble the nuclear fuel test rod was designed and fabricated to develop various welding technologies of the fuel test rods to joint between a cladding tube and end-caps. It is an air-cooling optical fiber type and its emission modes are a continuous (CW) mode of which the laser generates continuous emission, and pulse (QCW) mode in which the laser internally generates sequences of pulses. We considered the system welding a sample in a chamber that can weld a specimen in a vacuum and inert gas atmosphere, and the chamber was installed on the working plate of the laser welding system. In the chamber, the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a cladding tube and an end-cap.

  10. Investigation of Monoterpene Degradation in the Atmospheric Simulation Chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Martin; Acir, Ismail-Hakki; Bohn, Birger; Brauers, Theo; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Fuchs, Hendrik; Haeseler, Rolf; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Li, Xin; Lutz, Anna; Nehr, Sascha; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Wahner, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Monoterpenes are the volatile organic compound (VOC) species with the highest emission rates on a global scale beside isoprene. In the atmosphere these compounds are rapidly oxidized. Due to their high reactivity towards hydroxyl radicals (OH) they determine the radical chemistry under biogenic conditions if monoterpene concentration is higher than isoprene concentration. Recent field campaigns showed large discrepancies between measured and modeled OH concentration at low NOx conditions together with high reactivity of VOC towards OH (Hofzumahaus et al. 2009) especially in tropical forest areas (Lelieveld et al. 2008). These discrepancies were partly explained by new reaction pathways in the isoprene degradation mechanism (Whalley et al 2011). However, even an additional recycling rate of 2.7 was insufficient to explain the measured OH concentration. So other VOC species could be involved in a nonclassical OH recycling. Since the discrepancies in OH also occurred in the morning hours when the OH chemistry was mainly dominated by monoterpenes, it was assumed that also the degradation of monoterpenes may lead to OH recycling in the absence of NO. (Whalley et al 2011). The photochemical degradation of four monoterpene species was studied under high VOC reactivity and low NOx conditions in a dedicated series of experiments in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR from August to September 2012 to overcome the lack of mechanistic information for monoterpene degradation schemes. α-Pinene, β-pinene and limonene were chosen as most prominent representatives of this substance class. Moreover the degradation of myrcene was investigated due to its structural analogy to isoprene. The SAPHIR chamber was equipped with instrumentation to measure all important OH precursors (O3, HONO, HCHO), the parent VOC and their main oxidation products, radicals (OH, HO2, RO2), the total OH reactivity, and photolysis frequencies to investigate the degradation mechanism of monoterpenes in

  11. Studies of aldehydes in an atmosphere simulation chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossmeyer, J.

    2006-05-15

    In the course of this thesis, a DOAS instrument using a multiple reflection system of the White design was installed at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany). The DOAS instrument allowed to detect NO{sub 3} at SAPHIR for the first time. A loss process of NO{sub 3} was identified in the dry chamber and characterised with a lifetime of (42{+-}4) min. Apart from that, the chamber was used in three ways. (1) The DOAS could be compared to other detection methods under controlled conditions, which was done for the trace gases NO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, HONO, H{sub 2}O, benzene and m-xylene. The agreement between DOAS and the other methods was very good (13% maximum deviation in the absolute value, correlation coefficients higher than 0.92). (2) The DOAS could be compared to time profiles of trace gas injections (of benzaldehyde, toluene and HCHO) into the chamber, which were calculated from the sample weight and from fundamental chamber properties. The agreement between the DOAS and the calculations was also good (19% maximum deviation, R higher than 0.94). Thus, the scaling of the differential absorption cross section of HCHO used in the DOAS evaluations was confirmed. (3) Measurements of the DOAS and other instruments could be used to validate current chemistry models. The OH reactivity in the sunlit chamber was derived from DOAS measurements of benzene and m-xylene and matched a direct OH measurement excellently. Moreover, the HCHO yield from the ethene-ozone reaction was studied. A discrepancy was observed between a model calculation and the measurement, which originated from the model assumptions made for kinetics of reaction intermediates in the ethene-ozone mechanism. Finally, absolute rate studies of the NO{sub 3} reaction with ethanal (2.6{+-}0.5), propanal (5.8{+-}1.0), butanal (11.9{+-}1.4) and benzaldehyde (2.2{+-}0.6, all in cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 300 K) corroborated the rate coefficients of current literature

  12. Dependence of SOA oxidation on organic aerosol mass concentration and OH exposure: experimental PAM chamber studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA is studied with mass spectra analysis of SOA formed in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM chamber, a small flow-through photo-oxidation chamber with extremely high OH and ozone levels. The OH exposure from a few minutes in the PAM chamber is similar to that from days to weeks in the atmosphere. The mass spectra were measured with a Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS for SOA formed from oxidation of α-pinene, m-xylene, p-xylene, and a mixture of the three. The organic mass fractions of m/z 44 (CO2+ and m/z 43 (mainly C2H3O+, named f44 and f43 respectively, are used as indicators of the degree of organic aerosol (OA oxidation that occurs as the OA mass concentration or the OH exposure are varied. The degree of oxidation is sensitive to both. For a fixed OH exposure, the degree of oxidation initially decreases rapidly and then more slowly as the OA mass concentration increases. For fixed initial precursor VOC amounts, the degree of oxidation increases linearly with OH exposure, with f44 increasing and f43 decreasing. In this study, the degree of SOA oxidation spans much of the range observed in the atmosphere. These results, while sensitive to the determination of f44 and f43, provide evidence that some characteristics of atmospheric OA oxidation can be generated in a PAM chamber. For all measurements in this study, the sum of f44 and f43 is 0.25 ± 0.03, so that the slope of a linear regression is approximately −1 on an f44 vs. f43 plot. This constancy of the sum suggests that these ions are complete proxies for organic mass in the OA studied.

  13. Large organic aerosols in a human exposure chamber : Applications in occupational dermatology and lung medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, Lennart

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to large organic aerosol particles may cause respiratory and skin reactions. The use of human exposure chambers offers possibilities for experimental exposure challenges carried out with patients, in research and for investigations of the effects of exposure on the skin and in the respiratory tract. The present aim was to study the performance of modern human whole-body exposure chambers during generation of large organic particles, and to develop and test new me...

  14. Mutagenicity in Salmonella of a Simulated Urban-Smog Atmosphere Generated Using a Mobile Reaction Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA Mobile Reaction Chamber (MRC) is a 24-foot trailer containing a 14.3-m3 Teflon lined photochemical chamber used to generate simulated urban atmospheres. Photochemistry in the MRC is catalyzed by 120 fluorescent bulbs evenly mixed with black light bulbs and UV bulbs (300 &...

  15. Development of exposure assessment method with the chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, N.; Koyama, Y.; Yokoyama, H.; Matsui, Y.; Yoneda, M.

    2015-05-01

    This study aims at developing the measurement method of nanoparticle concentration and at getting a representative value of nanoparticle uniform concentration due to chamber ventilation. We conducted a chamber equipped with HEPA filter and control the background nanoparticles concentration by using an adequate ventilation. Then, we used generator to evaluate concentration in the chamber uniformity. We measured background value and source counts at the particle size distribution by SMPS. In addition, we performed numerical analysis with CFD model OpenFoam. As results, we found that there is no aggregate in experimental conditions in this study. Though we confirmed that it is difficult to uniformalise nanoparticle concentration, However we also found simulation results showed higher reproducibility. Therefore, we could assess nanoparticle size distribution and concentration in our chamber at this stage.

  16. Construction and Characterization of an Atmospheric Simulation Smog Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Currently, air pollution in Beijing has become a complex problem with two types of source pollutants:coal smoke and photochemical smog. Furthermore the maximum hourly mean concentration of O3 increases continuously, especially in the summer. In order to simulate the photochemical reaction, develop an air quality simulation model and further improve the air quality of Beijing, a precisely temperature-controlled,indoor, smog chamber facility was designed and constructed at Tsinghua University. Characterization experiments have been carried out to acquire the basic parameters of the smog chamber, such as the wall loss rates of NO2, NO, 03, C3H6 and particulate matter (PM), the intensity of ultraviolet (UV) light in the chamber, the reactivity of the purified air and the reproducibility of the experimental results. The results indicate that the facility performs up to specifications, and can meet the demands required for simulating the photochemical reaction. The effect of high primary contaminated PM on the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is under investigation.

  17. A twin-type airflow pulse ionization chamber for continuous alpha-radioactivity monitoring in atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kada, Wataru, E-mail: kada@nf.eie.eng.osaka-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Dwaikat, Nidal; Datemichi, Jun; Sato, Fuminobu; Murata, Isao; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    A simple and inexpensive twin-type airflow pulse ionization chamber was developed for the continuous monitoring of alpha-radioactivity in atmosphere under high humidity condition. The symmetrical structure of the twin-type ionization chamber was effective in the improvement of the ratio of signal to noise in the measurement of pulses induced by alpha-rays. Outdoor alpha-ray measurement was well performed with this ionization chamber by applying sufficiently high bias voltage to the electrodes, except for at very high humidity conditions. It was confirmed that the declination of the counting efficiency due to wetting was easily recovered by the dry-up of the inside of the chamber. Alpha-radioactivity from radon and other alpha-emitting radionuclide in atmosphere was satisfactorily monitored by the detector.

  18. Design of an exposure chamber to test samplers used in the evaluation of personal exposure to nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, R.; Izadi, H.; Quémerais, B.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to design a laboratory size exposure chamber for the testing of samplers used to collect personal exposure samples for nanoparticles. A polyethylene cylindrical container with a diameter of 42 cm and height of 60 cm was used as the testing chamber. The chamber was divided into 2 parts by an aluminium honey comb. Particles generated using a 1 jet Collison nebulizer (BGI) operating at a flow rate of 4L/min were inserted into the chamber via a tube located near to the top of the chamber. A heater was inserted just after the nebulizer to avoid condensation of water in the tubing, and dilution air, running at 10L/min was inserted just after the heater. As particle charge can dramatically affect sampling a particle neutralizer was attached to the generation system so as to neutralize the particles before they enter the chamber. A diffusion dryer was used to remove any water from the air stream prior to enter the chamber. A fan was used to mix and distribute the generated particles. After generation and mixing, the particles passed through the aluminium honeycomb which is essential to eliminate any turbulent or unwanted air flow. Six sampling ports along with a pressure gauge were placed on the walls 15 cm from the bottom of the chamber. The pressure gauge was added to ensure the desired pressure is achieved during sampling. The sampling ports allowed for the connection of five samplers and sampling pumps as well as the connection of an ultrafine particle counter. The exposure chamber was developed to assess various samplers for carbon nanotubes and cellulose nanocrystals. Results showed that the chamber was working properly and that mixing was sufficiently uniform to test samplers.

  19. Characterisation of the photolytic HONO-source in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rohrer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available HONO formation has been proposed as an important OH radical source in simulation chambers for more than two decades. Besides the heterogeneous HONO formation by the dark reaction of NO2 and adsorbed water, a photolytic source has been proposed to explain the elevated reactivity in simulation chamber experiments. However, the mechanism of the photolytic process is not well understood so far. As expected, production of HONO and NOx was also observed inside the new atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR under solar irradiation. This photolytic HONO and NOx formation was studied with a sensitive HONO instrument under reproducible controlled conditions at atmospheric concentrations of other trace gases. It is shown that the photolytic HONO source in the SAPHIR chamber is not caused by NO2 reactions and that it is the only direct NOy source under illuminated conditions. In addition, the photolysis of nitrate which was recently postulated for the observed photolytic HONO formation on snow, ground, and glass surfaces, can be excluded in the chamber. A photolytic HONO source at the surface of the chamber is proposed which is strongly dependent on humidity, on light intensity, and on temperature. An empirical function describes these dependencies and reproduces the observed HONO formation rates to within 10%. It is shown that the photolysis of HONO represents the dominant radical source in the SAPHIR chamber for typical tropospheric O3/H2O concentrations. For these conditions, the HONO concentrations inside SAPHIR are similar to recent observations in ambient air.

  20. Centrifuge modeling of soil atmosphere interaction using climatic chamber

    OpenAIRE

    CAICEDO, B; TRISTANCHO, J; THOREL, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Soil-atmospheric interaction processes such as infiltration or evaporation can have a significant effect on the behavior of geotechnical structures located near the soil surface. This paper focuses on the drying process of soils due to evaporation. The scaling laws are analyzed and the results of the application of two cycles of heating and cooling on a soil mass are presented. Based on these results, conclusions about the feasibility of reproducing evaporation on centrifuge models are recomm...

  1. Interferences of commercial NO2 instruments in the urban atmosphere and in a smog chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kleffmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable measurements of atmospheric trace gases are necessary for both, a better understanding of the chemical processes occurring in the atmosphere, and for the validation of model predictions. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2 is a toxic gas and is thus a regulated air pollutant. Besides, it is of major importance for the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere and plays a pivotal role in the formation of ozone and acid precipitation. Detection of NO2 is a difficult task since many of the different commercial techniques used are affected by interferences. The chemiluminescence instruments that are used for indirect NO2 detection in monitoring networks and smog chambers use either molybdenum or photolytic converters and are affected by either positive (NOy or negative interferences (radical formation in the photolytic converter. Erroneous conclusions on NO2 can be drawn if these interferences are not taken into consideration. In the present study, NO2 measurements in the urban atmosphere, in a road traffic tunnel and in a smog-chamber using different commercial techniques, i.e. chemiluminescence instruments with molybdenum or photolytic converters, a Luminol based instrument and a new NO2-LOPAP, were compared with spectroscopic techniques, i.e. DOAS and FTIR. Interferences of the different instruments observed during atmospheric measurements were partly characterised in more detail in the smog chamber experiments. Whereas all the commercial instruments showed strong interferences, excellent agreement was obtained between a new NO2-LOPAP instrument and the FTIR technique for the measurements performed in the smog chamber.

  2. X-ray detector for automatic exposure control using ionization chamber filled with xenon gas

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, A; Yoshida, T

    2003-01-01

    This report refers to our newly developed X-ray detector for reliable automatic X-ray exposure control, which is to be widely used for X-ray diagnoses in various clinical fields. This new detector utilizes an ionization chamber filled with xenon gas, in contrast to conventional X-ray detectors which use ionization chambers filled with air. Use of xenon gas ensures higher sensitivity and thinner design of the detector. The xenon gas is completely sealed in the chamber, so that the influence of the changes in ambient environments is minimized. (author)

  3. A simple and versatile {sup 222}Rn/{sup 220}Rn exposure chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, K.N. E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk; Koo, V.S.Y.; Guan, Z.J

    2002-04-01

    A simple {sup 222}Rn/{sup 220}Rn exposure chamber is described. The chamber is made of acrylic and has a volume of 0.41 m{sup 3}. The {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn sources can be operated independently or simultaneously. The concentrations of {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn were monitored by a continuous alpha spectrometer called RAD7. The capability of alpha spectrometry has removed the mutual interference between {sup 220}Rn and {sup 222}Rn, which is a major problem in measuring {sup 220}Rn. Furthermore, the capability can also provide fast response to changes in the {sup 222}Rn level and {sup 220}Rn level in the exposure chamber, with temporal resolutions of about 20 and 2 min, respectively.

  4. Technical Note: Intercomparison of formaldehyde measurements at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wisthaler

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at the Research Centre Jülich was used to test the suitability of state-of-the-art analytical instruments for the measurement of gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO in air. Five analyzers based on four different sensing principles were deployed: a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS, cartridges for 2,4-dinitro-phenyl-hydrazine (DNPH derivatization followed by off-line high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis, two different types of commercially available wet chemical sensors based on Hantzsch fluorimetry, and a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS. A new optimized mode of operation was used for the PTR-MS instrument which significantly enhanced its performance for on-line HCHO detection at low absolute humidities.

    The instruments were challenged with typical ambient levels of HCHO ranging from zero to several ppb. Synthetic air of high purity and particulate-filtered ambient air were used as sample matrices in the atmosphere simulation chamber onto which HCHO was spiked under varying levels of humidity and ozone. Measurements were compared to mixing ratios calculated from the chamber volume and the known amount of HCHO injected into the chamber; measurements were also compared between the different instruments. The formal and blind intercomparison exercise was conducted under the control of an independent referee. A number of analytical problems associated with the experimental set-up and with individual instruments were identified, the overall agreement between the methods was good.

  5. Technical Note: Intercomparison of formaldehyde measurements at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wisthaler

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at the Research Centre Jülich was used to test the suitability of state-of-the-art analytical instruments for the measurement of gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO in air. Five analyzers based on four different sensing principles were deployed: a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS, cartridges for 2,4-dinitro-phenyl-hydrazine (DNPH derivatization followed by off-line high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis, two different types of commercially available wet chemical sensors based on Hantzsch fluorimetry, and a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS. A new optimized mode of operation was used for the PTR-MS instrument which significantly enhanced its performance for online HCHO detection at low absolute humidities.

    The instruments were challenged with typical ambient levels of HCHO ranging from zero to several ppb. Synthetic air of high purity and particulate-filtered ambient air were used as sample matrices in the atmosphere simulation chamber onto which HCHO was spiked under varying levels of humidity and ozone. Measurements were compared to mixing ratios calculated from the chamber volume and the known amount of HCHO injected into the chamber; measurements were also compared between the different instruments. The formal and blind intercomparison exercise was conducted under the control of an independent referee. A number of analytical problems associated with the experimental set-up and with individual instruments were identified, the overall agreement between the methods was fair.

  6. Quality assurance for radon exposure chambers at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semler, M.O.; Sensintaffar, E.L. [National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, AL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), operates six radon exposure chambers in its two laboratories, the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama, and the Las Vegas Facility, Las Vegas, Nevada. These radon exposure chambers are used to calibrate and test portable radon measuring instruments, test commercial suppliers of radon measurement services through the Radon Measurement Proficiency Program, and expose passive measurement devices to known radon concentrations as part of a quality assurance plan for federal and state studies measuring indoor radon concentrations. Both laboratories participate in national and international intercomparisons for the measurement of radon and are presently working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to receive a certificate of traceability for radon measurements. NAREL has developed an estimate of the total error in its calibration of each chamber`s continuous monitors as part of an internal quality assurance program. This paper discusses the continuous monitors and their calibration for the three chambers located in Montgomery, Alabama, as well as the results of the authors intercomparisons and total error analysis.

  7. Planetary Atmosphere and Surfaces Chamber (PASC: A Platform to Address Various Challenges in Astrobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Mateo-Marti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of planetary environments of astrobiological interest has become a major challenge. Because of the obvious technical and economical limitations on in situ planetary exploration, laboratory simulations are one of the most feasible research options to make advances both in planetary science and in developing a consistent description of the origin of life. With this objective in mind, we applied vacuum technology to the design of versatile vacuum chambers devoted to the simulation of planetary atmospheres’ conditions. These vacuum chambers are able to simulate atmospheres and surface temperatures representative of the majority of planetary objects, and they are especially appropriate for studying the physical, chemical and biological changes induced in a particular sample by in situ irradiation or physical parameters in a controlled environment. Vacuum chambers are a promising potential tool in several scientific and technological fields, such as engineering, chemistry, geology and biology. They also offer the possibility of discriminating between the effects of individual physical parameters and selected combinations thereof. The implementation of our vacuum chambers in combination with analytical techniques was specifically developed to make feasible the in situ physico-chemical characterization of samples. Many wide-ranging applications in astrobiology are detailed herein to provide an understanding of the potential and flexibility of these experimental systems. Instruments and engineering technology for space applications could take advantage of our environment-simulation chambers for sensor calibration. Our systems also provide the opportunity to gain a greater understanding of the chemical reactivity of molecules on surfaces under different environments, thereby leading to a greater understanding of interface processes in prebiotic chemical reactions and facilitating studies of UV photostability and photochemistry on surfaces

  8. State-of-the-art exposure chamber for highly controlled and reproducible THz biological effects studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerna, Cesario Z.; Elam, David P.; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Sloan, Mark A.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2014-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging and sensing technologies are increasingly being used at international airports for security screening purposes and at major medical centers for cancer and burn diagnosis. The emergence of new THz applications has directly resulted in an increased interest regarding the biological effects associated with this frequency range. Knowledge of THz biological effects is also desired for the safe use of THz systems, identification of health hazards, and development of empirically-based safety standards. In this study, we developed a state-of-the-art exposure chamber that allowed for highly controlled and reproducible studies of THz biological effects. This innovative system incorporated an industry grade cell incubator system that permitted a highly controlled exposure environment, where temperatures could be maintained at 37 °C +/- 0.1 °C, carbon dioxide (CO2) levels at 5% +/- 0.1%, and relative humidity (RH) levels at 95% +/- 1%. To maximize the THz power transmitted to the cell culture region inside the humid incubator, a secondary custom micro-chamber was fabricated and incorporated into the system. This micro-chamber shields the THz beam from the incubator environment and could be nitrogen-purged to eliminate water absorption effects. Additionally, a microscope that allowed for real-time visualization of the live cells before, during, and after THz exposure was integrated into the exposure system.

  9. Quality assurance for radon exposure chambers at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, Alabama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), operates six radon exposure chambers in its two laboratories, the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama, and the Las Vegas Facility, Las Vegas, Nevada. These radon exposure chambers are used to calibrate and test portable radon measuring instruments, test commercial suppliers of radon measurement services through the Radon Measurement Proficiency Program, and expose passive measurement devices to known radon concentrations as part of a quality assurance plan for federal and state studies measuring indoor radon concentrations. Both laboratories participate in national and international intercomparisons for the measurement of radon and are presently working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to receive a certificate of traceability for radon measurements. NAREL has developed an estimate of the total error in its calibration of each chamber's continuous monitors as part of an internal quality assurance program. This paper discusses the continuous monitors and their calibration for the three chambers located in Montgomery, Alabama, as well as the results of the authors intercomparisons and total error analysis

  10. COMPASS - COMparative Particle formation in the Atmosphere using portable Simulation chamber Study techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonn, B.; Sun, S.; Haunold, W.; Sitals, R.; van Beesel, E.; dos Santos, L.; Nillius, B.; Jacobi, S.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we report the set-up of a novel twin chamber technique that uses the comparative method and establishes an appropriate connection of atmospheric and laboratory methods to broaden the tools for investigations. It is designed to study the impact of certain parameters and gases on ambient processes, such as particle formation online, and can be applied in a large variety of conditions. The characterisation of both chambers proved that both chambers operate identically, with a residence time xT (COMPASS1) = 26.5 ± 0.3 min and xT (COMPASS2) = 26.6 ± 0.4 min, at a typical flow rate of 15 L min-1 and a gas leak rate of (1.6 ± 0.8) × 10-5 s-1. Particle loss rates were found to be larger (due to the particles' stickiness to the chamber walls), with an extrapolated maximum of 1.8 × 10-3 s-1 at 1 nm, i.e. a hundredfold of the gas leak rate. This latter value is associated with sticky non-volatile gaseous compounds, too. Comparison measurement showed no significant differences. Therefore operation under atmospheric conditions is trustworthy. To indicate the applicability and the benefit of the system, a set of experiments was conducted under different conditions, i.e. urban and remote, enhanced ozone and terpenes as well as reduced sunlight. In order to do so, an ozone lamp was applied to enhance ozone in one of two chambers; the measurement chamber was protected from radiation by a first-aid cover and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were added using a small additional flow and a temperature-controlled oven. During the elevated ozone period, ambient particle number and volume increased substantially at urban and remote conditions, but by a different intensity. Protection of solar radiation displayed a clear negative effect on particle number, while terpene addition did cause a distinct daily pattern. E.g. adding β pinene particle number concentration rose by 13% maximum at noontime, while no significant effect was observable during darkness. Therefore

  11. Oxidation of a new Biogenic VOC: Chamber Studies of the Atmospheric Chemistry of Methyl Chavicol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, William; Alam, Mohammed; Adbul Raheem, Modinah; Rickard, Andrew; Hamilton, Jacqui; Pereira, Kelly; Camredon, Marie; Munoz, Amalia; Vazquez, Monica; Vera, Teresa; Rodenas, Mila

    2013-04-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leads to formation of ozone and SOA, with consequences for air quality, health, crop yields, atmospheric chemistry and radiative transfer. Recent observations have identified Methyl Chavicol ("MC": Estragole; 1-allyl-4-methoxybenzene, C10H12O) as a major BVOC above pine forests in the USA, and oil palm plantations in Malaysian Borneo. Palm oil cultivation, and hence MC emissions, may be expected to increase with societal food and bio fuel demand. We present the results of a series of simulation chamber experiments to assess the atmospheric fate of MC. Experiments were performed in the EUPHORE facility, monitoring stable product species, radical intermediates, and aerosol production and composition. We determine rate constants for reaction of MC with OH and O3, and ozonolysis radical yields. Stable product measurements (FTIR, PTRMS, GC-SPME) are used to determine the yields of stable products formed from OH- and O3- initiated oxidation, and to develop an understanding of the initial stages of the MC degradation chemistry. A surrogate mechanism approach is used to simulate MC degradation within the MCM, evaluated in terms of ozone production measured in the chamber experiments, and applied to quantify the role of MC in the real atmosphere.

  12. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope system with an open sample chamber: Configuration and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi, E-mail: hinishiy@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Koizumi, Mitsuru, E-mail: koizumi@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Technics Ltd., 2-6-38 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0021 (Japan); Ogawa, Koji, E-mail: kogawa@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Technics Ltd., 2-6-38 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0021 (Japan); Kitamura, Shinich, E-mail: kitamura@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Konyuba, Yuji, E-mail: ykonyuub@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: watanabeyoshiy@pref.yamagata.jp [Yamagata Research Institute of Technology, 2-2-1, Matsuei, Yamagata 990-2473 (Japan); Ohbayashi, Norihiko, E-mail: n.ohbayashi@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Fukuda, Mitsunori, E-mail: nori@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo, E-mail: msuga@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-4, Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    An atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) with an open sample chamber and optical microscope (OM) is described and recent developments are reported. In this ClairScope system, the base of the open sample dish is sealed to the top of the inverted SEM column, allowing the liquid-immersed sample to be observed by OM from above and by SEM from below. The optical axes of the two microscopes are aligned, ensuring that the same sample areas are imaged to realize quasi-simultaneous correlative microscopy in solution. For example, the cathodoluminescence of ZnO particles was directly demonstrated. The improved system has (i) a fully motorized sample stage, (ii) a column protection system in the case of accidental window breakage, and (iii) an OM/SEM operation system controlled by a graphical user interface. The open sample chamber allows the external administration of reagents during sample observation. We monitored the influence of added NaCl on the random motion of silica particles in liquid. Further, using fluorescence as a transfection marker, the effect of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Varp on Tyrp1 trafficking in melanocytes was examined. A temperature-regulated titanium ASEM dish allowed the dynamic observation of colloidal silver nanoparticles as they were heated to 240 °C and sintered. - Highlights: • Atmospheric SEM (ASEM) allows observation of samples in liquid or gas. • Open sample chamber allows in situ monitoring of evaporation and sintering processes. • in situ monitoring of processes during reagent administration is also accomplished. • Protection system for film breakage is developed for ASEM. • Usability of ASEM has been improved significantly including GUI control.

  13. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope system with an open sample chamber: Configuration and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) with an open sample chamber and optical microscope (OM) is described and recent developments are reported. In this ClairScope system, the base of the open sample dish is sealed to the top of the inverted SEM column, allowing the liquid-immersed sample to be observed by OM from above and by SEM from below. The optical axes of the two microscopes are aligned, ensuring that the same sample areas are imaged to realize quasi-simultaneous correlative microscopy in solution. For example, the cathodoluminescence of ZnO particles was directly demonstrated. The improved system has (i) a fully motorized sample stage, (ii) a column protection system in the case of accidental window breakage, and (iii) an OM/SEM operation system controlled by a graphical user interface. The open sample chamber allows the external administration of reagents during sample observation. We monitored the influence of added NaCl on the random motion of silica particles in liquid. Further, using fluorescence as a transfection marker, the effect of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Varp on Tyrp1 trafficking in melanocytes was examined. A temperature-regulated titanium ASEM dish allowed the dynamic observation of colloidal silver nanoparticles as they were heated to 240 °C and sintered. - Highlights: • Atmospheric SEM (ASEM) allows observation of samples in liquid or gas. • Open sample chamber allows in situ monitoring of evaporation and sintering processes. • in situ monitoring of processes during reagent administration is also accomplished. • Protection system for film breakage is developed for ASEM. • Usability of ASEM has been improved significantly including GUI control

  14. Uptake of sulfuric acid mist by plant canopies. [Exposure chamber studies with maize and soybeans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedding, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    Wind tunnel studies and exposure chamber experiments were conducted in the Aerosol Science Laboratory at Colorado State University. Full scale, live plant canopies of 4 to 6 week old corn and soybeans were established in a large wind tunnel. Monodisperse aerosols (1 to 15 ..mu..m aerodynamic diameter) were injected into the tunnel and deposition velocities were determined for wind speeds of 183, 305, and 610 cm/sec. A minimum deposition velocity was seen to occur at 5 ..mu..m. Initially, 4 to 6 week old soybean plants were exposed to hydrated sulfuric acid mist droplets. Unquantified topically applied sulfuric acid mist was applied at a 1% or 10% volumetric concentration of acid to water. The 10% solution produced severe necrotic lesions and large chlorotic regions on the acropetal leaves. A heavy application of the 1% solution produced similar effects but with a reduced number of necrotic lesions. A light application had no visual effects on the plants even after 24 h.In addition, 4 to 6 week old corn and soybeans were placed in a glass exposure chamber. Droplets of pure 18M sulfuric acid mist (1.7 ..mu..m) were injected into the chamber at a rate commensurate with the deposition velocity results. Loading of 107 particles/cm2 were realized during exposure periods up to 10 h per day extending to 14 days total fumigation periods. No visible toxicity symptoms of damage resulted to the plants from these tests conducted at background humidity levels of approximately 40%. Scanning electron microscope observations of the 140 h treated plants showed no apparent damage due to the sulfuric acid mist treatment.

  15. Chamber experiments to investigate the release of fungal IN into the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Anna Theresa; Krüger, Mira; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Helleis, Frank; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2015-04-01

    Biological aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. Several types of microorganisms like bacteria, fungi and lichen have been identified as sources of biological ice nuclei (IN). They are a potentially strong source of atmospheric IN, as some of them are able to catalyze ice formation at relatively warm subfreezing temperatures. Common plant-associated bacteria are the best-known biological IN but recently ice nucleation activity in a variety of fungal species such as Mortierella alpina, Isaria farinosa, Acremonium implicatum was found. These fungal species are widely spread throughout the world and are present in soil and air. Their IN seem to be proteins, which are not anchored in the fungal cell wall. To which extent these small, cell-free IN are emitted directly into the atmosphere remains unexplored just as other processes, which probably indirectly release fungal IN e.g. absorbed onto soil dust particles. To analyze the release of fungal IN into the air, we designed a chamber, whose main principle is based on the emission of particles into a closed gas compartment and the subsequent collection of these particles in water. The concentration of the collected IN in the water is determined by droplet freezing assays. For a proof of principles, fungal washing water containing cell-free IN was atomized by an aerosol generator and the produced gas stream was lead through a water trap filled with pure water. Preliminary results show a successful proof of principles. The chamber design is capable of collecting aerosolic IN produced by an aerosol generator with fungal washing water. In ongoing experiments, alive or dead fungal cultures are placed into the chamber and a gentle, particle free air stream is directed over the fungi surface. This gas stream is also lead through water to collect particles, which might be emitted either actively or passively by the fungi. Further experiments will be e.g. conducted under different relative humidities. Results

  16. Reduced adverse effects on Si thin film solar cells caused by growth chamber air exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Lin; Zheng, Yi; Schimitt, Francimar; Tso, Alan; Li, Lipan; Tsuei, Lun; Yuan, Zheng; Shieh, Brian [Thin Film Solar Products Division, Applied Materials, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The cost of photovoltaic (PV) energy is reduced by increasing solar cell power conversion efficiency and decreasing manufacture cost. An effective way of lowering the cost of Si thin film solar cells (TFSC) is to grow panels on large-area substrates. In this paper we study the effect of air residual to Si TFSC grown on 5.7 m{sup 2} glass in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) chambers. Structural and chemical analysis show that oxygen incorporated into the Si films behaved as impurity dopant in the hydrogenated microcrystalline Si ({mu}c-Si) layers and reduced the efficiency of amorphous Si (a-Si)/{mu}c-Si tandem junction solar cells when the film had oxygen concentration >2 x 10{sup 19} atoms/cm{sup 3}. Higher oxygen content further suppressed the {mu}c-Si crystallization. We found that hydrogen plasma treatment of process chamber before Si film deposition effectively reduced the adverse effects of air exposure and improved both film quality and solar cell performance. The hydrogen-treated chamber produced contamination-free, solar cells with consistent, initial efficiency >10%. (author)

  17. A tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer for formaldehyde atmospheric measurements validated by simulation chamber instrumentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. Catoire; F. Bernard; Y. MébarKi; A. Mellouki; G. Eyglunent; V. Da(e)le; C. Robert

    2012-01-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) for formaldehyde atmospheric measurements has been set up and validated through comparison experiments with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) in a simulation chamber.Formaldehyde was generated in situ in the chamber from reaction of ethene with ozone.Three HCHO ro-vibrational line intensities (at 2909.71,2912.09and 2914.46 cm-1) possibly used by TDLAS were calibrated by FT-IR spectra simultaneously recorded in the 1600-3200 cm-1 domain during ethene ozonolysis,enabling the on-line deduction of the varying concentration for HCHO in formation.The experimental line intensities values inferred confirmed the calculated ones from the updated HITRAN database.In addition,the feasibility of stratospheric in situ HCHO measurements using the 2912.09 cm-1 line was demonstrated.The TDLAS performances were also assessed,leading to a 2σ detection limit of 88 ppt in volume mixing ratio with a response time of 60 see at 30 Torr and 294 K for 112 m optical path.As part of this work,the room-temperature rate constant of this reaction and the HCHO formation yield were found to be in excellent agreement with the compiled literature data.

  18. Model-aided radiometric determination of photolysis frequencies in a sunlit atmosphere simulation chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bohn

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work diurnal and seasonal variations of mean photolysis frequencies for the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich are calculated. SAPHIR has a complex construction with UV permeable teflon walls allowing natural sunlight to enter the reactor volume. The calculations are based on external measurements of solar spectral actinic flux and a model considering the time-dependent impact of shadows from construction elements as well as the influence of the teflon walls. Overcast and clear-sky conditions are treated in a consistent way and different assumptions concerning diffuse sky radiance distributions are tested. Radiometric measurements inside the chamber are used for an inspection of model predictions. Under overcast conditions we obtain fractions of 0.74 and 0.67 of external values for photolysis frequencies j(NO2 (NO2+hν→NO+O(3P and j(O1D (O3+hν→O2+O(1D, respectively. On a clear sky summer day these values are time-dependent within ranges 0.65-0.86 and 0.60-0.73, for j(NO2 and j(O1D, respectively. A succeeding paper (Bohn et al., 2004 is dealing with an on-road test of the model approach by comparison with photolysis frequencies from chemical actinometry experiments within SAPHIR.

  19. Comparison of OH reactivity instruments in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    OH reactivity measurement has become an important measurement to constrain the total OH loss frequency in field experiments. Different techniques have been developed by various groups. They can be based on flow-tube or pump and probe techniques, which include direct OH detection by fluorescence, or on a comparative method, in which the OH loss of a reference species competes with the OH loss of trace gases in the sampled air. In order to ensure that these techniques deliver equivalent results, a comparison exercise was performed under controlled conditions. Nine OH reactivity instruments measured together in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (volume 270 m3) during ten daylong experiments in October 2015 at ambient temperature (5 to 10° C) and pressure (990-1010 hPa). The chemical complexity of air mixtures in these experiments varied from CO in pure synthetic air to emissions from real plants and VOC/NOx mixtures representative of urban atmospheres. Potential differences between measurements were systematically investigated by changing the amount of reactants (including isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes), water vapour, and nitrogen oxides. Some of the experiments also included the oxidation of reactants with ozone or hydroxyl radicals, in order to elaborate, if the presence of oxidation products leads to systematic differences between measurements of different instruments. Here we present first results of this comparison exercise.

  20. Characterization of a multiculture in-vitro cell exposure chamber for assessing the biological impact of diesel engine exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the various health influencing parameters related to particulate as well as to gas-phase pollutants emitted by Diesel engine exhaust, there is an urgent need for appropriate sampling devices and methods for cell exposure studies and associated biological and toxicological tests. In a previous paper [1], a specific concept for a cell culture exposure chamber was introduced to allow the uniform exposure of cell cultures to diesel aerosols. In the present work, this cell culture exposure chamber is evaluated and characterized with state-of-the-art nanoparticles measurement instrumentation to assess the local deposition of soot aggregates on the cell cultures and any losses due to particle deposition on the cell culture exposure chamber walls, and in addition an upgraded Multiculture Exposure Chamber (MEC) for in vitro continuous flow cell exposure tests is introduced with improved, compared to the previous version, features. Analysis and design of the MEC employs CFD and true to geometry representations of soot particle aggregates.

  1. OH regeneration from methacrolein oxidation investigated in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fuchs

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl radicals (OH are the most important reagent for the oxidation of trace gases in the atmosphere. OH concentrations measured during recent field campaigns in isoprene rich environments were unexpectedly large. A number of studies showed that unimolecular reactions of organic peroxy radicals (RO2 formed in the initial reaction step of isoprene with OH play an important role for the OH budget in the atmosphere at low mixing ratios of nitrogen monoxide (NO of less than 100 pptv. It has also been suggested that similar reactions potentially play an important role for RO2 from other compounds. Here, we investigate the oxidation of methacrolein (MACR, one major oxidation product of isoprene, by OH in experiments in the simulation chamber SAPHIR under controlled atmospheric conditions. The experiments show that measured OH concentrations are approximately 50% larger than calculated by current chemical models for conditions of the experiments (NO mixing ratio of 90 pptv. The analysis of the OH budget reveals a so far unaccounted OH source, which is correlated with the production rate of RO2 radicals from MACR. In order to balance the measured OH destruction rate, (0.77±0.3 OH radicals need to be additionally reformed from each OH that has reacted with MACR. The strong correlation of the missing OH source with the production of RO2 radicals is consistent with the concept of OH formation from unimolecular isomerization and decomposition reactions of RO2. The comparison of observations with model calculations gives a lower limit of 0.03 s−1 for the reaction rate constant, if the OH source is attributed to an isomerization reaction of one RO2 species formed in the MACR+OH reaction as suggested in literature. This fast isomerization reaction would be competitive to the reaction of this RO2 species with minimum 150 pptv NO.

  2. Comparison of secondary organic aerosol formed with an aerosol flow reactor and environmental reaction chambers: effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time and seed particles on chemical composition and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Lambe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of SOA generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM continuous flow reactor and several environmental chambers. In the flow reactor, SOA precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2.0×108 to 2.2×1010 molec cm−3 over exposure times of 100 s. In the environmental chambers, precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2×106 to 2×107 molec cm−3 over exposure times of several hours. The OH concentration in the chamber experiments is close to that found in the atmosphere, but the integrated OH exposure in the flow reactor can simulate atmospheric exposure times of multiple days compared to chamber exposure times of only a day or so. A linear correlation analysis of the mass spectra (m=0.91–0.92, r2=0.93–0.94 and carbon oxidation state (m=1.1, r2=0.58 of SOA produced in the flow reactor and environmental chambers for OH exposures of approximately 1011 molec cm−3 s suggests that the composition of SOA produced in the flow reactor and chambers is the same within experimental accuracy as measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer. This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors, rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of sulfate seed particles on isoprene SOA yield measurements was examined in the flow reactor. The studies show that seed particles increase the yield of SOA produced in flow reactors by a factor of 3 to 5 and may also account in part for higher SOA yields obtained in the chambers, where seed

  3. Model-aided radiometric determination of photolysis frequencies in a sunlit atmosphere simulation chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bohn

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work diurnal and seasonal variations of mean photolysis frequencies for the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich are calculated. SAPHIR has a complex construction with UV permeable teflon walls allowing natural sunlight to enter the reactor volume. The calculations are based on external measurements of solar spectral actinic flux and a model considering the time-dependent impact of shadows from construction elements as well as the influence of the teflon walls. Overcast and clear-sky conditions are treated in a consistent way and different assumptions concerning diffuse sky radiance distributions are tested. Radiometric measurements inside the chamber are used for an inspection of model predictions. Under overcast conditions we obtain 74% and 67% of external values for photolysis frequencies j(NO2 (NO2+hν→NO+O(3P and j(O1D (O3+hν→O2+O(1D, respectively. On a clear sky summer day these values are time-dependent within ranges 0.65–0.86 and 0.60–0.73, for j(NO2 and j(O1D, respectively. A succeeding paper (Bohn et al., 2004 is dealing with an on-road test of the model approach by comparison with photolysis frequencies from chemical actinometry experiments within SAPHIR.

  4. Isotope effect in the formation of H2 from H2CO studied at the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röckmann, T.; Walter, S.; Bohn, B.; Wegener, R.; Spahn, H.; Brauers, T.; Tillmann, R.; Schlosser, E.; Koppmann, R.; Rohrer, F.

    2010-01-01

    Formaldehyde of known, near-natural isotopic composition was photolyzed in the SAPHIR atmosphere simulation chamber under ambient conditions. The isotopic composition of the product H2 was used to determine the isotope effects in formaldehyde photolysis. The experiments are sensitive to the molecula

  5. Copper patinas formed in different atmospheres and exposure times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric corrosion products in copper samples, known as patinas, formed in industrial-marine, severe-marine and rural atmospheres exposed for 1,2,3, and 4 years, have been studied. The nature and structure of the products formed, characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared spectrometry (FTIR) depend on the time of exposure and the type of atmosphere. Copper patinas have been extensively mentioned in the literature, but the structural nature of their compounds, which vary according to the time of exposure and types of atmospheres, is still not adequately described in the literature. In order to give a contribution to this area, copper panels were exposed for 1,2,3, and 4 years in different types of atmospheres representing situations commonly observed, and subsequently the patinas were studied by XRD and FTIR 150 mm x 1 mm copper panels from commercial copper were exposed to three different atmospheric conditions in Portugal: industrial-marine (Leixoes, near Oporto, highly industrialized city close to the Ocean, subject to SO2 from refineries); rural (Pego, small village in rural environment). The panels, attached to the appropriate stands, in accordance with ISO 8565 (1), were exposed for periods of 1,2,3 and 4 years, adequately collected for laboratory analysis by infrared spectrometry (FTIR). (Author)

  6. The ASIBIA sea-ice facility: First results from the Atmosphere-Sea-Ice-Biogeochemistry in the Arctic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, James L.; Thomas, Max

    2016-04-01

    Working in the natural ocean-ice-atmosphere system is very difficult, as conducting fieldwork on sea-ice presents many challenges ice including costs, safety, experimental controls and access. The new ASIBIA (Atmosphere-Sea-Ice-Biogeochemistry in the Arctic) coupled Ocean-Sea-Ice-(Snow)-Atmosphere chamber facility at the University of East Anglia, UK, we are aiming to perform controlled first-year sea-ice investigations in areas such as sea-ice physics, physicochemical and biogeochemical processes in sea-ice and quantification of the bi-directional flux of gases in various states of first-year sea-ice conditions. The facility is a medium sized chamber with programmable temperatures from -55°C to +30°C, allowing a full range of first year sea-ice growing conditions in both the Arctic and Antarctic to be simulated. The water depth can be up to 1 m (including up to 25 cm of sea-ice) and an optional 1 m tall Teflon film atmosphere on top of the sea-ice, thus creating a closed and coupled ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere mesocosm. Ice growth in the tank is well suited for studying first-year sea-ice physical properties, with in-situ ice-profile measurements of temperature, salinity, conductivity, pressure and spectral light transmission. Underwater and above ice cameras are installed to record the physical development of the sea-ice. Here, we present the data from the first suites of experiments in the ASIBIA chamber focussing on sea-ice physics and give a brief description of the capabilities of the facility going forward. The ASIBIA chamber was funded as part of an ERC consolidator grant to the late Prof. Roland von Glasow and we hope this work and further development of the facility will act as a lasting legacy.

  7. Intercomparison of NO3 radical detection instruments in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-P. Dorn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The detection of atmospheric NO3 radicals is still challenging owing to its low mixing ratios (≈ 1 to 300 pptv in the troposphere. While long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS has been a well-established NO3 detection approach for over 25 yr, newly sensitive techniques have been developed in the past decade. This publication outlines the results of the first comprehensive intercomparison of seven instruments developed for the spectroscopic detection of tropospheric NO3. Four instruments were based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, two utilised open-path cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS, and one applied "classical" long-path DOAS. The intercomparison campaign "NO3Comp" was held at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich (Germany in June 2007. Twelve experiments were performed in the well-mixed chamber for variable concentrations of NO3, N2O5, NO2, hydrocarbons, and water vapour, in the absence and in the presence of inorganic or organic aerosol. The overall precision of the cavity instruments varied between 0.5 and 5 pptv for integration times of 1 s to 5 min; that of the DOAS instrument was 9 pptv for an acquisition time of 1 min. The NO3 data of all instruments correlated excellently with the NOAA-CRDS instrument, which was selected as the common reference because of its superb sensitivity, high time resolution, and most comprehensive data coverage. The median of the coefficient of determination (r2 over all experiments of the campaign (60 correlations is r2 = 0.981 (quartile 1 (Q1: 0.949; quartile 3 (Q3: 0.994; min/max: 0.540/0.999. The linear regression analysis of the campaign data set yielded very small intercepts (median: 1.1 pptv; Q1/Q3: −1.1/2.6 pptv; min/max: −14.1/28.0 pptv, and the slopes of the regression lines were close to unity (median: 1.01; Q1/Q3: 0.92/1.10; min/max: 0.72/1.36. The deviation of individual regression slopes from unity was always within the combined

  8. Intercomparison of NO3 radical detection instruments in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Thieser

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of atmospheric NO3 radicals is still challenging owing to its low mixing ratios (≈ 1 to 300 pptv in the troposphere. While long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS is a well established NO3 detection approach for over 25 yr, newly sensitive techniques have been developed in the past decade. This publication outlines the results of the first comprehensive intercomparison of seven instruments developed for the spectroscopic detection of tropospheric NO3. Four instruments were based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, two utilised open-path cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS, and one applied "classical" long-path DOAS. The intercomparison campaign "NO3Comp" was held at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich (Germany in June 2007. Twelve experiments were performed in the well mixed chamber for variable concentrations of NO3, N2O5, NO2, hydrocarbons, and water vapour, in the absence and in the presence of inorganic or organic aerosol. The overall precision of the cavity instruments varied between 0.5 and 5 pptv for integration times of 1 s to 5 min; that of the DOAS instrument was 9 pptv for an acquisition time of 1 min. The NO3 data of all instruments correlated excellently with the NOAA-CRDS instrument, which was selected as the common reference because of its superb sensitivity, high time resolution, and most comprehensive data coverage. The median of the coefficient of determination (r2 over all experiments of the campaign (60 correlations is r2 = 0.981 (25th/75th percentiles: 0.949/0.994; min/max: 0.540/0.999. The linear regression analysis of the campaign data set yielded very small intercepts (1.2 ± 5.3 pptv and the average slope of the regression lines was close to unity (1.02, min: 0.72, max: 1.36. The deviation of individual regression slopes from unity was always within the combined accuracies of each instrument pair. The very good correspondence between the NO3 measurements

  9. Modeling of atmospheric corrosion of metals and its acceleration by increasing temperature in chambers of artificial climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are given on studying the effect of temperature on the rates of iron, zinc, cadmium, and copper corrosion in a pure humid atmosphere and in the presence of a thin phase water layer on the metal. The coefficients of corrosion acceleration with temperature have been determined. By conducting the experiments in chambers with artificial climate at 40-60 deg C, it has been shown how the corrosion process can be accelerated on the metals investigated in comparison with real conditions

  10. A kinetic study of the reaction of ozone with ethylene in a smog chamber under atmospheric conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yongfu; JIA Long; GE Maofa; DU Lin; WANG Gengchen; WANG Dianxun

    2006-01-01

    Ozone is one of the key species in the processes of atmospheric chemistry, which can be taken as an indicator of oxidation capacity in the troposphere, The reaction of ozone with reactive gases is an important process in the troposphere. Experimental simulation equipment of smog chamber for atmospheric reactions is used to study the reaction of ozone with ethylene in real atmospheric environment with ozone concentrations of 100-200 ppb. The concentrations of ozone and ethylene were monitored during the reaction with the combination of Model 49C-O3 Analyzer and GC-FID. A rate constant of 1.01×10-18 (cm3.mol-1.s-1) was obtained at 286.5 K,under condition of which the half-life of ozone was 88 min. The results obtained from our experiments are in excellent agreement with those reported previously by other researchers under extremely Iow pressure in terms of matrix-isolation technology. This demonstrates that our equipment of smog chamber for atmospheric reactions is reliable, which can be used for further research of the processes of atmospheric reactions.

