WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric energy redistribution

  1. THE EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION ON HOT JOVIAN ATMOSPHERES: HEAT REDISTRIBUTION AND ENERGY DISSIPATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, Rosalba [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Heng, Kevin [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Astronomy, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Pont, Frederic [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-20

    Hot Jupiters, due to the proximity to their parent stars, are subjected to a strong irradiating flux that governs their radiative and dynamical properties. We compute a suite of three-dimensional circulation models with dual-band radiative transfer, exploring a relevant range of irradiation temperatures, both with and without temperature inversions. We find that, for irradiation temperatures T{sub irr} {approx}< 2000 K, heat redistribution is very efficient, producing comparable dayside and nightside fluxes. For T{sub irr} Almost-Equal-To 2200-2400 K, the redistribution starts to break down, resulting in a high day-night flux contrast. Our simulations indicate that the efficiency of redistribution is primarily governed by the ratio of advective to radiative timescales. Models with temperature inversions display a higher day-night contrast due to the deposition of starlight at higher altitudes, but we find this opacity-driven effect to be secondary compared to the effects of irradiation. The hotspot offset from the substellar point is large when insolation is weak and redistribution is efficient, and decreases as redistribution breaks down. The atmospheric flow can be potentially subjected to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (as indicated by the Richardson number) only in the uppermost layers, with a depth that penetrates down to pressures of a few millibars at most. Shocks penetrate deeper, down to several bars in the hottest model. Ohmic dissipation generally occurs down to deeper levels than shock dissipation (to tens of bars), but the penetration depth varies with the atmospheric opacity. The total dissipated Ohmic power increases steeply with the strength of the irradiating flux and the dissipation depth recedes into the atmosphere, favoring radius inflation in the most irradiated objects. A survey of the existing data, as well as the inferences made from them, reveals that our results are broadly consistent with the observational trends.

  2. Atmospheric Heat Redistribution on Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Becker, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Infrared lightcurves of transiting hot Jupiters present a trend in which the atmospheres of the hottest planets are less efficient at redistributing the stellar energy absorbed on their daysides---and thus have a larger day-night temperature contrast---than colder planets. No predictive atmospheric model has been published that identifies which dynamical mechanisms determine the atmospheric heat redistribution efficiency on tidally locked exoplanets. Here we present a two-layer shallow water model of the atmospheric dynamics on synchronously rotating planets that explains the observed trend. Our model shows that planets with weak friction and weak irradiation exhibit a banded zonal flow with minimal day-night temperature differences, while models with strong irradiation and/or strong friction exhibit a day-night flow pattern with order-unity fractional day-night temperature differences. To interpret the model, we develop a scaling theory that shows that the timescale for gravity waves to propagate horizontall...

  3. ATMOSPHERIC HEAT REDISTRIBUTION ON HOT JUPITERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared light curves of transiting hot Jupiters present a trend in which the atmospheres of the hottest planets are less efficient at redistributing the stellar energy absorbed on their daysides—and thus have a larger day-night temperature contrast—than colder planets. To this day, no predictive atmospheric model has been published that identifies which dynamical mechanisms determine the atmospheric heat redistribution efficiency on tidally locked exoplanets. Here we present a shallow-water model of the atmospheric dynamics on synchronously rotating planets that explains why heat redistribution efficiency drops as stellar insolation rises. Our model shows that planets with weak friction and weak irradiation exhibit a banded zonal flow with minimal day-night temperature differences, while models with strong irradiation and/or strong friction exhibit a day-night flow pattern with order-unity fractional day-night temperature differences. To interpret the model, we develop a scaling theory which shows that the timescale for gravity waves to propagate horizontally over planetary scales, τwave, plays a dominant role in controlling the transition from small to large temperature contrasts. This implies that heat redistribution is governed by a wave-like process, similar to the one responsible for the weak temperature gradients in the Earth's tropics. When atmospheric drag can be neglected, the transition from small to large day-night temperature contrasts occurs when τwave∼√(τrad/Ω), where τrad is the radiative relaxation time and Ω is the planetary rotation frequency. Alternatively, this transition criterion can be expressed as τrad ∼ τvert, where τvert is the timescale for a fluid parcel to move vertically over the difference in day-night thickness. These results subsume the more widely used timescale comparison for estimating heat redistribution efficiency between τrad and the horizontal day-night advection timescale, τadv. Only because τadv ∼

  4. Atmospheric heat redistribution and collapse on tidally locked rocky planets

    CERN Document Server

    Wordsworth, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric collapse is likely to be of fundamental importance to tidally locked rocky exoplanets but remains understudied. Here, general results on the heat transport and stability of tidally locked terrestrial-type atmospheres are reported. First, the problem is modeled with an idealized 3D general circulation model (GCM) with gray gas radiative transfer. It is shown that over a wide range of parameters the atmospheric boundary layer, rather than the large-scale circulation, is the key to understanding the planetary energy balance. Through a scaling analysis of the interhemispheric energy transfer, theoretical expressions for the day-night temperature difference and surface wind speed are created that reproduce the GCM results without tuning. Next, the GCM is used with correlated-k radiative transfer to study heat transport for two real gases (CO2 and CO). For CO2, empirical formulae for the collapse pressure as a function of planetary mass and stellar flux are produced, and critical pressures for atmospher...

  5. Redistribution effects of energy and climate policy: The electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy and climate policies are usually seen as measures to internalize externalities. However, as a side effect, the introduction of these policies redistributes wealth between consumers and producers, and within these groups. While redistribution is seldom the focus of the academic literature in energy economics, it plays a central role in public debates and policy decisions. This paper compares the distributional effects of two major electricity policies: support schemes for renewable energy sources, and CO2 pricing. We find that the redistribution effects of both policies are large, and they work in opposed directions. While renewables support transfers wealth from producers to consumers, carbon pricing does the opposite. More specifically, we show that moderate amounts of wind subsidies can increase consumer surplus, even if consumers bear the subsidy costs. CO2 pricing, in contrast, increases aggregated producer surplus, even without free allocation of emission allowances; however, not all types of producers benefit. These findings are derived from an analytical model of electricity markets, and a calibrated numerical model of Northwestern Europe. Our findings imply that if policy makers want to avoid large redistribution they might prefer a mix of policies, even if CO2 pricing alone is the first-best climate policy in terms of allocative efficiency. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •CO2 pricing and renewables support have strikingly different impacts on rents. •Carbon pricing increases producer surplus and decreases consumer surplus. •Renewable support schemes (portfolio standards, feed-in tariffs) do the opposite. •We model these impacts theoretically and quantify them for Europe. •Redistribution of wealth is found to be significant in size

  6. Income- and energy-taxation for redistribution in general equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a 3-factor General Equilibrium (GE)-model with a continuum of ability, the employed choose optimal labour supply, and equilibrium unemployment is determined by benefits funded by wage- and energy-taxes. Aggregate labour and the net wage may increase or decrease with taxation (and unemployment), and conditions for a reduction in redistributive wage-taxes to be Pareto-improving are derived. A small energy tax always raises the net wage, providing the wage tax is reduced to maintain constant employment and a balanced budget. High ability households prefer higher energy taxes when externalities are uniformly distributed and non-distorting. (author)

  7. Energy redistribution dynamics in triarylamine-triarylborane containing hexaarylbenzenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeger, M; Holzapfel, M; Schmiedel, A; Lambert, C

    2016-05-21

    Two hexaarylbenzenes (HAB) 1 and 2 each decorated by three triarylamines (TAA) as electron donors and three triarylboranes (TAB) as electron acceptors in a symmetric (1) and asymmetric (2) fashion as well as one model compound (3) with only one donor-acceptor pair were investigated by ultrafast transient absorption and fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements revealed energy redistribution between localised, partly relaxed CT-states of the HABs 1 and 2 induced by dipole-dipole interaction with energy transfer time constants of ca. 3 ps. These results manifest symmetry breaking in the formally symmetric HAB 1 upon photoexcitation. PMID:27121104

  8. Nonlinear acoustic-gravity waves and dust particle redistribution in earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekova, Yu. N.; Popel, S. I.; Chen, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    A continuously stratified model of nonadiabatic terrestrial atmosphere with taking into account the temperature profile is developed to study a possibility of instability development of acoustic-gravity (AG-) waves. It is shown that the existence of the regions in the atmosphere where the instability conditions are satisfied is due to the cooperation of thermal flow of solar radiation, infrared emission of the atmosphere, water vapor condensation, as well as thermal conductivity. Large-amplitude vortices in Earth's troposphere and ionosphere and their possible structure as well as redistribution of dust particles in the ionosphere as a result of vortical motions are discussed. The following possibilities for the dust particle redistribution are studied: capture and evolution of dust particles in AG-vortices, formation of dust vortices as a result of involving a great number of dust particles into vortex motions, and formation of vertical and horizontal dust flows (streamers and zonal flows). It is shown that excitation of AG-vortices at the ionospheric altitudes as a result of development of AG-wave instability leads to a substantial transportation of dust particles and their mixing. Layers of dust particles with a thickness of about a kilometer, forming at the altitudes less than 120 km, distribute within the region of the existence of AG-vortical structures. As a result, at altitudes of 110-120 km, dust vortices can appear, and transportation of particles up to altitudes of 130 km becomes possible. One of the ways of transportation of dust particles in the ionosphere is dust flows, which are generated by dust vortices as a result of development of parametric instability.

  9. Partial redistribution in 3D non-LTE radiative transfer in solar atmosphere models

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhorukov, Andrii V

    2016-01-01

    Resonance spectral lines such as H I Ly {\\alpha}, Mg II h&k, and Ca II H&K that form in the solar chromosphere are influenced by the effects of 3D radiative transfer as well as partial redistribution (PRD). So far no one has modeled these lines including both effects simultaneously owing to the high computing demands of existing algorithms. Such modeling is however indispensable for accurate diagnostics of the chromosphere. We present a computationally tractable method to treat PRD scattering in 3D model atmospheres using a 3D non-LTE radiative transfer code. To make the method memory-friendly, we use the hybrid approximation of Leenaarts et al. (2012) for the redistribution integral. To make it fast, we use linear interpolation on equidistant frequency grids. We verify our algorithm against computations with the RH code and analyze it for stability, convergence, and usefulness of acceleration using model atoms of Mg II with the h&k lines and H I with the Ly {\\alpha} line treated in PRD. A typical...

  10. Biomass burning drives atmospheric nutrient redistribution within forested peatlands in Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponette-González, Alexandra G.; Curran, Lisa M.; Pittman, Alice M.; Carlson, Kimberly M.; Steele, Bethel G.; Ratnasari, Dessy; Mujiman; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2016-08-01

    Biomass burning plays a critical role not only in atmospheric emissions, but also in the deposition and redistribution of biologically important nutrients within tropical landscapes. We quantified the influence of fire on biogeochemical fluxes of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and sulfur (S) in a 12 ha forested peatland in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Total (inorganic + organic) N, {{{{NO}}}3}- –N, {{{{NH}}}4}+ –N, total P, {{{{PO}}}4}3- –P, and {{{{SO}}}4}2- –S fluxes were measured in throughfall and bulk rainfall weekly from July 2013 to September 2014. To identify fire events, we used concentrations of particulate matter (PM10) and MODIS Active Fire Product counts within 20 and 100 km radius buffers surrounding the site. Dominant sources of throughfall nutrient deposition were explored using cluster and back-trajectory analysis. Our findings show that this Bornean peatland receives some of the highest P (7.9 kg {{{{PO}}}4}3- –P ha‑1yr‑1) and S (42 kg {{{{SO}}}4}2- –S ha‑1yr‑1) deposition reported globally, and that N deposition (8.7 kg inorganic N ha‑1yr‑1) exceeds critical load limits suggested for tropical forests. Six major dry periods and associated fire events occurred during the study. Seventy-eight percent of fires within 20 km and 40% within 100 km of the site were detected within oil palm plantation leases (industrial agriculture) on peatlands. These fires had a disproportionate impact on below-canopy nutrient fluxes. Post-fire throughfall events contributed >30% of the total inorganic N ({{{{NO}}}3}- –N + {{{{NH}}}4}+ –N) and {{{{PO}}}4}3- –P flux to peatland soils during the study period. Our results indicate that biomass burning associated with agricultural peat fires is a major source of N, P, and S in throughfall and could rival industrial pollution as an input to these systems during major fire years. Given the sheer magnitude of fluxes reported here, fire-related redistribution of nutrients may have significant

  11. Pressure-strain energy redistribution in compressible turbulence: return-to-isotropy versus kinetic-potential energy equipartition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kurnchul; Venugopal, Vishnu; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2016-08-01

    Return-to-isotropy and kinetic-potential energy equipartition are two fundamental pressure-moderated energy redistributive processes in anisotropic compressible turbulence. Pressure-strain correlation tensor redistributes energy among various Reynolds stress components and pressure-dilatation is responsible for energy reallocation between dilatational kinetic and potential energies. The competition and interplay between these pressure-based processes are investigated in this study. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of low turbulent Mach number dilatational turbulence are performed employing the hybrid thermal Lattice Boltzman method (HTLBM). It is found that a tendency towards equipartition precedes proclivity for isotropization. An evolution towards equipartition has a collateral but critical effect on return-to-isotropy. The preferential transfer of energy from strong (rather than weak) Reynolds stress components to potential energy accelerates the isotropization of dilatational fluctuations. Understanding of these pressure-based redistributive processes is critical for developing insight into the character of compressible turbulence.

  12. Symmetry, vibrational energy redistribution and vibronic coupling: The internal conversion processes of cycloketones

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhlman, Thomas Scheby; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Sølling, Theis I.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we discern two basic mechanisms of internal conversion processes; one direct, where immediate activation of coupling modes leads to fast population transfer and one indirect, where internal vibrational energy redistribution leads to equidistribution of energy, i.e., ergodicity, and slower population transfer follows. Using model vibronic coupling Hamiltonians parameterized on the basis of coupled-cluster calculations, we investigate the nature of the Rydberg to valence excited-...

  13. Analyzing intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution via the overlap intensity-level velocity correlator

    OpenAIRE

    Keshavamurthy, Srihari; Cerruti, Nicholas R.; Tomsovic, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Numerous experimental and theoretical studies have established that intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) in isolated molecules has a heirarchical tier structure. The tier structure implies strong correlations between the energy level motions of a quantum system and its intensity-weighted spectrum. A measure, which explicitly accounts for this correaltion, was first introduced by one of us as a sensitive probe of phase space localization. It correlates eigenlevel velocities w...

  14. The anisotropic redistribution of free energy for gyrokinetic plasma turbulence in a Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Alejandro Bañón; Teaca, Bogdan; Jenko, Frank

    2016-04-01

    For a Z-pinch geometry, we report on the nonlinear redistribution of free energy across scales perpendicular to the magnetic guide field, for a turbulent plasma described in the framework of gyrokinetics. The analysis is performed using a local flux-surface approximation, in a regime dominated by electrostatic fluctuations driven by the entropy mode, with both ion and electron species being treated kinetically. To explore the anisotropic nature of the free energy redistribution caused by the emergence of zonal flows, we use a polar coordinate representation for the field-perpendicular directions and define an angular density for the scale flux. Positive values for the classically defined (angle integrated) scale flux, which denote a direct energy cascade, are shown to be also composed of negative angular sections, a fact that impacts our understanding of the backscatter of energy and the way in which it enters the modeling of sub-grid scales for turbulence. A definition for the flux of free energy across each perpendicular direction is introduced as well, which shows that the redistribution of energy in the presence of zonal flows is highly anisotropic.

  15. Wavelet Coefficients Energy Redistribution and Heisenberg Principle of Uncertainty

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vošvrda, Miloslav; Schurrer, J.

    Plzeň : University of West Bohemia, Plzeň, 2015, s. 894-899. ISBN 978-80-261-0539-8. [Mathematical Methods in Economics 2015 /33./. Cheb (CZ), 09.09.2015-11.09.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G097 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Heisenberg Principle of Uncertainty * signal energy * Wavelet Transformation * signal entropy Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/E/vosvrda-0449775.pdf

  16. Experimental study of a transformer with superconducting elements for fault current limitation and energy redistribution

    OpenAIRE

    Meerovich, V.; V. Sokolovsky

    2005-01-01

    Numerous proposed and developed superconducting fault current limiters and self-limiting transformers limit successfully fault currents but do not provide uninterrupted supplying of consumers. A design investigated in the work combines the functions of a conventional transformer with the functions of fast energy redistribution and fault protection. The device constitutes a transformer containing an additional high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil short-circuited by a thin film HTS switc...

  17. Symmetry, vibrational energy redistribution and vibronic coupling: The internal conversion processes of cycloketones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlman, Thomas Scheby; Sauer, Stephan P.A.; Sølling, Theis I.;

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we discern two basic mechanisms of internal conversion processes; one direct, where immediate activation of coupling modes leads to fast population transfer and one indirect, where internal vibrational energy redistribution leads to equidistribution of energy, i.e., ergodicity, and...... slower population transfer follows. Using model vibronic coupling Hamiltonians parameterized on the basis of coupled-cluster calculations, we investigate the nature of the Rydberg to valence excited-state internal conversion in two cycloketones, cyclobutanone and cyclopentanone. The two basic mechanisms...

  18. The anisotropic redistribution of free energy for gyrokinetic plasma turbulence in a Z-pinch

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro, Alejandro Banon; Jenko, Frank

    2015-01-01

    For a Z-pinch geometry, we report on the nonlinear redistribution of free energy across scales perpendicular to the magnetic guide field, for a turbulent plasma described in the framework of gyrokinetics. The analysis is performed using a local flux-surface approximation, in a regime dominated by electrostatic fluctuations driven by the entropy mode, with both ion and electron species being treated kinetically. To explore the anisotropic nature of the free energy redistribution caused by the emergence of zonal flows, we use a polar coordinate representation for the field-perpendicular directions and define an angular density for the scale flux. Positive values for the classically defined (angle integrated) scale flux, which denote a direct energy cascade, are shown to be also composed of negative angular sections, a fact that impacts our understanding of the backscatter of energy and the way in which it enters the modeling of sub-grid scales for turbulence. A definition for the flux of free energy across each...

  19. State transitions redistribute rather than dissipate energy between the two photosystems in Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocki, Wojciech J; Santabarbara, Stefano; Mosebach, Laura; Wollman, Francis-André; Rappaport, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis converts sunlight into biologically useful compounds, thus fuelling practically the entire biosphere. This process involves two photosystems acting in series powered by light harvesting complexes (LHCs) that dramatically increase the energy flux to the reaction centres. These complexes are the main targets of the regulatory processes that allow photosynthetic organisms to thrive across a broad range of light intensities. In microalgae, one mechanism for adjusting the flow of energy to the photosystems, state transitions, has a much larger amplitude than in terrestrial plants, whereas thermal dissipation of energy, the dominant regulatory mechanism in plants, only takes place after acclimation to high light. Here we show that, at variance with recent reports, microalgal state transitions do not dissipate light energy but redistribute it between the two photosystems, thereby allowing a well-balanced influx of excitation energy. PMID:27249564

  20. Twin boundary energy and characterization of charge redistribution near the twin boundaries of cupperate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Ab initio simulation for twin boundary energy in YBCO system for the 1st time. • Study of the twin boundary energy variation versus the inserted strain. • Proportionality of twin lamella width by the inserted strain. • Local charge transfer and charge redistribution on the twin planes. • Total DOSs for the twined system at Fermi level is higher than the untwined one. • This explain the effect of twin boundaries in agreement with experimental data. - Abstract: Ab-initio calculations under general gradient approximation have been employed for the first time to find out twin boundary energy, γ, in twined YBCO systems. Despite a vast discrepancy in reported experimental values, our results show that the γ value falls in the range of 40–85 mJ/m2. On the other hand, functional form of γ versus inserted strains shows that the mean value for the twin width lamella would tend to approach zero as the strain goes to zero. We have also investigated the local charge transfer and the modification of the electronic states of the basal and twin planes in YBCO, because the charge redistribution at interfaces can modify transport across the grains considerably and determine the applicability of high-Tc superconductors in the electronic applications. The total density of electronic states at the Fermi level for the twined system is enhanced in comparison with the untwined one. Our results explain the influence of twin boundaries in superconductive properties of YBCO, in experimental situations

  1. Note on the redistribution and dissipation of tidal energy over mid-ocean ridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinfeng Liang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The redistribution and dissipation of internal wave energy arising from the conversion at mid-ocean ridges of the barotropic tide is studied in a set of numerical experiments. A two-dimensional non-hydrostatic model with 100 m horizontal and 10–25 m vertical resolution is used to represent the detailed processes near an idealised ridge. Conventional internal wave beams at the tidal frequency, ωM2 , appear. At the ridge crest, strong tidal energy dissipation occurs that both mixes the fluid and generates strong near-inertial oscillations radiating in near-horizontal beams. Resonant triad interaction between the tidal and inertial motions in turn produces beams at (ωM2-f, and with high shear, thus effectively mixing fluid at considerable heights above the ridge crest.

  2. Theoretical investigation of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution in HFCO and DFCO induced by an external field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasin, Gauthier; Iung, Christophe; Gatti, Fabien; Richter, Falk; Léonard, Céline; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2008-10-14

    The present paper is devoted to a full quantum mechanical study of the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution in HFCO and DFCO. In contrast to our previous studies [Pasin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 124, 194304 (2006) and 126, 024302 (2007)], the dynamics is now performed in the presence of an external time-dependent field. This more closely reflects the experimental conditions. A six-dimensional dipole surface is computed. The multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method is exploited to propagate the corresponding six-dimensional wave packets. Special emphasis is placed on the excitation of the out-of-plane bending vibration and on the dissociation of the molecule. In the case of DFCO, we predict that it is possible to excite the out-of-plane bending mode of vibration and to drive the dissociation to DF+CO with only one laser pulse with a fixed frequency and without excitation of an electronic state. PMID:19045144

  3. Ion heating and energy redistribution across supercritical perpendicular shocks: Application to planetary and interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Liu, Y. D.; Richardson, J. D.; Parks, G. K.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate how the ion dissipative process across supercritical perpendicular shocks depends on the shock front micro-structures. At a collisionless plasma shock, the dissipation and micro-structure of the shock font are dominated by wave-particle interactions. Comparison of the ion thermalization at different kinds of shocks, e.g., planetary and interplanetary shocks, can quantify how much interaction is occurring at the shock boundary. Investigation of this problem for diverse solar wind (SW) conditions will yield important information on the dependences of the ion thermalization and energy redistribution on plasma parameters. With the aid of a successful automatic separation method [Yang et al., 2009], the incident ions at the shock can be divided into two parts: reflected (R) ions and directly transmitted (DT) ions. Corresponding heating efficiency of each population of ions at the shock can be calculated respectively. Wilkinson & Schwartz [1990] have theorized that the amount of reflected ions at perpendicular shocks depends on plasma parameters. Based on the Rankine-Hugoniot (R-H) conservation laws, they found that the fraction reflected is strongly dependent on the magnitude of the ratio of specific heat capacities γ chosen in the R-H relations. The main goal of this work is to investigate how the plasma parameters, e.g. the particle velocity distribution, the plasma beta value, seed populations, etc. (from a particle dynamic point of view), control the amount of reflected ions by using one-dimensional (1-D) full-particle-cell simulations. The simulation results may help to explain the ion heating efficiency and energy redistribution at shocks observed by Cluster, Wind, Voyager, etc.

  4. Low-energy atmospheric neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of a three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation of the low-energy spectrum and angular distribution of atmospheric neutrinos are presented and compared with earlier one-dimensional calculations valid at higher neutrino energies. The three-dimensional results agree with the one-dimensional calculation above 200 MeV, but are up to a factor of 2 lower below 50 MeV. Geomagnetic-cutoff effects on primary cosmic rays significantly reduce the neutrino flux at low geomagnetic latitudes. Azimuthal angular dependence shows a strong north-south asymmetry for upward-going fluxes, whereas an east-west effect is apparent only at low geomagnetic latitudes

  5. High-energy atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

    2010-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons that were produced through the cosmic rays collisions with air nuclei, form unavoidable background noise in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. The atmospheric neutrino flux above 1 PeV should be supposedly dominated by the contribution of charmed particle decays. These (prompt) neutrinos originated from decays of massive and shortlived particles, $D^\\pm$, $D^0$, $\\bar{D}{}^0$, $D_s^\\pm$, $\\Lambda^+_c$, form the most uncertain fraction of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux because of poor explored processes of the charm production. Besides, an ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. There is the energy region where above flux uncertainties superimpose. A new calculation presented here reveals sizable differences, up to the factor of 1.8 above 1 TeV, in muon neutrino flux predictions obtained with usage of known...

  6. Relaxation dynamics in quantum dissipative systems: The microscopic effect of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the effect of inter-mode coupling on the vibrational relaxation dynamics of molecules in weak dissipative environments. The simulations are performed within the reduced density matrix formalism in the Markovian regime, assuming a Lindblad form for the system-bath interaction. The prototypical two-dimensional model system representing two CO molecules approaching a Cu(100) surface is adapted from an ab initio potential, while the diatom-diatom vibrational coupling strength is systematically varied. In the weak system-bath coupling limit and at low temperatures, only first order non-adiabatic uni-modal coupling terms contribute to surface-mediated vibrational relaxation. Since dissipative dynamics is non-unitary, the choice of representation will affect the evolution of the reduced density matrix. Two alternative representations for computing the relaxation rates and the associated operators are thus compared: the fully coupled spectral basis, and a factorizable ansatz. The former is well-established and serves as a benchmark for the solution of Liouville-von Neumann equation. In the latter, a contracted grid basis of potential-optimized discrete variable representation is tailored to incorporate most of the inter-mode coupling, while the Lindblad operators are represented as tensor products of one-dimensional operators, for consistency. This procedure results in a marked reduction of the grid size and in a much more advantageous scaling of the computational cost with respect to the increase of the dimensionality of the system. The factorizable method is found to provide an accurate description of the dissipative quantum dynamics of the model system, specifically of the time evolution of the state populations and of the probability density distribution of the molecular wave packet. The influence of intra-molecular vibrational energy redistribution appears to be properly taken into account by the new model on the whole range of coupling strengths. It

  7. Rethinking Redistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Nilsson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In “From Redistribution to Recognition?” Nancy Fraser formulates a theory aiming at defending only those versions of identity politics that can be coherently combined with socialist politics. Many commentators have criticized the analytical distinction between economic and cultural injustice underpinning this theory. I argue, however, that it is Fraser’s inability to uphold this distinction that makes her argument problematic, and that a clearer analytical distinction between the categories class and identity, makes possible both a more theoretically satisfying critique of the “postsocialist” condition and the formulation of a radical politics that addresses economic as well as cultural injustices.

  8. Middle atmosphere electrical energy coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    The middle atmosphere (MA) has long been known as an absorber of radio waves, and as a region of nonlinear interactions among waves. The region of highest transverse conductivity near the top of the MA provides a common return for global thunderstorm, auroral Birkeland, and ionospheric dynamo currents, with possibilities for coupling among them. Their associated fields and other transverse fields map to lower altitudes depending on scale size. Evidence now exists for motion-driven aerosol generators, and for charge trapped at the base of magnetic field lines, both capable of producing large MA electric fields. Ionospheric Maxwell currents (curl H) parallel to the magnetic field appear to map to lower altitudes, with rapidly time-varying components appearing as displacement currents in the stratosphere. Lightning couples a (primarily ELF and ULF) current transient to the ionosphere and magnetosphere whose wave shape is largely dependent on the MA conductivity profile. Electrical energy is of direct significance mainly in the upper MA, but electrodynamic transport of minor constituents such as smoke particles or CN may be important at other altitudes.

  9. Redistribution effects resulting from cross-border cooperation in support for renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that international cooperation in achieving renewable energy targets, e.g., via a common tradable green certificate market, increases overall welfare. However, cooperation in the support of electricity from renewable energy sources also leads to regional price effects, from which some groups benefit while others lose. On a regional level, the introduction of cross-border cooperation in RES-E support generally has an opposite effect on support expenditures and wholesale electricity prices, as long as grid congestion between the different regions exists. In this paper, a theoretical model is used to analyze under which conditions different groups bene t or suffer from the introduction of cooperation. Findings of the analysis include that effects on consumers and total producers per country can only be clearly determined if no grid congestions between the countries exist. If bottlenecks in the transmission system exist, the relationship between the slopes of the renewable and the non-renewable marginal generation cost curves for electricity generation as well as the level of the RES-E target essentially determine whether these groups bene t or lose from the introduction of green certificate trading. In contrast, system-wide welfare always increases once cooperation in RES-E support is introduced. Similarly, welfare on the country level always increases (compared to a situation without RES-E cooperation) if the countries are perfectly or not at all physically interconnected. In the case of congested interconnectors, each country always at least potentially benefits from the introduction of certificate trade, taking into account possible distributions of congestion rents between the countries.

  10. Redistribution of whole-body energy metabolism by exercise. A positron emission tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our aim was to evaluate changes in glucose metabolism of skeletal muscles and viscera induced by different workloads using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) and three-dimensional positron emission tomography (3-D PET). Five male volunteers performed ergometer bicycle exercise for 40 min at 40% and 70% of the maximal O2 consumption (VO2max). [18]FDG was injected 10 min later following the exercise task. Whole-body 3-D PET was performed. Five other male volunteers were studied as a control to compare with the exercise group. The PET image data were analyzed using manually defined regions of interest to quantify the regional metabolic rate of glucose (rMRGlc). Group comparisons were made using analysis of variance, and significant differences (P18F]FDG-PET can be used as an index of organ energy metabolism for moderate exercise workloads (70% VO2max). The results of this investigation may contribute to sports medicine and rehabilitation science. (author)

  11. Competition between Reaction and Intramolecular Energy Redistribution in Solution. Observation and Nature of Nonstatistical Dynamics in the Ozonolysis of Vinyl Ethers

    OpenAIRE

    Quijano, Larisa Mae M.; Singleton, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental product ratios in ozonolyses of alkyl vinyl ethers in solution do not fit with expectations from statistical rate theories. The selectivity among cleavage pathways increases with the size of the alkyl group but to an extent that is far less than RRKM theory would predict. Trajectory studies account for the observed selectivities and support a mechanism involving a competition between cleavage of the primary ozonide and intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution. An approxim...

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 3: Atmospheric Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This 1989 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment, safety, and health conducted during fiscal year 1989. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. This volume contains research in the atmospheric sciences. Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at PNL are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, continental, and global scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. The redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. Eventually, large-scale experiments on cloud processing and redistribution of contaminants will be integrated into the national program on global change, investigating how energy pollutants affect aerosols and clouds and the transfer of radiant energy through them. As the significance of this effect becomes clear, its global impact on climate will be studied through experimental and modeling research. The description of ongoing atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: atmospheric studies in complex terrain, large-scale atmospheric transport and processing of emissions, and climate change. This report describes the progress in FY 1989 in each of these areas. A divider page summarizes the goals of each area and lists project titles that support research activities. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Atmospheric environment responses to fossil energy and renewable energy alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossil energy consumption and the atmospheric environmental problems are closely related leading together with various recent weather phenomena such as the climate change, global warming, greenhouse effect and atmospheric pollution. Accumulation of harmful emissions from the fossil fuels such as coal and oil causes increase in carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere which shield the long wave solar irradiation from the earth to outer space and consequently the temperature within the atmospheric layer increases giving rise to expected global warming and many long term undesirable disastrous events such as droughts, floods, the sea level rises as a result of polar ice melting, shifts of tropical belts towards the polar regions, undulating of low lying lands in addition to many other social effects. In order to reduce these undesirable effects, the atmosphere as a common property of all the world, must be protected jointly by all the countries. Hence, each country must contribute her share by reducing the use of fossil fuels with the replacement of environment friendly renewable energy resources such as solar, solar-hydrogen, wind and hydropower. In order to know the right for a country to defend herself for future accusations of atmospheric environmental pollution she must know and set up policies as her energy consumption levels and renewable energy potentials. This paper presents general account of fossil fuel usage consequences in the atmosphere. 15 refs

  14. Redistributed Regional Ventilation after the Administration of a Bronchodilator Demonstrated on Xenon-Inhaled Dual-Energy CT in a Patient with Asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Yu, Jin Ho [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    We report here on the redistributed regional ventilation abnormalities after the administration of a bronchodilator and as seen on xenon-inhaled dual-energy CT in a patient with asthma. The improved ventilation seen in the right lower lobe and the decreased ventilation seen in the right middle lobe after the administration of a bronchodilator on xenon-inhaled dual-energy CT could explain a positive bronchodilator response on a pulmonary function test. These changes may reflect the heterogeneity of the airway responsiveness to a bronchodilator in patients with asthma.

  15. Competition between reaction and intramolecular energy redistribution in solution: observation and nature of nonstatistical dynamics in the ozonolysis of vinyl ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, Larisa Mae M; Singleton, Daniel A

    2011-09-01

    Experimental product ratios in ozonolyses of alkyl vinyl ethers in solution do not fit with expectations based on statistical rate theories. The selectivity among cleavage pathways increases with the size of the alkyl group but to an extent that is far less than RRKM theory would predict. Trajectory studies account for the observed selectivities and support a mechanism involving a competition between cleavage of the primary ozonide and intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution. A statistical model is presented that assumes that RRKM theory holds for a molecular subset of the primary ozonides, allowing the rates of energy loss from the ozonides to be estimated from the observed product ratios. PMID:21812422

  16. Redistributed Regional Ventilation after the Administration of a Bronchodilator Demonstrated on Xenon-Inhaled Dual-Energy CT in a Patient with Asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here on the redistributed regional ventilation abnormalities after the administration of a bronchodilator and as seen on xenon-inhaled dual-energy CT in a patient with asthma. The improved ventilation seen in the right lower lobe and the decreased ventilation seen in the right middle lobe after the administration of a bronchodilator on xenon-inhaled dual-energy CT could explain a positive bronchodilator response on a pulmonary function test. These changes may reflect the heterogeneity of the airway responsiveness to a bronchodilator in patients with asthma.

  17. Solar Atmospheric Magnetic Energy Coupling: Broad Plasma Conditions and Temperature Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Orange, N Brice; Gendre, Bruce; Morris, David C; Oluseyi, Hakeem M

    2016-01-01

    Solar variability investigations that include its magnetic energy coupling are paramount to solving many key solar/stellar physics problems. Particularly understanding the temporal variability of magnetic energy redistribution and heating processes. Using three years of observations from the {\\it Solar Dynamics Observatory's} Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Heliosemic Magnetic Imager, radiative and magnetic fluxes were measured from coronal hole, quiet Sun, active regions, active region cores (i.e., inter moss), and at full-disk scales, respectively. We present, and mathematically describe, their coupling of radiative fluxes, across broad temperature gradients, to the available photospheric magnetic energy. A comparison of the common linear relationship of radiative to magnetic coupling is performed against our extended broken power-law description, which reveals a potential entanglement of thermodynamic and magnetic energy contributions in existing literature. As such, our work provides an improved approach...

  18. High-energy fluxes of atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovskaya, T S; Sinegovsky, S I

    2013-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos from decays of mesons, produced in collisions of cosmic ray particles with air nuclei, form unavoidable background for detection of astrophysical neutrinos. More precise calculations of the high-energy neutrino spectrum are required since measurements in the IceCube experiment reach the intriguing energy region where a contribution of the prompt neutrinos and/or astrophysical ones should be discovered. Basing on the referent hadronic models QGSJET II-03, SIBYLL 2.1, we calculate high-energy spectra, both of the muon and electron atmospheric neutrinos, averaged over zenith-angles. The computation is made using three parameterizations of cosmic ray spectra which include the knee region. All calculations are compared with the atmospheric neutrino measurements by Frejus and IceCube. The prompt neutrino flux predictions obtained with thequark-gluon string model (QGSM) for the charm production by Kaidalov & Piskunova do not contradict to the IceCube measurements and upper limit on the astr...

  19. Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.; Thomas, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV . An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chem...

  20. Education and Efficient Redistribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Dur (Robert); C.N. Teulings (Coen)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractShould education be subsidized for the purpose of redistribution? The usual argument against subsidies to education above the primary level is that the rich take up most education, so a subsidy would increase inequality. We show that there is a counteracting effect: an increase in the st

  1. Food Redistribution as Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, Caleb; Higbee, Becky

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the simultaneous problems of food waste and hunger in the context of the possible solution of food (waste) rescue and redistribution. To this end, we develop an empirical model that can be used in Monte Carlo simulations to study the dynamics of the underlying problem. Our model's parameters are derived from a unique data set provided by a large food bank and food rescue organization in north central Colorado. We find that food supply is a non-parametric heavy-tailed process that is well-modeled with an extreme value peaks-over-threshold model. Although the underlying process is stochastic, the basic approach of food rescue and redistribution appears to be feasible both at small and large scales. The ultimate efficacy of this model is intimately tied to the rate at which food expires and hence the ability to preserve and quickly transport and redistribute food. The cost of the redistribution is tied to the number and density of participating suppliers, and costs can be reduced (and supp...

  2. Energy, atmospheric chemistry, and global climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1991-01-01

    Global atmospheric changes due to ozone destruction and the greenhouse effect are discussed. The work of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is reviewed, including its judgements regarding global warming and its recommendations for improving predictive capability. The chemistry of ozone destruction and the global atmospheric budget of nitrous oxide are reviewed, and the global sources of nitrous oxide are described.

  3. Triton's surface-atmosphere energy balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, J.A.; Yelle, R.V.; Lunine, J.I.; McEwen, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    We explore the energetics of Triton's surface-atmosphere system using a model that includes the turbulent transfer of sensible heat as well as insolation, reradiation, and latent heat transport. The model relies on a 1?? by 1?? resolution hemispheric bolometric albedo map of Triton for determining the atmospheric temperature, the N2 frost emissivity, and the temperatures of unfrosted portions of the surface consistent with a frost temperature of ???38 K. For a physically plausible range of heat transfer coefficients, we find that the atmospheric temperature roughly 1 km above the surface is approximately 1 to 3 K hotter than the surface. Atmospheric temperatures of 48 K suggested by early analysis of radio occultation data cannot be obtained for plausible values of the heat transfer coefficients. Our calculations indicate that Triton's N2 frosts must have an emissivity well below unity in order to have a temperature of ???38 K, consistent with previous results. We also find that convection over small hot spots does not significantly cool them off, so they may be able to act as continous sources of buoyancy for convective plumes, but have not explored whether the convection is vigorous enough to entrain particulate matter thereby forming a dust devil. Our elevated atmospheric temperatures make geyser driven plumes with initial upward velocities ???10 m s-1 stagnate in the lower atmosphere. These "wimpy" plumes provide a possible explanation for Triton's "wind streaks.". ?? 1992.

  4. Annual progress report 2000. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B. [eds.

    2001-05-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2000 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  5. Energy sources of the high latitude upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrodynamic (Joule) dissipation and plasma wave heating are reviewed as sources of energy for the upper atmosphere at high latitudes. Electrodynamic heating in the thermosphere is described by a generalized energy balance equation taking into account a variety of inelastic processes and energy losses, and the use of height-integrated values of the Joule heating rate to estimate the importance of electrodynamic heating at high latitudes is discussed. Observations of electrons between 95 and 115 km altitude that are up to 1000 K hotter than the neutral atmosphere is presented as evidence for atmospheric heating due to unstable plasma waves arising from the Farley-Buneman modified two-stream instability.

  6. Annual progress report 2000. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2000 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  7. Annual progress report 2000. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B. (eds.)

    2001-05-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2000 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  8. Annual report 1997. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, P.H.; Dannemand Andersen, P.; Skrumsager, B. [eds.

    1998-08-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1997. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. (au)

  9. Triton's surface-atmosphere energy balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, John A.; Yelle, Roger V.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Mcewen, Alfred S.

    1992-01-01

    A model encompassing the turbulent transfer of sensible heat as well as insolation, reradiation, and latent heat transport is presently used to investigate the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system of Triton. Under the assumption of a physically plausible range of heat transfer coefficients, the atmospheric temperature 1 km above the surface is found to be 1-3 K hotter than the Triton surface. The observed N2 frosts must have an emissivity lower than unity in order to match a frost temperature at the surface of about 38 K.

  10. Racism, xenophobia, and redistribution

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Woojin; Roemer, John; Van der Straeten, Karine

    2005-01-01

    We report here a summary of our recent research on the effect that the race issue, in the United States, and the immigration issue in European countries, is having on the degree of redistribution and the size of the public sector that is implemented through political competition. We model political competition as taking place on a two dimensional policy space, where the first issue is the tax rate, or the size of the public sector, and the second issue is the race or immigration issue. Our su...

  11. Food Redistribution as Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Caleb; Hoenigman, Rhonda; Higbee, Becky

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the simultaneous problems of food waste and hunger in the context of the possible solution of food (waste) rescue and redistribution. To this end, we develop an empirical model that can be used in Monte Carlo simulations to study the dynamics of the underlying problem. Our model's parameters are derived from a unique data set provided by a large food bank and food rescue organization in north central Colorado. We find that food supply is a non-parametric heavy-tailed pr...

  12. Energy and angular distributions of atmospheric muons at the Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    A fair knowledge of the atmospheric muon distributions at Earth is a prerequisite for the simulations of cosmic ray setups and rare event search detectors. A modified power law is proposed for atmospheric muon energy distribution which gives good description of the cosmic muon data in low as well as high energy regime. Using this distribution, analytical forms for zenith angle ($\\theta$) distribution are obtained. Assuming a flat Earth, it leads to the $\\cos^{n-1}\\theta$ form where it is show...

  13. Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method...

  14. Did high energy astrophysical sources contribute to Martian atmospheric loss?

    CERN Document Server

    Atri, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Mars is believed to have had a substantial atmosphere in the past. Atmospheric loss led to depressurization and cooling, and is thought to be the primary driving force responsible for the loss of liquid water from its surface. Recently, MAVEN observations have provided new insight into the physics of atmospheric loss induced by ICMEs and solar wind interacting with the Martian atmosphere. In addition to solar radiation, it is likely that its atmosphere has been exposed to radiation bursts from high-energy astrophysical sources which become highly probable on timescales of ~Gy and beyond. These sources are capable of significantly enhancing the rates of photoionization and charged particle-induced ionization in the upper atmosphere. Here, we explore the possibility of damage from Galactic Gamma Ray Bursts, nearby supernovae, encounter with dense interstellar clouds and extreme solar events. We use Monte Carlo simulations to model the interaction of charged particles and photons from astrophysical sources in th...

  15. Seasonal variation of the atmospheric energy budget on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabataba-Vakili, F.; Read, P. L.; Lewis, S. R.; Montabone, L.; Ruan, T.; Valeanu, A.; Wang, Y.; Young, R. M. B.

    2014-04-01

    We compute a detailed Lorenz energy budget [1] to improve our understanding of the dynamical circulation of the martian atmosphere. Results suggest that the circulation of the martian atmosphere is is governed mostly by baroclinic instability, except during a 2 to 3 month long period around the northern hemisphere winter solstice when barotropic and baroclinic instabilites coincide. The difference between diurnally averaged quantities and the full energy budget also indicate a major role for diurnal tides in enabling a direct transfer of energy from diurnal heating to eddy potential and kinetic energy.

  16. Energy and the Protection of the Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Nakicenovic, N.; Grubler, A

    2000-01-01

    The essay reviews major environmental problems of energy development within a broader development and sustainability context. The role of energy in human development and major historical trends as well as their implications for carbon dioxide emissions are discussed. After summarizing the scientific understanding of current and possible future climate change, the paper reviews the available mitigation and adaptation options, including: energy efficiency improvements, fuels switching, zero-car...

  17. Energy and angular distributions of atmospheric muons at the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    A fair knowledge of the atmospheric muon distributions at Earth is a prerequisite for the simulations of cosmic ray setups and rare event search detectors. A modified power law is proposed for atmospheric muon energy distribution which gives good description of the cosmic muon data in low as well as high energy regime. Using this distribution, analytical forms for zenith angle ($\\theta$) distribution are obtained. Assuming a flat Earth, it leads to the $\\cos^{n-1}\\theta$ form where it is shown that the parameter $n$ is nothing but the power of the energy distribution. A new analytical form for zenith angle distribution is obtained without assuming a flat Earth which gives an improved description of the data at all angles even above $70^o$. These distributions are tested with the available atmospheric muon data of energy and angular distributions. The parameters of these distributions can be used to characterize the cosmic muon data as a function of energy, angle and altitude.

  18. Modeling Planetary Atmospheric Energy Deposition By Energetic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Bougher, Stephen; Gronoff, Guillaume; Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    The structure, dynamics, chemistry, and evolution of planetary upper atmospheres are in large part determined by the available sources of energy. In addition to the solar EUV flux, the solar wind and solar energetic particle (SEP) events are also important sources. Both of these particle populations can significantly affect an atmosphere, causing atmospheric loss and driving chemical reactions. Attention has been paid to these sources from the standpoint of the radiation environment for humans and electronics, but little work has been done to evaluate their impact on planetary atmospheres. At unmagnetized planets or those with crustal field anomalies, in particular, the solar wind and SEPs of all energies have direct access to the atmosphere and so provide a more substantial energy source than at planets having protective global magnetic fields. Additionally, solar wind and energetic particle fluxes should be more significant for planets orbiting more active stars, such as is the case in the early history of the solar system for paleo-Venus and Mars. Therefore quantification of the atmospheric energy input from the solar wind and SEP events is an important component of our understanding of the processes that control their state and evolution. We have applied a full Lorentz motion particle transport model to study the effects of particle precipitation in the upper atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Such modeling has been previously done for Earth and Mars using a guiding center precipitation model. Currently, this code is only valid for particles with small gyroradii in strong uniform magnetic fields. There is a clear necessity for a Lorentz formulation, hence, a systematic study of the ionization, excitation, and energy deposition has been conducted, including a comparison of the influence relative to other energy sources (namely EUV photons). The result is a robust examination of the influence of energetic ion transport on the Venus and Mars upper atmosphere which

  19. Assessment of global annual atmospheric energy balance from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Stackhouse, Paul W.; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Sun, Wenbo; Fan, Tai-Fang; Hinkelman, Laura M.

    2008-08-01

    Global atmospheric energy balance is one of the fundamental processes for the earth's climate system. This study uses currently available satellite data sets of radiative energy at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface as well as latent and sensible heat over the oceans for the year 2000 to assess the global annual energy budget. Over land, surface radiation data are used to constrain assimilated results and to force the radiation, turbulent heat, and heat storage into balance due to a lack of observation-based turbulent heat flux estimates. Global annual means of the TOA net radiation obtained from both satellite direct measurements and calculations are close to zero. The net radiative energy fluxes into the surface and the surface latent heat transported into the atmosphere are about 113 and 86 W/m2, respectively. The estimated atmospheric and surface heat imbalances are about -8 and 9 W/m2, respectively, values that are within the uncertainties of surface radiation and sea surface turbulent flux estimates and the likely systematic biases in the analyzed observations. The potential significant additional absorption of solar radiation within the atmosphere suggested by previous studies does not appear to be required to balance the energy budget: the spurious heat imbalances in the current data are much smaller (about half) than those obtained previously and debated about a decade ago. Progress in surface radiation and oceanic turbulent heat flux estimations from satellite measurements has significantly reduced the bias errors in the observed global energy budgets of the climate system.

  20. Assessment of Global Annual Atmospheric Energy Balance from Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Stackhouse, Paul; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Sun, Wenbo; Fan, Tai-Fang (Alice); Hinkelman, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Global atmospheric energy balance is one of the fundamental processes for the earth's climate system. This study uses currently available satellite data sets of radiative energy at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface and latent and sensible heat over oceans for the year 2000 to assess the global annual energy budget. Over land, surface radiation data are used to constrain assimilated results and to force the radiation, turbulent heat, and heat storage into balance due to a lack of observation-based turbulent heat flux estimations. Global annual means of the TOA net radiation obtained from both direct measurements and calculations are close to zero. The net radiative energy fluxes into the surface and the surface latent heat transported into the atmosphere are about 113 and 86 Watts per square meter, respectively. The estimated atmospheric and surface heat imbalances are about -8 9 Watts per square meter, values that are within the uncertainties of surface radiation and sea surface turbulent flux estimates and likely systematic biases in the analyzed observations. The potential significant additional absorption of solar radiation within the atmosphere suggested by previous studies does not appear to be required to balance the energy budget the spurious heat imbalances in the current data are much smaller (about half) than those obtained previously and debated at about a decade ago. Progress in surface radiation and oceanic turbulent heat flux estimations from satellite measurements significantly reduces the bias errors in the observed global energy budgets of the climate system.

  1. Emissions of atmospheric pollutant associated to energy activities scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the methodology use for the determination of the mains atmospheric pollutant from energy activities in Cuba is presented. These emissions are estimated from the definition of economic development scenarios and the projection of the energy balances. The main considerations in the study are presented, as well as the analysis of the emissions behavior

  2. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department annual progress report 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risø National Laboratory in 1999. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviateatmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The...

  3. The Atmospheric Energy and Hydrological Cycles in ECMWF Reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrisford, P.; Kallberg, P.; Kobayashi, S.; Dee, D.; Uppala, S.; Simmons, A. J.; Poli, P.; Sato, H.

    2012-04-01

    Analysing the long term time averaged atmospheric energy and hydrological cycles in atmospheric datasets provides a simple means of measuring the consistency and quality of these datasets. For the energy cycle, we assume that the long term change in storage of the total energy of the atmosphere is small. Energy is absorbed at the TOA at low latitudes, some of which is lost to the surface while the remainder is transported to high latitudes and then, augmented by energy from the surface, is lost to space. The net energy gain to the atmosphere at low latitudes should match the transport from low to high latitudes which, in turn, should match the net energy lost from the atmosphere at high latitudes. For the purposes of this study, we have defined the low latitudes to be between 40N and 40S with the high latitudes encompassing the remainder of the planet, which includes the higher latitudes of both hemispheres. For the hydrological cycle, we assume that the long term change in storage of the total column water vapour of the atmosphere is small. The excess of evaporation compared to precipitation over ocean should match the transport from ocean to land which, in turn, should match the excess of precipitation compared to evaporation over land. Here, we study these cycles as depicted by the ECMWF Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim) and ERA-40 for the 20 year period 1989-2008. Although better than in ERA-40, the transport of energy in ERA-Interim does not agree well with the net gain of energy at low latitudes and the net loss of energy at high latitudes unless various corrections are made to the data. These corrections consist of constraining the TOA global energy balance and the surface oceanic energy balance to be zero, constraining the surface energy balance everywhere over land to be zero and mass adjusting the energy transports. The result is an energy transport of 9.5 PW. However, the meridional gradient of the TOA energy balance in ERA-Interim is weaker than in CERES

  4. High Energy Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes From a Realistic Primary Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Penha, Felipe; Dembinski, Hans; Gaisser, Thomas K.; Tilav, Serap

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric neutrino fluxes depend on the energy spectrum of primary nucleons entering the top of the atmosphere. Before the advent of AMANDA and the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, measurements of the neutrino fluxes were generally below ~ 1TeV , a regime in which a simple energy power law sufficed to describe the primary spectrum. Now, IceCube's muon neutrino data extends beyond 1PeV , including a combination of neutrinos from astrophysical sources with background from atmospheric neutrinos. At such high energies, the steepening at the knee of the primary spectrum must be accounted for. Here, we describe a semi-analytical approach for calculating the atmospheric differential neutrino fluxes at high energies. The input is a realistic primary spectrum consisting of 4 populations with distinct energy cutoffs, each with up to 7 representative nuclei, where the parameters were extracted from a global fit. We show the effect of each component on the atmospheric neutrino spectra, above 10TeV . The resulting features follow directly from recent air shower measurements included in the fit. Felipe Campos Penha gratefully acknowledges financial support from CAPES (Processo BEX 5348/14-5), CNPq (Processo 142180/2012-2), and the Bartol Research Institute.

  5. Aircraft Measurements of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Lilly, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Wind velocity data obtained from a jet airliner are used to construct kinetic energy spectra over the range of wavelengths from 2.5 to 2500 km. The spectra exhibit an approximate -5/3 slope for wavelengths of less than about 150 km, steepening to about -2.2 at larger scales. These results support...

  6. Weakened atmospheric energy transport feedback in cold glacial climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cvijanovic

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The response of atmospheric energy transport during Northern Hemisphere cooling and warming from present day (PD and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM conditions is investigated using sea surface temperature anomalies derived from a freshwater hosing experiment. The present day climate shows enhanced sensitivity of the atmospheric energy transport compared to that of the LGM suggesting an ability of the PD atmosphere to reorganize more easily and thereby dampen temperature anomalies that may arise from changes in the oceanic transport. The increased PD sensitivity relative to that of the LGM is due mainly to a stronger dry static energy transport response which, in turn, is driven chiefly by larger changes in the transient eddy heat flux. In comparison, changes in latent heat transport play a minor role in the overall transport sensitivity.

  7. CELESTE: an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for high energy gamma astrophysics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paré, E.; Balauge, B.; Bazer-Bachi, R.; Bergeret, H.; Berny, F.; Briand, N.; Bruel, P.; Cerutti, M.; Collon, J.; Cordier, A.; Cornbise, P.; Debiais, G.; Dezalay, J. P.; Dumora, D.; Durand, E.; Eschstruth, P.; Espigat, P.; Fabre, B.; Fleury, P.; Gilly, J.; Gouillaud, J. C.; Gregory, C.; Hérault, N.; Holder, J.; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Incerti, S.; Jouenne, A.; Kalt, L.; LeGallou, R.; Lott, B.; Manigot, P.; Neveu, J.; Olive, J. F.; Palatka, Miroslav; Perez, A.; Rebii, A.; Rob, L.; Sans, J. L.; Schovánek, Petr; Villard, G.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 490, - (2002), s. 71-89. ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : gamma-ray astronopy * atmospheric Cherenkov detector Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.167, year: 2002

  8. The potential impact of hydrogen energy use on the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ruijven, B. J.; Lamarque, J. F.; van Vuuren, D. P.; Kram, T.; Eerens, H.

    2009-04-01

    Energy models show very different trajectories for future energy systems (partly as function of future climate policy). One possible option is a transition towards a hydrogen-based energy system. The potential impact of such hydrogen economy on atmospheric emissions is highly uncertain. On the one hand, application of hydrogen in clean fuel cells reduces emissions of local air pollutants, like SOx and NOx. On the other hand, emissions of hydrogen from system leakages are expected to change the atmospheric concentrations and behaviour (see also Price et al., 2007; Sanderson et al., 2003; Schultz et al., 2003; Tromp et al., 2003). The uncertainty arises from several sources: the expected use of hydrogen, the intensity of leakages and emissions, and the atmospheric chemical behaviour of hydrogen. Existing studies to the potential impacts of a hydrogen economy on the atmosphere mostly use hydrogen emission scenarios that are based on simple assumptions. This research combines two different modelling efforts to explore the range of impacts of hydrogen on atmospheric chemistry. First, the potential role of hydrogen in the global energy system and the related emissions of hydrogen and other air pollutants are derived from the global energy system simulation model TIMER (van Vuuren, 2007). A set of dedicated scenarios on hydrogen technology development explores the most pessimistic and optimistic cases for hydrogen deployment (van Ruijven et al., 2008; van Ruijven et al., 2007). These scenarios are combined with different assumptions on hydrogen emission factors. Second, the emissions from the TIMER model are linked to the NCAR atmospheric model (Lamarque et al., 2005; Lamarque et al., 2008), in order to determine the impacts on atmospheric chemistry. By combining an energy system model and an atmospheric model, we are able to consistently explore the boundaries of both hydrogen use, emissions and impacts on atmospheric chemistry. References: Lamarque, J.-F., Kiehl, J. T

  9. Demographics, Redistribution, and Optimal Inflation

    OpenAIRE

    James Bullard; Carlos Garriga; Waller, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    We study the interaction between population demographics, the desire for redistribution in the economy, and the optimal inflation rate in a deterministic economy with capital. The intergenerational redistribution tension is intrinsic in the general equilibrium life-cycle models we use. Young cohorts do not initially have any assets and wages are the main source of income; they prefer relatively low real interest rates, relatively high wages, and relatively high rates of inflation. Older gener...

  10. Redistributive Taxation and Public Expenditures

    OpenAIRE

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Esteban, Joan

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a model of redistributive income taxation and public expenditure. Besides redistributing personal income by means of taxes and transfers, the government supplies goods and services. The government chooses the tax schedule that is found acceptable by the largest share possible of the population. We show that there is a unique income tax schedule that is universally acceptable. The progressivity of the income tax is shown to depend on the composition of the public expenditure and o...

  11. Energy implications of future stabilization of atmospheric CO2 content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change calls for ''stabilization of greenhouse-gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system...''. A standard baseline scenario that assumes no policy intervention to limit greenhouse-gas emissions has 10 TW (10 x 1012 watts) of carbon-emission-free power being produced by the year 2050, equivalent to the power provided by all today's energy sources combined. Here we employ a carbon-cycle/energy model to estimate the carbon-emission-free power needed for various atmospheric CO2 stabilization scenarios. We find that CO2 stabilization with continued economic growth will require innovative, cost-effective and carbon-emission-free technologies that can provide additional tens of terawatts of primary power in the coming decades, and certainly by the middle of the twenty-first century, even with sustained improvement in the economic productivity of primary energy. (author)

  12. Energetic particle energy deposition in Titan's upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, J. H.; Smith, H. T.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C. P.; Rymer, A. M.; Bell, J. M.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Mandt, K. E.

    2012-04-01

    Titan’s upper atmosphere has been observed to be variable on a pass-by-pass basis. During the nominal mission where the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) only sampled the northern hemisphere this variability was initially believed to be tied to solar drivers manifest in latitudinal variations in the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere. However, when Cassini delved into the southern hemisphere the latitudinal dependence was not present in the data. Recently, Westlake et al. (2011) showed that the pass-by-pass variability is correlated with the deviations in the plasma environment as identified by Rymer et al. (2009) and Simon et al. (2010). Furthermore, the studies of Westlake et al. (2011) and Bell et al. (2011) showed that Titan’s upper atmosphere responds to changes in the ambient magnetospheric plasma on timescales of roughly one Titan day (16 Earth days). We report on recent studies of energy deposition in Titan’s upper atmosphere. Previous studies by Smith et al. (2009), Cravens et al. (2008), Tseng et al. (2008), and Shah et al. (2009) reported on energetic proton and oxygen ion precipitation. Back of the envelope calculations by Sittler et al. (2009) showed that magnetospheric energy inputs are expected to be of the order of or greater than the solar processes. We report on further analysis of the plasma environment around Titan during the flybys that the INMS has good data. We utilize data from the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument to determine how the magnetospheric particle population varies from pass to pass and how this influences the net magnetospheric energy input prior to the flyby. We also report on enhanced energetic neutral atom emissions during select highly energetic passes. References: Bell, J., et al.: “Simulating the time-dependent response of Titan's upper atmosphere to periods of magnetospheric forcing”. Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 38, L06202, 2011. Rymer, A. M., et al.: “Discrete classification and electron

  13. Hydraulic Redistribution: A Modeling Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, E.; Verma, P.; Loheide, S. P., III

    2014-12-01

    Roots play a key role in the soil water balance. They extract and transport water for transpiration, which usually represents the most important soil water loss in vegetated areas, and can redistribute soil water, thereby increasing transpiration rates and enhancing root nutrient uptake. We present here a two-dimensional model capable of describing two key aspects of root water uptake: root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution. Root water compensation is the ability of root systems to respond to the reduction of water uptake from areas of the soil with low soil water potential by increasing the water uptake from the roots in soil parts with higher water potential. Hydraulic redistribution is a passive transfer of water through the root system from areas of the soil with greater water potential to areas with lower water potential. Both mechanisms are driven by gradients of water potential in the soil and the roots. The inclusion of root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution in models can be achieved by describing root water uptake as a function of the difference in water potential between soil and root xylem. We use a model comprising the Richards equation for the water flow in variably saturated soils and the Darcy's equation for the water flow in the xylem. The two equations are coupled via a sink term, which is assumed to be proportional to the difference between soil and xylem water potentials. The model is applied in two case studies to describe vertical and horizontal hydraulic redistribution and the interaction between vegetation with different root depths. In the case of horizontal redistribution, the model is used to reproduce the fluxes of water across the root system of a tree subjected to uneven irrigation. This example can be extended to situations when only part of the root system has access to water, such as vegetation near creeks, trees at the edge of forests, and street trees in urban areas. The second case is inspired by recent

  14. The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Chemistry Program: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to a request from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry has reviewed OHER's Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). This report contains the committee's evaluation and critique arising from that review. The review process included a two-day symposium held at the National Academy of Sciences on September 25 and 26, 1990, that focused on presenting the ACP's current components, recent scientific accomplishments, and scientific plans. Following the symposium, committee members met in a one-day executive session to formulate and outline this report. In undertaking this review, OHER and ACP management requested that the committee attempt to answer several specific questions involving the program's technical capability and productivity, its leadership and organization, and its future direction. These questions are given in the Appendix. This report represents the committee's response to the questions posed in the Appendix. Chapter I explores the committee's view of the role that atmospheric chemistry could and should assume within the DOE and its prospective National Energy Strategy. Chapter 2 assesses the current ACP, Chapter 3 presents recommendations for revising and strengthening it, and Chapter 4 restates the committee's conclusions and recommendations

  15. Density redistribution effects in fermionic optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, Medha; Troyer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    We simulate a one dimensional fermionic optical lattice to analyse heating due to non-adiabatic lattice loading. Our simulations reveal that, similar to the bosonic case, density redistribution effects are the major cause of heating in harmonic traps. We suggest protocols to modulate the local density distribution during the process of lattice loading, in order to reduce the excess energy. Our numerical results confirm that linear interpolation of the trapping potential and/or the interaction strength is an efficient method of doing so, bearing practical applications relevant to experiments.

  16. Preferences for redistribution after the economic crisis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the effects of the recent Economic Crisis on individual preferences for redistribution in 23 European countries. After implementing a decomposition of the variation in these preferences, it is showed that the crisis was highly significant in increasing support for redistribution. It is found that more unemployment and, in particular, youth unemployment has considerably raised the citizens’ demand for redistribution.

  17. Redistributive Taxation with Endogenous Sentiments

    OpenAIRE

    Matteo Cervellati; Joan Mª Esteban; Laurence Kranich

    2015-01-01

    To help explain differences between the US and EU "social contracts" as well as other cultural differences, we present a model of rational voting over redistribution where individual attitudes toward others are endogenously determined. Individuals differ in their productivities and their degree of social concern, and their behavior is influenced by moral standards. According to these, agents determine what they take to be proper behavior, here identified with the average labor supply, and the...

  18. Redistributive Social Protection. Mapping Study

    OpenAIRE

    Fonteneau, Bénédicte; Van Ongevalle, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, social protection has come to feature more and more prominently on international and national development agendas. One key challenge that the quest for social protection currently faces, is the domestic resource mobilization to finance social protection. This paper intends to contribute to addressing this challenge by exploring the different dimensions of redistributive social protection and by analyzing how donors are currently engaging with this issue. Recognizing that...

  19. Response of Atmospheric Energy to Historical Climate Change in CMIP5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩博; 吕世华; 高艳红; 奥银焕; 李瑞青

    2015-01-01

    Three forms of atmospheric energy, i.e., internal, potential, and latent, are analyzed based on the histor-ical simulations of 32 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models and two reanalysis datasets (NCEP/NCAR and ERA-40). The spatial pattern of climatological mean atmospheric energy is well reproduced by all CMIP5 models. The variation of globally averaged atmospheric energy is similar to that of surface air temperature (SAT) for most models. The atmospheric energy from both simulation and reanalysis decreases following the volcanic eruption in low-latitude zones. Generally, the climatological mean of simulated atmospheric energy from most models is close to that obtained from NCEP/NCAR, while the simulated atmospheric energy trend is close to that obtained from ERA-40. Under a certain variation of SAT, the simulated global latent energy has the largest increase ratio, and the increase ratio of potential energy is the smallest.

  20. Did high energy astrophysical sources contribute to Martian atmospheric loss?

    OpenAIRE

    Atri, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Mars is believed to have had a substantial atmosphere in the past. Atmospheric loss led to depressurization and cooling, and is thought to be the primary driving force responsible for the loss of liquid water from its surface. Recently, MAVEN observations have provided new insight into the physics of atmospheric loss induced by ICMEs and solar wind interacting with the Martian atmosphere. In addition to solar radiation, it is likely that its atmosphere has been exposed to radiation bursts fro...

  1. Computations of Compton scattering redistribution function in plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Madej, J; Majczyna, A; Należyty, M

    2016-01-01

    Compton scattering is the dominant opacity source in hot neutron stars, accretion disks around black holes and hot coronae. We present here a set of numerical expressions of the Compton scattering redistribution functions for unpolarized radiation, which are more exact than the widely used Kompaneets equation. This paper fulfills three goals: 1. We have organized three existing algorithms into a form ready to use in radiative transfer and model atmosphere codes. 2. We present the correct algorithm derived first by Guilbert (1981). 3. We modify the exact algorithm by Suleimanov et al. (2012) in order to use it for the scattering in a very wide spectral range from hard X- rays to radio waves. We present sample computations of the Compton scattering redistribution functions in thermal plasma at temperatures corresponding to the atmospheres of bursting neutron stars and hot intergalactic medium. Our formulae are also useful to the study Compton scattering of unpolarised microwave background radiation in hot intra...

  2. High energy laser propagation in various atmospheric conditions utilizing a new, accelerated scaling code

    OpenAIRE

    Fussman, Chris R.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited For this thesis, an atmospheric propagation code named ANCHOR (Atmospheric NPS Code for High Energy Laser Optical pRopagation) was developed and utilized to study the propagation of high energy lasers in various atmospheric conditions and for numerous laser configurations. The ANCHOR code accesses existing industry databases to obtain relevant optical properties for various atmospheres and then uses scaling laws to simulate laser propa...

  3. The energy balance of plasmoids in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, P. J.; Pneuman, G. W.

    1986-01-01

    The properties of an isolated magnetized plasmoid in a nonuniform magnetic field such as arises in stellar atmospheres are studied. The work of Pneuman and Cargill (1985) on the so-called melon-seed effect is extended to include an equation describing the energy balance, so giving a unified picture of the shape, motion, and energetics of the plasmoid. Three treatments of plasmoid energy balance are considered: (1) a polytropic law, (P = about N to the gamma); (2) one in which the plasmoid cools radiatively; and (3) one in which a heating function proportional to the local density balances the radiation. For a gamma = 4/3 polytrope the evolution is self-similar, so that the plasmoid maintains its shape as it moves out from the stellar surface. If gamma is less than 4/3, the final shape is a long thin cigar-shaped body, whereas if gamma is greater than or equal to 4/3, it ultimately becomes self-similar. In cases with radiation and also with heating, the ultimate shape of the plasmoid is determined by whether its gas or magnetic pressure dominate. The former is equivalent to the gamma-less-than-4/3 polytrope, and the latter to the gamma-greater-than-4/3 one. If radiation alone is present, the plasmoid cools rapidly and subsequently evolves self-similarly. If heating balances radiation initially, then the plasmoid heats up as it moves out, but, if the ratio of the transit of time of Alfven waves across it is much less than the radiative cooling time, it ultimately evolves as a gamma = 5/3 polytrope. In each case the plasmoid can be ejected to large distances (several radii) in a stellar atmosphere, for a reasonable choice of surface parameters.

  4. Energy extraction from atmospheric turbulence to improve flight vehicle performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chinmay Karsandas

    Small 'bird-sized' Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have now become practical due to technological advances in embedded electronics, miniature sensors and actuators, and propulsion systems. Birds are known to take advantage of wind currents to conserve energy and fly long distances without flapping their wings. This dissertation explores the possibility of improving the performance of small UAVs by extracting the energy available in atmospheric turbulence. An aircraft can gain energy from vertical gusts by increasing its lift in regions of updraft and reducing its lift in downdrafts - a concept that has been known for decades. Starting with a simple model of a glider flying through a sinusoidal gust, a parametric optimization approach is used to compute the minimum gust amplitude and optimal control input required for the glider to sustain flight without losing energy. For small UAVs using optimal control inputs, sinusoidal gusts with amplitude of 10--15% of the cruise speed are sufficient to keep the aircraft aloft. The method is then modified and extended to include random gusts that are representative of natural turbulence. A procedure to design optimal control laws for energy extraction from realistic gust profiles is developed using a Genetic Algorithm (GA). A feedback control law is designed to perform well over a variety of random gusts, and not be tailored for one particular gust. A small UAV flying in vertical turbulence is shown to obtain average energy savings of 35--40% with the use of a simple control law. The design procedure is also extended to determine optimal control laws for sinusoidal as well as turbulent lateral gusts. The theoretical work is complemented by experimental validation using a small autonomous UAV. The development of a lightweight autopilot and UAV platform is presented. Flight test results show that active control of the lift of an autonomous glider resulted in approximately 46% average energy savings compared to glides with fixed

  5. Strategic campaigns and redistributive politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The article investigates strategic, informative campaigning by two parties when politics concern redistribution. Voters are uncertain about whether parties favour special groups. Parties will target campaigns on groups where most votes are gained by informing about policies. In equilibrium......, campaigning will be most intensive in groups where the uncertainty is largest and where voters are most mobile, most likely to vote, most receptive to campaigns and relatively uninformed initially. These groups will become more informed about policy. Parties will therefore gain more votes by treating these...... groups well so these groups will gain from strategic campaigning. Welfare effects are assessed...

  6. Time-dependent multiconfiguration theory for ultrafast electronic dynamics of molecules in an intense laser field: Electron correlation and energy redistribution among natural orbitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new definition of molecular orbital energy in order to investigate the energetics of constituent molecular orbitals in the many-electron wave function calculated based on time-dependent multiconfiguration theory. It is shown that when energies are assigned to natural orbitals by a similar manner to that used in the Hartree-Fock theory, we can quantify a correction energy to the total electronic energy that represents electron correlation, and thus we can evaluate the time-dependence of the correlation energy. Our attempt is illustrated by numerical results on the time-dependence of the spatial density of the correlation energy and the orbital energies for a H2 molecule interacting with an intense, near-infrared laser field. We compared the energy ζj(t) supplied by the applied field with the net energy gain Δε-barj(t) for respective natural orbitals φj(t). φj and found that the natural orbitals with Δε-barj(t)>ζj(t) play a key role in the ionization process.

  7. Production of gamma rays with energies greater than 30 MeV in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D.; Fichtel, C.; Kniffen, D.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional study of atmospheric gamma rays with energy greater than 30 MeV has been carried out. Experimental results were obtained from four balloon flights from Palestine, Texas, with a 15 cm by 15 cm digitized wire grid spark chamber. The energy spectrum for downward-moving gamma rays steepens with increasing atmospheric depth. Near the top of the atmosphere, the spectrum steepens with increasing zenith angle. Experimental results compare reasonably well with a three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation of atmospheric gamma ray production. Inclusion of upward-moving gamma rays makes possible the use of atmospheric secondaries for in-flight calibration of satellite gamma ray detectors.

  8. AtmoHEAD 2013 workshop / Atmospheric Monitoring for High-Energy Astroparticle Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bernlöhr, K; Blanch, O; Bourgeat, M; Bruno, P; Buscemi, M; Cassardo, C; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chouza, F; Cilmo, M; Coco, M; Colombi, J; Compin, M; Daniel, M K; Reyes, R De Los; Ebr, J; D'Elia, R; Deil, C; Etchegoyen, A; Doro, M; Ferrarese, S; Fiorini, M; Font, LL; Garrido, D; Gast, H; Gaug, M; Gonzales, F; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Hahn, J; Hrabovsky, M; Kosack, K; Krüger, P; La Rosa, G; Leto, G; Lo, Y T E; López-Oramas, A; Louedec, K; Maccarone, M C; Mandat, D; Marandon, V; Martinetti, E; Martinez, M; de Naurois, M; Neronov, A; Nolan, S J; Otero, L; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Pech, M; Puhlhofer, G; Prouza, M; Quel, E; Raul, D; Ristori, P; Frias, M D Rodriguez; Rivoire, S; Rulten, C B; Schovanek, P; Segreto, A; Sottile, G; Stringhetti, L; Tavernet, J -P; Tonachini, A S; Toscano, S; Travnicek, P; Valore, L; Vasileiadis, G; Vincent, S; Wada, S; Wiencke, L; Will, M

    2014-01-01

    A 3-day international workshop on atmospheric monitoring and calibration for high-energy astroparticle detectors, with a view towards next-generation facilities. The atmosphere is an integral component of many high-energy astroparticle detectors. Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and cosmic-ray extensive air shower detectors are the two instruments driving the rapidly evolving fields of very-high- and ultra-high-energy astrophysics. In these instruments, the atmosphere is used as a giant calorimeter where cosmic rays and gamma rays deposit their energy and initiate EASs; it is also the medium through which the resulting Cherenkov light propagates. Uncertainties in real-time atmospheric conditions and in the fixed atmospheric models typically dominate all other systematic errors. With the improved sensitivity of upgraded IACTs such as H.E.S.S.-II and MAGIC-II and future facilities like the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and JEM-EUSO, statistical uncertainties are expected to be significantly reduced, l...

  9. Inequality Aversion and Voting on Redistribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höchtl, Wolfgang; Sausgruber, Rupert; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    Some people have a concern for a fair distribution of incomes while others do not. Does such a concern matter for majority voting on redistribution? Fairness preferences are relevant for redistribution outcomes only if fair-minded voters are pivotal. Pivotality, in turn, depends on the structure of...

  10. Inequality aversion and voting on redistribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höchtl, Wolfgang; Sausgruber, Rupert; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    2012-01-01

    Some people have a concern for a fair distribution of incomes while others do not. Does such a concern matter for majority voting on redistribution? Fairness preferences are relevant for redistribution outcomes only if fair-minded voters are pivotal. Pivotality, in turn, depends on the structure of...

  11. Energy balance and plume dynamics in Triton's lower atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelle, Roger V.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Hunten, Donald M.

    1991-01-01

    The present study of the thermal balance-affecting relationships among Triton lower atmosphere thermal conduction, eddy mixing, condensation, and radiative heating indicates that, while the temperature gradient is negative in the lower atmosphere, it becomes positive at higher altitudes due to the downward conduction of ionospheric heat. This temperature profile is essentially consistent with radio-occultation experiment data; the geyser-like plumes observed by Voyager suggest that the Trioton atmosphere's convective and conductive regions join near 10-km altitude, and that the values inferred for the eddy diffusion and heat-transport coefficients indicate a profile reminiscent of the earth's.

  12. A weighted finite element mass redistribution method for dynamic contact problems

    CERN Document Server

    Dabaghi, Farshid; Petrov, Adrien; Pousin, Jérôme; Renard, Yves

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a one-dimensional wave equation being subjected to a unilateral boundary condition. An approximation of this problem combining the finite element and mass redistribution methods is proposed. The mass redistribution method is based on a redistribution of the body mass such that there is no inertia at the contact node and the mass of the contact node is redistributed on the other nodes. The convergence as well as an error estimate in time are proved. The analytical solution associated with a benchmark problem is introduced and it is compared to approximate solutions for different choices of mass redistribution. However some oscillations for the energy associated with approximate solutions obtained for the second order schemes can be observed after the impact. To overcome this difficulty, an new unconditionally stable and a very lightly dissipative scheme is proposed.

  13. Energy Estimation of UHE Cosmic Rays using the Atmospheric Fluorescence Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Song, C; Dawson, B R; Fick, B E; Lee, W; Sokolsky, P; Zhang, X

    2000-01-01

    We use the CORSIKA air shower simulation program to review the method for assigning energies to ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic rays viewed with the air fluorescence technique. This technique uses the atmosphere as a calorimeter, and we determine the corrections that must be made to the calorimetric energy to yield the primary cosmic ray energy.

  14. Annual progress report for 1999. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B. [eds.

    2000-06-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 1999. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the departments is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 1999 is presented, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  15. Annual progress report for 1999. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 1999. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the departments is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 1999 is presented, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  16. Applications of tunable high energy/pressure pulsed lasers to atmospheric transmission and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R. V.; Seals, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy C12 O2(16) lasers were improved by pulsed high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening of laser lines, permits tuning the laser 'off' atmospheric C12 O2(16) absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers, and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. The atmospheric transmission of tuned C12 O2(16) lasers compares favorably with C12 O2(18) isotope lasers and CO lasers. The advantages of tunable, high energy, high pressure pulsed lasers over tunable diode lasers and waveguide lasers, in combining high energies with a large tuning range, are evaluated for certain applications to remote sensing of atmospheric constituents and pollutants. Pulsed operation considerably increases the signal to noise ratio without seriously affecting the high spectral resolution of signal detection obtained with laser heterodyning.

  17. Studies of the Atmospheric Chemsitry of Energy-Related Volatile Organic Compounds and of their Atmospheric Reaction Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger Atkinson; Janet Arey

    2007-04-14

    The focus of this contract was to investigate selected aspects of the atmospheric chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted into the atmosphere from energy-related sources as well as from biogenic sources. The classes of VOCs studied were polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitro-PAHs, the biogenic VOCs isoprene, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol and cis-3-hexen-1-ol, alkenes (including alkenes emitted from vegetation) and their oxygenated atmospheric reaction products, and a series of oxygenated carbonyl and hydroxycarbonyl compounds formed as atmospheric reaction products of aromatic hydrocarbons and other VOCs. Large volume reaction chambers were used to investigate the kinetics and/or products of photolysis and of the gas-phase reactions of these organic compounds with hydroxyl (OH) radicals, nitrate (NO3) radicals, and ozone (O3), using an array of analytical instrumentation to analyze the reactants and products (including gas chromatography, in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and direct air sampling atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry). The following studies were carried out. The photolysis rates of 1- and 2-nitronaphthalene and of eleven isomeric methylnitronaphthalenes were measured indoors using blacklamp irradiation and outdoors using natural sunlight. Rate constants were measured for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals, Cl atoms and NO3 radicals with naphthalene, 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene, 1- and 2-ethylnaphthalene and the ten dimethylnaphthalene isomers. Rate constants were measured for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with four unsaturated carbonyls and with a series of hydroxyaldehydes formed as atmospheric reaction products of other VOCs, and for the gas-phase reactions of O3 with a series of cycloalkenes. Products of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and O3 with a series of biogenically emitted VOCs were identified and quantified. Ambient atmospheric measurements of the concentrations of a

  18. Effects of atmospheric variability on energy utilization and conservation. [Space heating energy demand modeling; Program HEATLOAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, E.R.; Johnson, G.R.; Somervell, W.L. Jr.; Sparling, E.W.; Dreiseitly, E.; Macdonald, B.C.; McGuirk, J.P.; Starr, A.M.

    1976-11-01

    Research conducted between 1 July 1975 and 31 October 1976 is reported. A ''physical-adaptive'' model of the space-conditioning demand for energy and its response to changes in weather regimes was developed. This model includes parameters pertaining to engineering factors of building construction, to weather-related factors, and to socio-economic factors. Preliminary testing of several components of the model on the city of Greeley, Colorado, yielded most encouraging results. Other components, especially those pertaining to socio-economic factors, are still under development. Expansion of model applications to different types of structures and larger regions is presently underway. A CRT-display model for energy demand within the conterminous United States also has passed preliminary tests. A major effort was expended to obtain disaggregated data on energy use from utility companies throughout the United States. The study of atmospheric variability revealed that the 22- to 26-day vacillation in the potential and kinetic energy modes of the Northern Hemisphere is related to the behavior of the planetary long-waves, and that the midwinter dip in zonal available potential energy is reflected in the development of blocking highs. Attempts to classify weather patterns over the eastern and central United States have proceeded satisfactorily to the point where testing of our method for longer time periods appears desirable.

  19. Income inequality and redistribution in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Tóthová, Simona

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is an empirical investigation of the relationship between income inequality and redistribution and their impact on the poorest segment of population. It is examined by two models in which we use transformed Gini coefficient as a measure of income inequality and sharegain (difference between disposable and factor income share of given decile) as a measure of redistribution. Relationships are tested on a sample consisting of 24 European countries in the period 1990 -2005. This sampl...

  20. Redistributive Taxation and PublicExpenditures

    OpenAIRE

    Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay; Joan Esteban

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a model of redistributive income taxation and publicexpenditure. Besides redistributing personal income by means of taxesand transfers, the government supplies goods and services. Thegovernment chooses the tax schedule that is found acceptable by thelargest share possible of the population. We show that there is a uniqueincome tax schedule that is universally acceptable. The progressivity ofthe income tax is shown to depend on the composition of the publicexpenditure and on the s...

  1. Interannual Variability of Energy Flux in Atmospheric Instability Conditions at Pantanal of Mato Grosso-Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Leone Francisco Amorim Curado; José de Souza Nogueira; Luciana Sanches; Marcelo Sacardis Biudes; Thiago Rangel Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    The energy balance partitions in wetlands have gained notoriety due to the dynamics and importance of these areas for regional and local climate. Thus, the study was conducted about seasonal and interannual behavior energy fluxes, as well as the influences of the conditions of atmospheric stability and instability. The results showed highest fluxes happened in instability atmospheric conditions. The fluxes of latent and sensible heat showed seasonal variation, indicating that the water availa...

  2. Strengthening of the hydrological cycle in future scenarios: atmospheric energy and water balance perspective

    OpenAIRE

    A. Alessandri; Fogli, P. G.; Vichi, M.; Zeng, N.

    2012-01-01

    Future climate scenarios experiencing global warming are expected to strengthen hydrological cycle during 21st century by comparison with the last decades of 20th century. We analyze strengthening of the global-scale increase in precipitation from the perspective of changes in whole atmospheric water and energy balances. Furthermore, by combining energy and water equations for the whole atmosphere we profitably obtain constraints for the changes in surface fluxes and for the partitioning at t...

  3. Mechanical energy input to the world oceans due to atmospheric loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; QIAN Chengchun; HUANG Ruixin

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical energy input to the oceans is one of the most important factors controlling the oceanic general circulation. The atmosphere transports mechanical energy to the oceans primarily through wind stress, plus changes of the sea level pressure (the so-called atmospheric loading). The rate of mechanical energy transfer into the ocean due to atmospheric loading is calculated, based on TOPEX/POSEIDON data over ten-year period (1993-2002). The rate of total energy input for the world oceans is estimated at 0.04TW (1TW=1012Watt), and most of this energy input is concentrated in the Southern Oceans and the Storm Tracks in the Northern Hemisphere. This energy input varied greatly with time, and the amplitude of the interannual variability over the past ten years is about 15%.

  4. Performance validation of an irradiance redistribution guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Allan; Bingham, Carl; Shatz, Narkis E.; Bortz, John C.

    1997-10-01

    Science Applications International Corporation has used a unique nonimaging-optical global optimization computer code, NICOS, to design an innovative secondary concentrator for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). NICOS allows for the optimal design of such devices to achieve a variety of irradiance distributions on a desired target. The case of interest to NREL called for a uniform irradiance of concentrated sunlight over a relatively large area and at a reasonable working distance from the exit of the device. Because the irradiance at the nominal focal point of NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) was reshaped from a near- Gaussian distribution to a nearly uniform one, the designs generated have been called irradiance redistribution guides (IRG). A design featuring reentrant optics was selected for fabrication and testing. This IRG has been fabricated and tested at the HFSF to compare predicted and measured performance. The IRG's performance is close to the theoretical predictions. Much of the performance difference can be explained by discrepancies between the actual HFSF performance relative to that assumed in the NICOS predictions. This IRG will be useful for applications in which uniform solar concentration at moderate flux is required. In general, the design methodology and resulting devices can provide a new way to satisfy diverse flux tailoring needs.

  5. Cloud Effects on Meridional Atmospheric Energy Budget Estimated from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Seiji; Rose, Fred G.; Rutan, David A.; Charlock, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    The zonal mean atmospheric cloud radiative effect, defined as the difference of the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface cloud radiative effects, is estimated from three years of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data. The zonal mean shortwave effect is small, though it tends to be positive (warming). This indicates that clouds increase shortwave absorption in the atmosphere, especially in midlatitudes. The zonal mean atmospheric cloud radiative effect is, however, dominated by the longwave effect. The zonal mean longwave effect is positive in the tropics and decreases with latitude to negative values (cooling) in polar regions. The meridional gradient of cloud effect between midlatitude and polar regions exists even when uncertainties in the cloud effect on the surface enthalpy flux and in the modeled irradiances are taken into account. This indicates that clouds increase the rate of generation of mean zonal available potential energy. Because the atmospheric cooling effect in polar regions is predominately caused by low level clouds, which tend to be stationary, we postulate that the meridional and vertical gradients of cloud effect increase the rate of meridional energy transport by dynamics in the atmosphere from midlatitude to polar region, especially in fall and winter. Clouds then warm the surface in polar regions except in the Arctic in summer. Clouds, therefore, contribute in increasing the rate of meridional energy transport from midlatitude to polar regions through the atmosphere.

  6. Energy transfer from a laser pulse to a blast wave in reduced-pressure air atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focusing a transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser beam in air atmospheres induced a blast wave. The kinetic energy of a laser-induced blast wave was determined from shadowgraph images of shock wave expansion. Results showed that the fraction of input laser energy that is converted into the blast wave energy decreased from 0.45 to 0.2 concomitant with the decrease in ambient pressure from 100 to 10 kPa. Also, it was insensitive to input laser energy from 4 to 13 J

  7. A review of solar wind and high energy particle influence on the middle atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the middle atmosphere there are several external sources of energy connected with solar wind and high energy particles. Some of them affect the basic state of the middle atmosphere, e.g. galactic cosmic rays are responsible for the ionization in the stratosphere. However, they are responsible mainly for various disturbances in the middle atmosphere. One can identify effects caused by geomagnetic storms (and substorms in high latitudes), solar cosmic ray and relativistic electron precipitation events, Forbush decreases of galactic cosmic rays, interplanetary magnetic field and its sector boundary, high speed streams, interaction regions and other phenomena in the solar wind. Their mechanisms often partly overlap and are usually associated with high-energy particle penetration. Most of the effects are reasonably well understood in the lower ionosphere, but our knowledge concerning the neutral middle atmosphere is still rather poor

  8. Detection of large acoustic energy flux in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    González, N Bello; Pillet, V Martínez; Bonet, J A; Solanki, S K; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Schmidt, W; Gandorfer, A; Domingo, V; Barthol, P; Berkefeld, T; Knölker, M

    2010-01-01

    We study the energy flux carried by acoustic waves excited by convective motions at sub-photospheric levels. The analysis of high-resolution spectropolarimetric data taken with IMaX/Sunrise provides a total energy flux of ~ 6400--7700 Wm$^{-2}$ at a height of ~ 250 km in the 5.2-10 mHz range, i.e. at least twice the largest energy flux found in previous works. Our estimate lies within a factor of 2 of the energy flux needed to balance radiative losses from the chromosphere according to Anderson & Athay (1989) and revives interest in acoustic waves for transporting energy to the chromosphere. The acoustic flux is mainly found in the intergranular lanes but also in small rapidly-evolving granules and at the bright borders, forming dark dots and lanes of splitting granules.

  9. Return currents and energy transport in the solar flaring atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Codispoti, Anna; Piana, Michele; Pinamonti, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    According to a standard ohmic perspective, the injection of accelerated electrons into the flaring region violates local charge equilibrium and therefore, in response, return currents are driven by an electric field to equilibrate such charge violation. In this framework, the energy loss rate associated to these local currents has an ohmic nature and significantly shortens the acceleration electron path. In the present paper we adopt a different viewpoint and, specifically, we study the impact of the background drift velocity on the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons in solar flares. We first utilize the Rutherford cross-section to derive the formula of the energy loss rate when the collisional target has a finite temperature and the background instantaneously and coherently moves up to equilibrate the electron injection. We then use the continuity equation for electrons and imaging spectroscopy data provided by RHESSI to validate this model. Specifically, we show that this new formula for the energy l...

  10. Magnetospheric energy inputs into the upper atmospheres of the giant planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. A. Smith

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the effects of Joule heating upon the upper atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. We show that in addition to direct Joule heating there is an additional input of kinetic energy – ion drag energy – which we quantify relative to the Joule heating. We also show that fluctuations about the mean electric field, as observed in the Earth's ionosphere, may significantly increase the Joule heating itself. For physically plausible parameters these effects may increase previous estimates of the upper atmospheric energy input at Saturn from ~10 TW to ~20 TW.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Electric fields and currents; Planetary ionosphere – Magnetospheric physics (Auroral phenomena

  11. The Formation of Stable Components in the Atmosphere due to Energy Production

    OpenAIRE

    Antonovsky, M.Y.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the possibility of taking into account the pressures of human activity on the atmosphere. It was presented at the International Workshop Envrisk '88 "Energy and Environment: the European Perspective on Risk" organized by the Italian Commission for Nuclear and Alternative Energy Sources, May 1988.

  12. Energy, Atmosphere, and Climate. Teacher's Guide to World Resources. Comprehensive Coursework on the Global Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Sarah A.

    This teacher's guide presents teaching suggestions and presentation materials about how daily human activities, such as energy use, add pollutants to the atmosphere. The lesson is divided into seven parts and can be taught in two or more class periods. Student handouts include: (1) "Total Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1991"; (2) "Facts about Air…

  13. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department annual progress report for 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risø National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviateatmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The...

  14. Towards redistribution laser cooling of molecular gases: Production of candidate molecules SrH by laser ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Philipp; Moroshkin, Peter; Weller, Lars; Sass, Anne; Weitz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Laser cooling by collisional redistribution of radiation has been successfully applied in the past for cooling dense atomic gases. Here we report on progress of work aiming at the demonstration of redistribution laser cooling in a molecular gas. The candidate molecule strontium monohydride is produced by laser ablation of strontium dihydride in a pressurized noble gas atmosphere. The composition of the ablation plasma plume is analyzed by measuring its emission spectrum. The dynamics of SrH m...

  15. Fluid mechanics simulation of fog formation associated with polluted atmosphere produced by energy related fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that large quantities of atmospheric aerosols with composition SO4(-2), NO3(-1), and NH4(+1) have been detected in highly industrialized areas. Most aerosol products come from energy-related fuel combustion. Fluid mechanics simulation of both microphysical and macrophysical processes is considered in studying the time dependent evolution of the saturation spectra of condensation nuclei associated with polluted and clean atmospheres during the time periods of advection fog formation. The results demonstrate that the condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere provide more favorable conditions than condensation nuclei associated with a clean atmosphere to produce dense advection fog, and that attaining a certain degree of supersaturation is not necessarily required for the formation of advection fog having condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere.

  16. Energy Sources of the Dominant Frequency Dependent 3-dimensional Atmospheric Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, S.

    1985-01-01

    The energy sources and sinks associated with the zonally asymmetric winter mean flow are investigated as part of an on-going study of atmospheric variability. Distinctly different horizontal structures for the long, intermediate and short time scale atmospheric variations were noted. In previous observations, the 3-dimensional structure of the fluctuations is investigated and the relative roles of barotropic and baroclinic terms are assessed.

  17. Aerosol influence on energy balance of the middle atmosphere of Jupiter

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xi; West, Robert A.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Nixon, Conor A.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosols are ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres in the Solar System. However, radiative forcing on Jupiter has traditionally been attributed to solar heating and infrared cooling of gaseous constituents only, while the significance of aerosol radiative effects has been a long-standing controversy. Here we show, based on observations from the NASA spacecraft Voyager and Cassini, that gases alone cannot maintain the global energy balance in the middle atmosphere of Jupiter. Instead, a thick ae...