  11. Design of a new multi-phase experimental simulation chamber for atmospheric photosmog, aerosol and cloud chemistry research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new simulation chamber has been built at the Interuniversitary Laboratory of Atmospheric Systems (LISA. The CESAM chamber (French acronym for Experimental Multiphasic Atmospheric Simulation Chamber is designed to allow research in multiphase atmospheric (photo- chemistry which involves both gas phase and condensed phase processes including aerosol and cloud chemistry. CESAM has the potential to carry out variable temperature and pressure experiments under a very realistic artificial solar irradiation. It consists of a 4.2 m3 stainless steel vessel equipped with three high pressure xenon arc lamps which provides a controlled and steady environment. Initial characterization results, all carried out at 290–297 K under dry conditions, concerning lighting homogeneity, mixing efficiency, ozone lifetime, radical sources, NOy wall reactivity, particle loss rates, background PM, aerosol formation and cloud generation are given. Photolysis frequencies of NO2 and O3 related to chamber radiation system were found equal to (4.2 × 10−3 s−1 for JNO2 and (1.4 × 10−5 s−1 for JO1D which is comparable to the solar radiation in the boundary layer. An auxiliary mechanism describing NOy wall reactions has been developed. Its inclusion in the Master Chemical Mechanism allowed us to adequately model the results of experiments on the photo-oxidation of propene-NOx-Air mixtures. Aerosol yields for the α-pinene + O3 system chosen as a reference were determined and found in good agreement with previous studies. Particle lifetime in the chamber ranges from 10 h to 4 days depending on particle size distribution which indicates that the chamber can provide high quality data on aerosol aging processes and their effects. Being evacuable, it is possible to generate in this new chamber

  12. Design of a new multi-phase experimental simulation chamber for atmospheric photosmog, aerosol and cloud chemistry research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new simulation chamber has been built at the Interuniversitary Laboratory of Atmospheric Systems (LISA. The CESAM chamber (French acronym for Experimental Multiphasic Atmospheric Simulation Chamber is designed to allow research in multiphase atmospheric (photo-chemistry which involves both gas phase and condensed phase processes including aerosol and cloud chemistry. CESAM has the potential to carry out variable temperature and pressure experiments under a very realistic artificial solar irradiation. It consists of a 4.2 m3 stainless steel vessel equipped with three high pressure xenon arc lamps which provides a controlled and steady environment. Initial characterization results, all carried out at 290–297 K under dry conditions, concerning lighting homogeneity, mixing efficiency, ozone lifetime, radical sources, NOy wall reactivity, particle loss rates, background PM, aerosol formation and cloud generation are given. Photolysis frequencies of NO2 and O3 related to chamber radiation system were found equal to (4.2 × 10−3 s−1 for JNO2 and (1.4 × 10-5 s−1 for J O1D which is comparable to the solar radiation in the boundary layer. An auxiliary mechanism describing NOy wall reactions has been developed. Its inclusion in the Master Chemical Mechanism allowed us to adequately model the results of experiments on the photo-oxidation of propene-NOx-air mixtures. Aerosol yields for the α-pinene + O3 system chosen as a reference were determined and found in good agreement with previous studies. Particle lifetime in the chamber ranges from 10 h to 4 days depending on particle size distribution which indicates that the chamber can provide high quality data on aerosol aging processes and their effects. Being evacuable, it is possible to generate in this new chamber clouds by fast

  13. Growth chamber for the cultivation of woody plants in a radioactive carbon dioxide atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A growth chamber is described, suited for the production of uniformly C14-labelled plant material. Temperature and humidity is automatically controlled. Radioactive 14CO2 is supplied by means of a manually operated bariumcarbonate-reactor. The cultivation of poplars (Populus tremula), larches (Larix Europea) and Scots pines (Pinus silvestris) as well as their growth experiences are described. Average specific activity of the plant material was 2 μCi/gC. This growth chamber is especially useful for labelling woody plants over long growing periods. (orig.)

  14. In Vitro Exposures in Diesel Exhaust Atmospheres: Resuspension of PM from Filters Verses Direct Deposition of PM from Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtveld, Kim M.; Ebersviller, Seth M.; Sexton, Kenneth G.; Vizuete, William; Jaspers, Ilona; Jeffries, Harvey E.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most widely used in vitro particulate matter (PM) exposures methods is the collection of PM on filters, followed by resuspension in a liquid medium, with subsequent addition onto a cell culture. To avoid disruption of equilibria between gases and PM, we have developed a direct in vitro sampling and exposure method (DSEM) capable of PM-only exposures. We hypothesize that the separation of phases and post-treatment of filter-collected PM significantly modifies the toxicity of the PM compared to direct deposition, resulting in a distorted view of the potential PM health effects. Controlled test environments were created in a chamber that combined diesel exhaust with an urban-like mixture. The complex mixture was analyzed using both the DSEM and concurrently-collected filter samples. The DSEM showed that PM from test atmospheres produced significant inflammatory response, while the resuspension exposures at the same exposure concentration did not. Increasing the concentration of resuspended PM sixteen times was required to yield measurable IL-8 expression. Chemical analysis of the resuspended PM indicated a total absence of carbonyl compounds compared to the test atmosphere during the direct-exposures. Therefore, collection and resuspension of PM into liquid modifies its toxicity and likely leads to underestimating toxicity. PMID:22834915

  15. First Results from the ASIBIA (Arctic Sea-Ice, snow, Biogeochemistry and Impacts on the Atmosphere) Sea-Ice Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, M. M.; France, J.; von Glasow, R.; Thomas, M.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean-ice-atmosphere system is very complex, and there are numerous challenges with conducting fieldwork on sea-ice including costs, safety, experimental controls and access. By creating a new coupled Ocean-Sea-Ice-(Snow)-Atmosphere facility at the University of East Anglia, UK, we are able to perform controlled investigations in areas such as sea-ice physics, physicochemical and biogeochemical processes in sea-ice, and to quantify the bi-directional flux of gases in established, freezing and melting sea-ice. The environmental chamber is capable of controlled programmable temperatures from -55°C to +30°C, allowing a full range of first year sea-ice growing conditions in both the Arctic and Antarctic to be simulated. The sea-ice tank within the chamber measures 2.4 m x 1.4 m x 1 m water depth, with an identically sized Teflon film atmosphere on top of the tank. The tank and atmosphere forms a coupled, isolated mesocosm. Above the atmosphere is a light bank with dimmable solar simulation LEDs, and UVA and UVB broadband fluorescent battens, providing light for a range of experiments such as under ice biogeochemistry and photochemistry. Ice growth in the tank will be ideally suited for studying first-year sea-ice physical properties, with in-situ ice-profile measurements of temperature, salinity, conductivity, pressure and spectral light transmission. Under water and above ice cameras are installed to observe the physical development of the sea-ice. The ASIBIA facility is also well equipped for gas exchange and diffusion studies through sea-ice with a suite of climate relevant gas measuring instruments (CH4, CO2, O3, NOx, NOy permanently installed, further instruments available) able to measure either directly in the atmospheric component, or via a membrane for water side dissolved gases. Here, we present the first results from the ASIBIA sea-ice chamber, focussing on the physical development of first-year sea-ice and show the future plans for the facility over

  16. Interferences of commercial NO2 instruments in the urban atmosphere and in a smog chamber

    OpenAIRE

    G. Villena; I. Bejan; R. Kurtenbach; P. Wiesen; Kleffmann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Reliable measurements of atmospheric trace gases are necessary for both, a better understanding of the chemical processes occurring in the atmosphere, and for the validation of model predictions. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a toxic gas and is thus a regulated air pollutant. Besides, it is of major importance for the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere and plays a pivotal role in the formation of ozone and acid precipitation. Detection of NO2 is a difficult task since many of the different comm...

  17. Planetary Atmosphere and Surfaces Chamber (PASC): A Platform to Address Various Challenges in Astrobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Mateo-Marti

    2014-01-01

    The study of planetary environments of astrobiological interest has become a major challenge. Because of the obvious technical and economical limitations on in situ planetary exploration, laboratory simulations are one of the most feasible research options to make advances both in planetary science and in developing a consistent description of the origin of life. With this objective in mind, we applied vacuum technology to the design of versatile vacuum chambers devoted to the simulation of p...

  18. A simple and versatile sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn/ sup 2 sup 2 sup 0 Rn exposure chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, K N; Guan, Z J

    2002-01-01

    A simple sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn/ sup 2 sup 2 sup 0 Rn exposure chamber is described. The chamber is made of acrylic and has a volume of 0.41 m sup 3. The sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn and sup 2 sup 2 sup 0 Rn sources can be operated independently or simultaneously. The concentrations of sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn and sup 2 sup 2 sup 0 Rn were monitored by a continuous alpha spectrometer called RAD7. The capability of alpha spectrometry has removed the mutual interference between sup 2 sup 2 sup 0 Rn and sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn, which is a major problem in measuring sup 2 sup 2 sup 0 Rn. Furthermore, the capability can also provide fast response to changes in the sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn level and sup 2 sup 2 sup 0 Rn level in the exposure chamber, with temporal resolutions of about 20 and 2 min, respectively.

  19. Modelling Contribution of Biogenic VOCs to New Particle Formation in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, L.; Boy, M.; Mogensen, D.; Mentel, T. F.; Kleist, E.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tillman, R.; Kulmala, M. T.; Dal Maso, M.

    2012-12-01

    Biogenic VOCs are substantially emitted from vegetation to atmosphere. The oxidation of BVOCs by OH, O3, and NO3 in air generating less volatile compounds may lead to the formation and growth of secondary organic aerosol, and thus presents a link to the vegetation, aerosol, and climate interaction system (Kulmala et al, 2004). Studies including field observations, laboratory experiments and modelling have improved our understanding on the connection between BVOCs and new particle formation mechanism in some extent (see e.g. Tunved et al., 2006; Mentel et al., 2009). Nevertheless, the exact formation process still remains uncertain, especially from the perspective of BVOC contributions. The purpose of this work is using the MALTE aerosol dynamics and air chemistry box model to investigate aerosol formation from reactions of direct tree emitted VOCs in the presence of ozone, UV light and artificial solar light in an atmospheric simulation chamber. This model employs up to date air chemical reactions, especially the VOC chemistry, which may potentially allow us to estimate the contribution of BVOCs to secondary aerosol formation, and further to quantify the influence of terpenes to the formation rate of new particles. Experiments were conducted in the plant chamber facility at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany (Jülich Plant Aerosol Atmosphere Chamber, JPAC). The detail regarding to the chamber facility has been written elsewhere (Mentel et al., 2009). During the experiments, sulphuric acid was measured by CIMS. VOC mixing ratios were measured by two GC-MS systems and PTR-MS. An Airmodus Particle size magnifier coupled with a TSI CPC and a PH-CPC were used to count the total particle number concentrations with a detection limit close to the expected size of formation of fresh nanoCN. A SMPS measured the particle size distribution. Several other parameters including ozone, CO2, NO, Temperature, RH, and flow rates were also measured. MALTE is a modular model to predict

  20. OH regeneration from methacrolein oxidation investigated in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, H; I.-H. Acir; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; H.-P. Dorn; R. Häseler; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Kaminski, M.; Li, X.; Lu, K.; A. Lutz; Nehr, S.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (OH) are the most important reagent for the oxidation of trace gases in the atmosphere. OH concentrations measured during recent field campaigns in isoprene rich environments were unexpectedly large. A number of studies showed that unimolecular reactions of organic peroxy radicals (RO2) formed in the initial reaction step of isoprene with OH play an important role for the OH budget in the atmosphere at low mixing ratios of nitrogen monoxide...

  1. Development of a dose-controlled multiculture cell exposure chamber for efficient delivery of airborne and engineered nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the various health influencing parameters related to engineered nanoparticles as well as to soot emitted by Diesel engines, there is an urgent need for appropriate sampling devices and methods for cell exposure studies that simulate the respiratory system and facilitate associated biological and toxicological tests. The objective of the present work was the further advancement of a Multiculture Exposure Chamber (MEC) into a dose-controlled system for efficient delivery of nanoparticles to cells. It was validated with various types of nanoparticles (Diesel engine soot aggregates, engineered nanoparticles for various applications) and with state-of-the-art nanoparticle measurement instrumentation to assess the local deposition of nanoparticles on the cell cultures. The dose of nanoparticles to which cell cultures are being exposed was evaluated in the normal operation of the in vitro cell culture exposure chamber based on measurements of the size specific nanoparticle collection efficiency of a cell free device. The average efficiency in delivering nanoparticles in the MEC was approximately 82%. The nanoparticle deposition was demonstrated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Analysis and design of the MEC employs Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and true to geometry representations of nanoparticles with the aim to assess the uniformity of nanoparticle deposition among the culture wells. Final testing of the dose-controlled cell exposure system was performed by exposing A549 lung cell cultures to fluorescently labeled nanoparticles. Delivery of aerosolized nanoparticles was demonstrated by visualization of the nanoparticle fluorescence in the cell cultures following exposure. Also monitored was the potential of the aerosolized nanoparticles to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) (e.g. free radicals and peroxides generation), thus expressing the oxidative stress of the cells which can cause extensive cellular damage or damage on DNA.

  2. Testing of various membranes for use in a novel sediment porewater isolation chamber for infaunal invertebrate exposure to PCBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jessica G; Lotufo, Guilherme R; Kennedy, Alan J; Poda, Aimee R; Rushing, Todd S; Ruiz, Carlos E; Bridges, Todd S

    2014-07-01

    In benthic sediment bioassays, determining the relative contribution to exposure by contaminants in overlying water, porewater, and sediment particles is technically challenging. The purpose of the present study was to assess the potential for membranes to be utilized as a mechanism to allow freely dissolved hydrophobic organic contaminants into a pathway isolation exposure chamber (PIC) while excluding all sediment particles and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This investigation was conducted in support of a larger effort to assess contaminant exposure pathways to benthos. While multiple passive samplers exist for estimating concentrations of contaminants in porewater such as those using solid-phase micro extraction (SPME) and polyoxymethylene (POM), techniques to effectively isolate whole organism exposure to porewater within a sediment system are not available. We tested the use of four membranes of different pore sizes (0.1-1.2μm) including nylon, polycarbonate, polyethylsulfone, and polytetrafluoroethylene with a hydrophilic coating. Exposures included both diffusion of radiolabeled and non-labeled contaminants across membranes from aqueous, sediment slurry, and whole sediment sources to assess and evaluate the best candidate membrane. Data generated from the present study was utilized to select the most suitable membrane for use in the larger bioavailability project which sought to assess the relevance of functional ecology in bioavailability of contaminated sediments at remediation sites. The polytetrafluoroethylene membrane was selected for use in the PIC, although exclusion of dissolved organic carbon was not achieved.

  3. Intercomparison of measurements of NO2 concentrations in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR during the NO3Comp campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fuchs

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available NO2 concentrations were measured by various instruments during the NO3Comp campaign at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany, in June 2007. Analytical methods included photolytic conversion with chemiluminescence (PC-CLD, broadband cavity ring-down spectroscopy (BBCRDS, pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBB\\-CEAS, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF. All broadband absorption spectrometers were optimized for the detection of the main target species of the campaign, NO3, but were also capable of detecting NO2 simultaneously with reduced sensitivity. NO2 mixing ratios in the chamber were within a range characteristic of polluted, urban conditions, with a maximum mixing ratio of approximately 75 ppbv. The overall agreement between measurements of all instruments was excellent. Linear fits of the combined data sets resulted in slopes that differ from unity only within the stated uncertainty of each instrument. Possible interferences from species such as water vapor and ozone were negligible under the experimental conditions.

  4. Intercomparison of measurements of NO2 concentrations in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR during the NO3Comp campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Varma

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available NO2 concentrations were measured by various instruments during the NO3Comp campaign at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany, in June 2007. Analytic methods included photolytic conversion with chemiluminescence (PC-CLD, broadband cavity ring-down spectroscopy (BBCRDS, pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF. All broadband absorption spectrometers were optimized for the detection of the main target species of the campaign, NO2, but were also capable of detecting NO2 simultaneously with reduced sensitivity. NO2 mixing ratios in the chamber were within a range characteristic of polluted, urban conditions, with a maximum mixing ratio of approximately 75 ppbv. The overall agreement between measurements of all instruments was excellent. Linear fits of the combined data sets resulted in slopes that differ from unity only within the stated uncertainty of each instrument. Possible interferences from species such as water vapor and ozone were negligible under the experimental conditions.

  5. Intercomparison of NO3 radical detection instruments in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    OpenAIRE

    Dorn, H.-P.; Apodaca, R. L.; Ball, S. M.; Brauers, T.; S. S. Brown; Crowley, J. N.; Dubé, W. P.; H. Fuchs; R. Häseler; U. Heitmann; Jones, R L; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; I. Labazan; Langridge, J. M.; J. Meinen

    2013-01-01

    The detection of atmospheric NO3 radicals is still challenging owing to its low mixing ratios (≈ 1 to 300 pptv) in the troposphere. While long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) is a well established NO3 detection approach for over 25 yr, newly sensitive techniques have been developed in the past decade. This publication outlines the results of the first comprehensive intercomparison of seven instruments developed for the spectroscopic detection of tropospheric NO3. Four...

  6. Special issue of Atmospheric Environment for Particulate Matter: Atmospheric Sciences, Exposure, and the Fourth Colloquium on PM and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrook, Ann; Turner, Jay; Solomon, Paul A.

    2004-10-01

    In response to epidemiological studies published over 20 years ago, at least three research communities have been intensively studying airborne particulate matter (PM). These efforts have been coordinated by approaching the source-atmospheric accumulation/receptor-exposure-dose-health effects paradigm (adopted from NRC, 2001) from different perspectives or along different parts of the paradigm. The atmospheric sciences communities consider the emissions of particles and precursors from sources, their transport and transformation in air to receptor locations, and finally removal from the atmosphere. The exposure communities' interest is to examine the pathways by which pollution or PM, in this case, approaches and enters the body, typically by trying to relate PM concentrations at a central location(s) to exposure and perhaps dose. Both the atmospheric sciences and exposure communities approach the paradigm from left to right. In contrast, the health effects communities have studied health outcomes, including hospital admissions, school absences, disease rates and deaths in human populations, and potential mechanisms of biological actions in laboratory settings. In general, the health effects communities' approach the paradigm from right to left attempting to correlate an observed adverse health effect with dose or exposure measures. For the most part, research results are reported in scientific publications and conferences for each community respectively. Over the years, there has been little effort to integrate information from these diverse groups in a substantive way. While a major attempt took place in 1998 at the Chapel Hill workshop (Albritton and Greenbaum, 1998), little has occurred since.

  7. Static opaque chamber-based technique for determination of net exchange of CO2 between terrestrial ecosystem and atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Jianwen; HUANG Yao; ZHENG Xunhua; WANG Yuesi; CHEN Yuquan

    2004-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon cycling is one of the hotspots in global change issues. In this paper, we presented the rationale for determination of net exchange of CO2 between terrestrial and the atmosphere (NEE) and the methods for measuring several relevant components. Three key processes for determination of NEE were addressed, including the separation of shoot autotrophic respiration from total CO2 emissions of the ecosystem, the partition of root respiration from soil CO2 efflux, and the quantification of rhizodeposition C from NPP. With an understanding of the processes involved in the CO2 exchange between terrestrial and the atmosphere, we estimated NEE of rice ecosystem in Nanjing based on field measurements of CO2 emissions and several relevant biotic components as well as abiotic factors. The field measurements of CO2 emissions were made over the rice-growing seasons in 2001 and 2002 with the static opaque chamber method. Calculations indicated that the seasonal pattern of NEE is comparable for two seasons. Either net carbon emission or fractional carbon fixation occurred during 3 weeks after rice transplanting and thereafter net carbon fixation appeared with an increasing trend as rice growing. Higher net carbon fixation occurred in the rice developmental period from elongating to heading. A decline trend in the fixation was documented after rice heading. The mean daily NEE was -6.06 gC·m-2 in 2001 season and -7.95 gC·m-2 in 2002 season, respectively. These values were comparable to the results obtained by Campbell et al. Who made field measurements with the Bowen ratio-energy balance technique in irrigated rice, Texas USA. Moreover, the mean daily NEE in this study was also comparable to the values obtained from a Japanese rice paddy with the eddy covariance method under the similar water regime, either drainage course or waterlogged. It is concluded that NEE determined by the static opaque chamber method is comparable and in agreement with those measured by

  8. Establishment of Airborne Nanoparticle Exposure Chamber System to Assess Nano TiO2 Induced Mice Lung Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hua; Li, Jui-Ping; Huang, Nai-Chun; Yang, Chung-Shi; Chen, Jen-Kun

    2011-12-01

    A great many governments have schemed their top priority to support the research and development of emerging nanotechnology, which lead to increasing products containing nanomaterials. However, platforms and protocols to evaluate the safety of nanomaterials are not yet established. We therefore design and fabricate a nanoparticle exposure chamber system (NECS) and try to standardize protocols to assess potential health risk of inhalable nanoparticles. This platform comprises: (1) nano-aerosol generators to produce homogeneous airborne nanoparticles, (2) double isolated container to prevent from unexpected exposure to humans, (3) gas supply system for housing animals or incubating cultured cells, and (4) system for automatic control and airborne nanoparticle analysis. The NECS providing multiple functions includes: (1) a secure environment to handle nanomaterials, (2) real-time measurement for the size and distribution of airborne nanoparticles, (3) SOP of safety evaluation for nanomaterials, and (4) key technology for the development of inhalable pharmaceuticals. We used NECS to mimic occupational environment for exploring potential adverse effects of TiO2 nanoparticles. The adult male ICR mice were exposed to 25nm, well-characterized TiO2 particles for 1 and 4 weeks. More than 90% of the inhaled TiO2 nanoparticles deposit in lung tissue, which tends to be captured by alveolar macrophages. Pulmonary function test does not show significant physiological changes between one and 4 weeks exposure. For plasma biochemistry analysis, there are no obvious inflammation responses after exposure for one and 4 weeks; however, disruption of alveolar septa and increased thickness of alveolar epithelial cells were observed. According to our results, the NECS together with our protocols show comprehensive integration and ideally fit the standard of OECD guildelines-TG403, TG412, TG413; it can be further customized to fulfill diverse demands of industry, government, and third party

  9. Detection of Amines and Ammonia with an Ambient Pressure Mass Spectrometer using a Corona Discharge Ion Source, in an Urban Atmosphere and in a Teflon Film Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M.; Hanson, D. R.; Grieves, C.; Ortega, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    Amines and ammonia are an important group of molecules that can greatly affect atmospheric particle formation that can go on to impact cloud formation and their scattering of thermal and solar radiation, and as a result human health and ecosystems. In this study, an Ambient Pressure Mass Spectrometer (AmPMS) that is selective and sensitive to molecules with a high proton affinity, such as amines, was coupled with a newly built corona discharge ion source. AmPMS was used to monitor many different nitrogenous compound that are found in an urban atmosphere (July 2015, Minneapolis), down to the single digit pmol/mol level. Simultaneous to this, a proton transfer mass spectrometer also sampled the atmosphere through an inlet within 20 m of the AmPMS inlet. In another set of studies, a similar AmPMS was attached to a large Teflon film chamber at the Atmospheric Chemistry Division at NCAR (August 2015, Boulder). Exploratory studies are planned on the sticking of amines to the chamber walls as well as oxidizing the amine and monitoring products. Depending on the success of these studies, results will be presented on the reversability of amine partitioning and mass balance for these species in the chamber.

  10. Optimum exposure time for speckle imaging through the atmosphere using the bispectrum technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrae, Kimberley A.; Roggemann, Michael C.; Welsh, Byron M.

    1996-10-01

    Bispectrum speckle imaging uses the average of many short exposure frames to eliminate atmospheric effects on images. Unfortunately, objects are often dim, requiring longer exposure times to collect enough photons to reconstruct an image. We investigate this trade-off using a computer simulation to create image frames under various seeing conditions, then determine the exposure time that yields the highest signal-to-noise ratio for the unbiased speckle interferometry estimator and the lowest mean square error for the reconstructed phase. We have found that for low light levels and for high read noise cases the optimum exposure time is greater than one Greenwood coherence time.

  11. An Initial Investigation into the Use of a Flux Chamber Technique to Measure Soil-Atmosphere Gas Exchanges from Application of Biosolids to UK Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Donovan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While a significant amount of work has been conducted to assess the concentration of pollutants in soils and waterways near land that has been amended with biosolids, a relatively small body of research investigating emissions to atmosphere is available in the literature. Some studies have indicated that while the CO2 emissions from soils decrease with fertiliser application, the CH4 and N2O emissions might be increased, offsetting the benefit. The objective of the research presented in this paper was to address this gap, by the use of a flux chamber technique to measure soil-atmosphere gas exchanges from the application of biosolids to land. This was done by applying three different types of biosolids to soils and measuring gases at the soil-atmosphere interface. The measurements were taken on areas with three different types of vegetation. The gases were collected using a flux chamber technique and analysed by gas chromatography. The results presented here are preliminary findings of an ongoing experiment. Insignificant variation appeared to occur between different areas of vegetation; however, small variations in gas concentrations were observed indicating a need for continued monitoring of soil-atmosphere gas exchanges to determine the long-term impacts on the atmosphere and the environment.

  12. An Initial Investigation into the Use of a Flux Chamber Technique to Measure Soil-Atmosphere Gas Exchanges from Application of Bio solids to UK Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While a significant amount of work has been conducted to assess the concentration of pollutants in soils and waterways near land that has been amended with bio solids, a relatively small body of research investigating emissions to atmosphere is available in the literature. Some studies have indicated that while the CO2 emissions from soils decrease with fertiliser application, the CH4 and N2O emissions might be increased, offsetting the benefit. The objective of the research presented in this paper was to address this gap, by the use of a flux chamber technique to measure soil-atmosphere gas exchanges from the application of bio solids to land. This was done by applying three different types of bio solids to soils and measuring gases at the soil-atmosphere interface. The measurements were taken on areas with three different types of vegetation. The gases were collected using a flux chamber technique and analysed by gas chromatography. The results presented here are preliminary findings of an ongoing experiment. Insignificant variation appeared to occur between different areas of vegetation; however, small variations in gas concentrations were observed indicating a need for continued monitoring of soil-atmosphere gas exchanges to determine the long-term impacts on the atmosphere and the environment.

  13. Atmospheric PSF Interpolation for Weak Lensing in Short Exposure Imaging Data

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C; Jernigan, J G; Peterson, J R; Kahn, S M; Gull, S F; AlSayyad, Y; Ahmad, Z; Bankert, J; Bard, D; Connolly, A; Gibson, R R; Gilmore, K; Grace, E; Hannel, M; Hodge, M A; Jones, L; Krughoff, S; Lorenz, S; Marshall, S; Meert, A; Nagarajan, S; Peng, E; Rasmussen, A P; Shmakova, M; Sylvestre, N; Todd, N; Young, M

    2012-01-01

    The synoptic imaging survey proposed for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will generate large numbers of short exposure ($\\simeq$15 seconds) images. A primary science driver for this project is to measure the cosmic shear signal from weak lensing to extreme accuracy. One difficulty, however, is that in these short exposure images, the spatial variation of the Point Spread Function (PSF) shapes may be dominated by the atmosphere, in addition to optics errors. In particular, the atmosphere generates stochastic structures on a wide range of angular scales. Since the PSF patterns in these images can only be inferred by interpolating the sparsely sampled stars in the field, these multi-scale, complex patterns from the atmosphere complicates the PSF interpolation problem. In this paper we present a new method, PSFent, for interpolating atmospheric PSF shape parameters, based on reconstructing underlying shape parameter maps with a multi-scale maximum entropy algorithm. We demonstrate, using images from th...

  14. Characterization of corrosion products formed on steels in the first months of atmospheric exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes Renato Altobelli; Costa Isolda; Faria Dalva Lúcia Araújo de

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion products of carbon steel and weathering steel exposed to three different types of atmospheres, at times ranging from one to three months, have been identified. The steels were exposed in an industrial site, an urban site (São Paulo City, Brazil), and a humid site. The effect of the steel type on the corrosion products formed in the early stages of atmospheric corrosion has been evaluated. The corrosion products formed at the various exposure locations were characterized by Raman...

  15. Study of atmospheric tritium transfers in lettuce: kinetic study, equilibrium and organic incorporation during a continuous atmospheric exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis has explored the mechanisms of tritium 'absorption and incorporation in a human-consumed plant, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), due to atmospheric exposure. Foliar uptake appears to play a key role in absorption of tritium as tissue free water tritium. Whatever the development stage and the light conditions, the specific activity in tissue free water reaches that of water vapour in air in several hours. The specific activity ratio is then about 0, 4. The time to reach equilibrium in soil is over 24 hours in most cases: the specific activity ratio ranges then 0, 01 to 0, 26. Incorporation rate of tissue free water tritium as organically-bound tritium has been estimated to 0, 13 to 0, 16 % h-l in average over the growing period of the plant, but marked variations are observed during growth. In particular, a significant increase appeared at the exponential growth stage. Deposition and diffusion of tritium in soil lead to significant OBT activities in soil. Results globally indicate equilibrium between the different environmental compartments (air, soil, plant). However, some experiments have revealed high OBT concentrations regarding atmospheric level exposure and ask for a possible phenomenon of local tritium accumulation in OBT for particular conditions of exposure. (author)

  16. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS AND RADIOLOGICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIGSBY KM

    2011-04-07

    This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farms safety analysis. The basis equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included. In this revision, the time averaging for toxicological consequence evaluations is clarified based on a review of DOE complex guidance and a review of tank farm chemicals.

  17. Use of high-volume outdoor smog chamber photo-reactors for studying physical and chemical atmospheric aerosol formation and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás, E.; Ródenas, M.; Vera, T.; Muñoz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric particulate matter has a large impact on climate, biosphere behaviour and human health. Its study is complex because of large number of species are present at low concentrations and the continuous time evolution, being not easily separable from meteorology, and transport processes. Closed systems have been proposed by isolating specific reactions, pollutants or products and controlling the oxidizing environment. High volume simulation chambers, such as EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE), are an essential tool used to simulate atmospheric photochemical reactions. This communication describes the last results about the reactivity of prominent atmospheric pollutants and the subsequent particulate matter formation. Specific experiments focused on organic aerosols have been developed at the EUPHORE photo-reactor. The use of on-line instrumentation, supported by off-line techniques, has provided well-defined reaction profiles, physical properties, and up to 300 different species are determined in particulate matter. The application fields include the degradation of anthropogenic and biogenic pollutants, and pesticides under several atmospheric conditions, studying their contribution on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The studies performed at the EUPHORE have improved the mechanistic studies of atmospheric degradation processes and the knowledge about the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric particulate matter formed during these processes.

  18. On the capability of in-situ exposure in an environmental scanning electron microscope for investigating the atmospheric corrosion of magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) in studying the atmospheric corrosion behavior of 99.97% Mg was investigated. For reference, ex-situ exposure was performed. A model system was designed by spraying few salt particles on the metal surface and further promoting the corrosion process using platinum (Pt) deposition in the form of 1×1×1 µm3 dots around the salt particles to create strong artificial cathodic sites. The results showed that the electron beam play a significant role in the corrosion process of scanned regions. This was attributed to the irradiation damage occurring on the metal surface during the ESEM in-situ experiment. After achieving to a reliable process route, in a successful attempt, the morphology and composition of the corrosion products formed in-situ in the ESEM were in agreement with those of the sample exposed ex-situ. - Highlights: • The feasibility of in-situ microscopy and atmospheric corrosion exposures of pure Mg in an ESEM are examined. • A model system was designed using NaCl particles on parts of the metal surface and promoting the corrosion process by depositing 1×1×1 µm3 Pt dots to create strong artificial cathodic sites. • The electron beam used for ESEM imaging affects the in-situ corrosion process. • A proper cleaning procedure for the sample and microscope chamber reducing carbon contamination makes the results from the ESEM in-situ exposures comparable to ex-situ exposures

  19. Two chamber reaction furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  20. The systemic exposure to inhaled beclometasone/formoterol pMDI with valved holding chamber is independent of age and body size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Govoni, Mirco; Piccinno, Annalisa; Lucci, Germano;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma guidelines recommend prescription of inhaled corticosteroids at a reduced dosage in children compared to older patients in order to minimize the systemic exposure and risk of unwanted side effects. In children, pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDI) are recommended in combina......BACKGROUND: Asthma guidelines recommend prescription of inhaled corticosteroids at a reduced dosage in children compared to older patients in order to minimize the systemic exposure and risk of unwanted side effects. In children, pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDI) are recommended...... in combination with a valved holding chamber (VHC) to overcome the problem of coordinating inhalation with actuation. However, the influence of age and body size on the systemic exposure of drugs to be administered via a pMDI with VHC is still not fully elucidated. Therefore, we aimed to compare the systemic...... pMDI with AeroChamber Plus™. RESULTS: The systemic exposure in children in comparison to adolescents was equivalent for formoterol while it was halved for beclometasone-17-monopropionate in accordance with the halved dose of beclometasone administered in children (90% CIs within 0...

  1. Overestimation of soil CO2 fluxes from closed chamber measurements at low atmospheric turbulence biases the diurnal pattern and the annual soil respiration budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braendholt, Andreas; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Ibrom, Andreas; Pilegaard, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Precise quantification of the diurnal and seasonal variation of soil respiration (Rs) is crucial to correctly estimate annual soil carbon fluxes as well as to correctly interpret the response of Rs to biotic and abiotic factors on different time scale. In this study we found a systematic effect of low atmospheric turbulence on continuous hourly Rs measurements with closed chambers throughout one year in a temperate Danish beech forest. Using friction velocity (u⋆) measured at the site above the canopy, we filtered out chamber flux data measured at low atmospheric turbulence. The non-filtered data showed a clear diurnal pattern of Rs across all seasons with highest fluxes during night time suggesting an implausible negative temperature sensitivity of Rs. When filtering out data at low turbulence, the annually averaged diurnal pattern changed, such that the highest Rs fluxes were seen during day time, i.e. following the course of soil temperatures. This effect on the diurnal pattern was due to low turbulence primarily occurring during night time. We calculated different annual Rs budgets by filtering out fluxes for different levels of u⋆. The highest annual Rs budget was found when including all data and it decreased with an increasing u⋆ filter threshold. Our results show that Rs was overestimated at low atmospheric turbulence throughout the year and that this overestimation considerably biased the diurnal pattern of Rs and led to an overestimation of the annual Rs budget. Thus we recommend that that any analysis of the diurnal pattern of Rs must consider overestimation of Rs at low atmospheric turbulence, to yield unbiased diurnal patterns. This is crucial when investigating temperature responses and potential links between CO2 production and Rs on a short time scale, but also for correct estimation of annual Rs budgets. Acknowledgements: This study was funded by the free Danish Ministry for Research, Innovation and higher Education, the free Danish Research

  2. The effects of air pollution and climatic factors on atmospheric corrosion of marble under field exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric corrosion of marble was evaluated in terms of SO2 concentration as air pollution and climatic factors such as rainfall, relative humidity, temperature and so on under the field exposure. Marble of calcite type (CaCO3) was exposed to outdoor atmospheric environment with and without a rain shelter at four test sites in the southern part of Vietnam for 3-month, 1- and 2-year periods from July 2001 to September 2003. The thickness loss of marble was investigated gravimetrically. X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescent methods were applied to study corrosion products on marble. The corrosion product of marble was only gypsum (CaSO4 . 2H2O) and was washed out by rain under the unsheltered exposure condition. It was found that the most substantial factors influencing the corrosion of marble were rainfall, SO2 concentration in the air and relative humidity. Based on the results obtained, we estimated the dose-response functions for the atmospheric corrosion of marble in the southern part of Vietnam

  3. Lung cancer mortality and exposure to atmospheric aerosol particles in Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Xuexi; Wu, Dui; Brasseur, Guy

    In recent years, China and other emerging countries have been experiencing severe air pollution problems with high concentrations of atmospheric aerosol particles. Satellite measurements indicate that the aerosol loading of the atmosphere in highly populated regions of China is about 10 times higher than, for example, in Europe and in the Eastern United States. The exposure to extremely high aerosol concentrations might lead to important human health effects, including respiratory and cardiovascular diseases as well as lung cancers. Here, we analyze 52-year historical surface measurements of haze data in the Chinese city of Guangzhou, and show that the dramatic increase in the occurrence of air pollution events between 1954 and 2006 has been followed by a large enhancement in the incidence of lung cancer.

  4. [Atmospheric Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Eight Cities of China: Pollution Characteristics and Human Exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai-tao; Li, Qi-lu; Zhang, Gan; Li, Jun

    2016-01-15

    The gas and particle samples of eight cities were collected by high flow active air sampler in the Eastern and Western China and eight congeners of polybrominated diphenyl ethers were analyzed. The results showed that the concentration of BDE-28 (tri-BDE) in the gas-phase (three bromide components) was the highest, which was different from previous studies where BDE-99 and-47 were the predominant homologues in the gas-phase while the concentration of BDE-209 [(25.4 ± 124) pg · m⁻³] in particle-phase was the highest. The atmospheric concentrations of PBDEs in Beijing and Guangzhou were relatively higher, especially the BDE-209 concentration in particle phases of Guangzhou was two orders higher than those of other cities. However, the atmospheric concentrations of PBDEs declined significantly when compared with the data from previous studies. Meanwhile, the results indicated that the gas-phase concentrations decreased slowly and the particle-phase concentrations decreased rapidly. Combined with the results of correlation analysis, this phenomenon might be ascribed to the ceased commercial production of penta- and octa-BDE, the light degradation of high bromide components and reduced concentrations of atmospheric particles in urban area. Inhalation exposure for infants was about 2-3 times higher than that of adults. This reflected that the potential health risk of atmospheric PBDEs in city for residents, especially infants and young children, should not be ignored. PMID:27078934

  5. Image analysis of atmospheric corrosion of field exposure high strength aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lei; Song, Shizhe; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Zheng; Lu, Feng

    2008-08-01

    The corrosion morphology image acquisition system which can be used in the field was established. In Beijing atmospheric corrosion exposure station, the image acquisition system was used to capture the early stage corrosion morphology of five types of high strength aluminium alloy specimens. After the denoise treatment, wavelet-based image analysis method was applied to decompose the improved images and energies of sub-images were extracted as character information. Based on the variation of image energy values, the corrosion degree of aluminium alloy specimens was qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. The conclusion was basically identical with the result based on the corrosion weight loss. This method is supposed to be effective to analysis and quantify the corrosion damage from image of field exposure aluminium alloy specimens.

  6. Exposure to the atmospheric ionizing radiation environment: studies on Icelandic and Italian civilian aviation flight personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, G.; Caldora, M.; Santaquilani, M.; Scipione, R.; Verdecchia, A.; Rafnsson, V.; Hrafnkelsson, J.; Sulem, P.; Gudjonsdottir, A. J.

    The largest source of data on human exposure to low dose rate radiation may be airline flight personnel, if enrolled for studies on health effects induced by the cosmic-ray-generated atmospheric ionizing radiation, whose total dose, increasing over the years, may cause delayed radiation-induced health effects, with the high-LET and highly ionizing neutron component typical of atmospheric radiation. With regards to this, the Italian civilian airline flight personnel have been studied by analyzing the atmospheric ionizing radiation exposure and associated effects. The study population includes all Italian civilian airline flight personnel, both cockpit and cabin crewmembers, whose work history records and actual flights (route, aircraft type, and date for each individual flight for each person where possible) were available. The dose calculations were performed along specific flight legs, taking into account the actual flight profiles for all different routes and the variations with time of solar and geomagnetic parameters, in order to take into account the whole atmospheric neutron spectrum. Dose values for each flight are applied to the flight history of study participants in order to estimate the individual annual and lifetime occupational radiation dose. Following the same protocols for both cohorts in terms of dose evaluation, a comparative study has been performed between the radiation exposure patterns of the Icelandic and the Italian civilian aviation flight personnel. These two populations represent two extremes within the group of worldwide airline personnel. The Icelandic crewmembers, like only in the world their Canadian colleagues, always fly over or very close to the geomagnetic pole, and are this way exposed to high doses within each flight leg, whereas the Italian crewmembers, apart from transatlantic flights, are always flying close to the geomagnetic equator or anyhow quite far from the geomagnetic pole, receiving a small dose rates for each flight

  7. Comparison of a diurnal vs steady-state ozone exposure profile on growth and yield of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in open-top chambers in the Yangtze Delta, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most available exposure-response relationships for assessing crop loss due to elevated ozone (O3) have been established using data from chamber and open-top chamber experiments, using a simulated constant O3 concentration exposure (square wave), which is not consistent with the diurnal variation of O3 concentration that occurs in nature. We investigated the response of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) to O3 as affected by two exposure regimes: one with a diurnal variation (CF100D) and another with a constant concentration (CF100). Although the two exposure regimes have the same mean O3 concentration and accumulated O3 concentration above 40 ppb (AOT40), our results show that O3 at CF100D reduced biomass and number of pods/plant more than O3 at CF100. Both O3 exposures resulted in larger seed weights/100 pods compared to CF. Numbers of seeds/100 pods were reduced by CF100, while numbers of seeds/100 pods in the CF100D chambers were comparable to those in CF. Our results suggest that chamber experiments that use a constant O3 exposure may underestimate O3 effects on biomass and yields. - Diurnal variation of O3 concentration should be considered when designing O3 exposure experiment

  8. Comparison of a diurnal vs steady-state ozone exposure profile on growth and yield of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in open-top chambers in the Yangtze Delta, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiaoke [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqinglu 18, Beijing 100085 (China)], E-mail: wangxk@rcees.ac.cn; Zheng Qiwei; Feng Zhaozhong [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqinglu 18, Beijing 100085 (China); Xie Juqing [Northwestern Sci-Tech University of Agriculture and Forestry, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Feng Zongwei; Ouyang Zhiyun [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqinglu 18, Beijing 100085 (China); Manning, William J. [Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9320 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Most available exposure-response relationships for assessing crop loss due to elevated ozone (O{sub 3}) have been established using data from chamber and open-top chamber experiments, using a simulated constant O{sub 3} concentration exposure (square wave), which is not consistent with the diurnal variation of O{sub 3} concentration that occurs in nature. We investigated the response of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) to O{sub 3} as affected by two exposure regimes: one with a diurnal variation (CF100D) and another with a constant concentration (CF100). Although the two exposure regimes have the same mean O{sub 3} concentration and accumulated O{sub 3} concentration above 40 ppb (AOT40), our results show that O{sub 3} at CF100D reduced biomass and number of pods/plant more than O{sub 3} at CF100. Both O{sub 3} exposures resulted in larger seed weights/100 pods compared to CF. Numbers of seeds/100 pods were reduced by CF100, while numbers of seeds/100 pods in the CF100D chambers were comparable to those in CF. Our results suggest that chamber experiments that use a constant O{sub 3} exposure may underestimate O{sub 3} effects on biomass and yields. - Diurnal variation of O{sub 3} concentration should be considered when designing O{sub 3} exposure experiment.

  9. On the capability of in-situ exposure in an environmental scanning electron microscope for investigating the atmospheric corrosion of magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esmaily, M., E-mail: mohsen.esmaily@chalmers.se [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Mortazavi, N. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Shahabi-Navid, M.; Svensson, J.E.; Johansson, L.G. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Halvarsson, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    The feasibility of environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) in studying the atmospheric corrosion behavior of 99.97% Mg was investigated. For reference, ex-situ exposure was performed. A model system was designed by spraying few salt particles on the metal surface and further promoting the corrosion process using platinum (Pt) deposition in the form of 1×1×1 µm{sup 3} dots around the salt particles to create strong artificial cathodic sites. The results showed that the electron beam play a significant role in the corrosion process of scanned regions. This was attributed to the irradiation damage occurring on the metal surface during the ESEM in-situ experiment. After achieving to a reliable process route, in a successful attempt, the morphology and composition of the corrosion products formed in-situ in the ESEM were in agreement with those of the sample exposed ex-situ. - Highlights: • The feasibility of in-situ microscopy and atmospheric corrosion exposures of pure Mg in an ESEM are examined. • A model system was designed using NaCl particles on parts of the metal surface and promoting the corrosion process by depositing 1×1×1 µm{sup 3} Pt dots to create strong artificial cathodic sites. • The electron beam used for ESEM imaging affects the in-situ corrosion process. • A proper cleaning procedure for the sample and microscope chamber reducing carbon contamination makes the results from the ESEM in-situ exposures comparable to ex-situ exposures.

  10. In vitro exposure of human lung cells to emissions of several indoor air sources created in a climate chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bluyssen, P.M.; Alblas, M.J.; Tuinman, I.L.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, studies on indoor air pollution suggest a link between exposure to indoor particulate matter and compounds, in particular ultrafine particles and secondary organic aerosols, and several health effects. The mechanisms of how those complex mixtures relate to health effects are stil

  11. Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos; Lewis, Dean C.; Buchanan, Randy K.; Buchanan, Aubri

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Electrostatics Chamber (MEC) is an environmental chamber designed primarily to create atmospheric conditions like those at the surface of Mars to support experiments on electrostatic effects in the Martian environment. The chamber is equipped with a vacuum system, a cryogenic cooling system, an atmospheric-gas replenishing and analysis system, and a computerized control system that can be programmed by the user and that provides both automation and options for manual control. The control system can be set to maintain steady Mars-like conditions or to impose temperature and pressure variations of a Mars diurnal cycle at any given season and latitude. In addition, the MEC can be used in other areas of research because it can create steady or varying atmospheric conditions anywhere within the wide temperature, pressure, and composition ranges between the extremes of Mars-like and Earth-like conditions.

  12. Evaluation of coral pathogen growth rates after exposure to atmospheric African dust samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisle, John T.; Garrison, Virginia H.; Gray, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to assess if exposure to atmospheric African dust stimulates or inhibits the growth of four putative bacterial coral pathogens. Atmospheric dust was collected from a dust-source region (Mali, West Africa) and from Saharan Air Layer masses over downwind sites in the Caribbean [Trinidad and Tobago and St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI)]. Extracts of dust samples were used to dose laboratory-grown cultures of four putative coral pathogens: Aurantimonas coralicida (white plague type II), Serratia marcescens (white pox), Vibrio coralliilyticus, and V. shiloi (bacteria-induced bleaching). Growth of A. coralicida and V. shiloi was slightly stimulated by dust extracts from Mali and USVI, respectively, but unaffected by extracts from the other dust sources. Lag time to the start of log-growth phase was significantly shortened for A. coralicida when dosed with dust extracts from Mali and USVI. Growth of S. marcescens and V. coralliilyticus was neither stimulated nor inhibited by any of the dust extracts. This study demonstrates that constituents from atmospheric dust can alter growth of recognized coral disease pathogens under laboratory conditions.

  13. In situ variation of cervical mucus pH during exposure to atmospheric air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correa C.H.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine if exposure of cervical mucus to air during specular examination could modify mucus pH. Detection of changes is justified because of their possible interference with sperm-mucus interaction, since an acidic pH is unfavorable to sperm penetration and is associated with infertility due to the cervical factor. Twenty women with good quality mucus were evaluated. pH measurements of ecto- and endocervical mucus were made in situ using a glass electrode after 0-, 5- and 10-min exposure to air. There was a progressive alkalinization of mucus pH. Mean values of ectocervical mucus pH were 6.91, 7.16 and 7.27, while mean values of endocervical mucus pH were 7.09, 7.34 and 7.46 at 0, 5 and 10 min, respectively. Significant differences were found between the mean values obtained at 0 and 5 min, and at 0 and 10 min (P<0.05, whereas the differences in mean values at 5 and 10 min were not significant at either site. We conclude that 5 to 10 min of exposure to atmospheric air affects cervical mucus pH in a significant way. Since tests used to evaluate sperm-mucus interaction generally have not considered this possibility, we suggest that they should be performed immediately after mucus collection in order to avoid misinterpretation of the results.

  14. spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    A few cosmic rays pass through your body every second of every day, no matter where you are. Look at the spark chamber to your right – every flash is the track made by a cosmic ray from outer space. The spark chamber is filled with a special gas mixture. Cosmic rays knock electrons out of the atoms in the gas. These electrons accelerate towards high voltage metal strips layered throughout the chamber, creating sparks like little bolts of lightning.