  18. RETURN CURRENTS AND ENERGY TRANSPORT IN THE SOLAR FLARING ATMOSPHERE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the standard Ohmic perspective, the injection of accelerated electrons into the flaring region violates local charge equilibrium and therefore, in response, return currents are driven by an electric field to equilibrate such charge violation. In this framework, the energy loss rate associated with these local currents has an Ohmic nature and significantly shortens the accelerated electron path. In the present paper, we adopt a different viewpoint and, specifically, we study the impact of the background drift velocity on the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons in solar flares. We first utilize the Rutherford cross-section to derive the formula of the energy loss rate when the collisional target has a finite temperature and the background instantaneously and coherently moves up to equilibrate the electron injection. We then use the continuity equation for electrons and imaging spectroscopy data provided by RHESSI to validate this model. We show that this new formula for the energy loss rate provides a better fit of the experimental data with respect to the model based on the effects of standard Ohmic return currents

  19. Stellar model atmospheres with magnetic line blanketing

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O; Shulyak, D

    2004-01-01

    Model atmospheres of A and B stars are computed taking into account magnetic line blanketing. These calculations are based on the new stellar model atmosphere code LLModels which implements direct treatment of the opacities due to the bound-bound transitions and ensures an accurate and detailed description of the line absorption. The anomalous Zeeman effect was calculated for the field strengths between 1 and 40 kG and a field vector perpendicular to the line of sight. The model structure, high-resolution energy distribution, photometric colors, metallic line spectra and the hydrogen Balmer line profiles are computed for magnetic stars with different metallicities and are discussed with respect to those of non-magnetic reference models. The magnetically enhanced line blanketing changes the atmospheric structure and leads to a redistribution of energy in the stellar spectrum. The most noticeable feature in the optical region is the appearance of the 5200 A depression. However, this effect is prominent only in ...

  20. The charge ratio of the atmospheric muons at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the nature of the muon production processes, it can be seen that the ratio of positive to negative cosmic muons has important information in both 'the atmospheric neutrino problem', and 'the hadronic interactions'. We have carried out an experiment for the measurement of the muon charge ratio in the cosmic ray flux in momentum range 0.112-0.178 GeV/c. The muon charge ratio is found to be 1.21±0.01 with a mean zenith angle of 32 deg. ±5 deg. . From the measurements it has been obtained a zenithal angle distribution of muons as I(θ)=I(0)cosnθ with n=1.95±0.13. An asymmetry has been observed in East-West directions because of the geomagnetic field. Meanwhile, in about the same momentum range, positive and negative muons have been studied on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations of the extensive air shower developement (Cosmic Ray Simulations for Kascade), using the Quark Gluon String model with JETs model as generator

  1. Proportional Conflict Redistribution Rules for Information Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Smarandache, Florentin; Dezert, Jean

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose five versions of a Proportional Conflict Redistribution rule (PCR) for information fusion together with several examples. From PCR1 to PCR2, PCR3, PCR4, PCR5 one increases the complexity of the rules and also the exactitude of the redistribution of conflicting masses. PCR1 restricted from the hyper-power set to the power set and without degenerate cases gives the same result as the Weighted Average Operator (WAO) proposed recently by J{\\o}sang, Daniel and Vannoorenber...

  2. Solute Redistribution in Directional Melting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The solute redistribution in directional melting process is theoretically studied. Based on quantitative evaluations, uniform solute distribution in liquid and a quasi-steady solute distribution in solid are supposed. The discussion on the solute balance comes to a simple model for the solute redistribution in directional melting process. As an example, the variation of liquid composition during melting process of carbon steel is quantitatively evaluated using the model. Results show that the melting of an alloy starts at solidus temperature, but approaches the liquidus temperature after a very short transient process.

  3. Bombardment-induced segregation and redistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During ion bombardment, a number of processes can alter the compositional distribution and microstructure in near-surface regions of alloys. The relative importance of each process depends principally on the target composition, temperature, and ion characteristics. In addition to displacement mixing leading to a randomization of atomic locations, and preferential loss of alloying elements by sputtering, which are dominant at relatively low temperatures, several thermally-activated processes, including radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and Gibbsian adsorption, also play important roles. At elevated temperatures, nonequilibrium point defects induced by ion impacts become mobile and tend to anneal out by recombination and diffusion to extended sinks, such as dislocations, grain boundaries and free surfaces. The high defect concentrations, far exceeding the thermodynamic equilbrium values, can enhance diffusion-controlled processes, while persistent defect fluxes, originating from the spatial non-uniformity in defect production and annihilation, give rise to local redistribution of alloy constituents because of radiation-induced segregation. Moreover, when the alloy is maintained at high temperature, Gibbsian adsorption, driven by the reduction in free energy of the system, occurs even without irradiation; it involves a compositional perturbation in a few atom layers near the alloy surface. The combination of these processes leads to the complex development of a compositionally-modified layer in the subsurface region. In the present paper, selected examples of these different phenomena and their synergistic effects on the evolution of the near-surface compositions of alloys during sputtering and ion implantation at elevated temperatures are discussed. 74 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  4. Water savings of redistributing global crop production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kyle; Seveso, Antonio; Rulli, Maria Cristina; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Human demand for crop production is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades as a result of population growth, richer diets and biofuel use. For food production to keep pace, unprecedented amounts of resources - water, fertilizers, energy - will be required. This has led to calls for 'sustainable intensification' in which yields are increased on existing croplands while seeking to minimize impacts on water and other agricultural resources. Recent studies have quantified aspects of this, showing that there is a large potential to improve crop yields and increase harvest frequencies to better meet human demand. Though promising, both solutions would necessitate large additional inputs of water and fertilizer in order to be achieved under current technologies. However, the question of whether the current distribution of crops is, in fact, the best for realizing maximized production has not been considered to date. To this end, we ask: Is it possible to minimize water demand by simply growing crops where soil and climate conditions are best suited? Here we use maps of agro-ecological suitability - a measure of physical and chemical soil fertility - for 15 major food crops to identify differences between current crop distributions and where they can most suitably be planted. By redistributing crops across currently cultivated lands, we determine what distribution of crops would maintain current calorie production and agricultural value while minimizing the water demand of crop production. In doing this, our study provides a novel tool for policy makers and managers to integrate food security, environmental sustainability, and rural livelihoods by improving the use of freshwater resources without compromising crop calorie production or rural livelihoods.

  5. A TEMPERATURE AND ABUNDANCE RETRIEVAL METHOD FOR EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new method to retrieve molecular abundances and temperature profiles from exoplanet atmosphere photometry and spectroscopy. We run millions of one-dimensional (1D) atmosphere models in order to cover the large range of allowed parameter space. In order to run such a large number of models, we have developed a parametric pressure-temperature (P-T) profile coupled with line-by-line radiative transfer, hydrostatic equilibrium, and energy balance, along with prescriptions for non-equilibrium molecular composition and energy redistribution. The major difference from traditional 1D radiative transfer models is the parametric P-T profile, which essentially means adopting energy balance only at the top of the atmosphere and not in each layer. We see the parametric P-T model as a parallel approach to the traditional exoplanet atmosphere models that rely on several free parameters to encompass unknown absorbers and energy redistribution. The parametric P-T profile captures the basic physical features of temperature structures in planetary atmospheres (including temperature inversions), and fits a wide range of published P-T profiles, including those of solar system planets. We apply our temperature and abundance retrieval method to the atmospheres of two transiting exoplanets, HD 189733b and HD 209458b, which have the best Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescope data available. For HD 189733b, we find efficient day-night redistribution of energy in the atmosphere, and molecular abundance constraints confirming the presence of H2O, CO, CH4, and CO2. For HD 209458b, we confirm and constrain the dayside thermal inversion in an average 1D temperature profile. We also report independent detections of H2O, CO, CH4, and CO2 on the dayside of HD 209458b, based on six-channel Spitzer photometry. We report constraints for HD 189733b due to individual data sets separately; a few key observations are variable in different data sets at similar wavelengths. Moreover, a noticeably

  6. Soft X-ray bremsstrahlung and fluorescent line production in the atmosphere by low energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraushaar, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of low energy quasi-trapped or precipitating electrons which impact on the counter windows of soft X-ray detectors are discussed. The errors caused by X-rays produced in the residual atmosphere above a rocket-borne detector because of the resemblance to X-rays of cosmic origin are examined. The design and development of counter windows which make it possible to identify the atmospherically produced X-rays are described. Curves are presented to show the following: (1) preliminary low energy electron data from Atmospheric Explorer C, (2) X-ray flux in electron-excited nitrogen and oxygen, (3) typical proportional counter response to low energy cosmic rays, and (4) proportional counter response to X-radiation produced by electrons incident upon a gas of oxygen to nitrogen number of 0.4.

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1988-08-01

    Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. For several years, studies of transport and diffusion have been extended to mesoscale areas of complex terrain. Atmospheric cleansing research has expanded to a regional scale, multilaboratory investigation of precipitation scavenging processes involving the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, the redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. A few long-range tracer experiments conducted in recent years and the special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity following the Chernobyl reactor accident of April 1986 offer important initial data bases for studying atmospheric processes at these super-regional scales.

  8. Wind energy meteorology atmospheric physics for wind power generation

    CERN Document Server

    Emeis, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    This book is intended to give an introduction into the meteorological boundary conditions for power generation from the wind, onshore and offshore. It aims to provide reliable meteorological information for the planning and running of this important kind of renewable energy. This includes the derivation of wind laws and wind profile descriptions, especially those above the logarithmic surface layer. Winds over complex terrain and nocturnal low-level jets are considered as well. A special chapter is devoted to the efficiency of large wind parks and their wakes.

  9. High energy cosmic ray particles and the most powerful discharges in thunderstorm atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The runaway breakdown-extensive atmospheric shower discharge (RB-EAS) excited in thunderstorm atmosphere by high energy cosmic ray particles (εp>1017-1019 eV) generate very powerful radio pulse. The RB-EAS theory is compared with observations of radio pulses. An agreement between the theory and experiment is established. The existence of nowaday satellite and ground based systems which obtain regularly a large amount of observational radio data could allow to use them in combination with other methods for effective study of high energy cosmic ray particles

  10. High energy cosmic ray particles and the most powerful new type discharges in thunderstorm atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Gurevich, A V

    2004-01-01

    The runaway breakdown -- extensive atmospheric shower discharge (RB - EAS) excited in thunderstorm atmosphere by high energy cosmic ray particles ($\\epsilon_p>10^{17} - 10^{19}$ eV) generate very powerful radio pulse. The RB - EAS theory is compared with observations of radio pulses. An agreement between the theory and experiment is established. The existence of nowaday satellite and ground based systems which obtain regularly a large amount of observational radio data could allow to use them in combination with other methods for effective study of high energy cosmic ray particles

  11. Solar wind and high energy particle effects in the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastovicka, Jan

    1989-01-01

    The solar wind variability and high energy particle effects in the neutral middle atmosphere are not much known. These factors are important in the high latitude upper mesosphere, lower thermosphere energy budget. They influence temperature, composition (minor constituents of nitric oxide, ozone), circulation (wind system) and airflow. The vertical and latitudinal structures of such effects, mechanisms of downward penetration of energy and questions of energy abundance are largely to be solved. The most important recent finding seems to be the discovery of the role of highly relativistic electrons in the middle atmosphere at L = 3 - 8 (Baker et al., 1987). The solar wind and high energy particle flux variability appear to form a part of the chain of possible Sun-weather (climate) relationships. The importance of such studies in the nineties is emphasized by their role in big international programs STEP and IGBP - Global Change.

  12. Inequality and redistribution during the Great Recession

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio Perri; Joe Steinberg

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the impact of the Great Recession on economic inequality and redistribution in the United States. We analyze many sorts of inequality (in earnings, disposable income, consumption expenditures and wealth) for different sections of the economic distribution.

  13. Satellite observations of global atmospheric energy budgets: annual means and decadal records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, B.; Stackhouse, P.; Minnis, P.; Wielicki, B.; Schlosser, C. A.; Rodell, M.; Hu, Y.; Sun, W.; Fan, T. A.; Hinkelman, L.

    2008-05-01

    The global atmospheric energy budget can tell us a lot about the earth's climate system, and is critical for general circulations of the atmosphere. This study uses satellite data sets of the radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface from ERBE, CERES and ISCCP and the latent and sensible heat over oceans from SSM/I to assess the global energy budgets. Over land, surface radiation estimates are used to constrain GLDAS model assimilated results and to force the radiation, turbulent heat, and land surface heat storage into balance due to a lack of observation-based turbulent heat flux estimations. Because of satellite data availability of broadband observations for radiation and microwave measurements for turbulent fluxes, this study considers the atmospheric energy budgets during 1988 and 2005. Global annual means of the TOA net radiation are close to zero. The net radiative energy fluxes into the surface and the surface latent heat transported into the atmosphere are about 113 and 86 W/m2, respectively. The estimated atmospheric and surface heat imbalances are about ­ 8 ~ 9 W/m2, values that are within the uncertainties of surface radiation and sea surface turbulent flux estimates and likely systematic biases in the analyzed observations. The potential significant additional absorption of solar radiation within the atmosphere suggested by previous studies does not appear to be required to balance the energy budget: the spurious heat imbalances in the current data are much smaller (about half) than those obtained previously and debated at about a decade ago. For long term energy budgets, TOA radiation measurements show a clear relationship with the changes in the ocean heat storage. Although most oceanic latent and sensible heat data sets have significant unrealistic long-term variations, some satellite global observations of marine latent heat fluxes from evaporation and precipitation measurements exhibit potential correlations with sea surface

  14. ASH REDISTRIBUTION FOLLOWING A POTENTIAL VOLCANIC ERUPTION AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The redistribution of contaminated tephra by hillslope, fluvial, and pedologic processes is a poorly-constrained but important aspect of evaluating the radiological dose from an unlikely volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain (YM). To better evaluate this hazard, we developed a spatially distributed, numerical model of tephra redistribution that integrates contaminated tephra from hill slopes and active channels, mixes it with clean sediment in the channel system, distributes it on the fan, and migrates it into the soil column. The model is coupled with an atmospheric dispersion model that predicts the deposition of radioactive waste-contaminated tephra at specified grid points. The redistribution model begins in the upper Fortymile Wash drainage basin where it integrates the tephra deposited on steep slopes and active channel beds within a GIS framework. The Fortymile Wash drainage basin is the focus of this model because tephra from only this basin reaches the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan by fluvial processes, and it is on this fan where the radiological dose to a hypothetical individual is compared to the regulatory standard (via additional biosphere models). The dilution effect of flood scour, mixing, and re-deposition within the upper basin is modeled using a dilution-mixing model widely used in the contaminant-transport literature. The accuracy of this model is established by comparing the model prediction with tephra concentrations measured in channels draining the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. The model combines the contaminated tephra transported from the upper basin with the tephra deposited directly on the fan as primary fallout. On the Fortymile Wash fan, channels and interchannel-divide areas are divided on the basis of soil-geomorphic mapping according to whether they are Holocene or Pleistocene in age. This approach allows the model to incorporate the effects of channel migration on the fan within the past 10,000 yr. The model treats the redistribution

  15. Ash Redistribution Following a Potential Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J. D.; Delong, S. B.; Cline, M. L.; Harrington, C. D.; Keating, G.

    2005-12-01

    The redistribution of contaminated tephra by hillslope, fluvial, and pedologic processes is a poorly-constrained but important aspect of evaluating the radiological dose from an unlikely volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain (YM). To better evaluate this hazard, we developed a spatially-distributed numerical model of tephra redistribution that integrates contaminated tephra from hill slopes and active channels, mixes it with clean sediment in the channel system, distributes it on the fan, and migrates it into the soil column. The model is coupled with an atmospheric dispersion model that predicts the deposition of radioactive waste-contaminated tephra at specified grid points. The redistribution model begins in the upper Fortymile Wash drainage basin where it integrates the tephra deposited on steep slopes and active channel beds within a spatially-distributed framework. The Fortymile Wash drainage basin is the focus of this model because tephra from only this basin reaches the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan by fluvial processes, and it is on this fan where the radiological dose to a hypothetical individual is compared to the regulatory standard (via additional biosphere models). The dilution effect of flood scour, mixing, and re-deposition within the upper basin is modeled using a dilution-mixing model widely used in the contaminant-transport literature. The accuracy of this model is established by comparing the model prediction with tephra concentrations measured in channels draining the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. The model combines the contaminated tephra transported from the upper basin with the tephra deposited directly on the fan as primary fallout. On the Fortymile Wash fan, channels and interchannel-divide areas are divided on the basis of soil-geomorphic mapping according to whether they are Holocene or Pleistocene in age. This approach allows the model to incorporate the effects of channel migration on the fan within the past 10,000 yr. The model treats

  16. Energy and protection of the atmosphere. A report of the Secretary-General of the United Nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protection of the atmosphere is one of the important preconditions for achieving and maintaining sustainable development. This article discusses the effects of human interference with the atmosphere resulting from uses of energy. It analyses the relationship between energy and development and prevailing global trends in current energy uses. Scenarios are presented for possible future developments, and projected consequent impacts on the atmosphere. Strategies for mitigating projected possible climate change and avoiding its adverse impacts are discussed. In conclusion, policy measures applicable to energy uses are assessed in relation to the protection of the atmosphere and in the context of furthering sustainable development. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs

  17. Use of anthropogenic radioisotopes to estimate rates of soil redistribution by wind I: Historic use of 137Cs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pelt, R. Scott

    2013-06-01

    Wind erosion is increasingly scrutinized as a causative factor in soil degradation and fugitive dust emissions. Although models have been developed to predict wind erosion and dust emissions, they are not accurate in all locations. The temporal and spatial variability of aeolian processes makes local estimates of long-term average erosion costly and time consuming. Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and 1960s resulted in anthropogenic radioisotopes that had not previously existed being injected into stratospheric global circulation and subsequently deposited on the Earth's surface. Many of these radioisotopes are strongly adsorbed to soil particles and their movement on the landscape is a powerful method for investigating soil redistribution by wind, water, and tillage. 137Cs is the most commonly used anthropogenic radioisotope used to assess soil redistribution rates. Models have been developed to equate differences of radioisotope inventories with rates of soil redistribution and these models have been employed globally to assess soil redistribution on agricultural and natural landscapes. The radioisotope method for assessing soil redistribution rates has many advantages, but also a few limitations. One of the major limitations occurs when local sources of radioisotope contamination, particularly 137Cs, mask the pulse from global fallout, making temporal estimates of redistribution difficult or impossible. In this paper, I explore the importance, history, and applications of the radioisotopic technique using 137Cs, particularly as it applies to soil redistribution by wind.

  18. Liquid-Desiccant Vapor Separation Reduces the Energy Requirements of Atmospheric Moisture Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gido, Ben; Friedler, Eran; Broday, David M

    2016-08-01

    An innovative atmospheric moisture harvesting system is proposed, where water vapor is separated from the air prior to cooling and condensation. The system was studied using a model that simulates its three interconnected cycles (air, desiccant, and water) over a range of ambient conditions, and optimal configurations are reported for different operation conditions. Model results were compared to specifications of commercial atmospheric moisture harvesting systems and found to represent saving of 5-65% of the electrical energy requirements due to the vapor separation process. We show that the liquid desiccant separation stage that is integrated into atmospheric moisture harvesting systems can work under a wide range of environmental conditions using low grade or solar heating as a supplementary energy source, and that the performance of the combined system is superior. PMID:27435379

  19. Agricultural benefits of controlling atmospheric emissions from energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cost-benefit analyses are now being used to develop pollution control strategies for different energy technologies and pollutants. In these analyses, there is significant interest in agricultural effects. Dose-response functions useful for cost-benefit analyses are available for important crops (e.g. corn, wheat, soybeans) and pollutants (e.g. sulphur dioxide, photochemical oxidants, and acid precipitation). Using dose-response functions derived from a cross-sectional analysis, crude estimates were developed of the expected increases in US soybean yields from controlling photochemical oxidant and acid deposition air pollutants. Although problems remain, preliminary modelling suggests that reducing average background growing season pH to 5.2 or 5.6 from ambient conditions (range = 4.1 to 6.3 pH) in all US soybean growing counties would result in a national-level increase in soybean yields of approx. 1%. In comparison, if seasonal average ambient oxidant concentrations (range = 36 to 71 ppb) were reduced to 40 or 25 ppb, US soybean yields would increase by approx. 5 to 9%. Simultaneous strict control of both pollutants would increase yields by approx. 10%. These analyses suggest that control of oxidant precursors (e.g. hydrocarbons from mobile sources) may be more important than the control of acid deposition precursors (e.g. sulphur and nitrogen oxides from large coal-fired utilities). Before actual regulatory decisions are made based on these data, specification and measurement errors in the predictor and assessment models must be explored more explicitly. (author)

  20. Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial and atmospheric neutron flux: A lookup table

    CERN Document Server

    Overholt, Andrew; Atri, Dimitra

    2013-01-01

    Under current conditions, the cosmic ray spectrum incident on the Earth is dominated by particles with energies < 1 GeV. Astrophysical sources including high energy solar flares, supernovae and gamma ray bursts produce high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) with drastically higher energies. The Earth is likely episodically exposed to a greatly increased HECR flux from such events, some of which lasting thousands to millions of years. The air showers produced by HECRs ionize the atmosphere and produce harmful secondary particles such as muons and neutrons. Neutrons currently contribute a significant radiation dose at commercial passenger airplane altitude. With higher cosmic ray energies, these effects will be propagated to ground level. This work shows the results of Monte Carlo simulations quantifying the neutron flux due to high energy cosmic rays at various primary energies and altitudes. We provide here lookup tables that can be used to determine neutron fluxes from primaries with total energies 1 GeV - 1 PeV...

  1. Wave-mean flow interaction and its relationship with the atmospheric energy cycle with diabatic heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN; Anmin

    2005-01-01

    Based on the traditional theory of wave mean flow interaction, an improved quasi-geostrophic Eliassen-Palm flux with diabatic heating included is deduced. It is shown that there exists an intrinsic relation between the atmospheric energy cycle derived by Lorenz and the wave energy transfer derived by Eliassen and Palm. From this relation it becomes clear that the energy propagation process of large-scale stationary wave is indeed a part of Lorenz energy cycle, and the energy transform from mean flow to wave equals the global mass integral of the divergence of local wave energy flux or the global integral of local wave energy. The diagnostic results by using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data suggest that the classical adiabatic Eliassen-Palm flux relation can present only the wintertime wave energy transformation. For other seasons, however, the diabatic effect must be taken into account.

  2. Acoustic energy transfer to the upper atmosphere from surface chemical and underground nuclear explosions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drobzheva, Yana Viktorovna; Krasnov, Valerij Michailovič

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 68, 3-5 (2006), s. 578-585. ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/04/2110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Acoustic wave * Energy * Atmosphere * Ionosphere Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.448, year: 2006

  3. Redistribution and the efficiency-justice trade-off

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Hans-Georg

    2004-01-01

    Contents: Justice of Needs and Redistribution -The Basics of the Utility Theory -Social Welfare Functions and Redistribution -Utility Possibility Curves on Egoism, Altruism and Envy -Types of Social Welfare Functions The Trade-off Problem Concluding Remarks

  4. Redistribution to Rent Seekers, Foreign Aid and Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Roland Hodler

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes the consequences of redistribution of public funds to rent seekers. Therefore, it introduces redistribution to rent seeking agents into Barro's (1990) endogenous growth model with a productive public sector. It shows that the growth rate decreases in the share of the public funds that is redistributed. The public sector's relative sizes that maximize growth and welfare become also smaller in presence of redistribution. Further, if foreign aid is added to the model, the rel...

  5. Usefulness and Limitations of Energy Limited Escape: Titan and Other Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert E.; Volkov, Alexey N.; Tucker, Orenthal J.

    2015-11-01

    Because thermal conduction and IR cooling are inefficient heat transfer processes, adiabatic expansion leading to molecular escape is often the dominant cooling process for energy deposited in the upper atmosphere of planetary bodies. This led to the use of the energy-limited escape (EL) approximation in which the loss rate is roughly proportional to the heating rate, Q. In applying the EL approximation, it was also frequently assumed that the adiabatic expansion resulted in the gas outflow going sonic. Johnson et al. (2013) used molecular kinetic simulations of an atmosphere with a heated layer to show this was not necessarily the case and estimated a critical heating rate, Qc. For Q greater than ~Qc a sonic point formed below the exobase where the gas properties were collision dominated. As Q increased above ~Qc sonic escape was eventually limited by the energy and number fluxes from the below the heated layer. In that case, adiabatic cooling did dominate upper atmosphere cooling, but the escape rate did not increase with increasing Q as predicted by the EL model. Instead, the escape rate remained nearly constant and the energy per molecule carried off increased nearly monotonically with Q. For heating rates from about twice Qc to more than an order of magnitude lower, the molecular escape rate was well approximated by the energy limited rate, but the upper atmospheric structure could not be described by a fluid model with a sonic point and escape was Jeans-like although the Jeans expressions was often a poor approximation. That is, molecules escape from well below the nominal exobase and collisions remained important well above it (Tucker et al. 2009; 2013) resulting in enhanced-Jeans-like escape (Volkov et al. 2011a,b; Erwin et al. 2013). Here we give a new expression for the escape rate produced by adiabatic cooling and expansion of the upper atmosphere and apply it to atmospheric loss from an early Titan atmosphere and related atmospheres.Ref.: Erwin,J.T., et

  6. Impacts of Soil Redistribution Processes on Soil Organic Carbon Stocks and Fluxes in a Small Agricultural Catchment

    OpenAIRE

    Dlugoß, Verena

    2011-01-01

    Soils play a major role in the global carbon cycle and have a huge potential for either sequestering or releasing carbon (C) to the atmosphere. Globally, large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC) are laterally redistributed on sloped arable land by soil erosion. Besides the lateral SOC fluxes, soil erosion also indirectly alters the vertical C fluxes between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and the atmosphere. Whether this results in a net source or sink of atmospheric CO2 is unclear. Glob...

  7. Influence of low energy hadron interaction models on atmospheric ionisation due to cosmic ray heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from recent atmospheric cascade simulations with CORSIKA 6.990 code using GHEISHA2002, FLUKA 2011 and QGSJET II hadron generators are presented. The energy deposit in air by various cosmic ray nuclei is computed. Primary Helium, Carbon, Oxygen and Iron nuclei are considered as primaries. The simulations are performed in a wide energy range between 1GeV/nucleon and 100 GeV/nucleon. A realistic curved atmospheric model is assumed, parameterised according to US standard atmosphere. The ion pair production in the atmosphere considering the contribution of different cascade components, namely electromagnetic, muon and hadron is obtained. The yield function Y for total ionisation is compared for the different models. In addition, the Y functions are compared for different geomagnetic rigidity cut-offs, namely 1 GV (polar caps), 5 GV (middle latitudes - i.e. Bulgaria), 9 GV (lower middle latitudes) and 15 GV (equatorial regions). The observed differences are widely discussed and a comparison with experimental data is performed. Several applications are mentioned as well. Key words: cosmic rays, ionisation model, hadron interaction models, atmosphere

  8. Redistributive effects of Swedish health care finance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdtham, U G; Sundberg, G

    1998-01-01

    This paper investigates the redistributive effects of the Swedish health care financing system in 1980 and 1990 for four different financial sources: county council taxes, payroll taxes, direct payments and state grants. The redistributive effects are decomposed into vertical, horizontal and 'reranking' segments for each of the four financial sources. The data used are based on probability samples of the Swedish population, from the Level of Living Survey (LNU) from 1981 and 1991. The paper concludes that the Swedish health care financing system is weakly progressive, although direct payments are regressive. There is some horizontal inequity and 'reranking', which mainly comes from the county council taxes, since those tax rates vary for each county council. The implication is that, to some extent, people with equal incomes are treated unequally. PMID:10346051

  9. The effects on oceanic planetary waves of coupling with an atmospheric energy balance model

    OpenAIRE

    Farneti, Riccardo; Killworth, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper shows the existence of a growing planetary-wave-like ocean mode, with a decadal period and growth rate, which appears when a stratified, diffusive ocean is coupled to a simple atmosphere via an energy balance model (EBM). Such modes are not found when simpler surface ocean conditions are applied. The mode is low order in the vertical and, because of its slow growth, is likely to be observed in Earth System Models using an EBM in place of a fuller set of atmospheric dynamics. There ...

  10. Redistributive taxation, multinational enterprises, and economic integration

    OpenAIRE

    Haufler, Andreas; Klemm, Alexander; Schjelderup, Guttorm

    2008-01-01

    Increased activity of multinational firms exposes national corporate tax bases to cross-country profit-shifting, but also leads to rising profitability of the corporate sector. We incorporate these two effects of economic integration into a simple political economy model where the median voter decides on a redistributive income tax rate. In this setting economic integration may raise or lower the equilibrium tax rate, and it is more likely to raise the tax rate of a low-tax country. The impli...

  11. Redistribution and Education Subsidies are Siamese Twins

    OpenAIRE

    Bovenberg, A.L.; Jacobs, B

    2001-01-01

    We develop models of optimal linear and non-linear income taxation with endogenous human capital formation to explore optimal education subsidies. Optimal subsidies on education ensure efficiency in human capital accumulation and thus play an important role in alleviating the tax distortions on learning induced by redistributive policies. If the government cannot verify all investments in human capital, education policy offsets some but not all tax-induced distortions on learning. Non-pecunia...

  12. Preferences for Redistribution around the World

    OpenAIRE

    Neher, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Gender, income, education and self-employment are robust predictors for individual support for redistribution in the OECD. In addition, considerations of social status, the fairness of the allocation mechanism, perceived moral worth of the poor and individual autonomy are important. The results for the OECD are compared to those for a large sample of non-OECD countries which also include less developed economies. Neither gender, nor self-employment, nor fairness considerations exhibit a robus...

  13. Relative income, redistribution and well-being

    OpenAIRE

    FitzRoy, Felix; Nolan, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In a model with heterogeneous workers and both intensive and extensive margins of employment, we consider two systems of redistribution: a universal basic income, and a categorical unemployment benefit. Well-being depends on own-consumption relative to average employed workers’ consumption, and concern for relativity is a parameter that affects model outcomes. While labour supply incurs positive marginal disutility, we allow negative welfare effects of unemployment. We also compare Rawlsian a...

  14. Dynamic modelling and simulation of a heat engine aerobot for atmospheric energy utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low grade heat utilization is not only an inevitable option to solve the energy and environment problems, but also a critical issue for many remote power applications and planetary explorations. In this study, a novel design called a heat engine aerobot which can convert planetary atmospheric energy to electricity is proposed and analysed. A dynamic theoretical model is established and some key issues, such as the thermodynamic performance and conversion efficiency are analysed. It shows that the heat engine aerobot is capable to convert the low grade atmospheric energy to electricity during its self-sustained vertical oscillation movement. Parametric analysis shows that some design parameters, such as the nozzle number, the nozzle outlet diameter, the initial liquid mass and the turbine start height may have significant influence on the energy generation performance. - Highlights: • A novel heat engine for low grade atmospheric energy utilization was proposed. • A theoretical model was established and the dynamic behaviour was simulated. • The parametric effects on its thermodynamic performance were analysed

  15. LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF PICOFLARE CATEGORY ENERGY RELEASES IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report low-frequency (80 MHz) radio observations of circularly polarized non-thermal type I radio bursts (noise storms) in the solar corona whose estimated energy is ∼1021 erg. These are the weakest energy release events reported to date in the solar atmosphere. The plot of the distribution of the number of bursts (dN) versus their corresponding peak flux density in the range S to S+dS shows a power-law behavior, i.e., dN ∝ S γ dS. The power-law index γ is in the range –2.2 to –2.7 for the events reported in the present work. The present results provide independent observational evidence for the existence of picoflare category energy releases in the solar atmosphere which are yet to be explored.

  16. Measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux by Super-Kamiokande: energy spectra, geomagnetic effects, and solar modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, E; Abe, K; Haga, Y; Hayato, Y; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakajima, T; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Orii, A; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Takeda, A; Tanaka, H; Tomura, T; Wendell, R A; Akutsu, R; Irvine, T; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Nishimura, Y; Labarga, L; Fernandez, P; Gustafson, J; Kachulis, C; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Berkman, S; Nantais, C M; Tanaka, H A; Tobayama, S; Goldhaber, M; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Weatherly, P; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Takhistov, V; Ganezer, K S; Hartfiel, B L; Hill, J; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Park, R G; Himmel, A; Li, Z; OSullivan, E; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Friend, M; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Yano, T; Cao, S V; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Fukuda, Y; Choi, K; Itow, Y; Suzuki, T; Mijakowski, P; Frankiewicz, K; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Li, X; Palomino, J L; Wilking, M J; Yanagisawa, C; Fukuda, D; Ishino, H; Kayano, T; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Xu, C; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Suda, Y; Yokoyama, M; Bronner, C; Hartz, M; Martens, K; Marti, Ll; Suzuki, Y; Vagins, M R; Martin, J F; Konaka, A; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Wilkes, R J

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study on the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy region from sub-GeV up to several TeV using the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector is presented in this paper. The energy and azimuthal spectra of the atmospheric ${\

  17. Wind Energy and the Turbulent Nature of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Wächter, Matthias; Hölling, Michael; Morales, Allan; Milan, Patrick; Mücke, Tanja; Peinke, Joachim; Reinke, Nico; Rinn, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The challenge of developing a sustainable and renewable energy supply within the next decades requires collaborative efforts as well as new concepts in the fields of science and engineering. Here we give an overview on the impact of small-scale properties of atmospheric turbulence on the wind energy conversion process. Special emphasis is given to the noisy and intermittent structure of turbulence and its outcome for wind energy conversion and utilization. Experimental, theoretical, analytical, and numerical concepts and methods are presented. In particular we report on new aspects resulting from the combination of basic research, especially in the field of turbulence and complex stochastic systems, with engineering applications.

  18. Observation of high energy atmospheric neutrinos with the Antarctic muon and neutrino detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Antarctic muon and neutrino detector array (AMANDA) began collecting data with ten strings in 1997. Results from the first year of operation are presented. Neutrinos coming through the Earth from the Northern Hemisphere are identified by secondary muons moving upward through the array. Cosmic rays in the atmosphere generate a background of downward moving muons, which are about 106 times more abundant than the upward moving muons. Over 130 days of exposure, we observed a total of about 300 neutrino events. In the same period, a background of 1.05x109 cosmic ray muon events was recorded. The observed neutrino flux is consistent with atmospheric neutrino predictions. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that 90% of these events lie in the energy range 66 GeV to 3.4 TeV. The observation of atmospheric neutrinos consistent with expectations establishes AMANDA-B10 as a working neutrino telescope

  19. Propagation and secondary production of low energy antiprotons in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, T.; Moats, A.

    1985-01-01

    Current theories, in which the observed antiproton component is attributed strictly to secondary production in high energy inelastic collisions of protons with the interstellar medium or the atmosphere, apparently fail to explain the relatively high p vertical intensities measured at mountain and balloon altitudes. Therefore, a more careful calculation of the theoretical secondary intensity spectra is required before more exotic sources for these excess p's can be explored. A one dimensional diffusion equation is used to calculate the expected vertical intensity of p's due only to secondary production in the atmosphere; any assumed primary p spectrum is also included. Two adjustable parameters, the inelasticity and charge exchange in nucleon-nucleus collisions, were included in the algorithm. In order to obtain an independent estimate of their values the proton vertical intensities in the atmosphere were calculated, adjusting the parameters until the curves fit the experimental proton data, and then assumed that these values were identical in antinucleon-nucleus collisions.

  20. Observation of high energy atmospheric neutrinos with antarctic muon and neutrino detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.; Andres, E.; Bai, X.; Barouch, G.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.C.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Bertrand, D.; Binon, F.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Bouhali, O.; Boyce, M.M.; Carius, S.; Chen, A.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Costa, C.G.S.; Cowen, D.F.; Dalberg, E.; De Clercq, C.; DeYoung, T.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Doksus, P.; Edsjo, J.; Ekstrom, P.; Feser, T.; Frere, J.-M.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gaug, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hellwig, M.; Heukenkamp, H.; Hill, G.C.; Hulth, P.O.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Koci, B.; Kopke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Loaiza, P.; Lowder, D.M.; Madsen, J.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.S.; McParland, C.P.; Miller, T.C.; Minaeva, Y.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.C.; Morse, R.; Neunhoffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Ogelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pohl, A.C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.B.; Przybylski, G.T.; Rawlins, K.; Reed, C.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Starinsky, N.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Streicher, O.; Sudhoff, P.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Vander Donckt, M.; Walck, C.; Weinheimer, C.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Wiedeman, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S.

    2002-05-07

    The Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) began collecting data with ten strings in 1997. Results from the first year of operation are presented. Neutrinos coming through the Earth from the Northern Hemisphere are identified by secondary muons moving upward through the array. Cosmic rays in the atmosphere generate a background of downward moving muons, which are about 10{sup 6} times more abundant than the upward moving muons. Over 130 days of exposure, we observed a total of about 300 neutrino events. In the same period, a background of 1.05 x 10{sup 9} cosmic ray muon events was recorded. The observed neutrino flux is consistent with atmospheric neutrino predictions. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that 90 percent of these events lie in the energy range 66 GeV to 3.4 TeV. The observation of atmospheric neutrinos consistent with expectations establishes AMANDA-B10 as a working neutrino telescope.

  1. Effects of atmospheric deposition of energy-related pollutants on water quality: a review and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects on surface-water quality of atmospheric pollutants that are generated during energy production are reviewed and evaluated. Atmospheric inputs from such sources to the aquatic environment may include trace elements, organic compounds, radionuclides, and acids. Combustion is the largest energy-related source of trace-element emissions to the atmosphere. This report reviews the nature of these emissions from coal-fired power plants and discusses their terrestrial and aquatic effects following deposition. Several simple models for lakes and streams are developed and are applied to assess the potential for adverse effects on surface-water quality of trace-element emissions from coal combustion. The probability of acute impacts on the aquatic environment appears to be low; however, more subtle, chronic effects are possible. The character of acid precipitation is reviewed, with emphasis on aquatic effects, and the nature of existing or potential effects on water quality, aquatic biota, and water supply is considered. The response of the aquatic environment to acid precipitation depends on the type of soils and bedrock in a watershed and the chemical characteristics of the water bodies in question. Methods for identifying regions sensitive to acid inputs are reviewed. The observed impact of acid precipitation ranges from no effects to elimination of fish populations. Coal-fired power plants and various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle release radionuclides to the atmosphere. Radioactive releases to the atmosphere from these sources and the possible aquatic effects of such releases are examined. For the nuclear fuel cycle, the major releases are from reactors and reprocessing. Although aquatic effects of atmospheric releases have not been fully quantified, there seems little reason for concern for man or aquatic biota

  2. Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP): Considerations for Beaming High Energy-Density Electromagnetic Waves Through the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    A study to determine the feasibility of employing beamed electromagnetic energy for vehicle propulsion within and outside the Earth's atmosphere was co-funded by NASA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency that began in June 2010 and culminated in a Summary Presentation in April 2011. A detailed report entitled "Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP) Study" appeared in February 2012 as NASA/TM-2012-217014. Of the very many nuances of this subject that were addressed in this report, the effects of transferring the required high energy-density electromagnetic fields through the atmosphere were discussed. However, due to the limitations of the length of the report, only a summary of the results of the detailed analyses were able to be included. It is the intent of the present work to make available the complete analytical modeling work that was done for the BEP project with regard to electromagnetic wave propagation issues. In particular, the present technical memorandum contains two documents that were prepared in 2011. The first one, entitled "Effects of Beaming Energy Through the Atmosphere" contains an overview of the analysis of the nonlinear problem inherent with the transfer of large amounts of energy through the atmosphere that gives rise to thermally-induced changes in the refractive index; application is then made to specific beamed propulsion scenarios. A brief portion of this report appeared as Appendix G of the 2012 Technical Memorandum. The second report, entitled "An Analytical Assessment of the Thermal Blooming Effects on the Propagation of Optical and Millimeter- Wave Focused Beam Waves For Power Beaming Applications" was written in October 2010 (not previously published), provides a more detailed treatment of the propagation problem and its effect on the overall characteristics of the beam such as its deflection as well as its radius. Comparisons are then made for power beaming using the disparate electromagnetic wavelengths of 1.06 microns and 2

  3. Global atmospheric energy deposition by energetic electrons - Quantitative spatial and temporal characteristics inferred from the Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (PEM/AXIS) on UARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenette, D. L.; Datlowe, D. W.; Robinson, R. M.; Schumaker, T. L.; Vondrak, R. R.; Frahm, R. A.; Sharber, J. R.; Winningham, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    The primary purpose of PEM/AXIS is to provide a global monitor of the energy input to the upper atmosphere due to energetic electrons. The design, development, and calibration of AXIS are described and an assessment of its excellent on-orbit performance is presented. The unique capabilities of X-ray imaging spectrometers to monitor the global patterns of electron energy deposition in the atmosphere are shown through an analysis of some specific cases during the first year of the UARS mission.

  4. Dynamics of the cloud produced by release of energy in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An algorithm for calculation of space variations of particles dimension distribution function, mass density and dimensions of the cloud produced by an instantaneous release of energy in the atmosphere has been developed. Dynamics of the hot air bubble has been treated independently from the particles because their mass is much smaller. The velocity of the particles is determined by their fall velocity and the air velocity. The fall velocity has been calculated by Hedman's formula. (author)

  5. Extensive Cloud Showers (ECS) – New High-Energy Phenomena Resulting from the Thunderstorm Atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the phenomenon of the Extensive Cloud Showers (ECS) detected by the surface particle detectors at mountain altitudes in correlation with thunderstorms. Measured microsecond duration particle bursts are first direct evidence of the electron-photon avalanches in the thunderstorm atmospheres, reaching the mountain altitudes from low located thunderclouds. In the report we present analysis of these rare events including spatial distribution, density spectra and particle energy.

  6. Mesoscale atmosphere ocean coupling enhances the transfer of wind energy into the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, D; Munnich, M.; Frenger, Ivy; Gruber, N.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well established that the large-scale wind drives much of the world’s ocean circulation, the contribution of the wind energy input at mesoscales (10–200 km) remains poorly known. Here we use regional simulations with a coupled high-resolution atmosphere–ocean model of the South Atlantic, to show that mesoscale ocean features and, in particular, eddies can be energized by their thermodynamic interactions with the atmosphere. Owing to their sea-surface temperature ...

  7. Addition Laws for Intensities of Radiation Emerging from Scattering Atmospheres Containing Energy Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoghossian, A. G.; Kapanadze, N. G.

    2016-03-01

    A group theoretical approach is developed for solving astrophysical radiative transfer problems described in a previous series of papers. Addition laws for observed radiative intensities are derived for the case in which atmospheres not only absorb and scatter radiation incident on them, but radiate themselves because of energy sources contained within them. As an illustration of the application of these laws, several special radiative transfer problems which we believe are of practical interest are discussed.

  8. Holmium redistribution during solid phase epitaxial crystallization in amorphized silicon layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration profiles of holmium were studied after annealing of silicon layers at 620 deg C. Silicon was implanted with Ho+ ions at 1 MeV energy and (1-3) · 1014 cm-2 doses. Recrystallization of amorphized silicon layer occurs by the mechanism of the solid phase epitaxy. The regularities of segregation redistribution of Ho impurity are similar to the Er redistribution regularities studied earlier. A decrease of Ho concentration at the initial stage of solid phase epitaxial recrystallization is due to a low velocity of mass transport through the crystal-amorphous interface

  9. Who benefits from cooperation? A numerical analysis of redistribution effects resulting from cooperation in European RES-E support

    OpenAIRE

    Unteutsch (geb. Fürsch), Michaela

    2014-01-01

    This paper numerically analyzes redistribution effects resulting from cooperation among European countries in achieving the 2020 targets for electricity generation from renewable energy sources (RES-E). The quantification of redistribution effects builds on the theoretical analysis by Unteutsch (2014), who shows that cooperation in RES-E support increases overall welfare but is not beneficial for all groups. In this paper, we use a dynamic investment and dispatch optimization model of the Eur...

  10. A conceptual, distributed snow redistribution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, S.; Holzmann, H.

    2015-11-01

    When applying conceptual hydrological models using a temperature index approach for snowmelt to high alpine areas often accumulation of snow during several years can be observed. Some of the reasons why these "snow towers" do not exist in nature are vertical and lateral transport processes. While snow transport models have been developed using grid cell sizes of tens to hundreds of square metres and have been applied in several catchments, no model exists using coarser cell sizes of 1 km2, which is a common resolution for meso- and large-scale hydrologic modelling (hundreds to thousands of square kilometres). In this paper we present an approach that uses only gravity and snow density as a proxy for the age of the snow cover and land-use information to redistribute snow in alpine basins. The results are based on the hydrological modelling of the Austrian Inn Basin in Tyrol, Austria, more specifically the Ötztaler Ache catchment, but the findings hold for other tributaries of the river Inn. This transport model is implemented in the distributed rainfall-runoff model COSERO (Continuous Semi-distributed Runoff). The results of both model concepts with and without consideration of lateral snow redistribution are compared against observed discharge and snow-covered areas derived from MODIS satellite images. By means of the snow redistribution concept, snow accumulation over several years can be prevented and the snow depletion curve compared with MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data could be improved, too. In a 7-year period the standard model would lead to snow accumulation of approximately 2900 mm SWE (snow water equivalent) in high elevated regions whereas the updated version of the model does not show accumulation and does also predict discharge with more accuracy leading to a Kling-Gupta efficiency of 0.93 instead of 0.9. A further improvement can be shown in the comparison of MODIS snow cover data and the calculated depletion curve, where

  11. A new correlation between solar energy radiation and some atmospheric parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Dumas, Antonio; Bonnici, Maurizio; Madonia, Mauro; Trancossi, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The energy balance for an atmospheric layer near the soil is evaluated. By integrating it over the whole day period a linear relationship between the global daily solar radiation incident on a horizontal surface and the product of the sunshine hours at clear sky with the maximum temperature variation in the day is achieved. The results show a comparable accuracy with some well recognized solar energy models such as the \\ang-Prescott one, at least for Mediterranean climatic area. Validation of the result has been performed using old dataset which are almost contemporary and relative to the same sites with the ones used for comparison.

  12. Carbon and energy yields in prebiotic syntheses using atmospheres containing CH4, CO and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. L.; Schlesinger, G.

    1984-01-01

    Yields based on carbon are usually reported in prebiotic experiments, while energy yields (moles/cal) are more useful in estimating the yields of products that would have been obtained from the primitive atmosphere of the earth. Energy yields for the synthesis of HCN and H2CO from a spark discharge were determined for various mixtures of CH4, CO, CO2, H2, H2O, N2 an NH3. The maximum yields of HCN and H2CO from CH4, CO, and CO2 as carbon sources are about 4 x 10 to the -8th moles/cal.