  15. spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    A few cosmic rays pass through your body every second of every day, no matter where you are. Look at the spark chamber to your right – every flash is the track made by a cosmic ray from outer space. The spark chamber is filled with a special gas mixture. Cosmic rays knock electrons out of the atoms in the gas. These electrons accelerate towards high voltage metal strips layered throughout the chamber, creating sparks like little bolts of lightning.

  16. Whole-body new-born and young rats' exposure assessment in a reverberating chamber operating at 2.4 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the whole-body specific absorption rate (WBSAR) assessment of embryos and new-born rats' exposure in a reverberating chamber (RC) operating at 2.4 GHz (WiFi). The finite difference in time domain (FDTD) method often used in bio-electromagnetism is facing very slow convergence. A new simulation-measurement hybrid approach has been proposed to characterize the incident power related to the RC and the WBSAR in rats, which are linked by the mean squared electric field strength in the working volume. Peak localized SAR in the rat under exposure is not included in the content of the study. Detailed parameters of this approach are determined by simulations. Evolutions for the physical and physiological parameters of the small rats at different ages are discussed. Simulations have been made to analyse all the variability factors contributing to the global results. WBSAR information and the variability for rats at different ages are also discussed in the paper.

  17. Second organic aerosol formation by irradiation of α-pinene-NOx-H2O in an indoor smog chamber for atmospheric chemistry and physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhe; HAO JiMing; LI JunHua; WU Shan

    2008-01-01

    Ozone(O3) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are considered to be the most serious secondary air pollutants of concern in most metropolitan areas, as well as for Beijing. In this study, O3 and SOA for-mation potential of α-pinene, the most abundant biogenic VOCs, is investigated at Tsinghua Indoor Chamber Facility. The experiments were conducted under atmospheric relevant HCs/NOx ratios in both presence and absence of ammonia sulfate seed aerosol. A Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer system (3936, TSI) and a Condensation Particle Counter (3010, TSI) were used to study the SOA formation and a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a DB-5 column and a flame ionization detector (FID) was used to measure α-pinene simultaneously. The results show that the presence of ammonia sulfate seed aerosol did not change the formation trend of O2, but significantly contribute to SOA formation. A strong linear relationship (r2=0.90) between SOA yield enhancement (△Y*) and surface concentration of seed aernsol (PMi,s)has been found, denoting that the PMi,s is the control factor for SOA yield en-hancement. And the possible reason for the enhancement is acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions.

  18. Global emission inventory and atmospheric transport of black carbon. Evaluation of the associated exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rong

    2015-06-01

    This thesis presents research focusing on the improvement of high-resolution global black carbon (BC) emission inventory and application in assessing the population exposure to ambient BC. A particular focus of the thesis is on the construction of a high-resolution (both spatial and sectorial) fuel consumption database, which is used to develop the emission inventory of black carbon. Above all, the author updates the global emission inventory of black carbon, a resource subsequently used to study the atmospheric transport of black carbon over Asia with the help of a high-resolution nested model. The thesis demonstrates that spatial bias in fuel consumption and BC emissions can be reduced by means of the sub-national disaggregation approach. Using the inventory and nested model, ambient BC concentrations can be better validated against observations. Lastly, it provides a complete uncertainty analysis of global black carbon emissions, and this uncertainty is taken into account in the atmospheric modeling, helping to better understand the role of black carbon in regional and global air pollution.

  19. Yttrium and lanthanides in human lung fluids, probing the exposure to atmospheric fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Censi, P., E-mail: censi@unipa.it [Dipartimento C.F.T.A., Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36 90123 - Palermo (Italy); I.A.M.C.-CNR - UOS di Capo Granitola, Via faro, 1 - 91026 Torretta Granitola, Campobello di Mazara (TP) (Italy); En.Bio.Tech. - Via Aquileia, 35 90100 Palermo (Italy); Tamburo, E. [Dipartimento C.F.T.A., Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36 90123 - Palermo (Italy); Speziale, S. [Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum, Telegrafenberg, Potsdam, 14473 (Germany); Zuddas, P. [Institut Genie de l' Environnement et Ecodeveloppement and Departement Sciences de la Terre, UMR 5125, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 rue R. Dubois, Bat GEODE 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Randazzo, L.A. [Dipartimento C.F.T.A., Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36 90123 - Palermo (Italy); I.A.M.C.-CNR - UOS di Capo Granitola, Via faro, 1 - 91026 Torretta Granitola, Campobello di Mazara (TP) (Italy); En.Bio.Tech. - Via Aquileia, 35 90100 Palermo (Italy); Institut Genie de l' Environnement et Ecodeveloppement and Departement Sciences de la Terre, UMR 5125, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 rue R. Dubois, Bat GEODE 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Punturo, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Universita di Catania, Corso Italia, 55 - 95129 Catania (Italy); Cuttitta, A. [I.A.M.C.-CNR - UOS di Capo Granitola, Via faro, 1 - 91026 Torretta Granitola, Campobello di Mazara (TP) (Italy); Arico, P. [Dipartimento C.F.T.A., Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36 90123 - Palermo (Italy)

    2011-02-28

    Inhalation of airborne particles can produce crystallization of phosphatic microcrysts in intraaveolar areas of lungs, sometimes degenerating into pulmonary fibrosis. Results of this study indicate that these pathologies are induced by interactions between lung fluids and inhaled atmospheric dust in people exposed to volcanic dust ejected from Mount Etna in 2001. Here, the lung solid-liquid interaction is evaluated by the distribution of yttrium and lanthanides (YLn) in fluid bronchoalveolar lavages on selected individuals according the classical geochemical approaches. We found that shale-normalised patterns of yttrium and lanthanides have a 'V shaped' feature corresponding to the depletion of elements from Nd to Tb when compared to the variable enrichments of heavy lanthanides, Y, La and Ce. These features and concurrent thermodynamic simulations suggest that phosphate precipitation can occur in lungs due to interactions between volcanic particles and fluids. We propose that patterns of yttrium and lanthanides can represent a viable explanation of some pathology observed in patients after prolonged exposure to atmospheric fallout and are suitable to become a diagnostic parameter of chemical environmental stresses.

  20. Characterization of corrosion products formed on steels in the first months of atmospheric exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Altobelli Antunes

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion products of carbon steel and weathering steel exposed to three different types of atmospheres, at times ranging from one to three months, have been identified. The steels were exposed in an industrial site, an urban site (São Paulo City, Brazil, and a humid site. The effect of the steel type on the corrosion products formed in the early stages of atmospheric corrosion has been evaluated. The corrosion products formed at the various exposure locations were characterized by Raman microscopy, X-Ray diffraction (XRD and their morphology was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. Three regions of different colours (yellow, black and red have been identified over the steel coupons by Raman microscopy. Analysis carried out on each of these areas led to the characterization of the correspondent oxide/hydroxide phases. The main phases present were lepidocrocite (g-FeOOH and goethite (a-FeOOH. Small amounts of magnetite (Fe3O4 were also eventually encountered.

  1. Atmospheric PSF Interpolation for Weak Lensing in Short Exposure Imaging Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.; Marshall, P.J.; Jernigan, J.G.; Peterson, J.R.; Kahn, S.M.; Gull, S.F.; AlSayyad, Y.; Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Bard, D.; Connolly, A.; Gibson, R.R.; Gilmore, K.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Hodge, M.A.; Jones, L.; Krughoff, S.; Lorenz, S.; Marshall, S.; Meert, A.

    2012-09-19

    A main science goal for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is to measure the cosmic shear signal from weak lensing to extreme accuracy. One difficulty, however, is that with the short exposure time ({approx_equal}15 seconds) proposed, the spatial variation of the Point Spread Function (PSF) shapes may be dominated by the atmosphere, in addition to optics errors. While optics errors mainly cause the PSF to vary on angular scales similar or larger than a single CCD sensor, the atmosphere generates stochastic structures on a wide range of angular scales. It thus becomes a challenge to infer the multi-scale, complex atmospheric PSF patterns by interpolating the sparsely sampled stars in the field. In this paper we present a new method, psfent, for interpolating the PSF shape parameters, based on reconstructing underlying shape parameter maps with a multi-scale maximum entropy algorithm. We demonstrate, using images from the LSST Photon Simulator, the performance of our approach relative to a 5th-order polynomial fit (representing the current standard) and a simple boxcar smoothing technique. Quantitatively, psfent predicts more accurate PSF models in all scenarios and the residual PSF errors are spatially less correlated. This improvement in PSF interpolation leads to a factor of 3.5 lower systematic errors in the shear power spectrum on scales smaller than {approx} 13, compared to polynomial fitting. We estimate that with psfent and for stellar densities greater than {approx_equal}1/arcmin{sup 2}, the spurious shear correlation from PSF interpolation, after combining a complete 10-year dataset from LSST, is lower than the corresponding statistical uncertainties on the cosmic shear power spectrum, even under a conservative scenario.

  2. Ussing Chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Wortelboer, H.; Verhoeckx, K.

    2015-01-01

    The Ussing chamber system is named after the Danish zoologist Hans Ussing, who invented the device in the 1950s to measure the short-circuit current as an indicator of net ion transport taking place across frog skin (Ussing and Zerahn, Acta Physiol Scand 23:110-127, 1951). Ussing chambers are increa

  3. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Proportional multi-wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle. Proportional wire chambers allow a much quicker reading than the optical or magnetoscriptive readout wire chambers.

  4. Forecasting human exposure to atmospheric pollutants in Portugal - A modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, C.; Sá, E.; Monteiro, A.; Ferreira, J.; Miranda, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    Air pollution has become one main environmental concern because of its known impact on human health. Aiming to inform the population about the air they are breathing, several air quality modelling systems have been developed and tested allowing the assessment and forecast of air pollution ambient levels in many countries. However, every day, an individual is exposed to different concentrations of atmospheric pollutants as he/she moves from and to different outdoor and indoor places (the so-called microenvironments). Therefore, a more efficient way to prevent the population from the health risks caused by air pollution should be based on exposure rather than air concentrations estimations. The objective of the present study is to develop a methodology to forecast the human exposure of the Portuguese population based on the air quality forecasting system available and validated for Portugal since 2005. Besides that, a long-term evaluation of human exposure estimates aims to be obtained using one-year of this forecasting system application. Additionally, a hypothetical 50% emission reduction scenario has been designed and studied as a contribution to study emission reduction strategies impact on human exposure. To estimate the population exposure the forecasting results of the air quality modelling system MM5-CHIMERE have been combined with the population spatial distribution over Portugal and their time-activity patterns, i.e. the fraction of the day time spent in specific indoor and outdoor places. The population characterization concerning age, work, type of occupation and related time spent was obtained from national census and available enquiries performed by the National Institute of Statistics. A daily exposure estimation module has been developed gathering all these data and considering empirical indoor/outdoor relations from literature to calculate the indoor concentrations in each one of the microenvironments considered, namely home, office/school, and other

  5. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  6. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber.Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  7. Atmospheric pressure plasma processing of polymeric materials utilizing close proximity indirect exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Bonds, Truman

    2016-09-20

    A plasma treatment method that includes providing treatment chamber including an intermediate heating volume and an interior treatment volume. The interior treatment volume contains an electrode assembly for generating a plasma and the intermediate heating volume heats the interior treatment volume. A work piece is traversed through the treatment chamber. A process gas is introduced to the interior treatment volume of the treatment chamber. A plasma is formed with the electrode assembly from the process gas, wherein a reactive species of the plasma is accelerated towards the fiber tow by flow vortices produced in the interior treatment volume by the electrode assembly.

  8. Vacuum chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed description is given of the vacuum chamber of the so-called experimental equipment DEMAS (double-arm-time-of-flight spectrometer) at the heavy ion accelerator U-400 at the JINR-Dubna. (author)

  9. Dataset of Atmospheric Environment Publication in 2016, Source emission and model evaluation of formaldehyde from composite and solid wood furniture in a full-scale chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data presented in this data file is a product of a journal publication. The dataset contains formaldehyde air concentrations in the emission test chamber and...

  10. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in ISR (Intersecting Storage Ring) split field magnet experiment. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  11. Robert Chambers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Biekart (Kees); D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractProfessor Robert Chambers is a Research Associate at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex (Brighton, UK), where he has been based for the last 40 years, including as Professorial Research Fellow. He became involved in the field of development management in the

  12. Use of molecular beacons for the rapid analysis of DNA damage induced by exposure to an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid method for evaluating the damage caused to DNA molecules upon exposure to plasma is demonstrated. Here, we propose the use of a molecular beacon for rapid detection of DNA strand breaks induced by atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) irradiation. Scission of the molecular beacon by APPJ irradiation leads to separation of the fluorophore-quencher pair, resulting in an increase in fluorescence that directly correlates with the DNA strand breaks. The results show that the increase in fluorescence intensity is proportional to the exposure time and the rate of fluorescence increase is proportional to the discharge power. This simple and rapid method allows the estimation of DNA damage induced by exposure to a non-thermal plasma

  13. Use of molecular beacons for the rapid analysis of DNA damage induced by exposure to an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurita, Hirofumi, E-mail: kurita@ens.tut.ac.jp, E-mail: mizuno@ens.tut.ac.jp; Miyachika, Saki; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira, E-mail: kurita@ens.tut.ac.jp, E-mail: mizuno@ens.tut.ac.jp [Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2015-12-28

    A rapid method for evaluating the damage caused to DNA molecules upon exposure to plasma is demonstrated. Here, we propose the use of a molecular beacon for rapid detection of DNA strand breaks induced by atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) irradiation. Scission of the molecular beacon by APPJ irradiation leads to separation of the fluorophore-quencher pair, resulting in an increase in fluorescence that directly correlates with the DNA strand breaks. The results show that the increase in fluorescence intensity is proportional to the exposure time and the rate of fluorescence increase is proportional to the discharge power. This simple and rapid method allows the estimation of DNA damage induced by exposure to a non-thermal plasma.

  14. Use of molecular beacons for the rapid analysis of DNA damage induced by exposure to an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Miyachika, Saki; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-12-01

    A rapid method for evaluating the damage caused to DNA molecules upon exposure to plasma is demonstrated. Here, we propose the use of a molecular beacon for rapid detection of DNA strand breaks induced by atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) irradiation. Scission of the molecular beacon by APPJ irradiation leads to separation of the fluorophore-quencher pair, resulting in an increase in fluorescence that directly correlates with the DNA strand breaks. The results show that the increase in fluorescence intensity is proportional to the exposure time and the rate of fluorescence increase is proportional to the discharge power. This simple and rapid method allows the estimation of DNA damage induced by exposure to a non-thermal plasma.

  15. Characterisation of initial atmospheric corrosion carbon steels by field exposure and laboratory simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The early stages of the evolution of atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels exposed in both a laboratory simulated and a natural atmosphere environment in Shenyang have been observed by in situ scanning electron microscopy. In the case of laboratory cyclic wet-dry tests, even though the chloride content level is very low, filiform corrosion is initiated in the early stage. The filiform corrosion grows in random directions, forming a network of ridges. White nodules nucleate and grow on the ridges during continued corrosion and eventually connect with each other to form the initial corrosion scale. Pits were also found on the surface beneath corrosion products. In the case of a natural atmospheric environment, both filiform corrosion and other localized corrosion, such as pitting and inter-granular attack take place in the initial stage. It is obvious that there is variety of localized corrosion in the initial stage of atmospheric corrosion

  16. Enhanced solubility and ecological impact of atmospheric phosphorus deposition upon extended seawater exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Katherine R M; Roberts, Kathryn; Lomas, Michael W; Saito, Mak A; Post, Anton F; Paytan, Adina

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric P solubility affects the amount of P available for phytoplankton in the surface ocean, yet our understanding of the timing and extent of atmospheric P solubility is based on short-term leaching experiments where conditions may differ substantially from the surface ocean. We conducted longer- term dissolution experiments of atmospheric aerosols in filtered seawater, and found up to 9-fold greater dissolution of P after 72 h compared to instantaneous leaching. Samples rich in anthropogenic materials released dissolved inorganic P (DIP) faster than mineral dust. To gauge the effect of biota on the fate of atmospheric P, we conducted field incubations with aerosol samples collected in the Sargasso Sea and Red Sea. In the Sargasso Sea phytoplankton were not P limited, and biological activity enhanced DIP release from aerosols, and aerosols induced biological mineralization of dissolved organic P in seawater, leading to DIP accumulation. However, in the Red Sea where phytoplankton were colimited by P and N, soluble P was rapidly consumed by phytoplankton following aerosol enrichment. Our results suggest that atmospheric P dissolution could continue over multiple days once reaching the surface ocean, and that previous estimates of atmospheric P deposition may underestimate the contribution from this source.

  17. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  18. Low cost transportable device for transference of atmosphere sensitive materials from glove box to SEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Janet Jonna; Saxild, Finn B.

    the field of high energy battery research involving highly reactive metals, e.g. lithium, we needed a means of transferring atmosphere sensitive materials from the protective atmosphere of a glove box, avoiding air exposure, to a sample chamber of a scanning electron microscope. Thus, we constructed a low...

  19. Atmospheric Corrosion of Painted Galvanized and 55%Al-Zn Steel Sheets: Results of 12 Years of Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. I. Elsner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc or 55%Al-Zn alloy-coated steel sheets, either bare or covered by different painting systems, have been exposed for 12 years to the action of the urban atmosphere at the CIDEPINT station located in La Plata (34° 50′ South, 57° 53′, West, province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. The samples exposed surface was evaluated through periodical visual inspections, standardized adhesion tests, and electrochemical impedance measurements. The ambient variables monitored were average annual rains and temperatures, time of wetness, sulphur and chloride concentration, relative humidity, and speed and direction of the winds. It was found that in this atmosphere, the corrosion resistance of the bare 55% Al-Zn/steel sheets was higher than of the galvanized steel, and the polyurethane painting system was more protective than the alkyd and epoxy ones, which degraded after 6-7 years of exposure.

  20. AXAIR: A Computer Code for SAR Assessment of Plume-Exposure Doses from Potential Process-Accident Releases to Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillinger, W.L.

    2001-05-17

    This report describes the AXAIR computer code which is available to terminal users for evaluating the doses to man from exposure to the atmospheric plume from postulated stack or building-vent releases at the Savannah River Plant. The emphasis herein is on documentation of the methodology only. The total-body doses evaluated are those that would be exceeded only 0.5 percent of the time based on worst-sector, worst-case meteorological probability analysis. The associated doses to other body organs are given in the dose breakdowns by radionuclide, body organ and pathway.

  1. Kinetics of atmospheric corrosion of mild steel, zinc, galvanized iron and aluminium at 10 exposure stations in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of updating Corrosion Map of India project, atmospheric corrosion behaviour of commercially available engineering materials such as mild steel, galvanized iron, zinc and aluminium metals was studied in marine, industrial, urban, and rural environments by weight loss method at 10 exposure stations in India over a period of 5 years. The results of these studies demonstrated that galvanized iron, zinc and aluminium metals were several times more durable than mild steel. Compared to galvanized iron and zinc, aluminium provided superior protection in industrial and marine environment except at Mormugao Port Trust (MPT). It also offered much better resistance to corrosion in rural environments. At certain places, galvanized iron proved to be more durable than aluminium. The results obeyed well with the empirical kinetics equation of the form C = Kt n, where K and C are the corrosion losses in μm after 1 and 't' years of the exposure, respectively, and 'n' is a constant. Based on 'n' values, the corrosion mechanisms of these metals are predicted. The corrosion products formed on the metal samples in Chennai marine atmosphere were identified by X-ray diffraction analysis

  2. Testing an hydrogen streamer chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    A 2x10 cm gap streamer chamber, 35x55 cm2 in surface, was built and tested at CERN. Good tracks of cosmic rays were obtained up to atmospheric pressure, see F. Rohrbach et al, CERN-LAL (Orsay) Collaboration, Nucl. Instr. Methods 141 (1977) 229. Michel Cathenoz stand on the center.

  3. GALVANIC CORROSION AND PROTECTION OF GECM/LY12CZ COUPLES UNDER DIFFERENT ATMOSPHERIC EXPOSURE CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.Lu; Q.P.Zhong; 等

    2003-01-01

    Galvanic compatibility between graphite epoxy composite materials (GECM) and LY12CZ aluminum alloy was evaluated in different atmospheric corrosion environ-ments and by laboratory electrochemical measurements.Open circuit potential elec-trochemical measurements showed a relatively large potemtial difference about 1 volt between the GECM and LY12CZ aluminum alloy,and this difference provided the driving force for galvanic corrosion of the LY12CZ aluminum alloy as an anode. Having been exposed for 1,3or 5years in Beijing,Tuandao and Wanning station,GECM/LY12CZ couples showed significant losses of strength and elongation.Protec-tive coatings and non-conductive barriers breaking the galvanic corrosion circuit were evaluated under the same atmospheric corrosive conditions.Epoxy primer paint,glass cloth barriers and LY12CZ anodizing were effective in glvanic corrosion control for GECM/LY12CZ couples.

  4. GALVANIC CORROSION AND PROTECTION OF GECM/LY12CZ COUPLES UNDER DIFFERENT ATMOSPHERIC EXPOSURE CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. Lu; Q.P. Zhong; C.X. Cao

    2003-01-01

    Galvanic compatibility between graphite epoxy composite materials (GECM) andLY12CZ aluminum alloy was evaluated in different atmospheric corrosion environ-ments and by laboratory electrochemical measurements. Open circuit potential elec-trochemical measurements showed a relatively large potential difference about 1 voltbetween the GECM and LY12CZ aluminum alloy, and this difference provided thedriving force for galvanic corrosion of the LY12CZ aluminum alloy as an anode.Having been exposed for 1, 3 or 5 years in Beijing, Tuandao and Wanning station,GECM/L Y12CZ couples showed significant losses of strength and elongation. Protec-tive coatings and non-conductive barriers breaking the galvanic corrosion circuit wereevaluated under the same atmospheric corrosive conditions. Epoxy primer paint, glasscloth barriers and LY12CZ anodizing were effective in galvanic corrosion control forGECM/L Y12CZ couples.

  5. Vapor wall deposition in Teflon chambers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, X; R. H. Schwantes; R. C. McVay; H Lignell; M. M. Coggon; Flagan, R C; Seinfeld, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Teflon chambers are ubiquitous in studies of atmospheric chemistry. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation can be substantially underestimated owing to deposition of SOA-forming compounds to chamber walls. We present here an experimental protocol to constrain the nature of wall deposition of organic vapors in Teflon chambers. We measured the wall deposition rates of 25 oxidized organic compounds generated from the photooxidation of isoprene, toluene, α-pinene, and dodecan...

  6. Atmospheric corrosion of hot and cold rolled carbon steel under field exposure in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon steel (hot and cold rolled) specimens have been exposed to the action of different atmospheres at 20 test sites distributed in Saudi Arabia and was investigated in terms of environmental factors such as average temperature, average relative humidity and deposition rates of atmospheric pollutants (Cl- and SO2). Applying the standard ISO 9223 norm aggressiveness of the atmospheres corresponding to 0the different test sites has been determined. Calculations of corrosion rates were made via loss of weight and characterization of the corrosion products formed on samples has been carried out by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD). The major constituent of the rust formed in marine and marine-industrial environment is goethite (α-FeOOH). These samples also show the presence of a large proportion of lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and small amounts of ferrihydrite and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). In the case of urban and rural samples goethite is the major constituent of corrosion layers. The rust formed under the urban environment also contains large amounts of ferrihydrite and in a lesser proportion, of goethite and maghemite

  7. RF Anechoic Chambers, Tri-Service Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In collaboration with the Navy, there are 12 RF Anechoic and static free exposure chambers located at TSRL. These chambers cover the majority of the RF spectrum and...

  8. Vectorization of nuclear codes for atmospheric transport and exposure calculation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three computer codes MATHEW, ADPIC of LLNL and GAMPUL of JAERI for prediction of wind field, concentration and external exposure rate of airborne radioactive materials are vectorized and the results are presented. Using the continuous equation of incompressible flow as a constraint, the MATHEW calculates the three dimensional wind field by a variational method. Using the particle-in -cell method, the ADPIC calculates the advection and diffusion of radioactive materials in three dimensional wind field and terrain, and gives the concentration of the materials in each cell of the domain. The GAMPUL calculates the external exposure rate assuming Gaussian plume type distribution of concentration. The vectorized code MATHEW attained 7.8 times speedup by a vector processor FACOM230-75 APU. The ADPIC and GAMPUL are estimated to attain 1.5 and 4 times speedup respectively on CRAY-1 type vector processor. (author)

  9. Studies of tracheo-bronchial mucus secretion and composition in the rat after exposure to the air pollutants SO sub 2 and NO sub 2 by means of the modified Ussing-chamber-technique. Untersuchungen der tracheobronchialen Schleimsekretion und -zusammensetzung am Rattenmodell nach Exposition gegenueber den inhalativen Noxen SO sub 2 und NO sub 2 mittels der modifizierten Ussing-Kammer-Technik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, U.; Lauber, F.; Becker, R. (Marburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Medizinische Poliklinik)

    1990-04-01

    In order to determine the effects of short-time exposure to low concentrations of the air pollutants SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} on tracheal mucus secretion male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed continuously to an atmosphere containing 10 ppm SO{sub 2} over a period of 6 days or 10 ppm NO{sub 2} over a period of 3 days respectively. Mucus secretion was then studied by means of Ussing-chambers, an in vitro method for tracheal organ culture. Thus tracheal preparations of treated and untreated animals were examined. One part of the study was done using {sup 35}S as radioactive precursor, the other by quantitative analysis of total protein and carbohydrate content of the secretions as the compounds of glycoproteins. Moreover light microscopic morphometric examination of the cultured tracheas was carried out. Neither short-time exposure to low concentrations of SO{sub 2} nor NO{sub 2} were seen to significantly affect mucus secretion. Only trends could be found. SO{sub 2} seemed to increase whereas NO{sub 2} seemed to reduce mucus secretion. By use of light microscopic morphometric studies no differences could be seen between exposed and untreated animals. The results are discussed with regard to the literature. (orig.).

  10. Pollution level, inhalation exposure and lung cancer risk of ambient atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Taiyuan, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passive air samplers were deployed to collect both gas and particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Taiyuan between 2009 and 2010. Annual average concentrations of BaP equivalent concentration (B[a]Peq) in background, rural and urban areas were 2.90 ± 0.29, 23.2 ± 30.8 and 27.4 ± 28.1 ng/m3, respectively, with higher concentration in the winter than in other seasons. The median B[a]Peq concentrations of annual inhalation exposure were estimated to be in the range of 103–347 ng/d for all population groups in rural as well as in urban areas. The median values of incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) induced by whole year inhalation exposure for all groups were basically larger than 10−6, with higher values in winter than in other seasons and in urban than in rural area. In the same season and area, the ILCR of adults was larger than other age groups and that of females was a little higher than males. - Highlights: ► The median values of ILCR were higher in winter than in other seasons. ► The median values of ILCR were higher in urban than in rural area. ► In the same season and area, the ILCR of adults was larger than other age groups. ► In the same season and area, the ILCR of females was a little higher than males. ► Exposure level and the cancer slope factor influenced the ILCR greatly. - The inhalation exposure and lung cancer risk of ambient atmospheric PAHs changed for different seasons, areas and population groups in Taiyuan, China.

  11. Chamber Music's Lesson in Performing Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Darrel W.

    1983-01-01

    Chamber music has the advantage of offering the student maximum exposure as an individual performer. The absence of a conductor means that the student assumes the role of interpreter, thereby gaining musical maturity. For these reasons, curriculum hours should be more evenly divided between chamber music and larger ensembles. (CS)

  12. [Assessment of a risk from exposure to atmosphere bus industrial emissions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepkin, Iu I; Kuzmichev, M K

    2009-01-01

    The carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic risks to health were estimated in accordance with the requirements stated in the guide P 2.1.10.1920-04 "Guidelines for assessing the health risk in the population exposed to the chemicals polluting the environment" (approved by G. G. Onishchenko, state sanitary inspector on March 5, 2004) and comprised four successive steps: 1) identification of a hazard; 2) estimation of a dose-response relationship; 3) evaluation of exposure of the population to chemical substances; 4) characterization of a risk, by calculating the individual carcinogenic risk, hazard coefficients and indices characterizing the noncarcinogenic risk. The performed assessment of the health risk to the population living in the area exposed to the ambient air pollutant emissions by the AOA "Shinnyi Kompleks Amtel-Chenozymye" (Amtel-Chernozem Tyre Complex) allowed determination of priority pollutants, by taking into account their effect on human health. The individual carcinogenic risk to health has been found to be higher than the acceptable (safe) level (10-4) was due to the probable exposure to a 2-heptane fraction (nefras ChS 94/99) and hexavalent chromium. The highest non-carcinogenic risk to human was also due to the heptane fraction (nefras ChS 94/99) (hazard coefficient > 1). PMID:19354178

  13. Accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing using a cyclic wet/dry exposure test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum corrosion is important in overhead electrical conductors constructed from aluminum wire centrally reinforced by galvanized steel strands. Inspection of conductor after long service has implicated rubber bushing material, on the outside, and the galvanized strands, on the inside, as providing potential galvanic sites for the initiation of rapid aluminum corrosion. Therefore, the galvanic corrosion of aluminum in contact with graphite-loaded neoprene rubber, hot-dip galvanized steel and steel was assessed in a cyclic wet/dry exposure test using mixed-salts spray solutions containing appropriate ratios of sulfate and chloride ion. Aluminum was found to corrode at between 3 to 6 times its uncoupled rate when associated with the rubber material. While the eta-phase, relatively pure Zn, galvanized layer remained intact, galvanic corrosion of aluminum was slow. However, on exposure of the zeta-phase, Zn/Fe intermetallic layer, aluminum corroded about 35 times faster than expected in a solution with a high level of Cl- ion. The importance of these data to conductor lifetime is discussed

  14. Investigation of the influence of high humidity and exposure duration on the measurement results of radon concentration by means of PicoRad system in the CLOR calibration chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PicoRad system based on activated charcoal collectors and liquid scintillation counter is one of the most popular passive methods of radon measurements which may be used both indoors and in other environments such as caves, tunnels, mines etc. It is well known that charcoal is also a very good adsorber of water vapor and it can reduce adsorption efficiency for radon. In PicoRad collectors, the charcoal is mixed with a dessicant to lower this effect. A series of expositions of PicoRad detectors was performed in a Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection (CLOR) radon calibration/climatic chamber to study the effect of high relative humidity on the airborne radon concentration measurements and the dependence of the results on the duration of exposure. The results obtained from the PicoRad system were referred to the mean concentrations delivered by an AlphaGUARD monitor, Genitron (GmbH), Germany. The main conclusions are the following: 1) the PicoRad system results are not affected by high relative humidity, including extreme values of 90-96%, for the duration of exposure up to ca. 24 h; 2) in the relative humidity range of 75-96% the correction coefficient linearly depends on the duration of exposure reaching a value of ca. 16 for 96 h exposure; 3) the PicoRad system delivers results corresponding better to the mean value of radon concentration in the last 6 h interval of exposure than that in the whole exposure duration. This finding is particularly important for the calibration of PicoRad collectors in the conditions of decreasing radon concentration due to radon decay. (author)

  15. Measurement of cardiopulmonary performance during acute exposure to a 2440-m equivalent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, B. M.; Bungo, M. W.

    1982-01-01

    Each of 20 subjects (ranging in age from 18 to 38 years, 15 being male, five female) was given two Bruce Protocol symptom-limited maximum treadmill stress tests, breathing sea-level compressed air (20.9% O2) for one test and a 2440-m equivalent (15.5% O2) for the other. A significant difference was found to exist between measured VO2 max (p less than 0.0002) and exercise time (p less than 0.0004) for the two conditions. No significant differences were observed in heart rate or the recovery time to a respiratory quotient of less than 1. Hemoglobin saturation, as measured by an ear oximeter, averaged 95% for sea-level and 91% for the 2440-m equivalent gases. These results support a 2440-m equivalent contingency atmosphere in the Space Shuttle prior to donning a low-pressure suit for the purpose reducing nitrogen washout times.

  16. Short-term exposure of low-alloyed steels in Qinghai Salt Lake atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI QiaoXia; WANG ZhenYao; HAN Wei; YU GuoCai; HAN EnHou

    2009-01-01

    The rusts formed on carbon steel and weathering steel exposed in Oinghai Salt Lake atmosphere for 6 months were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared transmission spectroscopy (IRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) and electrochemical polarization techniques. The two kinds of steels showed the similar corrosion rate, corrosion product composition and electrochemical polarization behavior. Their rusts were mainly composed of β-FeOOH, Fe_8(O,OH)_(16)Cl_(1.3) and a little γ-FeOOH. Cl~- played an important role during the corrosion process of low-alloyed steels. The alloyed elements Cr, Ni and Cu in weathering steel were detected in the rusts; however, they showed no remarkable protective ability.

  17. Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber comprises a power anechoic chamber and one transverse electromagnetic cell for characterizing radiofrequency (RF) responses of...

  18. Thaumasite formation in hydraulic mortars by atmospheric SO^ deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-Varela, María Teresa; Martínez-Ramírez, S.; Sabbioni, C.; Zappia, G.; Toumbakari, E. E.; Aguilera, J.; Palomo, Ángel; Riontino, C.; Van Valen, K.

    2001-01-01

    [EN]Sulphation of mortars and concretes is a function of diverse environmental factors (SO^ aerosol, temperature, etc) as well as some material characteristics. One of the phases that could be formed as consequence of the sulphation of the hydraulic binder is thaumasite. In this paper different hydraulic mortars have been exposed to laboratory exposure chambers in order to reproduce thaumasite formation due to atmospheric SO^. Under the laboratory exposure conditions, ...

  19. Assessing effects of seasonal variation on occupational exposure of newsagent kiosks to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons found in the urban atmosphere of Tehran Metropolitan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Rezaei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: PAHs are main components of urban air pollution and are mutagenic for human being. Seasonal variations have effects on the amount of exposure to PAHs. The objectives of this research were to determine the amount of newsagent’s exposure to PAHs found in the urban atmosphere of Tehran City during warm and cold periods and comparing exposure levels in two periods. Materials and Methods: The assessment of personal exposure was performed based on NIOSH method 5515 and was analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Mann- Whitney test was used to determine the effects of seasonal variation on the amount of newsagent’s exposure to PAHs. Results: The mean levels of newsagent’s exposure to benzo[a]pyrene in the south area of Tehran City were 0.148±0.010 and 0.417±0.041 μg/m3 in summer and autumn seasons respectively. The amount was higher than the mean levels of newsagent’s exposure in other geographic areas of city. The levels of newsagent’s exposure to all PAHs (p<0.001 were significantly higher in autumn compared with summer. Conclusion: The levels of exposure to PAHs during autumn were 2 to 3 fold higher than the levels of exposure during summer. Newsagents in the south area of Tehran City were experiencing higher levels of exposures to PAHs.

  20. Optimum modellings of atmospheric diffusion of radioactive effluents and exposure doses in the accident consequence assessment (Level 3 PSA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric diffusion and exposure strongly dependent on the environment were firstly considered in the full spectrum of accident consequence assessment to establish based on Korean conditions. An optimum weather category based on Korean climate and site-specific meteorology of Kori region was established by statistical analysis of measured data for 10 years. And a trajectory model was selected as the optimal one in the ACA by reviewing several existing diffusion models. Following aspects were considered in this selection as availability of meteorological data, ability to treat the change to wind direction, easy applicability of the model, and restriction of CPU time and core memory in current computers. Numerical integration method of our own was selected as the optimal dose assessment tool of external exposure. Unit dose rate was firstly computed with this method as the function of energy level of radionuclide, size of lattice, and distance between source and receptor, and then the results were rearranged as the data library for the rapid access to the ACA run. Dynamic ecosystem modelling has been done in order to estimate the seasonal variation of radioactivity for the assessment of ingestion exposure, considering Korean ingestion behavior, agricultural practice and the transportation. There is a lot of uncertainty in a countermeasure model due to the assumed values of parameters such as fraction of population with different shielding factor and driving speed. A new countermeasure model was developed using the concept of fuzzy set theory, since it provided the mathematical tools which could characterize the uncertainty involved in countermeasure modelling. (Author)

  1. Optical monitoring of CH3NH3PbI3 thin films upon atmospheric exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Kiran; Zhao, Dewei; Cimaroli, Alex; Ke, Weijun; Yan, Yanfa; Podraza, Nikolas J.

    2016-10-01

    CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films of interest for photovoltaic (PV) devices have been prepared by (i) vapor deposition and (ii) solution processing. Complex dielectric function (ε  =  ε 1  +  iε 2) spectra and structural parameters of the films have been extracted using near infrared to ultraviolet spectroscopic ellipsometry. In situ real time spectroscopic ellipsometry (RTSE) over a 48 h period has been performed on vapor deposited CH3NH3PbI3 after the deposition in normal atmospheric laboratory ambient conditions. Analysis of RTSE data for vapor deposited CH3NH3PbI3 film prepared under un-optimized conditions identifies phase segregated PbI2 and CH3NH3I at the substrate/film interface and unreacted PbI2 and CH3NH3I on the film surface. This analysis also provides the time dependence of the effective thicknesses of perovskite film, unreacted components, and phase segregated layers to track CH3NH3PbI3 decomposition.

  2. Sulfate concentrations in Norway spruce needles in relation to atmospheric SO(2): a comparison of trees from various forests in Germany with trees fumigated with SO(2) in growth chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, W; Dittrich, A; Heber, U

    1993-01-01

    Concentrations of inorganic sulfur, organic sulfur and water-soluble cations and anions were determined in needles of young Norway spruce trees (Picea abies L. (Karst.)) that had been fumigated in growth chambers for weeks or months with different concentrations of SO(2), SO(2) plus ozone, or SO(2) plus NO(2). Measurements were also made on needles from older trees growing in forests in various regions of Germany with different mean annual atmospheric SO(2) emissions. In the fumigated young trees, sulfate accumulation in the needles was a linear function of atmospheric SO(2) concentration. Little or no sulfur was incorporated into the organic sulfur fraction. The mean accumulation rate of sulfate in needles of fumigated trees was about 0.4 nmol g(dw) (-1) (nl l(-1))(-1) h(-1), which is very similar to the estimated rate of uptake of atmospheric SO(2) calculated from mean stomatal conductances (15 mmol m(-2) s(-1)) and the external SO(2) concentration (the calculated rate of uptake was 0.37 nmol g(dw) (-1) (nl l(-1))(-1) h(-1)). Concentrations of organic acids and other inorganic ions did not change much in response to SO(2) fumigation. In needles collected from trees in south and southeast Germany, large differences in sulfate concentrations were observed that probably reflect SO(2) emissions in the different regions. The highest foliar sulfate concentrations, and the highest annual increase in sulfate concentration with needle age were observed in material collected from the heavily polluted Erzgebirge (up to 12 micro mol g(dw) (-1) year(-1)), followed by material from the Fichtelgebirge (up to 6 micro mol g(dw) (-1) year(-1)). If it is assumed that this annual increase is the result of uptake of SO(2) from the atmosphere, mean annual atmospheric SO(2) concentrations can be calculated. The calculated values were somewhat below the measured values in the Fichtelgebirge and in the heavily polluted Erzgebirge. Norway spruce trees can cope with high concentrations of

  3. Impacts of Mercury Pollution Controls on Atmospheric Mercury Concentration and Occupational Mercury Exposure in a Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Yang, Yan; Xiong, Wuyan

    2015-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) and Hg-containing products are used in a wide range of settings in hospitals. Hg pollution control measures were carried out in the pediatric ward of a hospital to decrease the possibility of Hg pollution occurring and to decrease occupational Hg exposure. Total gaseous Hg (TGM) concentrations in the pediatric ward and hair and urine Hg concentrations for the pediatric staff were determined before and after the Hg pollution control measures had been implemented. A questionnaire survey performed indicated that the pediatric staff had little understanding of Hg pollution and that appropriate disposal techniques were not always used after Hg leakage. TGM concentrations in the pediatric ward and urine Hg (UHg) concentrations for the pediatric staff were 25.7 and 22.2% lower, respectively, after the Hg pollution control measures had been implemented than before, which indicated that the control measures were effective. However, TGM concentrations in the pediatric ward remained significantly higher than background concentrations and UHg concentrations for the pediatric staff were remained significantly higher than the concentrations in control group, indicating continued existence of certain Hg pollution.

  4. "Flat-Fish" Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    The picture shows a "Flat-Fish" vacuum chamber being prepared in the ISR workshop for testing prior to installation in the Split Field Magnet (SFM) at intersection I4. The two shells of each part were hydroformed from 0.15 mm thick inconel 718 sheet (with end parts in inconel 600 for easier manual welding to the arms) and welded toghether with two strips which were attached by means of thin stainless steel sheets to the Split Field Magnet poles in order to take the vertical component of the atmospheric pressure force. This was the thinnest vacuum chamber ever made for the ISR. Inconel material was chosen for its high elastic modulus and strenght at chamber bake-out temperature. In this picture the thin sheets transferring the vertical component of the atmosferic pressure force are attached to a support frame for testing. See also 7712182, 7712179.

  5. Test of an undulated vacuum chamber for the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This picture shows mechanical tests of an undulated vacuum chamber for downstream arms of ISR intersections. This chamber, made of 0.3 mm thick inconel, had inner dimensions of 150 mm by 50 mm. The deflection under vacuum is measured by dial gauges. On the left one sees the large vessel where vacuum chambers were tested at pressures above atmospheric pressure.

  6. Assessment of Public Health Risks Associated with Atmospheric Exposure to PM2.5 in Washington, DC, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon R. Morris

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, we investigated the public health risks associated with atmospheric exposure to PM2.5 for different subpopulations (black, white, Hispanic, youth, adults, and elderly in the Washington, DC area. Washington, DC has long been considered a non-healthy place to live according to the American Lung Association due to its poor air quality. This recognition clearly includes the negative PM-related human health effects within the region. Specifically, DC fine particulate matter (PM2.5 [or particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm] poses notable health risks to subpopulations having an annual mean value of 16.70 μg/m3 during the years 1999-2004, exceeding the EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS of 15 μg/m3. Incessant exposure to significant levels of PM has previously been linked to deleterious health effects, such as heart and lung diseases. The environmental quality and public health statistics of Washington, DC indicate the need for higher-resolution measurements of emissions, both spatially and temporally, and increased analysis of PM-related health effects. Our findings show that there are significant risks of ward-specific pediatric asthma emergency room visits (ERV. Results also illustrate lifetime excess lung cancer risks, exceeding the 1x10-6 threshold for the measured levels of particulate matter and heavy metals (chromium and arsenic on behalf of numerous subpopulations in the DC selected wards.

  7. Responses of epidermal cell turgor pressure and photosynthetic activity of leaves of the atmospheric epiphyte Tillandsia usneoides (Bromeliaceae) after exposure to high humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Craig E; Rux, Guido; Herppich, Werner B

    2013-01-01

    It has been well-established that many epiphytic bromeliads of the atmospheric-type morphology, i.e., with leaf surfaces completely covered by large, overlapping, multicellular trichomes, are capable of absorbing water vapor from the atmosphere when air humidity increases. It is much less clear, however, whether this absorption of water vapor can hydrate the living cells of the leaves and, as a consequence, enhance physiological processes in such cells. The goal of this research was to determine if the absorption of atmospheric water vapor by the atmospheric epiphyte Tillandsia usneoides results in an increase in turgor pressure in leaf epidermal cells that subtend the large trichomes, and, by using chlorophyll fluorescence techniques, to determine if the absorption of atmospheric water vapor by leaves of this epiphyte results in increased photosynthetic activity. Results of measurements on living cells of attached leaves of this epiphytic bromeliad, using a pressure probe and of whole-shoot fluorescence imaging analyses clearly illustrated that the turgor pressure of leaf epidermal cells did not increase, and the photosynthetic activity of leaves did not increase, following exposure of the leaves to high humidity air. These results experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, that the absorption of water vapor following increases in atmospheric humidity in atmospheric epiphytic bromeliads is mostly likely a physical phenomenon resulting from hydration of non-living leaf structures, e.g., trichomes, and has no physiological significance for the plant's living tissues.

  8. Atmospheric constituents and surface-level UVB: Implications for a paleoaltimetry proxy and attempts to reconstruct UV exposure during volcanic episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian C.; Goracke, Byron D.; Dalton, Sean M.

    2016-11-01

    Chemical and morphological features of spores and pollens have been linked to changes in solar ultraviolet radiation (specifically UVB, 280-315 nm) at Earth's surface. Variation in UVB exposure as inferred from these features has been suggested as a proxy for paleoaltitude; such proxies are important in understanding the uplift history of high altitude plateaus, which in turn is important for testing models of the tectonic processes responsible for such uplift. While UVB irradiance does increase with altitude above sea level, a number of other factors affect the irradiance at any given place and time. In this modeling study we use the TUV atmospheric radiative transfer model to investigate dependence of surface-level UVB irradiance and relative biological impact on a number of constituents in Earth's atmosphere that are variable over long and short time periods. We consider changes in O3 column density, and SO2 and sulfate aerosols due to periods of volcanic activity, including that associated with the formation of the Siberian Traps. We find that UVB irradiance may be highly variable under volcanic conditions and variations in several of these atmospheric constituents can easily mimic or overwhelm changes in UVB irradiance due to changes in altitude. On the other hand, we find that relative change with altitude is not very sensitive to different sets of atmospheric conditions. Any paleoaltitude proxy based on UVB exposure requires confidence that the samples under comparison were located at roughly the same latitude, under very similar O3 and SO2 columns, with similar atmospheric aerosol conditions. In general, accurate estimates of the surface-level UVB exposure at any time and location require detailed radiative transfer modeling taking into account a number of atmospheric factors; this result is important for paleoaltitude proxies as well as attempts to reconstruct the UV environment through geologic time and to tie extinctions, such as the end-Permian mass

  9. Time-resolved dosimetric verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy exposures using a high-resolution 2D ionisation chamber array

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R. B.; Agnew, C. E.; O’Connell, B. F.; Prise, K. M.; Hounsell, A. R.; McGarry, C. K.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to track and verify the delivery of respiratory-gated irradiations, performed with three versions of TrueBeam linac, using a novel phantom arrangement that combined the OCTAVIUS® SRS 1000 array with a moving platform. The platform was programmed to generate sinusoidal motion of the array. This motion was tracked using the real-time position management (RPM) system and four amplitude gating options were employed to interrupt MV beam delivery when the platform was not located within set limits. Time-resolved spatial information extracted from analysis of x-ray fluences measured by the array was compared to the programmed motion of the platform and to the trace recorded by the RPM system during the delivery of the x-ray field. Temporal data recorded by the phantom and the RPM system were validated against trajectory log files, recorded by the linac during the irradiation, as well as oscilloscope waveforms recorded from the linac target signal. Gamma analysis was employed to compare time-integrated 2D x-ray dose fluences with theoretical fluences derived from the probability density function for each of the gating settings applied, where gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm and 0.5%/0.5 mm were used to evaluate the limitations of the RPM system. Excellent agreement was observed in the analysis of spatial information extracted from the SRS 1000 array measurements. Comparisons of the average platform position with the expected position indicated absolute deviations of  rates using gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm and 50% of the fluences achieved pass-rates  >90% when criteria of 0.5%/0.5 mm were used. Results using this novel phantom arrangement indicate that the RPM system is capable of accurately gating x-ray exposure during the delivery of a fixed-field treatment beam.

  10. Time-resolved dosimetric verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy exposures using a high-resolution 2D ionisation chamber array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R B; Agnew, C E; O'Connell, B F; Prise, K M; Hounsell, A R; McGarry, C K

    2016-08-01

    system is capable of accurately gating x-ray exposure during the delivery of a fixed-field treatment beam.

  11. Time-resolved dosimetric verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy exposures using a high-resolution 2D ionisation chamber array

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R. B.; Agnew, C. E.; O'Connell, B. F.; Prise, K. M.; Hounsell, A. R.; McGarry, C. K.

    2016-08-01

    using this novel phantom arrangement indicate that the RPM system is capable of accurately gating x-ray exposure during the delivery of a fixed-field treatment beam.

  12. Traffic-related atmospheric pollutants levels during pregnancy and offspring's term birth weight: a study relying on a land-use regression exposure model.

    OpenAIRE

    Slama, Rémy; Morgenstern, Verena; Cyrys, Josef; Zutavern, Anne; Herbarth, Olf; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Heinrich, Joachim; Study Group, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    International audience BACKGROUND: Some studies have suggested that particulate matter (PM) levels during pregnancy may be associated with birth weight. Road traffic is a major source of fine PM (PM with aero-dynamic diameter < 2.5 microm; PM(2.5)). OBJECTIVE: We determined to characterize the influence of maternal exposure to atmospheric pollutants due to road traffic and urban activities on offspring term birth weight. METHODS: Women from a birth cohort [the LISA (Influences of Lifestyle...

  13. Assessment of exposure to atmospheric particles: contribution of individual measurements; Evaluation de l'exposition aux particules atmospheriques: apport des mesures individuelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosqueron, L.; Momas, I. [Universite Rene Descartes, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, Lab. d' Hygiene et de Sante Publique, 75 - Paris (France); Le Moullec, Y. [Laboratoire d' Hygiene de la Ville de Paris, 75 (France); Momas, I. [Direction de l' Action Sociale, de l' Enfance et de la Sante, Cellule Epidemiologie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-02-01

    There are few studies of individual exposure to atmospheric particles, because of the relatively bulky and noisy sampling devices. These personalized measurements, generally associated with micro-environmental measurements, are aimed at studying the distribution of individual exposure and identifying its main determinants. Methods: A synopsis of the methods implemented in such studies (populations studied, measurements strategies, questionnaires on time-activity patterns, residences and work place) was detailed. The major results are presented and discussed from an epidemiological point of view. Results: The individual exposure measured with portable devices generally were generally found to be higher than the estimations made by combining micro-environmental (outdoor and indoor) measurements and data from time-activity diaries. The difference between results of these two approaches, known as 'personal cloud', remains poorly understood. Correlations between individual measurements and outdoor concentrations are weak; nevertheless, day to day variations of these two series of measurements are better related. The main determinants of individual exposure to particles are identified but a quantification of their contribution remains difficult, except for passive smoking. Conclusion: Personal measurements cannot be used to estimate particle exposure in large scale epidemiological studies. This exposure needs to be modeled. (authors)

  14. Performance of vintage direct reading pocket ionization chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Robert J; Harvey, John A; Kearfott, Kimberlee J

    2010-05-01

    The linearity, accuracy, and precision of each of two groups of vintage 51.6 microC-kg-1 maximum scale passive direct reading pocket ionization chambers, each from a different manufacturer and all aged at least 50 years since manufacture, were tested. The pocket ionization chambers were suspended on a phantom and exposed using a 137Cs source. Variations from trial to trial were smaller than variations from chamber to chamber. The average percent standard deviations ranged from 5.7% to 14% across all exposures. The accuracy of the dosimeter readings increased as the exposure level increased. Percent error from known exposure values decreased as exposure increased. An independent samples t test indicated there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups only at a delivered exposure of 6.45 microC-kg-1. Testing was performed in a 222Rn drum to determine the effect of Rn on the pocket ionization chambers. Exposure of five chambers to an average Rn level of 4.70 kBq m-3 and thirty chambers to 3.86 kBq m-3 over a 7-d period produced abnormally high readings at least three times background in eight of the 35 chambers tested.

  15. Prototype multiwire proportional chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    Chambers of this type were initially developed within the Alpha project (finally not approved). They were designed such to minimize the radiation length with a view to a mass spectrometer of high resolution meant to replace the Omega detector. The chambers were clearly forerunners for the (drift) chambers later built for R606 with the novel technique of crimping the wires. See also photo 7510039X.

  16. Pressurized ionization chamber detectors for industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of the thickness of the sheets made of different materials, e.g. metal, plastic, paper, cellulose, rubber, etc., is one of many industrial applications of nuclear techniques. The ionizing radiation detectors of ionization chamber type are based on measuring the variations in either exposure rate (for gamma radiation) or absorbed dose rate (for beta radiation) occurring in materials of different thickness, placed between the radiation source and the detector. The variations in exposure rate and absorbed dose rate can be traced by using radiation detectors of the ionization chamber type, which convert the exposure rate, X point, or the absorbed dose rate, D point, into a proportional electric current. The more stable the ionization current of the chambers (keeping a constant exposure rate or absorbed dose rate), the slighter the variations that can be detected in either exposure rate or absorbed dose rate, hence in the absorbing material placed between the radiation source and the detector. Based on these facts, several variants of such detectors, including the ionization chamber CIS-P5M-100Kr, CIS-P2M-1000Kr and CIS-P8M-70Kr, have been made. (author)

  17. Chamber catalogues of optical and fluorescent signatures distinguish bioaerosol classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Mark; Perring, Anne E.; McCabe, Kevin; Kok, Greg; Granger, Gary; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2016-07-01

    Rapid bioaerosol characterization has immediate applications in the military, environmental and public health sectors. Recent technological advances have facilitated single-particle detection of fluorescent aerosol in near real time; this leverages controlled ultraviolet exposures with single or multiple wavelengths, followed by the characterization of associated fluorescence. This type of ultraviolet induced fluorescence has been used to detect airborne microorganisms and their fragments in laboratory studies, and it has been extended to field studies that implicate bioaerosol to compose a substantial fraction of supermicron atmospheric particles. To enhance the information yield that new-generation fluorescence instruments can provide, we report the compilation of a referential aerobiological catalogue including more than 50 pure cultures of common airborne bacteria, fungi and pollens, recovered at water activity equilibrium in a mesoscale chamber (1 m3). This catalogue juxtaposes intrinsic optical properties and select bandwidths of fluorescence emissions, which manifest to clearly distinguish between major classes of airborne microbes and pollens.

  18. ASSIMILATION, RESPIRATION AND ALLOCATION OF CARBON IN PLANTAGO MAJOR AS AFFECTED BY ATMOSPHERIC CO2 LEVELS - A CASE-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENHERTOG, J; STULEN, [No Value; LAMBERS, H

    1993-01-01

    The response of Plantago major ssp. pleiosperma plants, grown on nutrient solution in a climate chamber, to a doubling of the ambient atmospheric CO2 concentration was investigated. Total dry matter production was increased by 30 % after 3 weeks of exposure, due to a transient stimulation of the rel

  19. Target chambers for gammashpere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  20. High resolution drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 μm resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs

  1. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Experience Japan The Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry will further promote its Japan-experience program and seek cooperation with various Chinese institutions.Between early May and June 2007,the chamber organized a Chinese college student delegation to Japan with the support from its members in China.

  2. BEBC bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Looking up into the interior of BEBC bubble chamber from the expansion cylinder. At the top of the chamber two fish-eye lenses are installed and three other fish-eye ports are blanked off. In the centre is a heat exchanger.

  3. Evaluation of submarine atmospheres: effects of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and oxygen on general toxicology, neurobehavioral performance, reproduction and development in rats. I. Subacute exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Daniel J; James, R Arden; Gut, Chester P; McInturf, Shawn M; Sweeney, Lisa M; Erickson, Richard P; Gargas, Michael L

    2015-02-01

    The inhalation toxicity of submarine contaminants is of concern to ensure the health of men and women aboard submarines during operational deployments. Due to a lack of adequate prior studies, potential general, neurobehavioral, reproductive and developmental toxicity was evaluated in male and female rats exposed to mixtures of three critical submarine atmospheric components: carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2; levels elevated above ambient), and oxygen (O2; levels decreased below ambient). In a 14-day, 23 h/day, whole-body inhalation study of exposure to clean air (0.4 ppm CO, 0.1% CO2 and 20.6% O2), low-dose, mid-dose and high-dose gas mixtures (high dose of 88.4 ppm CO, 2.5% CO2 and 15.0% O2), no adverse effects on survival, body weight or histopathology were observed. Reproductive, developmental and neurobehavioral performance were evaluated after a 28-day exposure in similar atmospheres. No adverse effects on estrus phase, mating, gestation or parturition were observed. No developmental or functional deficits were observed in either exposed parents or offspring related to motor activity, exploratory behavior or higher-level cognitive functions (learning and memory). Only minimal effects were discovered in parent-offspring emotionality tests. While statistically significant increases in hematological parameters were observed in the offspring of exposed parents compared to controls, these parameters remained within normal clinical ranges for blood cells and components and were not considered adverse. In summary, subacute exposures to elevated concentrations of the submarine atmosphere gases did not affect the ability of rats to reproduce and did not appear to have any significant adverse health effects. PMID:25600219

  4. OPAL Jet Chamber Prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the dirfferent parts of the tracking system. This piece is a prototype of the jet chambers

  5. Toxic Test Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Hazardous material test facility Both facilities have 16,000 cubic foot chambers, equipped with 5000 CFM CBR filter systems with an air change...

  6. ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Lippmann, C

    2013-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device in the ALICE 'central barrel' for the tracking and identification (PID) of charged particles. It has to cope with unprecedented densities of charges particles.

  7. Calorimetry with flash chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flash chambers used in the Fermilab E594 neutrino experiment are described, and their use in a calorimeter discussed. Resolutions obtained with a calibration beam are presented, and comments made about the pattern recognition capabilities of the calorimeter

  8. Vacuum chamber 'bicone'

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This chamber is now in the National Museum of History and Technology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA, where it was exposed in an exhibit on the History of High Energy Accelerators (1977).

  9. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  10. Correlation between atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure and urinary hydroxyl metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in elderly population in Tianjin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦晓蕾

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify suitable hydroxyl polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(OH-PAHs) for co-evaluation of internal exposure level of PAHs by simultaneous determination of a variety of OH-PAHs in urine. Methods The 24-h individual particulate matter and morning urine

  11. New Ion-Nucleation Mechanism Relevant for the Earth's Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Svensmark, Henrik; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke;

    An experiment has been set up in order to investigate the role of ionization in Earth's climate. We have chosen to start our investigation at the smallest scales, namely by studying the effect of cosmic ray produced ions on atmospheric aerosol nucleation and growth processes. This experiment...... is conducted at the Danish National Space Center, Center for Sun-Climate Research. It comprises a 7 m3 reaction chamber where atmospheric conditions can be simulated. The number of ions can be increased by exposure to radioactive sources and decreased by applying an electric field; this will enable experiments...

  12. Atmospheric Corrosion of Painted Galvanized and 55%Al-Zn Steel Sheets: Results of 12 Years of Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    C.I. Elsner; P. R. Seré; Di Sarli, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc or 55%Al-Zn alloy-coated steel sheets, either bare or covered by different painting systems, have been exposed for 12 years to the action of the urban atmosphere at the CIDEPINT station located in La Plata (34° 50′ South, 57° 53′, West), province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. The samples exposed surface was evaluated through periodical visual inspections, standardized adhesion tests, and electrochemical impedance measurements. The ambient variables monitored were average annual rains and t...

  13. Atmospheric constituents and surface-level UVB: implications for a paleoaltimetry proxy and attempts to reconstruct UV exposure during volcanic episodes

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Brian C; Dalton, Sean M

    2016-01-01

    Chemical and morphological features of spores and pollens have been linked to changes in solar ultraviolet radiation (specifically UVB, 280-315 nm) at Earth's surface. Variation in UVB exposure as inferred from these features has been suggested as a proxy for paleoaltitude. While UVB irradiance does increase with altitude above sea level, a number of other factors affect the irradiance at any given place and time. In this modeling study we use the TUV atmospheric radiative transfer model to investigate dependence of surface-level UVB irradiance and relative biological impact on a number of constituents in Earth's atmosphere that are variable over long and short time periods. We consider changes in O3 column density, and SO2 and sulfate aerosols due to periods of volcanic activity, including that associated with the formation of the Siberian Traps. We find that UVB irradiance may be highly variable under volcanic conditions and variations in several of these atmospheric constituents can easily mimic or overwhe...

  14. A wet effluent denuder/mist-chamber coupled to ion chromatography for the continuous measurement of atmospheric HONO, HNO{sub 3}, NO{sub 3}{sup -} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zellweger, C.; Baltensperger, U. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Hofer, P. [EMPA, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    A denuder/mist chamber system has been developed for the continuous automated measurement of low level concentrations of HONO, HNO{sub 3} as well as of NO{sub 3}{sup -} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. (author) 2 figs., 1 ref.

  15. Noise exposure under hyperbaric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    Objective evidence exists that divers demonstrate a hearing deficit greater than would be expected from ageing effects alone. Deafness in divers may be caused by a number of factors other than exposure to excessive noise levels, eg barotrauma, ear infection etc. This review concentrates on the concern that exposure of commercial divers to noise while at work may cause a hearing deficit. Sound pressure levels recorded both underwater and in diving chambers often exceed those allowable to workers onshore. However, the sound perceived by the diver is modified both in amplitude and in frequency when he is either underwater or in pressurised chambers. Broadly the effect of this modification is to attenuate the sound and thus offer some protection from high noise levels. The degree of attentuation varies with the frequency of the sound, however it is also possible under specific conditions associated with gas density for the sensitivity to particular frequencies to be amplified above that for normal atmospheric air. The levels of sound observed from some underwater tools are of concern even after allowing for a significant de-sensitisation of the divers` hearing. Reports of tinnitus and temporary hearing loss following a dive are sure signs that the noise levels have been harmful. It is not possible at present to describe risk criteria for hearing damage due to noise exposure associated with diving. (author)

  16. Study of spatiotemporal variation of atmospheric mercury and its human exposure around an integrated steel plant, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, S.; Koshle, A.; Pervez, Y.

    2010-06-01

    Mercury release by coal combustion has been significantly increased in India. Mercury content in coal has been analyzed to 0.272 ppm by Central Pollution Control Board. Toxicological effects of elemental Hg (Hg0) exposure include respiratory and renal failures, cardiac arrest, and cerebral oedema, while subclinical exposure may induce kidney, behavioral, and cognitive dysfunctions. The present work is focused on dispersion pattern and inter-phase exchange phenomena of ambient mercury between air-particulate matter evaluations of alongwith dominance of various major routes of human exposure-dose response using regression analysis around an integrated steel plant in central India. Source-downwind type stratified random sampling plan using longitudinal study design has been adopted for ambient monitoring of total mercury, while representative sampling plant has been adopted for persona exposure-dose response study In space-time framework. Control sites and subjects have been chosen from uncontaminated area (100 km away from any industrial activities). 06 ambient air monitoring stations and 17 subjects from workers, non-workers but local residents' categories and from controlled sites have been chosen for the study. Samples of mercury biomarkers (blood, breast milk and urine) have also been collected from same subjects in each month during sampling period. The sampling period was March 2005 to February 2006 . Samples of 30% acidified KMnO4 for air-Hg absorption, PM10, RPM and biological samples were analyzed for total mercury by ICP-AES using standard methods. Local soils and ground water were also monitored for total mercury content during the sampling period. Results have shown that mercury concentration is very high compared to prescribed limits in all receptors. Results of exchange phenomenon have shown the higher transfer of mercury from air to particulate during combustion in steel plant environment due to presence of huge amount of iron particles, in contrast to

  17. In vitro exposure of Ostrya carpinifolia and Carpinus betulus pollen to atmospheric levels of CO, O3 and SO 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuinica, Lázaro G; Abreu, Ilda; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2014-02-01

    Ostrya spp. and Carpinus spp. pollen was in vitro exposed to three atmospheric pollutants: CO, O3 and SO2. Two levels of each pollutant were used, and the first level corresponds to a concentration about the atmospheric hour-limit value acceptable for human health protection in Europe and the second level to about the triple of the first level. Experiments were done under artificial solar light with temperature and relative humidity controlled. The viability of the exposed pollen samples showed a significant decrease. Also, the germination percentage showed a significant decrease in both exposed pollens, and the effect was most pronounced for SO2, followed by O3 and CO. A general decreasing trend in the total soluble protein content of the exposed pollen samples when compared with the control was observed, but it was only statistically significant for the Ostrya spp pollen. The results showed marked effects were observed on the Ostrya spp. and Carpinus spp. pollen when exposed to air pollutant levels that can be considered safe for human health protection.

  18. micro strip gas chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    About 16 000 Micro Strip Gas Chambers like this one will be used in the CMS tracking detector. They will measure the tracks of charged particles to a hundredth of a millimetre precision in the region near the collision point where the density of particles is very high. Each chamber is filled with a gas mixture of argon and dimethyl ether. Charged particles passing through ionise the gas, knocking out electrons which are collected on the aluminium strips visible under the microscope. Such detectors are being used in radiography. They give higher resolution imaging and reduce the required dose of radiation.

  19. A study of external exposure variation due to atmospheric dispersion of 41Ar Plume in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Trombay site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the ambient radiation level in the surroundings of any nuclear facility is necessary to ensure the regulation and control over the environmental releases and any possible radiological impact. This is achieved in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Trombay site using various monitoring methodologies, different Dose Logging Equipments including Radiation Early Warning System and other passive devices. During the present study (October 2009 to September 2010), external exposures due to atmospheric dispersion of 41Ar, released from Cirus and Dhruva reactors (maximum cumulative release rate 8.27E+8 Bq.s-1) were assessed by installing Gamma tracers and TLDs at different monitoring locations. TLDs were used for the measurement of cumulative environmental doses for a longer period and Gamma tracer is primarily used for dose rate measurement with provision of dose assessment of any desired period

  20. Study of the Durability of Doped Lanthanum Manganite and Cobaltite Cathode Materials under ''Real World'' Air Exposure Atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Prabhakar [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Mahapatra, Manoj [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Ramprasad, Rampi [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Minh, Nguyen [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Misture, Scott [Alfred Univ., NY (United States)

    2014-11-30

    The overall objective of the program is to develop and validate mechanisms responsible for the overall structural and chemical degradation of lanthanum manganite as well as lanthanum ferrite cobaltite based cathode when exposed to “real world” air atmosphere exposure conditions during SOFC systems operation. Of particular interest are the evaluation and analysis of degradation phenomena related to and responsible for (a) products formation and interactions with air contaminants, (b) dopant segregation and oxide exolution at free surfaces, (c) cation interdiffusion and reaction products formation at the buried interfaces, (d) interface morphology changes, lattice transformation and the development of interfacial porosity and (e) micro-cracking and delamination from the stack repeat units. Reaction processes have been studied using electrochemical and high temperature materials compatibility tests followed by structural and chemical characterization. Degradation hypothesis has been proposed and validated through further experimentation and computational simulation.

  1. On the capability of in-situ exposure in an environmental scanning electron microscope for investigating the atmospheric corrosion of magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaily, M; Mortazavi, N; Shahabi-Navid, M; Svensson, J E; Johansson, L G; Halvarsson, M

    2015-06-01

    The feasibility of environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) in studying the atmospheric corrosion behavior of 99.97% Mg was investigated. For reference, ex-situ exposure was performed. A model system was designed by spraying few salt particles on the metal surface and further promoting the corrosion process using platinum (Pt) deposition in the form of 1×1×1 µm(3) dots around the salt particles to create strong artificial cathodic sites. The results showed that the electron beam play a significant role in the corrosion process of scanned regions. This was attributed to the irradiation damage occurring on the metal surface during the ESEM in-situ experiment. After achieving to a reliable process route, in a successful attempt, the morphology and composition of the corrosion products formed in-situ in the ESEM were in agreement with those of the sample exposed ex-situ. PMID:25731810

  2. Whole-body nanoparticle aerosol inhalation exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jinghai; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Frazer, Dave; Castranova, Vince; McBride, Carroll; Knuckles, Travis L; Stapleton, Phoebe A; Minarchick, Valerie C; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    time (minute). The chamber pressure, temperature, relative humidity (RH), O2 and CO2 concentrations were monitored and controlled continuously. Nano-TiO2 aerosols collected on Nuclepore filters were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. In summary, we report that the nano-particle aerosols generated and delivered to our exposure chamber have: 1) steady mass concentration; 2) homogenous composition free of contaminants; 3) stable particle size distributions with a count-median aerodynamic diameter of 157 nm during aerosol generation. This system reliably and repeatedly creates test atmospheres that simulate occupational, environmental or domestic ENM aerosol exposures. PMID:23685643

  3. Atmospheric corrosion of brass in outdoor applications: patina evolution, metal release and aesthetic appearance at urban exposure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goidanich, S; Brunk, J; Herting, G; Arenas, M A; Odnevall Wallinder, I

    2011-12-15

    Short (days, weeks) and long-term (months, years) non-sheltered field exposures of brass (15, and 20 wt.% Zn) and copper sheet have been conducted in three European cities (Milan, Stockholm, Madrid) to generate an in-depth time-dependent understanding of patina evolution, corrosion rates, aesthetic appearance, metal release and degree of dezincification in relation to detailed bulk and surface characteristics prior to exposure. This has been accomplished by using a multitude of surface and bulk analytical tools, chemical analysis and colorimetric investigations. Small differences in surface finish and local variations in nobility observed for the non-exposed brass alloys resulted in slight differences in corrosion initiation. Despite different kinetic behaviour and relative surface distributions of zinc- and copper-rich patina constituents, similar phases were identified with copper-rich phases rapidly dominating the outermost patina layer in Milan, compared to Madrid and Stockholm showing both copper- and zinc-rich phases. As a consequence of differences in surface coverage of copper- and zinc-rich corrosion products at the different sites, the release ratios of copper to zinc varied concordantly. The released amount of zinc to copper (Zn/Cu) was for both alloys and test sites always higher compared to the bulk composition showing a preferential release of zinc. The amount of released copper from the brass alloys was on an average 30-40% lower compared to copper sheet at all test sites investigated. Significantly lower annual total release rates of copper and zinc compared with annual corrosion rates were evident for both brass alloys at all sites. PMID:22051551

  4. Heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1965-01-01

    The CERN Heavy liquid bubble chamber being installed in the north experimental hall at the PS. On the left, the 1180 litre body; in the centre the magnet, which can produce a field of 26 800 gauss; on the right the expansion mechanism.

  5. Wire chamber conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet contains program and the abstracts of the papers presented at the conference, most of them dealing with performance testing of various types of wire chambers. The publication of proceedings is planned as a special issue of 'Nuclear instruments and methods' later on. All abstracts are in English. An author index for the book of abstracts is given. (A.N.)

  6. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  7. LEP vacuum chamber, prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Final prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, see 8305170 for more details. Here we see the strips of the NEG pump, providing "distributed pumping". The strips are made from a Zr-Ti-Fe alloy. By passing an electrical current, they were heated to 700 deg C.

  8. OPAL Muon Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the 4 experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 to 2000. This is a slice of the outermost layer of OPAL : the muon chambers. This outside layer detects particles which are not stopped by the previous layers. These are mostly muons.

  9. LEP Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is a cut-out of a LEP vacuum chamber for dipole magnets showing the beam channel and the pumping channel with the getter (NEG) strip and its insulating supports. A water pipe connected to the cooling channel can also be seen at the back.The lead radiation shield lining is also shown. See also 8305563X.

  10. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  11. Outgassing rate of preconditioned vacuum systems after short exposure to the atmosphere: Outgassing rate measurements on Viton-A and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the sorption and desorption rates depend primarily on the diffusion of water vapor and atmospheric gases through the bulk of the sorbent (which may be an elastomer or plastic) and the process is reversible, then by an application of Fick's law and Duhamel's theorem equations can be derived for the outgassing rate as a function of time during subsequent pumpdowns in terms of the time of exposure to atmosphere with known relative humidity and the outgassing rate as a function of time during the initial conditioning cycle. Good agreement with the predictions of these equations has been obtained from measurements of repeated pumpdowns of a large-area sample of a Viton-A elastomer. However, similar experiments on copper plates showed relatively poor agreement with the theoretical equations indicating that the sorption--desorption process for water vapor in the oxide layer on metal surfaces may not be exactly reversible or that the process is not strictly controlled by diffusion. copyright 1995 American Vacuum Society

  12. Quantifying the "chamber effect" in CO2 flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihermaa, Leena; Childs, Amy; Long, Hazel; Waldron, Susan

    2014-05-01

    The significance of aquatic CO2 emissions has received attention in recent years. For example annual aquatic emissions in the Amazon basin have been estimated as 500 Mt of carbon1. Methods for determining the flux rates include eddy covariance flux tower measurements, flux estimates calculated from partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in water and the use floating flux chambers connected to an infra-red gas analyser. The flux chamber method is often used because it is portable, cheaper and allows smaller scale measurements. It is also a direct method and hence avoids problems related to the estimation of the gas transfer coefficient that is required when fluxes are calculated from pCO2. However, the use of a floating chamber may influence the flux measurements obtained. The chamber shields the water underneath from effects of wind which could lead to lower flux estimates. Wind increases the flux rate by i) causing waves which increase the surface area for efflux, and ii) removing CO2 build up above the water surface, hence maintaining a higher concentration gradient. Many floating chambers have an underwater extension of the chamber below the float to ensure better seal to water surface and to prevent any ingress of atmospheric air when waves rock the chamber. This extension may cause additional turbulence in flowing water and hence lead to overestimation of flux rates. Some groups have also used a small fan in the chamber headspace to ensure thorough mixing of air in the chamber. This may create turbulence inside the chamber which could increase the flux rate. Here we present results on the effects of different chamber designs on the detected flux rates. 1Richey et al. 2002. Outgassing from Amazonian rivers and wetlands as a large tropical source of atmospheric CO2. Nature 416: 617-620.

  13. Thaumasite formation in hydraulic mortars by atmospheric SO2 deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-Varela, M. T.; Aguilera, J.; Martínez Ramires, S.; Palomo, A.; Sabbioni, C.; Riotinto, C.; Zappia, C.; Van Valen, K.; Toumbakari, E. E.

    2001-01-01

    Sulphation of mortars and concretes is a function of diverse environmental factors (SO2 aerosol, temperature, etc) as well as some material characteristics. One of the phases that could be formed as consequence of the sulphation of the hydraulic binder is thaumasite. In this paper different hydraulic mortars have been exposed to laboratory exposure chambers in order to reproduce thaumasite formation due to atmospheric SO2. Under the laboratory exp...

  14. The multimedia models for the evaluation of exposure bond to the atmospheric emissions of classified installations; Les modeles multimedia pour l'evaluation des expositions liees aux emissions atmospheriques des installations classees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnard, R

    2001-12-15

    Risk assessment and environmental impacts studies are realized to preserve the public health. Today one of the most used approach is the use of an atmospheric dispersion model to assess the risks. The data are then injected in a calculation software of exposure bond to polluted soils, to evaluate the risks of non direct exposure. This report details and evaluates the models corresponding to the need: the methodology for assessing Health Risks associated with multiple pathways of exposure to combustor, human health risk assessment proto col for hazardous waste combustion facilities, EUSES, CALTOX, MEPAS, MEND-TOX, RESRAD, MMSOILS, FRAMES-HWIR, PC-GEMS and TRIM. (A.L.B.)

  15. Imploded test-chamber for an ISR intersection

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    At the ISR intersection points the vacuum chambers had to be as "transparent" as possible, for the p-p collision product particles to reach the detectors with minimum hindrance. This meant the choice of a light, yet very strong, metal; minimum thickness; and corrugation for mechanical strength. The test-chamber seen here was made of 0.6 mm thick corrugated titanium, obviously not strong enough to withstand the atmospheric pressure.

  16. Notes on the exposure of several species of fish to sudden changes in the hydrogen-ion concentration of the water and to an atmosphere of pure oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, A.H.

    1931-01-01

    Several species of fish have been subjected to higher concentrations of dissolved oxygen when an atmosphere of pure oxygen was maintained over the surface of the water and also with a super-stratum of pure oxygen under pressure. Several species of fish have been subjected to sudden transfers from low O/sub 2/ to high O/sub 2/ and the reverse. (5.6 p.p.M. to 40.33 p.p.M. and from 41.0 to 7.3 p.p.M.) The results show (a) that different sizes of several species of fish tolerate large and sudden changes in the concentration of O/sub 2/ in either direction, (b) that these fish can live in water containing a large excess of dissolved oxygen with a super-stratum of pure oxygen over the surface (c) that several species of fish can stand pressure of 10 to 13 lbs. for a period of 24 hours and pressures from 15 to 19 lbs for shorter periods. The increase in dissolved oxygen is followed by a slowing down of the respiratory movements. No instances of exophthalmus, opaqueness of the lens, and of the accumulation of gas bubbles were observed. No fish were observed to lose their equilibrium except in the pressure experiment where depression occurred too rapidly. That exposure to a high concentration of dissolved oxygen with a super-stratum of pure oxygen at atmospheric pressures and under small pressure is not harmful is inferred from the small number of fish lost and from the length of time they survived the experiment. The data presented here suggest that they may by applicable to the problem of handling fish in transportation.

  17. The iron component of particulate matter is antiapoptotic: A clue to the development of lung cancer after exposure to atmospheric pollutants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovera-Leroux, Melanie; Crobeddu, Belinda; Kassis, Nadim; Petit, Patrice X; Janel, Nathalie; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Andreau, Karine

    2015-11-01

    The classification of outdoor air pollution as carcinogenic for humans strengthens the increasing concern about particulate matter (PM). We previously demonstrated that PM exposure produces an antiapoptotic effect resulting from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and water-soluble components. In this study, we investigated transition metallic compounds, particularly iron, in order to decipher their underlying molecular mechanisms that prevent apoptosis. Human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed for 4 h to different PM samples with established antiapoptotic effect (e.g. PM-AW) or not (e.g. PM-VS) or to their metallic components (Fe, Mn, Zn and Al) before apoptosis induction by the calcium ionophore A23187 or Staurosporine. PM-AW, Fe, Mn and Al significantly reduced induced apoptosis. The antiapoptotic effect of Fe was enhanced by benzo(a)pyrene, a typical PAH compound, but was totally reversed by the iron chelator, deferiprone. Furthermore, particles and iron triggered cellular ROS generation and prevented the depletion in glutathione levels observed during A23187-induced apoptosis. In contrast to benzo(a)pyrene, PM-AW and Fe rapidly activated NRF2, subsequently upregulated several target genes (HO1, NQO1 and GPX1) and modulated some genes which control cell death (BCL2, BAX and p53). The key role of the NRF2 pathway in the antiapoptotic effect mediated by Fe and PM was demonstrated using siRNA technology. Our results suggest that the iron component participates in the antiapoptotic effect of PM by activating a NRF2-dependent antioxidant process. As resisting to cell death is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells, these findings provide additional clues for understanding the development of lung cancer after atmospheric pollution exposure. PMID:26419736

  18. Variable g- Mars environmental chamber: a small window of the martian environment for life science investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgambati, Antonella; Slenzka, Klaus; Schmeyers, Bernd; Di Capua, Massimiliano; Harting, Benjamin

    Human exploration and permanent settlement on the Martian surface is the one of the most attractive and ambitious endeavors mankind has ever faced. As technology and research progress, solutions and information that were before unavailable are slowly making the dream become everyday more feasible. In the past years a huge amount of knowledge was gathered by the Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity and now, even more insight is being gathered through the latest rover of the family, Curiosity. In this work, data from the various missions will be used to define and reproduce on Earth the characteristic Martian atmospheric conditions. A small Mars environmental chamber has been designed and built with the objective of studying the effects of the Martian environment on biological systems. The Variable gravity Mars Environmental Chamber (VgMEC) will allow researchers to replicate atmospheric pressure, gas composition, temperature and UVA/B exposure typical of the equatorial regions of Mars. By exposing biological systems to a controllable set of stressor it will be possible to identify both multi and single stressor effects on the system of interest. While several Mars environment simulation facilities exist, due to their size and mass, all are confined to floor-fixed laboratory settings. The VgMEC is an OHB funded project that wishes to bring together the scientific community and the industry. Collaborations will be enabled by granting low cost access to cutting-edge instrumentation and services. Developed at OHB System AG, VgMEC has been designed from the ground up to be a 28L, compact and lightweight test volume capable of being integrated in existing centrifuges (such as the ESA-ESTEC LCD), gimbal systems and parabolic flight aircraft. The VgMEC support systems were designed to accommodate continuous operations of virtually unlimited duration through the adoption of solutions such as: hot swappable gas/liquid consumables bottles, low power requirements, an

  19. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Smith, Graham (Port Jefferson, NY); Mahler, George J. (Rocky Point, NY); Vanier, Peter E. (Setauket, NY)

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  20. Vacuum Chambers for LEP sections

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The picture shows sections of the LEP vacuum chambers to be installed in the dipole magnets (left) and in the quadrupoles (right). The dipole chamber has three channels: the beam chamber, the pumping duct where the NEG (non-evaporabe getter) is installed and the water channel for cooling (on top in the picture). The pumping duct is connected to the beam chamber through holes in the separating wall. The thick lead lining to shield radiation can also be seen. These chambers were manufactured as extruded aluminium alloy profiles.

  1. The APS ceramic chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  2. Review of wire chamber aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper makes an overview of the wire chamber aging problems as a function of various chamber design parameters. It emphasizes the chemistry point of view and many examples are drawn from the plasma chemistry field as a guidance for a possible effort in the wire chamber field. The paper emphasizes the necessity of variable tuning, the importance of purity of the wire chamber environment, as well as it provides a practical list of presently known recommendations. In addition, several models of the wire chamber aging are qualitatively discussed. The paper is based on a summary talk given at the Wire Chamber Aging Workshop held at LBL, Berkeley on January 16-17, 1986. Presented also at Wire Chamber Conference, Vienna, February 25-28, 1986. 74 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs

  3. Safety-Enclosure System For MOCVD Process Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singletery, James, Jr.; Velasquez, Hugo; Warner, Joseph

    1995-01-01

    Safety-enclosure system filled with nitrogen surrounds reaction chamber in which metallo-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) performed. Designed to protect against explosions and/or escaping toxic gases and particulates. Gas-purification subsystem ensures during loading and unloading of process materials, interior of MOCVD chamber exposed to less than 1 ppm of oxygen and less than 5 ppm of water in nitrogen atmosphere. Toxic byproducts of MOCVD process collected within inert atmosphere. Enclosure strong enough to contain any fragments in unlikely event of explosion.

  4. Council Chamber exhibition

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    To complete the revamp of CERN’s Council Chamber, a new exhibition is being installed just in time for the June Council meetings.   Panels will showcase highlights of CERN’s history, using some of the content prepared for the exhibitions marking 50 years of the PS, which were displayed in the main building last November. The previous photo exhibition in the Council Chamber stopped at the 1970s. To avoid the new panels becoming quickly out of date, photos are grouped together around specific infrastructures, rather than following a classic time-line. “We have put the focus on the accelerators – the world-class facilities that CERN has been offering researchers over the years, from the well-known large colliders to the lesser-known smaller facilities,” says Emma Sanders, who worked on the content. The new exhibition will be featured in a future issue of the Bulletin with photos and an interview with Fabienne Marcastel, designer of the exhibit...

  5. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  6. Comparative evaluation of nose-only vs. whole-body inhalation exposures for rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of rat exposure chambers, nose-only and whole-body chambers, were evaluated simultaneously for the temporal and spatial distribution of the same test aerosols within the chambers, both with and without animals present. Results indicated that both types of exposure chambers performed well, with coefficients of variation less than 10% for both temporal and spatial variations. (author)

  7. Multi-chamber ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the detector a single beta ionization source and a double- or three-chamber set-up is used, the chambers being designed in the shape of a truncated cone and facing each other with their bases. The source can be positioned with respect to the common center or modal electrode, the adjustment of the ionization in each chamber this becoming easier. The center or modal electrode also can be adjusted with respect to the source. (DG)

  8. SONTRAC: A solar neutron track chamber detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, T. L.; Frye, G. M., Jr.; Owens, A.

    1985-01-01

    The recent detection on the solar maximum mission (SMM) satellite of high energy neutrons emitted during large solar flares has provided renewed incentive to design a neutron detector which has the sensitivity, energy resolution, and time resolution to measure the neutron time and energy spectra with sufficient precision to improve our understanding of the basic flare processes. Over the past two decades a variety of neutron detectors has been flown to measure the atmospheric neutron intensity above 10 MeV and to search for solar neutrons. The SONTRAC (Solar Neutron Track Chamber) detector, a new type of neutron detector which utilizes n-p scattering and has a sensitivity 1-3 orders of magnitude greater than previous instruments in the 20-200 MeV range is described. The energy resolution is 1% for neutron kinetic energy, T sub n 50 MeV. When used with a coded aperture mask at 50 m (as would be possible on the space station) an angular resolution of approx. 4 arc sec could be achieved, thereby locating the sites of high energy nuclear interactions with an angular precision comparable to the existing x-ray experiments on SMM. The scintillation chamber is investigated as a track chamber for high energy physics, either by using arrays of scintillating optical fibers or by optical imaging of particle trajectories in a block of scintillator.

  9. Environmental test chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Li

    2016-04-01

    Increasing of particulates in the air in city became a serious problem , but in the Beijing area students rarely research such questions. The intelligent instrument of suspended particulate matter sampler which introduce from the institute of geology and geophysics, Chinese academy of sciences can be collected for all kinds of grain size of suspended matter in the air.We put them near schools,so the PM2.5 in the air near our shool can be collected. The method for analysis is the environmental magnetism, etc. Numerous studies have demonstrated rapid and non-destructive magnetic parameters measurement for rapid estimation of particulate sources of heavy metals and provides a very effective means. Environmental magnetism is a frontier science among earth science, environmental science and magnetism,which has been applied into many fields because it is capable of providing important information for studying the regional or global environmental changes and the impact of human activity on environment. Testing magnetic parameters of the particle can extract atmospheric particulate matter source, distribution, pollution level and dynamic change information. Measured the magnetic parameters of ARM, IRM, hysteresis loop , element composition, soil particle size of the soil, leaf, the river and dustfall samples and PM2.5 of the atmospheric dustfall samples on campus and the Beijing city.By means of environmental magnetism analysis of atmospheric pollutants category, amount, etc. Magnetic properties of pollutants may indicate the source of the pollutants, the nature of the analysis of pollutants, monitoring pollutant change over time.

  10. Coating experiment with 1.6-m vacuum evaporation chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Yukiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Noguchi, Takeshi; Kanzawa, Tomio; Sasaki, Goro; Torii, Yasuo; Yutani, Masami; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi

    1998-08-01

    We have conducted a series of coating experiments using the newly installed 1.6 m evaporation chamber at the Advanced Technology Center (ATC) of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. The main task of this chamber is to re-aluminize the 1.6 m mirror of the Infrared Simulator at the ATC. The design concept of the 1.6 m chamber is basically the same with the 8.3 m coating facility for Subaru Telescope. Therefore, we could utilize this chamber to evaluate the fundamental performance of the larger chamber. The extensive coating experiments were done in the spring, autumn of 1996, and autumn of 1997. Reduction of the number of the filaments has lead to the increase in their size, which caused difficulty in the annealing process. Attempts are focused on securing the sufficient metal loads on the filaments. Then the filaments are fired to measure the spray pattern of a single filament exposure, or the uniformity pattern resulted from the full setup of filament arrays. Using small slide glasses, the important parameters of the resultant reflecting film that are the thickness, the uniformity of the thickness, and the spectroscopic reflectance are measured. The absolute value of the reflectivity is estimated to be around 91% immediately after opening the chamber. In order to cover a wide range of observing wavelengths for the Infrared Simulator, and eventually for the optical-IR Subaru Telescope, it is necessary to seek after a higher evaporation rate with these chambers.

  11. Development of Fission Chamber Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGJinwei; ZHANGWei; SONGXianying; LIXu

    2003-01-01

    The fission chambers which are gas counters with fissile material inside chamber,provide essential information for plasma opcharacteristics. In conjunction with the neutron flux monitor system these provide time-resolved measurements of the global neutron source strength and fusion power from thermal nuclear fusion reactor as ITER for all plasma conditions for which neutrons are produced.

  12. The Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    1977-01-01

    The 3.70 metre Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC), dismantled on 9 August 1984. During operation it was one of the biggest detectors in the world, producing direct visual recordings of particle tracks. 6.3 million photos of interactions were taken with the chamber in the course of its existence.

  13. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This

  14. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  15. Hemodynamic Changes Caused by Exposure of Animals with Acute Immobilization Stress to Continuous Terahertz Radiation with Frequencies equal to Absorption and Emission Frequencies of Nitrogen Oxide and Atmospheric Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav F. Kirichuk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to study the effects of exposure of albino rats to continuous terahertz radiation with frequencies equal to absorption and emission frequencies of nitrogen oxide (150.176-150.664 GHz and atmospheric oxygen (129.0 ± 0.75 GHz during their immobilization stress on their blood flow rate. Methods – The group of 120 male non-pedigree albino rats with average weight of 180-220 g was chosen as a test subject. Simulation of hemodynamic disorders was achieved by incurring active immobilization stress. All rats were exposed to electromagnetic terahertz radiation equal to absorption and emission frequencies of nitrogen oxide (150.176-150.664 GHz and atmospheric oxygen (129.0 ± 0.75 GHz for 5, 15 and 30 minutes. Results – Experimental simulation of hemodynamic disorders during acute immobilization stress has shown that exposure to continuous terahertz radiation with frequencies equal to absorption and emission frequencies of nitrogen oxide (150.176-150.664 GHz and atmospheric oxygen (129.0 ± 0.75 GHz for 5, 15 and 30 minutes allows to revert post-stress hemodynamic changes in great vessels. Conclusion – This allows using terahertz electromagnetic radiation with frequencies equal to absorption and emission frequencies of nitrogen oxide (150.176-150.664 GHz and atmospheric oxygen (129.0 ± 0.75 GHz to treat hemodynamic disorders accompanying some of pathologic diseases.

  16. Development of a Next-Generation Environmental Chamber Facility for Chemical Mechanism and VOC Reactivity Research

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, W P L; Fitz, D; D. R. Cocker III; Malkina, I L; Bumiller, K; Sauer, C G; Pisano, J T; Bufalino, C; Song, C.

    2005-01-01

    A new state-of-the-art indoor environmental chamber facility for the study of atmospheric processes leading to the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) has been constructed and characterized. The chamber is designed for atmospheric chemical mechanism evaluation at low reactant concentrations under well-controlled environmental conditions. It consists of two collapsible 90 m3 FEP Teflon film reactors on pressure-controlled moveable frameworks inside a temperature-controlled e...

  17. Cyclically controlled welding purge chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An arrangement for butt-welding cylindrical sections of large, thin-wall tanks includes a rotatable mandrel with side-by-side sets of radial position adjusters. Each set of adjusters bears on one of the tank sections adjacent the seam, to prevent the sections from sagging out-of-round. The mandrel rotates relative to the welder, so that a continuous seam is formed. A purge chamber is fixed in position behind the seam at the weld head, and is flushed with inert gas. The purge chamber includes a two-sided structure which is contiguous with the cylindrical sections and a circumferential vane to form an open-ended tube-like structure, through which the radial position adjusters pass as the mandrel and cylindrical workpiece sections rotate. The tube-like structure is formed into a chamber by a plurality of movable gates which are controlled to maintain a seal while allowing adjusters to progress through the purge chamber.

  18. The multigap resistive plate chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeballos, E. Cerron [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Crotty, I. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Hatzifotiadou, D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Valverde, J. Lamas [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Univ. Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France); Neupane, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Williams, M. C. S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Zichichi, A. [Univ. of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2015-02-03

    The paper describes the multigap resistive plate chamber (RPC). This is a variant of the wide gap RPC. However it has much improved time resolution, while keeping all the other advantages of the wide gap RPC design.

  19. Herds of methane chambers grazing bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinham, Alistair; Dunbabin, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Water to air methane emissions from freshwater reservoirs can be dominated by sediment bubbling (ebullitive) events. Previous work to quantify methane bubbling from a number of Australian sub-tropical reservoirs has shown that this can contribute as much as 95% of total emissions. These bubbling events are controlled by a variety of different factors including water depth, surface and internal waves, wind seiching, atmospheric pressure changes and water levels changes. Key to quantifying the magnitude of this emission pathway is estimating both the bubbling rate as well as the areal extent of bubbling. Both bubbling rate and areal extent are seldom constant and require persistent monitoring over extended time periods before true estimates can be generated. In this paper we present a novel system for persistent monitoring of both bubbling rate and areal extent using multiple robotic surface chambers and adaptive sampling (grazing) algorithms to automate the quantification process. Individual chambers are self-propelled and guided and communicate between each other without the need for supervised control. They can maintain station at a sampling site for a desired incubation period and continuously monitor, record and report fluxes during the incubation. To exploit the methane sensor detection capabilities, the chamber can be automatically lowered to decrease the head-space and increase concentration. The grazing algorithms assign a hierarchical order to chambers within a preselected zone. Chambers then converge on the individual recording the highest 15 minute bubbling rate. Individuals maintain a specified distance apart from each other during each sampling period before all individuals are then required to move to different locations based on a sampling algorithm (systematic or adaptive) exploiting prior measurements. This system has been field tested on a large-scale subtropical reservoir, Little Nerang Dam, and over monthly timescales. Using this technique

  20. The HERMES Back Drift Chambers

    OpenAIRE

    al, S. Bernreuther et

    1998-01-01

    The tracking system of the HERMES spectrometer behind the bending magnet consists of two pairs of large planar 6-plane drift chambers. The design and performance of these chambers is described. This description comprises details on the mechanical and electronical design, information about the gas mixture used and its properties, results on alignment, calibration, resolution, and efficiencies, and a discussion of the experience gained through the first three years of operation.

  1. BEBC Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    A view of the dismantling of the magnet of BEBC, the 3.7 m European Bubble Chamber : iron magnetic shielding ; lower and upper parts of the vacuum enclosure of the magnet; turbo-molecular vacuum pumps for the "fish-eye" windows; the two superconducting coils; a handling platform; the two cryostats suspended from the bar of the travelling crane which has a 170 ton carrying capacity. The chamber proper, not dismantled, is inside the shielding.

  2. Anterior chamber depth during hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracitelli CPB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Pelegrini Barbosa Gracitelli,1 Francisco Rosa Stefanini,1 Fernando Penha,1 Miguel Ângelo Góes,2 Sérgio Antonio Draibe,2 Maria Eugênia Canziani,2 Augusto Paranhos Junior1 1Ophthalmology Department, 2Division of Nephrology, Federal University of São Paulo – UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Exacerbation of chronic glaucoma or acute glaucoma is occasionally observed in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD because of anterior chamber depth changes during this therapy. Purpose: To evaluate anterior chamber depth and axial length in patients during HD sessions. Methods: A total of 67 eyes of 35 patients were prospectively enrolled. Axial length and anterior chamber depth were measured using ultrasonic biometry, and these measures were evaluated at three different times during HD sessions. Body weight and blood pressure pre- and post-HD were also measured. Results: There was no difference in the axial length between the three measurements (P = 0.241. We observed a significantly decreased anterior chamber depth (P = 0.002 during HD sessions. Conclusion: Our results support the idea that there is a change in anterior chamber depth in HD sessions. Keywords: anterior chamber, hemodialysis, axial length, acute angle-closure glaucoma

  3. Radon detection in conical diffusion chambers: Monte Carlo calculations and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickards, J.; Golzarri, J. I.; Espinosa, G., E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Circuito de la Investigación Científica, Ciudad Universitaria México, D.F. 04520, México (Mexico); Vázquez-López, C. [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN Ave. IPN 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México 07360, DF, México (Mexico)

    2015-07-23

    The operation of radon detection diffusion chambers of truncated conical shape was studied using Monte Carlo calculations. The efficiency was studied for alpha particles generated randomly in the volume of the chamber, and progeny generated randomly on the interior surface, which reach track detectors placed in different positions within the chamber. Incidence angular distributions, incidence energy spectra and path length distributions are calculated. Cases studied include different positions of the detector within the chamber, varying atmospheric pressure, and introducing a cutoff incidence angle and energy.

  4. Characterization of a free air ionization chamber for low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Natalia F.; Xavier, Marcos; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: nsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br, E-mail: vivolo@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Free air ionization chambers are used by most primary metrology laboratories as primary standards of the quantities air kerma and exposure in X-ray beams. The free air ionization chamber for low energies of the Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN showed in a characterization test a problem in the set responsible for the variation of its sensitive volume. After a modification in the support of the micrometers used for the movement of the internal cylinder and the establishment of a new alignment system protocol, the tests were redone. The objective of this work was to present the results obtained in the new condition. (author)

  5. Characterization of a free air ionization chamber for low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free air ionization chambers are used by most primary metrology laboratories as primary standards of the quantities air kerma and exposure in X-ray beams. The free air ionization chamber for low energies of the Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN showed in a characterization test a problem in the set responsible for the variation of its sensitive volume. After a modification in the support of the micrometers used for the movement of the internal cylinder and the establishment of a new alignment system protocol, the tests were redone. The objective of this work was to present the results obtained in the new condition. (author)

  6. LARGE VOLUME IONIZATION CHAMBER USED AS LABORATORY REFERENCE FOR LOW ENERGY X—RAY MEASUREMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国山; 薛永库; 等

    1994-01-01

    A large volume spherical ionization chamber of 195mm diameter and 0.36mg/cm2 wall thickness made from conducting carbon-fibre epoxy composite material has been developed.The mechanical intensity of the chamber is satisfactory for a good longterm volume stability.Owing to its large volume and thin wall,the chamber is sensitive to low energy photon beams and has excellent energy-response characteristics.This ionization chamber is suitable not only for a laboratory reference but also for measurement of low energy photon beam exposure rates at protection-level.