  13. Rapid Atmospheric-Pressure-Plasma-Jet Processed Porous Materials for Energy Harvesting and Storage Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Zhang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ technology is a versatile technology that has been applied in many energy harvesting and storage devices. This feature article provides an overview of the advances in APPJ technology and its application to solar cells and batteries. The ultrafast APPJ sintering of nanoporous oxides and 3D reduced graphene oxide nanosheets with accompanying optical emission spectroscopy analyses are described in detail. The applications of these nanoporous materials to photoanodes and counter electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells are described. An ultrashort treatment (1 min on graphite felt electrodes of flow batteries also significantly improves the energy efficiency.

  14. Observation and interpretation of energy efficient, diffuse direct current glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jie, E-mail: tangjie1979@opt.ac.cn; Jiang, Weiman; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi' an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of CAS, Xi' an 710119 (China); Li, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi' an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of CAS, Xi' an 710119 (China); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian 223003 (China); Duan, Yixiang [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi' an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of CAS, Xi' an 710119 (China); Research Center of Analytical Instrumentation, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2015-08-24

    A diffuse direct-current glow discharge was realized with low energy consumption and high energy utilization efficiency at atmospheric pressure. The formation of diffuse discharge was demonstrated by examining and comparing the electrical properties and optical emissions of plasmas. In combination with theoretical derivation and calculation, we draw guidelines that appearance of nitrogen ions at low electron density is crucial to enhance the ambipolar diffusion for the expansion of discharge channel and the increasing ambipolar diffusion near the cathode plays a key role in the onset of diffuse discharge. An individual-discharge-channel expansion model is proposed to explain the diffuse discharge formation.

  15. Observation and interpretation of energy efficient, diffuse direct current glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diffuse direct-current glow discharge was realized with low energy consumption and high energy utilization efficiency at atmospheric pressure. The formation of diffuse discharge was demonstrated by examining and comparing the electrical properties and optical emissions of plasmas. In combination with theoretical derivation and calculation, we draw guidelines that appearance of nitrogen ions at low electron density is crucial to enhance the ambipolar diffusion for the expansion of discharge channel and the increasing ambipolar diffusion near the cathode plays a key role in the onset of diffuse discharge. An individual-discharge-channel expansion model is proposed to explain the diffuse discharge formation

  16. A multi-layer land surface energy budget model for implicit coupling with global atmospheric simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, J.; Polcher, J.; Peylin, P.; Ottlé, C.; Chen, Y.; van Gorsel, E.; Haverd, V.; McGrath, M. J.; Naudts, K.; Otto, J.; Valade, A.; Luyssaert, S.

    2016-01-01

    In Earth system modelling, a description of the energy budget of the vegetated surface layer is fundamental as it determines the meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer and as such contributes to the atmospheric conditions and its circulation. The energy budget in most Earth system models has been based on a big-leaf approach, with averaging schemes that represent in-canopy processes. Furthermore, to be stable, that is to say, over large time steps and without large iterations, a surface layer model should be capable of implicit coupling to the atmospheric model. Surface models with large time steps, however, have difficulties in reproducing consistently the energy balance in field observations. Here we outline a newly developed numerical model for energy budget simulation, as a component of the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems - CANopy). This new model implements techniques from single-site canopy models in a practical way. It includes representation of in-canopy transport, a multi-layer long-wave radiation budget, height-specific calculation of aerodynamic and stomatal conductance, and interaction with the bare-soil flux within the canopy space. Significantly, it avoids iterations over the height of the canopy and so maintains implicit coupling to the atmospheric model LMDz (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique Zoomed model). As a first test, the model is evaluated against data from both an intensive measurement campaign and longer-term eddy-covariance measurements for the intensively studied Eucalyptus stand at Tumbarumba, Australia. The model performs well in replicating both diurnal and annual cycles of energy and water fluxes, as well as the vertical gradients of temperature and of sensible heat fluxes.

  17. Liquid water on Mars - An energy balance climate model for CO2/H2O atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffert, M. I.; Callegari, A. J.; Hsieh, C. T.; Ziegler, W.

    1981-01-01

    A simple climatic model is developed for a Mars atmosphere containing CO2 and sufficient liquid water to account for the observed hydrologic surface features by the existence of a CO2/H2O greenhouse effect. A latitude-resolved climate model originally devised for terrestrial climate studies is applied to Martian conditions, with the difference between absorbed solar flux and emitted long-wave flux to space per unit area attributed to the divergence of the meridional heat flux and the poleward heat flux assumed to equal the atmospheric eddy heat flux. The global mean energy balance is calculated as a function of atmospheric pressure to assess the CO2/H2O greenhouse liquid water hypothesis, and some latitude-resolved cases are examined in detail in order to clarify the role of atmospheric transport and temperature-albedo feedback. It is shown that the combined CO2/H2O greenhouse at plausible early surface pressures may account for climates hot enough to support a hydrological cycle and running water at present-day insolation and visible albedo levels.

  18. A conceptual, distributed snow redistribution model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Frey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When applying conceptual hydrological models using a temperature index approach for snowmelt to high alpine areas often accumulation of snow during several years can be observed. Some of the reasons why these "snow towers" do not exist in nature are vertical and lateral transport processes. While snow transport models have been developed using grid cell sizes of tens to hundreds of square meters and have been applied in several catchments, no model exists using coarser cell sizes of one km2. In this paper we present an approach that uses only gravity and snow density as a proxy for the age of the snow cover and land-use information to redistribute snow in the catchment of Ötztaler Ache, Austria. This transport model is implemented in the distributed rainfall–runoff model COSERO and a comparison between the standard model without using snow transport and the updated version is done using runoff and MODIS data for model validation. While the signal of snow redistribution can hardly be seen in the binary classification compared with MODIS, snow accumulation over several years can be prevented. In a seven year period the classic model would lead to snow accumulation of approximately 2900 mm SWE in high elevated regions whereas the updated version of the model does not show accumulation and does also predict discharge more precisely leading to a Kling–Gupta-Efficiency of 0.93 instead of 0.9.

  19. Non-standard interactions with high-energy atmospheric neutrinos at IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Salvado, Jordi; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Rius, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Non-standard interactions in the propagation of neutrinos in matter can lead to significant deviations from expectations within the standard neutrino oscillation framework and atmospheric neutrino detectors have been considered to set constraints. However, most previous works have focused on relatively low-energy atmospheric neutrino data. Here, we consider the one-year high-energy through-going muon data in IceCube, which has been already used to search for light sterile neutrinos, to constrain new interactions in the $\\mu\\tau$-sector. In our analysis we include several systematic uncertainties on both, the atmospheric neutrino flux and on the detector properties, which are accounted for via nuisance parameters. After considering different primary cosmic-ray spectra and hadronic interation models, we obtain the most stringent bound on the off-diagonal $\\varepsilon_{\\mu \\tau}$ parameter to date, with the 90\\% credible interval given by $-6.0 \\times 10^{-3} < \\varepsilon_{\\mu \\tau} < 5.4 \\times 10^{-3}$....

  20. The Sobolev approximation for line formation with partial frequency redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, D. G.; Rybicki, G. B.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to the formation of a spectral line in a uniformly expanding infinite medium in the Sobolev approximation, with emphasis on the various mechanisms for frequency redistribution. Numerical and analytic solutions of the transfer equation are presented of a number of redistribution functions and their approximations, including type I and type II partial redistribution, coherent scattering and complete redistribution, and the Fokker-Planck and uncorrelated approximation to the R sub II function. The solutions for the mean intensity are shown to depend very much on the type of redistribution mechanism, while for the frequency-weighted mean intensity, which enters the rate equations, this dependence is weak. It is inferred that use of Sobolev escape probabilities based on complete redistribution can be an adequate approximation for many calculations for which only the radiative excitation rates are needed.

  1. Atmospheric CO2 enrichment alters energy assimilation, investment and allocation in Xanthium strumarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jennifer M; Wang, Xianzhong; Lewis, James D; Fung, Howard A; Tissue, David T; Griffin, Kevin L

    2005-05-01

    Energy-use efficiency and energy assimilation, investment and allocation patterns are likely to influence plant growth responses to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]). Here, we describe the influence of elevated [CO2] on energetic properties as a mechanism of growth responses in Xanthium strumarium. Individuals of X. strumarium were grown at ambient or elevated [CO2] and harvested. Total biomass and energetic construction costs (CC) of leaves, stems, roots and fruits and percentage of total biomass and energy allocated to these components were determined. Photosynthetic energy-use efficiency (PEUE) was calculated as the ratio of total energy gained via photosynthetic activity (Atotal) to leaf CC. Elevated [CO2] increased leaf Atotal, but decreased CC per unit mass of leaves and roots. Consequently, X. strumarium individuals produced more leaf and root biomass at elevated [CO2] without increasing total energy investment in these structures (CCtotal). Whole-plant biomass was associated positively with PEUE. Whole-plant construction required 16.1% less energy than modeled whole-plant energy investment had CC not responded to increased [CO2]. As a physiological mechanism affecting growth, altered energetic properties could positively influence productivity of X. strumarium, and potentially other species, at elevated [CO2]. PMID:15819914

  2. Strengthening of the hydrological cycle in future scenarios: atmospheric energy and water balance perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alessandri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Future climate scenarios experiencing global warming are expected to strengthen hydrological cycle during 21st century by comparison with the last decades of 20th century. We analyze strengthening of the global-scale increase in precipitation from the perspective of changes in whole atmospheric water and energy balances. Furthermore, by combining energy and water equations for the whole atmosphere we profitably obtain constraints for the changes in surface fluxes and for the partitioning at the surface between sensible and latent components.

    Above approach is applied to investigate difference in strengthening of hydrological cycle in two scenario centennial simulations performed with an Earth System model forced with specified atmospheric concentration pathways. Alongside the medium-high non-mitigation scenario SRES A1B, we considered a new aggressive-mitigation scenario (E1 with reduced fossil fuel use for energy production aimed at stabilizing global warming below 2 K. Quite unexpectedly, mitigation scenario is shown to strengthen hydrological cycle more than SRES A1B till around 2070. Our analysis shows that this is mostly a consequence of the larger increase in the negative radiative imbalance of atmosphere in E1 compared to A1B. This appears to be primarily related to the abated aerosol concentration in E1, which considerably reduces atmospheric absorption of solar radiation compared to A1B.

    In contrast, last decades of 21st century (21C show marked increase of global precipitation in A1B compared to E1, despite the fact that the two scenarios display almost same overall increase of radiative imbalance with respect to 20th century. Our results show that radiative cooling is weakly effective in A1B throughout all 21C, so that two distinct mechanisms characterize the diverse strengthening of hydrological cycle in mid and end 21C. It is only through a very large perturbation of surface fluxes that A1B achieves larger increase

  3. Energy distribution and heat transfer mechanisms in atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy distribution and heat transfer mechanisms in atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas were investigated extensively through energy balance analysis, emission spectroscopy of the rotational band of CH (A2Δ→XΠ2), and gas chromatographic analysis. Two plasma sources were examined: methane-fed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) and atmospheric pressure glow-discharge (APG). The DBD features filamentary microdischarges accompanied by surface discharge along a dielectric barrier. As a result, 60% of the input power was measured as heat transfer to the dielectric electrode, whereas 20% was to the metallic electrode. Consequently, feed gas average temperature was increased only by 20-40 K. On the other hand, rotational temperature of the corresponding emission region exceeded average gas temperature by 100 K. In APG, heat transfer to electrodes was dominated by formation of negative glow regardless of whether the electrode was covered by a dielectric. However, negative glow tended to be thinner and more intense when it formed on a metallic electrode, leading to slightly higher metallic heating. Rotational temperature in APG was close to average gas temperature since APG does not show radial localization of plasma. Energy efficiency for methane decomposition process to produce ethane, ethylene, and hydrogen was about 1% regardless of the plasma source. Energy distribution and heat transfer mechanisms depend strongly on the plasma spatial structure rather than flow fields or feed gas physical properties. (author)

  4. Mesoscale atmosphere ocean coupling enhances the transfer of wind energy into the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, D; Münnich, M; Frenger, I; Gruber, N

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well established that the large-scale wind drives much of the world's ocean circulation, the contribution of the wind energy input at mesoscales (10-200 km) remains poorly known. Here we use regional simulations with a coupled high-resolution atmosphere-ocean model of the South Atlantic, to show that mesoscale ocean features and, in particular, eddies can be energized by their thermodynamic interactions with the atmosphere. Owing to their sea-surface temperature anomalies affecting the wind field above them, the oceanic eddies in the presence of a large-scale wind gradient provide a mesoscale conduit for the transfer of energy into the ocean. Our simulations show that this pathway is responsible for up to 10% of the kinetic energy of the oceanic mesoscale eddy field in the South Atlantic. The conditions for this pathway to inject energy directly into the mesoscale prevail over much of the Southern Ocean north of the Polar Front. PMID:27292447

  5. Energy intensity decline implications for stabilization of atmospheric CO2 content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By calculating the amount of carbon-free energy required to stabilize the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere at some level, such as 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 2100, the authors estimate the appropriate rate of world average annual energy intensity decline. The roles played by energy efficiency and long term sectoral changes like shifts in economic activity from high energy intensity sectors or industries to low energy intensity sectors or industries are distinguished. Advances in technology and better and improved procedures, as well as a broader adoption of more efficient technologies currently available are included in the improvements made in energy efficiency. The objective was, for the period 1990 to 2100 (110 years), to estimate the potential energy efficiency increase for world electricity generation. It is noted that electricity generation represents 38 per cent of world energy consumption in 1995, while transportation accounts for 19 per cent and residential, industrial and commercial uses account for 43 per cent. In 2100, it is expected that the overall average decline in energy intensity will be 40.1 per cent of that of 1990, according to the results obtained. Looked at from another perspective, it represents an average annual rate of energy intensity decline of 0.83 per cent for 110 years. Between 0.16 and 0.30 per cent could be added to the impact of sectoral changes on the average annual rate of decline in energy intensity, while 0.83 per cent would be attributable to improvements in energy efficiency, as shown by sensitivity analysis. 33 refs., 9 tabs., 1 fig

  6. Redistributive effect of personal income taxation in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Vaqar; O'Donoghue, Cathal

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the redistribution effect of personal income tax in Pakistan. We decompose the overall tax system in order to evaluate the contribution of rate, allowances, deductions, exemptions and credits. The structure given in Income Tax Ordinance, 2001, is applied to gross household incomes in 2002 (low growth year) and 2005 (high growth year). Our findings reveal that the reforms laid down in this Ordinance resulted in a greater redistribution of incomes. The redistributive effect i...

  7. Charge redistribution from anomalous magneto-vorticity coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate novel transport phenomena in a chiral fluid originated from an interplay between a vorticity and strong magnetic field, which induces a redistribution of vector charges in the system and an axial current along the magnetic field. The corresponding transport coefficients are obtained from an energy-shift argument for the chiral fermions in the lowest Landau level (LLL) due to a spin-vorticity coupling and also from diagrammatic computations on the basis of the linear response theory. Based on consistent results from the both methods, we observe that the transport coefficients are proportional to the anomaly coefficient and are independence of temperature and chemical potential. We therefore speculate that these transport phenomena are connected to quantum anomaly.

  8. Chromium redistribution in ion-implanted GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper an attempt is made to find systematic differences between the annealing conditions for ion implanted GaAs where Cr is observed to redistribute and the conditions where it does not. For samples where Cr redistribution was observed, electrical and chemical and/or strain interactions were separated. The results indicate that electrical interactions are at least a limiting factor and in most cases a dominant factor in Cr redistribution. For this reason it appears that Cr redistribution in ion implanted samples can be minimized or eliminated by annealing at temperatures such that the background free carrier concentration screens out any internal electric fields. (author)

  9. Contributions from the Department of Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics to EWEC `99 in Nice, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Gunner C.; Westermann, Kirsten; Noergaard, Per [eds.

    1999-03-01

    The first conference following the merger of the series of European Union Wind Energy Conference and the European Wind Energy Conferences - EWEC`99 - was held in Nice, France during the period 1-5 March 1999. About 600 delegates, mainly from Europe but also from other parts of the world, attended the conference. The conference contributions included 96 oral presentations and 305 posters. The Department of Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics contributed with 29 oral presentations and 36 posters with members of the department as authors or co-authors. The present report contains the set of these papers available at the deadline 19 March 1999. The contributions cover a wide spectrum of subjects including wind resources, aerodynamics, reliability and load assessment, grid connection, measurement methods, innovative wind turbines and market aspects. (au)

  10. Future monitoring of charged particle energy deposition into the upper atmosphere and comments on possible relationships between atmospheric phenomena and solar and/or geomagnetic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. J.; Grubb, R. N.; Evans, D. S.; Sauer, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Monitoring of earth's atmosphere was conducted for several years utilizing the ITOS series of low-altitude, polar-orbiting weather satellites. A space environment monitoring package was included in these satellites to perform measurements of a portion of earth's charged particle environment. The charged particle observations proposed for the low-altitude weather satellite TIROS N, are described which will provide the capability of routine monitoring of the instantaneous total energy deposition into the upper atmosphere by the precipitation of charged particles from higher altitudes. Such observations may be of use in future studies of the relationships between geomagnetic activity and atmospheric weather pattern developments. Estimates are given to assess the potential importance of this type of energy deposition. Discussion and examples are presented illustrating the importance of distinguishing between solar and geomagnetic activity as possible causative sources. Such differentiation is necessary because of the widely different spatial and time scales involved in the atmospheric energy input resulting from these various sources of activity.

  11. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to assess, describe, and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to study the impacts of contaminants on local, regional, and global climates. The contaminants being investigated are those resulting from the development and use of conventional resources (coal, gas, oil, and nuclear power) as well as alternative energy sources. The description of the research is organized into 3 sections: (1) Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT); (2) Boundary Layer Meteorology; and (3) Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants. Separate analytics have been done for each of the sections and are indexed and contained in the EDB

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1985-02-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to assess, describe, and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to study the impacts of contaminants on local, regional, and global climates. The contaminants being investigated are those resulting from the development and use of conventional resources (coal, gas, oil, and nuclear power) as well as alternative energy sources. The description of the research is organized into 3 sections: (1) Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT); (2) Boundary Layer Meteorology; and (3) Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants. Separate analytics have been done for each of the sections and are indexed and contained in the EDB. (MDF)

  13. Towards redistribution laser cooling of molecular gases: Production of candidate molecules SrH by laser ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Philipp; Weller, Lars; Sass, Anne; Weitz, Martin; 10.1117/12.2002379

    2013-01-01

    Laser cooling by collisional redistribution of radiation has been successfully applied in the past for cooling dense atomic gases. Here we report on progress of work aiming at the demonstration of redistribution laser cooling in a molecular gas. The candidate molecule strontium monohydride is produced by laser ablation of strontium dihydride in a pressurized noble gas atmosphere. The composition of the ablation plasma plume is analyzed by measuring its emission spectrum. The dynamics of SrH molecular density following the ablation laser pulse is studied as a function of the buffer gas pressure and the laser intensity.

  14. The model study of water mass and energy exchange between the inland water body and atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on a one-dimensional eddy diffusion model,a model to study the water mass and energy exchange between the water body(such as lake and wetland) and the atmosphere is developed,which takes the phase change process due to the seasonal melting and freezing of water and the convection mixing process of energy caused by temperature stratification into consideration. The model uses enthalpy instead of temperature as predictive variable,which will help to deal with the phase change process and to design an efficient numerical scheme for obtaining the solution more easily. The performance of the model and the rationality of taking convection mixing into the consideration are validated by using observed data of Kinneret Lake in Israel and Lower Two Medicine Lake in Montana State in America. The comparison of model results with observed data indicates that the model presented here is capable of describing the physical process of water mass and energy between the water body(lake and wetland) and atmosphere. Comparison of the result from wetland with shallow and deep lakes under the same forcing conditions shows that the evaporation from wetland is much greater than that from lakes,which accords with the real observation fact and physical mechanism.

  15. Mount Aragats as a stable electron accelerator for atmospheric high-energy physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingarian, Ashot; Hovsepyan, Gagik; Mnatsakanyan, Eduard

    2016-03-01

    Observation of the numerous thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs), i.e., enhanced fluxes of electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons detected by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface and related to the strong thunderstorms above it, helped to establish a new scientific topic—high-energy physics in the atmosphere. Relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) are believed to be a central engine initiating high-energy processes in thunderstorm atmospheres. RREAs observed on Mount Aragats in Armenia during the strongest thunderstorms and simultaneous measurements of TGE electron and gamma-ray energy spectra proved that RREAs are a robust and realistic mechanism for electron acceleration. TGE research facilitates investigations of the long-standing lightning initiation problem. For the last 5 years we were experimenting with the "beams" of "electron accelerators" operating in the thunderclouds above the Aragats research station. Thunderstorms are very frequent above Aragats, peaking in May-June, and almost all of them are accompanied with enhanced particle fluxes. The station is located on a plateau at an altitude 3200 asl near a large lake. Numerous particle detectors and field meters are located in three experimental halls as well as outdoors; the facilities are operated all year round. All relevant information is being gathered, including data on particle fluxes, fields, lightning occurrences, and meteorological conditions. By the example of the huge thunderstorm that took place at Mount Aragats on August 28, 2015, we show that simultaneous detection of all the relevant data allowed us to reveal the temporal pattern of the storm development and to investigate the atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes.

  16. Adaptive lens using liquid crystal concentration redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongwen; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2006-05-01

    An adaptive lens using electrically induced liquid crystal (LC)/monomer concentration redistribution is demonstrated. In the absence of an electric field, the LC/monomer mixture is homogeneously distributed. Application of an inhomogeneous electric field causes the LC molecules to diffuse towards the high field region and the liquid monomer towards the low field region. On the other hand, the LC molecules tend to diffuse from high to low concentration direction in order to balance the concentration change. A gradient LC concentration is thus obtained. Using the gradient LC concentration, we demonstrate a tunable-focus lens. Compared with a conventional LC lens, our lens has advantages in small astigmatism and without light scattering, but its response time is slower.

  17. Redistribution of cesium-137 in southeastern watersheds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment samples from 14 southeastern agricultural reservoirs and surface samples from representative soils from the contributing water shed areas were analyzed for 137Cs. The concentrations of 137Cs measured reflect the nature of the watershed, its cover, its use, and man's activities. Since the redistribution of 137Cs was assumed to result from soil erosion, recent erosion rates can be calculated from the measured 137Cs accumulations in sediments and from the decreases in the 137Cs calculated to have been deposited on upland soils. Measured concentrations of 137Cs ranged from 14 to 158 nCi/m2 in surface soils. As much as 525 nCi/m2 of 137Cs was measured in the deposited sediment profile. Watershed budgets for 137Cs were calculated for three representative watersheds using available sediment survey information and the measured 137Cs concentrations

  18. Infiltration and redistribution of water in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flow of the liquid phase through a soil can be predicted from pressure gradients. Different ways of predicting infiltration for irrigation of a basin were compared: numerical approximation; semi-analytical and analytical. A partly empirical equation was developed for description of rate of infiltration, after examination of existing equations. Under certain conditions, infiltration was influenced by under or over pressure of the trapped gas phase and by swelling of clays. Complex models for redistribution were of little value in practice, since they could not be generalized and required too many physical data about the soil. A scheme was developed that grouped techniques for estimating physical properties of soil, according to cost and expertise required. A new experimental technique based on gamma transmission is described for estimating the physical properties of the soil. (Auth.)

  19. Wind Energy Forecasting: A Collaboration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Xcel Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, K.; Wan, Y. H.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    The focus of this report is the wind forecasting system developed during this contract period with results of performance through the end of 2010. The report is intentionally high-level, with technical details disseminated at various conferences and academic papers. At the end of 2010, Xcel Energy managed the output of 3372 megawatts of installed wind energy. The wind plants span three operating companies1, serving customers in eight states2, and three market structures3. The great majority of the wind energy is contracted through power purchase agreements (PPAs). The remainder is utility owned, Qualifying Facilities (QF), distributed resources (i.e., 'behind the meter'), or merchant entities within Xcel Energy's Balancing Authority footprints. Regardless of the contractual or ownership arrangements, the output of the wind energy is balanced by Xcel Energy's generation resources that include fossil, nuclear, and hydro based facilities that are owned or contracted via PPAs. These facilities are committed and dispatched or bid into day-ahead and real-time markets by Xcel Energy's Commercial Operations department. Wind energy complicates the short and long-term planning goals of least-cost, reliable operations. Due to the uncertainty of wind energy production, inherent suboptimal commitment and dispatch associated with imperfect wind forecasts drives up costs. For example, a gas combined cycle unit may be turned on, or committed, in anticipation of low winds. The reality is winds stayed high, forcing this unit and others to run, or be dispatched, to sub-optimal loading positions. In addition, commitment decisions are frequently irreversible due to minimum up and down time constraints. That is, a dispatcher lives with inefficient decisions made in prior periods. In general, uncertainty contributes to conservative operations - committing more units and keeping them on longer than may have been necessary for purposes of maintaining reliability

  20. Energy distribution of runaway electrons generated by a nanosecond discharge in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Lomaev, M. I.; Petin, V. K.; Rybka, D. V.; Shlyakhtun, S. V.

    2008-12-01

    The spectra of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam generated by a nanosecond discharge in atmospheric-pressure air were investigated. The temporal characteristics of the beam current pulses, gap voltage, and discharge current in a gas diode were measured with a time resolution of ˜0.1 ns. A simple technique was developed for recovering electron spectra from the curves of beam attenuation by aluminum foils. The effect of the cathode design, electrode gap length, and generator parameters on the electron spectra were studied using seven setups. It is shown that generation of electrons with anomalously high energies requires the use of cathodes with increased curvature radius.

  1. Radiative energy balance of Venus based on improved models of the middle and lower atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Tellmann, S.; Arnold, G.; Piccioni, G.; Drossart, P.; Häusler, B.

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of sources and sinks of radiative energy forces the atmospheric dynamics. The radiative transfer simulation model described by Haus et al. (2015b) is applied to calculate fluxes and temperature change rates in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus (0-100 km) covering the energetic significant spectral range 0.125-1000 μm. The calculations rely on improved models of atmospheric parameters (temperature profiles, cloud parameters, trace gas abundances) retrieved from Venus Express (VEX) data (mainly VIRTIS-M-IR, but also VeRa and SPICAV/SOIR with respect to temperature results). The earlier observed pronounced sensitivity of the radiative energy balance of Venus to atmospheric parameter variations is confirmed, but present detailed comparative analyses of possible influence quantities ensure unprecedented insights into radiative forcing on Venus by contrast with former studies. Thermal radiation induced atmospheric cooling rates strongly depend on temperature structure and cloud composition, while heating rates are mainly sensitive to insolation conditions and UV absorber distribution. Cooling and heating rate responses to trace gas variations and cloud mode 1 abundance changes are small, but observed variations of cloud mode 2 abundances and altitude profiles reduce cooling at altitudes 65-80 km poleward of 50°S by up to 30% compared to the neglect of cloud parameter changes. Cooling rate variations with local time below 80 km are in the same order of magnitude. Radiative effects of the unknown UV absorber are modeled considering a proxy that is based on a suitable parameterization of optical properties, not on a specific chemical composition, and that is independent of the used cloud model. The UV absorber doubles equatorial heating near 68 km. Global average radiative equilibrium at the top of atmosphere (TOA) is characterized by the net flux balance of 156 W/m2, the Bond albedo of 0.76, and the effective planetary emission temperature of 228

  2. Immigration, integration and support for redistribution in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Burgoon

    2011-01-01

    Immigration can be expected to have offsetting implications for public support for redistribution. On the one hand, immigration poses individual or collective economic risks that might make citizens more likely to support government redistribution, but on the other it can generate fiscal pressure or

  3. Redistribution of radiation for the wings of Lyman-alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelnik, J.-B.; Burnett, K.; Cooper, J.; Ballagh, R. J.; Voslamber, D.

    1981-01-01

    Earlier work on redistribution of radiation by collisions for isolated lines is extended to overlapping lines, and an explicit expression for the frequency redistribution is given for Lyman-alpha. This expression is valid, even when the emitted photon is in the (non-impact) line wings. A simple physical explanation of the result is possible.

  4. Measurements and Simulations of nonlinear noise redistribution in an SOA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Tromborg, Bjarne; Mørk, Jesper;

    2005-01-01

    Measurements and numerical simulations of the noise statistics after a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) demonstrate nonlinear noise redistribution. The redistribution, which relies on self-modulation due to gain saturation and carrier dynamics, shows a strong power and bandwidth dependence and...... can be important for SOA-based regenerators....

  5. Assessment of thorotrast redistribution in liver tissue of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to examine gammaspectrometrically and histo-autoradiographically in samples of self-regenerating liver tissue from rats after partial resection of the organ, whether a redistribution of ThO2 is stimulated by the process of regeneration and, if so, whether this redistribution is taking place predominantly at the organ level itself. (orig./MG)

  6. Pure Redistribution and the Provision of Public Goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sausgruber, Rupert; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    We study pure redistribution as a device to increase cooperation and efficiency in the provision of public goods. Experimental subjects play a two-stage game. The first stage is the standard linear public goods game. In the second stage, subjects can redistribute payoffs among other subjects in...

  7. Pure redistribution and the provision of public goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sausgruber, Rupert; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    2007-01-01

    We show that a simple redistribution scheme can increase the provision of public goods and that the scheme is popular. This suggests that imposed redistribution as in the mechanism by Falkinger [Falkinger, J., 1996. Efficient private provision of public goods when deviations from average are rewa...

  8. 45 CFR 98.64 - Reallotment and redistribution of funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT FUND Financial Management § 98.64 Reallotment and redistribution of funds. (a) According to the... will be based on the State's financial report to ACF for the Child Care and Development Fund (ACF-696... funds, if any. (5) A State's share of redistributed Matching Funds is based on the same ratio as...

  9. Terrestrial vegetation redistribution and carbon balance under climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erbrecht Tim

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs compute the terrestrial carbon balance as well as the transient spatial distribution of vegetation. We study two scenarios of moderate and strong climate change (2.9 K and 5.3 K temperature increase over present to investigate the spatial redistribution of major vegetation types and their carbon balance in the year 2100. Results The world's land vegetation will be more deciduous than at present, and contain about 125 billion tons of additional carbon. While a recession of the boreal forest is simulated in some areas, along with a general expansion to the north, we do not observe a reported collapse of the central Amazonian rain forest. Rather, a decrease of biomass and a change of vegetation type occurs in its northeastern part. The ability of the terrestrial biosphere to sequester carbon from the atmosphere declines strongly in the second half of the 21st century. Conclusion Climate change will cause widespread shifts in the distribution of major vegetation functional types on all continents by the year 2100.

  10. Stellar Winds and High-Energy Radiation: Evolution and influences on planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, C.; Tu, L.; Güdel, M.; Lüftinger, T.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K.; Fichtinger, B.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the Austrian research network "Pathways to Habitability: From Disks to Active Stars, Planets and Life" (path.univie.ac.at), we study the evolution of stellar output (e.g. winds, high-energy radiation) over the lifetimes of solar-like stars and the influence of stellar output on the development of habitable planetary environments. We have developed a coupled stellar rotation-wind-radiation model that describes the long term evolution of stellar output over the course of a star's life. We show that the initial rotation rate of a star can significantly influence the evolution of winds and high-energy radiation and therefore the development of planetary atmospheres.

  11. Resonant energy conversion of 3-minute intensity oscillations into Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinear coupling between 3-minute oscillations and Alfven waves in the solar lower atmosphere is studied. 3-minute oscillations are considered as acoustic waves trapped in a chromospheric cavity and oscillating along transversally inhomogeneous vertical magnetic field. It is shown that under the action of the oscillations the temporal dynamics of Alfven waves is governed by Mathieu equation. Consequently, the harmonics of Alfven waves with twice period and wavelength of 3-minute oscillations grow exponentially in time near the layer where the sound and Alfven speeds equal. Thus the 3-minute oscillations are resonantly absorbed by pure Alfven waves near this resonant layer. The resonant Alfven waves may penetrate into the solar corona taking energy from the chromosphere. Therefore the layer c_s=v_A may play a role of energy channel for otherwise trapped acoustic oscillations.

  12. A land surface scheme for atmospheric and hydrologic models: SEWAB (Surface Energy and Water Balance)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengelkamp, H.T.; Warrach, K.; Raschke, E. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1997-12-31

    A soil-vegetation-atmosphere-transfer scheme is presented here which solves the coupled system of the Surface Energy and Water Balance (SEWAB) equations considering partly vegetated surfaces. It is based on the one-layer concept for vegetation. In the soil the diffusion equations for heat and moisture are solved on a multi-layer grid. SEWAB has been developed to serve as a land-surface scheme for atmospheric circulation models. Being forced with atmospheric data from either simulations or measurements it calculates surface and subsurface runoff that can serve as input to hydrologic models. The model has been validated with field data from the FIFE experiment and has participated in the PILPS project for intercomparison of land-surface parameterization schemes. From these experiments we feel that SEWAB reasonably well partitions the radiation and precipitation into sensible and latent heat fluxes as well as into runoff and soil moisture Storage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein Landoberflaechenschema wird vorgestellt, das den Transport von Waerme und Wasser zwischen dem Erdboden, der Vegetation und der Atmosphaere unter Beruecksichtigung von teilweise bewachsenem Boden beschreibt. Im Erdboden werden die Diffusionsgleichungen fuer Waerme und Feuchte auf einem Gitter mit mehreren Schichten geloest. Das Schema SEWAB (Surface Energy and Water Balance) beschreibt die Landoberflaechenprozesse in atmosphaerischen Modellen und berechnet den Oberflaechenabfluss und den Basisabfluss, die als Eingabedaten fuer hydrologische Modelle genutzt werden koennen. Das Modell wurde mit Daten des FIFE-Experiments kalibriert und hat an Vergleichsexperimenten fuer Landoberflaechen-Schemata im Rahmen des PILPS-Projektes teilgenommen. Dabei hat sich gezeigt, dass die Aufteilung der einfallenden Strahlung und des Niederschlages in den sensiblen und latenten Waermefluss und auch in Abfluss und Speicherung der Bodenfeuchte in SEWAB den beobachteten Daten recht gut entspricht. (orig.)

  13. High-energy spectrum and zenith-angle distribution of atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

    2011-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons produced through the collisions of cosmic ray particles with air nuclei, form the background in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. An ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. We present results of the calculation of the energy spectrum and zenith-angle distribution of the muon and electron atmospheric neutrinos in the energy range 10 GeV to 10 PeV. The calculation was performed with usage of known hadronic models (QGSJET-II-03, SIBYLL 2.1, Kimel & Mokhov) for two of the primary spectrum parametrizations, by Gaisser & Honda and by Zatsepin & Sokolskaya. The comparison of the calculated muon neutrino spectrum with the IceCube40 experiment data make it clear that even at energies above 100 TeV the prompt neutrino contribution is not so apparent because of tangled uncertainties of the strange (kaons) and charm...

  14. Transition from geostrophic turbulence to inertia-gravity waves in the atmospheric energy spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Bühler, Oliver

    2014-12-01

    Midlatitude fluctuations of the atmospheric winds on scales of thousands of kilometers, the most energetic of such fluctuations, are strongly constrained by the Earth's rotation and the atmosphere's stratification. As a result of these constraints, the flow is quasi-2D and energy is trapped at large scales—nonlinear turbulent interactions transfer energy to larger scales, but not to smaller scales. Aircraft observations of wind and temperature near the tropopause indicate that fluctuations at horizontal scales smaller than about 500 km are more energetic than expected from these quasi-2D dynamics. We present an analysis of the observations that indicates that these smaller-scale motions are due to approximately linear inertia-gravity waves, contrary to recent claims that these scales are strongly turbulent. Specifically, the aircraft velocity and temperature measurements are separated into two components: one due to the quasi-2D dynamics and one due to linear inertia-gravity waves. Quasi-2D dynamics dominate at scales larger than 500 km; inertia-gravity waves dominate at scales smaller than 500 km. PMID:25404349

  15. Evidence for Energy Supply by Active Region Spicules to the Solar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Zeighami, S; Tavabi, E; Ajabshirizadeh, A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the role of active region spicules in the mass balance of the solar wind and energy supply for heating the solar atmosphere. We use high cadence observations from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Hinode satellite in the Ca II H line filter obtained on 26 January 2007. The observational technique provides the high spatio-temporal resolution required to detect fine structures such as spicules. We apply Fourier power spectrum and wavelet analysis to SOT/Hinode time series of an active region data to explore the existence of coherent intensity oscillations. The presence of coherent waves could be an evidence for energy transport to heat the solar atmosphere. Using time series, we measure the phase difference between two intensity profiles obtained at two different heights, which gives information about the phase difference between oscillations at those heights as a function of frequency. The results of a fast Fourier transform (FFT) show peaks in the power spectrum at frequencies in th...

  16. Modeling the atmospheric and terrestrial water and energy cycles in the ScaleX experiment through a fully-coupled atmosphere-hydrology model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatore, Alfonso; Benjamin, Fersch; Thomas, Rummler; Caroline, Brosy; Christian, Chwala; Junkermann, Wolfgang; Ingo, Völksch; Harald, Kunstmann

    2016-04-01

    The TERENO preAlpine Observatory, comprising a series of observatory sites along an altitudinal gradient within the Ammer catchment (southern Bavaria, Germany), has been designed as an international research platform, open for participation and integration, and has been provided with comprehensive technical infrastructure to allow joint analyses of water-, energy- and nutrient fluxes. In June and July 2015 the operational monitoring has been complemented by the ScaleX intensive measurement campaign, where additional precipitation and soil moisture measurements, remote sensing measurements of atmospheric wind, humidity and temperature profiles have been performed, complemented by micro-light aircraft- and UAV-based remote sensing for three-dimensional pattern information. The comprehensive observations serve as validation and evaluation basis for compartment-crossing modeling systems. Specifically, the fully two-way dynamically coupled atmosphere-hydrology modeling system WRF-Hydro has been used to investigate the interplay of energy and water cycles at the regional scale and across the compartments atmosphere, stream, vadose zone and groundwater during the ScaleX campaign and to assess the closure of the budgets involved. Here, several high-resolution modeled hydro-meteorological variables, such as precipitation, soil moisture, river discharge and air moisture and temperature along vertical profiles are compared with observations from multiple sources, such as rain gauges and soil moisture networks, rain radars, stream gauges, UAV and a micro-light aircraft. Results achieved contribute to the objective of addressing questions on energy- and water-cycling within the TERENO-Ammer region at a very high scale and degree of integration, and provides hints on how well can observations constrain uncertainties associated with the modeling of atmospheric and terrestrial water and energy balances.

  17. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3: Atmospheric and climate research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the Environmental Sciences Division of OHER, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program continues DOE`s long-term commitment to understanding the local, regional, and global effects of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and analytical studies in the Atmospheric Chemistry Program emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, photochemically produced oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The atmospheric studies in Complex Terrain Program applies basic research on atmospheric boundary layer structure and evolution over inhomogeneous terrain to DOE`s site-specific and generic mission needs in site safety, air quality, and climate change. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements, the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics, and Quantitative Links program to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The description of ongoing atmospheric and climate research at PNL is organized in two broad research areas: atmospheric research; and climate research. This report describes the progress in fiscal year 1993 in each of these areas. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  18. Strengthening of the hydrological cycle in future scenarios: atmospheric energy and water balance perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alessandri

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Future climate scenarios experiencing global warming are expected to strengthen the hydrological cycle during the 21st century (21C. We analyze the strengthening of the global-scale increase in precipitation from the perspective of changes in whole atmospheric water and energy balances. By combining energy and water equations for the whole atmosphere, we obtain constraints for the changes in surface fluxes and partitioning at the surface between sensible and latent components. We investigate the differences in the strengthening of the hydrological cycle in two centennial simulations performed with an Earth system model forced with specified atmospheric concentration pathways. Alongside the Special Report on Emissions Scenario (SRES A1B, which is a medium-high non-mitigation scenario, we consider a new aggressive-mitigation scenario (E1 with reduced fossil fuel use for energy production aimed at stabilizing global warming below 2 K.

    Our results show that the mitigation scenario effectively constrains the global warming with a stabilization below 2 K with respect to the 1950–2000 historical period. On the other hand, the E1 precipitation does not follow the temperature field toward a stabilization path but continues to increase over the mitigation period. Quite unexpectedly, the mitigation scenario is shown to strengthen the hydrological cycle even more than SRES A1B till around 2070. We show that this is mostly a consequence of the larger increase in the negative radiative imbalance of atmosphere in E1 compared to A1B. This appears to be primarily related to decreased sulfate aerosol concentration in E1, which considerably reduces atmospheric absorption of solar radiation compared to A1B.

    The last decades of the 21C show a marked increase in global precipitation in A1B compared to E1, despite the fact that the two scenarios display almost the same overall increase of radiative imbalance with respect to the 20th century. Our

  19. High-energy neutrino fluxes and flavor ratio in the Earth atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovskaya, T S; Sinegovsky, S I

    2014-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos from decays of mesons, produced in collisions of cosmic-ray particles with air nuclei, form unavoidable background for detection of astrophysical neutrinos. More precise calculations of the high-energy neutrino spectrum are required since measurements in the IceCube experiment reach the intriguing energy range where a contribution of the prompt neutrinos and/or astrophysical ones should be uncovered. The calculation of muon and electron neutrino fluxes in the energy range 100 GeV - 10 PeV is performed for three hadronic models, QGSJET II, SIBYll 2.1 and Kimel & Mokhov, taking into consideration the "knee" of the cosmic-ray spectrum. All calculations are compared with the atmospheric neutrino measurements by Frejus, AMANDA, IceCube and ANTARES. The prompt neutrino flux predictions obtained with the quark-gluon string model (QGSM) for the charm production by Kaidalov & Piskunova do not contradict to the measurements and upper limits on the astrophysical muon neutrino flux obtained ...

  20. Carbon Dioxide Extraction from the Atmosphere Through Engineered Chemical Sinkage: Enabling Energy and Environmental Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, M. K.; Ziock, H.; Rueff, G.; Smith, W. S.; Colman, J.; Elliott, S.; Lackner, K.; Johnston, N. A.

    2002-05-01

    We present the case for carbon dioxide (CO2) extraction from air using engineered chemical sinks as a means of sustaining fossil energy use by avoiding climate change. Existing carbon sequestration strategies such as CO2 injection into geologic formations or the deep ocean and mineral carbonation, require a pure stream of concentrated CO2 to be viable. Furthermore, current emphasis on reducing the global CO2 emissions is on large centralized power plants. However, more than half of all emissions are from the transportation sector and small, distributed sources such as home heating, etc. Most solutions for dealing with these sources explicitly or implicitly entail completely overhauling the existing infrastructure. To solve these problems, Los Alamos National Laboratory has conceived a novel approach for directly extracting CO2 from the atmosphere. Direct extraction converts the dilute CO2 (370 parts per million) in the atmosphere into a pure CO2 stream ready for permanent sequestration. It provides the following advantages: (1) Preserves our existing energy use and fuel distribution systems, which represent a large investment, (2) Indirectly captures CO2 from the myriad of small, distributed, and mobile sources that otherwise are not accessible to sequestration, (3) Allows atmospheric CO2 levels to be restored to their pre-industrial age value, (4) Provides free transport of CO2 to suitable sequestration sites by using natural atmospheric circulation, and (5) Is relatively compact and therefore inexpensive when compared to renewable concepts. Our concept harnesses atmospheric circulation to transport CO2 to sites where the CO2 is extracted by binding it to an adsorbent. The bound CO2 is then recovered as pure gas by heating together with the solid adsorbent that is recycled. As a proof of concept, we show that an aqueous Ca(OH)2 solution efficiently converts CO2 to a CaCO3 solid that can be heated to obtain pure CO2 and recover the CaO. Even with recycling costs

  1. Energy Transport Effects in Flaring Atmospheres Heated by Mixed Particle Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Zharkov, Sergei; Macrae, Connor; Druett, Malcolm; Scullion, Eamon

    2016-07-01

    We investigate energy and particle transport in the whole flaring atmosphere from the corona to the photosphere and interior for the flaring events on the 1st July 2012, 6 and 7 September 2011 by using the RHESSI and SDO instruments as well as high-resolution observations from the Swedish 1-metre Solar Telescope (SST3) CRISP4 (CRisp Imaging Spectro-polarimeter). The observations include hard and soft X-ray emission, chromospheric emission in both H-alpha 656.3 nm core and continuum, as well as, in the near infra-red triplet Ca II 854.2 nm core and continuum channels and local helioseismic responses (sunquakes). The observations are compared with the simulations of hard X-ray emission and tested by hydrodynamic simulations of flaring atmospheres of the Sun heated by mixed particle beams. The temperature, density and macro-velocity variations of the ambient atmospheres are calculated for heating by mixed beams and the seismic response of the solar interior to generation of supersonic shocks moving into the solar interior. We investigate the termination depths of these shocks beneath the quiet photosphere levels and compare them with the parameters of seismic responses in the interior, or sunquakes (Zharkova and Zharkov, 2015). We also present an investigation of radiative conditions modelled in a full non-LTE approach for hydrogen during flare onsets with particular focus on Balmer and Paschen emission in the visible, near UV and near IR ranges and compare them with observations. The links between different observational features derived from HXR, optical and seismic emission are interpreted by different particle transport models that will allow independent evaluation of the particle transport scenarios.