  7. Calculation of the electric field inside electret ionisation chambers - Influence on the response function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of electret ion chambers for gamma dose and radon exposure measurement was increasing rapidly in the last years. In contrast to conventional ion chambers, the electric field in these detectors is not constant during the exposure time. Both field-strength and direction are changing due to inhomogeneous decrease of the electret surface charges. Data of numerical field calculations inside cylindrical electret Ionisation chambers are given. The change of the field-strength distribution with respect to electret discharge is described. The influence on the response function is discussed and experimentally verified. (author)

  8. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an 55Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed

  9. Whole-Body Nanoparticle Aerosol Inhalation Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jinghai; Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Frazer, Dave; Castranova, Vince; McBride, Carroll; Knuckles, Travis L.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Minarchick, Valerie C.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    sampling flowrate (m3/min), and t is the sampling time (minute). The chamber pressure, temperature, relative humidity (RH), O2 and CO2 concentrations were monitored and controlled continuously. Nano-TiO2 aerosols collected on Nuclepore filters were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. In summary, we report that the nano-particle aerosols generated and delivered to our exposure chamber have: 1) steady mass concentration; 2) homogenous composition free of contaminants; 3) stable particle size distributions with a count-median aerodynamic diameter of 157 nm during aerosol generation. This system reliably and repeatedly creates test atmospheres that simulate occupational, environmental or domestic ENM aerosol exposures. PMID:23685643

  10. Studies of Aldehydes in an Atmosphere Simulation Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    J. Bossmeyer

    2006-01-01

    Im Zuge dieser Arbeit wurde ein DOAS-Instrument an der Atmosphären-Simulationskammer SAPHIR (Forschungszentrum Jülich) aufgebaut, das auf einem Vielfach-Reflektionssystem des White-Designs basiert. Das DOAS-Instrument ermöglichte erstmalig den Nachweis von NO3 an der Kammer. Ein NO3- Verlustprozess wurde in der trockenen Kammer beobachtet und mit einer Lebensdauer von (42 +/- 4) min charakterisiert. Davon abgesehen diente die Kammer für Experimente von dreierlei Art. (1) Das DOAS konnte unter...

  11. Tohoku one meter bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the request of Tohoku University and the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, IHI has developed a complete freon bubble chamber system successfully, which is used for photo analysis of elementary particles physics. This system will be delivered to Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Illinois (U.S.A.) and will be coupled with the superconducting accelerator (TEVATRON) for the study of elementary particles. The total system of the freon bubble chamber is composed of a stainless steel casting spherical bubble chamber with a diameter of about one meter, an expansion system for freon pressure control, hydraulic system for driving an expansion piston, a freon feed system, a temperature control system, an overall control system as well as camera and flashlight for photograph. (author)

  12. The CLAS drift chamber system

    CERN Document Server

    Mestayer, M D; Asavapibhop, B; Barbosa, F J; Bonneau, P; Christo, S B; Dodge, G E; Dooling, T; Duncan, W S; Dytman, S A; Feuerbach, R; Gilfoyle, G P; Gyurjyan, V; Hicks, K H; Hicks, R S; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jacobs, G; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Magahiz, R A; Major, R W; Martin, C; McGuckin, T; McNabb, J; Miskimen, R A; Müller, J A; Niczyporuk, B B; O'Meara, J E; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Robb, J; Roudot, F; Schumacher, R A; Tedeschi, D J; Thompson, R A; Tilles, D; Tuzel, W; Vansyoc, K; Vineyard, M F; Weinstein, L B; Wilkin, G R; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2000-01-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on the toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  13. The CLAS drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestayer, M.D.; Carman, D.S.; Asavaphibhop, B. [and others

    1999-04-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on a toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  14. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  15. Test chamber for alpha spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Robert P.

    1977-01-01

    Alpha emitters for low-level radiochemical analysis by measurement of alpha spectra are positioned precisely with respect to the location of a surface-barrier detector by means of a chamber having a removable threaded planchet holder. A pedestal on the planchet holder holds a specimen in fixed engagement close to the detector. Insertion of the planchet holder establishes an O-ring seal that permits the chamber to be pumped to a desired vacuum. The detector is protected against accidental contact and resulting damage.

  16. Hypobaric chamber for wind sensor testing in Martian condictions

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalski, Lukasz; García Molina, Francisco Miguel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we will describe the installation of a low pressure stainless steel horizontal chamber to be used in preliminary tests of a Mars atmosphere wind sensor. It includes custom made additional QF ports, electric and pneumatic interfaces together with a vacuum pump system. Absolute pressure, as a function of the pump operational time during the vacuum process and depressurization will be shown as a result of experimental measurements. We will propose the integration of a typical compa...

  17. DELPHI's Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The hundreds of mirrors around this Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber reflect cones of light created by fast moving particles to a detector. The velocity of a particle can be measured by the size of the ring produced on the detector. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  18. Bubble chamber: colour enhanced tracks

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    This artistically-enhanced image of real particle tracks was produced in the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC). Liquid hydrogen is used to create bubbles along the paths of the particles as a piston expands the medium. A magnetic field is produced in the detector causing the particles to travel in spirals, allowing charge and momentum to be measured.

  19. The TESLA Time Projection Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Ghodbane, Nabil

    2002-01-01

    A large Time Projection Chamber is proposed as part of the tracking system for a detector at the TESLA electron positron linear collider. Different ongoing R&D studies are reviewed, stressing progress made on a new type readout technique based on Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors.

  20. A brief review of the use of environmental chambers for gas phase studies of kinetics, chemical mechanisms and characterisation of field instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Seakins P.W.

    2010-01-01

    This introductory review considers the role of environmental chambers in atmospheric chemistry, emphasising the importance of being able to carry out studies in controlled conditions. The advantages and disadvantages of different types of chambers are discussed and compared. Examples of the use of chambers for kinetic and mechanistic studies are presented. The final section of this brief review considers the use of chambers in providing a well defined environment for calibrating and investiga...

  1. A brief review of the use of environmental chambers for gas phase studies of kinetics, chemical mechanisms and characterisation of field instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seakins P.W.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This introductory review considers the role of environmental chambers in atmospheric chemistry, emphasising the importance of being able to carry out studies in controlled conditions. The advantages and disadvantages of different types of chambers are discussed and compared. Examples of the use of chambers for kinetic and mechanistic studies are presented. The final section of this brief review considers the use of chambers in providing a well defined environment for calibrating and investigating the performance of field instruments.

  2. Effects of VOCs on herbaceous plants in an open-top chamber experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cape, J.N.; Leith, I.D.; Binnie, J.; Content, J.; Donkin, M.; Skewes, M.; Price, D.N.; Brown, A.R.; Sharpe, A.D

    2003-07-01

    Birdsfoot trefoil and broad-leaved dock were affected by VOCs. - A selection of herbaceous plants representing the ground flora around a typical chemical installation in the UK was exposed continuously for 7 weeks to a mixture of six VOCs (acetone, acetonitrile, dichloromethane, ethanol, methyl t-butyl ether and toluene) in open-top chambers. Exposure concentrations were based on predictions of atmospheric dispersion from a single source, at a distance of approximately 2 km. The effects of continuous exposure, representing a worst-case, were measured in terms of uncontrolled water loss from leaves, leaf wettability, chlorophyll content and fluorescence, dry matter production and detailed observations of changes in plant growth and phenology. There were significant effects of VOC exposure on seed production, leaf water content and photosynthetic efficiency in some plant species. Such effects may be detectable in vegetation close to major industrial point sources of VOCs, or as a result of an accidental release of material during manufacture or transport. Some of the species tested e.g. birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.) seem to be promising as potential bioindicators for VOCs, but there may be other even more sensitive species waiting to be discovered. However, the most obvious and conveniently measured response to VOC exposure in the birdsfoot trefoil (premature senescence i.e. advanced timing of seed pod production) could easily be confused in the field with climatic influences. It is also uncertain at this stage whether any of the effects observed would lead to longer term ecological changes in natural plant communities, through biased competition between sensitive and more tolerant species.

  3. Quantification of protein-derived thiols during atmosphere-controlled brewing in laboratory scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murmann, Anne Nordmark; Andersen, Preben; Mauch, Alexander;

    2016-01-01

    An atmosphere-controlled brewing system was built to study thiol oxidation during brewing in laboratory scale under conditions with limited oxygen exposure. Quantification of free and total thiols and protein showed that thiols were lost during wort boiling possibly owing to protein precipitation...... oxidized thiols was determined by incubating boiled wort obtained from a pilot scale trial with various concentrations of sulfite (0-2,000 μM) in an anaerobic chamber for up to 7 days. Addition of sulfite increased the concentration of free thiols in a concentration-dependent manner, and the effect...

  4. Risk assessment of arsenic and other metals via atmospheric particles, and effects of atmospheric exposure and other demographic factors on their accumulations in human scalp hair in urban area of Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minjuan; Chen, Xunwen; Shao, Dingding; Zhao, Yinge; Wang, Wei; Wong, Ming Hung

    2014-04-01

    Eighty-eight scalp hair samples were collected from Guangzhou (GZ) urban population (15-65 years) to investigate the accumulation of As and other metals (Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Sn, Sb, Hg and Pb). Demographic information, including body weight, height, age, gender, habits of smoking and drinking, types of drinking water, duration of stay in GZ, days of stay in GZ per year (days/year), and hours spent in indoor environment per day (h/day), were also recorded during hair sampling to refine the uncertainty of risk assessment derived from exposures to elements via dust and airborne particles. No significant non-carcinogenic risk was found. However, the cancer risks of Cr and As for both ingestion and inhalation exceeded the most tolerable regulated level (1.0×10(-6)). The environmental exposures to urban dust and airborne particles were observed significantly correlated to accumulations of Cd (R=0.306, p=0.005) and Ni (R=0.333, p=0.002) in scalp hair. Furthermore, the hair burden of elements was also significantly (pnutritional and physical status, reflected by BMI and BSA (Cr, Ni, Cd, Sb and Hg). Nutritional and physical status was observed as the exclusive important factor influencing As speciation in human scalp hair. However, habits of smoking and alcohol drinking as well as types of drinking water were not identified as the significant influencing factors on any element (p>0.05).

  5. A compact multi-chamber setup for degradation and lifetime studies of organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C;

    2011-01-01

    A controlled atmosphere setup designed for long-term degradation studies of organic solar cells under illumination is presented. The setup was designed with ease-of-use and compactness in mind and allows for multiple solar cells distributed on four glass substrates to be studied in four different...... chambers with temperature and atmosphere control. The four chambers are situated at close proximity in the setup thereby allowing the solar cells to be subjected to as uniform an illumination distribution as possible for the given solar simulator employed. The cell substrates serve as the front window...... and present a tight seal. Hence no illumination correction needs to be performed due to transmission and reflection losses as otherwise seen with test chambers employing a window as a seal. The solar cells in each chamber are continuously and individually electrically monitored under biased conditions...

  6. Development of multiwire proportional chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    Charpak, G

    1969-01-01

    It has happened quite often in the history of science that theoreticians, confronted with some major difficulty, have successfully gone back thirty years to look at ideas that had then been thrown overboard. But it is rare that experimentalists go back thirty years to look again at equipment which had become out-dated. This is what Charpak and his colleagues did to emerge with the 'multiwire proportional chamber' which has several new features making it a very useful addition to the armoury of particle detectors. In the 1930s, ion-chambers, Geiger- Muller counters and proportional counters, were vital pieces of equipment in nuclear physics research. Other types of detectors have since largely replaced them but now the proportional counter, in new array, is making a comeback.

  7. LEP vacuum chamber, early prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    The structure of LEP, with long bending magnets and little access to the vacuum chamber between them, required distributed pumping. This is an early prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, made from extruded aluminium. The main opening is for the beam. The small channel to the right is for cooling water, to carry away the heat deposited by the synchroton radiation from the beam. The 4 slots in the channel to the left house the strip-shaped ion-getter pumps (see 7810255). The ion-getter pumps depended on the magnetic field of the bending magnets, too low at injection energy for the pumps to function well. Also, a different design was required outside the bending magnets. This design was therefore abandoned, in favour of a thermal getter pump (see 8301153 and 8305170).

  8. Actuator System with Dual Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    (8), the lid having a shaft opening (17) for a shaft (6) coupled to the magnetic rotor (5), wherein the magnetic rotor (5), when inserted in the translator cylinder (2), is arranged to translate a linear movement of the translator cylinder (2) into a rotational movement of the magnetic rotor by using...... magnetic flux (82) interacting between the magnetic stator and the magnetic rotor, said rotational movements is being transferred through a shaft (6), the lid (8) with a shaft opening (17) arranged for receiving the shaft (6), wherein the shaft is arranged to make both the linear and the rotational...... movement in the shaft opening (17), the lid (8) being arranged for confining the second end (15) of the translator cylinder (2), the translator cylinder confined by the lid (8) forms,when divided by the magnetic rotor (5), a first chamber (TC) with a first volume and a second chamber(BC) with a second...

  9. MPS II drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed.

  10. Analysis of Heat Stress and the Indoor Climate Control Requirements for Movable Refuge Chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Hao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Movable refuge chambers are a new kind of rescue device for underground mining, which is believed to have a potential positive impact on reducing the rate of fatalities. It is likely to be hot and humid inside a movable refuge chamber due to the metabolism of trapped miners, heat generated by equipment and heat transferred from outside. To investigate the heat stress experienced by miners trapped in a movable refuge chamber, the predicted heat strain (PHS model was used to simulate the heat transfer process between the person and the thermal environment. The variations of heat stress with the temperature and humidity inside the refuge chamber were analyzed. The effects of air temperature outside the refuge chamber and the overall heat transfer coefficient of the refuge chamber shell on the heat stress inside the refuge chamber was also investigated. The relationship between the limit of exposure duration and the air temperature and humidity was numerically analyzed to determine the upper limits of temperature and humidity inside a refuge chamber. Air temperature of 32 °C and relative humidity of 70% are recommended as the design standard for internal thermal environment control of movable refuge chambers.

  11. Analysis of Heat Stress and the Indoor Climate Control Requirements for Movable Refuge Chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaoli; Guo, Chenxin; Lin, Yaolin; Wang, Haiqiao; Liu, Heqing

    2016-01-01

    Movable refuge chambers are a new kind of rescue device for underground mining, which is believed to have a potential positive impact on reducing the rate of fatalities. It is likely to be hot and humid inside a movable refuge chamber due to the metabolism of trapped miners, heat generated by equipment and heat transferred from outside. To investigate the heat stress experienced by miners trapped in a movable refuge chamber, the predicted heat strain (PHS) model was used to simulate the heat transfer process between the person and the thermal environment. The variations of heat stress with the temperature and humidity inside the refuge chamber were analyzed. The effects of air temperature outside the refuge chamber and the overall heat transfer coefficient of the refuge chamber shell on the heat stress inside the refuge chamber was also investigated. The relationship between the limit of exposure duration and the air temperature and humidity was numerically analyzed to determine the upper limits of temperature and humidity inside a refuge chamber. Air temperature of 32 °C and relative humidity of 70% are recommended as the design standard for internal thermal environment control of movable refuge chambers. PMID:27213422

  12. Global atmospheric changes.

    OpenAIRE

    Piver, W T

    1991-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere can be directly related to global warming. In terms of human health, because a major cause of increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 is the increased combustion of fossil fuels, global warming also may result in increases in air pollutants, acid deposition, and exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. To understand better the impacts of global warming phenomena on human health, this review emphasizes the proces...

  13. The KEK 1 m hydrogen bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A medium size hydrogen bubble chamber has been constructed at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, KEK. The bubble chamber has been designed to be operated with a maximum rate of three times per half a second in every two second repetition time of the accelerator, by utilizing a hydraulic expansion system. The bubble chamber has a one meter diameter and a visible volume of about 280 l. A three-view stereo camera system is used for taking photographic pictures of the chamber. A 2 MW bubble chamber magnet is constructed. The main part of the bubble chamber vessel is supported by the magnet yoke. The magnet gives a maximum field of 18.4 kG at the centre of the fiducial volume of the chamber. The overall system of the KEK 1 m hydrogen bubble chamber facility is described in some detail. Some operational characteristics of the facility are also reported. (auth.)

  14. NRAO RF Anechoic Chamber & Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A shielded anechoic chamber measuring 15 by 15 by 37 feet is located in the Jansky Laboratory at Green Bank. This chamber has been outfitted as a far-field antenna...

  15. A method for the long-term exposure of rabbits to environmental pollutant gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, G.J.; Page, C.P. (Dept. of Pharmacology, King' s College, University of London, London (United Kingdom)); Price, J.F. (Dept. of Thoracic Medicine, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01

    The aims of the present study were twofold. Firstly, we wanted to develop a system for the exposure of rabbits to pollutant gases that would monitor gas concentrations accurately, allow flexibility, be simple to operate, and could be constructed at relatively modest cost. Additionally, we wanted to determine whether the procedures necessary for the daily exposure of young rabbits had any detrimental effect on their development. Using the enviromental exposure system that we developed, littermate New Zealand White rabbits, neonatally immunized to either Alternaria tenuis or house dust mite antigen were exposed 2 h daily, from within 24 h of birth until 3 months of age, to either 4 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO[sub 2]), or 5 ppm sulphur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) or ambient air. The environmental exposure system consists of four sections; a stainless steel exposure chamber; an airflow monitoring and control system and gas delivery system, a gas detector and monitoring system; and an exhaust fan. Equilibration and wash-out times of gas were short and the gas mixing within the chamber atmosphere was uniform. Levels of gases were reliably maintained throughout the period of exposure within predetermined limits. The weights of the immunized, gas-exposed animals did not differ significantly from those of the immunized, air-exposed animals at any time throughout the 3 month period of exposure. At 3 months of age, the basal values for lung resistance and dynamic compliance did not differ between gas- and air-exposed rabbits. These values did not differ significantly from those obtained from naive animals of the same age. Our results suggest that we have developed a sensitive, reliable and simple environmental exposure and monitoring system. It is anticipated that the methodology described will allow the careful investigation of the effects of long-term exposure to pollutant gases from birth on the development of airways hyperresponsiveness. (au)

  16. A method for the long-term exposure of rabbits to environmental pollutant gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, G J; Price, J F; Page, C P

    1994-08-01

    The aims of the present study were twofold. Firstly, we wanted to develop a system for the exposure of rabbits to pollutant gases that would monitor gas concentrations accurately, allow flexibility, be simple to operate, and could be constructed at relatively modest cost. Additionally, we wanted to determine whether the procedures necessary for the daily exposure of young rabbits had any detrimental effect on their development. Using the environmental exposure system that we developed, littermate New Zealand White rabbits, neonatally immunized to either Alternaria tenuis or house dust mite antigen were exposed 2 h daily, from within 24 h of birth until 3 months of age, to either 4 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO2), or 5 ppm sulphur dioxide (SO2) or ambient air. The environmental exposure system consists of four sections; a stainless steel exposure chamber; an airflow monitoring and control system and gas delivery system; a gas detector and monitoring system; and an exhaust fan. Equilibration and wash-out times of gas were short and the gas mixing within the chamber atmosphere was uniform. Levels of gases were reliably maintained throughout the period of exposure within predetermined limits. The weights of the immunized, gas-exposed animals did not differ significantly from those of the immunized, air-exposed animals at any time throughout the 3 month period of exposure. At 3 months of age, the basal values for lung resistance and dynamic compliance did not differ between gas- and air-exposed rabbits. These values did not differ significantly from those obtained from naive animals of the same age. Our results suggest that we have developed a sensitive, reliable and simple environmental exposure and monitoring system. It is anticipated that the methodology described will allow the careful investigation of the effects of long-term exposure to pollutant gases from birth on the development of airways hyperresponsiveness. PMID:7957839

  17. Growing and analyzing biofilms in flow chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic......, and disassembly and cleaning of the system. In addition, embedding and fluorescent in situ hybridization of flow chamber-grown biofilms are addressed....

  18. The Consistency of Isotopologues of Ambient Atmospheric Nitric Acid in Passively Collected Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M. D.; Sickman, J. O.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Padgett, P.; Allen, E. B.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic sources of nitrogen oxides have previously been shown to have distinctive isotopic signatures of oxygen and nitrogen. Nylon filters are currently used in passive sampling arrays to measure ambient atmospheric nitric acid concentrations and estimate deposition rates. This experiment measured the ability of nylon filters to consistently collect isotopologues of atmospheric nitric acid in the same ratios as they are present in the atmosphere. Samplers were deployed in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and at field sites across a nitrogen deposition gradient in Southern California. Filters were exposed over a four week period with individual filters being subjected to 1-4 week exposure times. Extracted nitric acid were measured for δ18O and δ15N ratios and compared for consistency based on length of exposure and amount of HNO3 collected. Filters within the CSTRs collected HNO3 at a consistent rate in both high and low concentration chambers. After two weeks of exposure, the mean δ18O values were within 0.5‰ of the δ18O of the source HNO3 solution. The mean of all weekly exposures were within 0.5‰ of the δ15N of the source solution, but after three weeks, the mean δ15N of adsorbed HNO3 was within 0.2‰. As the length of the exposure increased, the variability of measured delta values decreased for both elements. The field samplers collected HNO3 consistent with previously measured values along a deposition gradient. The mean δ18O at high deposition sites was 52.2‰ compared to 35.7‰ at the low deposition sites. Mean δ15N values were similar at all sites across the deposition gradient. Due to precipitation events occurring during the exposure period, the δ15N and δ18O of nitric acid were highly variable at all field sites. At single sites, changes in δ15N and δ18O were negatively correlated, consistent with two-sourcing mixing dynamics, but the slope of the regressions differed between high and low deposition sites. Anthropogenic

  19. The risk of leukaemia in young children from exposure to tritium and carbon-14 in the discharges of German nuclear power stations and in the fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeford, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Towards the end of 2007, the results were published from a case-control study (the "KiKK Study") of cancer in young children, diagnosed nuclear power stations in western Germany. The study found a tendency for cases of leukaemia to live closer to the nearest nuclear power station than their matched controls, producing an odds ratio that was raised to a statistically significant extent for residence within 5 km of a nuclear power station. The findings of the study received much publicity, but a detailed radiological risk assessment demonstrated that the radiation doses received by young children from discharges of radioactive material from the nuclear reactors were much lower than those received from natural background radiation and far too small to be responsible for the statistical association reported in the KiKK Study. This has led to speculation that conventional radiological risk assessments have grossly underestimated the risk of leukaemia in young children posed by exposure to man-made radionuclides, and particular attention has been drawn to the possible role of tritium and carbon-14 discharges in this supposedly severe underestimation of risk. Both (3)H and (14)C are generated naturally in the upper atmosphere, and substantial increases in these radionuclides in the environment occurred as a result of their production by atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the late 1950s and early 1960s. If the leukaemogenic effect of these radionuclides has been seriously underestimated to the degree necessary to explain the KiKK Study findings, then a pronounced increase in the worldwide incidence of leukaemia among young children should have followed the notably elevated exposure to (3)H and (14)C from nuclear weapons testing fallout. To investigate this hypothesis, the time series of incidence rates of leukaemia among young children nuclear weapons testing, or that incidence rates are related to level of exposure to fallout, is apparent from these

  20. On-site and off-site atmospheric PBDEs in an electronic dismantling workshop in south China: gas-particle partitioning and human exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Taicheng; Zhang, Delin; Li, Guiying; Mai, Bixian; Fu, Jiamo

    2011-12-01

    Gas samples and total suspended particle during work and off work time were investigated on-site and off-site electronic waste dismantling workshop (I- and O-EWDW), then compared with plastic recycling workshop (PRW) and waste incineration plant (WIP). TSP concentrations and total PBDE were 0.36-2.21 mg/m(3) and 27-2975 ng/m(3) at different workshops, respectively. BDE-47, -99, and -209 were major ∑PBDE congeners at I-EWDW and WIP, while BDE-209 was only dominant congener in PRW and control sites during work time and all sites during off work time. The gas-particle partitioning result was well correlated with the subcooled liquid vapor pressure for all samples, except for WIP and I-EDWD, at park during work time, and residential area during off work time. The predicted urban curve fitted well with measured φ values at O-DEWD during work time, whereas it was slightly overestimated or underestimated for others. Exposure assessment revealed the highest exposure site was I-EDWD.

  1. LEP vacuum chamber cross-section

    CERN Multimedia

    1987-01-01

    This diagram shows the layout of the vacuum chambers used at LEP, which was in operation at CERN between 1989 and 2000. Vacuum chambers are necessary in accelerators to prevent unwanted interactions that can destabilise the beam. The pump on the right sucks air out of the chamber allowing the beam to progress with minimal interactions.

  2. A cryogenic chamber for scattering measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, M. I.; Chepel, V.; Kuchenkov, A.; Gonçalves, O. D.; Schechter, H.

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed a cryogenic chamber to measure scattering cross sections of photons in liquids of low-boiling point. The chamber was tested with liquid xenon using a 137Cs radioactive source emitting 662 keV photons. The spectra obtained are presented and analyzed, attesting the good performance of the chamber for the desired purposes.

  3. Subminiature fission chamber with gas tight penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission chambers suffer from gas leaks at electric feed-trough. This micro chamber suppresses that defect thanks to an alumina plug and welded seal of the chamber sleeve. This device is easy to produce at industrial scale with reduced dimensions (1,5 mm diameter, 25 mm length). It can work with 30 m long feeding cables. (D.L.). 3 figs

  4. Vacuum chamber at intersection I-6

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    The vacuum chamber at intersection region I-6, one of these where experiments in colliding-beam physics will be taking place. The "wheels" prevent the thin wall (1.5 mm) of the chamber from collapsing. The chamber is equipped with heating tapes and its wrapped in thermal insulation. Residual gas pressure at this and other similar regions is around 10_11.

  5. A Sensitive Cloud Chamber without Radioactive Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeze, Syoji; Itoh, Akio; Oyama, Ayu; Takahashi, Haruka

    2012-01-01

    We present a sensitive diffusion cloud chamber which does not require any radioactive sources. A major difference from commonly used chambers is the use of a heat sink as its bottom plate. The result of a performance test of the chamber is given. (Contains 8 figures.)

  6. Simple Cloud Chambers Using Gel Ice Packs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Kubota, Miki

    2012-01-01

    Although cloud chambers are highly regarded as teaching aids for radiation education, school teachers have difficulty in using cloud chambers because they have to prepare dry ice or liquid nitrogen before the experiment. We developed a very simple and inexpensive cloud chamber that uses the contents of gel ice packs which can substitute for dry…

  7. Occupational exposure in hemodynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper has an objective to perform a radiometric survey at a hemodynamic service. Besides, it was intended to evaluate the effective dose of health professionals and to provide data which can contribute with minimization of exposures during the realization of hemodynamic procedure. The radiometric survey was realized in the real environment of work simulating the conditions of a hemodynamic study with a ionization chamber

  8. Effects of open-top chambers on Valencia' orange trees. [Citrus sinensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszyk, D.M. (Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States)); Takemoto, B.K. (California Air Resources Board, Sacramento (United States)); Kats, G.; Dawson, P.J.; Morrison, C.L.; Preston, J.W.; Thompson, C.R. (Univ. of California, Riverside (United States))

    Open-top field chambers are the most widely used technology for evaluating the impacts of air pollutants on vegetation. This study was conducted to evaluate the long-term effects of chambers on Valencia orange trees (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck). The trees were exposed to ambient ozone (O{sub 3}) for 51 months in large (4.3-m diam. by 2.9-m high) nonfiltered open-top chambers (NF) and in ambient air without chambers (AA). Results suggest that the yield increases for NF compared to AA trees could, in part, be accounted for by decreased flux of O{sub 3} into leaves (based on decreased O{sub 3} exposure and leaf conductance). However, other factors, i.e., increased tree growth, altered leaf C allocation, and lack of wind stress occurring only in chambers, likely contributed to higher NF tree yields.

  9. Experimental biomass burning emission assessment by combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusini, Ilaria; Pallozzi, Emanuele; Corona, Piermaria; Ciccioli, Paolo; Calfapietra, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Biomass burning is a significant source of several atmospheric gases and particles and it represents an important ecological factor in the Mediterranean ecosystem. In this work we describe the performances of a recently developed combustion chamber to show the potential of this facility in estimating the emission from wildland fire showing a case study with leaves, small branches and litter of two representative species of Mediterranean vegetation, Quercus pubescens and Pinus halepensis. The combustion chamber is equipped with a thermocouple, a high resolution balance, an epiradiometer, two different sampling lines to collect organic volatile compounds (VOCs) and particles, a sampling line connected to a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass-Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a portable analyzer to measure CO and CO2 emission. VOCs emission were both analyzed with GC-MS and monitored on-line with PTR-MS. The preliminary qualitative analysis of emission showed that CO and CO2 are the main gaseous species emitted during the smoldering and flaming phase, respectively. Many aromatics VOCs as benzene and toluene, and many oxygenated VOC as acetaldehyde and methanol were also released. This combustion chamber represents an important tool to determine the emission factor of each plant species within an ecosystem, but also the contribution to the emissions of the different plant tissues and the kinetics of different compound emissions during the various combustion phases. Another important feature of the chamber is the monitoring of the carbon balance during the biomass combustion.

  10. Responses of fungal root colonization, plant cover and leaf nutrients to long-term exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2 and warming in a subarctic birch forest understory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsrud, Maria; Carlsson, Bengt Å.; Svensson, Brita M.;

    2010-01-01

    Responses of the mycorrhizal fungal community in terrestrial ecosystems to global change factors are not well understood. However, virtually all land plants form symbiotic associations with mycorrhizal fungi, with approximately 20% of the plants' net primary production transported down...... by mycorrhizal and other root-associated fungi to global change factors of all the fungal types studied could have broad implications for plant community structure and biogeochemistry of subarctic ecosystems....... to the fungal symbionts. In this study, we investigated how ericoid mycorrhiza (ErM), fine endophytes (FE) and dark septate endophytes (DSE) in roots responded to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and warming in the dwarf shrub understory of a birch forest in the subarctic region of northern Sweden...

  11. Carbon-14 transfer into potato plants following a short exposure to an atmospheric 14CO2 emission: observations and model predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melintescu, A; Galeriu, D; Tucker, S; Kennedy, P; Siclet, F; Yamamoto, K; Uchida, S

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the environmental (14)C behaviour, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) coordinated a Tritium and C-14 Working Group (T&C WG) in its EMRAS (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) programme. One of the scenarios developed in the frame of T&C WG involved the prediction of time dependent (14)C concentrations in potato plants. The experimental data used in the scenario were obtained from a study in which potatoes (Solanum tuberosum cv. Romano) were exposed to atmospheric (14)CO(2) in a wind tunnel. The observations were used to test models that predict temporal changes in (14)C concentrations in leaves at each sampling time for each experiment and (14)C concentrations in tubers at the final harvest of each experiment. The experimental data on (14)C dynamics in leaves are poorly reproduced by most of the models, but the predicted concentrations in tubers are in good agreement with the observations. PMID:22995861

  12. Effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations on Pinus ponderosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surano, K.A.; Kercher, J.R. [eds.

    1993-10-01

    This report details the results from an experiment of the effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) saplings and seedlings. The study began in 1983 as a pilot study designed to explore the feasibility of using open-top chambers for continuous multi-year exposures on sapling-sized trees and to examine possible CO{sub 2} responses so that future research could be adequately designed. however, following the first year of exposure, preliminary results from the study indicated that measurements of CO{sub 2} responses should be intensified. Open-top chambers proved suitable for use in multiyear exposures of mature trees. With respect to the preliminary examination of CO{sub 2} responses, many interesting observations were made. The nature of the preliminary results suggests that future long-term field CO{sub 2} exposures on perennial species may be critical to the understanding and preparation for future environments. Other research reported here attempted to adapt an existing western coniferous forest growth and succession model for use in elevated CO{sub 2} scenarios using differential species responses, and assessed the usefulness of the model in that regard. Seven papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  13. Effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on Pinus ponderosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the results from an experiment of the effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) saplings and seedlings. The study began in 1983 as a pilot study designed to explore the feasibility of using open-top chambers for continuous multi-year exposures on sapling-sized trees and to examine possible CO2 responses so that future research could be adequately designed. however, following the first year of exposure, preliminary results from the study indicated that measurements of CO2 responses should be intensified. Open-top chambers proved suitable for use in multiyear exposures of mature trees. With respect to the preliminary examination of CO2 responses, many interesting observations were made. The nature of the preliminary results suggests that future long-term field CO2 exposures on perennial species may be critical to the understanding and preparation for future environments. Other research reported here attempted to adapt an existing western coniferous forest growth and succession model for use in elevated CO2 scenarios using differential species responses, and assessed the usefulness of the model in that regard. Seven papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  14. Design and construction of a radiation monitor with ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and construction of a portable radiation monitor with ionization chamber for gamma and x rays measurements in the range from 40 KeV to 2 MeV are described in detail. The monitor is calibrated to give the exposure rate in Roentgens/hour in three linear ranges: 0-25 mR/h, 0-250 mR/h and 0-2500 mR/h for an ionization chamber with a sensitive volume of 600 cubic centimeters. Two conventional 9 V alkaline batteries are used to energize the monitor. The small current coming from the ionization chamber is measured by an operational amplifier with electrometer characteristics. The high voltage power supply to bias the chamber is made with a blocking oscillator and a ferrite transformer. Starting form a discussion of the desired characteristics of the monitor, the technical specifications are established. The design criteria for every section are shown. The testing procedures used to qualify every block and the results for three units are reported. (Author)

  15. Enclosed Chambers for Humidity Control And Sample Containment in Fiber Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, M.; Kendall, A.; Tanaka, M.; Weissman, J.S.; Stubbs, G.

    2009-05-26

    A chamber and stretch frame for making fibers for diffraction is described. The chamber is made from a simple plastic cuvette with silicon nitride windows. It is suitable for maintaining constant humidity during fiber drying and data collection, and allows stretching of the fiber and exposure to magnetic fields during sample preparation. If necessary, it provides primary containment for toxic and infectious biological materials. The chamber has been used in fiber diffraction experiments with filamentous plant viruses and a yeast prion protein, and is shown to produce excellent orientation and to maintain hydration and order at the molecular level.

  16. Enclosed chambers for humidity control and sample containment in fiber diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, M.; Kendall, A.; Tanaka, M.; Weissman, J.S.; Stubbs, G. (Vanderbilt); (HHMI)

    2008-11-03

    A chamber and stretch frame for making fibers for diffraction is described. The chamber is made from a simple plastic cuvette with silicon nitride windows. It is suitable for maintaining constant humidity during fiber drying and data collection, and allows stretching of the fiber and exposure to magnetic fields during sample preparation. If necessary, it provides primary containment for toxic and infectious biological materials. The chamber has been used in fiber diffraction experiments with filamentous plant viruses and a yeast prion protein, and is shown to produce excellent orientation and to maintain hydration and order at the molecular level.

  17. Co-ordination in Morphological Leaf Traits of Early Diverging Angiosperms Is Maintained Following Exposure to Experimental Palaeo-atmospheric Conditions of Sub-ambient O2 and Elevated CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Fitz.Gerald, Christiana; Porter, Amanda S.; Yiotis, Charilaos; Elliott-Kingston, Caroline; McElwain, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    In order to be successful in a given environment a plant should invest in a vein network and stomatal distribution that ensures balance between both water supply and demand. Vein density (Dv) and stomatal density (SD) have been shown to be strongly positively correlated in response to a range of environmental variables in more recently evolved plant species, but the extent of this relationship has not been confirmed in earlier diverging plant lineages. In order to examine the effect of a changing atmosphere on the relationship between Dv and SD, five early-diverging plant species representing two different reproductive plant grades were grown for 7 months in a palaeo-treatment comprising an O2:CO2 ratio that has occurred multiple times throughout plant evolutionary history. Results show a range of species-specific Dv and SD responses to the palaeo-treatment, however, we show that the strong relationship between Dv and SD under modern ambient atmospheric composition is maintained following exposure to the palaeo-treatment. This suggests strong inter-specific co-ordination between vein and stomatal traits for our study species even under relatively extreme environmental change. This co-ordination supports existing plant function proxies that use the distance between vein endings and stomata (Dm) to infer plant palaeo-physiology. PMID:27695464

  18. Repercussões clínicas da exposição à poluição atmosférica Clinical repercussions of exposure to atmospheric pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo Delfini Cançado

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available A poluição atmosférica é um assunto exaustivamente discutido mundialmente. As repercussões clínicas decorrentes das exposições aos principais poluentes atmosféricos são apresentadas resumidamente. Os padrões de qualidade do ar para esses agentes, segundo a Agência de Proteção Ambiental Americana, estão descritos em relação aos seus valores primários e tempo médio. Os efeitos respiratórios conseqüentes à queima de combustíveis fósseis e de biomassa são apresentados de forma sucinta visando, essencialmente, a alertar os profissionais da saúde para o aumento da morbidade relacionada com a poluição ambiental.Atmospheric pollution is a topic of extensive discussion the world over. The clinical repercussions of exposure to the principal atmospheric pollutants are summarized herein. According to the American Environmental Protection Agency, air quality standards for these agents are set based on their primary and half-life values. The respiratory effects of the burning of fossil fuels and biomass are succinctly presented, with a special focus on alerting health care professionals of the increased morbidity related to environmental pollution.

  19. Experimental work on drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental work made on drift chambers is described in two chapters. In the firt chapter we present the description of the experimental installation used, as well as some details on the data adquisition systems and the characteristics on three ways used for calibration proposes (cosmic muons, β radiation and test beam using SPS at CERN facilities). The second chapter describes the defferent prototypes studied. The experimental set up and the analysis are given. Some results are discussed. The magnetic field effect is also studied. (Author)

  20. Germination and growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) at low atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanarkel, Robert; Drew, Malcolm C.

    2002-01-01

    The response of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Waldmann's Green) to low atmospheric pressure was examined during the initial 5 days of germination and emergence, and also during subsequent growth to vegetative maturity at 30 days. Growth took place inside a 66-l-volume low pressure chamber maintained at 70 kPa, and plant response was compared to that of plants in a second, matching chamber that was at ambient pressure (approximately 101 kPa) as a control. In other experiments, to determine short-term effects of low pressure transients, plants were grown at ambient pressure until maturity and then subjected to alternating periods of 24 h of low and ambient atmospheric pressures. In all treatments the partial pressure of O2 was maintained at 21 kPa (approximately the partial pressure in air at normal pressure), and the partial pressure of CO2 was in the range 66.5-73.5 Pa (about twice that in normal air) in both chambers, with the addition of CO2 during the light phase. With continuous exposure to low pressure, shoot and root growth was at least as rapid as at ambient pressure, with an overall trend towards slightly greater performance at the lower pressure. Dark respiration rates were greater at low pressure. Transient periods at low pressure decreased transpiration and increased dark respiration but only during the period of exposure to low pressure. We conclude that long-term or short-term exposure to subambient pressure (70 kPa) was without detectable detriment to vegetative growth and development.

  1. Pupillary block glaucoma following implantation of a posterior chamber pseudophakos in the anterior chamber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Anil

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Pupillary block glaucoma is a common complication of cataract surgery, especially following anterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. We report a case of pupillary block glaucoma with a posterior chamber IOL that was implanted in the anterior chamber following a complicated extracapsular cataract extraction. The case was successfully managed by explantation of the posterior chamber lens, anterior vitrectomy, peripheral iridectomy and secondary anterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. The intraocular pressure was controlled with a single topical antiglaucoma medication.

  2. Simulation of space charge effects in resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Lippmann, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Multigap resistive plate chambers with 0.3-mm gas gaps operated in avalanche mode at atmospheric pressure have reached timing accuracies below 50 ps (standard deviation) with efficiencies above 99% . The avalanches in high homogeneous electric fields of 100 kV/cm are strongly influenced by space charge effects which are the main topic of this paper. We extend a previously discussed Monte Carlo simulation model of avalanches in resistive plate chambers by the dynamic calculation of the electric field in the avalanches. We complete the previously presented results on time resolution and efficiency data with simulated charge spectra. The simulated data shows good agreement with measurements. The detailed simulation of the avalanche saturation due to the space charge fields explains the small observed charges, the shape of the spectra, and the linear increase of average charges with high voltage. (22 refs).

  3. 北京地区大气细颗粒物的个体暴露水平%Personal exposure levels to atmospheric fine particulate matters in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫伟奇; 张潇尹; 郎凤玲; 曹军

    2014-01-01

    From December, 2012to April, 2013, measurements of personal exposure levels to atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in Beijing were conducted using laser dust monitor (Model LD6S) with the method of daily tracking for single participant, and the different participants’ time-activity journals were also collected to calculate the daily averaged exposure levels and merge application. During the monitoring period, the ambient PM2.5 concentrations issued by the Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Centre were recorded synchronously. The local mean concentrations of PM2.5 in winter and in spring were 127µg/m3and 69 µg/m3, respectively, and the former was much higher than the latter. The median value of personal daily exposure level was 54µg/m3and the averaged ratio to the ambient PM2.5 concentration was 0.60. The averaged indoor exposure fraction reached 80%of the total exposure, and the outdoor exposure and the traffic exposure separately accounted for about 10%. There was no significant difference between the exposure levels of different populations and different seasons. As the ambient PM2.5 concentration exceeded 75µg/m3, a significant correlation existed between the ambient PM2.5 concentration and the PM2.5 concentrations in different microenvironments, including residential house, office, restaurant, bus and street.%于2012年12月至2013年4月采用LD6S型微电脑激光粉尘仪在北京地区采取单人逐日跟踪的方式记录了多名个体对大气细颗粒物(PM 2.5)的暴露水平,同时收集研究对象的时间-活动日志,计算日平均暴露水平,再进行多人多日合并处理.并于研究时段内同步记录北京市环境保护监测中心发布的空气质量监测数据.结果表明,研究期间北京地区冬季与春季PM 2.5的平均浓度分别为127,69µg/m3.个体日均暴露水平中值为54µg/m3,与大气质量浓度的平均比值为0.60.个体室内暴露分量均值达到总暴露量的80%,

  4. Radiation exposure due to cosmic rays and solar X-ray photons at various atmospheric heights in aviation range over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-07-01

    In this presentation we present our work on the continuous monitoring of radiation exposure in terms of effective dose rates, due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar X-rays at various altitudes within aviation range over India. As India belongs to equatorial region, there is negligible contribution from solar energetic particles (SEP). The calculation of cosmic ray counts as well as the solar X-ray photons are performed on the basis of the observation of various Dignity series balloon experiments on cosmic ray and solar high energy radiation studies, conducted by ICSP and Monte Carlo simulations performed with GEANT4 detector simulation software. The information on solar activity level from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES) are employed in the calculations. A program, which is done entirely in MATLAB is employed to update regularly in a website, where we show images of dose rate (μSv) distribution over India at four different heights within the aviation range (updating at an interval of 30 minutes) and the approximate dose rates thats should be experienced by a pilot in an entire flight time between pairs of stations distributed all over India.

  5. Physicist makes muon chamber sing

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    This Monitored Drift Tube detector, consisting of argon-CO2-filled aluminium tubes with a wire down the centre of each, will track muons in ATLAS; Tiecke used a single tube from one of these detectors to create the pipes in his organ. Particle physicists can make good musicians; but did you know particle detectors can make good music? That's what NIKHEF physicist Henk Tiecke learned when he used pipes cut from the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube detector (MDT) to build his own working Dutch-style barrel organ in the autumn of 2005. 'I like to work with my hands,' said Tiecke, who worked as a senior physicist at NIKHEF, Amsterdam, on ZEUS until his retirement last summer. Tiecke had already constructed his barrel organ when he visited some colleagues in the ATLAS muon chambers production area at Nikhef in 2005. He noticed that the aluminium tubes they were using to build the chambers were about three centimetres in diameter-just the right size for a pipe in a barrel organ. 'The sound is not as nice as from wooden...

  6. Limits to Drift Chamber Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS (A Large Toroidal LHC Apparatus) will be a general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider that will be operational at CERN in the year 2004. The ATLAS muon spectrometer aims for a momentum resolution of 10% for a transverse momentum of pT=1TeV. The precision tracking devices in the muon system will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs) with a single wire resolution of 1100 chambers covering an area of ≈ 2500m2. The high counting rates in the spectrometer as well as the aim for excellent spatial resolution and high efficiency put severe constraints on the MDT operating parameters. This work describes a detailed study of all the resolution limiting factors in the ATLAS environment. A ’full chain’ simulation of the MDT response to photons and charged particles as well as quantitative comparisons with measurements was performed. The good agreement between simulation and measurements resulted in a profound understanding of the drift chamber processes and the individual contributions to the spat...

  7. Characterization of Missouri surface waters near point sources of pollution reveals potential novel atmospheric route of exposure for bisphenol A and wastewater hormonal activity pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Alvarez, David A.; Taylor, Julia A.; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Nagel, Susan C.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Surface water contamination by chemical pollutants increasingly threatens water quality around the world. Among the many contaminants found in surface water, there is growing concern regarding endocrine disrupting chemicals, based on their ability to interfere with some aspect of hormone action in exposed organisms, including humans. This study assessed water quality at several sites across Missouri (near wastewater treatment plants and airborne release sites of bisphenol A) based on hormone receptor activation potencies and chemical concentrationspresent in the surface water. We hypothesized that bisphenol A and ethinylestradiol would be greater in water near permitted airborne release sites and wastewater treatment plant inputs, respectively, and that these two compounds would be responsible for the majority of activities in receptor-based assays conducted with water collected near these sites. Concentrations of bisphenol A and ethinylestradiol were compared to observed receptor activities using authentic standards to assess contribution to total activities, and quantitation of a comprehensive set of wastewater compounds was performed to better characterize each site. Bisphenol A concentrations were found to be elevated in surface water near permitted airborne release sites, raising questions that airborne releases of BPA may influence nearby surface water contamination and may represent a previously underestimated source to the environment and potential for human exposure. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of surface water samples were predictive of wastewater input, although the lower sensitivity of the ethinylestradiol ELISA relative to the very high sensitivity of the bioassay approaches did not allow a direct comparison. Wastewater-influenced sites also had elevated anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic equivalence, while sites without wastewater discharges exhibited no antagonist activities.

  8. Testing Plant Responses to Rarified Atmospheres for Inflatable Greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    2000-01-01

    Reduced atmospheric pressures will likely be used to minimize mass and engineering requirements for plant growth habitats used in extraterrestrial applications. A chamber with high vacuum capability was used to design and begin construction of a system for testing plant responses to reduced pressure atmospheres. Several preliminary tests were conducted to evaluate chamber suitability for plant tests and to determine performance of thermal and vacuum systems at ambient and reduced pressure atmospheres down to 0.1 atm. The first tests consisted of measurements of internal gas volume and leakage rate. The method for volume determination was quite sensitive and will be needed for plant gas exchange measurements and calculations. This information will also be used in conjunction with the leak rate. Measured leak rates on the order of 0.46 mm Hg/min at 76 mm Hg pressure are low enough to conduct sensitive carbon dioxide exchange rate measurements at reduced pressure given an adequate plant sample (0.5 to 1.0 sq m area). A test rack with lighting provided by three high-pressure sodium vapor lamps was built to accommodate both short-term and long-term plant responses. Initial short-term experiments with lettuce showed that a pressure of 77 mm Hg resulted in a 6.1-fold increase in the rate of water loss compared to water loss at ambient pressure. Plants were severely wilted after 30 minutes exposure to 77 mm Hg. Water loss was found to be inversely correlated with atmospheric pressure over the range of pressures from 0.2 to 1.0 atm; the rate of water loss at 0.2 atm was 4.3 times higher than water loss at ambient pressure. Older leaves showed moderate wilting during exposure to 156 mm Hg, but those exposed to 345 mm, Hg remained turgid. Results suggest a reduced atmospheric pressure limit of 0.2 to 0.3 atm for lettuce grown in a solid medium. Follow-up experiments with carbon dioxide control and control at high relative humidity (> 90 %) will be needed to further confirm

  9. Neutron-chamber detectors and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detector applications in Nuclear Safeguards and Waste Management have included measuring neutrons from fission and (alpha,n) reactions with well-moderated neutron proportional counters, often embedded in a slab of polyethylene. Other less-moderated geometries are useful for detecting both bare and moderated fission-source neutrons with good efficiency. The neutron chamber is an undermoderated detector design comprising a large, hollow, polyethylene-walled chamber containing one or more proportional counters. Neutron-chamber detectors are relatively inexpensive; can have large apertures, usually through a thin chamber wall; and offer very good detection efficiency per dollar. Neutron-chamber detectors have also been used for monitoring vehicles and for assaying large crates of transuranic waste. Our Monte Carlo calculations for a new application (monitoring low-density waste for concealed plutonium) illustrate the advantages of the hollow-chamber design for detecting moderated fission sources. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  10. A mathematical model of aerosol holding chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Madsen, J; Berg, E;

    1999-01-01

    A mathematical model of aerosol delivery from holding chambers (spacers) was developed incorporating tidal volume (VT), chamber volume (Vch), apparatus dead space (VD), effect of valve insufficiency and other leaks, loss of aerosol by immediate impact on the chamber wall, and fallout of aerosol...... in the chamber with time. Four different spacers were connected via filters to a mechanical lung model, and aerosol delivery during "breathing" was determined from drug recovery from the filters. The formula correctly predicted the delivery of budesonide aerosol from the AeroChamber (Trudell Medical, London......, Ontario, Canada), NebuChamber (Astra, Södirtälje, Sweden) and Nebuhaler (Astra) adapted for babies. The dose of fluticasone proportionate delivered by the Babyhaler (Glaxco Wellcome, Oxbridge, Middlesex, UK) was 80% of that predicted, probably because of incomplete priming of this spacer. Of the above...