  2. Exploring High-Energy Phenomena in Earth's Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the beginning of last century C.T.R. Wilson proposed that the strong electric field of thunderclouds might accelerate electrons to very high energies. However, this and many other electromagnetic processes in our atmosphere are poorly understood till now; the key questions about the thundercloud electrification and lightning initiation remain unanswered. During recent decades several observations of gamma ray, electron and neutron fluxes correlated with thunderstorms were reported. Nonetheless, the origin of these fluxes is under debate till now. According to our model the electron acceleration downward becomes possible after creation of the Lower Positive Charged Region below the main negative charged layer in the middle of the thundercloud. Our analysis is based on the vast thunderstorm data from the Aragats Mountain in Armenia, 3200 m above sea level. Varieties of particle detectors located at Aragats Space Environmental Center are registering neutral and charged particle fluxes correlated with thunderstorms, so-called Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements. Simultaneously the electric mills and lightning detectors are monitoring the near-surface electric field and lightning flashes. Study of Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements provides unique information about particle acceleration and multiplication in the atmosphere during thunderstorms. Generation and propagation of large fluxes of electrons, positrons, gamma rays, and neutrons in the atmosphere and in near space are related to the development of thunderstorms and may be used for monitoring dangerous consequences of extreme weather. Electromagnetic emissions connected with thunderstorms trigger various dynamic processes in the Earth's magnetosphere, causing global geomagnetic storms and changing electrodynamics properties of the ionosphere. (author)

  3. Root controls on water redistribution and carbon uptake in the soil-plant system under current and future climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, V.; Marani, M.; Albertson, J. D.; Katul, G.

    2013-10-01

    Understanding photosynthesis and plant water management as a coupled process remains an open scientific problem. Current eco-hydrologic models characteristically describe plant photosynthetic and hydraulic processes through ad hoc empirical parameterizations with no explicit accounting for the main pathways over which carbon and water uptake interact. Here, a soil-plant-atmosphere continuum model is proposed that mechanistically couples photosynthesis and transpiration rates, including the main leaf physiological controls exerted by stomata. The proposed approach links the soil-to-leaf hydraulic transport to stomatal regulation, and closes the coupled photosynthesis-transpiration problem by maximizing leaf carbon gain subject to a water loss constraint. The approach is evaluated against field data from a grass site and is shown to reproduce the main features of soil moisture dynamics and hydraulic redistribution. In particular, it is shown that the differential soil drying produced by diurnal root water uptake drives a significant upward redistribution of moisture both through a conventional Darcian flow and through the root system, consistent with observations. In a numerical soil drying experiment, it is demonstrated that more than 50% of diurnal transpiration is supplied by nocturnal upward water redistribution, and some 12% is provided directly through root hydraulic redistribution. For a prescribed leaf area density, the model is then used to diagnose how elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and increased air temperature jointly impact soil moisture, transpiration, photosynthesis, and whole-plant water use efficiency, along with compensatory mechanisms such as hydraulic lift using several canonical forms of root-density distribution.

  4. Who Supports Redistribution? Subjective Income Inequality in Japan and China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    STEPHEN; TAY

    2015-01-01

    Governments reduce income inequality with redistribution policies. These policies are often contentious because people who live in the same country have different preferences for redistribution. Some prefer the government to do more while others prefer the government to do less. Hence what explains the difference in preferences? Using the methodologically suitable cases of Japan and China, this paper contributes to the redistributive preference literature by proposing an alternative theory of how a person’s subjective evaluation of and experiences with income inequality—subjective income inequality—affect his/her redistributive preferences. Specifically, a person who feels that his/her country’s level of income inequality is too high is more likely to support government redistribution. But contrary to extant studies, this paper finds that a spatial locality’s level of objective income inequality does not systematically affect its citizens’ preference for redistribution. This finding has implications for redistribution policies because government policies in Japan and China—as with other countries—narrowly frame income inequality in the objective dimensions by pegging it to "objective" income inequality indices(e.g., Gini ratio), thereby ignoring the more important subjective dimensions of income inequality.

  5. Physical modeling of the atmospheric boundary layer for wind energy and wind engineering studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Power, Gregory; Turner, John; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH has test section dimensions W6.0m, H2.7m, L=72m. It can achieve high Reynolds number boundary layers, enabling turbulent boundary layer, wind energy and wind engineering research with exceptional spatial and temporal instrument resolution. We examined the FPF's ability to experimentally simulate different types of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL): the stable, unstable, and neutral ABL. The neutral ABL is characterized by a zero potential temperature gradient, which is readily achieved in the FPF by operating when air and floor temperatures are close to equal. The stable and unstable ABLs have positive and negative vertical temperature gradients, respectively, which are more difficult to simulate without direct control of air or test section floor temperature. The test section floor is a 10 inch thick concrete cement slab and has significant thermal mass. When combined with the diurnal temperature variation of the ambient air, it is possible to achieve vertical temperature gradients in the test section, and produce weakly stable or weakly unstable boundary layer. Achievable Richardson numbers and Obukhov lengths are estimated. The different boundary layer profiles were measured, and compared to theoretical atmospheric models. Supported by UNH Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research SURF.

  6. Atmospheric corrosion monitoring at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6) at the US Department of Energy's K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, TN has been stored in large steel cylinders which have undergone significant atmospheric corrosion damage over the last 35 years. A detailed experimental program to characterize and monitor the corrosion damage was initiated in 1992. Large amounts of corrosion scale and deep pits are found to cover cylinder surfaces. Ultrasonic wall thickness measurements have shown uniform corrosion losses up to 20 mils (0.5 mm) and pits up to 100 mils (2.5 mm) deep. Electrical resistance corrosion probes, time-of-wetness sensors and thermocouples have been attached to cylinder bodies. Atmospheric conditions are monitored using rain gauges, relative humidity sensors and thermocouples. Long-term (16 years) data are being obtained from mild steel corrosion coupons on test racks as well as attached directly to cylinder surfaces. Corrosion rates have been found to intimately related to the times-of-wetness, both tending to be higher on cylinder tops due to apparent sheltering effects. Data from the various tests are compared, discrepancies are discussed and a pattern of cylinder corrosion as a function of cylinder position and location is described

  7. Observational Investigation of Energy Release in the Lower Solar Atmosphere of a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Sharykin, I N; Kosovichev, A G; Vargas-Dominguez, S; Zimovets, I V

    2016-01-01

    We study flare processes in the lower solar atmosphere using observational data for a M1-class flare of June 12, 2014, obtained by New Solar Telescope (NST/BBSO) and Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI/SDO). The main goal is to understand triggers and manifestations of the flare energy release in the lower layers of the solar atmosphere (the photosphere and chromosphere) using high-resolution optical observations and magnetic field measurements. We analyze optical images, HMI Dopplergrams and vector magnetograms, and use Non-Linear Force-Free Field (NLFFF) extrapolations for reconstruction of the magnetic topology. The NLFFF modelling reveals interaction of oppositely directed magnetic flux-tubes in the PIL. These two interacting magnetic flux tubes are observed as a compact sheared arcade along the PIL in the high-resolution broad-band continuum images from NST. In the vicinity of the PIL, the NST H alpha observations reveal formation of a thin three-ribbon structure corresponding to the small-scale photospher...

  8. Study of x-ray radiant characteristics and thermal radiation redistribution in CH foam filling cylindrical cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments are presented, which demonstrate the properties of x-ray radiation and redistribution of radiant thermal energy in high Z cylindrical cavities filled with low Z CH foam. Time integrated spectra records were obtained by a calibrated space-resolved transmission grating spectrometer. The x-ray radiation became weaker in intensity and was changed to a softer near-Planckian radiation light after a 1500 μm long transport in the foam filling cavity. The experimental redistribution of the radiant thermal energy was plotted and compared to the numerical results of a simplified model. Good agreements have been achieved.

  9. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrempf, R.E. [ed.

    1993-04-01

    Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the ESD, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) continues DOE`s long-term commitment to study the continental and oceanic fates of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and laboratory studies in the ACP emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program continues to apply basic research on density-driven circulations and on turbulent mixing and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer to the micro- to mesoscale meteorological processes that affect air-surface exchange and to emergency preparedness at DOE and other facilities. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and Quantitative Links programs to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program.

  10. Optimal capture and sequestration from the carbon emission flow and from the atmospheric carbon stock with heterogeneous energy consuming sectors

    OpenAIRE

    Amigues, Jean-Pierre; Lafforgue, Gilles; MOREAUX Michel

    2010-01-01

    We characterize the optimal exploitation paths of two primary energy resources. The first one is a non-renewable polluting resource, the second one a pollution-free renewable resource. Both resources can supply the energy needs of two sectors. Sector 1 is able to reduce the potential carbon emissions generated by its non-renewable energy consumption at a reasonable cost while sector 2 cannot. Another possibility is to capture the carbon spread in the atmosphere but at a significantly higher c...

  11. Comparison of energy fluxes at the land surface-atmosphere interface in an Alpine valley as simulated with different models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Grossi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of a research project coupling meteorological and hydrological models in mountainous areas a distributed Snow-Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model was developed and applied to simulate the energy fluxes at the land surface – atmosphere interface in an Alpine valley (Toce Valley - North Italy during selected flood events in the last decade. Energy fluxes simulated by the distributed energy transfer model were compared with those simulated by a limited area meteorological model for the event of June 1997 and the differences in the spatial and temporal distribution. The Snow/Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model was also applied to simulate the energy fluxes at the land surface-atmosphere interface for a single cell, assumed to be representative of the Siberia site (Toce Valley, where a micro-meteorological station was installed and operated for 2.5 months in autumn 1999. The Siberia site is very close to the Nosere site, where a standard meteorological station was measuring precipitation, air temperature and humidity, global and net radiation and wind speed during the same special observing period. Data recorded by the standard meteorological station were used to force the energy transfer model and simulate the point energy fluxes at the Siberia site, while turbulent fluxes observed at the Siberia site were used to derive the latent heat flux from the energy balance equation. Finally, the hourly evapotranspiration flux computed by this procedure was compared to the evapotranspiration flux simulated by the energy transfer model. Keywords: energy exchange processes, land surface-atmosphere interactions, turbulent fluxes

  12. Heterogeneity and scaling land-atmospheric water and energy fluxes in climate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of small-scale heterogeneity in land surface characteristics on the large-scale fluxes of water and energy in land-atmosphere system has become a central focus of many of the climatology research experiments. The acquisition of high resolution land surface data through remote sensing and intensive land-climatology field experiments (like HAPEX and FIFE) has provided data to investigate the interactions between microscale land-atmosphere interactions and macroscale models. One essential research question is how to account for the small scale heterogeneities and whether 'effective' parameters can be used in the macroscale models. To address this question of scaling, three modeling experiments were performed and are reviewed in the paper. The first is concerned with the aggregation of parameters and inputs for a terrestrial water and energy balance model. The second experiment analyzed the scaling behavior of hydrologic responses during rain events and between rain events. The third experiment compared the hydrologic responses from distributed models with a lumped model that uses spatially constant inputs and parameters. The results show that the patterns of small scale variations can be represented statistically if the scale is larger than a representative elementary area scale, which appears to be about 2 - 3 times the correlation length of the process. For natural catchments this appears to be about 1 - 2 sq km. The results concerning distributed versus lumped representations are more complicated. For conditions when the processes are nonlinear, then lumping results in biases; otherwise a one-dimensional model based on 'equivalent' parameters provides quite good results. Further research is needed to fully understand these conditions.

  13. Redistribution of the solar radiation and the rain inside of coffee plantations (Arabic Coffea L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following review presents a series of studies on microclimates of non-shaded and shaded conditions of coffee plantations (Coffea arabica L.) in Colombia. Likewise, The redistribution of solar radiation and the temperature, as well as the energy balance, of the coffee plant and the crop are described. The results on the components of water balance and transport of nutrients within the coffee plantations are reported

  14. Measurement of atmospheric neutron and photon energy spectra at aviation altitudes using a phoswich-type neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron energy spectrum from 7 to 180 MeV and photon energy spectrum from 4 to 50 MeV were measured onboard an aircraft using a newly developed phoswich-type neutron detector at 10.8 km altitude (atmospheric depth of 249 g/cm2) and geographical latitude of 39degN (a vertical cut-off rigidity of 10.2 GV) near Japan on February 13, 2008 (at a heliocentric potential of 312 MV). Our results were compared with other measurements obtained using 3He-loaded or extended-energy multi moderator neutron spectrometers (Bonner balls) at aviation altitudes, an organic liquid scintillator on the ground, and a double-scatter neutron telescope at the top of the atmosphere and with calculations using the LUIN2000, EXPACS and RMC codes. Our measured results give a large, sharp peak around a neutron energy of 70 MeV, although Bonner balls present a broad peak around 100 MeV due to low energy resolution. Our neutron fluxes agree well with the others. The measured photon energy spectrum is between the LUIN2000- and EXPACS-calculated spectra and agrees with measured vertical photon spectra at the top of the atmosphere. This onboard study provides the first experimental neutron energy spectrum in the high-energy region (over 10 MeV) with a high energy resolution. (author)

  15. Macroeconomic and social change and popular demand for redistribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Mads Meier

    -demographic groups that are matched over time. I estimate fixed effect models and find that (1) changes in macroeconomic and social conditions affect the demand for redistribution; (2) results are mostly consistent with the self-interest hypothesis claiming that agents demand more redistribution in economically hard...... times (and vice versa in good times); and (3) the effect of macroeconomic and social conditions on the demand for redistribution are highly non-linear.......This paper tests the self-interest hypothesis arguing that changes in macroeconomic and social conditions affect popular demand for redistribution. I analyze data from four waves of the European Social Survey and use a synthetic cohort design to generate pseudo panel data for socio...

  16. Radial plutonium redistribution in mixed-oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha autoradiographs from all HEDL fuel pin metallography samples are evaluated and catalogued according to different plutonium distribution patterns. The data base is analyzed for effects of fabrication and operating parameters on redistribution

  17. Capital mobility, tax competition, and lobbying for redistributive capital taxation

    OpenAIRE

    Lorz, Jens Oliver

    1996-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of international capital mobility on redistributive capital taxation and on lobbying activities by interest groups. It employs a model where different capital endowments lead to a conflict between households concerning their most preferred capital tax rate. Three main results are derived: First, redistributive source based capital taxes or subsidies decline as international tax competition intensifies. Second, lobbying activities of certain interest groups may e...

  18. Income Redistribution and the Diversity of Consumer Goods

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Maarek; Renaud Bourlès; Michael T.Dorsch

    2014-01-01

    Reductions in the generosity of welfare benefits and less progressive taxation have decreased the redistributive impact of fiscal policy since the mid-1990’s across the advanced democracies. We argue that the strong increase in the diversity of goods observed those last decades may have modified preferences for redistribution differently across groups in society and affected the political equilibrium tax rate. We show that if the share of diversified goods compared to that of basic (necessary...

  19. Wealth Inequality, Income Redistribution and Growth in 15 OECD countries

    OpenAIRE

    Sonedda, Daniela

    2003-01-01

    We model the individuals' investment in physical capital and education decisions in presence of borrowing constraints and a progressive taxation system. Our empirical evidence for 15 OECD countries supports the theoretical model predictions according to which the effects on growth of higher redistribution are ambiguous. We find that in those countries characterized by a high (low) taxation level and a high (low) degree of tax progressivity, further redistribution has a negative (positive) imp...

  20. Social norms on rent seeking and preferences for redistribution

    OpenAIRE

    Sabatini, Fabio; Sarracino, Francesco; Yamamura, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Empirical studies have shown that preferences for redistribution are sig- nificantly correlated with expectations of future mobility and the belief that society offers equal opportunities. We add to previous research by inves- tigating the role of individual and social norms on rent seeking. We find that the individual propensity for stigmatizing rent seeking significantly and positively affects preferences for redistribution. On the other hand, living in an area where most citizens do not st...

  1. Redistributive Constraints under High Inequality: The Case of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    John Scott

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a comprehensive analysis and interpretation of redistributive spending in Mexico. It reviews the evolution over the last two decades of the principal redistributive instruments and the distributive outcomes targeted by these instruments (income, land, education, health, nutrition). Using recent income and expenditure surveys, the paper presents a comparative benefit incidence analysis (BIA) of 25 mayor programs or spending categories covering all public spending on educatio...

  2. Asset-Centred Redistributive Policies for Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    Kohler, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this discussion paper is to propose an asset-centred analytical framework for (i) mapping the most important redistributive policy tools that shape the distribution of income and income-generating assets (such as human capital and wealth, including land, industrial or financial capital) across individuals as well as between the private and the public sector and (ii) outlining key linkages between redistributive policies, equity and sustainable development by looking at how th...

  3. Do Redistributive Pension Systems Increase Inequalities and Welfare?

    OpenAIRE

    Hachon, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Using a capital-skill complementarity technology, we analytically show that an increase in the direct redistributivity of Pay-As-You-Go (PAYG) pension systems has a positive impact on wages and on wage inequalities. We also show that life expectancyinequalities play an important role in the achievement of these results. Then, we calibrate our model and we and that, if life expectancy inequalities are suffciently high, a more redistributive pension system increases the wealth and the welfare o...

  4. Simulation of Water Movement through Unsaturated Infiltration- Redistribution System

    OpenAIRE

    T Bunsri; Sivakumar, M.; D Hagare

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the movement of water in a natural unsaturated zone, focusing on infiltration-redistribution system. Infiltration refers to the downward movement of water due to the gravitational force and redistribution defines the upward movement of water due to the capillary rise. Under natural conditions, the movement of water through an infiltrationredistribution depended upon the relations among water content, hydraulic conductivity and tension of soil pore. Various...

  5. The Structure of Inequality and the Politics of Redistribution

    OpenAIRE

    Lupu, Noam; Pontusson, Harry Jonas

    2011-01-01

    Against the current consensus among comparative political economists, we argue that inequality matters for redistributive politics in advanced capitalist societies, but it is the structure of inequality, not the level of inequality, that matters. Our theory posits that middle-income voters will be inclined to ally with low-income voters and support redistributive policies when the distance between the middle and the poor is small relative to the distance between the middle and the rich. We te...

  6. Redistribution natural resource rents for welfare society: experience Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Sherstyukova, Karyna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of article is an investigation of mechanism and conditions of the efficiency of distribution and redistribution models of natural resources rents, as well as the World Experience of. Using of redistribution mechanism of rents for the public welfare.The study used general scientific and special methods, in particular: the dialectic, the theoretical generalization and comparison, analysis and synthesis - when determining the basic principles of the system and elements of rent redistribu...

  7. Evidence of Energy Supply by Active-Region Spicules to the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeighami, S.; Ahangarzadeh Maralani, A. R.; Tavabi, E.; Ajabshirizadeh, A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the role of active-region spicules in the mass balance of the solar wind and energy supply in heating the solar atmosphere. We use high-cadence observations from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Hinode satellite in the Ca ii H-line filter obtained on 26 January 2007. The observational technique provides the high spatio-temporal resolution required to detect fine structures such as spicules. We apply a Fourier power spectrum and wavelet analysis to Hinode/SOT time series of an active-region data set to explore the existence of coherent intensity oscillations. Coherent waves could be evidence of energy transport that serves to heat the solar atmosphere. Using time series, we measure the phase difference between two intensity profiles obtained at two different heights, which gives information about the phase difference between oscillations at those heights as a function of frequency. The results of a fast Fourier transform (FFT) show peaks in the power spectrum at frequencies in the range from 2 to 8 mHz at four different heights (above the limb), while the wavelet analysis indicates dominant frequencies similar to those of the Fourier power spectrum results. A coherency study indicates coherent oscillations at about 5.5 mHz (3 min). We measure mean phase speeds in the range 250-425 km s^{-1} increasing with height. The energy flux of these waves is estimated to be F = 1.8 × 106-11.2 × 106 erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} or 1.8-11.2 kW m^{-2}, which indicates that they are sufficiently energetic to accelerate the solar wind and heat the corona to temperatures of several million degrees. We compute the the mass flux carried by spicules of 3 × 10^{-10}-2 × 10^{-9} g cm^{-2} s^{-1}, which is 10-60 times higher than the mass that is carried away from the corona because of the solar wind (about 3 × 10^{-11} g cm^{-2} s^{-1}). Therefore, our results indicate that about 0.02-0.1 of the spicule mass is ejected from the corona, while the remainder reverts

  8. Atmospheric considerations regarding the impact of heat dissipation from a nuclear energy center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential changes in climate resulting from a large nuclear energy center are discussed. On a global scale, no noticeable changes are likely, but on both a regional and a local scale, changes can be expected. Depending on the cooling system employed, the amount of fog may increase, the amount and distribution of precipitation will change, and the frequency or location of severe storms may change. Very large heat releases over small surface areas can result in greater atmospheric instability; a large number of closely spaced natural-draft cooling towers have this disadvantage. On the other hand, employment of natural-draft towers makes an increase in the occurrence of ground fog unlikely. The analysis suggests that the cooling towers for a large nuclear energy center should be located in clusters of four with at least 2.5-mile spacing between the clusters. This is equivalent to the requirement of one acre of land surface per each two megawatts of heat being rejected

  9. Atmospheric energy harvesting: use of Doppler Wind Lidars on UAVs to extend mission endurance and enable quiet operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, S.; Emmitt, G. D.; Wood, S. A.; Costello, M.

    2014-10-01

    The investigators are developing a system tool that utilizes both pre-flight information and continuous real-time knowledge and description of the state of the atmosphere and atmospheric energetics by an Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar (ADWL) to provide the autonomous guidance for detailed and adaptive flight path planning by UAS and small manned aircraft. This flight planning and control has the potential to reduce mission dependence upon preflight assumptions, extend flight duration and endurance, enable long periods of quiet operations and allow for the optimum self-routing of the aircraft. The ADWL wind data is used in real-time to detect atmospheric energy features such as thermals, waves, wind shear and others. These detected features are then used with an onboard, weather model driven flight control model to adaptively plan a flight path that optimizes energy harvesting with frequent updates on local changes in the opportunities and atmospheric flow characteristics. We have named this package AEORA for the Atmospheric Energy Opportunity Ranking Algorithm (AEORA).

  10. Redistribution of energetic ions during reconnection events in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on the spherical torus NSTX show that reconnection events (sawtooth crashes, internal reconnection events et.) can result in strong, by a factor of two, drops of the neutron yield, which are an evidence of losses of energetic ions. In the present work, mechanisms of the energetic ion redistributions during sawtooth crashes are analyzed, and strong drops of the neutral emission in a particular NSTX experiment are explained. It is found that in NSTX shots with a low magnetic field the main mechanisms of the particle redistribution during the crash are the particle resonance with the 1/1 harmonic of the perturbation and the stochastization of the particle motion. The latter is considerably enhanced by the diamagnetic perturbation of the magnetic field strength. The conclusion is drawn that the loss is sensitive to the safety factor profile, the plasma pressure and the particle precession rate, which, in turn, depends on the particle energy and pitch angle, the plasma elongation etc. The NSTX shot 104505, where drops of the neutron yield by a factor of 2 were observed during reconnection events, was selected for detailed analysis. A semi-analytical model of the electromagnetic field evolution during a Kadomtsev-type reconnection, which takes into account the perturbation of the magnetic field strength, is suggested and incorporated into the code GYROXY, which calculates the particle motion without using the guiding-center approximation. It is found that the motion of a considerable fraction of 80-keV ions is stochastic during the reconnection, and this stochasticity can lead to a particle loss. The observed stochasticity results from the overlap of resonance islands, in particular, secondary islands near the separatrix of the 1/1 resonance and islands produced through a nonlinear mechanism. To calculate the post-crash distribution function of energetic ions and the loss of these ions, Monte-Carlo simulations of the particle motion in the evolving magnetic

  11. A Standardized Based Approach to Managing Atmosphere Studies For Wind Energy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, E.; Sivaraman, C.

    2015-12-01

    Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) is a multi-year U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research initiative targeting significant reductions in the cost of wind energy through an improved understanding of the complex physics governing wind flow into and through wind farms. Better insight into the flow physics has the potential to reduce wind farm energy losses by up to 20%, to reduce annual operational costs by hundreds of millions of dollars, and to improve project financing terms to more closely resemble traditional capital projects. The Data Archive and Portal (DAP) is a key capability of the A2e initiative. The DAP is a cloud-based distributed system known as the 'Wind Cloud' that functions as a repository for all A2e data. This data includes numerous historic and on-going field studies involving in situ and remote sensing instruments, simulations, and scientific analysis. Significantly it is the integration and sharing of these diverse data sets through the DAP that is key to meeting the goals of A2e. This cloud will be accessible via an open and easy-to navigate user interface that facilitates community data access, interaction, and collaboration. DAP management is working with the community, industry, and international standards bodies to develop standards for wind data and to capture important characteristics of all data in the Wind Cloud. Security will be provided to facilitate storage of proprietary data alongside publicly accessible data in the Wind Cloud, and the capability to generate anonymized data will be provided to facilitate using private data by non-privileged users (when appropriate). Finally, limited computing capabilities will be provided to facilitate co-located data analysis, validation, and generation of derived products in support of A2e science.

  12. Measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum with IceCube in the 79- and 86-String configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe, T.; Scheriau, F.; Schmitz, M.

    2016-04-01

    IceCube is a neutrino telescope with an instrumented volume of one cubic kilometer. A total of 5160 Digital Optical Modules (DOMs) is deployed on 86 strings forming a three dimensional detector array. Although primarily designed for the detection of neutrinos from astrophysical sources, the detector can be used for spectral measurements of atmospheric neutrinos. These spectral measurements are hindered by a dominant background of atmospheric muons. State-of-the-art techniques from Machine Learning and Data Mining are required to select a high-purity sample of atmospheric neutrino candidates. The energy spectrum of muon neutrinos is obtained from energy-dependent input variables by utilizing regularized unfolding. The results obtained using IceCube in the 79- and 86-string configuration are presented in this paper.

  13. Production of high-energy gamma rays by cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere and lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    The production of gamma rays above 10 MeV by the interaction of cosmic rays in the atmosphere and the lunar surface is simulated using Monte Carlo methods. The calculation incorporates a new model of high-energy nucleon-nucleus interactions based on empirical fits to inclusive cross sections for the production of pions and nucleons. The atmospheric gamma ray flux is calculated as a function of direction, energy, and atmospheric depth. These calculations are compared with observations from balloons and from the SAS 2 satellite. Estimates of the flux of earth albedo electrons produced by cosmic ray interactions are presented. The lunar gamma ray albedo is calculated and compared with an upper limit based on SAS 2 measurements.

  14. Direct observation of charge re-distribution in a MgB2 superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng Yun; Shih, Po-Hsun; Ji, Jhong-Yi; Chan, Ting-Shan; Yang, Chun Chuen

    2016-04-01

    To study the origin of negative thermal expansion effects near the superconducting transition temperature TC in MgB2, low-temperature high-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction was used to probe the charge redistribution near the boron atoms. Our results reveal that the in-plane hole-distribution of B- hops through the direct orbital overlap of Mg2+ along the c-axis at 50 K and is re-distributed out-of-plane. This study shows that the out-of-plane π-hole distribution plays a dominant role in the possible origin of superconductivity and negative thermal effects in MgB2.

  15. Calculation of pressure drop and flow redistribution in the LMFBR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flow redistribution through fuel assemblies of LMFBRs: for the correct calculation of mass flow rates and pressure drop, are studied. Using a quasi-static formulation of conservation equations of mass and energy, a computer program was developed to simulate any arbitrary number of flow channels, operating at different linear power levels. Therefore f flow channels, operating at different linear power levels. Therefore, it was possible to perform thermal transient calculations for the Clinch River reactor core. The results of the calculations agree with the data found in the literature and supply accurate information about flow redistribution, average temperature, and pressure drop in the core, when the reactor is operated at conditions from the designed flow conditions, as is always the case in a load changing operation, or during transients. (Autor)

  16. Modeling of a-particle redistribution by sawteeth in TFTR using FPPT code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from recent DT experiments on TFTR to measure the radial density profiles of fast confined well trapped α-particles using the Pellet Charge eXchange (PCX) diagnostic [PETROV M. P., et. al. Nucl. Fusion, 35 (1995) 1437] indicate that sawtooth oscillations produce a significant broadening of the trapped alpha radial density profiles. ' Conventional models consistent with measured sawtooth effects on passing particles do not provide satisfactory simulations of the trapped particle mixing measured by PCX diagnostic. We propose a different mechanism for fast particle mixing during the sawtooth crash to explain the trapped α-particle density profile broadening after the crash. The model is based on the fast particle orbit averaged toroidal drift in a perturbed helical electric field with an adjustable absolute value. Such a drift of the fast particles results in a change of their energy and a redistribution in phase space. The energy redistribution is shown to obey the diffusion equation, while the redistribution in toroidal momentum P var-phi (or in minor radius) is assumed stochastic with large diffusion coefficient and was taken flat. The distribution function in a pre- sawtooth plasma and its evolution in a post-sawtooth crash plasma is simulated using the Fokker-Planck Post-TRANSP (FPPT) processor code. It is shown that FPPT calculated α-particle distributions are consistent with TRANSP Monte-Carlo calculations. Comparison of FPPT results with Pellet Char eXchange (PCX) measurements shows good agreement for 9 both sawtooth free and sawtoothing plasmas

  17. Improving wind energy forecasts using an Ensemble Kalman Filter data assimilation technique in a fully coupled hydrologic and atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. L.; Maxwell, R. M.; Delle Monache, L.

    2012-12-01

    Wind power is rapidly gaining prominence as a major source of renewable energy. Harnessing this promising energy source is challenging because of the chaotic nature of wind and its propensity to change speed and direction over short time scales. Accurate forecasting tools are critical to support the integration of wind energy into power grids and to maximize its impact on renewable energy portfolios. Numerous studies have shown that soil moisture distribution and land surface vegetative processes profoundly influence atmospheric boundary layer development and weather processes on local and regional scales. Using the PF.WRF model, a fully-coupled hydrologic and atmospheric model employing the ParFlow hydrologic model with the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled via mass and energy fluxes across the land surface, we have explored the connections between the land surface and the atmosphere in terms of land surface energy flux partitioning and coupled variable fields including hydraulic conductivity, soil moisture and wind speed, and demonstrated that reductions in uncertainty in these coupled fields propagate through the hydrologic and atmospheric system. We have adapted the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART), an implementation of the robust Ensemble Kalman Filter data assimilation algorithm, to expand our capability to nudge forecasts produced with the PF.WRF model using observational data. Using a semi-idealized simulation domain, we examine the effects of assimilating observations of variables such as wind speed and temperature collected in the atmosphere, and land surface and subsurface observations such as soil moisture on the quality of forecast outputs. The sensitivities we find in this study will enable further studies to optimize observation collection to maximize the utility of the PF.WRF-DART forecasting system.

  18. Light extinction in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric aerosol particles originating from natural sources, such as volcanos and sulfur-bearing gas emissions from the oceans, and from human sources, such as sulfur emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, strongly affect visual air quality and are suspected to significantly affect radiative climate forcing of the planet. During the daytime, aerosols obscure scenic vistas, while at night they diminish our ability to observe stellar objects. Scattering of light is the main means by which aerosols attenuate and redistribute light in the atmosphere and by which aerosols can alter and reduce visibility and potentially modify the energy balance of the planet. Trends and seasonal variability of atmospheric aerosol loading, such as column-integrated light extinction or optical depth, and how they may affect potential climate change have been difficult to quantify because there have been few observations made of important aerosol optical parameters, such as optical depth, over the globe and over time and often these are of uneven quality. To address questions related to possible climate change, there is a pressing need to acquire more high-quality aerosol optical depth data. Extensive deployment of improved solar radiometers over the next few years will provide higher-quality extinction data over a wider variety of locations worldwide. An often overlooked source of turbidity data, however, is available from astronomical observations, particularly stellar photoelectric photometry observations. With the exception of the Project ASTRA articles published almost 20 years ago, few of these data ever appear in the published literature. This paper will review the current status of atmospheric extinction observations, as highlighted by the ASTRA work and augmented by more recent solar radiometry measurements

  19. Light extinction in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laulainen, N.

    1992-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles originating from natural sources, such as volcanos and sulfur-bearing gas emissions from the oceans, and from human sources, such as sulfur emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, strongly affect visual air quality and are suspected to significantly affect radiative climate forcing of the planet. During the daytime, aerosols obscure scenic vistas, while at night they diminish our ability to observe stellar objects. Scattering of light is the main means by which aerosols attenuate and redistribute light in the atmosphere and by which aerosols can alter and reduce visibility and potentially modify the energy balance of the planet. Trends and seasonal variability of atmospheric aerosol loading, such as column-integrated light extinction or optical depth, and how they may affect potential climate change have been difficult to quantify because there have been few observations made of important aerosol optical parameters, such as optical depth, over the globe and over time and often these are of uneven quality. To address questions related to possible climate change, there is a pressing need to acquire more high-quality aerosol optical depth data. Extensive deployment of improved solar radiometers over the next few years will provide higher-quality extinction data over a wider variety of locations worldwide. An often overlooked source of turbidity data, however, is available from astronomical observations, particularly stellar photoelectric photometry observations. With the exception of the Project ASTRA articles published almost 20 years ago, few of these data ever appear in the published literature. This paper will review the current status of atmospheric extinction observations, as highlighted by the ASTRA work and augmented by more recent solar radiometry measurements.

  20. Laser cooling of dense atomic gases by collisional redistribution of radiation and spectroscopy of molecular dimers in a dense buffer gas environment

    OpenAIRE

    Saß, Anne; Forge, Ralf; Christopoulos, Stavros; Knicker, Katharina; Moroshkin, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We study laser cooling of atomic gases by collisional redistribution of fluorescence. In a high pressure buffer gas regime, frequent collisions perturb the energy levels of alkali atoms, which allows for the absorption of a far red detuned irradiated laser beam. Subsequent spontaneous decay occurs close to the unperturbed resonance frequency, leading to a cooling of the dense gas mixture by redistribution of fluorescence. Thermal deflection spectroscopy indicates large relative temperature ch...

  1. Fixing atmospheric CO2 by environment adaptive sorbent and renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Liu, J.; Ge, K.; Fang, M.

    2014-12-01

    Fixing atmospheric CO2, followed by geologic storage in remote areas is considered an environmentally secure approach to climate mitigation. A moisture swing sorbent was investigated in the laboratory for CO2 capture at a remote area with humid and windy conditions. The energy requirement of moisture swing absorption could be greatly reduced compared to that of traditional high-temperature thermal swing, by assuming that the sorbent can be naturally dried and regenerated at ambient conditions. However, for currently developed moisture swing materials, the CO2 capacity would drop significantly at high relative humidity. The CO2 capture amount can be reduced by the poor thermodynamics and kinetics at high relative humidity or low temperature. Similar challenges also exist for thermal or vacuum swing sorbents. Developing sorbent materials which adapt to specific environments, such as high humidity or low temperature, can ensure sufficient capture capacity on the one hand, and realize better economics on the other hand (Figure 1) .An environment adaptive sorbent should have the abilities of tunable capacity and fast kinetics at extreme conditions, such as high humidity or low temperature. In this presentation, the possibility of tuning CO2 absorption capacity of a polymerized ionic liquid material is discussed. The energy requirement evaluation shows that tuning the CO2 binding energy of sorbent, rather than increasing the temperature or reducing the humidity of air, could be much more economic. By determining whether the absorption process is controlled by physical diffusion controlled or chemical reaction, an effective approach to fast kinetics at extreme conditions is proposed. A shrinking core model for mass transfer kinetics is modified to cope with the relatively poor kinetics of air capture. For the studied sample which has a heterogeneous structure, the kinetic analysis indicates a preference of sorbent particle size optimization, rather than support layer

  2. A comparison between energy transfer and atmospheric turbulent exchanges over alpine meadow and banana plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhangwei; Ma, Yaoming; Wen, Zhiping; Ma, Weiqiang

    2016-04-01

    Banana plantation and alpine meadow ecosystems in southern China and the Tibetan Plateau are unique in the underlying surfaces they exhibit. In this study, we used eddy covariance and a micrometeorological tower to examine the characteristics of land surface energy exchanges over a banana plantation in southern China and an alpine meadow in the Tibetan Plateau from May 2010 to August 2012. The results showed that the diurnal and seasonal variations in upward shortwave radiation flux and surface soil heat flux were larger over the alpine meadow than over the banana plantation surface. Dominant energy partitioning varied with season. Latent heat flux was the main consumer of net radiation flux in the growing season, whereas sensible heat flux was the main consumer during other periods. The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory was employed for comparative purposes, using sonic anemometer observations of flow over the surfaces of banana plantations in the humid southern China monsoon region and the semi-arid areas of the TP, and was found to be applicable. Over banana plantation and alpine meadow areas, the average surface albedo and surface aerodynamic roughness lengths under neutral atmospheric conditions were ~0.128 and 0.47m, and ~0.223 and 0.01m, respectively. During the measuring period, the mean annual bulk transfer coefficients for momentum and sensible heat were 1.47×10-2 and 7.13×10-3, and 2.91×10-3 and 1.96×10-3, for banana plantation and alpine meadow areas, respectively. This is the first time in Asia that long-term open field measurements have been taken with the specific aim of making comparisons between banana plantation and alpine meadow surfaces.

  3. Changing Surface-Atmosphere Energy Exchange and Refreezing Capacity of the Lower Accumulation Area, West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampidis, C.; van As, D.; Machguth, H.; Smeets, P.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Box, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    We present five years (2009-2013) of automatic weather station (AWS) data from the lower accumulation area (1840 m above sea level) of the Kangerlussuaq region, western Greenland ice sheet. The summers of 2010 and 2012 were both exceptionally warm, but only 2012 resulted in negative surface mass budget (SMB) and surface runoff. The observed runoff was due to a large ice fraction in the upper 10 m of firn that prevented melt water from percolating to available pore space below. Analysis of the in situ data reveals a relatively low 2012 summer albedo of ~0.7 as melt water was present at the surface. Consequently, during the 2012 melt season the surface absorbed 30% (213 MJ m-2) more solar radiation than in 2010. We drive a surface energy balance model with the AWS data to evaluate the seasonal and interannual variability of all surface energy fluxes. The model is able to reproduce the observed melt rates as well as the SMB for each season. While the drive for melt is solar radiation, year-to-year differences are controlled by terrestrial radiation, apart from 2012 when solar radiation dominated melt. Sensitivity tests reveal that 72% of the excess solar energy in 2012 was used for melt, corresponding to 40% (0.67 m) of the 2012 surface ablation. The remaining ablation (0.99 m) was primarily due to the relatively high atmospheric temperatures up to +2.6 °C daily average, indicating that 2012 would have been a negative SMB year in the lower accumulation area even without the melt-albedo feedback. Longer time series of SMB, regional temperature and remotely sensed albedo (MODIS) suggest that 2012 was the first negative SMB year with the lowest albedo at this elevation on record. The warming conditions of the last years resulted in enhanced melt and reduction of the refreezing capacity of the lower accumulation area. If the warming continues the lower accumulation area will be transformed into superimposed ice.

  4. Atmospheric Lepton Fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric $\

  5. Medicare financing and redistribution in british columbia, 1992 and 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Kimberlyn

    2007-05-01

    Equity in healthcare in British Columbia is defined as the provision of services based on need rather than ability to pay and a separation of contributions to financing from the use of services. Physician and hospital services in Canada are financed mainly through general tax revenues, and there is a perception that this financing is progressive. This paper uses Gini coefficients, concentration indexes and Kakwani indexes of progressivity to assess the progressivity of medicare financing in British Columbia in 1992 and 2002. It also measures the overall redistributive effect of medicare services, considering both contributions to financing and use of hospital and physician services. The conclusion is that medicare does redistribute across income groups, but this redistribution is the result solely of the positive correlation between health status and income; financing is nearly proportionate across income groups, but use is higher among lower-income groups. Informed public debate requires a better understanding of these concepts of equity. PMID:19305738

  6. Ultrafast charge redistribution in small iodine containing molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Hollstein, Maximilian; Gerken, Nils; Klumpp, Stephan; Palutke, Steffen; Baev, Ivan; Brenner, Günter; Dziarzhytski, Siarhei; Wurth, Wilfried; Pfannkuche, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The competition between intra molecular charge redistribution and fragmentation has been studied in small molecules containing iodine by using intense ultrashort pulses in the extreme ultraviolet regime (XUV). We show that after an element specific inner-shell photoionization of diiodomethane (CH$_2$I$_2$) and iodomethane (CH$_3$I), the induced positive charge is redistributed with a significantly different efficiency. Therefore, we analyze ion time-of-flight data obtained from XUV-pump XUV-probe experiments at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH). Theoretical considerations on the basis of ab initio electronic structure calculations including correlations relate this effect to a strongly molecule specific, purely electronic charge redistribution process that takes place directly after photoionization causing a distribution of the induced positive charge predominantly on the atoms which exhibit the lowest atomic ionization potential, i.e, in the molecules considered, the iodine atom(s). As a result of t...

  7. The Redistribution of Trade Gains When Income Inequality Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco de Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available How does a redistribution of trade gains affect welfare when income inequality matters? To answer this question, we extend the [1] model to unionized labor markets and heterogeneous workers. As redistribution schemes, we consider unemployment benefits that are financed either by a wage tax, a payroll tax or a profit tax. Assuming that welfare declines in income inequality, we find that welfare increases up to a maximum in the case of wage tax funding, while welfare declines weakly (sharply if a profit tax (payroll tax is implemented. These effects are caused by the wage tax neutrality (due to union wage setting and by a profit tax-induced decline in long-term unemployment. As a result, the government’s optimal redistribution scheme is to finance unemployment benefits by a wage tax.

  8. Lightning-driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: implications for ionisation-levels and neutral chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Lightning-generated whistlers lead to coupling between the troposphere, the Van Allen radiation belts and the lower-ionosphere through Whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP. Lightning produced whistlers interact with cyclotron resonant radiation belt electrons, leading to pitch-angle scattering into the bounce loss cone and precipitation into the atmosphere. Here we consider the relative significance of WEP to the lower ionosphere and atmosphere by contrasting WEP produced ionisation rate changes with those from Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR and solar photoionisation. During the day, WEP is never a significant source of ionisation in the lower ionosphere for any location or altitude. At nighttime, GCR is more significant than WEP at altitudes <68 km for all locations, above which WEP starts to dominate in North America and Central Europe. Between 75 and 80 km altitude WEP becomes more significant than GCR for the majority of spatial locations at which WEP deposits energy. The size of the regions in which WEP is the most important nighttime ionisation source peaks at ~80 km, depending on the relative contributions of WEP and nighttime solar Lyman-α. We also used the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC model to consider the atmospheric consequences of WEP, focusing on a case-study period. Previous studies have also shown that energetic particle precipitation can lead to large-scale changes in the chemical makeup of the neutral atmosphere by enhancing minor chemical species that play a key role in the ozone balance of the middle atmosphere. However, SIC modelling indicates that the neutral atmospheric changes driven by WEP are insignificant due to the short timescale of the WEP bursts. Overall we find that WEP is a significant energy input into some parts of the lower ionosphere, depending on the latitude/longitude and altitude, but does not play a significant role in the neutral chemistry of the mesosphere.

  9. The Importance of Deep Roots and Hydraulic Redistribution to Amazonian Rainforest Resilience and Response to Hydro-Climatic Variability: A Simulation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewry, D.; Kumar, P.; Sivapalan, M.; Long, S.; Liang, X.

    2008-12-01

    Amazonian rain forests are a crucial component of the terrestrial biosphere, acting as a significant sink of anthropogenic carbon emissions, as well as playing a key role in driving tropical climate patterns through surface energy partitioning and significant precipitation recycling. Recent studies using remotely-sensed indices of canopy functioning (ie. canopy greeness, canopy water storage and photosynthetic capacity) have raised questions regarding the response of deep-rooted Amazonian vegetation functioning to short-term hydro-climatic forcing anomalies. Climate model predictions show an increase in ENSO-driven drought for eastern Amazonia in the coming decades. In this context, we utilize a multi-layer process-based model that represents the complex set of interactions and feedbacks between the canopy, soil and root subsystems to examine the impacts of drought on deep-rooted Amazonian rainforests. The model canopy is partitioned into several layers, allowing for resolution of the shortwave and longwave radiation regimes that drive photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and leaf energy balance in each layer, along with the canopy microclimate. The above-ground component of the model is coupled to a multi-layer soil-root model that computes soil moisture and heat transport, root water uptake, and the passive redistribution of moisture across soil potential gradients by the root system (ie. hydraulic redistribution). Carbon and nitrogen transformations in each layer of the soil system are modulated by microbial activity, and act to provide nutrient constraints on the photosynthetic capacity of the canopy. Model skill in capturing the seasonal and inter-annual variability in canopy-atmosphere exchange is evaluated through multi-year records of canopy- top eddy covariance CO2, water vapor and heat fluxes collected at a field site in eastern Amazonia. A nearby throughfall exclusion experiment provides information on the vertical distribution of soil moisture under

  10. Transport of Ionizing Radiation in Terrestrial-like Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D S; Wheeler, J C; Smith, David S.; Scalo, John

    2003-01-01

    (Abridged) Propagation of ionizing radiation, as from parent star flares, supernovae, or gamma-ray bursts, is studied for a suite of simple model atmospheres of terrestrial-like exoplanets covering a large range of column densities and incident photon energies. We developed a Monte Carlo code to treat the Compton scattering and photoabsorption. Atmospheres thinner than about 100 g cm^-2 transmit a significant fraction of incident gamma-rays, but even the thinnest atmospheres are essentially opaque to X-rays below about 30 keV. For thicker atmospheres, the incident ionizing radiation is efficiently blocked, but most of the incident energy is redistributed via secondary electron excitation into diffuse UV and visible aurora-like emission, increasing the atmospheric transmission by many orders of magnitude; in some cases the transmission can be up to 10%, depending on the intervening UV opacity. For Earth, between 2 x 10^-3 and 4 x 10^-2 of the incident flux reaches the ground in the 200-320 nm range, depending ...

  11. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division Is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and Implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and quantitative links programs to form DOEs contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. Climate research in the ESD has the common goal of improving our understanding of the physical, chemical, biological, and social processes that influence the Earth system so that national and international policymaking relating to natural and human-induced changes in the Earth system can be given a firm scientific basis. This report describes the progress In FY 1991 in each of these areas.

  12. Natural gas: redistributing the economic surplus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural gas has a limited role in the Brazilian energy balance. This role in industrial countries and some developing countries is much more important. Historically this contrasting situation can be explained by the limited natural gas reserves Brazil used to have. Since the oil crisis however the Brazilian natural gas reserves increased substantially without a similar increase in the role of natural gas in the energy balance. The existing institutional arrangement generates a struggle for the economic rent generated by natural gas production and consumption that seems to be at the core of this question. Our paper estimates the economic rent generated by natural gas in Brazil and its distribution among producers and consumers: it points toward a new institutional arrangement that could arguably, generate a new role for the natural gas in the Brazilian energy balance. (author)

  13. Core temperature fluctuations and redistributions at Fort St. Vrain HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fort St. Vrain high temperature gas-cooled reactor in the USA has exhibited two types of anomalous behavior called core temperature fluctuations and redistributions during the rise-to-power test program. These originally unexpected phenomena pose an important technical issue to the design, research and development works for JAERI experimental VHTR consisting of prismatic block type fuel elements similar to those of Fort St. Vrain. This report reviews the fluctuation/redistribution problem encountered in Fort St. Vrain along with its resolution. (author)

  14. Global Redistributive Obligations in the Face of Severe Poverty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, David Vestergaard

    This dissertation concerns global poverty. More specifically, it concerns the question of, which redistributive obligations we have towards foreigners and how these obligations are affected by the existence of severe and widespread poverty. Most people (both theorists and ordinary citizens) agree...... the debate on global justice, a number of theorists argue that this discrepancy can indeed be justified (so-called anti-cosmopolitans). Thus, to bring us closer to answer regarding our redistributive obligations towards foreigners, I analyze and evaluate such arguments. My critical examination reveals...

  15. Pt redistribution during Ni(Pt) silicide formation

    OpenAIRE

    Demeulemeester, Jelle; Smeets, D.; Van Bockstael, C; Detavernier, C.; Comrie, C. M.; Barradas, N. P.; Vieira, A; Vantomme, André

    2008-01-01

    We report on a real-time Rutherford backscattering spectrometry study of the erratic redistribution of Pt during Ni silicide formation in a solid phase reaction. The inhomogeneous Pt redistribution in Ni(Pt)Si films is a consequence of the low solubility of Pt in Ni2Si compared to NiSi and the limited mobility of Pt in NiSi. Pt further acts as a diffusion barrier and resides in the Ni2Si grain boundaries, significantly slowing down the Ni2Si and NiSi growth kinetics. Moreover, the observed in...

  16. Redistribution of ruthenium in UO2 in a temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The redistribution of Ru in UO2 in a thermal gradient is substantial, with Ru moving up the temperature gradient. The apparent heat of transport of Ru in UO2 is negative. This is believed to be the same mechanism which causes fission product Ru to redistribute in oxide fuels. The tungsten crucible reduces stoichiometric urania, and the oxygen in UO2 under steep temperature gradient moves down the temperature. The heat of transport of oxygen vacancy in UO2 is -138 +- 53 KJ/mole

  17. Thermally driven moisture redistribution in partially saturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is widely recognized that the decay heat produced by high-level radioactive waste (HLW) will likely have a significant impact on both the pre- and post-closure performance of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), in southwest Nevada. The task of delineating which aspects of that impact are favorable to isolation performance and which are adverse is an extremely challenging technical undertaking because of such factors as the hydrothermal regimes involved, heterogeneity of the geologic media, and the time and space scales involved. This difficulty has motivated both the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to undertake multi-year thermohydrology research programs to examine the effects of decay heat on pre- and post-closure performance of the repository. Both of these organizations are currently pursuing laboratory and field experiments, as well as numerical modeling studies, to advance the state of knowledge of the thermohydrologic phenomena relevant to the proposed geologic repository. The NRC-sponsored Thermohydrology Research Project, which was initiated in mid-1989 at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), began with the intent of addressing a broad spectrum of generic thermohydrologic questions. While some of these questions were answered in the conduct of the study, other new and challenging ones were encountered. Subsequent to that report, laboratory-scale experiments were designed to address four fundamental questions regarding thermohydrologic phenomena: what are the principal mechanisms controlling the redistribution of moisture; under what hydrothermal conditions and time frames do individual mechanisms predominate; what driving mechanism is associated with a particular hydrothermal regime; what is the temporal and spatial scale of each hydrothermal regime? This report presents the research results and findings obtained since issuance of the first progress report. 85 refs

  18. Calorie increase and water savings of redistributing global crop production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K. F.; Seveso, A.; Rulli, M. C.; D'Odorico, P.

    2015-12-01

    Human demand for crop production is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades as a result of population growth, richer diets and biofuel use. In order for food production to keep pace, unprecedented amounts of resources - water, fertilizers, energy - will be required. This has led to calls for 'sustainable intensification' in which yields are increased on existing croplands while seeking to minimize impacts on water and other agricultural resources. Recent studies have quantified aspects of this, showing that there is a large potential to improve crop yields and increase harvest frequencies to better meet human demand. Though promising, both solutions would necessitate large additional inputs of water and fertilizer in order to be achieved under current technologies. However, the question of whether the current distribution of crops is, in fact, the best for realizing maximized production has not been considered to date. To this end, we ask: Is it possible to increase calorie production and minimize water demand by simply growing crops where soil and climate conditions are best suited? Here we use maps of agro-ecological suitability - a measure of physical and chemical soil fertility - for 15 major food crops to identify differences between current crop distributions and where they can most suitably be planted. By redistributing crops across currently cultivated lands, we determine the potential improvement in calorie production as well as the associated change in water demand. We also consider what distribution of crops would maintain current calorie production while minimizing crop water demand. In doing all of this, our study provides a novel tool for improving crop calorie production without necessarily increasing resource demands.

  19. A new formulation of the atmospheric spectral energy budget, with application to two high-resolution general circulation models

    CERN Document Server

    Augier, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    A new formulation of the spectral energy budget of kinetic and available potential energies of the atmosphere is derived, with spherical harmonics as base functions. Compared to previous formulations, there are three main improvements: (i) the topography is taken into account, (ii) the exact three-dimensional advection terms are considered and (iii) the vertical flux is separated from the energy transfer between different spherical harmonics. Using this formulation, results from two different high resolution GCMs are analyzed: the AFES T639L24 and the ECMWF IFS T1279L91. The spectral fluxes show that the AFES, which reproduces realistic horizontal spectra with a $k^{-5/3}$ inertial range at the mesoscales, simulates a strong downscale energy cascade. % In contrast, neither the $k^{-5/3}$ vertically integrated spectra nor the downscale energy cascade are produced by the ECMWF IFS.

  20. The east-west effect of the muon charge ratio at energies relevant to the atmospheric neutrino anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurements of the muon charge ratio representing the ratio of positive to negative atmospheric muons are performed using a small compact device, WILLI, by detecting the life time of the muons in different materials. Avoiding the difficulties of measurements with magnetic spectrometers, this method gives precise results on muon charge ratio especially in the low energy range relevant for the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. In the present configuration the detector is constructed as a rotatable device which permits measurements on different azimuthal directions. The preliminary results for the energy of incident muon in the range of 0.3-0.5 GeV/c, at mean zenith angle of 35 angle, evidence the east-west effect similarly found in neutrino measurements. (authors)

  1. Cheap Artificial AB-Mountains, Extraction of Water and Energy from Atmosphere and Change of Regional Climate

    CERN Document Server

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary method for changing the climates of entire countries or portions thereof, obtaining huge amounts of cheap water and energy from the atmosphere. In this paper is presented the idea of cheap artificial inflatable mountains, which may cardinally change the climate of a large region or country. Additional benefits: The potential of tapping large amounts of fresh water and energy. The mountains are inflatable semi-cylindrical constructions from thin film (gas bags) having heights of up to 3 - 5 km. They are located perpendicular to the main wind direction. Encountering these artificial mountains, humid air (wind) rises to crest altitude, is cooled and produces rain (or rain clouds). Many natural mountains are sources of rivers, and other forms of water and power production - and artificial mountains may provide these services for entire nations in the future. The film of these gasbags is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric overpressure and may be...

  2. Atmospheric radiative transfer parametrization for solar energy yield calculations on buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Jochen E

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the practical approach to evaluate the incoming solar radiation on buildings based on atmospheric composition and cloud cover is presented. The effects of absorption and scattering due to atmospheric composition is taken into account to calculate, using radiative transfer models, the net incoming solar radiation at surface level. A specific validation of the Alpine Region in Europe is presented with a special focus on the region of South Tyrol.

  3. The role of quantum interference and partial redistribution in the solar Ba II D2 4554 A line

    CERN Document Server

    Smitha, H N; Stenflo, J O; Sampoorna, M

    2014-01-01

    The Ba II D2 line at 4554 A is a good example, where the F-state interference effects due to the odd isotopes produce polarization profiles, which are very different from those of the even isotopes that do not exhibit F-state interference. It is therefore necessary to account for the contributions from the different isotopes to understand the observed linear polarization profiles of this line. In this paper we present radiative transfer modeling with partial frequency redistribution (PRD), which is shown to be essential to model this line. This is because complete frequency redistribution (CRD) cannot reproduce the observed wing polarization. We present the observed and computed Q/I profiles at different limb distances. The theoretical profiles strongly depend on limb distance (\\mu) and the model atmosphere which fits the limb observations fails at other \\mu\\ positions.

  4. Potential energy of atmospheric water vapor and the air motions induced by water vapor condensation on different spatial scales

    OpenAIRE

    Makarieva, Anastassia M.; Gorshkov, Victor G.

    2010-01-01

    Basic physical principles are considered that are responsible for the origin of dynamic air flow upon condensation of water vapor, the partial pressure of which represents a store of potential energy in the atmosphere of Earth. Quantitative characteristics of such flow are presented for several spatial scales. It is shown that maximum condensation-induced velocities reach 160 m/s and are realized in compact circulation patterns like tornadoes.

  5. The east-west effect of the muon charge ratio at energies relevant to the atmospheric neutrino anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the propagation of cosmic rays in the atmosphere, pions and kaons are produced by the interactions with atmospheric nuclei, pions and kaons are produced, which subsequently decay in muons and neutrinos. Considering the decay chains, it is obviously that the ratio of positive to negative atmospheric muons, called the muon charge ratio: Rν = μ+/μ-, maps the neutrino production and carries information on the hadronic interactions, used in the calculations of atmospheric neutrino. Measurements of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons at low energy reveal information of interest for the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. Measurements of East-West effect of the muon charge ratio allow to check different models for the hadronic interaction and investigate the influence of the Earth's magnetic field. The WILLI detector, built in IFIN-HH (Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering) Bucharest measures the charge ratio by the effective life-time of the stopped muons. While positive muons undergo a free decay with natural lifetime, negative muons form muonic atoms, leading to a shorter lifetime of negative muons. The measured decay curve of all muons is a superposition of several decay laws, containing 3 detector dependent constants, accounting for the stopping power in the materials and the detection efficiencies, which are determined by extensive detector simulations using GEANT. The investigation of the directional dependence of the muon charge ratio has been started with measurements in the East and West direction at a mean zenithal angle of 35 angle. Introducing the azimuthal anisotropy AEW = (RW - RE) / ( RW + RE) with RW and RE being the muon charge ratios measured in East and West direction, the preliminary results show a pronounced East-West effect. (authors)

  6. Decentralisation and Interregional Redistribution in the Italian Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Irene; Zanardi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the potential impact of the reform designed to decentralise public education in Italy, currently under discussion, on interregional redistribution. The central government has always played a prominent financial and administrative role in the provision of compulsory education in Italy. This has had a strong…

  7. The redistribution of granulocytes following E. coli endotoxin induced sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Lillevang, S T; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine;

    1994-01-01

    Infusion of endotoxin elicits granulocytopenia followed by increased numbers of granulocytes in peripheral blood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the redistribution and sequestration of granulocytes in the tissues following E. coli endotoxin induced sepsis. From 16 rabbits granulocytes...

  8. Population Redistribution and Migration of Asian Americans, 1970-1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Stephen H.; Liu, William T.

    This paper uses 1980 Census data to assess the patterns of population redistribution and migration of Asian Americans. Analyzing migration flows, it argues that Asian Americans who immigrated to the United States before 1975 followed a national trend of regional population shift from the Northeast and the North Central to the West and South.…

  9. Modeling of horizontal water redistribution in an unsaturated soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhuang, Luwen; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; Genuchten, van Martinus Th.; Leijnse, Toon; Raoof, Amir; Qin, Chaozhong

    2016-01-01

    When two soil samples with the same hydraulic properties but different initial water saturations are brought into contact, water will redistribute horizontally between the samples until some equilibrium is reached. The part with a higher initial saturation undergoes drainage while imbibition occu

  10. Redistribution, Recognition and Representation: Working against Pedagogies of Indifference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingard, Bob; Keddie, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on an Australian government-commissioned research study that documented classroom pedagogies in 24 Queensland schools. The research created the model of "productive pedagogies", which conjoined what Nancy Fraser calls a politics of redistribution, recognition and representation. In this model pedagogies are…

  11. Model of Cs-137 redistribution by Lira objects territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the approach of Cs-137 redistribution model on the Lira objects territory is proposed.The peculiarity of this approach is testing of results by the way of comparison with measured values of Lira objects territory contamination, assessment of integral radionuclide stocks in soil, and, lastly, radionuclides migration mechanisms both by a soil surface and a soil depth ward

  12. Isotope exchange investigation of nitrogen redistribution in expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Drouet, M.; Martinavičius, A.;

    2013-01-01

    Sequential plasma and gaseous nitriding of Fe–18Cr–10Ni–3Mo stainless steel at 390°C with 14N and 15N isotopes followed by denitriding in flowing hydrogen was investigated. Redistribution of plasma-inserted nitrogen atoms (15N) by subsequent gaseous nitriding (14N) was observed. Denitriding after...

  13. Income distributions, inequality perceptions and redistributive claims in European societies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.G. Tóth; T. Keller

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyse how redistributive preference relates to actual income and to its distribution. For measuring the relationship on macro level, we defi ne distance based measures of income inequality (P-ratios, based on data from LIS) and test them for their direct and for their contextual ef

  14. Manganese uptake and its redistribution in sugar cane settlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation was conducted to study manganese uptake and partitioning after 2 hr of feeding and its redistribution in settlings after 30 days of growth in two cultivars of sugar cane which differed in their yield, maturity and nutritional and physiological characteristics. (author). 6 refs

  15. Relative Influence of Initial Surface and Atmospheric Conditions on Seasonal Water and Energy Balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglesby, Robert J.; Marshall, Susan; Roads, John O.; Robertson, Franklin R.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We constructed and analyzed wet and dry soil moisture composites for the mid-latitude GCIP region of the central US using long climate model simulations made with the NCAR CCM3 and reanalysis products from NCEP. Using the diagnostic composites as a guide, we have completed a series of predictability experiments in which we imposed soil water initial conditions in CCM3 for the GCIP region for June 1 from anomalously wet and dry years, with atmospheric initial conditions taken from June 1 of a year with 'near-normal' soil water, and initial soil water from the near-normal year and atmospheric initial conditions from the wet and dry years. Preliminary results indicate that the initial state of the atmosphere is more important than the initial state of soil water determining the subsequent late spring and summer evolution of sod water over the GCIP region. Surprisingly, neither the composites or the predictability experiments yielded a strong influence of soil moisture on the atmosphere. To explore this further, we have made runs with extreme dry soil moisture initial anomalies imposed over the GCIP region (the soil close to being completely dry). These runs did yield a very strong effect on the atmosphere that persisted for at least three months. We conclude that the magnitude of the initial soil moisture anomaly is crucial, at least in CCM3, and are currently investigating whether a threshold exists, below which little impact is seen. In a complementary study, we compared the impact of the initial condition of snow cover versus the initial atmospheric state over the western US (corresponding to the westward extension of the GAPP program follow-on to GCIP). In this case, the initial prescription of snow cover is far more important than the initial atmospheric state in determining the subsequent evolution of snow cover. We are currently working to understand the very different soil water and snow cover results.

  16. Plant transpiration and groundwater dynamics in water-limited climates: Impacts of hydraulic redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiangyu; Liang, Xu; Lin, Jeen-Shang

    2016-06-01

    The role of groundwater in sustaining plant transpiration constitutes an important but not well-understood aspect of the interactions between groundwater, vegetation, the land surface, and the atmosphere. The effect of the hydraulic redistribution (HR) process by plant roots on the interplay between plant transpiration and groundwater dynamics under water-limited climates is investigated by using the Variable Infiltration Capacity Plus (VIC+) land surface model. Numerical experiments, with or without explicitly considering HR, are conducted on soil columns over a range of groundwater table depths (GWTDs) under different vegetative land covers, soil types, and precipitation conditions. When HR is not included, this study obtains transpiration-GWTD relationships consistent with those from watershed studies that do not include HR. When HR is included, the transpiration-GWTD relationships are modified. The modification introduced by HR is manifested in the soil moisture of the root zone. The mechanism of HR is explained by detailing the roles of the hydraulically redistributed water, the upward diffusion of soil water, and the daytime root uptake. We have found that HR is particularly important in water-limited climates under which plants have high transpiration demand. At the beginning stage of a dry period, HR modulates the severe impacts that climate has on plant transpiration. Only after a prolonged dry period, impacts of HR are lessened when the groundwater table drops below the depth of water uptake by roots and are diminished when plant transpiration is decoupled from groundwater dynamics.

  17. Intrahepatic Flow Redistribution in Patients Treated with Radioembolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IntroductionIn planning Yttrium-90 (90Y)-radioembolizations, strategy problems arise in tumours with multiple arterial supplies. We aim to demonstrate that tumours can be treated via one main feeding artery achieving flow redistribution by embolizing accessory vessels.MethodsOne hundred 90Y-radioembolizations were performed on 90 patients using glass microspheres. In 19 lesions/17 patients, accessory branches were found feeding a minor tumour portion and embolized. In all 17 patients, the assessment of the complete perfusion was obtained by angiography and single photon emission computerized tomography–computerized tomography (SPECT–CT). Dosimetry, toxicity, and tumor response rate of the patients treated after flow redistribution were compared with the 83 standard-treated patients. Seventeen lesions in 15 patients with flow redistribution were chosen as target lesions and evaluated according to mRECIST criteria.ResultsIn all patients, the complete tumor perfusion was assessed immediately before radioembolization by angiography in all patients and after the 90Y-infusion by SPECT–CT in 15 of 17 patients. In the 15 assessable patients, the response rate in their 17 lesions was 3 CR, 8 PR, and 6 SD. Dosimetric and toxicity data, as well tumour response rate, were comparable with the 83 patients with regular vasculature.ConclusionsAll embolization procedures were performed successfully with no complications, and the flow redistribution was obtained in all cases. Results in term of toxicity, median dose administered, and radiological response were comparable with standard radioembolizations. Our findings confirmed the intratumoral flow redistribution after embolizing the accessory arteries, which makes it possible to treat the tumour through its single main feeding artery

  18. Simulation of Water Movement through Unsaturated Infiltration- Redistribution System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Bunsri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the movement of water in a natural unsaturated zone, focusing on infiltration-redistribution system. Infiltration refers to the downward movement of water due to the gravitational force and redistribution defines the upward movement of water due to the capillary rise. Under natural conditions, the movement of water through an infiltrationredistribution depended upon the relations among water content, hydraulic conductivity and tension of soil pore. Various combinations of water balance concepts, Richards’ equation, soil-physics theory and capillary height concepts were applied to mathematically model the movement of water through infiltration-redistribution system. The accuracy and computational efficiency of the developed model were evaluated for the case study. Besides the laboratory scale sand/soil columns with the inner diameter of 10.4 cm were investigated in order to provide the supporting data for model calibration. Sand/soil layers were packed with a bulk density of 1.80 and 1.25 g/cm3, respectively. The infiltration was sprayed uniformly at the soil surface with the constant rate of 66.1 and 7.18 cm3/h for sand and soil columns, respectively. The redistribution process was developed by which water arriving at the column base enter to the sand/soil column due to capillary rise. The laboratory observations were simulated using the developed model. The results indicate that the developed model could well estimate the movement of water in the infiltration-redistribution system that observed in the case study and the experiments.

  19. Intrahepatic Flow Redistribution in Patients Treated with Radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spreafico, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.spreafico@istitutotumori.mi.it; Morosi, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.morosi@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Radiology (Italy); Maccauro, Marco, E-mail: marco.maccauro@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Italy); Romito, Raffaele, E-mail: raffaele.romito@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Liver Surgery and Transplant (Italy); Lanocita, Rodolfo, E-mail: rodolfo.lanocita@istitutotumori.mi.it; Civelli, Enrico M., E-mail: enrico.civelli@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Radiology (Italy); Sposito, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.sposito@istitutotumori.mi.it; Bhoori, Sherrie, E-mail: sherrie.bhoori@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Liver Surgery and Transplant (Italy); Chiesa, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.chiesa@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Italy); Frigerio, Laura F., E-mail: laura.frigerio@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Radiology (Italy); Lorenzoni, Alice, E-mail: alice.lorenzoni@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Italy); Cascella, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.cascella@istitutotumori.mi.it; Marchianò, Alfonso, E-mail: alfonso.marchiano@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Radiology (Italy); Mazzaferro, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.mazzaferro@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Liver Surgery and Transplant (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    IntroductionIn planning Yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y)-radioembolizations, strategy problems arise in tumours with multiple arterial supplies. We aim to demonstrate that tumours can be treated via one main feeding artery achieving flow redistribution by embolizing accessory vessels.MethodsOne hundred {sup 90}Y-radioembolizations were performed on 90 patients using glass microspheres. In 19 lesions/17 patients, accessory branches were found feeding a minor tumour portion and embolized. In all 17 patients, the assessment of the complete perfusion was obtained by angiography and single photon emission computerized tomography–computerized tomography (SPECT–CT). Dosimetry, toxicity, and tumor response rate of the patients treated after flow redistribution were compared with the 83 standard-treated patients. Seventeen lesions in 15 patients with flow redistribution were chosen as target lesions and evaluated according to mRECIST criteria.ResultsIn all patients, the complete tumor perfusion was assessed immediately before radioembolization by angiography in all patients and after the {sup 90}Y-infusion by SPECT–CT in 15 of 17 patients. In the 15 assessable patients, the response rate in their 17 lesions was 3 CR, 8 PR, and 6 SD. Dosimetric and toxicity data, as well tumour response rate, were comparable with the 83 patients with regular vasculature.ConclusionsAll embolization procedures were performed successfully with no complications, and the flow redistribution was obtained in all cases. Results in term of toxicity, median dose administered, and radiological response were comparable with standard radioembolizations. Our findings confirmed the intratumoral flow redistribution after embolizing the accessory arteries, which makes it possible to treat the tumour through its single main feeding artery.

  20. Energy distribution of cosmic rays in the Earth’s atmosphere and avionic area using Monte Carlo codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MOHAMED M OULD; DIB A S A; BELBACHIR A H

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic rays cause significant damage to the electronic equipments of the aircrafts. In this paper, we have investigated the accumulation of the deposited energy of cosmic rays on the Earth’s atmosphere, especially in the aircraft area. In fact, if a high-energy neutron or proton interacts with a nanodevice having only a few atoms, this neutron or proton particle can change the nature of this device and destroy it. Our simulation based on Monte Carlo using Geant4 code shows that the deposited energy of neutron particles ranging between 200MeV and 5 GeV are strongly concentrated in the region between 10 and 15 km from the sea level which is exactly the avionic area. However, the Bragg peak energy of proton particle is slightly localized above the avionic area.

  1. Toward an Improved Understanding of the Tropical Energy Budget Using TRMM-based Atmospheric Radiative Heating Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Ecuyer, T.; McGarragh, G.; Ellis, T.; Stephens, G.; Olson, W.; Grecu, M.; Shie, C.; Jiang, X.; Waliser, D.; Li, J.; Tian, B.

    2008-05-01

    It is widely recognized that clouds and precipitation exert a profound influence on the propagation of radiation through the Earth's atmosphere. In fact, feedbacks between clouds, radiation, and precipitation represent one of the most important unresolved factors inhibiting our ability to predict the consequences of global climate change. Since its launch in late 1997, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) has collected more than a decade of rainfall measurements that now form the gold standard of satellite-based precipitation estimates. Although not as widely advertised, the instruments aboard TRMM are also well-suited to the problem of characterizing the distribution of atmospheric heating in the tropics and a series of algorithms have recently been developed for estimating profiles of radiative and latent heating from these measurements. This presentation will describe a new multi-sensor tropical radiative heating product derived primarily from TRMM observations. Extensive evaluation of the products using a combination of ground and satellite-based observations is used to place the dataset in the context of existing techniques for quantifying atmospheric radiative heating. Highlights of several recent applications of the dataset will be presented that illustrate its utility for observation-based analysis of energy and water cycle variability on seasonal to inter-annual timescales and evaluating the representation of these processes in numerical models. Emphasis will be placed on the problem of understanding the impacts of clouds and precipitation on atmospheric heating on large spatial scales, one of the primary benefits of satellite observations like those provided by TRMM.

  2. Experimental and numerical analysis of atmospheric propagation of high energy laser

    OpenAIRE

    Pargmann, Carsten; Hall, Thomas; Duschek, Frank; Fischbach, Thomas; Grünewald, Karin; Klaffki, Kirsten; Thieser, Jim; Handke, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The transmission of high power laser radiation through the atmosphere is influenced by turbulent motion of the air. As a result the beam experiences an alteration regarding its position and its distribution, which increases with increasing propagation length. In order to analyze the atmospheric influence on the laser beam propagation a disk laser with a maximum output power of 6 kW and a wavelength of 1.03 µm is operated on a 130 m long free transmission laser test range in Lampoldshausen. Th...

  3. Mitigation of MHD induced fast-ion redistribution in MAST and implications for MAST-Upgrade design

    CERN Document Server

    Keeling, D L; Cecconello, M; Challis, C D; Hawkes, N; Jones, O M; Klimek, I; McClements, K G; Meakins, A; Milnes, J; Turnyanskiy, M

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of redistribution of neutral beam fast-ions due to MHD activity in plasma has been observed on many tokamaks and more recently has been a focus of research on MAST (Turnyanskiy M. et al, 2011 Nucl. Fusion 53 053016). n=1 fishbone modes are observed to cause a large decrease in the neutron emission rate corresponding to a significant perturbation of the fast-ion population in the plasma. Theoretical work on fishbone modes states that the fast-ion distribution itself acts as the source of free energy driving the modes that cause the redistribution. Therefore a series of experiments have been carried out on MAST to investigate a range of plasma density levels at two neutral beam power levels to determine the region within this parameter space in which MHD activity and consequent fast-ion redistribution is suppressed. Analysis of these experiments shows complete suppression of MHD activity at high density with increasing activity and fast-ion redistribution at lower densities and higher NB power ac...

  4. High Energy Gamma-Ray Observations of the Crab Nebula and Pulsar with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Oser, S; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gregorich, D T; Hanna, D S; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schuette, D R; Theoret, C G; Tumer, T O; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2015-01-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a new ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for gamma-ray astronomy. STACEE uses the large mirror area of a solar heliostat facility to achieve a low energy threshold. A prototype experiment which uses 32 heliostat mirrors with a total mirror area of ~ 1200\\unit{m^2} has been constructed. This prototype, called STACEE-32, was used to search for high energy gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and Pulsar. Observations taken between November 1998 and February 1999 yield a strong statistical excess of gamma-like events from the Crab, with a significance of $+6.75\\sigma$ in 43 hours of on-source observing time. No evidence for pulsed emission from the Crab Pulsar was found, and the upper limit on the pulsed fraction of the observed excess was E_{th}) = (2.2 \\pm 0.6 \\pm 0.2) \\times 10^{-10}\\unit{photons cm^{-2} s^{-1}}. The observed flux is in agreement with a continuation to lower energies of the power law spectrum seen at TeV energies...

  5. Analytical yield spectrum approach to electron energy degradation in earth's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical spatial yield spectrum approach has been applied to calculate the electron flux, volume excitation, and ionization rates for monoenergetic electrons incident on the earth's atmosphere. The results have been compared with the previous model calculations of Mantas and Walker (1976) and Banks et al. (1974)

  6. Wind Energy-Related Atmospheric Boundary Layer Large-Eddy Simulation Using OpenFOAM: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchfield, M.J.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J.G.; Moriarty, P.J.

    2010-08-01

    This paper develops and evaluates the performance of a large-eddy simulation (LES) solver in computing the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat terrain under a variety of stability conditions, ranging from shear driven (neutral stratification) to moderately convective (unstable stratification).

  7. Improvement of noise redistribution by employing an SOA-EA cascade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Bischoff, Svend; Christiansen, Lotte Jin;

    2001-01-01

    Noise redistribution and pulse reshaping in an optical transmission link, by concatenated pairs of SOAs and electro absorbers, is investigated theoretically. The results show sharper nonlinear transfer function, better noise redistribution and stronger pulse compression for increasing number of...

  8. Redistribution of energetic particles by background turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quest to understand the turbulent transport of particles, momentum and energy in magnetized plasmas remains a key challenge in fusion research. A basic issue being .still relatively poorly understood is the turbulent ExB advection of charged test particles with large gyroradii. Especially the interaction of alpha particles or impurities with the background turbulence is of great interest. In order to understand the dependence of the particle diffusivity on the interaction mechanisms between FLR effects and the special structure of a certain type of turbulence, direct numerical simulations are done in artificially created two dimensional turbulent electrostatic fields, assuming a constant magnetic field. Finite gyroradius effects are introduced using the gyrokinetic approximation which means that the gyrating particle is simply replaced by a charged ring. Starting from an idealized isotropic potential with Gaussian autocorrelation function, numerous test particle simulations are done varying both the gyroradius and the Kubo number of the potential. It is found that for Kubo numbers larger than about unity, the particle diffusivity is almost independent of the gyroradius as long as the latter does not exceed the correlation length of the electrostatic potential, whereas for small Kubo numbers the diffusivity is monotonically reduced. The underlying physical mechanisms of this behavior are identified and an analytic approach is developed which favorably agrees with the simulation results. The investigations are extended by introducing anisotropic structures like streamers and zonal flows into the artificial potential, leading to quantitative modulations of the gyroradius dependence of the diffusion coefficient. Analytic models are used to explain these various effects. After having developed a general overview on the behavior in simplified artificial potentials, test particle simulations in realistic turbulence created by the gyrokinetic turbulence code GENE are

  9. Political competition and the (in)effectiveness of redistribution in a federation

    OpenAIRE

    Ikuho Kochi & Raúl Ponce Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    We analyze political and economic conditions in which the effectiveness of public redistribution might be low in a federation. In our economy, the central government redistributes income while local governments provide a pro poor local public good. If local public spending falls as a response to the ex-post tax-transfer distribution of income engineered by the policy of the central government then public redistribution might be ineffective in redistributing welfare. In this paper we address t...

  10. Spend it like Beckham? Inequality and redistribution in the UK, 1983-2004

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiadis, Andreas; Manning, Alan

    2007-01-01

    A main activity of the state is to redistribute resources. Models of the political process generally predict that a rise in inequality will lead to more redistribution. This paper shows that, for the UK in the period 1983-2004, a plausibly exogenous rise in income inequality has not been associated with increased redistribution. We then explore this further using attitudinal data. We show that the demand for redistribution, having shown considerable variation over time, is at an all-time low....

  11. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K

    2016-01-01

    In view of the observation by IceCube of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos, it is important to quantify the uncertainty in the background of atmospheric neutrinos. There are two sources of uncertainty, the imperfect knowledge of the spectrum and composition of the primary cosmic rays that produce the neutrinos and the limited understanding of hadron production, including charm, at high energy. This paper is an overview of both aspects.

  12. Influence of hadronic interaction models and the cosmic ray spectrum on the high-energy atmospheric muon and neutrino flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiati Paolo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent observations of muon charge ratio up to about 10 TeV and of atmospheric neutrinos up to energies of about 400 TeV has triggered a renewed interest into the high-energy interaction models and cosmic ray primary composition. A reviewed calculation of lepton spectra produced in cosmic ray induced extensive air showers is carried out with a primary cosmic ray spectrum that fits the latest direct measurements below the knee. In order to achieve this, we used a full Monte Carlo method to derive the inclusive differential spectra (yields of muons, muon neutrinos and electron neutrinos at the surface for energies between 80 GeV and hundreds of PeV. Using these results the differential flux and the flavor ratios of leptons were calculated. The air shower simulator CORSIKA 6.990 was used for showering and propagation of the secondary particles through the atmosphere, employing the established high energy hadronic interaction models SIBYLL 2.1, QGSJet-01 and QGSJet-II-03. We show that the performance of the interaction models allows makes it possible to predict the spectra within experimental uncertainties, while SIBYLL generally yields a higher flux at the surface than the QGSJet models. The calculation of the flavor and charge ratios has lead to inconsistent results, mainly influenced by the different representations of the K/π ratio within the models. The influence of the knee of cosmic rays is reflected in the secondary spectra at energies between 100 and 200 TeV. Furthermore, we could quantify systematic uncertainties of atmospheric muon- and neutrino fluxes, associated to the models of the primary cosmic ray spectrum and the interaction models. For most recent parametrizations of the cosmic ray primary spectrum, atmospheric muons can be determined with an uncertainty smaller than +15/-13% of the average flux. Uncertainties of the muon and electron neutrino fluxes can be calculated within an average error of +32/-22% and +25

  13. Absorption of solar energy heats up our planet's surface and the atmosphere and makes life for us po

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Credit: Image courtesy Barbara Summey, NASA Goddard Visualization Analysis Lab, based upon data processed by Takmeng Wong, CERES Science Team, NASA Langley Research Center Satellite: Terra Sensor: CERES Image Date: 09-30-2001 VE Record ID: 11546 Description: Absorption of solar energy heats up our planet's surface and the atmosphere and makes life for us possible. But the energy cannot stay bound up in the Earth's environment forever. If it did then the Earth would be as hot as the Sun. Instead, as the surface and the atmosphere warm, they emit thermal longwave radiation, some of which escapes into space and allows the Earth to cool. This false-color image of the Earth was produced on September 30, 2001, by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The image shows where more or less heat, in the form of longwave radiation, is emanating from the top of Earth's atmosphere. As one can see in the image, the thermal radiation leaving the oceans is fairly uniform. The blue swaths across the central Pacific represent thick clouds, the tops of which are so high they are among the coldest places on Earth. In the American Southwest, which can be seen in the upper righthand corner of the globe, there is often little cloud cover to block outgoing radiation and relatively little water to absorb solar energy. Consequently, the amount of outgoing radiation in the American Southwest exceeds that of the oceans. Also, that region was experiencing an extreme heatwave when these data were acquired. Recently, NASA researchers discovered that incoming solar radiation and outgoing thermal radiation increased in the tropics from the 1980s to the 1990s. (Click to read the press release .) They believe that the reason for the unexpected increase has to do with an apparent change in circulation patterns around the globe, which effectively reduced the amount of water vapor and cloud cover in the upper reaches of the atmosphere

  14. Improvement of Polytetrafluoroethylene Surface Energy by Repetitive Pulse Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in Atmospheric Air%Improvement of Polytetrafluoroethylene Surface Energy by Repetitive Pulse Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in Atmospheric Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国清; 张冠军; 张文元

    2011-01-01

    Improvement of polytetrafluoroethylene surface energy by non-thermal plasma treatment is presented, using a nanosecond-positive-edge repetitive pulsed dielectric barrier discharge generator in atmospheric air. The electrical parameters including discharging power, peak and density of micro-discharge current were calculated, and the electron energy was estimated. Surface treatment experiments of polytetrafluoroethylene films were conducted for both different applied voltages and different treating durations. Results show that the surface energy of polytetrafluoroethylene film could be improved to 40 mJ/m2 or more by plasma treatment. Surface roughness measurement and surface X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicate that there are chemical etching and implantation of polar oxygen groups in the sample surface treating process, resulting in the improvement of the sample surface energy. Compared with an AC source of 50 Hz, the dielectric barrier discharges generated by a repetitive pulsed source could provide higher peak power, lower mean power, larger micro-discharge current density and higher electron energy. Therefore, with the same applied peak voltage and treating duration, the improvement of polytetrafluoroethylene surface energy using repetitive pulsed plasma is more effective, and the plasma treatment process based on repetitive pulsed dielectric barrier discharges in air is thus feasible and applicable.

  15. Influence of the atmosphere on the space detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays; Influence de l'atmosphere sur la detection spatiale des rayons cosmiques d'ultra-haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreggia, S

    2007-06-15

    EUSO (Extreme Universe Space Observatory) is a project of ultra-high energy (> 10{sup 20} eV) cosmic rays detection from space. Its concept relies on the observation of fluorescence and Cerenkov photons emitted by extensive air showers from a telescope located on the International Space Station. A simulation software has been developed to study the characteristics of this innovative concept of detection. It deals with the different steps of the detection chain: extensive air shower development, emission of fluorescence and Cerenkov light, and radiative transfer to the telescope. A Monte-Carlo code has been implemented to simulate the propagation of photons through the atmosphere, dealing with multiple scattering in clear sky conditions as well as in presence of aerosols and clouds. With this simulation program, the impact of atmospheric conditions on the performance of a space-located detector has been studied. The precise treatment of photons propagation through the atmosphere has permitted to quantify the scattered light contribution to the detected signal. (author)

  16. Canonical transfer and multiscale energetics for primitive and quasi-geostrophic atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, X San

    2016-01-01

    The past years have seen the success of a novel multiscale energetic formalism in a variety of ocean and engineering fluid applications. In a self-contained way, this study introduces it to the atmospheric dynamical diagnostics, with important theoretical updates. Multiscale energy equations are derived using a new analysis apparatus, namely, multiscale window transform, with respect to both the primitive equation and quasi-geostrophic models. A reconstruction of the "atomic" energy fluxes on the multiple scale windows allows for a natural and unique separation of the in-scale transports and cross-scale transfers from the intertwined nonlinear processes. The resulting energy transfers bear a Lie bracket form, reminiscent of the Poisson bracket in Hamiltonian mechanics, we hence would call them "canonical". A canonical transfer process is a mere redistribution of energy among scale windows, without generating or destroying energy as a whole. By classification, a multiscale energetic cycle comprises of availabl...

  17. Protostellar Accretion Flows Destabilized by Magnetic Flux Redistribution

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Zhao, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic flux redistribution lies at the heart of the problem of star formation in dense cores of molecular clouds that are magnetized to a realistic level. If all of the magnetic flux of a typical core were to be dragged into the central star, the stellar field strength would be orders of magnitude higher than the observed values. This well-known "magnetic flux problem" can in principle be resolved through non-ideal MHD effects. Two dimensional (axisymmetric) calculations have shown that ambipolar diffusion, in particular, can transport magnetic flux outward relative to matter, allowing material to enter the central object without dragging the field lines along. We show through simulations that such axisymmetric protostellar accretion flows are unstable in three dimensions to magnetic interchange instability in the azimuthal direction. The instability is driven by the magnetic flux redistributed from the matter that enters the central object. It typically starts to develop during the transition from the pres...

  18. Pt redistribution during Ni(Pt) silicide formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a real-time Rutherford backscattering spectrometry study of the erratic redistribution of Pt during Ni silicide formation in a solid phase reaction. The inhomogeneous Pt redistribution in Ni(Pt)Si films is a consequence of the low solubility of Pt in Ni2Si compared to NiSi and the limited mobility of Pt in NiSi. Pt further acts as a diffusion barrier and resides in the Ni2Si grain boundaries, significantly slowing down the Ni2Si and NiSi growth kinetics. Moreover, the observed incorporation of a large amount of Pt in the NiSi seeds indicates that Pt plays a major role in selecting the crystallographic orientation of these seeds and thus in the texture of the resulting Ni1-xPtxSi film

  19. The redistribution of granulocytes following E. coli endotoxin induced sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Lillevang, S T; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine;

    1994-01-01

    Infusion of endotoxin elicits granulocytopenia followed by increased numbers of granulocytes in peripheral blood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the redistribution and sequestration of granulocytes in the tissues following E. coli endotoxin induced sepsis. From 16 rabbits granulocytes...... were isolated, labelled with Indium and reinjected intravenously. Eight rabbits received an infusion of E. coli endotoxin 2 micrograms kg-1 while eight received isotonic saline. The redistribution of granulocytes was imaged with a gamma camera and calculated with a connected computer before and 2 and 6...... hours after infusion of endotoxin or saline. Serum cortisol and interleukin-1 beta were measured. In another seven rabbits, respiratory burst activity and degranulation of granulocytes were measured prior to and from 5 min to 6 hours after infusion of E. coli endotoxin 2 micrograms kg-1 BW. Following...

  20. Energy conversion and momentum coupling of the sub-kJ laser ablation of aluminum in air atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy conversion and momentum coupling using nano-second 1-μm-wavelength pulse laser irradiation on an aluminum target were measured in air and nitrogen gas atmospheres over a wide range of laser pulse energies from sub-J to sub-kJ. From the expansion rate of the shock wave, the blast-wave energy conversion efficiency, ηbw, was deduced as 0.59 ± 0.02 in the air atmosphere at an ambient pressure from 30 to 101 kPa for a constant laser fluence at 115 J/cm2. Moreover, the momentum coupling of a circular disk target was formulated uniquely as a function of the dimensionless shock-wave radius and the ratio of the laser spot radius to the disk radius, while ηbw could be approximated as constant for the laser fluence from 4.7 to 4.1 kJ/cm2, and the ambient pressure from 0.1 to 101 kPa

  1. Intertemporal commitment problems and voting on redistributive taxation

    OpenAIRE

    Glazer, Amihai; Konrad, Kai A.

    1992-01-01

    A rich person who fears a loss of income may later favor redistributive taxation and a mix of taxes and public goods that differs from the one he now favors. If mobility is costly, and if government in each period uses majority voting to determine policy, then this person may prefer to live in a community that is permanently ruled by poor residents. Majority voting is a mechanism that can overcome intertemporal commitment problems of income insurance.

  2. Alternatives to Redistribution Communities in Inter-domain traffic Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Vivekanandan Mahadevan

    2012-01-01

    Today’s internet routing mainly concentrates on controlling the ingress and egress traffic which occurs through border routers. There are different ways by which we can control the traffic between autonomous systems. In most cases redistribution communities are used for the control over traffic engineering. In this paper we focus on alternative approaches like Multi Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Ambient Networks, through which there can be an effective control over traffi...

  3. Trade and Foreign Capital: Income Redistribution in Simulated Trade Models

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Thompson

    2002-01-01

    The present paper compares quantitative impacts of a free trade "program" of 1% price changes across simulations of general equilibrium models of countries and aggregates of skilled labor. These simulations of factor proportions and specific factors models illustrate two quantitative properties of competitive models of production and trade. First, factor intensity has a much stronger influence than factor substitution on the pattern of income redistribution due to price changes and foreign ca...

  4. Manganese uptake and redistribution in soybean as affected by glyphosate

    OpenAIRE

    Ciro Antonio Rosolem; Gabriel José Massoni de Andrade; Izaias Pinheiro Lisboa; Samuel Menegatti Zoca

    2010-01-01

    Detrimental effects of glyphosate on plant mineral nutrition have been reported in the literature, particularly on Mn uptake and redistribution. However, in most of the experiments conducted so far glyphosate-susceptible plants were used. Effects of glyphosate on Mn absorption kinetics, accumulation, and distribution within the plant, as well as soybean response to Mn as affected by glyphosate were studied in three experiments. In the first experiment, in nutrient solution, the effect of glyp...

  5. Free to Move: Migration, Tax Competition and Redistribution

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Woojin

    2005-01-01

    We study a model of tax competition between two countries when both skilled and unskilled workers make their migration decisions simultaneously and wages are endogenously determined. If both factors of production are allowed to migrate freely and when the demand for skilled labor is not so elastic, the problem typically predicted in the literature of tax competition that increased mobility of production factors will pose a severe threat to redistribution possibility is less acute than it migh...

  6. Tax compliance and income redistribution: a political competition model

    OpenAIRE

    Solano-Garc??a, ??ngel

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the political economy of income redistribution when voters are concerned about tax compliance. We consider a two stagemodel where there is a two party competition over the tax rate in the first stage and voters decide about their level of tax compliance in the second stage. We model political competition ?? la Wittman with the ideology of parties endogenously determined at equilibrium. We calibrate the model for an average of EU-27 countries. Numerical simulations provide ...

  7. Indirect taxes for redistribution: Should necessity goods be favored?

    OpenAIRE

    Boadway, Robin; Pestieau, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The Atkinson-Stiglitz Theorem shows that with weakly separable preferences, differential commod- ity taxes are not needed if an optimal nonlinear income tax is imposed. Redistributive objectives can be achieved with the income tax alone even if goods differ considerably in their income elasticities of demand. Deaton showed that if the government is restricted to a linear progressive income tax along with commodity taxes, the latter are superfluous if preferences are not only weakly separable ...

  8. Indirect taxes for redistribution: should necessity goods be favored?

    OpenAIRE

    Boadway, Robin; Pestieau, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The Atkinson-Stiglitz Theorem shows that with weakly separable preferences, differential commod- ity taxes are not needed if an optimal nonlinear income tax is imposed. Redistributive objectives can be achieved with the income tax alone even if goods differ considerably in their income elasticities of demand. Deaton showed that if the government is restricted to a linear progressive income tax along with commodity taxes, the latter are superfluous if preferences are not only weakly separable ...

  9. Petrol consumption and redistributive effects of its taxation in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Asensio Ruiz de Alda, Francisco Javier; Matas i Prat, Anna; Raymond Bara, José Luis

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to estimate a petrol consumption function for Spain and to evaluate the redistributive effects of petrol taxation. We use micro data from the Spanish Household Budget Survey of 1990/91 and model petrol consumption taking into account the effect that income changes may have on car ownership levels, as well as the differences that exist between expenditure and consumption. Our results show the importance that household structure, place of residence and income have...

  10. Alternatives to Redistribution Communities in Inter-domain traffic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivekanandan Mahadevan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Today’s internet routing mainly concentrates on controlling the ingress and egress traffic which occurs through border routers. There are different ways by which we can control the traffic between autonomous systems. In most cases redistribution communities are used for the control over traffic engineering. In this paper we focus on alternative approaches like Multi Protocol Label Switching (MPLS and Ambient Networks, through which there can be an effective control over traffic engineering.