  11. Repatriation of Gamma Chambers Exported by India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) is engaged in the production and supply of laboratory gamma chambers. The gamma chambers are self-shielded devices in which a number of 60Co source pencils placed in a cylindrical cage. The gamma chambers are type approved as a device and a transportation package separately by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board. BRIT has exported number of such gamma chambers. For some of the gamma chambers, the type approval validity period is over and can no longer be transported. Hence, the radiation sources need to be transferred to a type approved package before transportation. BRIT has decommissioned five such gamma chambers so far and sources have been repatriated back to India. (author)

  12. Legacies of the bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legacies are what we pass on to those who follow us, the foundations on which the next advances in our science are being made; the things by which we shall be remembered, recorded in learned journals, written in the text books -food for the historians of science. This is not a summary, and it will draw no conclusions. It is a personal view which will look a little wider than the main physics results to include a mention of one or two of the technologies and methods handed on to both particle physics and other branches of sciences, a brief reference to bubble chamber pictures as aids in teaching, and a comment on the challenge now increasingly applied in the UK - and perhaps elsewhere -as a criterion for funding research: will it contribute to ''wealth creation''? (orig.)

  13. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  14. Vacuum Chamber for the Booster Bending Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    To minimize eddy currents, induced by the rising magnetic field, the chamber was made from thin stainless steel of high specific electric resistance. For mechanical stength, it was corrugated in a hydro-forming process. The chamber is curved, to follow the beam's orbital path. Under vacuum, the chamber tends to staighten, the ceramic spacer along half of its length keeps it in place (see also 7402458).

  15. Bubble chamber: Omega production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This image is taken from one of CERN's bubble chambers and shows the decay of a positive kaon in flight. The decay products of this kaon can be seen spiraling in the magnetic field of the chamber. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that has been heated to boiling point.

  16. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  17. D0 central tracking chamber performance studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzuto, D.

    1991-12-01

    The performance of the completed DO central tracking chamber was studied using cosmic rays at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Also studied was a prototype tracking chamber identical in design to the completed DO tracking chamber. The prototype chamber was exposed to a collimated beam of 150 GeV pions at the Fermilab NWA test facility. Results indicate an R{Phi} tracking resolution compatible with the limitations imposed by physical considerations, excellent 2 track resolution, and a high track reconstruction efficiency along with a good rejection power against {gamma} {yields} e {sup +} e{sup {minus}} events.

  18. D0 central tracking chamber performance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of the completed DO central tracking chamber was studied using cosmic rays at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Also studied was a prototype tracking chamber identical in design to the completed DO tracking chamber. The prototype chamber was exposed to a collimated beam of 150 GeV pions at the Fermilab NWA test facility. Results indicate an RΦ tracking resolution compatible with the limitations imposed by physical considerations, excellent 2 track resolution, and a high track reconstruction efficiency along with a good rejection power against γ → e + e- events

  19. Bicone vacuum chamber for ISR intersection

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This is one of the bicone chambers made of titanium for experiment R 702. The central corrugated part had a very thin titanium wall (0.28 mm). The first of these chambers collapsed in its central part when baked at 300 C (August 1975). After an intensive effort to develop better quality and reproducible welds for this special material, the ISR workshop was able to build two new chambers of this type. One of them was installed at I 7 for R 702 in 1976 and worked perfectly. It was at that time the most "transparent" intersection vacuum chamber. See also 7609219, 7609221.

  20. Precision Radio Frequency Anechoic Chamber Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs measurements and calibration of antennas for satellites and aircraft or groundbased systems. The chamber is primarily used for optimizing antenna...

  1. Rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} and crops: Research methodology and direct effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, H. [National Soil Dynamics Laboratory, Auburn, AL (United States); Acock, B. [Systems Research Laboratory, Beltsville, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Carbon dioxide is the food of trees and grass. Our relentless pursuit of a better life has taken us down a traffic jammed road, past smoking factories and forests. This pursuit is forcing a rise in the atmospheric CO{sub 2} level, and no one know when and if flood stage will be reached. Some thinkers have suggested that this increase of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere will cause warming. No matter whether this prediction is realized or not, more CO{sub 2} will directly affect plants. Data from controlled observations have usually, but not always, shown benefits. Our choices of scientific equipment for gathering CO{sub 2} response data are critical since we must see what is happening through the eye of the instrument. The signals derived from our sensors will ultimately determine the truth of our conclusions, conclusion which will profoundly influence our policy decisions. Experimental gear is selected on the basis of scale of interest and problem to be addressed. Our imaginations and our budgets interact to set bounds on our objectives and approaches. Techniques run the gamut from cellular microprobes through whole-plant controlled environment chambers to field-scale exposure systems. Trade-offs exist among the various CO{sub 2} exposure techniques, and many factors impinge on the choice of a method. All exposure chambers are derivatives of three primary types--batch, plug flow, and continuous stirred tank reactor. Systems for the generation of controlled test atmospheres of CO{sub 2} vary in two basic ways--size and degree of control. Among the newest is free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment which allows tens of square meters of cropland to be studied.

  2. Inhalation exposure methodology.

    OpenAIRE

    Phalen, R F; Mannix, R C; Drew, R T

    1984-01-01

    Modern man is being confronted with an ever-increasing inventory of potentially toxic airborne substances. Exposures to these atmospheric contaminants occur in residential and commercial settings, as well as in the workplace. In order to study the toxicity of such materials, a special technology relating to inhalation exposure systems has evolved. The purpose of this paper is to provide a description of the techniques which are used in exposing laboratory subjects to airborne particles and ga...

  3. Re-evaluating the Frankfurt isothermal static diffusion chamber for ice nucleation

    OpenAIRE

    J. Schrod; A. Danielczok; Weber, D.; M. Ebert; Thomson, E. S.; H. G. Bingemer

    2015-01-01

    Recently significant advances have been made in the collection, detection, and characterization of ice nucleating particles (INP). Ice nuclei are particles that facilitate the heterogeneous formation of ice within the atmospheric aerosol by lowering the free energy barrier to spontaneous nucleation and growth of ice from atmospheric water and/or vapor. The Frankfurt isostatic diffusion chamber (FRIDGE) is an INP collection and offline detection system that has become widely deployed and sho...

  4. Re-evaluating the Frankfurt isothermal static diffusion chamber for ice nucleation

    OpenAIRE

    Schrod, Jann; Danielczok, Anja; Weber, Daniel; Ebert, Martin; Thomson, Erik S.; Bingemer, Heinz G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently significant advances have been made in the collection, detection and characterization of ice nucleating particles (INPs). Ice nuclei are particles that facilitate the heterogeneous formation of ice within the atmospheric aerosol by lowering the free energy barrier to spontaneous nucleation and growth of ice from atmospheric water and/or vapor. The Frankfurt isostatic diffusion chamber (FRankfurt Ice nucleation Deposition freezinG Experiment: FRIDGE) is an INP collecti...

  5. High rate tests of microstrip gas chambers for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Malina, R F; Bell, B; Bellazzini, R; Bozzo, M; Brand, C; Brez, A; Caner, A; Cattai, A; Chorowicz, V; Contardo, D; Latronico, L; Lumb, N; Magazzù, C; Martín, J; Massai, M M; Mirabito, L; Morelli, A; Raffo, R; Rolandi, Luigi; Smadja, G; Spandre, G; Spezziga, M; Tsirou, A L

    1999-01-01

    Microstrip gas chambers (MSGC's) have been proposed for equipping the outer region of the tracker of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The MSGC's have undergone extensive development and tests during the last few years and their performance is well established. An important issue that has to be addressed to date is whether MSGC's can maintain their characteristics after a long exposure to an intense flux of particles, similar to LHC. We report results from the most recent beam test addressing this topic. (9 refs).

  6. Review of Electret ion chamber technology for measuring technologically enhanced natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electret ion chamber (EIC) is a passive integrating ionization chamber used extensively for measuring technologically enhanced radioactivity. Commercially available electret ion chambers called 1E-PERM (Electret-Passive Environmental Radiation Monitors) electret ion chambers are relatively new and are in use only from the past 10 years. The EIC consists of a stable electret (electrically charged Teflon disc) mounted inside an electrically conducting chamber. The electret serves both as a source of the electric field and as a sensor. The ions produced inside the chamber are collected by the electret. The reduction in charge of the electret is related to total ionization during the period of exposure. This charge reduction is measured using a battery operated electret reader. Using appropriate calibration factors and the exposure time, the desired parameters such as radon concentration in air is calculated. These low cost monitors require neither power nor battery and several hundreds of these can be used simultaneously and serviced by one reader. These monitors do not provide on line readings, but provide an average value over a period of time. The EICs have been used for measuring: (a) indoor and outdoor radon, (b) thoron, (c) dissolved radon and radium in water, (d) environmental gamma, (e) radon emanating radon concentration in soil samples and in pipes, (f) radon flux from surfaces and building materials. The purpose of this paper is to describe these methods and give selected reference to the related publications for more detailed reading. (author)

  7. Disinfection effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma for foodborne bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Mohammad Rasel; Inomata, Takanori; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Kakikawa, Makiko; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Yasunori; Yano, Toshihiro; Miwa, Shoji; Noguchi, Akinori

    2015-09-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NAPP) exposure can be a suitable alternative for bacteria inactivation in food processing industry. Specimen placed in the enclosure are exposed to various reactive radicals produced within the discharge chamber. It is also exposed to the periodic variation of the electric field strength in the chamber. Dielectric barrier discharge is produced by high voltage pulse (Vpp = 18 kV, pulse width 20 μs, repetition frequency 10 kHz) in a polypropylene box (volume = 350 cm3) using helium as main feed gas. Inactivation efficiency of NAPP depends on the duration of NAPP exposure, applied voltage pulse strength and type, pulse duration, electrode separation and feed gas composition. In this study we have investigated inactivation of Bacillus lichenformis spore as an example of food borne bacteria. Keeping applied voltage, electrode configuration and total gas flow rate constant, spores are exposed to direct NAPP for different time duration while O2 concentration in the feed gas composition is varied. 10 minutes NAPP exposure resulted in ~ 3 log reduction of Bacillus lichenformis spores for 1% O2concentration (initial concentration ~ 106 / specimen). This work is supported by research and development promotion grant provided by the Hokuriku Industrial Advancement Center.

  8. Design and construction of an interface system for the extrapolation chamber from the beta secondary standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Interface System for the Extrapolation Chamber (SICE) contains several devices handled by a personal computer (PC), it is able to get the required data to calculate the absorbed dose due to Beta radiation. The main functions of the system are: a) Measures the ionization current or charge stored in the extrapolation chamber. b) Adjusts the distance between the plates of the extrapolation chamber automatically. c) Adjust the bias voltage of the extrapolation chamber automatically. d) Acquires the data of the temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity of the environment and the voltage applied between the plates of the extrapolation chamber. e) Calculates the effective area of the plates of the extrapolation chamber and the real distance between them. f) Stores all the obtained information in hard disk or diskette. A comparison between the desired distance and the distance in the dial of the extrapolation chamber, show us that the resolution of the system is of 20 μm. The voltage can be changed between -399.9 V and +399.9 V with an error of less the 3 % with a resolution of 0.1 V. These uncertainties are between the accepted limits to be used in the determination of the absolute absorbed dose due to beta radiation. (Author)

  9. Medical applications of multi-wire proportional chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adaption of Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPC) for medical applications has necessitated bi-dimensional readout. This is achieved by analysing signals induced onto the cathode planes. At a useful X-ray energy of 40 to 45 keV, just above the K absorption edge in Xenon, the efficiency and resolution are both optimized. Poor resolution events due to K shell fluorescent capture and Auger emission, or L shell photo-electron emission, may be rejected by using energy discrimination - resulting in approximately halving the efficiency to 8% for a 1.6 cm thick atmospheric pressure chamber, but with sub millimeter inherent resolution. This is still far inferior to film resolution, but the MWPC is useful when numbers are required for computation or retrieval. Short descriptions of the MWPC applications to bone density measurements and tomography are given. Its use when pressurized as a gamma camera is discussed, and it is concluded that it may prove useful as a portable special purpose camera, or as one with a very large area thus compensating for low efficiency. Developments with liquid filled chambers are given and also the promising positron imaging hybrid MWPC. (author)

  10. 76 FR 22805 - Medical Devices; Reclassification of the Topical Oxygen Chamber for Extremities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reclassifying the topical oxygen chamber for extremities (TOCE) from class III to class II. This device is intended to surround a patient's limb and apply humidified oxygen topically at a pressure slightly greater than atmospheric pressure to aid healing of chronic skin ulcers, such as bedsores. This reclassification is on the Secretary of Health and......

  11. Stability results of a free air ionization chamber in standard mammography beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Natalia F.; Xavier, Marcos; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: nsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br, E-mail: vivolo@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Free air ionization chambers are absolute dosimeters, because they can measure basic physical quantities directly without the need of their calibration in a standard radiation beam. They are used for measuring exposure and air kerma in X and gamma radiation beams. The Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN has a free air ionization chamber of the cylindrical type for low energies. The characterization of this ionization chamber was already performed and reported in a previous study. After a modification in the support of the micrometers used for the movement of the internal cylinder devices, the tests were redone. The objective of this work was to present the new alignment protocol of the free air ionization chamber in low energies of X-ray beams of standard mammography qualities, assuring the positioning reproducibility, and new results of stability tests performed with the application of this protocol will be presented. (author)

  12. Oxidative potential of secondary organic aerosols produced from photooxidation of different hydrocarbons using outdoor chamber under ambient sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huanhuan; Jang, Myoseon; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Robinson, Sarah E.

    2016-04-01

    The oxidative potential of various secondary organic aerosols (SOA) was measured using dithiothreitol (DTT) assay to understand how organic aerosols react with cellular materials. SOA was produced via the photooxidation of four different hydrocarbons (toluene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, isoprene and α-pinene) in the presence of NOx using a large outdoor photochemical smog chamber. The DTT consumption rate was normalized by the aerosol mass, which is expressed as DTTmass. Toluene SOA and isoprene SOA yielded higher DTTmass than 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene SOA or α-pinene SOA. In order to discover the correlation between the molecular structure and oxidative potential, the DTT responses of selected model compounds were also measured. Among them, conjugated aldehydes, quinones, and H2O2 showed considerable DTT response. To investigate the correlation between DTT response and cell responses in vitro, the expression of biological markers, i.e. IL-6, IL-8, and HMOX-1 were studied using small airway epithelial cells. Higher cellular expression of IL-8 was observed with toluene SOA exposure compared to 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene SOA exposure, which aligned with the results from DTT assay. Our study also suggests that within the urban atmosphere, the contribution of toluene SOA and isoprene SOA to the oxidative potential of ambient SOA will be more significant than that of α-pinene SOA.

  13. Space Power Facility Reverberation Chamber Calibration Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catherine C.; Dolesh, Robert J.; Garrett, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the process and results of calibrating the Space Environmental Test EMI Test facility at NASA Plum Brook Space Power Facility according to the specifications of IEC61000-4-21 for susceptibility testing from 100 MHz to 40 GHz. The chamber passed the field uniformity test, in both the empty and loaded conditions, making it the world's largest Reverberation Chamber.

  14. An ionization chamber with magnetic levitated electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Kawaguchi, T

    1999-01-01

    A new type of ionization chamber which has magnetically levitated electrodes has been developed. The electrodes are supplied voltages for the repelling of ions by a battery which is also levitated with the electrodes. The characteristics of this ionization chamber are investigated in this paper.

  15. Supersonic Jet Interactions in a Plenum Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Venugopal

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding thè supersonic jet interactions in a plenum chamber is essential for thè design of hot launch systems. Static tests were conducted in a small-scale rocket motor ioaded with a typical nitramine propellaiit to produce a nozzle exit Mach number of 3. This supersonic jet is made to interact with plenum chambers having both open and closed sides. The distance between thè nozzle exit and thè back piate of plenum chamber are varied from 2. 5 to 7. 0 times thè nozzle exit diameter. The pressure rise in thè plenum chamber was measured using pressure transducers mounted at different locatìons. The pressure-time data were analysed to obtain an insight into thè flow field in thè plenum chamber. The maximum pressure exerted on thè back piate of plenum chamber is about 25-35 per cent. of thè maximum stagnation pressure developed in thè rocket motor. Ten static tests were carried out to obtain thè effect of axial distance between thè nozzle exit and thè plenum chamber back piate, and stagnation pressure in thè rocket motoron thè flow field in thè open-sided and closed-sided plenum chambers configurations.

  16. Results from the MAC Vertex chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-05-01

    The design, construction, and performance characteristics of a high precision gaseous drift chamber made of thin walled proportional tubes are described. The device achieved an average spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m in use for physics analysis with the MAC detector. The B-lifetime result obtained with this chamber is discussed.

  17. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  18. 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hypervelocity dust accelerator for studying micrometeorite impacts has been constructed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) at the University of Colorado. Based on the Max-Planck-Institüt für Kernphysik (MPI-K) accelerator, this accelerator is capable of emitting single particles of a specific mass and velocity selected by the user. The accelerator consists of a 3 MV Pelletron generator with a dust source, four image charge pickup detectors, and two interchangeable target chambers: a large high-vacuum test bed and an ultra-high vacuum impact study chamber. The large test bed is a 1.2 m diameter, 1.5 m long cylindrical vacuum chamber capable of pressures as low as 10−7 torr while the ultra-high vacuum chamber is a 0.75 m diameter, 1.1 m long chamber capable of pressures as low as 10−10 torr. Using iron dust of up to 2 microns in diameter, final velocities have been measured up to 52 km/s. The spread of the dust particles and the effect of electrostatic focusing have been measured using a long exposure CCD and a quartz target. Furthermore, a new technique of particle selection is being developed using real time digital filtering techniques. Signals are digitized and then cross-correlated with a shaped filter, resulting in a suppressed noise floor. Improvements over the MPI-K design, which include a higher operating voltage and digital filtering for detection, increase the available parameter space of dust emitted by the accelerator. The CCLDAS dust facility is a user facility open to the scientific community to assist with instrument calibrations and experiments.

  19. Changes of body fluid and hematology in toad and their rehabilitation following intermittent exposure to simulated high altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, H. M.; Boral, M. C.

    1986-06-01

    Three groups of adult male toads were exposed intermittently in a decompression chamber for a daily period of 4 and 8 hours at a time for 6 consecutive days to an “altitude” of 12,000; 18,000 and 24,000 feet (3658; 5486; 7315 m) respectively. Most of the exposed animals were sacrificed immediately after the last exposure, but only a few animals experiencing 8 hours of exposure were sacrificed after a further 16 hours of exposure at normal atmospheric pressure. Eight hours of daily exposure for 6 days causes a decrease of body fluids and an increase of hematological parameters in all the altitude exposed animals compared with to the changes noted in the animals having 4 hours of daily exposure for 6 days at the same altitude levels. The animals that were exposed to pressures equivalent to altitudes of 12,000 and 18,000 feet daily for 8 hours were found to return nearly to their normal body fluids and hematological balance after 16 hours of exposure to normal atmospheric pressure, whereas the animals exposed for a similar period at an equivalent 24,000 feet failed to get back their normal balance of body fluids and hematology after 16 hours of exposure at normal atmospheric pressure. The present experiment shows that the body weight loss and changes of body fluid and hematological parameters in the toad after exposure to simulated high altitude are due not only to dehydration, but suggest that hypoxia may also have a role.

  20. Compact ion chamber based neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzon, Mark S.; Galambos, Paul C.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2015-10-27

    A directional neutron detector has an ion chamber formed in a dielectric material; a signal electrode and a ground electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the signal and ground electrodes; and a signal processor electrically coupled to the readout circuitry. The ion chamber has a pair of substantially planar electrode surfaces. The chamber pressure of the neutron absorbing material is selected such that the reaction particle ion trail length for neutrons absorbed by the neutron absorbing material is equal to or less than the distance between the electrode surfaces. The signal processor is adapted to determine a path angle for each absorbed neutron based on the rise time of the corresponding pulse in a time-varying detector signal.

  1. Ionization-chamber smoke detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Robert F.

    1976-10-19

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system is designed to reduce false alarms caused by fluctuations in ambient temperature. Means are provided for periodically firing the gas discharge triode and each time recording the triggering voltage required. A computer compares each triggering voltage with its predecessor. The computer is programmed to energize an alarm if the difference between the two compared voltages is a relatively large value indicative of particulates in the measuring chamber and to disregard smaller differences typically resulting from changes in ambient temperature.

  2. Wet drift chambers for precise luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of high-precision compact drift chambers has been a vital component of the OPAL luminosity monitor since the start of data-taking at LEP. They were augmented in 1992 by the addition of Small Angle Reference Chambers with a very similar design to the original chamber. The performance of the chambers is reviewed, highlighting both the importance of using polyalkylene glycol (Breox) to maintain a uniform and parallel electric field and the construction techniques used to sustain the required field strength. We describe some of the operating problems, with their solutions, and show how the chambers have been used in achieving a systematic error of 0.41% on the luminosity measurement. ((orig.))

  3. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...... localities of tensions between matter and the immaterial, the practical and the ideal, and subject and object. In the colloquial language there can, moreover, often seem to be something authentic or genuine about atmosphere, juxtaposing it to staging, which is implied to be something simulated or artificial....... This introduction seeks to outline how a number of scholars have addressed the relationship between staged atmospheres and experience, and thus highlight both the philosophical, social and political aspects of atmospheres...

  4. An Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory for the Space Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.; Anderson, J.; Schrick, B.; Ellsworth, C.; Davis, M.

    1976-01-01

    Results of research and engineering analyses to date show that it is feasible to develop and fly on the first Spacelab mission a multipurpose laboratory in which experiments can be performed on the microphysical processes in atmospheric clouds. The paper presents a series of tables on the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory, with attention given to experiment classes, the preliminary equipment list (particle generators, optical and imaging devices, particle detectors and characterizers, etc.), initial equipment (scientific equipment subsystems and flight support subsystems), and scientific functional requirements (the expansion chamber, the continuous flow diffusion chamber, the static diffusion chamber, the humidifier, and particle generators).

  5. Study of atmospheric tritium transfers in lettuce: kinetic study, equilibrium and organic incorporation during a continuous atmospheric exposure; Etude des transferts du tritium atmospherique chez la laitue: Etude cinetique, etat d'equilibre et integration du tritum sous forme organique lors d'une exposition atmospherique continue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, C.

    2009-11-30

    This thesis has explored the mechanisms of tritium 'absorption and incorporation in a human-consumed plant, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), due to atmospheric exposure. Foliar uptake appears to play a key role in absorption of tritium as tissue free water tritium. Whatever the development stage and the light conditions, the specific activity in tissue free water reaches that of water vapour in air in several hours. The specific activity ratio is then about 0, 4. The time to reach equilibrium in soil is over 24 hours in most cases: the specific activity ratio ranges then 0, 01 to 0, 26. Incorporation rate of tissue free water tritium as organically-bound tritium has been estimated to 0, 13 to 0, 16 % h-l in average over the growing period of the plant, but marked variations are observed during growth. In particular, a significant increase appeared at the exponential growth stage. Deposition and diffusion of tritium in soil lead to significant OBT activities in soil. Results globally indicate equilibrium between the different environmental compartments (air, soil, plant). However, some experiments have revealed high OBT concentrations regarding atmospheric level exposure and ask for a possible phenomenon of local tritium accumulation in OBT for particular conditions of exposure. (author) [French] Ce travail de these a concerne l'etude des phenomenes d'absorption et d'incorporation sous forme organique du tritium dans un vegetal de consommation courante, la laitue (Lactuca sativa L.), en reponse a une exposition atmospherique. Il apparait que la voie foliaire joue un role primordial dans l'absorption du tritium au sein de l'eau tissulaire des plants. Quels que soient le stade de developpement des plants et les conditions d'eclairement, le temps necessaire pour atteindre l'equilibre des concentrations dans l'eau libre et dans la vapeur d'eau de l'air est de plusieurs heures; le rapport des concentrations est alors de

  6. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  7. Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory thermal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J. L.; Fogal, G. L.; Scollon, T. R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents the development background and the present status of the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL) thermal control capability. The ACPL, a Spacelab payload, is currently in the initial flight hardware development phase for a first flight scheduled in June 1981. The ACPL is intended as a facility for conducting a wide variety of cloud microphysics experimentation under zero gravity conditions. The cloud chambers, which are key elements of the ACPL, have stringent thermal requirements. Thus the expansion chamber inner walls must be uniform to within + or - 0.1 C during both steady-state and transient operation over a temperature range of +30 to -25 C. Design progression of the expansion chamber, from early in-house NASA-MSFC concepts (including test results of a prototype chamber) to a thermal control concept currently under development, is discussed.

  8. Exposure Forecaster

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Exposure Forecaster Database (ExpoCastDB) is EPA's database for aggregating chemical exposure information and can be used to help with chemical exposure...

  9. Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S

    2010-01-01

    At the dawn of the first discovery of exoplanets orbiting sun-like stars in the mid-1990s, few believed that observations of exoplanet atmospheres would ever be possible. After the 2002 Hubble Space Telescope detection of a transiting exoplanet atmosphere, many skeptics discounted it as a one-object, one-method success. Nevertheless, the field is now firmly established, with over two dozen exoplanet atmospheres observed today. Hot Jupiters are the type of exoplanet currently most amenable to study. Highlights include: detection of molecular spectral features; observation of day-night temperature gradients; and constraints on vertical atmospheric structure. Atmospheres of giant planets far from their host stars are also being studied with direct imaging. The ultimate exoplanet goal is to answer the enigmatic and ancient question, "Are we alone?" via detection of atmospheric biosignatures. Two exciting prospects are the immediate focus on transiting super Earths orbiting in the habitable zone of M-dwarfs, and u...

  10. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the (α, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for (α, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only (α, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. x 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the (α, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the (α, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction

  11. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumard, B. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: shumard@phy.anl.gov; Henderson, D.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rehm, K.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Tang, X.D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the ({alpha}, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for ({alpha}, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only ({alpha}, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. x 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the ({alpha}, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the ({alpha}, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction.

  12. Mimicking Mars: A vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobrado, J. M., E-mail: sobradovj@inta.es; Martín-Soler, J. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Martín-Gago, J. A. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-15

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10{sup −6} mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  13. Mimicking Mars: a vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrado, J M; Martín-Soler, J; Martín-Gago, J A

    2014-03-01

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10(-6) mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  14. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses...

  15. Articulating Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily...... experience in space, presented as middle ground experience. In the field of HCI, middle ground experiences complete the unarticulated spectrum between designing for foreground of attention or background awareness. When “Articulating Atmospheres through Middle Ground Experiences in Interaction Design...

  16. APS Storage Ring vacuum chamber fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1104-m circumference Advanced Photon Source Storage Ring Vacuum System is composed of 240 individual sections, which are fabricated from a combination of aluminum extrusions and machined components. The vacuum chambers will have 3800 weld joints, each subject to strict vacuum requirements, as well as a variety of related design criteria. The vacuum criteria and chamber design are reviewed, including a discussion of the weld joint geometries. The critical fabrication process parameters for meeting the design requirements are discussed. The experiences of the prototype chamber fabrication program are presented. Finally, the required facilities preparation for construction activity is briefly described. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  17. Growing and Analyzing Biofilms in Flow Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic......, and disassembly and cleaning of the system. In addition, embedding and fluorescent in situ hybridization of flow chamber–grown biofilms are addressed. Curr. Protoc. Microbiol. 21:1B.2.1-1B.2.17. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc....

  18. Cloud chamber photographs of the cosmic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Rochester, George Dixon

    1952-01-01

    Cloud Chamber Photographs of the Cosmic Radiation focuses on cloud chamber and photographic emulsion wherein the tracks of individual subatomic particles of high energy are studied. The publication first offers information on the technical features of operation and electrons and cascade showers. Discussions focus on the relationship in time and space of counter-controlled tracks; techniques of internal control of the cloud chamber; cascade processes with artificially-produced electrons and photons; and nuclear interaction associated with an extensive shower. The manuscript then elaborates on

  19. Bubble chamber: Omega production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This image is of real particle tracks taken from the CERN 2 m liquid hydrogen bubble chamber and shows the production and decay of a negative omega particle. A negative kaon enters the chamber which decays into many particles, including a negative omega that travels a short distance before decaying into more particles. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  20. LEP vacuum chamber, cross-section

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Cross-section of the final prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber. The elliptic main-opening is for the beam. The small channel to the left is for the cooling water, to carry away the heat deposited by the synchrotron radiation. The square channel to the right houses the Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) pump. The chamber is made from extruded aluminium. Its outside is clad with lead, to stop the synchrotron radiation emitted by the beam. For good adherence between Pb and Al, the Al chamber was coated with a thin layer of Ni. Ni being slightly magnetic, some resulting problems had to be overcome. See also 8301153.

  1. Pluto's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne CCD photometer observations of Pluto's June 9, 1988 stellar occultation have yielded an occultation lightcurve, probing two regions on the sunrise limb 2000 km apart, which reveals an upper atmosphere overlying an extinction layer with an abrupt upper boundary. The extinction layer may surround the entire planet. Attention is given to a model atmosphere whose occultation lightcurve closely duplicates observations; fits of the model to the immersion and emersion lightcurves exhibit no significant derived atmosphere-structure differences. Assuming a pure methane atmosphere, surface pressures of the order of 3 microbars are consistent with the occultation data. 43 references

  2. Atmospheric electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, J Alan

    1957-01-01

    Atmospheric Electricity brings together numerous studies on various aspects of atmospheric electricity. This book is composed of 13 chapters that cover the main problems in the field, including the maintenance of the negative charge on the earth and the origin of the charges in thunderstorms. After a brief overview of the historical developments of atmospheric electricity, this book goes on dealing with the general principles, results, methods, and the MKS system of the field. The succeeding chapters are devoted to some aspects of electricity in the atmosphere, such as the occurrence and d

  3. A system for measuring fluxes of trace gases to and from soil and vegetation with a chamber technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mobile system for measurements of gaseous fluxes of SO2 NOx, O3 and water vapour between the atmosphere and the vegetation soil system using a chamber technique is described. Equipment, instruments and instrumental sensitivities are listed. A gas-handling system including calibration procedures and information on the chamber construction is also presented. With this system it is possible to make measurements using a wide range of concentrations including subambient levels. The environment in the chamber can be kept very close to ambient conditions. The mechanisms regulating the flux can be studied. A limitation of this system is the problem of extrapolating the fluxes obtained to larger areas. (author)

  4. Developing cloud chambers with high school students

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    2013-01-01

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry ice free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical detail of the chamber is presented. We also argue how the project affects student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project had been done in very similar way to those of professional researchers, i.e., planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we learn that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  5. Developing Cloud Chambers with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Tan, Nobuaki; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry-ice-free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical details of the chamber are described. We also argue how the project have affected student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project has taken steps of professional researchers, i.e., in planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we have learnt that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  6. RADAR Anechoic Chamber/RCS Measurements Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The RF Anechoic Chamber is 56 feet long by 12 feet high by 13.5 feet wide, with an adjoining electronic computer control room. A double door entrance at one end of...

  7. High Performance Methane Thrust Chamber (HPMTC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a High-Performance Methane Thrust Chamber (HPMRE) to meet the demands of advanced chemical propulsion systems for deep-space mission...

  8. MAN-IN-SIMULANT TEST (MIST) CHAMBER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The MIST chamber uses methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) vapor as a simulant for HD agent to conduct system level evaluations of chemical protective ensembles....

  9. Performance of a prototype drift chamber with 100 MHz FADC readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rectangular drift chamber cells have been constructed and tested using an electron test beam facility at DESY. A systematic study of the time, space, energy and double track resolution with a 100 MHz FADC readout is presented. The spatial resolution is 100 μm to 120 μm and the double track resolution is 2.5 mm with an Ar:C2H6 (50:50) gas mixture at atmospheric pressure. The dE/dx resolution obtained corresponds to 6% resolution for a 72-layer chamber. (author)

  10. New indoor environment chambers and field experiment offices for research on human comfort, health and productivity at moderate energy expenditure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toftum, J.; Langkilde, G.; Fanger, P.O. [Technical Univ., Lyngby (Denmark). International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy

    2004-09-01

    This article describes three new indoor environment chambers, a new laboratory for the study of air movement in spaces and five offices for controlled environment exposures of human subjects in field experiments at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Together with three older chambers, the Centre now has at its disposal 12 spaces for studying indoor environments and their impact on human comfort, health, productivity at moderate energy demands. [Author].

  11. Comparing contact and immersion freezing from continuous flow diffusion chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagare, Baban; Marcolli, Claudia; Welti, André; Stetzer, Olaf; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2016-07-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the atmosphere are responsible for glaciating cloud droplets between 237 and 273 K. Different mechanisms of heterogeneous ice nucleation can compete under mixed-phase cloud conditions. Contact freezing is considered relevant because higher ice nucleation temperatures than for immersion freezing for the same INPs were observed. It has limitations because its efficiency depends on the number of collisions between cloud droplets and INPs. To date, direct comparisons of contact and immersion freezing with the same INP, for similar residence times and concentrations, are lacking. This study compares immersion and contact freezing efficiencies of three different INPs. The contact freezing data were obtained with the ETH CoLlision Ice Nucleation CHamber (CLINCH) using 80 µm diameter droplets, which can interact with INPs for residence times of 2 and 4 s in the chamber. The contact freezing efficiency was calculated by estimating the number of collisions between droplets and particles. Theoretical formulations of collision efficiencies gave too high freezing efficiencies for all investigated INPs, namely AgI particles with 200 nm electrical mobility diameter, 400 and 800 nm diameter Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and kaolinite particles. Comparison of freezing efficiencies by contact and immersion freezing is therefore limited by the accuracy of collision efficiencies. The concentration of particles was 1000 cm-3 for ATD and kaolinite and 500, 1000, 2000 and 5000 cm-3 for AgI. For concentrations nucleation process that is enhanced compared to immersion freezing due to the position of the INP on the droplet, and we discriminate it from collisional contact freezing, which assumes an enhancement due to the collision of the particle with the droplet. For best comparison with contact freezing results, immersion freezing experiments of the same INPs were performed with the continuous flow diffusion chamber Immersion Mode Cooling chAmber-Zurich Ice

  12. Using a ceramic chamber in kicker magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S.

    1993-05-01

    A ceramic chamber inside kicker magnets can provide the relevant field risetime. On the other hand, some metallic coating inside has to prevent static charge buildup and shield the beam from ceramic and ferrite at high frequencies to avoid possible resonances. The issues concerning the metallized ceramic chamber, such as coupling impedances and requirements on the coating, are studied to find a compromise solution for kickers of the Medium Energy Booster at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  13. A very large multigap resistive plate chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Cerron-Zeballos, E; Hatzifotiadou, D; Kim, D W; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lee, S C; Platner, E D; Roberts, J; Williams, M C S; Zichichi, A

    1999-01-01

    We have built and tested a very large multigap resistive plate chamber (MRPC). We discuss the suitability of the multigap RPC for the construction of large area modules. We give details of the construction technique and results from a scan across the surface of the chamber. We also report on the implementation of `half-strip resolution', where we improve the spatial resolution by a factor 2 without increasing the number of read-out channels. (9 refs).

  14. Impact excited strain gage for multiwire chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for measuring multiwire chamber tension by impact excitation of mechanical oscillations and measuring their periods is described. A flowsheet of an automated electron gaugeis presented; the gauge provides high efficiency and possibility for measurements under conditions of difficult availability of the multiwire chamber system. The range of tension measurements is 0.5-70 g for gilded tugsten wires of 20 μm in diameter and 60 cm length

  15. The world's largest time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Peter Glassel, the technical coordinator for the ALICE time projection chamber, is seen sitting inside the detector; the largest in the world at nearly 100 cubic metres. Thousands of wires are connected to read out electronic data produced as particles are created in lead-lead collisions at the centre of the detector. These particles will cause the medium within the time projection chamber to ionise along their tracks allowing the particle paths to be recreated.

  16. Georges Charpak and his multiwire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    In 1968, Georges Charpak developed the 'multiwire proportional chamber', a gas-filled box with a large number of parallel detector wires, each connected to individual amplifiers. Linked to a computer, it could achieve a counting rate a thousand times better than existing techniques - without a camera in sight. From left to right, Georges Charpak, Fabio Sauli and Jean-Claude Santiard working on a multiwire chamber in 1970.

  17. Tracking with wire chambers at high luminosities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, G.G. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (USA) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Radiation damage and rate limitations impose severe constraints on wire chambers at the SSC. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems that satisfy these constraints are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Virtual Calibration Chamber CPT on Ticino sand

    OpenAIRE

    Butlanska, Joanna; Arroyo Alvarez de Toledo, Marcos; Gens Solé, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The following paper surnmarizes results of CPT's performed in virtual calibration chamber (VCC) built with a 3D model based on the distinct element method (DEM). A discrete material tailored to mimic Ticino sand is tested at different densities, stress and stress history. The limit cone tip resistance from the numerical experiments shows quantitative agreement with different empirical curves summarizing previous tests on Ticino sand in physical calibration chambers (ENEL and ISMES).

  19. The CDF vertex time projection chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vertex time projection chamber (VTPC) system is one of the major components of the charged particle tracking system for the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The chambers cover about seven units of pseudorapidity (η) and must be capable of handling substantially more than the 30-35 charged particle tracks produced by typical anti pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 1.8 TeV. The chambers are optimized to provide the good pattern recognition in the r-z view required to locate the event vertex, measure the overall event topology, and to complement the r-φ tracking in the large axial wire drift chamber that surrounds them. The chambers provide r-z information using TDC data from sense wire signals. Information on the φ of tracks is obtained from cathode pad signals on a subset of chambers read out by a FADC system. A similar system measures dE/dx of tracks in the forward cones surrounding the exiting beams. Because of the large number of photons that pass through the detector during each collision, novel techniques are required to reduce the amount of material in the chamber. These techniques include a custom surface mount integrated circuit preamplifier, epoxy-graphite and Kapton covered foam structural members, and miniature coaxial signal cables. The mechanical construction of the chamber, radiation length vs angle, and details of the electronics are described. The event reconstruction, corrections, and preliminary performance results for 1.8 TeV anti pp collisions are also discussed. (orig.)

  20. The Gargamelle heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    This image shows the Gargamelle heavy liquid bubble chamber. It was used to detect particles in experiments at the PS between 1970 and 1976 before being moved to the SPS. In 1973, while working on the PS, it detected the first neutral current, an interaction vital to the electroweak theory. In 1978 a large fissure appeared in the body of the chamber and Gargamelle was stopped in 1979.

  1. Characteristic parameters of drift chambers calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present here the methods we used to analyse the characteristic parameters of drift chambers. The algorithms to calculate the electric potential in any point for any drift chamber geometry are presented. We include the description of the programs used to calculate the electric field, the drift paths, the drift velocity and the drift time. The results and the errors are discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  2. A model to forecast magma chamber rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, John; Drymoni, Kyriaki; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-04-01

    An understanding of the amount of magma available to supply any given eruption is useful for determining the potential eruption magnitude and duration. Geodetic measurements and inversion techniques are often used to constrain volume changes within magma chambers, as well as constrain location and depth, but such models are incapable of calculating total magma storage. For example, during the 2012 unrest period at Santorini volcano, approximately 0.021 km3 of new magma entered a shallow chamber residing at around 4 km below the surface. This type of event is not unusual, and is in fact a necessary condition for the formation of a long-lived shallow chamber. The period of unrest ended without culminating in eruption, i.e the amount of magma which entered the chamber was insufficient to break the chamber and force magma further towards the surface. Using continuum-mechanics and fracture-mechanics principles, we present a model to calculate the amount of magma contained at shallow depth beneath active volcanoes. Here we discuss our model in the context of Santorini volcano, Greece. We demonstrate through structural analysis of dykes exposed within the Santorini caldera, previously published data on the volume of recent eruptions, and geodetic measurements of the 2011-2012 unrest period, that the measured 0.02% increase in volume of Santorini's shallow magma chamber was associated with magmatic excess pressure increase of around 1.1 MPa. This excess pressure was high enough to bring the chamber roof close to rupture and dyke injection. For volcanoes with known typical extrusion and intrusion (dyke) volumes, the new methodology presented here makes it possible to forecast the conditions for magma-chamber failure and dyke injection at any geodetically well-monitored volcano.

  3. Numerical simulation of magma chamber dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Antonella; Papale, Paolo; Montagna, Chiara Paola; Vassalli, Melissa; Giudice, Salvatore; Cassioli, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    Magma chambers are characterized by periodic arrivals of deep magma batches that give origin to complex patterns of magma convection and mixing, and modify the distribution of physical quantities inside the chamber. We simulate the transient, 2D, multi-component homogeneous dynamics in geometrically complex dyke+chamber systems, by means of GALES, a finite element parallel C++ code solving mass, momentum and energy equations for multi-component homogeneous gas-liquid (± crystals) mixtures in compressible-to-incompressible flow conditions. Code validation analysis includes several cases from the classical engineering literature, corresponding to a variety of subsonic to supersonic gas-liquid flow regimes (see http://www.pi.ingv.it/~longo/gales/gales.html). The model allows specification of the composition of the different magmas in the domain, in terms of ten major oxides plus the two volatile species H2O and CO2. Gas-liquid thermodynamics are modeled by using the compositional dependent, non-ideal model in Papale et al. (Chem.. Geol., 2006). Magma properties are defined in terms of local pressure, temperature, and composition including volatiles. Several applications are performed within domains characterized by the presence of one or more magma chambers and one or more dykes, with different geometries and characteristic size from hundreds of m to several km. In most simulations an initial compositional interface is placed at the top of a feeding dyke, or at larger depth, with the deeper magma having a lower density as a consequence of larger volatile content. The numerical results show complex patterns of magma refilling in the chamber, with alternating phases of magma ingression and magma sinking from the chamber into the feeding dyke. Intense mixing takes place in feeding dykes, so that the new magma entering the chamber is always a mixture of the deep and the initially resident magma. Buoyant plume rise occurs through the formation of complex convective

  4. State of the art incubator for controlled atmosphere studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose

    1998-01-01

    A state of the art incubator for studies of the biological effect of controlled atmosphere was designed. Working conditions are all combinations of: Temperature (5 to 40°C), Humidity (25 to 98%), oxygen (0.1 to 30%) and nitrogen (0.1 to 50%). Several points were given specific considerations...... without interfering with the atmosphere inside the chamber....

  5. The GODDESS ionization chamber: developing robust windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Rose; Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Pain, Steven; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Goddess Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Reaction studies of nuclei far from stability require high-efficiency arrays of detectors and the ability to identify beam-like particles, especially when the beam is a cocktail beam. The Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) is made up of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors for charged particles inside of the gamma-ray detector array Gammasphere. A high-rate ionization chamber is being developed to identify beam-like particles. Consisting of twenty-one alternating anode and cathode grids, the ionization chamber sits downstream of the target chamber and is used to measure the energy loss of recoiling ions. A critical component of the system is a thin and robust mylar window which serves to separate the gas-filled ionization chamber from the vacuum of the target chamber with minimal energy loss. After construction, windows were tested to assure that they would not break below the required pressure, causing harm to the wire grids. This presentation will summarize the status of the ionization chamber and the results of the first tests with beams. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  6. Quality control of ATLAS muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Fabich, Adrian

    ATLAS is a general-purpose experiment for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Its Muon Spectrometer will require ∼ 5500m2 of precision tracking chambers to measure the muon tracks along a spectrometer arm of 5m to 15m length, embedded in a magnetic field of ∼ 0.5T. The precision tracking devices in the Muon System will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs). Approximately 370,000 MDTs will be assembled into ∼ 1200 drift chambers. The performance of the MDT chambers is very much dependent on the mechanical quality of the chambers. The uniformity and stability of the performance can only be assured providing very high quality control during production. Gas tightness, high-voltage behaviour and dark currents are global parameters which are common to gas detectors. For all chambers, they will be tested immediately after the chamber assembly at every production site. Functional tests, for example radioactive source scans and cosmic-ray runs, will be performed in order to establish detailed performan...

  7. In vitro penetration of bleaching agents into the pulp chamber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Valera, M C; Mancini, M N G;

    2004-01-01

    To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures.......To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures....

  8. Bulkhead chamber ignition for internal combustion engines. Schottkammerzuendung fuer Verbrennungsmotore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, G.

    1990-12-06

    Bulkhead chamber ignition makes for reliable ignition of different fuels (e.g. petrol or diesel) in internal combustion engines (multifuel engine) that can be operated with an extremely lean fuel-air mixture. This is realized by an open chamber (referred to as bulkhead chamber in the following) inside the combustion chamber which diverts a fraction of the compressed fuel-air mixture from the combustion chamber. After this the pressure in the bulkhead chamber is increased until the mixture ignites spontaneously. The combustion pressure drives back the piston and opens the bulkhead chamber. Then the compressed fuel-air mixture in the combustion chamber is ignited by the released combustion gas.

  9. Characterization of a free air ionization chamber for low energy X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, N. F.; Xavier, M.; Vivolo, V.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    Free air ionization chambers are used by most primary metrology laboratories as primary standards of the quantities air kerma and exposure in X-ray beams. The free air ionization chamber for low energies of the Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN showed in a characterization test a problem in the set responsible for the variation of its sensitive volume. After a modification in the support of the micrometers used for the movement of the internal cylinder and the establishment of a new alignment system protocol, the tests were redone. The objective of this work was to present the results obtained in the new condition.

  10. Cloud droplet activity changes of soot aerosol upon smog chamber ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wittbom

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Particles containing soot, or black carbon, are generally considered to contribute to global warming. However, large uncertainties remain in the net climate forcing resulting from anthropogenic emissions of black carbon (BC, to a large extent due to the fact that BC is co-emitted with gases and primary particles, both organic and inorganic, and subject to atmospheric ageing processes. In this study, diesel exhaust particles and particles from a flame soot generator spiked with light aromatic secondary organic aerosol (SOA precursors were processed by UV-radiation in a 6 m3 Teflon chamber in the presence of NOx. The time-dependent changes of the soot nanoparticle properties were characterised using a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter, an Aerosol Particle Mass Analyzer and a Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. The results show that freshly emitted soot particles do not activate into cloud droplets at supersaturations ≤ 2%, i.e. the black carbon core coated with primary organic aerosol (POA from the exhaust is limited in hygroscopicity. Before the onset of UV radiation it is unlikely that any substantial SOA formation is taking place. An immediate change in cloud-activation properties occurs at the onset of UV exposure. This change in hygroscopicity is likely attributed to SOA formed from intermediate volatile organic compounds (IVOC in the diesel engine exhaust. The change of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN properties at the onset of UV radiation implies that the lifetime of soot particles in the atmosphere is affected by the access to sunlight, which differs between latitudes. The ageing of soot particles progressively enhances their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei, due to changes in: (I organic fraction of the particle, (II chemical properties of this fraction (POA or SOA, (III particle size, and (IV particle morphology. Applying κ-Köhler theory, using a κSOA value of 0.13 (derived from independent input parameters

  11. Technical Note: A numerical test-bed for detailed ice nucleation studies in the AIDA cloud simulation chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Cotton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere aerosol and cloud chamber of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe can be used to test the ice forming ability of aerosols. The AIDA chamber is extensively instrumented including pressure, temperature and humidity sensors, and optical particle counters. Expansion cooling using mechanical pumps leads to ice supersaturation conditions and possible ice formation. In order to describe the evolving chamber conditions during an expansion, a parcel model was modified to account for diabatic heat and moisture interactions with the chamber walls. Model results are shown for a series of expansions where the initial chamber temperature ranged from −20°C to −60°C and which used desert dust as ice forming nuclei. During each expansion, the initial formation of ice particles was clearly observed. For the colder expansions there were two clear ice nucleation episodes. In order to test the ability of the model to represent the changing chamber conditions and to give confidence in the observations of chamber temperature and humidity, and ice particle concentration and mean size, ice particles were simply added as a function of time so as to reproduce the observations of ice crystal concentration. The time interval and chamber conditions over which ice nucleation occurs is therefore accurately known, and enables the model to be used as a test bed for different representations of ice formation.

  12. Characterization and testing of a new environmental chamber designed for emission aging studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskinen, A.; Yli-Pirilä, P.; Kuuspalo, K.; Sippula, O.; Jalava, P.; Hirvonen, M.-R.; Jokiniemi, J.; Virtanen, A.; Komppula, M.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.

    2014-06-01

    A 29 m3 Teflon chamber, designed for aging studies of combustion aerosols, at the University of Eastern Finland is described and characterized. The chamber belongs to a research facility, called Ilmari, where small-scale combustion devices, a dynamometer for vehicle exhaust studies, dilution systems, the chamber, as well as cell and animal exposure devices are side by side under the same roof. The small surface-to-volume ratio of the chamber enables reasonably long experiment times, with particle wall loss rate constants of 0.088, 0.080, 0.045, and 0.040 h-1 for polydisperse, 50, 100, and 200 nm monodisperse aerosols, respectively. The NO2 photolysis rate can be adjusted from zero to 0.62 min-1. The irradiance spectrum is centered at 365 nm and the maximum irradiance, produced by 160 blacklight lamps, is 29.7 W m-2, which corresponds to the UV irradiance in Central Finland at noon on a sunny day in the midsummer. The temperature inside the chamber is uniform and can be kept at 25 ± 1 °C when half of the blacklights are on. The chamber is kept in an overpressure with a moving top frame, which prevents sample dilution and contamination from entering the chamber during an experiment. The functionality of the chamber was tested with oxidation experiments of toluene, resulting in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields of 33-44%, depending on the initial conditions, such as the NOx concentration. The highest gaseous oxidation product yields of 14.4-19.5% were detected with ions corresponding to 2-butenedial (m/z 73.029) and 4-oxo-2-pentenal (m/z 99.044). Overall, reasonable yields of SOA and gaseous reaction products, comparable to those obtained in other laboratories, were obtained.

  13. Phase B-final definition and preliminary design study for the initial Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL). A spacelab mission payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Progress in the development of the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory is outlined. The fluid subsystem, aerosol generator, expansion chamber, optical system, control systems, and software are included.

  14. Development and evaluation of an instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeld, F.; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Kendig, M. W.; Roe, D. K.

    1985-06-01

    A research program was carried out in which a new instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor (ACRM) was developed and evaluated, and equipment was constructed which will allow the use of many sensors in an economical way in outdoor exposures. In the first task, the ACRM was developed and tested in flow chambers in which relative humidity and gaseous and particulate pollutant levels can be controlled. Diurnal cycles and periods of rain were simulated. The effects of aerosols were studied. A computerized system was used for collection, storage, and analysis of the electrochemical data. In the second task, a relatively inexpensive electronics system for control of the ACRM and measurement of atmospheric corrosion rates was designed and built. In the third task, calibration of deterioration rates of various metallic and nonmetallic materials with the response of the ACRMs attached to these materials was carried out under controlled environmental conditions using the system developed in the second task. A Quality Assurance project plan was prepared with inputs from the Rockwell International Environmental Monitoring and Service Center and Quality Assurance System audits were performed.

  15. Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Fortney, Jonathan; Barman, Travis

    2014-01-01

    The study of exoplanetary atmospheres is one of the most exciting and dynamic frontiers in astronomy. Over the past two decades ongoing surveys have revealed an astonishing diversity in the planetary masses, radii, temperatures, orbital parameters, and host stellar properties of exoplanetary systems. We are now moving into an era where we can begin to address fundamental questions concerning the diversity of exoplanetary compositions, atmospheric and interior processes, and formation histories, just as have been pursued for solar system planets over the past century. Exoplanetary atmospheres provide a direct means to address these questions via their observable spectral signatures. In the last decade, and particularly in the last five years, tremendous progress has been made in detecting atmospheric signatures of exoplanets through photometric and spectroscopic methods using a variety of space-borne and/or ground-based observational facilities. These observations are beginning to provide important constraints...

  16. Atmospheric composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The earth's atmosphere is made up of a number of gases in different relative amounts. Near sea level and up to about 90 km, the amount of these atmospheric gases in clean, relatively dry air is practically constant. Four of these gases, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide, make up 99.99 percent by volume of the atmosphere. Two gases, ozone and water vapor, change in relative amounts, but the total amount of these two is very small compared to the amount of the other gases. The atmospheric composition shown in a table can be considered valid up to 90 km geometric altitude. Above 90 km, mainly because of molecular dissociation and diffusive separation, the composition changes.

  17. Second generation "Flat-Fish" vacuum chamber for an ISR intersection

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The picture shows the part of the "Flat-Fish" chamber covering one side of the beam intersection region. The other side is covered by an equal part and both are welded toghether at their small end. The two shells of each part were hydroformed from 0.15 mm thick inconel 718 sheet (with end parts in inconel 600 for easier manual welding to the arms) and welded toghether with two strips which were attached by means of stainless steel strings to the Split Field Magnet poles in order to take the atmospheric pressure forces. This was the thinnest vacuum chamber made for the ISR. Inconel material was chosen for its high elastic modulus and strenght at chamber bake-out temperature.

  18. Quantificação de fluxos de mercúrio gasoso na interface solo/atmosfera utilizando câmara de fluxo dinâmica: aplicação na bacia do Rio Negro Quantification of atmosphere - soil mercury fluxes by using a dynamic flux chamber: application at the Negro River basin, Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Magarelli

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous mercury sampling conditions were optimized and a dynamic flux chamber was used to measure the air/surface exchange of mercury in some areas of the Negro river basin with different vegetal coverings. At the two forest sites (flooding and non-flooding, low mercury fluxes were observed: maximum of 3 pmol m-2 h-1 - day and minimum of -1 pmol m-2 h-1 - night. At the deforested site, the mercury fluxes were higher and always positive: maximum of 26 pmol m-2 h-1 - day and 17 pmol m-2 h-1 - night. Our results showed that deforestation could be responsible for significantly increasing soil Hg emissions, mainly because of the high soil temperatures reached at deforested sites.

  19. D. phi. vertex drift chamber construction and test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, A.R.; Goozen, F.; Grudberg, P.; Klopfenstein, C.; Kerth, L.T.; Loken, S.C.; Oltman, E.; Strovink, M.; Trippe, T.G.

    1991-05-01

    A jet-cell based vertex chamber has been built for the D{O} experiment at Fermilab and operated in a test beam there. Low drift velocity and diffusion properties were achieved using CO{sub 2}(95%)-ethane(5%) at atmospheric pressure. The drift velocity is found to be consistent with (9.74+8.68( E -1.25)) {mu}m/nsec where E is the electric field strength in (kV/cm < E z 1.6 kV/cm.) An intrinsic spatial resolution of 60 {mu}m or better for drift distances greater than 2 mm is measured. The track pair efficiency is estimated to be better than 90% for separations greater than 630 {mu}m. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Thermoelastic analysis of solar window of a vacuum chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amba-Rao, C. L.; Soni, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    It has been noted during space simulation test programs that the chamber penetration window becomes the limiting factor as the solar intensity increases. The temperature at the center of the window normally attains a level of 550 C, while the edge temperature remains at about 35 C. The stresses produced by this thermal gradient combined with the atmospheric pressure are studied within the framework of classical theory of elasticity. The solution for the problem is obtained by solving the static uncoupled thermoelastic equations for a circular blank, subjected to nonuniform heat on one face, by introduction of two auxiliary variables. The displacements are expressed in terms of Bessel functions and parameters of interest are computed at various mesh points of the window. The maximum principal stresses thus obtained show that even with steep temperature gradient, the safety factor is acceptable.

  1. Investigation of Swirling Flows in Mixing Chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh Jian Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation analyzed the three-dimensional momentum and mass transfer characteristics arising from multiple inlets and a single outlet in micromixing chamber. The chamber consists of a right square prism, an octagonal prism, or a cylinder. Numerical results which were presented in terms of velocity vector plots and concentration distributions indicated that the swirling flows inside the chamber dominate the mixing index. Particle trajectories were utilized to demonstrate the rotational and extensional local flows which produce steady stirring, and the configuration of colored particles at the outlet section expressed at different Re represented the mixing performance qualitatively. The combination of the Taylor dispersion and the vorticity was first introduced and made the mixing successful. The effects of various geometric parameters and Reynolds numbers on the mixing characteristics were investigated. An optimal design of the cylindrical chamber with 4 inlets can be found. At larger Reynolds number, Re>15, more inertia caused the powerful swirling flows in the chamber, and more damping effect on diffusion was diminished, which then increased the mixing performance.

  2. Study and analysis of drift chamber parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work deals mainly with drift chambers. In the first chapter a summary of drift chamber properties is presented. The information has been collected from the extensive bibliography available in this field. A very simple calculation procedure of drift chamber parameters has been developed and is presented in detail in the second chapter. Some prototypes have been made following two geometries (multidrift chamber and Z-chambers). Several installations have been used for test and calibration of these prototypes. A complete description of these installations is given in the third chapter. Cosmic rays, beta particles from a Ru106 radiactive source and a test beam in the WA (West Area) of SPS at CERN have been used for experimental purposes. The analysis and the results are described for the different setups. The experimental measurements have been used to produce a complete cell parametrization (position as function of drift time) and to obtain spatial resolution values (in the range of 200-250 um). Experimental results are in good agreement with numerical calculations. (Author)

  3. Proportional chambers for the Σ installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of proportional chambers used in experiments with SIGMA set are considered. The main parameters of detecting electronics, high-voltage, low-voltage and gas supplies are presented. The first type chambers consist of the round or square frames of sheet foiled glass-cloth-base laminate, on which surface electrode lands and joints between them are applied by photographic printing. The second type chamber electrodes are also made of the sheet foiled glass-cloth-base laminate as strips arranged at the ends of two rectangular metallic profiles. The chamber sensitive regions vary from 64x64 mm to 768x2500 mm. The chambers are used for more than 15 years in different experiments, such as determination of elastic scattering, study of J/ψ and ψ' particle production, search for charm particles in hadron interactions, measuring the change of π--meson polarizability, study of μ+μ-π- system production. The experience of past years manifested their high efficiency and reliability

  4. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  5. Attempt to visualize cavitation in nozzle chamber of diesel engine by neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary experiment using neutron radiography was attempted on visualization of cavitation (= cold boiling) of fuel flow inside the metallic nozzle chamber of diesel engine. Fuel ejection from a diesel-engine nozzle is dependent on the cavitation conditions in fuel flow, subjective to pressure change, were studied using a cooled CCD camera with electric shutter open and with the help of a synchronous chopper for neutron beams which enables to observe visualized flow at 0.5 mm width nozzle chamber, 1 mm diameter sac chamber, and 0.2 mm diameter nozzle hole in a diesel engine. Each images could be obtained with short exposure time from 100 μs to 1 mx. (S. Ohno)

  6. Change of Pressing Chamber Conicalness at Briquetting Process in Briquetting Machine Pressing Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Križan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will present the impact of the conical shape of a pressing chamber, an important structural parameter. Besides the known impact of the technological parameters of pressing chambers, it is also very important to pay attention to their structural parameters. In the introduction, we present a theoretical analysis of pressing chamber conicalness. An experiment aimed at detecting this impact was performed at our institute, and it showed that increasing the conicalness of a pressing chamber improves the quality of the final briquettes. The conicalness of the pressing chamber has a significanteffect on the final briquette quality and on the construction of briquetting machines. The experimental findings presented here show the importance of this parameter in the briquetting process.

  7. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the very high event rates projected for experiments at the SSC and LHC, it is important to investigate new approaches to on line pattern recognition. The use of neural networks for pattern recognition. The use of neural networks for pattern recognition in high energy physics detectors has been an area of very active research. The authors discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial analog VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  8. Classification of the LHC BLM Ionization Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Stockner, M; Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Holzer, E B; Kramer, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The LHC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system must prevent the super conducting magnets from quenching and protect the machine components from damage. The main monitor type is an ionization chamber. About 4000 of them will be installed around the ring. The lost beam particles initiate hadronic showers through the magnets and other machine components. These shower particles are measured by the monitors installed on the outside of the accelerator equipment. For the calibration of the BLM system the signal response of the ionization chamber is simulated in GEANT4 for all relevant particle types and energies (keV to TeV range). For validation, the simulations are compared to measurements using protons, neutrons, photons and mixed radiation fields at various energies and intensities. This paper will focus on the signal response of the ionization chamber to various particle types and energies including space charge effects at high ionization densities.

  9. Posing the first LEAR vacuum chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    The photo shows one of the four bending magnets of LEAR. They were of C-type with the opening ('mouth') to the outside of the ring (yoke to the inside). Last preparations are made before the vacuum chamber is slid through the mouth into the magnet. Stochastic cooling pickups/kickers were installed inside the chamber. One can distinguish a large number of feed-throughs on the chamber (leading to the pickup/kicker gaps). The free space in the middle of the block was left to offer room for an internal target in the magnet. This possibility was never exploited. Instead it is used here, to accommodate a pumping port for the high vacuum system. Michel Chanel (left) and Pierre Lefevre admire the mechanics at work.

  10. Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber, details

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Parts of the hydraulic expansion system of the Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber (RCBC). RCBC was the largest of 3 rapid-cycling bubble-chambers (the others were LEBC and HOLEBC), used as target- and vertex-detectors within the European Hybrid Spectrometer (EHS) in the SPS North Area (EHN1). RCBC contained 250 l of liquid hydrogen and was located inside a 3 T superconducting magnet. It was designed for 30 expansions/s (100 times faster than BEBC), the system shown here allowed 50 expansions/s. RCBC operated from 1981 to 1983 for experiments NA21, NA22 and NA23 at a rate of 15 expansions/s, clocking up a total of over 4 million. In the rear, at left, is bearded Lucien Veillet; Augustin Didona is at the right. See also 8001009. The installation of the piston assembly in the RCBC chamber body is shown in the Annual Report 1980, p.65.

  11. Thermal Vacuum Chamber Repressurization with Instrument Purging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    At the end of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) OTIS (Optical Telescope Element-OTE-Integrated Science Instrument Module-ISIM) cryogenic vacuum testing in NASA Johnson Space Centers (JSCs) thermal vacuum (TV) Chamber A, contamination control (CC) engineers are mooting the idea that chamber particulate material stirred up by the repressurization process may be kept from falling into the ISIM interior to some degree by activating instrument purge flows over some initial period before opening the chamber valves. This memo describes development of a series of models designed to describe this process. These are strung together in tandem to estimate overpressure evolution from which net outflow velocity behavior may be obtained. Creeping flow assumptions are then used to determine the maximum particle size that may be kept suspended above the ISIM aperture, keeping smaller particles from settling within the instrument module.

  12. Design of the CLIC Quadrupole Vacuum Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider, under study, requires vacuum chambers with a very small aperture, of the order of 8 mm in diameter, and with a length up to around 2 m for the main beam quadrupoles. To keep the very tight geometrical tolerances on the quadrupoles, no bake out is allowed. The main issue is to reach UHV conditions (typically 10-9 mbar static pressure) in a system where the vacuum performance is driven by water outgassing. For this application, a thinwalled stainless steel vacuum chamber with two ante chambers equipped with NEG strips, is proposed. The mechanical design, especially the stability analysis, is shown. The key technologies of the prototype fabrication are given. Vacuum tests are carried out on the prototypes. The test set-up as well as the pumping system conditions are presented.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Research of a Novel Combustion Chamber for Small Gas Turbine Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hybl R.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available New combustion chamber concept (based on burner JETIS-JET Induced Swirl for small gas turbine engine (up to 200kW is presented in this article. The combustion chamber concept is based on the flame stabilization by the generated swirl swirl generated by two opposite tangentially arranged jet tubes in the intermediate zone, this arrangement replaces air swirler, which is very complicated and expensive part in the scope of small gas turbines with annular combustion chamber. The mixing primary jets are oriented partially opposite to the main exhaust gasses flow, this enhances hot product recirculation and fuel-air mixing necessary for low NOx production and flame stability. To evaluate the designed concept a JETIS burner demonstrator (methane fuel was manufactured and atmospheric experimental measurements of CO, NOx for various fuel nozzles and jet tubes the configuration were done. Results of these experiments and comparison with CFD simulation are presented here. Practical application of the new chamber concept in small gas turbine liquid fuel combustor was evaluated (verified on 3 nozzles planar combustor sector test rig at atmospheric conditions results of the experiment and numerical simulation are also presented.

  14. Experimental and Numerical Research of a Novel Combustion Chamber for Small Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, J.; Kubata, J.; Betak, V.; Hybl, R.

    2013-04-01

    New combustion chamber concept (based on burner JETIS-JET Induced Swirl) for small gas turbine engine (up to 200kW) is presented in this article. The combustion chamber concept is based on the flame stabilization by the generated swirl swirl generated by two opposite tangentially arranged jet tubes in the intermediate zone, this arrangement replaces air swirler, which is very complicated and expensive part in the scope of small gas turbines with annular combustion chamber. The mixing primary jets are oriented partially opposite to the main exhaust gasses flow, this enhances hot product recirculation and fuel-air mixing necessary for low NOx production and flame stability. To evaluate the designed concept a JETIS burner demonstrator (methane fuel) was manufactured and atmospheric experimental measurements of CO, NOx for various fuel nozzles and jet tubes the configuration were done. Results of these experiments and comparison with CFD simulation are presented here. Practical application of the new chamber concept in small gas turbine liquid fuel combustor was evaluated (verified) on 3 nozzles planar combustor sector test rig at atmospheric conditions results of the experiment and numerical simulation are also presented.

  15. A view inside the Gargamelle bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    Gargamelle was the name given to a big bubble chamber built at the Saclay Laboratory in France during the late 1960s. It was designed principally for the detection at CERN of the elusive particles called neutrinos. A bubble chamber contains a liquid under pressure, which reveals the tracks of electrically charged particles as trails of tiny bubbles when the pressure is reduced. Neutrinos have no charge, and so leave no tracks, but the aim with Gargamelle was "see neutrinos" by making visible any charged particles set in motion by the interaction of neutrinos in the liquid

  16. Cosmic Muon Detector Using Proportional Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Varga, Dezső; Hamar, Gergő; Molnár, Janka Sára; Oláh, Éva; Pázmándi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    A set of classical multi-wire proportional chambers were designed and constructed with the main purpose of efficient cosmic muon detection. These detectors are relatively simple to construct, and at the same time are low cost, making them ideal for educational purposes. The detector layers have efficiencies above 99% for minimum ionizing cosmic muons, and their position resolution is about 1 cm, that is, particle trajectories are clearly observable. Visualization of straight tracks is possible using an LED array, with the discriminated and latched signal driving the display. Due to the exceptional operating stability of the chambers, the design can also be used for cosmic muon telescopes.

  17. Quasi-Porous Plug With Vortex Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J. V.

    1985-01-01

    Pressure-letdown valve combines quasi-porous-plug and vortex-chamber in one controllable unit. Valve useful in fossil-energy plants for reducing pressures in such erosive two-phase process streams as steam/water, coal slurries, or combustion gases with entrained particles. Quasi-Porous Plug consists of plenums separated by perforated plates. Number or size of perforations increases with each succeeding stage to compensate for expansion. In Vortex Chamber, control flow varies to control swirl and therefore difference between inlet and outlet pressures.

  18. A Monte Carlo study of radon detection in cylindrical diffusion chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickards, Jorge, E-mail: rickards@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegacion Coyoacan, 04520 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Golzarri, Jose-Ignacio, E-mail: golzarri@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegacion Coyoacan, 04520 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Espinosa, Guillermo, E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegacion Coyoacan, 04520 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-05-15

    The functioning of radon diffusion chambers was studied using the Monte Carlo code RAMMX developed here. The alpha particles from radon are assumed randomly produced in the volume of the cylinder, and those from the progeny are assumed to originate randomly at the cylindrical surface. The energy spectrum, the distribution of incident angles, and the distribution of path lengths of the alpha particles on the detector were obtained. These quantities vary depending on input parameters such as initial alpha particle energy, radius and depth of the diffusion chamber, detector size and atmospheric pressure. The calculated energy spectrum for both {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn was compared with experiment, permitting the identification of each peak and its origin, and a better understanding of radon monitoring. Three aspects not considered in previous calculations are progeny alphas coming from surfaces of the monitor, taking into account the atmospheric pressure, and including the isotope {sup 220}Rn.

  19. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  20. Calibration of a pencil ionization chamber with and without preamplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Maia, Ana Figueiredo

    2004-01-01

    The pencil ionization chamber is a cylindrical dosimeter developed for computed tomography beams. Many kinds of ionization chambers have a preamplifier connected to the chamber to make it electrically more stable, specially for field instruments. In this study, the performance of a Victoreen pencil ionization chamber with the original preamplifier and after its removal was compared. The objective of the preamplifier removal was to enable connecting the chamber to other kinds of electromete...

  1. Multigas Leakage Correction in Static Environmental Chambers Using Sulfur Hexafluoride and Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, Tobias; von Fischer, Joseph C; Trumbore, Susan; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    In static environmental chamber experiments, the precision of gas flux measurements can be significantly improved by a thorough gas leakage correction to avoid under- or overestimation of biological activity such as respiration or photosynthesis. Especially in the case of small biological net gas exchange rates or gas accumulation phases during long environmental monitoring experiments, gas leakage fluxes could distort the analysis of the biogenic gas kinetics. Here we propose and demonstrate a general protocol for online correction of diffusion-driven gas leakage in plant chambers by simultaneous quantification of the inert tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and the investigated biogenic gases using enhanced Raman spectroscopy. By quantifying the leakage rates of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and hydrogen (H2) simultaneously with SF6 in the test chamber, their effective diffusivity ratios of approximately 1.60, 1.96, and 5.65 were determined, each related to SF6. Because our experiments suggest that the effective diffusivity ratios are reproducible for an individual static environmental chamber, even under varying concentration gradients and slight changes of the chamber sealing, an experimental method to quantify gas leakage fluxes by using effective diffusivity ratios and SF6 leakage fluxes is proposed. The method is demonstrated by quantifying the CO2 net exchange rate of a plant-soil ecosystem (Mirabilis jalapa). By knowing the effective chamber diffusivity ratio CO2/SF6 and the measured SF6 leakage rate during the experiment, the leakage contribution to the total CO2 exchange rate could be calculated and the biological net CO2 concentration change within the chamber atmosphere determined. PMID:26492154

  2. 30 CFR 77.305 - Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet... drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. Drying chambers, hot... dust and the loss of fluidizing air....

  3. Rectal temperature changes and oxygen toxicity in dogs treated in a monoplace chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmalberg, Justin; Davies, Wendy; Lopez, Stacy; Shmalberg, Danielle; Zilberschtein, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen treatments are increasingly administered to pet dogs, using veterinary-specific monoplace chambers. The basic physiologic responses, chamber performance and oxygen toxicity rates have not yet been evaluated in dogs in a clinical setting. As a result, a series of consecutive 45-minute, 2-atmospheres absolute (atm abs) hyperbaric treatments with 100% oxygen were evaluated in a veterinary rehabilitation center (n = 285). 65 dogs with a mean body weight of 21 ± 15 kg (1.4-71 kg) were treated with an average of four sessions each. The mean rectal temperature of canine patients decreased 0.07 degrees C (0.1 degrees F) during treatments (p = 0.04). Intra-chamber temperature and humidity both increased: +1.0 degrees C (1.7 degrees F, p 0.75) were identified between body weights, body condition scores, maximal oxygen concentrations, starting or ending rectal temperature, chamber humidity and chamber temperature. Oxygen toxicity was not observed during the observational period. Patients were most commonly treated for intervertebral disc disease (n = 16 dogs) and extensive traumatic wounds (n = 10 dogs), which represented a large number of the total study sessions (19% and 16%, respectively).

  4. Development of special ionization chambers for a quality control program in mammography; Desenvolvimento de camaras de ionizacao especiais para controle de qualidade em mamografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jonas Oliveira da

    2013-07-01

    Mammography is an imaging method that uses X-rays. The use of ionization chambers in mammography quality control programs presents an essential role which is to verify whether the parameters of the patient exposure are correct. However, the commercial ionization chambers for dosimetry in mammography represent a high cost for small and medium size clinics that wish to have this equipment or for professionals that work with quality control programs. The innovative feature of this work was to develop ionization chambers for this purpose. In this work ionization chambers for X radiation beams in the mammography energy range were designed, constructed and characterized. The ionization chambers were tested in standard X radiation beams at the LCI/IPEN. The main characterization tests performed with the ionization chambers were: saturation curve, linearity of response, angular and energy dependence. The response stability tests of the ionization chambers were also conducted at the LCI, presenting results within 2.0 % for long-term stability. The results of the remaining tests are in accordance with international standards. These ionization chambers were also submitted to quality control tests of mammography equipment: linearity of the air kerma rates, determination of half-value layers and mean glandular doses. The results for air kerma rate linearity were less than 10 %, as recommended in international standards. The mean glandular dose obtained with the developed chambers presented values comparable to those of commercial ionization chambers tested, with an estimated variation within international standards. (author)

  5. Atmospheric thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarne, J V

    1973-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the atmosphere is the subject of several chapters in most textbooks on dynamic meteorology, but there is no work in English to give the subject a specific and more extensive treatment. In writing the present textbook, we have tried to fill this rather remarkable gap in the literature related to atmospheric sciences. Our aim has been to provide students of meteorology with a book that can playa role similar to the textbooks on chemical thermodynamics for the chemists. This implies a previous knowledge of general thermodynamics, such as students acquire in general physics courses; therefore, although the basic principles are reviewed (in the first four chapters), they are only briefly discussed, and emphasis is laid on those topics that will be useful in later chapters, through their application to atmospheric problems. No attempt has been made to introduce the thermodynamics of irreversible processes; on the other hand, consideration of heterogeneous and open homogeneous systems permits a...

  6. Dark Matter Search Results from the PICO-60 CF$_3$I Bubble Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). et al.

    2015-10-26

    We reported new data from the operation of the PICO-60 dark matter detector, a bubble chamber filled with 36.8 kg of CF3I and located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory. PICO-60 is the largest bubble chamber to search for dark matter to date. With an analyzed exposure of 92.8 live-days, PICO-60 exhibits the same excellent background rejection observed in smaller bubble chambers. Alpha decays in PICO-60 exhibit frequency-dependent acoustic calorimetry, similar but not identical to that reported recently in a C3F8 bubble chamber. PICO-60 also observes a large population of unknown background events, exhibiting acoustic, spatial, and timing behaviors inconsistent with those expected from a dark matter signal. We found these behaviors allow for analysis cuts to remove all background events while retaining 48.2%of the exposure. Stringent limits on WIMPs interacting via spin-dependent proton and spin-independent processes are set, and the interpretation of the DAMA/LIBRA modulation signal as dark matter interacting with iodine nuclei is ruled out.

  7. Dark matter search results from the PICO-60 CF3I bubble chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C.; Asner, David M.; Ardid, M.; Baxter, D.; Behnke, E.; Bhattacharjee, P.; Borsodi, H.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Brice, S. J.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Clark, K.; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, P. S.; Crisler, M.; Dahl, C. E.; Daley, S.; Das, M.; Debris, F.; Dhungana, N.; Fallows, S.; Farine, J.; Felis, I.; Filgas, R.; Girard, F.; Giroux, G.; Grandison, A.; Hai, M.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, O.; Jin, M.; Krauss, C. B.; Lafreniere, M.; Laurin, M.; Lawson, I.; Levine, I.; Lippincott, W. H.; Mann, E.; Maurya, D.; Mitra, Pitam; Neilson, R.; Noble, A. J.; Plante, A.; Podviianiuk, R. B.; Priya, S.; Ramberg, E.; Robinson, A. E.; Rucinski, R.; Ruschman, M.; Scallon, O.; Seth, S.; Simon, P.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Stekl, I.; Vazquez Jauregui, Eric; Wells, J.; Wichoski, U.; Zacek, V.; Zhang, J.; Shkrob, Ilya A.

    2016-03-28

    New data are reported from the operation of the PICO-60 dark matter detector, a bubble chamber filled with 36.8 kg of CF3I and located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory. PICO-60 is the largest bubble chamber to search for dark matter to date. With an analyzed exposure of 92.8 livedays, PICO-60 exhibits the same excellent background rejection observed in smaller bubble chambers. Alpha decays in PICO-60 exhibit frequency-dependent acoustic calorimetry, similar but not identical to that reported recently in a C3F8 bubble chamber. PICO-60 also observes a large population of unknown background events, exhibiting acoustic, spatial, and timing behaviors inconsistent with those expected from a dark matter signal. These behaviors allow for analysis cuts to remove all background events while retaining 48.2% of the exposure. Stringent limits on weakly interacting massive particles interacting via spin-dependent proton and spin-independent processes are set, and most interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA modulation signal as dark matter interacting with iodine nuclei are ruled out.

  8. Chamber and field evaluations of air pollution tolerances of urban trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnosky, D.F.

    1981-04-01

    Results are presented for a study of the relative air pollution tolerances of 32 urban-tree cultivars as determined by both chamber fumigations and field exposures. Tolerances to ozone and sulfur dioxide, alone and in combination, were determined using short-term, acute doses administered while the plants were inside a plastic fumigation chamber located inside the Cary Arboretum greenhouses. In a follow-up study still underway, representatives of the same cultivars were outplanted at four locations in the greater New York City area. To date, only oxidant-type injury has been observed on trees in the field plots. Cultivars tolerant to all chamber and field exposures were Acer platanoides Cleveland, Crimson King, Emerald Queen, Jade Glen, and Summershade; Acer rubrum Autumn Flame and Red Sunset; Acer saccharum Green Mountain and Temple's Upright; Fagus sylvatica Rotundifolia; Fraxinus pennsylvanica Summit; and Ginkgo biloba Fastigate and Sentry. Cultivars sensitive to ozone as determined by the chamber and field tests and that may serve as bioindicators of the presence of ozone were Gleditsia triacanthos inermis imperial and Platanus acerifolia Bloodgood.

  9. Dark Matter Search Results from the PICO-60 CF$_3$I Bubble Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Asner, D M; Baxter, D; Behnke, E; Bhattacharjee, P; Borsodi, H; Bou-Cabo, M; Brice, S J; Broemmelsiek, D; Clark, K; Collar, J I; Cooper, P S; Crisler, M; Dahl, C E; Daley, S; Das, M; Debris, F; Dhungana, N; Farine, J; Felis, I; Filgas, R; Girard, F; Giroux, G; Grandison, A; Hai, M; Hall, J; Harris, O; Jin, M; Krauss, C B; Fallows, S; Lafrenière, M; Laurin, M; Lawson, I; Levine, I; Lippincott, W H; Mann, E; Maurya, D; Mitra, P; Neilson, R; Noble, A J; Plante, A; Podviianiuk, R B; Priya, S; Ramberg, E; Robinson, A E; Rucinski, R; Ruschman, M; Scallon, O; Seth, S; Simon, P; Sonnenschein, A; Štekl, I; Vàzquez-Jàuregui, E; Wells, J; Wichoski, U; Zacek, V; Zhang, J; Shkrob, I A

    2015-01-01

    New data are reported from the operation of the PICO-60 dark matter detector, a bubble chamber filled with 36.8 kg of CF$_3$I and located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory. PICO-60 is the largest bubble chamber to search for dark matter to date. With an analyzed exposure of 92.8 live-days, PICO-60 exhibits the same excellent background rejection observed in smaller bubble chambers. Alpha decays in PICO-60 exhibit frequency-dependent acoustic calorimetry, similar but not identical to that reported recently in a C$_3$F$_8$ bubble chamber. PICO-60 also observes a large population of unknown background events, exhibiting acoustic, spatial, and timing behaviors inconsistent with those expected from a dark matter signal. These behaviors allow for analysis cuts to remove all background events while retaining $48.2\\%$ of the exposure. Stringent limits on WIMPs interacting via spin-dependent proton and spin-independent processes are set, and the interpretation of the DAMA/LIBRA modulation signal as dark matter inte...

  10. Does Pluto have a substantial atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of CH4 ice on Pluto implies that Pluto may have a substantial atmosphere consisting of heavy gases. Without such an atmosphere, sublimation of the CH4 ice would be so rapid on a cosmogonic time scale that either such an atmosphere would soon develop through the exposure of gases trapped in the CH4 ice or else the surface CH4 ice would soon be all sublimated away as other, more stable, ices became exposed. If such stable ices were present from the beginning, the existence of CH4 frosts would also imply that Pluto's present atmosphere contains a remnant of its primordial atmosphere

  11. Bulky PAH-DNA induced by exposure of a co-culture model of human alveolar macrophages and embryonic epithelial cells to atmospheric particulate pollution; Adduits encombrants a l'ADN dans des cocultures de cellules pulmonaires humaines exposees a une pollution atmospherique particulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Imane; Garcon, Guillaume; Billet, Sylvain; Shirali, Pirouz [Universite Lille Nord de France - Lille (France); Unite de Chimie Environnementale et Interactions sur le Vivant, MREI, Universite du Littoral Cote d' Opale, Dunkerque (France); Andre, Veronique; Le Goff, Jeremie; Sichel, Francois [GRECAN, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie et centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Roy Saint-Georges, Francoise; Mulliez, Philippe [Service de Pneumologie, Hopital Saint-Philibert, GHICL, Lille (France)

    2012-01-15

    Because of their deep penetration in human lungs, fine airborne particulate matter were described as mainly responsible for the deleterious effects of exposure to air pollution on health. Organic constituents are adsorbed on particles surface and, after inhalation, some (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) can be activated into reactive metabolites and can bind to DNA. The formation of bulky DNA adducts has been researched after exposure of mono-and co-cultures of alveolar macrophages (AM) and human embryonic human lung epithelial (L132), to fine air pollution particulate matter Air samples have been collected with cascade impactor and characterized: size distribution (92.15% < 2.5{mu}.m), specific surface area (1 m{sup 2}/g), inorganic (Fe, AI, Ca, Na, K, Mg, Pb, etc.) and organic compounds (PAHs, etc.). {sup 32}P post-labeling method was applied to detect bulky DNA adducts in AM and L132, in mono-and co-cultures, 72 h after their exposure to atmospheric particles at their Lethals and Effects concentrations or (LC or CE) to 50% (i.e. MA: EC{sub 50} = 74.63 {mu}g/mL and L132: LC-5-0 = 75.36 {mu}g/mL). Exposure to desorbed particles (MA: C1= 61.11 {mu}g/mL and L132 : C2 = 61.71 {mu}g/mL) and B[a]P (1 {mu}M) were included. Bulky PAH-DNA adducts were detected in AM in mono-culture after exposure to total particles (Pt), to B[a]P and desorbed particles (Pd). Whatever the exposure, no DNA adduct was detected in L132 in mono-culture. These results are coherent with the enzymatic activities of cytochrome P450 l Al in AM and L132. Exposure of co-culture to Pt, or Pd induced bulky adducts to DNA in AM but not in L132. Exposure to B[a]P alone has altered the DNA of AM and L132, in co-culture. Exposure to Pt is closer to the environmental conditions, but conferred an exposure to amounts of genotoxic agents compared to studies using organic extracts. The formation of bulky DNA adducts was nevertheless observed in AM exposed to Pt, in mono- or co-culture, indicating that

  12. Note: Fabrication of a fast-response and user-friendly environmental chamber for atomic force microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Han, Tingting; Song, Xiaoxue; Pan, Chengbin; Lanza, Mario, E-mail: mlanza@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano & Soft Materials, Soochow University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science & Technology, 199 Ren-Ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-10-15

    The atomic force microscope is one of the most widespread tools in science, but many suppliers do not provide a competitive solution to make experiments in controlled atmospheres. Here, we provide a solution to this problem by fabricating a fast-response and user-friendly environmental chamber. We corroborate the correct functioning of the chamber by studying the formation of local anodic oxidation on a silicon sample (biased under opposite polarities), an effect that can be suppressed by measuring in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. The usefulness of this chamber goes beyond the example here presented, and it could be used in many other fields of science, including physics, mechanics, microelectronics, nanotechnology, medicine, and biology.

  13. The arrival of the CLOUD chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN AVC

    2009-01-01

    The team from the CLOUD experiment - the world’s first experiment using a high-energy particle accelerator to study the climate - were on cloud nine after the arrival of their new three-metre diameter cloud chamber. This marks the end of three years’ R&D; and design, and the start of preparations for data taking later this year.

  14. Acoustical-Levitation Chamber for Metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Trinh, E.; Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Sample moved to different positions for heating and quenching. Acoustical levitation chamber selectively excited in fundamental and second-harmonic longitudinal modes to hold sample at one of three stable postions: A, B, or C. Levitated object quickly moved from one of these positions to another by changing modes. Object rapidly quenched at A or C after heating in furnace region at B.

  15. Vacuum chamber for intersection I-4

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Vacuum chamber for intersection I-4 of the ISR being assembled inside a wooden mock-up of the gap of the split-field magnet. The central round-cylinder section is provisional and is to be replaced by an elliptic-cylinder section to give more space vertically for installation of detectors. Supports for the central section are of carbon fibre composite.

  16. IKAR, a ionization chamber for WA9

    CERN Document Server

    1976-01-01

    This ionization chamber arrived at CERN from Leningrad for a high precision study of hadron elastic scattering by a CERN-Clermont-Ferrand-Leningrad-Lyon-Uppsala Collaboration in the H3 beam (WA9). G.A. Korolev (third from right) looks at the drawings.

  17. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted

  18. Prototype vacuum chamber for ISR intersection region

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The vacuum chambers at the ISR interaction regions had to be as transparent as possible to the secondary particles emerging from the collision points. Made from stainless steel or titanium, only a fraction of a millimeter thick, they were most delicate to handle.

  19. Prototype Vacuum Chamber for ISR Intersection Region

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The vacuum chambers at the ISR interaction region had to be as transparent as possible to the secondary particles emerging from the collision points. Made from stainless steel or titanium, only a fraction of a millimeter thick, they were most delicate to handle.

  20. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Craig L., E-mail: clolson66@msn.com

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted.

  1. Anterior Chamber Live Loa loa: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagmeni, G; Cheuteu, R; Bilong, Y; Wiedemann, P

    2016-01-01

    We reported a case of unusual intraocular Loa loa in a 27-year-old patient who presented with painful red eye. Biomicroscopy revealed a living and active adult worm in the anterior chamber of the right eye. After surgical extraction under local anesthesia, parasitological identification confirmed L. loa filariasis. PMID:27441005

  2. A mathematical model of aerosol holding chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Madsen, J; Berg, E;

    1999-01-01

    , Ontario, Canada), NebuChamber (Astra, Södirtälje, Sweden) and Nebuhaler (Astra) adapted for babies. The dose of fluticasone proportionate delivered by the Babyhaler (Glaxco Wellcome, Oxbridge, Middlesex, UK) was 80% of that predicted, probably because of incomplete priming of this spacer. Of the above...

  3. Anterior Chamber Live Loa loa: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagmeni, G.; Cheuteu, R.; Bilong, Y.; Wiedemann, P.

    2016-01-01

    We reported a case of unusual intraocular Loa loa in a 27-year-old patient who presented with painful red eye. Biomicroscopy revealed a living and active adult worm in the anterior chamber of the right eye. After surgical extraction under local anesthesia, parasitological identification confirmed L. loa filariasis. PMID:27441005

  4. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  5. Wave Phenomena in an Acoustic Resonant Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary E.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design and operation of a high Q acoustical resonant chamber which can be used to demonstrate wave phenomena such as three-dimensional normal modes, Q values, densities of states, changes in the speed of sound, Fourier decomposition, damped harmonic oscillations, sound-absorbing properties, and perturbation and scattering problems.…

  6. SEPAC system test in NASDA space chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, T.; Kuriki, K.; Kawashima, N.; Nagatomo, M.; Kudo, I.; Ninomiya, K.; Ushirokawa, A.; Ejiri, M.; Sasaki, S.

    1980-01-01

    Test results of the second NASDA space chamber test using SEPAC (Space Experiment with Particle Acceleration) prototype models are reviewed. A safety level of electrical charge is determined, the electromagnetic interference effect caused by an electron beam and MPD arcjet firing is evaluated, and beam spread for EBA software mask design is measured.

  7. Liquid ionization chambers for LET determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki;

    Liquid ionization chambers [1] (LICs) have have been used in the last decades as background dosemeters. Since a few years LICs are also commercially available for dosimetry and are used for measurements of dose distributions where a high spatial distribution is necessary. Also in the last decades...

  8. Development of pulmonary oxygen toxicity in rats after hyperoxic exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siermontowski Piotr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the effects of hyperbaric oxygen on lung aeration on an animal experimental model and compare the obtained results with the anticipated scope of damage to pulmonary parenchyma in humans under the same exposure conditions. The research was carried out on Black Hood rats that were kept in a hyperbaric chamber designed for animals in an atmosphere of pure oxygen and at overpressures of 0.15, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 MPa for 1, 2 or 4 h. After sacrificing the animals, histopathological specimens were obtained encompassing cross-sections of entire lungs, which were subjected to qualitative and quantitative examination with the use of the 121-point Haug grid. A statistically significant decrease in pulmonary parenchyma was observed as a result of an increasing oxygen partial pressure as well as with prolonged exposure time. The intensification of changes observed was much higher than expected on the basis of calculations performed with the use of tables.

  9. Development of Master Chamber Software for Data Acquisition of Ionization Chamber for Indus 2 RRCAT

    OpenAIRE

    Priyesh Soni; Mrs. B. Harita; Nawaz Ali Sayed

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this paper was to Develop Master control software for DAQ of ionization chamber for INDUS-2 beam lines for detection of X-ray flux by an Ionization chamber that will remotely control and monitor the ultra low current signal detection analog module precisely. This application will be useful to measure the intensity of X-ray flux through ionization chamber in a beam line of synchrotron radiation source which is mounted in INDUS-2. It is one of new technique of detection. Beam l...

  10. Atmospheric cloud physics laboratory project study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, W. E.; Stephen, L. A.; Usher, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    Engineering studies were performed for the Zero-G Cloud Physics Experiment liquid cooling and air pressure control systems. A total of four concepts for the liquid cooling system was evaluated, two of which were found to closely approach the systems requirements. Thermal insulation requirements, system hardware, and control sensor locations were established. The reservoir sizes and initial temperatures were defined as well as system power requirements. In the study of the pressure control system, fluid analyses by the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory were performed to determine flow characteristics of various orifice sizes, vacuum pump adequacy, and control systems performance. System parameters predicted in these analyses as a function of time include the following for various orifice sizes: (1) chamber and vacuum pump mass flow rates, (2) the number of valve openings or closures, (3) the maximum cloud chamber pressure deviation from the allowable, and (4) cloud chamber and accumulator pressure.

  11. Investigation on Atmospheric Corrosiveness in Hainan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    According to the results of four-year exposure tests for carbon steel samples in Hainan province, the influences of meteorological factors and Cl- on atmospheric corrosion were investigated. The feature of atmospheric corrosion in this area was summarized. A corrosive map for the area was drawn. The corrosion products on carbon steel at some typical places were analyzed by XRD and XPS.

  12. A chamber study of the influence of boreal BVOC emissions and sulphuric acid on nanoparticle formation rates at ambient concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Dal Maso, M.; Liao, L.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A; Kleist, E; Tillmann, R.; Sipilä, M.; Hakala, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; M. Ehn; V.-M. Kerminen; M. Kulmala; Worsnop, D.; Mentel, T.

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol formation from biogenic and anthropogenic precursor trace gases in continental background areas affects climate via altering the amount of available cloud condensation nuclei. Significant uncertainty still exists regarding the agents controlling the formation of aerosol nanoparticles. We have performed experiments in the Jülich Plant-Atmosphere Simulation Chamber with instrumentation for the detection of sulphuric acid and nanoparticles, and present ...

  13. Atmospheric Refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Calculations of atmospheric refraction are generally based on a simplified model of atmospheric density in the troposphere which assumes that the temperature decreases at a constant lapse rate from sea level up to a height equal to eleven km, and that afterwards it remains constant. In this model, the temperature divided by the lapse rate determines the length scale in the calculations for altitudes less than this height. But daily balloon measurements across the U.S.A. reveal that in some cases the air temperature actually increases from sea level up to a height of about one km, and only after reaching a plateau, it decreases at an approximately constant lapse rate. Moreover, in three examples considered here, the temperature does not remain constant at eleven km , but continues to decreases to a minimum at about sixteen kilometers , and then increases at higher altitudes at a lower rate. Calculations of atmospheric refraction based on this atmospheric data is compared with the results of simplified models.

  14. Atmospheric Dispositifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    as a spatial phenomenon, exploring a multiplicity of conditions that constitute their resonant origins – i.e. the production sites from and within they have emerged. The intention is also to argue that despite the fact that atmosphere as an aesthetic category has crystallised over the last few decades...

  15. Performance Of A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Exposed To The WANF Neutrino Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Arneodo, F; Bonesini, M; Borio di Tigliole, A; Boschetti, B; Bueno, A; Calligarich, E; Casagrande, F; Cavalli, D; Cavanna, F; Cennini, P; Centro, Sandro; Cesana, E; Cline, D; Curioni, A; De Mitri, I; De Vecchi, C; Dolfini, R; Ferrari, A; Ghezzi, A; Guglielmi, A; Kisiel, J; Mannocchi, G; Martinez de la Ossa, A; Matthey, C; Mauri, F; Montanari, C; Navas, S; Negri, P; Nicoletto, Marino; Otwinowski, S; Paganoni, M; Palamara, O; Pepato, Adriano; Periale, L; Piano Mortari, G; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F; Puccini, A; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Rancati, T; Rappoldi, A; Raselli, G L; Redaelli, N; Rondio, E; Rubbia, André; Rubbia, Carlo; Sala, P R; Sergiampietri, F; Sobczyk, J; Suzuki, S; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Terrani, M; Terranova, F; Tonazzo, A; Ventura, Sandro; Vignoli, C; Wang, H; Zalewska A

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of the first exposure of a Liquid Argon TPC to a multi-GeV neutrino beam. The data have been collected with a 50 liters ICARUS-like chamber located between the CHORUS and NOMAD experiments at the CERN West Area Neutrino Facility (WANF). We discuss both the instrumental performance of the detector and its capability to identify and reconstruct low multiplicity neutrino interactions.

  16. Dispersion, deposition and resuspension of atmospheric contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are discussed: dry deposition, oil shale fugitive air emissions, particle resuspension and translocation, theoretical studies and applications, and processing of emissions by clouds and precipitation. The concentration of contaminant species in air is governed by the rate of input from sources, the rate of dilution or dispersion as a result of air turbulence, and the rate of removal to the surface by wet and dry deposition processes. Once on the surface, contaminants also may be resuspended, depending on meteorological and surface conditions. An understanding of these processes is necessary for accurate prediction of exposures of hazardous or harmful contaminants to humans, animals, and crops. In the field, plume dispersion and plume depletion by dry deposition were studied by the use of tracers. Dry deposition was investigated for particles of both respiration and inhalation interest. Complementary dry deposition studies of particles to rock canopies were conducted under controlled conditions in a wind tunnel. Because of increasing concern about hazardous, organic gases in the atmosphere some limited investigations of the dry deposition of nitrobenzene to a lichen mat were conducted in a stirred chamber. Resuspension was also studied using tracers and contaminated surfaces and in the wind tunnel. The objective of the resuspension studies was to develop and verify models for predicting the airborne concentrations of contaminants over areas with surface contamination, develop resuspension rate predictors for downwind transport, and develop predictors for resuspension input to the food chain. These models will be of particular relevance to the evaluation of deposition and resuspension of both radionuclides and chemical contaminants

  17. Atmospheric scavenging of solid rocket exhaust effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

    1978-01-01

    Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments; a large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents, while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique used. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity. Characterization of the aluminum oxide particles substantiated the similarity between the constituents of the small scale rocket and the full size vehicles.