  11. The intra-generational redistributive effects of social security

    OpenAIRE

    Luis M. Cubeddu

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides a quantitative evaluation of the intra--cohort redistributive elements of the United States social security system in the context of a computable general equilibrium model. I determine how the well--being of individuals that differ across {\\sl gender, race} and {\\sl education} is affected by government social security policy. I find that females, whites and non--college graduates stand less to gain (lose) from reductions (increases) in the size of social ...

  12. The Redistributive Role of Minimum Wage Legislation and Unemployment Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Marceau; Robin Boadway

    1991-01-01

    The use of unemployment insurance and minimum wages as instruments for redistributing income are analyzed. The government is assumed to be able to implement an optimal income tax in an economy consisting of two ability-types of persons. The effect of introducing a minimum wage which induces involuntary unemployment combined with unemployment insurance is considered. Social welfare can be improved despite the possible revenue costs to the government if the policy causes a self-selection constr...

  13. Myocardial viability assessed by Tl-201 SPECT. Redistribution versus reinjection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to verify if a third series of images acquired by reinjection thallium-201, 24 h after conventional myocardial perfusion with the radioisotope, improves the identification of myocardial viability segments. The methods: we studied 30 patients, mean age 57.7 ±9.4 years, with old myocardial infarction using thallium (Tl)-201 SPECT, and we obtained three series of images (stress, redistribution after 4 h and reinjection after 24 h. Cardiac images were divided in 5 segments (apical, lateral, anterior, septal and inferior) and each one received a value by a score system according to the Tl-201 myocardial uptake (0=normal uptake; 1=mild hypoperfusion; 2=moderate hypoperfusion; 3=severe hypoperfusion or no myocardial uptake). We considered viable myocardium when the uptake of Tl-201 in the segment related to te myocardial infarction increases at least 1 point in two different axis of Tl-201 SPECT. The results: seven (23,3%) patients demonstrated increase of Tl-201 uptake only at reinjection images, showing a high efficacy of the method. Nine (30%) patients showed persistent hypoperfusion at all series of images suggesting only fibrosis in the are related to the infarction. Fourteen (46,7%) patients showed increase of Tl-201 concentration at redistribution images; among these patients, six showed improvement of myocardial uptake at reinjection. This condition was interpreted as regional chronic ischemic process: hibernating myocardium. The conclusion was that Tl-201 hypoperfusion at redistribution images without significant changes in relation to the stress images do not represent fibrosis at all. The reinjection technic was better than conventional redistribution in the detection of viable myocardium. This data allows a better therapeutic orientation. (author)

  14. A Decomposition Method with Redistributed Subroutine for Constrained Nonconvex Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan Lu; Wei Wang; Li-Ping Pang; Dan Li

    2013-01-01

    A class of constrained nonsmooth nonconvex optimization problems, that is, piecewise ${C}^{2}$ objectives with smooth inequality constraints are discussed in this paper. Based on the $\\mathrm{}\\mathrm{}$ -theory, a superlinear convergent $\\mathrm{}\\mathrm{}$ -algorithm, which uses a nonconvex redistributed proximal bundle subroutine, is designed to solve these optimization problems. An illustrative example is given to show how this convergent method works on a Second-Order ...

  15. Alloy element redistribution during sintering of powder metallurgy steels

    OpenAIRE

    Tahir, Abdul Malik

    2014-01-01

    Homogenization of alloying elements is desired during sintering of powder metallurgy components. The redistribution processes such as penetration of liquid phase into the interparticle/grain boundaries of solid particles and subsequent solid-state  diffusion of alloy element(s) in the base powder, are important for the effective homogenization of alloy element(s) during liquid phase sintering of the mixed powders. The aim of this study is to increase the understanding of alloy element redistr...

  16. ECONOMIC GROWTH AND REDISTRIBUTION: EVIDENCE FROM DYNAMIC GAMES

    OpenAIRE

    James Robert E. Sampi Bravo

    2012-01-01

    This work is based on a differential game proposed by Kelvin Lancaster. The game between two agents called workers and capitalists is based on the accumulation and redistribution of benefits among social classes concluding that cooperative outcomes outperform non-cooperative. This approach determines the optimum solution in a centralized economy as a non-cooperative game and cooperative Pareto solutions forced by the social planner. We compare the model solution in a decentralized economy, wh...

  17. Redistributive Taxation, Public Expenditure, and Size of Governent

    OpenAIRE

    Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay; Joan-Maria Esteban

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model of redistributive income taxation and public expenditure. This joint treatment permits analyzing the interdependencies between the two policies: one cannot be chosen independently of the other. Empirical evidence reveals that partisan confrontation essentially falls on expenditure policies rather than on income taxation. We examine the case in which the expenditure policy (or the size of government) is chosen by majority voting and income taxation is consistently adjusted...

  18. State redistribution as merging: introducing the coherent relay

    OpenAIRE

    Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    State redistribution allows one party to optimally send part of her state to another party. Here we show that this can be derived simply from two applications of coherent state-merging. This provides a protocol whereby a middle party acts as a relay station to help another party more efficiently transfer quantum states. This also gives a protocol for state splitting and the reverse Shannon theorem (assisted or unassisted by side information), and allows one to use less classical communication...

  19. Globalization and Redistribution: Feasible Egalitarianism in a Competitive World

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Bowles

    2000-01-01

    A reduction of impediments to international flows of goods, capital and professional labor is thought to raise the economic costs of programs by the nation state (and labor unions) to redistribute income to the poor and to provide economic security. But some of the more politically and economically successful examples of such policies --for example Nordic social democracy and East Asian land reform-- have occurred in small open economies which would, on the above account, provide a prohibitiv...

  20. Prompt and direct muon production in the atmosphere and very high energy inclined EAS at sea level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryazhskaya, O.G. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary pr. 7a, Moscow, 117312 (Russian Federation); Volkova, L.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary pr. 7a, Moscow, 117312 (Russian Federation); Zatsepin, G.T. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary pr. 7a, Moscow, 117312 (Russian Federation)

    2006-01-15

    Prompt muons are produced through decays of charmed particles and direct muons are produced through decays of particles with life-time much less than that of charmed particles (for example, resonances). The ratios of the number of particles in showers initiated by bremsstrahlung of these muons to those from decays of {pi}{sup o} - mesons from primary nucleon interactions in the atmosphere are estimated for the primary nucleon energy 10{sup 19} eV. The calculations are made at {theta}{approx}45 deg. - 72 deg. to the vertical at sea level. At large angles prompt and direct muons could be completely responsible for EAS measured at the sea level.

  1. An analysis of the OI 1304 A dayglow using a Monte Carlo resonant scattering model with partial frequency redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, R. R.; Lee, J.-S.

    1982-01-01

    The transport of resonance radiation under optically thick conditions is shown to be accurately described by a Monte Carlo model of the atomic oxygen 1304 A airglow triplet in which partial frequency redistribution, temperature gradients, pure absorption and multilevel scattering are accounted for. All features of the data can be explained by photoelectron impact excitation and the resonant scattering of sunlight, where the latter source dominates below 100 and above 500 km and is stronger at intermediate altitudes than previously thought. It is concluded that the OI 1304 A emission can be used in studies of excitation processes and atomic oxygen densities in planetary atmospheres.

  2. Disentangling the response of forest and grassland energy exchange to heatwaves under idealized land–atmosphere coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. van Heerwaarden

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the difference in land–atmosphere interactions between grassland and forest during typical heat wave conditions in order to understand the controversial results of Teuling et al. (2010 (T10, hereafter, who have found the systematic occurrence of higher sensible heat fluxes over forest than over grassland during heat wave conditions. With a simple, but accurate coupled land–atmosphere model, we are able to reproduce the findings of T10 for both normal summer and heat wave conditions, and to carefully explore the sensitivity of the coupled land–atmosphere system to changes in incoming radiation and early-morning temperature. Our results emphasize the importance of fast processes during the onset of heat waves, since we are able to explain the results of T10 without having to take into account changes in soil moisture. In order to disentangle the contribution of differences in several static and dynamic properties between forest and grassland, we have performed an experiment in which new land use types are created that are equal to grassland, but with one of its properties replaced by that of forest. From these, we conclude that the closure of stomata in the presence of dry air is by far the most important process in creating the different behavior of grassland and forest during the onset of a heat wave. However, we conclude that for a full explanation of the results of T10 also the other properties (albedo, roughness and the ratio of minimum stomatal resistance to leaf-area index play an important, but indirect role; their influences mainly consist of strengthening the feedback that leads to the closure of the stomata by providing more energy that can be converted into sensible heat. The model experiment also confirms that, in line with the larger sensible heat flux, higher atmospheric temperatures occur over forest.

  3. Energy analysis of a recent approximation to the atmospheric primitive equations

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Duane E.

    2011-01-01

    An approximation to the thermodynamic equation was introduced by Holton which was motivated by an energy principle involving a quadratic expression in temperature deviation, which he identified as available potential energy. The approximation consists of neglecting the component of adiabatic warming/cooling due to the temporally and horizontally variable part of the specific volume on a constant pressure surface, WKT*. If the approximation is made, the system lacks a total energy principle in...

  4. Acoustic energy transfer to the upper atmosphere from sinusoidal sources and a role of nonlinear processes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krasnov, Valerij Michailovič; Drobzheva, Yana Viktorovna; Laštovička, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 12 (2007), s. 1357-1365. ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/04/2110; GA ČR GA205/07/1367 Grant ostatní: Ministry of Education and Science of Kazakhstan(KZ) 1-4-1.11-1 (112) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Infrasonic waves * Ionosphere * Atmosphere Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.566, year: 2007

  5. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth's radiation belts uncovers a missing energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Mozer, F. S.

    2015-05-01

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth's magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave-particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts, controlled by solar activity.

  6. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation with reference to aeronautical operating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Flow over surface obstructions can produce significantly large wind shears such that adverse flying conditions can occur for aeronautical systems (helicopters, STOL vehicles, etc.). Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow and highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient. Discussion of the effects of the disturbed wind field in CTOL and STOL aircraft flight path and obstruction clearance standards is given. The results indicate that closer inspection of these presently recommended standards as influenced by wind over irregular terrains is required.

  7. The aurora as a source of planetary-scale waves in the middle atmosphere. [atmospheric turbulence caused by auroral energy absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Straus, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Photographs of global scale auroral forms taken by scanning radiometers onboard weather satellites in 1972 show that auroral bands exhibit well organized wave motion with typical zonal wave number of 5 or so. The scale size of these waves is in agreement with that of well organized neutral wind fields in the 150- to 200-km region during the geomagnetic storm of May 27, 1967. Further, the horizontal scale size revealed by these observations are in agreement with that of high altitude traveling ionospheric disturbances. It is conjectured that the geomagnetic storm is a source of planetary and synoptic scale neutral atmospheric waves in the middle atmosphere. Although there is, at present, no observation of substorm related waves of this scale size at mesospheric and stratospheric altitudes, the possible existence of a new source of waves of the proper scale size to trigger instabilities in middle atmospheric circulation systems may be significant in the study of lower atmospheric response to geomagnetic activity.

  8. Ecosystem-Atmosphere Exchange of Carbon, Water and Energy over a Mixed Deciduous Forest in the Midwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilo Dragoni; Hans Peter Schmid; C.S.B. Grimmond; J.C. Randolph; J.R. White

    2012-12-17

    During the project period we continued to conduct long-term (multi-year) measurements, analysis, and modeling of energy and mass exchange in and over a deciduous forest in the Midwestern United States, to enhance the understanding of soil-vegetation-atmosphere exchange of carbon. At the time when this report was prepared, results from nine years of measurements (1998 - 2006) of above canopy CO2 and energy fluxes at the AmeriFlux site in the Morgan-Monroe State Forest, Indiana, USA (see Table 1), were available on the Fluxnet database, and the hourly CO2 fluxes for 2007 are presented here (see Figure 1). The annual sequestration of atmospheric carbon by the forest is determined to be between 240 and 420 g C m-2 a-1 for the first ten years. These estimates are based on eddy covariance measurements above the forest, with a gap-filling scheme based on soil temperature and photosynthetically active radiation. Data gaps result from missing data or measurements that were rejected in qua)lity control (e.g., during calm nights). Complementary measurements of ecological variables (i.e. inventory method), provided an alternative method to quantify net carbon uptake by the forest, partition carbon allocation in each ecosystem components, and reduce uncertainty on annual net ecosystem productivity (NEP). Biometric datasets are available on the Fluxnext database since 1998 (with the exclusion of 2006). Analysis for year 2007 is under completion.

  9. The influence of the Extreme Ultraviolet spectral energy distribution on the structure and composition of the upper atmosphere of exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, J H

    2015-01-01

    By varying the profiles of stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral energy distribution (SED), we tested the influences of stellar EUV SEDs on the physical and chemical properties of the escaping atmosphere. We apply our model to study four exoplanets, HD\\,189733b, HD\\,209458b, GJ \\,436b, and Kepler-11b. We found that the total mass loss rates of an exoplanet, which are determined mainly by the integrated fluxes, are moderately affected by the profiles of the EUV SED, but the composition and species distributions in the atmosphere can be dramatically modified by the different profiles of the EUV SED. For exoplanets with a high hydrodynamic escape parameter ($\\lambda$), the amount of atomic hydrogen produced by photoionization at different altitudes can vary by one to two orders of magnitude with the variation of stellar EUV SEDs. The effect of photoionization of H is prominent when the EUV SED is dominated by the low-energy spectral region (400-900${\\AA}$), which pushes the transition of H/H$^{+}$ to low al...

  10. Effects of atmospheric variability on energy utilization and conservation. Final report, 1 November 1976--31 October 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, E.R.; Dreiseitl, E.; Johnson, G.R.; Leong, H.H.; Macdonald, B.C.; Somervell, W.L. Jr.; Starr, A.M.; Timbre, K.O.

    1978-02-01

    A space-heating energy-consumption model for Greeley, Colorado for the winter of 1976-77 was within 98.9 percent of actual natural gas consumption for that city. Modeling of Cheyenne, Wyoming, including the testing of a new statistical scheme to develop the building census required by the energy consumption model, has progressed to the point where reliable natural gas consumption estimates can be made with the model for that community. A detailed study of temperature and surface wind patterns in and near the city of Greeley, Colorado revealed that, at times, an urban heat island effect is present, in spite of the relatively small size of that town. Various feedback mechanisms between the oceans and the atmosphere were examined. Several of these mechanisms appear to be the cause of the interannual variability of the atmosphere's general circulation and of climatic changes on a time scale of several tens of years. A recent cooling trend in the North Pacific north of 40/sup 0/N, and sea-surface temperature fluctuations with an irregular periodicity of 2 to 4 years superimposed upon this trend were studied. To advance regional long-range forecasting skills January temperature anomalies over the eastern United States were correlated with flow patterns over the U.S. and Canada.

  11. Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs) – New High-Energy Phenomenon Originated in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong electric fields inside thunderclouds give rise to enhanced fluxes of high- energy electrons and, consequently, gamma rays and neutrons. During thunderstorms at Mount Aragats, hundreds of Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs) comprising millions of energetic electrons and gamma rays, as well as neutrons, were detected at Aragats Space Environmental Center (ASEC) on 3200 m altitude. Observed large TGE events allow for the first time to measure the energy spectra of electrons and gamma rays well above the cosmic ray background. The energy spectra of the electrons have an exponential shape and extend up to 30-40 MeV. Recovered energy spectra of the gamma rays is also exponential in energy range 5-10 MeV, then turns to power law and extends up to 100 MeV.

  12. Atmospheric and Surface Contributions to Planetary Albedo and their Relationship to the Total Meridional Energy Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, A.; Battisti, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    The meridional distribution of incident solar radiation and planetary albedo both contribute to the equator-to-pole gradient in absorbed solar radiation (ASR) in the observed climate system. While the former component is determined by the Earth-Sun geometry and composes 60% of the equator-to-pole gradient in ASR, the latter component makes a significant (40%) contribution to the ASR gradient and is potentially a function of climate state due to its dependence on both atmospheric and surface albedo. In turn, the equator-to-pole gradient in planetary albedo is found to be primarily (86% -89%) dictated by atmospheric albedo with meridional gradients in surface albedo playing a much smaller role in forcing the climate system on the equator-to-pole scale. Simulations of the pre-industrial climate system using the CMIP3 coupled models show large differences in the equator-to-pole gradient in planetary albedo which are mainly due to differences in the simulated cloud distribution, with surface processes playing a much smaller role. The inter-model spread in total meridional heat transport is also primarily (85% of the inter-model spread) due to differences in the simulated cloud distribution. Further model simulations demonstrate that the surface albedo changes associated with moving from the present climate to an ice free climate have a small effect on the equator-to-pole gradient of ASR as compared to the uncertainty in simulated cloud distributions, and hence a small effect on the meridional heat transport.

  13. Induction of strand breaks in DNA films by low energy electrons and soft X-ray under nitrous oxide atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Elahe, E-mail: Elahe.Alizadeh@USherbrooke.ca [Groupe en science des radiations, Departement de medecine nucleaire et radiobiologie, Faculte de medecine et des sciences de la sante, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, J1H 5N4 (Canada); Sanche, Leon, E-mail: Leon.Sanche@USherbrooke.ca [Groupe en science des radiations, Departement de medecine nucleaire et radiobiologie, Faculte de medecine et des sciences de la sante, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, J1H 5N4 (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Five-monolayer (5 ML) plasmid DNA films deposited on glass and tantalum substrates were exposed to Al K{sub {alpha}} X-rays of 1.5 keV under gaseous nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) at atmospheric pressure and temperature. Whereas the damage yields for DNA deposited on glass are due to soft X-rays, those arising from DNA on tantalum are due to both the interaction of low energy photoelectrons from the metal and X-rays. Then, the differences in the yields of damage on glass and tantalum substrates, essentially arises from interaction of essentially low-energy electrons (LEEs) with DNA molecules and the surrounding atmosphere. The G-values (i.e., the number of moles of product per Joule of energy absorbed) for DNA strand breaks induced by LEEs (G{sub LEE}) and the lower limit of G-values for soft X-ray photons (G{sub XL}) were calculated and the results compared to those from previous studies under atmospheric conditions and other ambient gases, such as N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. Under N{sub 2}O, the G-values for loss of supercoiled DNA are 103{+-}15 nmol/J for X-rays, and 737{+-}110 nmol/J for LEEs. Compared to corresponding values in an O{sub 2} atmosphere, the effectiveness of X-rays to damage DNA in N{sub 2}O is less, but the G value for LEEs in N{sub 2}O is more than twice the corresponding value for an oxygenated environment. This result indicates a higher effectiveness for LEEs relative to N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} environments in causing SSB and DSB in an N{sub 2}O environment. Thus, the previously observed radiosensitization of cells by N{sub 2}O may not be only due to OH{sup {center_dot}} radicals but also to the reaction of LEE with N{sub 2}O molecules near DNA. The previous experiments with N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} and the present one demonstrate the possibility to investigate damage induced by LEEs to biomolecules under various types of surrounding atmospheres. - Highlights: > A completely different and new approach is applied to investigate the radiation chemistry of N

  14. Spectral energy transfer of atmospheric gravity waves through sum and difference nonlinear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, K.M. [Wuhan Univ. (China). School of Electronic Information; Chinese Academey of Sciences, Hefei (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment; Embry Riddle Aeronautical Univ., Daytona Beach, FL (United States). Dept. of Physical Science; Ministry of Education, Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment and Geodesy; State Observatory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Wuhan (China); Liu, A.Z.; Li, Z. [Embry Riddle Aeronautical Univ., Daytona Beach, FL (United States). Dept. of Physical Science; Zhang, S.D.; Yi, F. [Wuhan Univ. (China). School of Electronic Information; Ministry of Education, Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment and Geodesy; State Observatory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Wuhan (China)

    2012-07-01

    Nonlinear interactions of gravity waves are studied with a two-dimensional, fully nonlinear model. The energy exchanges among resonant and near-resonant triads are examined in order to understand the spectral energy transfer through interactions. The results show that in both resonant and near-resonant interactions, the energy exchange between two high frequency waves is strong, but the energy transfer from large to small vertical scale waves is rather weak. This suggests that the energy cascade toward large vertical wavenumbers through nonlinear interaction is inefficient, which is different from the rapid turbulence cascade. Because of considerable energy exchange, nonlinear interactions can effectively spread high frequency spectrum, and play a significant role in limiting wave amplitude growth and transferring energy into higher altitudes. In resonant interaction, the interacting waves obey the resonant matching conditions, and resonant excitation is reversible, while near-resonant excitation is not so. Although near-resonant interaction shows the complexity of match relation, numerical experiments show an interesting result that when sum and difference near-resonant interactions occur between high and low frequency waves, the wave vectors tend to approximately match in horizontal direction, and the frequency of the excited waves is also close to the matching value. (orig.)

  15. Large Abundances of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Adriani, A.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Moriconi, M. L.; D'Aversa, E.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 micron in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al.We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 micron. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) × 10(exp 4) particles / cubic cm. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is approx 430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 sq. nm; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  16. Atmospheric aerosols at the Pierre Auger Observatory: characterization and effect on the energy estimation for ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located in the Province of Mendoza in Argentina, is making good progress in understanding the nature and origin of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays. Using a hybrid detection technique, based on surface detectors and fluorescence telescopes, it provides large statistics, good mass and energy resolution, and solid control of systematic uncertainties. One of the main challenges for the fluorescence detection technique is the understanding of the atmosphere, used as a giant calorimeter. To minimize as much as possible the systematic uncertainties in fluorescence measurements, the Auger Collaboration has developed an extensive atmospheric monitoring program. The purpose of this work is to improve our knowledge of the atmospheric aerosols, and their effect on fluorescence light propagation. Using a modelling program computing air mass displacements, it has been shown that nights with low aerosol concentrations have air masses coming much more directly from the Pacific Ocean. For the first time, the effect of the aerosol size on the light propagation has been estimated. Indeed, according to the Ramsauer approach, large aerosols have the largest effect on the light scattering. Thus, the dependence on the aerosol size has been added to the light scattering parameterizations used by the Auger Collaboration. A systematic overestimation of the energy and of the maximum air shower development Xmax is observed. Finally, a method based on the very inclined laser shots fired by the Auger central laser has been developed to estimate the aerosol size. Large aerosol sizes ever estimated at the Pierre Auger Observatory can now be probed. First preliminary results using laser-shot data collected in the past have identified a population of large aerosols. (author)

  17. High Temperature Energy Storage for In Situ Planetary Atmospheric Measurement Technologies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of energy storage capable of operational temperatures of 380:C and 486oC with a specific capacity 200 Wh/kg for use as a power source on the Venusian...

  18. Carrying away and redistribution of radioisotopes on the Peyne catchment basin. Preliminary report; Entrainement et redistribution des radionucleides sur le bassin versant de la Peyne. Rapport preliminaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffa, C.; Danic, F

    2006-07-01

    The transfers of radioisotopes present in soils and sediments are essentially conditioned by the mobilities of the physical vectors which constitute their supports. The water is the main vector of natural transfer, radioisotopes being associated with it under dissolved or particulate shape. The rainout and the hydrous erosion are responsible in particular for the carrying away and for the redistribution of contaminants following an atmospheric deposit on a catchment basin. However their effect is not the same in any point of the catchment basin. The work begun here aims at elaborating a classification of the grounds sensitivity towards this phenomenon of radioisotopes carrying away. The different factors of sensitivity have been identified: pluviometry, slope, soils occupation and soils nature. The Peyne catchment basin, that presents an important variability of these four parameters, constitutes the experimental site for this study. On this catchment basin, we search to identify the areas the most sensitive to the carrying away of radioisotopes, by combining a theoretical predictive approach based on the cartography and a descriptive approach basing on the sampling and the analysis of soils samples. (N.C.)

  19. Changing surface-atmosphere energy exchange and refreezing capacity of the lower accumulation area, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charalampidis, C.; Van As, D.; Box, J. E.;

    2015-01-01

    negative surface mass budget (SMB) and surface meltwater run-off. The observed run-off was due to a large ice fraction in the upper 10 m of firn that prevented meltwater from percolating to available pore volume below. Analysis reveals an anomalously low 2012 summer-averaged albedo of 0.71 (typically ∼ 0...... lowering resulted from high atmospheric temperatures, up to a +2.6 °C daily average, indicating that 2012 would have been a negative SMB year at this site even without the melt-albedo feedback. Longer time series of SMB, regional temperature, and remotely sensed albedo (MODIS) show that 2012 was the first...... strongly negative SMB year, with the lowest albedo, at this elevation on record. The warm conditions of recent years have resulted in enhanced melt and reduction of the refreezing capacity in the lower accumulation area. If high temperatures continue, the current lower accumulation area will turn into a...

  20. Large laser sparks for laboratory simulation of high-energy-density events in planetary atmospheres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babánková, Dagmar; Juha, Libor; Civiš, Svatopluk; Bittner, Michal; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Mikolajczyk, J.; Ryc, L.; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skála, Jiří; Ullschmied, Jiří

    Bellingham : SPIE, 2005 - (Hoover, R.; Levin, G.; Rozanov, A.; Gladstone, G.), 590614/1-590614/9 ISBN 0-8194-5911-9. ISSN 0277-786X. - (Proccedings of SPIE. 5906). [Optics and Photonics 2005:Astronomical Optics and Instrumentation. San Diego (US), 31.07.2005-04.08.2005] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LA 055; GA MŠk(CZ) 1P04LA235 Grant ostatní: EU Transnational Access to Research Infrastruktur(XE) RII3-CT-2003-506350 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser spark * laser-induced dielectric breakdown * high-power laser * chemical evolution * origins of life * early Earth´s atmosphere * planetary atmosphers * laboratory simulation of impact shock * lightning simulation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  1. Comments on "Tropical Convection and the Energy Balance at the Top of the Atmosphere"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Lindzen, Richard S.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data show that the effects of clouds on the solar and thermal infrared radiation in the tropical deep convective regions have a similar magnitude but opposite signs. This small difference in the effects of clouds on radiation led Hartmann et al. (2001) to conclude that the contrast in the net radiation at the top of the atmosphere between the convective and non-convective regions must also be small. However, we have found that the ERBE data do not generally show a small contrast in the radiation between the convective and non-convective regions, and the model used by Hartmann et al., therefore, seems unlikely to represent the real physical processes involving convection, radiation, and climate in an appropriate way.

  2. Spectral re-distribution and surface loss effects in Swift XRT (XMM-Newton EPIC) MOS CCDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of testing and selecting the EPIC MOS CCDs for the XMM-Newton observatory, the authors developed a Monte-Carlo model of the CCD response. Among other things, this model was used to investigate surface loss effects evident at low energies. By fitting laboratory data, these losses were characterised as a simple function of X-ray interaction depth and this result enabled the spectral re-distribution itself to be modelled as a simple analytical function. Subsequently, this analytical function has been used to generate the response matrix for the EPIC MOS instruments and will now be employed to model the spectral re-distribution for the Swift XRT CCD

  3. Measurement of the atmospheric neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Duvoort, M R; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Geisler, M; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hülß, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K -H; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kemming, N; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kuehn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lehmann, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Matusik, M; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, A R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nießen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Prikockis, M; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Singh, K; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, B T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Turčan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Voge, M; Voigt, B; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wikström, G; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P

    2010-01-01

    A measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV was performed using a data sample of about 18,000 up-going atmospheric muon neutrino events in IceCube. Boosted decision trees were used for event selection to reject mis-reconstructed atmospheric muons and obtain a sample of up-going muon neutrino events. Background contamination in the final event sample is less than one percent. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos up to 400 TeV, and is fundamental to understanding the impact of this neutrino background on astrophysical neutrino observations with IceCube. The measured spectrum is consistent with predictions for the atmospheric muon neutrino plus muon antineutrino flux.

  4. Redistribution of paclobutrazol-14C in soil and plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Maria Aparecida; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Ecotoxicologia]. E-mail: macosta@cena.usp.br; vltorrnis@cena.usp.br; regitano@cena.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Paclobutrazol (PBZ) is important to the mango culture since it works as a growth regulator that inhibits gibberellins synthesis controlling the growth of the trees and thus reducing pruning and manipulation during cultivation. Although PBZ has been used for years in mango in Brazil, there are no studies evaluating its environmental fate under Brazilian conditions. Therefore, the objective of the present work is to evaluate the redistribution of PBZ and its metabolites in soil and plant. For this experiment, radiolabeled ({sup 14}C-PBZ) was used once this technique allows detention of minimum amounts of residues in both soil and plant. In addition, plants were cultivated in vessels (100 L and 1 plant /vessel) and the PBZ were applied to the soils at the recommended rate of 1,0 kg ha{sup -1}, having radioactive concentration of 2,0 MBq/vessel. In order to evaluate PBZ redistribution, the volumes of water percolated with rainfall and senescent leaves were collected to monitor their {sup 14}C-residue concentration by liquid scintillation spectrometry (LSS). In parallel, the sorption and leaching potential of PBZ was determined in order to support the previous study. The results showed that PBZ presented relatively low mobility (0.12 % of the applied amount) and high sorption (91.9 % of the applied amount) in the studied soil, being minimal its leached amount; and that majority of the soil applied radioactivity were redistributed in the plant leaves (1.08% of the applied amount). Needing more inquiries in relation to the contamination of the soil and rain water percolated in period of September, 2nd, 2006 to January, 8th, 2007 was of the 0.06% in relation applied radioactivity being very next the radioactivity to deep, indicating that the product still is not being leached during rains. (author)

  5. Who benefits from cooperation? A numerical analysis of redistribution effects resulting from cooperation in European RES-E support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper numerically analyzes redistribution effects resulting from cooperation among European countries in achieving the 2020 targets for electricity generation from renewable energy sources (RES-E). The quanti cation of redistribution effects builds on the theoretical analysis by Unteutsch (2014), who shows that cooperation in RES-E support increases overall welfare but is not beneficial for all groups. In this paper, we use a dynamic investment and dispatch optimization model of the European electricity system to investigate which groups potentially benefit from cooperation and which groups would be worse off compared to a situation in which national RES-E targets are reached solely by domestic RES-E production. In the analysis, cooperation in RES-E support is implemented as a European-wide green certificate trading scheme. Main findings of the analysis include that in the European electricity system, effects of the change in the certificate price in most countries would overcompensate for the effects of the change in the wholesale electricity price. Thus, in most countries with comparatively high (low) generation costs for renewable energies, consumer rents increase (decrease) due to cooperation and producers yield lower (higher) profits. In addition, it is found that the magnitude of redistribution effects between the individual groups is quite large: In some countries, the change in consumer rents or producer profits resulting from cooperation is nearly twice as high as the overall welfare effect of cooperation in the whole European electricity system. Moreover, we find that the sign, but not always the magnitude, of redistribution effects is quite robust to different developments of interconnector extensions, the CO2 price and RES-E investment costs.

  6. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio at TeV energies with MINOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, K.E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D.J.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D.S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barnes, P.D., Jr.; Barr, G.; /Fermilab /University Coll. London /Rutherford /Minnesota U. /Indiana U. /Sussex U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Argonne /Caltech /LLNL, Livermore /Oxford U.

    2007-05-01

    The 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking charge-separated cosmic ray muon data since the beginning of August, 2003 at a depth of 2070 m.w.e. in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. The data with both forward and reversed magnetic field running configurations were combined to minimize systematic errors in the determination of the underground muon charge ratio. When averaged, two independent analyses find the charge ratio underground to be N{sub {mu}}+/N{sub {mu}}-=1.374{+-}0.004(stat)-0.010{sup +0.012}(sys). Using the map of the Soudan rock overburden, the muon momenta as measured underground were projected to the corresponding values at the surface in the energy range 1-7 TeV. Within this range of energies at the surface, the MINOS data are consistent with the charge ratio being energy independent at the 2 standard deviation level. When the MINOS results are compared with measurements at lower energies, a clear rise in the charge ratio in the energy range 0.3-1.0 TeV is apparent. A qualitative model shows that the rise is consistent with an increasing contribution of kaon decays to the muon charge ratio.

  7. Measurement of the Atmospheric Muon Charge Ratio at TeV Energies with MINOS

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, P; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Avvakumov, S; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barish, B; Barnes, P D; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Beall, E; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bergfeld, T; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, B; Bock, G J; Böhm, J; Böhnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Border, P M; Bower, C; Buckley-Geer, E; Bungau, C; Cabrera, A; Chapman, J D; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Culling, A J; De Jong, J K; De Santo, A; Dierckxsens, M; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Drakoulakos, D; Durkin, T; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk-Harris, E; Feldman, G J; Fields, T H; Ford, R; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Giurgiu, G A; Godley, A; Gogos, J; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E W; Grossman, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hartouni, E P; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Holin, A; Howcroft, C; Hylen, J; Indurthy, D; Irwin, G M; Ishitsuka, M; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jenner, L; Jensen, D; Joffe-Minor, T; Kafka, T; Kang, H J; Kasahara, S M S; Kim, M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kotelnikov, S K; Kreymer, A; Kumaratunga, S; Lang, K; Lebedev, A; Lee, R; Ling, J; Liu, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marino, A D; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Meier, J R; Merzon, G I; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Milburn, R H; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mislivec, A; Miyagawa, P S; Moore, C D; Morfin, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Osiecki, T; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlovic, Z; Pearce, G F; Peck, C W; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Ping, H; Piteira, R; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Rahman, D; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Reyna, D E; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ruddick, K; Ryabov, V A; Saakyan, R; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Semenov, V K; Seun, S M; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Smirnitsky, V; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Symes, P A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tetteh-Lartey, E; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Trostin, I; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Velissaris, C; Verebryusov, V; Viren, B; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Wu, Q K; Yang, T; Yumiceva, F X; Zheng, H; Zois, M; Zwaska, R

    2007-01-01

    The 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking charge-separated cosmic ray muon data since the beginning of August, 2003 at a depth of 2070 meters-water-equivalent in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. The data with both forward and reversed magnetic field running configurations were combined to minimize systematic errors in the determination of the underground muon charge ratio. When averaged, two independent analyses find the charge ratio underground to be 1.374 +/- 0.004 (stat.) +0.012 -0.010(sys.). Using the map of the Soudan rock overburden, the muon momenta as measured underground were projected to the corresponding values at the surface in the energy range 1-7 TeV. Within this range of energies at the surface, the MINOS data are consistent with the charge ratio being energy independent at the two standard deviation level. When the MINOS results are compared with measurements at lower energies, a clear rise in the charge ratio in the energy range 0.3 -- 1.0 TeV is apparent. A qualitativ...

  8. Internal Transport Barrier Driven by Redistribution of Energetic Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven instabilities excited by energetic ions are used as a means to reduce the central magnetic shear in a tokamak via redistribution of energetic ions. When the central magnetic shear is low enough, ballooning modes become stable for any plasma pressure gradient and an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a steep pressure gradient can exist. This mechanism can sustain a steady-state ITB as demonstrated by experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. It can also produce a shear in toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. Possible application of this technique to use the energetic alpha particles for improvement of burning plasma performance is discussed

  9. Internal Transport Barrier Driven by Redistribution of Energetic Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.L. Wong; W.W. Heidbrink; E. Ruskov; C.C. Petty; C.M. Greenfield; R. Nazikian; R. Budny

    2004-11-12

    Alfven instabilities excited by energetic ions are used as a means to reduce the central magnetic shear in a tokamak via redistribution of energetic ions. When the central magnetic shear is low enough, ballooning modes become stable for any plasma pressure gradient and an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a steep pressure gradient can exist. This mechanism can sustain a steady-state ITB as demonstrated by experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. It can also produce a shear in toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. Possible application of this technique to use the energetic alpha particles for improvement of burning plasma performance is discussed.

  10. Isotope exchange investigation of nitrogen redistribution in expanded austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequential plasma and gaseous nitriding of Fe–18Cr–10Ni–3Mo stainless steel at 390 °C with 14N and 15N isotopes followed by denitriding in flowing hydrogen was investigated. Redistribution of plasma-inserted nitrogen atoms (15N) by subsequent gaseous nitriding (14N) was observed. Denitriding after plasma- and gaseous nitriding resulted in predominant retraction of 14N, and only a minor amount of 15N. The nitrogen isotope diffusion behaviour is explained by two different states of nitrogen bonding and short-range ordering between nitrogen and chromium

  11. Carbon redistribution by erosion processes in an intensively disturbed catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Martínez-Mena, María; Pérez Cutillas, Pedro; de Vente, Joris; Barberá, Gonzalo G.; Mosch, Wouter; Navarro Cano, Jose Antonio; Gaspar, Leticia; Navas, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Understanding how organic carbon moves with sediments along the fluvial system is crucial to close catchment scale carbon budgets. Especially challenging is the analysis of organic carbon dynamics during fluvial transport in heterogeneous, fragile and disturbed environments with ephemeral and intense hydrological pulses, typical of Mediterranean conditions. This paper explores the catchment scale organic carbon redistribution by lateral flows in extreme Mediterranean environmental conditions from a geomorphological perspective. The study area is a catchment (Cárcavo) in SE Spain with a semiarid climate, erodible lithologies, shallow soils, and highly disturbed by agricultural terraces, land levelling, reforestations and construction of check-dams. To increase understanding of erosion induced catchment scale organic carbon redistribution, we studied the subcatchments of 8 check-dams distributed along the catchment main channel in detail. We determined 137Cs, physicochemical characteristics and organic carbon pools of soils and sediments deposited behind each check-dam, performed spatial analysis of properties of the catchment and buffer areas around check-dams, and carried out geomorphological analysis of the slope-channel connections. Soils showed very low Total Organic Carbon (TOC) values oscillating between 15.2 and 4.4 g Kg-1 for forest and agricultural soils, respectively. Sediments mobilized by erosion were poor in TOC compared to the eroded (forest) soils (6.6±0.7 g Kg-1), and the redistribution of organic carbon through the catchment, especially of the Mineral Associated Organic Carbon (MAC) pool, showed the same pattern as clay particles and 137Cs. The TOC erosion rates (0.031±0.03 Mg ha-1 y-1) were comparable to others reported for subhumid Mediterranean catchments and to those modelled worldwide for pasture land. Those lateral fluxes were equivalent to 10.4 % of the TOC stock from the topsoil at the moment of the check-dam construction and

  12. Quantum Conditional Mutual Information, Reconstructed States, and State Redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Harrow, Aram W; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Strelchuk, Sergii

    2015-07-31

    We give two strengthenings of an inequality for the quantum conditional mutual information of a tripartite quantum state recently proved by Fawzi and Renner, connecting it with the ability to reconstruct the state from its bipartite reductions. Namely, we show that the conditional mutual information is an upper bound on the regularized relative entropy distance between the quantum state and its reconstructed version. It is also an upper bound for the measured relative entropy distance of the state to its reconstructed version. The main ingredient of the proof is the fact that the conditional mutual information is the optimal quantum communication rate in the task of state redistribution. PMID:26274402

  13. Democracy, Redistributive Taxation and the Private Provision of Public Goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas

    ) pointed to, is weakened and might even be reversed in this context. Also, the median voter may choose a negative tax rate, even if he is poorer than the mean, in order to stimulate public goods production. The relevance of the model is illustrated with an application to the finance of higher education.......The paper studies in a simple, Downsian model of political competition how the private provision of public goods is affected when it is embedded in a system of democracy and redistributive taxation. Results show that the positive effect of inequality on public goods production, which Olson (1965...

  14. Democracy, redistributive taxation and the private provision of public goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    and might even be reversed in this context. Also, the median voter may choose a negative tax rate, even if he or she is poorer than the mean, in order to stimulate production of public goods. The relevance of the model is illustrated with an application to the financing of higher education.......The paper studies in a simple, Downsian model of political competition the private provision of public goods embedded in a system of democracy and redistributive taxation. Results show that the positive effect of inequality on production of public goods, to which Olson (1965) pointed, is weakened...

  15. Frequency redistribution function for the polarized two-term atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, R. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Landi Degl' Innocenti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Manso Sainz, R. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, c/Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Landi Degl' Innocenti, E. [Dipartimento di Astronomia e Scienze dello Spazio, Università di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Landolfi, M. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2014-08-20

    We present a generalized frequency redistribution function for the polarized two-term atom in an arbitrary magnetic field. This result is derived within a new formulation of the quantum problem of coherent scattering of polarized radiation by atoms in the collisionless regime. The general theory, which is based on a diagrammatic treatment of the atom-photon interaction, is still a work in progress. However, the results anticipated here are relevant enough for the study of the magnetism of the solar chromosphere and of interest for astrophysics in general.

  16. Frequency redistribution function for the polarized two-term atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a generalized frequency redistribution function for the polarized two-term atom in an arbitrary magnetic field. This result is derived within a new formulation of the quantum problem of coherent scattering of polarized radiation by atoms in the collisionless regime. The general theory, which is based on a diagrammatic treatment of the atom-photon interaction, is still a work in progress. However, the results anticipated here are relevant enough for the study of the magnetism of the solar chromosphere and of interest for astrophysics in general.

  17. Nonlinear optical beam manipulation and high energy beam propagation through the atmosphere; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 18-20, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert A.; Wilson, Leroy E.

    Various papers on nonlinear optical beam manipulation and high-energy beam propagation through the atmosphere are presented. Individual topics addressed include: suppression of Raman amplification using large Stokes seeds, review of multiple-short-pulse SBS experiments and theory, laser-induced gratings for beam manipulation in a gas, considerations for computing realistic atmospheric distortion parameter profiles, effect of turbulent diffusion on laser propagation, use of multiple photon processes in krypton for laser guiding of electron beams, effect of ionization on intense electron beam propagation in low-pressure media, lidar measurements of the troposphere and middle atmosphere, seasonal and diurnal changes in cloud obscuration to visible and IR energy transmission, new cloud composite climatologies using meteorological satellite imagery, effect of neutral atmospheric structure on beam propagation, small-scale electron density fluctuations in a disturbed ionospheric environment, and SDIO radio frequency communications in a structured environment.

  18. Momentum and energy transport by waves in the solar atmosphere and solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The fluid equations for the solar wind are presented in a form which includes the momentum and energy flux of waves in a general and consistent way. The concept of conservation of wave action is introduced and is used to derive expressions for the wave energy density as a function of heliocentric distance. The explicit form of the terms due to waves in both the momentum and energy equations are given for radially propagating acoustic, Alfven, and fast mode waves. The effect of waves as a source of momentum is explored by examining the critical points of the momentum equation for isothermal spherically symmetric flow. We find that the principal effect of waves on the solutions is to bring the critical point closer to the sun's surface and to increase the Mach number at the critical point. When a simple model of dissipation is included for acoustic waves, in some cases there are multiple critical points.

  19. Soft x-ray bremsstrahlung and flourescent line production in the atmosphere by low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several clues, such as pulse height distribution and angular distribution, that reveal the presence of low energy quasi-trapped or precipitating electrons capable of by-passing magnetic rejection schemes and penetrating the counter windows of soft x-ray detectors are discussed. (U.S.)

  20. Cascade curves in the atmosphere and composition of primary cosmic radiation with energy above 1015 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the base of experimental data obtained by means of the Tien Shan complex device for the measurement of extensive air showers, cascade curves of charged particles and high-energy (Esub(μ) > 5 GeV) muons are studied in the interval of the Earth atmosphere depth from 700 up to 1200 gxcm-2. The muon cascade curves are presented for flux intensities of 10-11 and 10-12 cm-2xs-1xsr-1. The form of cascade curves obtained using the Tien Shan complex device are in a good agreement both with the Chakaltai data and estimations of flux intensities presented in MSU and Akeno papers. The method of analysis of forms of extensive air shower fluctuation distributions is of practical advantage to investigate the primary cosmic radiation chemical composition both in the Tien Shan and Aragats experiments for the energy range of 1015-1017 eV and using the Akeno device for the 1017-1019 eV energy range

  1. Zinc Redistribution in a Soil Developed from Limestone During Pedogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.LAVEUF; S.CORNU; D.BAIZE; M.HARDY; O.JOSIERE; S.DROUIN; A.BRUAND; F.JUILLOT

    2009-01-01

    The long-term redistribution of Zn in a naturally Zn-enriched soil during pedogenesis was quantified based on mass balance calculations.According to their fate,parent limestones comprised three Zn pools:bound to calcite and pyritesphalerite grains,bound to phyllosilicates and bound to goethite in the inherited phosphate nodules.Four pedological processes,i.e.,carbonate dissolution,two stages of redox processes and eluviation,redistributed Zn during pedogenesis.The carbonate dissolution of limestones released Zn bound to calcite into soil solution.Due to residual enrichment,Zn concentrations in the soil are higher than those in parent limestones.Birnessite,ferrihydrite and goethite dispersed in soil horizon trapped high quantities of Zn during their formation.Afterwards,primary redox conditions induced the release of Zn and Fe into soil solution,and the subsequent individualization of Fe and Mn into Zn-rich concretions.Both processes and subsequent aging of the concretions formed induced significant exportation of Zn through the bottom water table.Secondary redox conditions promoted the weathering of Fe and Mn oxides in cements and concretions.This process caused other losses of Zn through lateral exportation in an upper water table.Concomitantly,eluviation occurred at the top of the solum.The lateral exportation of ehiviated minerals through the upper water table limited illuviation.Ehiviation was also responsible for Zn loss,but this Zn bound to phyllosilicates was not bioavailable.