  18. Determinations of the correction factors for small fields in cylindrical ionization chambers based on measurement and numerical calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwangwoo; Choi, Wonhoon; Park, Sungho; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Bak, Jino

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the volume averaging effect for air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers to determine the correction factors in a small photon field for a given chamber. We measured output factors with several cylindrical ionization chambers, and by using a mathematical method similar to deconvolution, we modeled the non-constant and inhomogeneous exposure function in the cavity of the chamber. The parameters in the exposure function and the correction factors were determined by solving a system of equations that we had developed by using the measured data and the geometry of the given chamber. The correction factors (CFs) were very similar to those obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For example, the CFs in this study were found to be 1.116 for PTW31010 and 1.0225 for PTW31016 while the CFs obtained from MC simulations were reported as being approximately between 1.17 and 1.20 for PTW31010 and between 1.02 and 1.06 for PTW31016 in a 6-MV photon beam of 1 × 1 cm2. Furthermore, the method of deconvolution combined with the MC result for the chamber's response function showed a similar CF for PTW 30013, which was reported as 2.29 and 1.54 for a 1 × 1 cm2 and a 1.5 × 1.5 cm2 field size, respectively. The CFs from our method were similar, 2.42 and 1.54. In addition, we report CFs for PTW30013, PTW31010, PTW31016, IBA FC23-C, and IBA CC13. As a consequence, we suggest the use of our method to measure the correct output factor by using the fact that an inhomogeneous exposure causes a volume averaging effect in the cavity of air-filled cylindrical ionization chamber. The result obtained by using our method is very similar to that obtained from MC simulations. The method we developed can easily be applied in clinics.

  19. Ammonia concentration in an animal radon exposure facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental and dosimetric study on lung tumour induction by inhalation of radon daughters under indoor conditions has been started with the aim of analysing the various factors which determine the risk due to this inhalation. In the experimental part of the study, WAG/Rij rats will be exposed daily for a period of about 18 months in an exposure chamber to a relatively low concentration of radon daughter products. In chronic exposure chambers, ammonia is produced by the action of urease-positive bacteria in urine and faeces. There are reports showing that, in such exposure chambers, the ammonia concentrations will rise beyond acceptable levels. The ammonia concentration as a function of time has therefore been studied, as has means of reducing this concentration. The results demonstrate that, with the addition of Aqualloy granules the ammonia concentration can be reduced over a long period of time to a level for which no cooperative action with the radon exposure is expected. (Auth.)

  20. Temperature changes in the pulp chamber during dentin ablation with Er:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhao, Haibin; Zhan, Zhenlin; Guo, Wenqing; Xie, Shusen

    2012-12-01

    To examine the temperature changes in the pulp chamber during cavity preparation in dentin with the Er:YAG laser (2940 nm), a total 20 intact premolars teeth were divided into 4 groups for dentin ablation with different radiant exposures at 4Hz and 8Hz with and without water spray. A K-type thermocouple was used to monitor the temperature changes in pulp chamber during laser treatment. The total time of irradiation was 70 sec. the water spray rate was 3 mL/min. It showed that maximum temperature rise increases with the increasing of radiant exposure and pulse repetition rate and the additional water cooling during laser ablation can significantly reduce the temperature rise in pulp chamber which will benefit to avoid or reduce thermal damage to tooth structure and dental pulp. The highest rise of temperature in the pulp was achieved with 20 J/cm2 and 8 Hz (19.83°C ). For all sample without water spray, the rise of temperature was exceed 5 °C . In contrast, with water spray, the temperature rise in the pulp can be firmly controlled under 1°C. The results also indicated that ablation rate and efficiency can be enhanced by increasing the incident radiant exposure and pulse repetition rate, which simultaneously producing more heat accumulation in dental tissue and causing thermal damage to dental tissue. By applying an additional water spray, thermal damage can be significantly reduced in clinical application.

  1. Anterior chamber fixation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens: A novel technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sahap Kükner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the implantation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL in the anterior chamber (AC with the haptics passing through two iridectomies to the posterior chamber. A total of 33 eyes of 33 patients with inadequate posterior capsular support due to either previous aphakia or posterior capsular rupture during cataract extraction were included in the study. A double iridectomy was performed on all patients using a vitrectomy probe on the midperiphery of the iris. IOLs were implanted in the AC, and the haptics were passed through the iridectomies to the posterior chamber. The mean follow-up time was 25.3 months. AC hemorrhage occurred in five patients during the iridectomy procedure. Corneal edema was detected in eight of 14 patients with primary IOL insertions. Haptic dislocation was detected in only one patient. This technique may be a good alternative to scleral-fixated IOL implantation in eyes with aphakia.

  2. Achievable field strength in reverberation chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Eulig

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Feldvariable Kammern (FVK, engl.: modestirred- chamber werden unter anderem für EMV-Störfestigkeitsprüfungen verwendet. Ein häufig genanntes Argument, das die Einführung dieser Kammern als normgerechte Prüfumgebung vorantreiben soll, ist eine hohe Feldstärke, die im Vergleich zu anderen Testumgebungen mit relativ moderaten HF-Leistungen erreicht werden kann. Besonders für sicherheitskritische Geräte, wie Komponenten aus der Avionik- oder KFZ-Industrie, sind heutzutage Testfeldstärken von mehreren 100 V/m notwendig. Derart hohe Feldstärken können in Umgebungen, die ein ebenes Wellenfeld erzeugen oder nachbilden, nur mit großen HFLeistungen generiert werden. Durch die Resonanzeigenschaften einer FVK können demgegenüber mit sehr viel weniger Leistung und damit Verstärkeraufwand vergleichbare Werte der Feldstärke erzeugt werden. Allerdings sinkt mit zunehmendem Volumen die erreichbare Feldstärke bei gleicher Speiseleistung. Idealerweise sollen Feldvariable Kammern bei möglichst niedrigen Frequenzen für EMVTests nutzbar sein, was jedoch ein großes Kammervolumen erfordert. Das Problem, bei niedrigen Frequenzen hohe Feldstärken erzeugen zu können, relativiert deshalb den Vorteil von FVKn gegenüber bekannten Testumgebungen bei niedrigen Testfrequenzen. Der Posterbeitrag erläutert, welche Feldstärken in verschieden großen Feldvariablen Kammern beim Einspeisen einer bestimmten hochfrequenten Leistung erreicht werden können. Anhand dieser Ergebnisse wird aufgezeigt, oberhalb welcher Grenzfrequenz eine Anwendung von FVKn nur sinnvoll erscheint. Mode-stirred chambers (MSCs can be used for radiated immunity tests in EMC testing. Advantageous compared to conventional test methods is the high field strength which can here be generated with less RF-Power. This point is often the main argument for pushing the standardization of MSCs as an other EMC testing environment. Especially for safety-critical electronic equipment like avionic or

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study on surface reaction on titanium by laser irradiation in nitrogen atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface reaction on titanium due to pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation in a nitrogen atmosphere was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The laser, with a wavelength of 532 nm (SHG mode), was irradiated on a titanium substrate in an atmosphere-controlled chamber, and then the substrate was transported to an XPS analysis chamber without exposure to air. This in situ XPS technique makes it possible to clearly observe the intrinsic surface reaction. The characteristics of the surface layer strongly depend on the nitrogen gas pressure. When the pressure is 133 kPa, an oxynitride and a stoichiometric titanium nitride form the topmost and lower surface layers on the titanium substrate, respectively. However, only a nonstoichiometric titanium oxide layer containing a small amount of nitrogen is formed when the pressure is lower than 13.3 kPa. Repetition of laser shots promotes the formation of the oxide layer, but the formation is completed within a few laser shots. After the initial structure is formed, the chemical state of the surface layer is less influenced by the repetition of laser shots.

  4. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornero-López, Ana M.; Guirado, Damián; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, E-18012 Granada (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Servicio de Radioterapia, Unidad de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, E-46026 Valencia (Spain); Simancas, Fernando; Lallena, Antonio M. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Gazdic-Santic, Maja [Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Safety, Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of {sup 125}I seeds.Methods: Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for {sup 125}I selectSeed{sup TM} brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level.Results: Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber.Conclusions: Variations of the altitude and

  5. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    This report completes Clarkson University`s study of the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. In order to pursue this general goal, two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. Thus, two sets of specific goals have been established for this project. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are (1) Determine the formation rates of {circ}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay; (2) Examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size; (3) Measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and (4) Measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations.

  6. Model test study of evaporation mechanism of sand under constant atmospheric condition

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Yu Jun; DING, Wenqi; Song, Weikang

    2014-01-01

    The evaporation mechanism of Fontainebleau sand using a large-scale model chamber is studied. First, the evaporation test on a layer of water above sand surface is performed under various atmospheric conditions, validating the performance of the chamber and the calculation method of actual evaporation rate by comparing the calculated and measured cumulative evaporations. Second,the evaporation test on sand without water layer is conducted under constant atmospheric condition. Both the evoluti...

  7. Measuring evapotranspiration: comparison of eddy covariance, scintillometers and enclosed chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Mei Sun; Beringer, Jason; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Daly, Edoardo; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Rüdiger, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is the combination of evaporation from the soil surface and transpiration from plants. It is an important component of the hydrological cycle, particularly in arid and semi-arid areas where most of the precipitation is returned to the atmosphere via ET. It also drives the land-surface energy balance, largely affecting soil temperature and the heat exchange between the land and atmosphere. Therefore, the ability to quantify ET is important for accurate climate and weather predictions, as well as improving the management of water resources. Various methods for measuring ET are available, including gas chambers, lysimeters, Bowen-ratio energy balance stations, eddy-covariance systems, scintillometers, and space-borne sensors. These methods differ in spatial scales (from leaf to basin scale), time scales (seconds to days), principles (water-balance, mass-transfer, eddy-correlation, energy balance) and have their own strengths and limitations. For instance, point scale measurements, such as those obtained using lysimeters, assume that the sample is representative of a larger area, whereas measurements at a basin scale assume that the spatial average of all the other components in the water or energy balance equations can be measured accurately. The purpose of this study is to compare different techniques to measure ET across their respective scales and to identify causes of discrepancies between measurements. The final aim is to identify a technique or a combination of techniques to be used for verification of remote sensing evapotranspiration products. The study area is located in the Yanco Study Area (34.561°S, 35.170°S, 145.826°E, 146.439°E), situated within the western plains of the Murrumbidgee River catchment, in New South Wales, Australia. This area has been extensively monitored and a series of field experiments have been performed in the past to contribute to the pre- and post-launch algorithm development of earth observing

  8. The physics of Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    2004-01-01

    Over the last 3 years we investigated theoretical aspects of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) in order to clarify some of the outstanding questions on space charge effects, high efficiency of small gap RPCs, charge spectra, signal shape and time resolution. In a series of reports we analyzed RPC performance including all detector aspects covering primary ionization, avalanche multiplication, space charge effects, signal induction in presence of resistive materials, crosstalk along detectors with long strips and front-end electronics. Using detector gas parameters entirely based on theoretical predictions and physical models for avalanche development and space charge effects we are able to reproduce measurements for 2 and 0.3 mm RPCs to very high accuracy without any additional assumptions. This fact gives a profound insight into the workings of RPCs and also underlines the striking difference in operation regime when compared to wire chambers. A summary of this work as well as recent results on three-dimensiona...

  9. Tailored vacuum chambers for ac magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed LAMPF-II accelerator has a 60-Hz booster synchrotron and a 3-Hz main ring. To provide a vacuum enclosure inside the magnets with low eddy-current losses and minimal field distortion, yet capable of carrying rf image currents and providing beam stabilization, we propose an innovative combination pipe. Structurally, the enclosure is high-purity alumina ceramic, which is strong, radiation resistant, and has good vacuum properties. Applied to the chamber are thin, spaced, silver conductors using adapted thick-film technology. The conductor design can be tailored to the stabilization requirements, for example, longitudinal conductors for image currents, circumferential for transverse stabilization. The inside of the chamber has a thin, resistive coating to avoid charge build-up. The overall 60-Hz power loss is less than 100 W/m

  10. HYLIFE-II reactor chamber mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical design features of the reactor chamber for the HYLIFE-II inertial confinement fusion power plant are presented. A combination of oscillating and steady, molten salt streams are used for shielding and blast protection. The system is designed for an 8 Hz repetition rate. Beam path clearing, between shots, is accomplished with the oscillating flow. The mechanism for generating the oscillating streams is described. A design configuration of the vessel wall allows adequate cooling and provides extra shielding to reduce thermal stresses to tolerable levels. The bottom portion of the reactor chamber is designed to minimize splash back of the high velocity (20 m/s) salt streams and also recover up to half of the dynamic head

  11. Reproducibility of the chamber scarification test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1996-01-01

    The chamber scarification test is a predictive human skin irritation test developed to rank the irritation potential of products and ingredients meant for repeated use on normal and diseased skin. 12 products or ingredients can be tested simultaneously on the forearm skin of each volunteer....... The test combines with the procedure scratching of the skin at each test site and subsequent closed patch tests with the products, repeated daily for 3 days. The test is performed on groups of human volunteers: a skin irritant substance or products is included in each test as a positive control......, and a compound with low irritant potential as a negative control, to obtain relative characterization of the irritant potential of the unknown products. The outcome of tests with a positive and negative control product used repeatedly in 13 chamber scarification tests over a 7-year period is reported, and shows...

  12. Search for impurities of counting gases in ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reach for the gas detectors applied at the ALADIN spectrometer of the GSI an as good as possible and timely remaining gas purity, a study on the kind and effects of impurities in different counting gases was performed. The gas purity was observed via the signal height of an α source after a drift path of the electrons of 50 cm. A steady decrease of the α-signals was measures, the steepness of which decreases slowly as function of the time. The half-life lies in the range of weeks, which lets conclude on a slow outgassing from the materials of the arrangement. By a gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy these impurities could be determined. Beside impurities by polar molecules as water and oxygen from the atmosphere, which are deposed in microscopical capillaries of the chamber materials and then outgassed in the samples after several days so-called softeners could be observed. Because these impurities in the arrangement at the ALADIN spectrometer cannot be avoided, a purification system in the flow-through operation was constructed and its effect tested. The gas quality can by this over several days be kept in the mean constant. In this dynamical process the fluctuations of the signal heights lie at ±0.7%. A ionization chamber as monitor for the gas purity was constructed and tested with different gas mixtures concerning observables like signal height and drift time. By this calibrated monitor in the experiment at the ALADIN spectrometer the gas quality can be independently determined. (orig.)

  13. The fast Ice Nucleus chamber FINCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundke, U.; Nillius, B.; Jaenicke, R.; Wetter, T.; Klein, H.; Bingemer, H.

    2008-11-01

    We present first results of our new developed Ice Nucleus (IN) counter FINCH from the sixth Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6) campaign at Jungfraujoch station, 3571 m asl. Measurements were made at the total and the ICE CVI inlet. Laboratory measurements of ice onset temperatures by FINCH are compared to those of the static diffusion chamber FRIDGE (FRankfurt Ice Deposition Freezing Experiment). Within the errors of both new instruments the results compare well to published data.

  14. The Bern Infinitesimal Bubble Chamber (BIBC)

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The chamber body was machined from a block of aluminium. The visible volume was cylindrical with 65 mm diameter and 35 mm depth. It was filled with propane or freon. It was meant as vertex detector in the search of short-lived particles. It was also used with in-line holography resulting in 8 µm bubble size and 9 cm depth of the field. See E. Ramseyer, B. Hahn and E. Hugentobler, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 201 (1982) 335.

  15. Comment on 'Proton beam monitor chamber calibration'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmans, Hugo; Vatnitsky, Stanislav M

    2016-09-01

    We comment on a recent article (Gomà et al 2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) which compares different routes of reference dosimetry for the energy dependent beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams. In this article, a 3% discrepancy is reported between a Faraday cup and a plane-parallel ionization chamber in the experimental determination of the number of protons per monitor unit. It is further claimed that similar discrepancies between calorimetry and ionization chamber based dosimetry indicate that [Formula: see text]-values tabulated for proton beams in IAEA TRS-398 might be overestimated. In this commentary we show, however, that this supporting argument misrepresents the evidence in the literature and that the results presented, together with published data, rather confirm that there exist unresolved problems with Faraday cup dosimetry. We also show that the comparison in terms of the number of protons gives a biased view on the uncertainty estimates for both detectors while the quantity of interest is absorbed dose to water or dose-area-product to water, even if a beam monitor is calibrated in terms of the number of protons. Gomà et al (2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) also report on the discrepancy between cylindrical and plane-parallel ionization chambers and confirm experimentally that in the presence of a depth dose gradient, theoretical values of the effective point of measurement, or alternatively a gradient correction factor, account for the discrepancy. We believe this does not point to an error or shortcoming of IAEA TRS-398, which prescribes taking the centre of cylindrical ionization chambers as reference point, since it recommends reference dosimetry to be performed in the absence of a depth dose gradient. But these observations reveal that important aspects of beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams are not addressed in IAEA TRS-398 given that those types of beams were not widely implemented at the time of its publication

  16. High pressure hydrogen time projection chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a high pressure hydrogen gas time projection chamber which consists of two cylindrical drift regions each 45 cm in diameter and 75 cm long. Typically, at 15 atm of H2 with 2 kV/cm drift field and 7 kV on the 35μ sense wires, the drift velocity is about 0.5 cm/μsec and the spatial resolution +-200μ

  17. Improvement of a New Gas Ionization Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to identify heavier elements, we have developed a new longitudinal field gas ionization chamber (IC)with an angle of 30° of plate (as shown in Fig.1). The IC is operated in flowing iso-butane gas at a pressure of 10kPa. After testing by using a 3- component α particle source and comparing with the old longitudinal field

  18. Development and progress in resistive plate chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong-Fang; WU Jian

    2004-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) is a robust and low cost gas detector, which is extensively used in high-energy physics, cosmic and astroparticle physics experiments. Over the past twenty years, as a particle detector,RPC has made remarkable progress. The main achievements, features and results of experiemantal tests including R&D and production of the RPCs by several Chinese groups in recent years are reported in this article.

  19. Neutron measurements performed with miniature fission chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research aims at proposing solutions regarding instruments to perform neutron flow measurements in nuclear power reactors and to perform measurements of the reaction rates of highly radioactive transuranic fissile elements in experimental reactors. This research is also part of a program aimed at the adjustment of the Cadarache cross section set. The report defines the instrumentation, recalls the operation of fission chambers, discusses the implemented instrumentation, and discusses the obtained measurements

  20. Vacuum Chamber for the Booster Bending Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    To minimise eddy currents, induced by the rising magnetic field, the chamber was made from thin stainless steel of high specific electric resistance. For mechanical strength, it was corrugated in a hydro-forming process. The cross-section was designed for maximum strength and maximum aperture. To accept particles with simultaneous large amplitudes in both planes, the cross-section approaches a rectangular shape (see also 7402463).

  1. Wire chambers with their magnetostrictive readout

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    This set of wire chamber planes shaped as a cylinder sector was installed inside the magnet of a polarized spin target modified to allow as well momentum analysis of the produced particles. The experiment (S126) was set up by the CERN-Trieste Collaboration in the PS beam m9 to measure spin effects in the associated production of of a positive kaon and a positive Sigma by interaction of a positive pion with polarized protons.

  2. Foreign Body Embedded in Anterior Chamber Angle

    OpenAIRE

    Shmuel Graffi; Beatrice Tiosano; Ran Ben Cnaan; Jonathan Bahir; Modi Naftali

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. We present a case of a metallic foreign body embedded in the anterior chamber angle. After standing in close proximity to a construction worker breaking a tile, a 26-year-old woman using soft contact lens for the correction of mild myopia presented to emergency department for evaluation of a foreign body sensation of her right eye. Methods and Results. Diagnosis was confirmed by gonioscopic examination and a noncontrast CT scan of head and orbits. The foreign body was removed by...

  3. Angular resolution of stacked resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Samuel, Deepak; Murgod, Lakshmi P

    2016-01-01

    We present here detailed derivations of mathematical expressions for the angular resolution of a set of stacked resistive plate chambers (RPCs). The expressions are validated against experimental results using data collected from the prototype detectors (without magnet) of the upcoming India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). In principle, these expressions can be used for any other detector with an architecture similar to that of RPCs.

  4. Design of an ionization diffusion chamber detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototype of an Ionization Diffusion Chamber detector has been made. It is a silindrical glass, 20 cm in diameter, 13,5 cm in height, air gas filled, operated at room pressure and room temperature at the top of this instrument while for the box temperature dry ice (CO2 solid) temperature is used. This detector is ready for seeing alpha and beta particle tracks. (author)

  5. The 'Diogene' detector, 4π drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Diogene' is a detector with a solid angle near the steradian 4π, mainly comprising a drift chamber and capable of detecting in coincidence several tens of charged particles. Built by several laboratories (Dph-N/Saclay, CRN/Strasbourg and LPC/Clermont-Ferrand) it should be ready round about June 1980 to use the heavy ion beams of Saturne II for studying the multiple production of pions and protons in central collisions of relativistic heavy ions

  6. Bubble Chambers for Experiments in Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    DiGiovine, B.; Henderson, D.; Holt, R. J.; Rehm, K. E.; Raut, R.; Robinson, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Rusev, G.; A.P. Tonchev; Ugalde, C.

    2015-01-01

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with gamma-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning...

  7. Bubble chamber: D meson production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    This event shows real particle tracks from the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC), which was used to observe neutrino and hadron beams between 1973 and 1984 from the PS and SPS accelerators. In this event a neutrino interacts with a proton producing an excited D meson. A labeled diagram is seen on the right as the particles spiral in the magnetic field of the detector.

  8. Posterior Chamber Hemorrhage during Fluorescein Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A. P. Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the first reported case of acute posterior chamber hemorrhage during fluorescein angiography (FA. This is a case review with serial color photographs of the anterior segment. A 76-year-old male was referred for angiographic control of age-related macular degeneration. He was pseudophakic OU, BCVA 20/40 OU. He had mild hypertension, but not diabetes. He had had two previous angiograms without adverse effects. Difficulty was experienced in obtaining the images owing to a progressive reduction in the transparency of the media. A dense hemorrhage in the posterior chamber of the right eye was found, involving the visual axis. Thorough biomicroscopy, gonioscopy, and ultrasonic biomicroscopy showed that part of one of the haptics of the right intraocular lens (IOL was touching and tearing the posterior face of the iris, without any visible synechiae, iris, or angle neovascularization. Anterior segment FA and posterior ultrasonography were normal. No similar case has been described in the literature involving dense progressive bleeding located in the capsular bag and posterior chamber, without any detectable triggering ocular event other than mydriasis and fluorescein injection. Contact of the iris or sulcus with part of the intraocular lens, aggravated by the intense use of mydriatics during the FA procedure, probably caused bleeding to happen.

  9. Chamber Design For Slow Nucleation Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc Lee

    1995-01-01

    Multiple-chamber dialysis apparatus grows protein crystals on Earth or in microgravity with minimum of intervention by technician. Use of multiple chambers provides gradation of nucleation and growth rates.

  10. Introduction to the Workshop "30 years of bubble chamber physics"

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgio GiacomelliUniversity of Bologna and INFN, Bologna, Italy

    2014-01-01

    After some recollections of the early bubble chamber times, a brief overview of the golden age of the field is made, including its legacy and the use of bubble chamber events for the popularization of science.

  11. Exposure of Research Personnel to Carbon Dioxide during Euthanasia Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amparan, Ashlee A; Djoufack-Momo, Shelly M; Grunden, Beverly; Boivin, Gregory P

    2014-01-01

    CO2 is one of the most commonly used euthanasia agents for laboratory animals. Considerable research has gone into the effect of the agent on animals, but little has been done to examine potential human exposure during these procedures. In this study, we examine the CO2 concentrations to which personnel are exposed while euthanizing rodents with CO2. To examine the environmental levels of CO2 generated during euthanasia, we examined several variables including flow rate, inclusion of a cage in the euthanasia chamber, inversion of the euthanasia chamber, chamber size, distance from the euthanasia chamber, and room size. Under all conditions, CO2 concentrations in the room temporarily increased significantly to 600 to 4000 ppm. The results of this study show that, under several testing scenarios, occupational levels of CO2 did not exceed governmentally mandated allowable exposure limits during routine rodent euthanasia procedures. PMID:25199093

  12. Chemistry of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Chhabra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm−3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition and fragmentation (carbon loss as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.

  13. Chemistry of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm-3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.

  14. Smart ionization chamber for gamma-ray monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Drndarević Vujo R.; Jevtić Nenad J.; Rajović Vladimir M.; Stanković Srboljub J.

    2014-01-01

    A design and implementation of a smart ionization chamber suitable for connection into gamma radiation monitoring networks is presented in this paper. The smart ionization chamber consists of air-equivalent one liter ionization chamber with associated electronics and a built-in memory for storage of electronic data specifications. Generally, operating and measurement characteristics of the used ionization chamber are written into the memory chip attached to...

  15. Cone penetration tests in a virtual calibration chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Arroyo Alvarez de Toledo, Marcos; Butlanska, Joanna; Gens Solé, Antonio; Calvetti, Francesco; Jamiolkowski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A virtual calibration chamber was built using a threedimensional model based on the discrete-element method. The chamber was then filled with a scaled granular equivalent of Ticino sand, the material properties of which were selected by curve-fitting triaxial tests. Cone penetration tests were then performed under different initial densities and isotropic stresses. Penetration resistance in the virtual calibration chamber was affected by the same cone/chamber size effect that affects ph...

  16. The Impedance of the Ceramic Chamber in J-PARC

    CERN Document Server

    Shobuda, Yoshihiro; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Toyama, Takeshi

    2005-01-01

    The ceramic chamber is adopted at the RCS (rapid cycling synchrotron) in J-PARC. The copper stripes are on the outer surface of the chamber in order to shield the electro-magnetic field produced by the beam. The inner surface of the chamber is coated by TiN to suppress the secondary electron emission. In this paper, we calculate the strength of electro-magnetic field produced by the beam and evaluate the impedance of this ceramic chamber.

  17. Heterogeneous reactions of particulate matter-bound PAHs and NPAHs with NO3/N2O5, OH radicals, and O3 under simulated long-range atmospheric transport conditions: reactivity and mutagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariyasopit, Narumol; Zimmermann, Kathryn; Schrlau, Jill; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger; Yu, Tian-Wei; Dashwood, Roderick H; Tao, Shu; Simonich, Staci L Massey

    2014-09-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of ambient particulate matter (PM)-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitro-PAHs (NPAHs) with NO3/N2O5, OH radicals, and O3 were studied in a laboratory photochemical chamber. Ambient PM2.5 and PM10 samples were collected from Beijing, China, and Riverside, California, and exposed under simulated atmospheric long-range transport conditions for O3 and OH and NO3 radicals. Changes in the masses of 23 PAHs and 20 NPAHs, as well as the direct and indirect-acting mutagenicity of the PM (determined using the Salmonella mutagenicity assay with TA98 strain), were measured prior to and after exposure to NO3/N2O5, OH radicals, and O3. In general, O3 exposure resulted in the highest relative degradation of PM-bound PAHs with more than four rings (benzo[a]pyrene was degraded equally well by O3 and NO3/N2O5). However, NPAHs were most effectively formed during the Beijing PM exposure to NO3/N2O5. In ambient air, 2-nitrofluoranthene (2-NF) is formed from the gas-phase NO3 radical- and OH radical-initiated reactions of fluoranthene, and 2-nitropyrene (2-NP) is formed from the gas-phase OH radical-initiated reaction of pyrene. There was no formation of 2-NF or 2-NP in any of the heterogeneous exposures, suggesting that gas-phase formation of NPAHs did not play an important role during chamber exposures. Exposure of Beijing PM to NO3/N2O5 resulted in an increase in direct-acting mutagenic activity which was associated with the formation of mutagenic NPAHs. No NPAH formation was observed in any of the exposures of the Riverside PM. This was likely due to the accumulation of atmospheric degradation products from gas-phase reactions of volatile species onto the surface of PM collected in Riverside prior to exposure in the chamber, thus decreasing the availability of PAHs for reaction. PMID:25119270

  18. Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Dissipation within a Euthanasia Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoufack-Momo, Shelly M; Amparan, Ashlee A; Grunden, Beverly; Boivin, Gregory P

    2014-01-01

    CO2 euthanasia is used widely for small laboratory animals, such as rodents. A common necessity in many animal research facilities is to euthanize mice in sequential batches. We assessed the effects of several variables on the time it took for CO2 to dissipate within a chamber. Using standard euthanasia time, changes in flow rate were compared between a slow 15% fill rate for 7 min, and a slow 15% followed by a rapid 50% filling for a total of 5 min. Additional variables assessed included the effects of opening the lid after the completion of chamber filling, turning the chamber over after completion of filling, and the use and removal of a cage from within the chamber. For all trials, CO2 levels in the chambers peaked between 50% and 80%. After the gas was turned off, the concentration of CO2 dropped to below 10% CO2 within 2 min, except when the lid was left on the chamber, where concentration levels remained above 10% after 20 min. CO2 dissipation was significantly faster when the chamber was turned upside down after filling. Significant interaction effects occurred among the factors of cage presence within the chamber, flow rate, and chamber position. Only leaving the lid on the chamber had any practical implication for delaying CO2 dissipation. We recommend that users allow 2 min for CO2 to clear from the chamber before subsequent euthanasia procedures, unless the chamber is manipulated to increase the dissipation rate. PMID:25199098

  19. 21 CFR 878.5650 - Topical oxygen chamber for extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Topical oxygen chamber for extremities. 878.5650... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 878.5650 Topical oxygen chamber for extremities. (a) Identification. A topical oxygen chamber for extremities is a device...

  20. Installation and Commissioning of the new GLM Implantation Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Summer student report about the work with the new implantation chamber for the GLM branch of ISOLDE. In the context of this project an API for the vacuum system of the new chamber was developed and implemented in web application that will be used to control the new implantation chamber at some point.

  1. Bi-cone vacuum chamber in the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The "bi-cone" vacuum chamber in ISR intersection I-7, for experiment R702. Made from 0.28 mm thick titanium, it was at its time the most transparent chamber ever built. Ian Wilson is standing next to the chamber. See also 7609219.

  2. Characterization of a homemade ionization chamber for radiotherapy beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P; Perini, Ana P; dos Santos, Gelson P; Xavier, Marcos; Khoury, Helen J; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    A homemade cylindrical ionization chamber was studied for routine use in therapy beams of (60)Co and X-rays. Several characterization tests were performed: leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, stability, stabilization time, chamber orientation and energy dependence. All results obtained were within international recommendations. Therefore the homemade ionization chamber presents usefulness for routine dosimetric procedures in radiotherapy beams.

  3. Anechoic chamber in industrial plants. [construction materials and structural design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, E.; Juncu, O.; Lorian, R.; Marfievici, D.; Mararu, I.

    1974-01-01

    A light anechoic chamber for routine acoustical measurements in the machine building industry is reported. The outer housing of the chamber consists of modules cast in glass fiber reinforced polyester resin; the inner housing consists of pyramidal modules cut out of sound absorbing slates. The parameters of this anechoic chamber facilitate acoustical measurements according to ISO and CAEM recommendations.

  4. Characterization of a homemade ionization chamber for radiotherapy beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P; Perini, Ana P; dos Santos, Gelson P; Xavier, Marcos; Khoury, Helen J; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    A homemade cylindrical ionization chamber was studied for routine use in therapy beams of (60)Co and X-rays. Several characterization tests were performed: leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, stability, stabilization time, chamber orientation and energy dependence. All results obtained were within international recommendations. Therefore the homemade ionization chamber presents usefulness for routine dosimetric procedures in radiotherapy beams. PMID:22153889

  5. Engineering analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers for GEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, J.A.; Belser, F.C.; Pratuch, S.M.; Wuest, C.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mitselmakher, G. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Gordeev, A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Johnson, C.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Polychronakos, V.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Golutvin, I.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1993-10-21

    Structural analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers performed up to the date of this publication are documented. Mechanical property data for typical chamber materials are included. This information, originally intended to be an appendix to the {open_quotes}CSC Structural Design Bible,{close_quotes} is presented as a guide for future designers of large chambers.

  6. Open-top Chamber for in situ Research on Response of Mercury Enrichment in Rice to the Rising Gaseous Elemental Mercury in the Atmosphere%开顶式气室原位研究水稻汞富集对大气汞浓度升高的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈剑; 王章玮; 张晓山; 秦普丰; 陆海军

    2015-01-01

    In situ research was conducted on the response of mercury enrichment in rice organs to elevated gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) with open-top chambers ( OTCs) fumigation experiment and soil Hg enriched experiment. The results showed that Hg concentrations in roots were generally correlated with soil Hg concentrations (R = 0. 998 8, P 0. 05), indicating that Hg in rice roots was mainly from soil. Hg concentrations in stems increased linearly (RB = 0. 964 6, RU = 0. 983 1, P 0.05),与土壤汞含量呈显著正相关(R=0.9988,P<0.05),表明水稻根中的汞主要来自于对土壤中汞的吸收累积.水稻茎中汞含量随大气汞质量浓度的升高呈线性增加(RB=0.9646,RU=0.9831,P<0.05),且上部茎中汞含量高于下部茎;茎下部汞含量随土壤汞含量的升高呈线性增加(R=0.9901,P<0.05),茎上部汞含量随土壤汞含量的升高呈二次拟合增加(R=0.9989,P<0.05),且下部茎汞含量高于上部茎,说明茎汞含量受土壤和大气汞浓度的共同影响.水稻叶中汞含量与大气汞质量浓度呈显著正相关(R=0.9985,P<0.05),与土壤汞含量也有很好的线性关系(R=0.9983,P=0.0585),表明水稻从大气吸收的汞主要积累在叶片中,从土壤吸收的汞主要富集在根中并通过茎部向叶部传输.利用实验建立的函数关系对水稻地上生物质中汞的大气来源估算,至少60%~94%和56%~77%水稻叶和上部茎中的汞来自大气,而大气对下部茎仅贡献8%~56%.由此水稻地上部分生物质汞主要来自对大气汞的吸收,为区域大气汞的收支及汞循环模型提供理论依据.

  7. Oxidation Products of Biogenic Emissions Contribute to Nucleation of Atmospheric Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Riccobono, F.; Schobesberger, S.; Scott, CE; Dommen, J; Ortega, IK; L. Rondo; Almeida, J; Amorim, A.; BIANCHI, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; David, A.(CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva, Switzerland); Downard, A.; Dunne, EM; J. Duplissy; S. Ehrhart

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric new-particle formation affects climate and is one of the least understood atmospheric aerosol processes. The complexity and variability of the atmosphere has hindered elucidation of the fundamental mechanism of new-particle formation from gaseous precursors. We show, in experiments performed with the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN, that sulfuric acid and oxidized organic vapors at atmospheric concentrations reproduce particle nucleation rates observed in ...

  8. Novel application of a combustion chamber for experimental assessment of biomass burning emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusini, Ilaria; Pallozzi, E.; Corona, P.; Ciccioli, P.; Calfapietra, C.

    2014-09-01

    Biomass burning is an important ecological factor in the Mediterranean ecosystem and a significant source of several atmospheric gases and particles. This paper demonstrates the performance of a recently developed combustion chamber, showing its capability in estimating the emission from wildland fire through a case study with dried leaf litter of Quercus robur. The combustion chamber was equipped with a thermocouple, a high resolution balance, an epiradiometer, two different sampling lines to collect volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particles, and a portable analyzer to measure carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. VOCs were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after enrichment on adsorption traps, but also monitored on-line with a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Preliminary qualitative analyses of emissions from burning dried leaf litter of Q. robur found CO and CO2 as the main gaseous species emitted during the flaming and smoldering stages. Aromatic VOCs, such as benzene and toluene, were detected together with several oxygenated VOCs, like acetaldehyde and methanol. Moreover, a clear picture of the carbon balance during the biomass combustion was obtained with the chamber used. The combustion chamber will allow to distinguish the contribution of different plant tissues to the emissions occurring during different combustion phases.

  9. Determination of Correction Factors for Small Field Based on Measurement and Numerical Calculation using Cylindrical Ionization Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Kwangwoo; Park, Sungho; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Bak, Jino

    2015-01-01

    We studied the investigation of volume averaging effect for air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers to determine correction factors in small photon field for the given chamber. As a method, we measured output factors using several cylindrical ionization chambers and calculated with mathematical method similar to deconvolution in which we modeled non-constant and inhomogeneous exposure function in the cavity of chamber. The parameters in exposure function and correction factors were determined by solving a system of equations we developed with measurement data and geometry of the given chamber. Correction factors (CFs) we had found are very similar to that from Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. For example, CFs in this study were computed as 1.116 for PTW31010, and 1.0225 for PTW31016, while CFs from MC were reported as approximately between 1.17 and 1.20 for PTW31010, and between 1.02 and 1.06 for PTW31016 in of 6MV photon beam . Furthermore, the result from the method of deconvolution combined with MC for cham...

  10. A novel non invasive measurement of hemodynamic parameters: Comparison of single-chamber ventricular and dual-chamber pacemaker

    OpenAIRE

    Ingrid M. Pardede; Yoga Yuniadi

    2008-01-01

    We carried out a cross sectional study to analyze hemodynamic parameters of single-chamber ventricular pacemaker compared with dual-chamber pacemaker by using thoracic electrical bioimpedance monitoring method (Physio Flow™) - a novel simple non-invasive measurement. A total of 48 consecutive outpatients comprised of 27 single chamber pacemaker and 21 dual chamber were analyzed. We measured cardiac parameters: heart rate, stroke volume index, cardiac output index, estimated ejection fraction,...

  11. A novel non invasive measurement of hemodynamic parameters: Comparison of single-chamber ventricular and dual-chamber pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid M. Pardede

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We carried out a cross sectional study to analyze hemodynamic parameters of single-chamber ventricular pacemaker compared with dual-chamber pacemaker by using thoracic electrical bioimpedance monitoring method (Physio Flow™ - a novel simple non-invasive measurement. A total of 48 consecutive outpatients comprised of 27 single chamber pacemaker and 21 dual chamber were analyzed. We measured cardiac parameters: heart rate, stroke volume index, cardiac output index, estimated ejection fraction, end diastolic volume, early diastolic function ratio, thoracic fluid index, and systemic parameters: left cardiac work index and systemic vascular resistance index. Baseline characteristic and pacemaker indication were similar in both groups. Cardiac parameters assessment revealed no significant difference between single-chamber pacemaker and dual-chamber pacemaker in heart rate, stroke volume index, cardiac index, estimated ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, thoracic fluid index. There was significantly higher early diastolic function ratio in single-chamber pacemaker compared to dual-chamber pacemaker: 92% (10.2-187.7% vs. 100.6% (48.7-403.2%; p=0.006. Systemic parameters assessment revealed significantly higher left cardiac work index in single-chamber group than dual-chamber group 4.9 kg.m/m² (2.8-7.6 kg.m/m² vs. 4.3 kg.m/m² (2.9-7.2 kg.m/m²; p=0.004. There was no significant difference on systemic vascular resistance in single-chamber compared to dual-chamber pacemaker. Single-chamber ventricular pacemaker provides similar stroke volume, cardiac output and left cardiac work, compared to dual-chamber pacemaker. A non-invasive hemodynamic measurement using thoracic electrical bioimpedance is feasible for permanent pacemaker outpatients. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 25-32Keywords: Permanent pacemaker, single chamber, dual chamber, thoracic electrical bioimpedance, hemodynamic parameter

  12. Survival and ice nucleation activity of bacteria as aerosols in a cloud simulation chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Amato

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The residence time of bacterial cells in the atmosphere is predictable by numerical models. However, estimations of their aerial dispersion as living entities are limited by lacks of information concerning survival rates and behavior in relation to atmospheric water. Here we investigate the viability and ice nucleation (IN activity of typical atmospheric ice nucleation active bacteria (Pseudomonas syringae and P. fluorescens when airborne in a cloud simulation chamber (AIDA, Karlsruhe, Germany. Cell suspensions were sprayed into the chamber and aerosol samples were collected by impingement at designated times over a total duration of up to 18 h, and at some occasions after dissipation of a cloud formed by depressurization. Aerosol concentration was monitored simultaneously by online instruments. The cultivability of airborne cells decreased exponentially over time with a half-life time of 250 ± 30 min (about 3.5 to 4.5 h. In contrast, IN activity remained unchanged for several hours after aerosolization, demonstrating that IN activity was maintained after cell death. Interestingly, the relative abundance of IN active cells still airborne in the chamber was strongly decreased after cloud formation and dissipation. This illustrates the preferential precipitation of IN active cells by wet processes. Our results indicate that from 106 = cells aerosolized from a surface, one would survive the average duration of its atmospheric journey estimated at 3.4 days. Statistically, this corresponds to the emission of 1 cell that achieves dissemination every ~33 min per m2 of cultivated crops fields, a strong source of airborne bacteria. Based on the observed survival rates, depending on wind speed, the trajectory endpoint could be situated several hundreds to thousands of kilometers from the emission source. These results should improve the representation of the aerial dissemination of bacteria in numeric models.

  13. Radiological risk of building materials using homemade airtight radon chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab.; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12

    Soil based building materials known to contain various amounts of natural radionuclide mainly {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th series and {sup 40}K. In general most individuals spend 80% of their time indoors and the natural radioactivity in building materials is a main source of indoor radiation exposure. The internal exposure due to building materials in dwellings and workplaces is mainly caused by the activity concentrations of short lived {sup 222}Radon and its progenies which arise from the decay of {sup 226}Ra. In this study, the indoor radon concentration emanating from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples were measured in a homemade airtight radon chamber using continuous radon monitor 1029 model of Sun Nuclear. Radon monitor were left in the chamber for 96 hours with an hour counting time interval. From the result, the indoor radon concentrations for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples determined were 396 Bq m{sup −3}, 192 Bq m{sup −3}, 176 Bq m{sup −3} and 28 Bq m{sup −3}, respectively. The result indicates that the radon concentration in the studied building materials have more than 100 Bq m{sup −3} i.e. higher than the WHO action level except for Portland cement sample. The calculated annual effective dose for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples were determined to be 10 mSv y{sup −1}, 4.85 mSv y{sup −1}, 4.44 mSv y{sup −1} and 0.72 mSv y{sup −1}, respectively. This study showed that all the calculated effective doses generated from indoor radon to dwellers or workers were in the range of limit recommended ICRP action levels i.e. 3 - 10 mSv y{sup −1}. As consequences, the radiological risk for the dwellers in terms of fatal lifetime cancer risk per million for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement were calculated to be 550, 267, 244 and 40 persons respectively.

  14. SHAPE OF PRESSING CHAMBER FOR WOOD BIOMASS COMPACTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Krizan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this contribution is to present results of analyse of mathematical models of wood biomass compacting. Doesn't exist a lot of models which describes real state in pressing chamber and amount of factors impact at compacting process and thereby on briquette quality. According to our suggestion have also constructional parameters of pressing chamber (pressing spout and pressing ram expressive impact on result briquette quality. We did theoretical analyses which showed us that impact on briquette quality have also change of pressing chamber length, change of friction coefficient, change of pressing chamber conicalness and also change of pressing chamber diameter.

  15. Advanced photon source experience with vacuum chambers for insertion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last five years, a new approach to the design and fabrication of extruded aluminum vacuum chambers for insertion devices was developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). With this approach, three different versions of the vacuum chamber, with vertical apertures of 12 mm, 8 mm, and 5 mm, were manufactured and tested. Twenty chambers were installed into the APS vacuum system. All have operated with beam, and 16 have been coupled with insertion devices. Two different vacuum chambers with vertical apertures of 16 mm and 11 mm were developed for the BESSY-II storage ring and 3 of 16 mm chambers were manufactured

  16. Measuring the sensitivity of a boron-lined ion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron-lined ion chambers are used to monitor external neutron flux from fissionable materials assembled at the Los Alamos Critical Assembly Experiment Facility. The sensitivity of these chambers must be measured periodically in order to detect changes in filling gas and to evaluate other factors that may affect chamber performance. We delineate a procedure to measure ion chamber response using a particular neutron source (239PuBe) in a particular moderating geometry of polyethylene. We also discuss use of the amplifier, high-voltage power supply, recorders, and scram circuits that comprise the complete ion chamber monitoring system

  17. Liquid rocket combustion chamber acoustic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Magno de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 40 years, many solid and liquid rocket motors have experienced combustion instabilities. Among other causes, there is the interaction of acoustic modes with the combustion and/or fluid dynamic processes inside the combustion chamber. Studies have been showing that, even if less than 1% of the available energy is diverted to an acoustic mode, combustion instability can be generated. On one hand, this instability can lead to ballistic pressure changes, couple with other propulsion systems such as guidance or thrust vector control, and in the worst case, cause motor structural failure. In this case, measures, applying acoustic techniques, must be taken to correct/minimize these influences on the combustion. The combustion chamber acoustic behavior in operating conditions can be estimated by considering its behavior in room conditions. In this way, acoustic tests can be easily performed, thus identifying the cavity modes. This paper describes the procedures to characterize the acoustic behavior in the inner cavity of four different configurations of a combustion chamber. Simple analytical models are used to calculate the acoustic resonance frequencies and these results are compared with acoustic natural frequencies measured at room conditions. Some comments about the measurement procedures are done, as well as the next steps for the continuity of this research. The analytical and experimental procedures results showed good agreement. However, limitations on high frequency band as well as in the identification of specific kinds of modes indicate that numerical methods able to model the real cavity geometry and an acoustic experimental modal analysis may be necessary for a more complete analysis. Future works shall also consider the presence of passive acoustic devices such as baffles and resonators capable of introducing damping and avoiding or limiting acoustic instabilities.

  18. Fail-safe ion chamber errant beam detector tailored for personnel protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fail-safe ion chamber system is designed to be part of the personnel safety system (PSS) for the Los Alamos neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Its job is to protect the occupants of the experimental areas from large radiation doses caused by errant beam conditions during beam transport from the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) to the LANSCE neutron spallation target. Due to limited shielding between the beam transport line and the experimental area only if the beam losses in the transport line are very low. The worst case beam spill scenario is calculated to result in a personnel exposure of about 0.01 Gys/s (1 rad/s). Although the preferred solution is to increase the bulk shielding between the beam line and the experimental area, the physical dimensions of the site do not permit an adequate amount of shielding to be added. The solution adopted is a layered system of three types of highly reliable detector systems: a current limiter system located in the beam line, a neutron detector system located in the experimental areas, and an ion chamber system located on the walls of the beam line tunnels. The ion chamber system is capable of shutting off the beam in less than 0.5 s, resulting in a worst case personnel exposure of 0.005 Gys (0.5 rad). 4 figs

  19. Fail-safe ion chamber errant beam detector tailored for personnel protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fail-safe ion chamber system is designed to be part of the personnel safety system (PSS) for the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Its job is to protect the occupants of the experimental areas from large radiation doses caused by errant beam conditions during beam transport from the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) to the LANSCE neutron spallation target. The worst case beam spill scenario is calculated to result in a personnel exposure of about 0.01 Gys/s (1 rad/s). Although the preferred solution is to increase the bulk shielding between the beam line and the experimental area, the physical dimensions of the site do not permit an adequate amount of shielding to be added. The solution adopted is a layered system of three types of highly reliable detector systems: a current limiter system located in the beam line, a neutron detector system located in the experimental areas, and an ion chamber system located on the walls of the beam line tunnels. The ion chamber system is capable of shutting off the beam in less than 0.5 s, resulting in a worst case personnel exposure of 0.005 Gys (0.5 rad). 4 figs

  20. Field calibration studies for ionisation chambers in mixed high-energy radiation fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, C; Forkel-Wirth, D; Fuerstner, M; Mayer, S; Otto, Th; Roesler, S; Vincke, H

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring of ambient doses at work places around high-energy accelerators is a challenging task due the complexity of the mixed stray radiation fields encountered. At CERN, mainly Centronics IG5 high-pressure ionisation chambers are used to monitor radiation exposure in mixed fields. The monitors are calibrated in the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent H*(10) using standard, source-generated photon- and neutron fields. However, the relationship between ionisation chamber reading and ambient dose equivalent in a mixed high-energy radiation field can only be assessed if the spectral response to every component and the field composition is known. Therefore, comprehensive studies were performed at the CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility where the spectral fluence for each particle type has been assessed with Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, studies have been performed in an accessible controlled radiation area in the vicinity of a beam loss point of CERN's proton synchrotron. The comparison of measurements and calculations has shown reasonable agreement for most exposure conditions. The results indicate that conventionally calibrated ionisation chambers can give satisfactory response in terms of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields at high-energy accelerators in many cases. These studies are one step towards establishing a method of 'field calibration' of radiation protection instruments in which Monte Carlo simulations will be used to establish a correct correlation between the response of specific detectors to a given high-energy radiation field.