  2. Oxygen redistribution in (UCe)Osub(2-x)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redistribution of oxygen has been investigated in (Usub(0,7)Cesub(0,3))Osub(2-x) mixed oxide subjected to a temperature gradient in laboratory experiments, in order to apply the results to the nuclear fuel (UPu)Osub(2-x). Cylindrical sintered oxide specimens were exposed to temperature up to 13000C with a longitudinal thermal gradient of about 4000C/cm. The most interesting feature of the experimental set-up is a solid-state electrochemical gauge (ThO2 - Y2O3), placed in the cold part of the sample which allows a continuous measurement of the oxygen activity. The experiments showed a fast oxygen migration down the thermal gradient. The calculations performed with a model based on solid-state thermodiffusion are in good agreement with experimental results. The heat of transport Q measured for bare samples reaches (7.2+-0.5)-kcal/mole. When the sample is coated with a tight fitting metallic cladding, an extra term Qe has to be added to the heat of transport Qe. This was interpreted as an electrotransport phenomena. On the same basis, calculations applied to radial oxygen redistribution in (UPu)Osub(2-x) seem to be adequate at least during the first stage of irradiation, taking Q=(20+-5)kcal/mole

  3. Membrane Phospholipid Redistribution in Cytokinesis: A Theoretical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-Wen AN; Wen-Zhou WU; Wei-Yi CHEN

    2005-01-01

    In cell mitosis, cytokinesis is a major deformation process, during which the site of the contractile ring is determined by the biochemical stimulus from asters of the mitotic apparatus, actin and myosin assembly is related to the motion of membrane phospholipids, and local distribution and arrangement of the microfilament cytoskeleton are different at different cytokinesis stages. Based on the Zinemanas-Nir model, a new model is proposed in this study to simulate the entire process by coupling the biochemical stimulus with the mechanical actions. There were three assumptions in this model: the movements of phospholipid proteins are driven by gradients of biochemical stimulus on the membrane surface; the local assembly of actin and myosin filament depends on the amount of phospholipid proteins at the same location;and the surface tension includes membrane tensions due to both the passive deformation of the membrane and the active contraction of actin filament, which is determined by microfilament redistribution and rearrangement. This model could explain the dynamic movement of microfilaments during cytokinesis and predict cell deformation. The calculated results from this model demonstrated that the reorientation of phospholipid proteins and the redistribution and reorientation of microfilaments may play a crucial role in cell division. This model may better represent the cytokinesis process by the introduction of biochemical stimulus.

  4. A Simple Method for Measuring Soil Redistribution on Hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, D. G.

    2002-12-01

    Human activities and associated land-use changes often result in accelerated soil movement on hillslopes. The impacts of such soil movement can be dramatic both on- and off-site. Appropriate strategies for mitigation or control erosion and mass movements are especially critical for application in tropical countries, where steep slopes are increasingly converted from forest to agricultural use and are subject to intense precipitation. The immediacy of the need for erosion control and limited access to research institutions often results in a gap between extension and testing of erosion control strategies for these settings. To address this need, a transect datum technique was developed to assess rates of soil redistribution and loss on steep, deforested slopes with thin, calcareous soil in the Philippines. The method is simple, inexpensive and robust and does not require disturbing the soil surface, as do erosion pins. Application of the technique for three years to several land uses, including contour hedgerows, a contour-plowed field without hedgerows, slash/burn no-till, and pasture demonstrated the technique sensitive enough to measure fluctuations in soil height associated with changing bulk density, soil redistribution and loss and slumping of the terraces within the contour-hedgerow system.

  5. Systemic zinc redistribution and dyshomeostasis in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siren, Pontus M A; Siren, Matti J

    2010-09-01

    Cachexia affects up to two thirds of all cancer patients and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. It is a complex metabolic syndrome associated with the underlying illness and characterized by loss of skeletal muscle tissue with or without loss of fat mass. Cachexia's other prominent clinical symptoms include anorexia, systemic inflammation, pediatric growth failure, and hypogonadism. The relationship between the symptoms of cancer cachexia and the underlying illness is unclear, and there is an urgent need for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Normal Zn metabolism is often disrupted in cancer patients, but the possible effects of systemic Zn dyshomeostasis in cachexia have not been investigated. We propose that the acute phase response can mediate Zn redistribution and accumulation in skeletal muscle tissue and contribute to the activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway that regulates protein catabolism. This chronic redistribution deprives Zn from other tissues and organs and compromises critical physiological functions in the body. The cardinal symptoms of Zn deficiency are anorexia, systemic inflammation, growth failure in children, and hypogonadism. These symptoms also prominently characterize cancer cachexia suggesting that the role of systemic Zn dyshomeostasis in cachexia should be investigated. PMID:21475700

  6. Cesium 137 redistribution by horizontal migration in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During radiation monitoring the local nonuniformities of contamination density were noticed which can not be explained by meteorologic conditions at the moment of fallout. The mathematical model of redistribution of cesium 137 radionuclides of Chernobyl origin for the post accidental period on account of migration with horizontal outflow in the upper layer of soils was developed. It has been shown that for nonuniform landscapes (borders of fields, forests, roads etc.) redistribution of radionuclides with increasing of their concentration at the places, where the objects with different migration characteristics are connected, will take place. In Belarus the typical size of such 'spots' will increase with the time up to 1 m/year. It is possible the increasing of contamination density of territories on account of the process of shifting of radioactive 'spots', caused by horizontal flow. The speed of replacement of such 'spots' along the direction of underground water is about 1 m/year; increasing of their typical size is going on with the speed up to 0.3 m/year. 4 refs., 1 fig

  7. Wave energy in white dwarf atmospheres. I - Magnetohydrodynamic energy spectra for homogeneous DB and layered DA stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musielak, Zdzislaw E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiative damping of acoustic and MHD waves that propagate through white dwarf photospheric layers is studied, and other damping processes that may be important for the propagation of the MHD waves are calculated. The amount of energy remaining after the damping processes have occurred in different types of waves is estimated. The results show that lower acoustic fluxes should be expected in layered DA and homogeneous DB white dwarfs than had previously been estimated. Acoustic emission manifests itself in an enhancement of the quadrupole term, but this term may become comparable to or even lower than the dipole term for cool white dwarfs. Energy carried by the acoustic waves is significantly dissipated in deep photospheric layers, mainly because of radiative damping. Acoustically heated corona cannot exist around DA and DB white dwarfs in a range T(eff) = 10,000-30,000 K and for log g = 7 and 8. However, relatively hot and massive white dwarfs could be exceptions.

  8. Effect of an Energy Reservoir on the Atmospheric Propagation of Laser-Plasma Filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to select and stabilize a single filament during propagation of an ultrashort, high-intensity laser pulse in air makes it possible to examine the longitudinal structure of the plasma channel left in its wake. We present the first detailed measurements and numerical 3-D simulations of the longitudinal plasma density variation in a laser-plasma filament after it passes through an iris that blocks the surrounding energy reservoir. Since no compensation is available from the surrounding background energy, filament propagation is terminated after a few centimeters. For this experiment, simulations indicate that filament propagation is terminated by plasma defocusing and ionization loss, which reduces the pulse power below the effective self-focusing power. With no blockage, a plasma filament length of over a few meters was observed

  9. International energy R and D spillovers and the economics of greenhouse gas atmospheric stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is now widely recognized that technological change will play a substantial role in reducing GHG emissions without compromising economic growth; hence, any better understanding of the process of technological innovation is likely to increase our knowledge of mitigation possibilities and costs. This paper explores how international knowledge flows affect the dynamics of the domestic R and D sector and the main economic and environmental variables. The analysis is performed using WITCH, a dynamic regional model of the world economy, in which energy-related technological change is endogenous. The focus is on disembodied energy R and D international spillovers. The knowledge pool from which regions draw foreign ideas differs between High Income and Low Income countries. Absorption capacity is also endogenous in the model. The basic questions are as follows. Do knowledge spillovers enhance energy-related technological innovation in different regions of the world? Does the speed of innovation increase? Or do free-riding incentives prevail and international spillovers crowd out domestic R and D efforts? What is the role of domestic absorption capacity and of policies designed to enhance it? Do greenhouse gas stabilization costs drop in the presence of international technological spillovers? The new specification of the WITCH model presented in this paper enables us to answer these questions. Our analysis shows that international knowledge spillovers tend to increase free-riding incentives and decrease the investments in energy R and D. The strongest cuts in energy R and D investments are recorded among High Income countries, where international knowledge flows crowd out domestic R and D efforts. The overall domestic pool of knowledge, and thus total net GHG stabilization costs, remain largely unaffected. International spillovers, however, are also an important policy channel. We therefore analyze the implication of a policy-mix in which climate policy is combined with a

  10. Field-Induced Point Defect Redistribution in Metal Oxides: Mesoscopic Length Scale Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moballegh, Ali

    continuously monitored. To understand spatial variations in chemistry and possible changes in microstructure, we utilize a combination of cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (CL), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). After electrical degradation, correlating electrical characterization measurements with electron microscopy analyses provides insight into the redistribution of point defects as a function of electric field and time. Diode-like rectification behavior was observed in crystals subjected to an applied voltage in the low electric field regime ( 175 V/cm) in which the concentrations of point defects become large enough to induce higher-dimensional defects such as dislocations and the formation of Magneli phases. We find that the condensation of point defects into Magneli phases at the electrodes depletes point defect concentration in the bulk, thus increasing the bulk resistivity. The Magneli phases formed near the cathode are found to be stable, and not reversible, at 200°C for the times and fields studied. The defect condensation processes have significant impacts on the overall I-V behavior of the material and the ability to switch the total resistance. The electroformation of conductive filaments, another dominant degradation mechanism, is observed on samples with slightly higher initial bulk resistivity (about 80 O.cm) at field levels as low as 150 V/cm. The redistribution of ionic carriers leads to heterogeneity in the chemistry of TiO2 in the form of nonstoichiometric filaments oriented along the applied field direction. The CL spectra taken from conductive filaments and nonfilaments regions indicate a noticeable increase in the concentration of the titanium interstitials of the filaments. We demonstrate that the filaments can be disconnected from the electrodes with subsequent reverse-polarity biasing, demonstrating switching on a macroscopic crystal. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under

  11. Improved cosmic ray ionization model for the system lower ionosphere-middle atmosphere. Determination of approximation energy interval characteristics for the particle penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velinov, Peter; Mateev, Lachezar

    The effects of galactic and solar cosmic rays (CRs) in the middle atmosphere are considered in this work. We take into account the CR modulation by solar wind and the anomalous CR component also. In fact, CRs determine the electric conductivity in the middle atmosphere and influence the electric processes in it in this way. CRs introduce solar variability in the terrestrial atmosphere and ozonosphere -because they are modulated by solar wind. A new analytical approach for CR ionization by protons and nuclei with charge Z in the lower ionosphere and the middle atmosphere is developed in this paper. For this purpose, the ionization losses (dE/dh) for the energetic charged particles according to the Bohr-Bethe-Bloch formula are approximated in three different energy intervals. More accurate expressions for CR energy decrease E(h) and electron production rate profiles q(h) are derived. The obtained formulas allow comparatively easy computer programming. q(h) is determined by the solution of a 3D integral with account of geomagnetic cut-off rigidity. The integrand in q(h) gives the possibility for application of adequate numerical methods -in this case Gauss quadrature and Romberg extrapolation, for the solution of the mathematical problem. Computations for CR ionization in the middle atmosphere are made. The contributions of the different approximation energy intervals are presented. In this way the process of interaction of CR particles with the upper and middle atmosphere are described much more realistically. The full CR composition is taken into account: protons, helium (alpha-particles), light L, medium M, heavy H and very heavy VH group of nuclei. The computations are made for different geomagnetic cut-off rigidities R in the altitude interval 35-120 km. The COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere CIRA'86 is applied in the computer program for the neutral density and scale height values. The proposed improved CR ionization model will contribute to the

  12. Racism and Redistribution in the United States: A Solution to the Problem of American Exceptionalism

    OpenAIRE

    Woojin Lee; John E. Roemer

    2004-01-01

    The two main political parties in the United States put forth policies on redistribution and on issues pertaining directly to race. We argue that redistributive politics in America can be fully understood only by taking account of the interconnection between these issues, and the effects of political competition upon the multi-dimensional party platforms. We identify two mechanisms through which racism among American voters decreases the degree of redistribution that would otherwise obtain. M...

  13. Inequality perceptions, distributional norms, and redistributive preferences in East and West Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies differences in inequality perceptions, distributional norms, and redistributive preferences between East and West Germany. As expected, there are substantial differences with respect to all three of these measures. Surprisingly, however, differences in distributional norms are much smaller than differences with respect to inequality perceptions or redistributive preferences. Nonetheless, individuals from East Germany tend to be more supportive of state redistribution and pr...

  14. Politique sociale, redistribution et intégration économique

    OpenAIRE

    Pestieau, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    This paper surveys the theoretical literature devoted to the effect of labor mobility on social and redistributive policies for member states of an economic union. It presents the basic model which relies on a non-cooperative equilibrium, discusses some of the main qualifications that can be addressed to this model and then turns to the solutions suggested to give back to national governments their redistributive power and possibly to achieve some redistribution within the whole economic unio...

  15. Self-interested international income redistribution and access to health care innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Alonso, Maria D C; Acharyya, Rajat

    2006-01-01

    We study how income redistribution affects decisions of a health care innovator and the utility of individuals. We find that income redistribution from rich to poor can increase the quality of medical innovation and the utility of some consumers whose income is reduced through the redistribution. We therefore find a non-altruistic motive for international income transfers that would increase access to health innovations.

  16. The Size and Shape of Government: Preferences over redistributive tax policy

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Why do some people support government redistribution more than others? This article addresses this question with reference to attitudes towards redistributive tax policy. In doing so, it identifies an important distinction between preferences over the level of taxation and preferences over its structure. Using individual-level survey data from 17 advanced industrial countries, I find ‘decoupling’ of pro-redistributive attitudes over the size versus the shape of government. The modal responden...

  17. Redistribution at the Local Level: The Case of Public Childcare in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Bucciol; Laura Cavalli; Paolo Pertile; Veronica Polin; Alessandro Sommacal

    2013-01-01

    We study the determinants of redistribution at the municipal level in the context of public childcare in Italy. Within a substantially homogeneous legislative framework, different municipalities autonomously define how participation fees vary with a compound indicator of income and wealth (ISEE), thus redistributing resources across households using the service. The nearly one hundred municipalities we take into account exhibit wide heterogeneity in redistributive attitudes. We find statistic...

  18. Redistributive Policies for Sustainable Development: Looking at the Role of Assets and Equity

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Kohler

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of redistributive policies often focus on income flows to examine the nexus between redistribution and economic growth. With strengthening signs of growing economic inequality in many countries, an increasing number of economists investigated the existence and nature of a hypothetical trade-off between economic growth and equity. As signs of unsustainable development are strengthening more generally, this paper proposes to look at the broader nexus between redistribution, equity and ...

  19. Diverse preferences over publicly provided goods and the limits to redistribution

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    My thesis mainly discusses the extent of redistribution in a democratic society. In poor and unequal societies, the income distribution is typically skewed to the right. Standard electoral models of politics predict that the above case would lead to a large extent of redistribution. Empirical studies, however, show weak support for this theory. Some researchers even find the opposite relationship between income inequality and redistribution. In my thesis, I will review some theoretical...

  20. Redistributive effects of the shift from personal income taxes to indirect taxes: Belgium 1988-93.

    OpenAIRE

    Andrá Decoster; Guy Van Camp

    2001-01-01

    Between 1988 and 1993, the Belgian personal income tax system and the indirect tax system were reformed to a considerable extent. We use microsimulation models to investigate the impact of the reform on the liability progression and the redistributive effect of the combined tax system. The redistributive effect of personal income taxes decreased, notwithstanding an increase in liability progression. For indirect taxes, both the liability regressivity and the reverse redistributive effect have...

  1. Reducing food waste through direct surplus food redistribution : the Norwegian case

    OpenAIRE

    Capodistrias, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Food waste is a global problem with significant economic and environmental consequences. Food waste management approaches include production of biogas, animal feed and compost and surplus food redistribution. From a sustainability point of view, surplus food redistribution is the most favorable approach. Surplus food redistribution can be either direct (between suppliers of surplus food and charity food services) or indirect (Through Food banks). This paper is a case study on direct surplus f...

  2. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Omidi, N.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversy surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  3. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Burch, J.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Kuntz, Kip; Omidi, N.; Read, A.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversies surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  4. Energy loss of solar p modes due to the excitation of magnetic sausage tube waves: Importance of coupling the upper atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider damping and absorption of solar p modes due to their energy loss to magnetic tube waves that can freely carry energy out of the acoustic cavity. The coupling of p modes and sausage tube waves is studied in a model atmosphere composed of a polytropic interior above which lies an isothermal upper atmosphere. The sausage tube waves, excited by p modes, propagate along a magnetic fibril which is assumed to be a vertically aligned, stratified, thin magnetic flux tube. The deficit of p-mode energy is quantified through the damping rate, Γ, and absorption coefficient, α. The variation of Γ and α as a function of frequency and the tube's plasma properties is studied in detail. Previous similar studies have considered only a subphotospheric layer, modeled as a polytrope that has been truncated at the photosphere. Such studies have found that the resulting energy loss by the p modes is very sensitive to the upper boundary condition, which, due to the lack of an upper atmosphere, have been imposed in a somewhat ad hoc manner. The model presented here avoids such problems by using an isothermal layer to model the overlying atmosphere (chromosphere, and, consequently, allows us to analyze the propagation of p-mode-driven sausage waves above the photosphere. In this paper, we restrict our attention to frequencies below the acoustic cut off frequency. We demonstrate the importance of coupling all waves (acoustic, magnetic) in the subsurface solar atmosphere with the overlying atmosphere in order to accurately model the interaction of solar f and p modes with sausage tube waves. In calculating the absorption and damping of p modes, we find that for low frequencies, below ≈3.5 mHz, the isothermal atmosphere, for the two-region model, behaves like a stress-free boundary condition applied at the interface (z = –z0).

  5. Energy loss of solar p modes due to the excitation of magnetic sausage tube waves: Importance of coupling the upper atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascoyne, A.; Jain, R. [Applied Mathematics Department, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Hindman, B. W., E-mail: a.d.gascoyne@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: r.jain@sheffield.ac.uk [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We consider damping and absorption of solar p modes due to their energy loss to magnetic tube waves that can freely carry energy out of the acoustic cavity. The coupling of p modes and sausage tube waves is studied in a model atmosphere composed of a polytropic interior above which lies an isothermal upper atmosphere. The sausage tube waves, excited by p modes, propagate along a magnetic fibril which is assumed to be a vertically aligned, stratified, thin magnetic flux tube. The deficit of p-mode energy is quantified through the damping rate, Γ, and absorption coefficient, α. The variation of Γ and α as a function of frequency and the tube's plasma properties is studied in detail. Previous similar studies have considered only a subphotospheric layer, modeled as a polytrope that has been truncated at the photosphere. Such studies have found that the resulting energy loss by the p modes is very sensitive to the upper boundary condition, which, due to the lack of an upper atmosphere, have been imposed in a somewhat ad hoc manner. The model presented here avoids such problems by using an isothermal layer to model the overlying atmosphere (chromosphere, and, consequently, allows us to analyze the propagation of p-mode-driven sausage waves above the photosphere. In this paper, we restrict our attention to frequencies below the acoustic cut off frequency. We demonstrate the importance of coupling all waves (acoustic, magnetic) in the subsurface solar atmosphere with the overlying atmosphere in order to accurately model the interaction of solar f and p modes with sausage tube waves. In calculating the absorption and damping of p modes, we find that for low frequencies, below ≈3.5 mHz, the isothermal atmosphere, for the two-region model, behaves like a stress-free boundary condition applied at the interface (z = –z{sub 0}).

  6. Inferring heat recirculation and albedo for exoplanetary atmospheres: Comparing optical phase curves and secondary eclipse data

    CERN Document Server

    von Paris, P; Bordé, P; Selsis, F

    2015-01-01

    Basic atmospheric properties such as albedo and heat redistribution between day and nightside have been inferred for a number of planets using observations of secondary eclipses and thermal phase curves. Optical phase curves have not yet been used to constrain these atmospheric properties consistently. We re-model previously published phase curves of CoRoT-1b, TrES-2b and HAT-P-7b and infer albedos and recirculation efficiencies. These are then compared to previous estimates based on secondary eclipse data. We use a physically consistent model to construct optical phase curves. This model takes Lambertian reflection, thermal emission, ellipsoidal variations and Doppler boosting into account. CoRoT-1b shows a non-negligible scattering albedo (0.11re-distribution of energy between dayside and nightside. These values are contrary to previous secondary eclipse and phase curve analyses. In the case of ...

  7. Element- and charge-state-resolved ion energies in the cathodic arc plasma from composite AlCr cathodes in argon, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Franz, Robert; Polcik, Peter; Anders, André

    2014-01-01

    The energy distribution functions of ions in the cathodic arc plasma using composite AlCr cathodes were measured as a function of the background gas pressure in the range 0.5 to 3.5 Pa for different cathode compositions and gas atmospheres. The most abundant aluminium ions were Al$^{+}$ regardless of the background gas species, whereas Cr$^{2+}$ ions were dominating in Ar and N$_2$ and Cr$^{+}$ in O$_2$ atmospheres. The energy distributions of the aluminium and chromium ions typically consist...

  8. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1982 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1983-02-01

    This report is organized in terms of generic studies: theoretical studies of atmospheric processes; pollutant characterizations and transformation; boundary layer meteorology; and dispersion, deposition and resuspension of atmospheric pollutants.

  9. Control technology for radioactive emissions to the atmosphere at US Department of Energy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, E.B.

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection agency (EPA) on existing technology for the control of radionuclide emissions into the air from US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, and to provide EPA with information on possible additional control technologies that could be used to further reduce these emissions. Included in this report are generic discussions of emission control technologies for particulates, iodine, rare gases, and tritium. Also included are specific discussions of existing emission control technologies at 25 DOE facilities. Potential additional emission control technologies are discussed for 14 of these facilities. The facilities discussed were selected by EPA on the basis of preliminary radiation pathway analyses. 170 references, 131 figures, 104 tables.

  10. Control technology for radioactive emissions to the atmosphere at US Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection agency (EPA) on existing technology for the control of radionuclide emissions into the air from US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, and to provide EPA with information on possible additional control technologies that could be used to further reduce these emissions. Included in this report are generic discussions of emission control technologies for particulates, iodine, rare gases, and tritium. Also included are specific discussions of existing emission control technologies at 25 DOE facilities. Potential additional emission control technologies are discussed for 14 of these facilities. The facilities discussed were selected by EPA on the basis of preliminary radiation pathway analyses. 170 references, 131 figures, 104 tables

  11. ModObs: Atmospheric modelling for wind energy, climate and environment applications : exploring added value from new observation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempreviva, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    The EC FP6 Marie Curie Training Network "ModObs" http://www.modobs.windeng.net addresses the improvement of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) models to investigate the interplay of processes at different temporal and spatial scales, and to explore the added value from new observation techniques. The overall goal is to bring young scientists to work together with experienced researchers in developing a better interaction amongst scientific communities of modelers and experimentalists, using a comprehensive approach to "Climate Change", "Clean Energy assessment" and "Environmental Policies", issues. This poster describes the work in progress of ten students, funded by the network, under the supervision of a team of scientists within atmospheric physics, engineering and satellite remote sensing and end-users such as companies in the private sector, all with the appropriate expertise to integrate the most advanced research methods and techniques in the following topics. MODELING: GLOBAL-TO-MESO SCALE: Analytical and process oriented numerical models will be used to study the interaction between the atmosphere and the ocean on a regional scale. Initial results indicate an interaction between the intensity of polar lows and the subsurface warm core often present in the Nordic Seas (11). The presence of waves, mainly swell, influence the MABL fluxes and turbulence structure. The regional and global wave effect on the atmosphere will be also studied and quantified (7) MESO-SCALE: Applicability of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) parametrizations in the meso-scale WRF model to marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) over the North Sea is investigated. The most suitable existing PBL parametrization will be additionally improved and used for downscaling North Sea past and future climates (2). Application of the meso-scale model (MM5 and WRF) for the wind energy in off-shore and coastal area. Set-up of the meso-scale model, post-processing and verification of the data from

  12. MACHETE: A transit Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope to survey half of the Very High Energy $\\gamma$-ray sky

    CERN Document Server

    Cortina, J; Moralejo, A

    2015-01-01

    Current Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes for Very High Energy $\\gamma$-ray astrophysics are pointing instruments with a Field of View up to a few tens of sq deg. We propose to build an array of two non-steerable (drift) telescopes. Each of the telescopes would have a camera with a FOV of 5$\\times$60 sq deg oriented along the meridian. About half of the sky drifts through this FOV in a year. We have performed a Montecarlo simulation to estimate the performance of this instrument. We expect it to survey this half of the sky with an integral flux sensitivity of $\\sim$0.77\\% of the steady flux of the Crab Nebula in 5 years, an analysis energy threshold of $\\sim$150 GeV and an angular resolution of $\\sim$0.1$^{\\circ}$. For astronomical objects that transit over the telescope for a specific night, we can achieve an integral sensitivity of 12\\% of the Crab Nebula flux in a night, making it a very powerful tool to trigger further observations of variable sources using steerable IACTs or instruments at other w...

  13. MACHETE: A transit imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope to survey half of the very high energy γ-ray sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, J.; López-Coto, R.; Moralejo, A.

    2016-01-01

    Current imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes for very high energy γ-ray astrophysics are pointing instruments with a field of view up to a few tens of sq deg. We propose to build an array of two non-steerable (drift) telescopes. Each of the telescopes would have a camera with a FOV of 5 × 60 sq deg oriented along the meridian. About half of the sky drifts through this FOV in a year. We have performed a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the performance of this instrument. We expect it to survey this half of the sky with an integral flux sensitivity of ˜0.77% of the steady flux of the Crab Nebula in 5 years, an analysis energy threshold of ˜150 GeV and an angular resolution of ˜0.1°. For astronomical objects that transit over the telescope for a specific night, we can achieve an integral sensitivity of 12% of the Crab Nebula flux in a night, making it a very powerful tool to trigger further observations of variable sources using steerable IACTs or instruments at other wavelengths.

  14. Picosecond laser-induced fluorescence measurement of rotational energy transfer of OH A (2)?(+) (v? = 2) in atmospheric pressure flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, T; Bormann, F; Burrows, M; Andresen, P

    1997-10-20

    Rate constants for total and state-specific rotational energy transfer (RET) of OH A(2) ?(+) (v? = 2) have been measured directly in atmospheric methane-air and methane-oxygen flames for the first time to our knowledge. We used a picosecond Raman-excimer laser (tau(l) = 300 ps, lambda = 268 nm) to excite the P(11) (12.5) and Q(11) (16.5) A -X transitions in the (2, 0) band of OH molecules. We analyzed the resultant fluorescence with a high-resolution spectrometer in combination with a fast-gated, intensified CCD camera (tau(g) = 400 ps). We recorded the temporal evolution of the emission spectrum by shifting the detection time with respect to the laser pulse. Measured emission spectra were inverted to yield the time-dependent population of rotational levels in the excited state. We calculated rate constants for RET from the results of the fit. The total RET in v? = 2 is similar to v? = 0, 1. The state-specific rates are represented well by a simple energy-gap law. PMID:18264324

  15. Mapping land water and energy balance relations through conditional sampling of remote sensing estimates of atmospheric forcing and surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Leila; Entekhabi, Dara; Salvucci, Guido

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop and apply a mapping estimation capability for key unknown parameters that link the surface water and energy balance equations. The method is applied to the Gourma region in West Africa. The accuracy of the estimation method at point scale was previously examined using flux tower data. In this study, the capability is scaled to be applicable with remotely sensed data products and hence allow mapping. Parameters of the system are estimated through a process that links atmospheric forcing (precipitation and incident radiation), surface states, and unknown parameters. Based on conditional averaging of land surface temperature and moisture states, respectively, a single objective function is posed that measures moisture and temperature-dependent errors solely in terms of observed forcings and surface states. This objective function is minimized with respect to parameters to identify evapotranspiration and drainage models and estimate water and energy balance flux components. The uncertainty of the estimated parameters (and associated statistical confidence limits) is obtained through the inverse of Hessian of the objective function, which is an approximation of the covariance matrix. This calibration-free method is applied to the mesoscale region of Gourma in West Africa using multiplatform remote sensing data. The retrievals are verified against tower-flux field site data and physiographic characteristics of the region. The focus is to find the functional form of the evaporative fraction dependence on soil moisture, a key closure function for surface and subsurface heat and moisture dynamics, using remote sensing data.

  16. Geographical redistribution of radionuclides in forest and wetland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results from a survey concerning the presence of caesium-137 in soil in two different areas, Verkmyraan in Gaestrikland and Nyaenget in Vaesterbotten. This has been done with a portable NaI gamma spectrometer connected to a GPS, called back pack. Soil samples have also been taken in the two areas to compare the results from these with the back pack measurements. The results from a survey of Cesium-137 1989 in Nyaenget has also been included to see if there has been a redistribution of Cs-137 in the area in the last ten years. At Verkmyraan there is an increase in Cs-137 deposition at the lower part of the catchment which probably depends on a transport of Cs-137 to the outflow. In Nyaenget the results show a possible levelling of the Cs-137 activity between the different soil types, but to verify that, more soil samples must be taken and analysed

  17. Intergenerational redistribution and risk sharing with changing longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben M.

    2014-01-01

    Trend increases in longevity are a global phenomenon challenging the fiscal sustainability of current welfare arrangements. Policy proposals abound and often build on implicit assertions concerning intergenerational equity. This paper offers a simple but manageable OLG model with endogenous...... retirement and cohort-specific longevity to address intergenerational redistribution and risk sharing. While it is well known that a utilitarian planner strives for consumption smoothing, it is shown that healthy ageing calls for work smoothing in the sense that retirement ages increase with longevity. Hence......, cohorts with higher longevity should contribute to their larger consumption needs via later retirement, although it is shown that the planner still front-loads some financing (pre-saving). Stochastic longevity raises the issue of intergenerational risk sharing, which implies that cohorts turning out to...

  18. Measurement and control of the fast ion redistribution on MAST

    CERN Document Server

    Turnyanskiy, M; Akers, R J; Cecconello, M; Keeling, D L; Kirk, A; Lake, R; Pinches, S D; Sangaroon, S; Wodniak, I

    2013-01-01

    Previous experiments on MAST and other tokamaks have indicated that the level of fast ion redistribution can exceed that expected from classical diffusion and that this level increases with beam power. In this paper we present a quantification of this effect in MAST plasmas using a recently commissioned scanning neutron camera. The observed fast ion diffusivity correlates with the amplitude of n=1 energetic particle modes, indicating that they are the probable cause of the non-classical fast ion diffusion in MAST. Finally, it will be shown that broadening the fast ion pressure profile by the application of neutral beam injection at an off-axis location can mitigate the growth of these modes and result in the classical fast ion behaviour

  19. Distributed Human Resource Redistribution System Based on Agent and Ontology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiangquan; Wang Ningsheng; Long Wen

    2006-01-01

    A computer system for human resource (HR) redistribution system is presented to solve the balance problem of the "surplus resources" and "surplus tasks" among a group of project units. The system architecture is designed in a compositional manner using the elements of agent technology and knowledge technology. A combination of generic agent models, ontology and knowledge provides an effective approach to address the dynamic, distributed and knowledge-intensive characters of the HR management. In the system, the broker agent acting as intermediary provides matchmaking services to the domain agents, and the individual domain agents communicate directly with each other. The HR ontology provides the semantic match of the surplus task and the surplus resource. Finally, an application example is presented to illustrate the achieved solution for a concrete scenario. This novel way offers a comprehensive HR exchange solution and is suitable for both intra-organizational and inter-organizational HR management.

  20. From microscopic taxation and redistribution models to macroscopic income distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertotti, Maria Letizia; Modanese, Giovanni

    2011-10-01

    We present here a general framework, expressed by a system of nonlinear differential equations, suitable for the modeling of taxation and redistribution in a closed society. This framework allows one to describe the evolution of income distribution over the population and to explain the emergence of collective features based on knowledge of the individual interactions. By making different choices of the framework parameters, we construct different models, whose long-time behavior is then investigated. Asymptotic stationary distributions are found, which enjoy similar properties as those observed in empirical distributions. In particular, they exhibit power law tails of Pareto type and their Lorenz curves and Gini indices are consistent with some real world ones.

  1. From microscopic taxation and redistribution models to macroscopic income distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Bertotti, Maria Letizia; 10.1016/j.physa.2011.06.008

    2011-01-01

    We present here a general framework, expressed by a system of nonlinear differential equations, suitable for the modelling of taxation and redistribution in a closed (trading market) society. This framework allows to describe the evolution of the income distribution over the population and to explain the emergence of collective features based on the knowledge of the individual interactions. By making different choices of the framework parameters, we construct different models, whose long-time behavior is then investigated. Asymptotic stationary distributions are found, which enjoy similar properties as those observed in empirical distributions. In particular, they exhibit power law tails of Pareto type and their Lorenz curves and Gini indices are consistent with some real world ones.

  2. Spacecraft Spin Rate Change due to Propellant Redistribution Between Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyu Hong

    1984-09-01

    A bubble trapped in the liquid manifold of INTELSAT IV F-7 spacecraft caused a mass imbalance between the System 1 propellant tanks and a wobble half angle of 0.38 degree to 0.48 degree. A maneuver in May 14, 1980 passed the bubble through the axial jet and allowed propellant to redistribute. A 0.2 rpm change in spin rate was observed with an exponential decay time constant of 6 minutes. In this paper, moment of inertia, tank geometry and hydrodynamics models are derived to match the observed spin rate data. The values of the total mass of the propellant considered were 16, 19 and 20 Kgs with corresponding mass imbalances of 14.3, 15 and 15.1 Kgs, respectively. The result shows excellent agreement with observed spin rate data but it was necessary to assume a greater mass of hydrazine in the tanks than propellant accounting indicated.

  3. Wind structure and variability in the middle atmosphere during the November 1980 energy budget campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Carlson, M.; Rees, D.; Offermann, D.; Philbrick, C. R.; Widdel, H. U.

    1985-01-01

    Between November 6 and December 1, 1980 series of rocket observations were obtained from two sites in northern Scandinavia (68 deg N) as part of the Energy Budget Campaign, revealing the presence of significant vertical and temporal changes in the wind structure. These changes coincided with different geomagnetic conditions, i.e. quiet and enhanced. Large amounts of rocket data were gathered from high latitudes over such a short interval of time. Prior to November 16 the meridional wind component above 60 km was found to be positive (southerly), while the magnitude of the zonal wind component incresed with altitude. After November 16 the meridional component became negative (northerly) and the magnitude of the zonal wind component was noted to decrease with altitude. Time-sections of the perturbations of the zonal wind show the presence of vertically propagating waves, which suggest gravity wave activity. These waves increase in length from 1 km near 30 km to over 12 km near 80 km. The observational techniques employed Andoya (69 deg N), Norway, and Esrange (67.9 deg N), Sweden, consisted of chaff foil, instrumented rigid spheres, chemical trails, inflatable spheres and parachutes.

  4. Extracellular fluid redistribution during hemodialysis: bioimpedance measurement and model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intradialytic fluid redistribution may cause hypotension. We hypothesized that measuring extracellular fluid volumes (ECV) with segmental bioimpedance analysis (SBIA) could test a simple, volume-driven model of redistribution among the arm, leg and trunk compartments. Patients (22, 5 females/17 males, with ages 60.2 ± 9 years, weights 80.7 ± 15 kg, heights 174 ± 9 cm) were studied during 30 HD treatments on different days. Hypotensive symptoms (Hypo+) were observed in eight patients. ECVs in the arm, trunk and leg, respectively VA, VT and VL, were measured at initiation of, and throughout, dialysis. Two variables λA and λL were defined as VA/VT and VL/VT. System dynamics, assuming initial equilibrium, are then described by two rate coefficients kRL and kRA and two constants β and γ. These were obtained using a Marquardt–Levenberg least-squares algorithm. Significant differences (Hypo+ versus Hypo−) for λL (0.55 ± 0.13 versus 0.84 ± 0.3, *p A (0.17 ± 0.032 versus 0.23 ± 0.07, **p L might indicate that less leg volume predisposes to hypotension, larger peripheral volume mitigates hypotension. Observed transport ratios indicated that the ratio of limb to trunk volume stabilized during dialysis after an initial adjustment. These data imply encumbered movement of water from the interstitial components around skeletal muscle in the arm and leg to those of the trunk and are useful in predicting anatomical or situational predispositions to hypotension

  5. Measurement of the Atmospheric $\

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose1, D; Boser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegard, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glusenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Gora, D; Grant, D; Gross, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klas, J; Klein, S R; Kohne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Kopke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lunemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Meszaros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Perez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Radel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schoneberg, S; Schonherr, L; Schonwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoss, A; Strahler, E A; Strom, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge1, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    We report the first observation in a high energy neutrino telescope of cascades induced by atmospheric electron neutrinos and by neutral current interactions of atmospheric neutrinos of all flavors. Using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low energy extension, a sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data. The number of observed cascades is $N_{\\rm cascade} = 496 \\pm 66 (stat.) \\pm 88(syst.)$ and the rest of the sample consists of residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is determined in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV and is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos.

  6. Atmospheric multiple scattering of fluorescence light from extensive air showers and effect of the aerosol size on the reconstruction of energy and depth of maximum

    CERN Document Server

    Louedec, K

    2013-01-01

    The reconstruction of the energy and the depth of maximum Xmax of an extensive air shower depends on the multiple scattering of fluorescence photons in the atmosphere. In this work, we explain how atmospheric aerosols, and especially their size, scatter the fluorescence photons during their propagation. Using a Monte Carlo simulation for the scattering of light, the dependence on the aerosol conditions of the multiple scattered light contribution to the recorded signal is fully parameterised. A clear dependence on the aerosol size is proposed for the first time. Finally, using this new parameterisation, the effect of atmospheric aerosols on the energy and on the Xmax reconstructions is presented for a typical extensive air shower observed by a ground-based detector: a systematic over-estimation of these two quantities is observed if aerosols of large size are neglected in the estimation of the multiple scattered fraction.

  7. Low temperature carrier redistribution dynamics in InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badcock, T. J., E-mail: Thomas.badcock@crl.toshiba.co.uk; Dawson, P.; Davies, M. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Kappers, M. J.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Oehler, F.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-21

    We have studied the carrier recombination dynamics in an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structure as a function of emission energy and excitation density between temperatures of 10 K and 100 K. Under relatively low levels of excitation, the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and decay time of emission on the high energy side of the luminescence spectrum decrease strongly between 10 K and 50 K. In contrast, for emission detected on the low energy side of the spectrum, the PL intensity and decay time increase over the same temperature range. These results are consistent with a thermally activated carrier redistribution process in which the (temperature dependent) average timescale for carrier transfer into or out of a localised state depends on the energy of the given state. Thus, the transfer time out of shallow, weakly localised states is considerably shorter than the arrival time into more deeply localised states. This picture is consistent with carriers hopping between localisation sites in an uncorrelated disorder potential where the density of localised states decreases with increasing localisation depth, e.g., a exponential or Gaussian distribution resulting from random alloy disorder. Under significantly higher levels of excitation, the increased occupation fraction of the localised states results in a greater average separation distance between unoccupied localised states, causing a suppression of the spectral and dynamic signatures of the hopping transfer of carriers.

  8. Low temperature carrier redistribution dynamics in InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the carrier recombination dynamics in an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structure as a function of emission energy and excitation density between temperatures of 10 K and 100 K. Under relatively low levels of excitation, the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and decay time of emission on the high energy side of the luminescence spectrum decrease strongly between 10 K and 50 K. In contrast, for emission detected on the low energy side of the spectrum, the PL intensity and decay time increase over the same temperature range. These results are consistent with a thermally activated carrier redistribution process in which the (temperature dependent) average timescale for carrier transfer into or out of a localised state depends on the energy of the given state. Thus, the transfer time out of shallow, weakly localised states is considerably shorter than the arrival time into more deeply localised states. This picture is consistent with carriers hopping between localisation sites in an uncorrelated disorder potential where the density of localised states decreases with increasing localisation depth, e.g., a exponential or Gaussian distribution resulting from random alloy disorder. Under significantly higher levels of excitation, the increased occupation fraction of the localised states results in a greater average separation distance between unoccupied localised states, causing a suppression of the spectral and dynamic signatures of the hopping transfer of carriers

  9. The optimal fuel mix and redistribution of social surplus in the Korean power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the difference between the optimal fuel mix incorporating a pre-installed generation capacity constraint and the actual fuel mix in the Korean power market. Since the restructuring of the market, the fuel mix has been determined partly by investors and partly by the Basic Plan for Long-Term Electricity Supply and Demand (BPE). Both the system marginal price (SMP), and the capacity payment (CP), which has been based on the fixed cost of a specific gas turbine generator, were intended to provide an investment incentive in the market; however, they did not bring about an optimal fuel mix in Korea. Under the circumstances of a shortage of base load generators, these generators may garner excessive profits due to a high SMP level. However, the adjustment scheme of profit between KEPCO and Gencos left scant profit for generators. This paper suggests that a contract is needed to create the appropriate profit and tax levels for these base load generators. The redistribution of profit improves equality between consumers and generators, and the proper margin creates incentives for base load technology investment in Korea. - Research highlights: → This paper aims to determine the optimal fuel mix in Korea and shows the difference between the optimal and actual fuel mix; → We discovered that the optimal fuel mix ratio should be 63.5%:20.5%:16.0%for nuclear energy, coal, and LNG, respectively; → Because the pre-installed capacity is taken as given, the optimal fuel mix under the given installed capacity is an addition of a new nuclear unit to the current fuel mix; → The additional profit above the profit margin in the BPE should be collected and redistributed to consumers; → While we provide an incentive to build nuclear and coal units in Korea, we also suggest that a contract is needed to guarantee the profit level for generators based on a government regulation constraint, the BPE, to achieve a fair treatment.

  10. Measurements of non-linear noise re-distribution in an SOA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Tromborg, Bjarne; Mørk, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of the noise statistics after a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) demonstrate non-linear noise re-distribution with a strong power and bandwidth dependence.......Measurements of the noise statistics after a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) demonstrate non-linear noise re-distribution with a strong power and bandwidth dependence....

  11. Measurements and simulations of non-linear noise re-distribution in an SOA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Tromborg, Bjarne; Mørk, Jesper;

    2005-01-01

    Measurements and numerical simulations of the noise statistics after a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) demonstrate non-linear noise re-distribution. The re-distribution, which depends on self-modulation due to gain saturation and carrier dynamics, show a strong power and bandwidth dependence...... and can be important for SOA based regenerators....

  12. Development Planning and Population Growth and Redistribution in the Republic of Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Attar, M. E.; Salman, A. D.

    Utilizing the 1947, 1957, and l965 census data and the 1970 preliminary population count, the relationship between population growth and redistribution and development planning in Iraq was examined. Trends in rural-urban population growth, migration, and population redistribution were examined as they pertained to the socioeconomic development…

  13. A little fairness may induce a lot of redistribution in democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyran, Jean-Robert; Sausgruber, Rupert

    2006-01-01

    We use a model of self-centered inequality aversion suggested by Fehr and Schmidt (Quart. J. Econom. 114 (3) (1999) 817) to study voting on redistribution. We theoretically identify two classes of conditions when an empirically plausible amount of fairness preferences induces redistribution through...

  14. 41 CFR 101-25.104-1 - Redistribution, repair, or rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., or rehabilitation. 101-25.104-1 Section 101-25.104-1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 101-25.104-1 Redistribution, repair, or rehabilitation. Prior to the... through redistribution, repair, or rehabilitation of already owned furniture and office machines....

  15. 43 CFR 44.52 - May a State enact legislation to reallocate or redistribute PILT payments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May a State enact legislation to... After the Department Distributes Payments § 44.52 May a State enact legislation to reallocate or redistribute PILT payments? A State may enact legislation to reallocate or redistribute PILT payments. If...

  16. Carrying away and redistribution of radioisotopes on the Peyne catchment basin. Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transfers of radioisotopes present in soils and sediments are essentially conditioned by the mobilities of the physical vectors which constitute their supports. The water is the main vector of natural transfer, radioisotopes being associated with it under dissolved or particulate shape. The rainout and the hydrous erosion are responsible in particular for the carrying away and for the redistribution of contaminants following an atmospheric deposit on a catchment basin. However their effect is not the same in any point of the catchment basin. The work begun here aims at elaborating a classification of the grounds sensitivity towards this phenomenon of radioisotopes carrying away. The different factors of sensitivity have been identified: pluviometry, slope, soils occupation and soils nature. The Peyne catchment basin, that presents an important variability of these four parameters, constitutes the experimental site for this study. On this catchment basin, we search to identify the areas the most sensitive to the carrying away of radioisotopes, by combining a theoretical predictive approach based on the cartography and a descriptive approach basing on the sampling and the analysis of soils samples. (N.C.)

  17. Model for predicting the redistribution of particulate contaminants from soil surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computerized model was developed to describe the redistribution of wind eroding soil-contaminant mixtures. Potentially mobile particulate contaminants can, in the first approximation, be assumed to be indistinquishable from the wind eroding soil in which they are distributed. A grid network characterizes important soil and surface conditions, and mass conserving control volumes are constructed on each cell. Material is transported through the vertical and top surfaces of a control volume by a modified Bagnold-Chepil horizontal flux formulation and modified Gillette vertical flux formulation, respectively. The vertical emissions, considered as puffs from area sources, create at regular time intervals a contaminant cloud which is proportional to the suspendable ground concentration. These puffs diffuse downwind under time-dependent wind velocity and atmospheric stability conditions, maintaining during the time interval a three-dimensional Gaussian distribution of concentration with cloud volume. Material from each puff is deposited in downward cells, leading to the possibility of many different flights from these new sources. The usefulness of this predictive tool is demonstrated by calculations involving mixtures of particulate 238PuO2 in highly erodible soils under dust storm conditions. Time-dependent surface concentration and breathing zone

  18. Redistribution and Recognition: Assessing Alternative Frameworks for Aboriginal Policy in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Maciel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we argue that government approaches to addressing the claims of Aboriginal peoples in Canada are insufficient. Historically, these approaches have focused on redistribution. At the same time, these approaches have all but ignored recognition. We argue that a more holistic approach that addresses both redistribution and recognition is necessary. Further, we attempt to show that our approach is consistent with the tenets of liberalism. By conceiving of Aboriginal politics as such, the state may be better able to address claims. We begin by providing a theoretical overview of redistribution and recognition, respectively. Then, we proceed to show how redistribution and recognition must work together in an adequate account of justice with respect to Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Finally, we offer a conception of Aboriginal politics that fulfills this desideratum, and integrates the principle of recognition and redistribution in a way that is within the bounds of liberalism.

  19. Probing wind-turbine/atmosphere interactions at utility scale: Novel insights from the EOLOS wind energy research station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite major research efforts, the interaction of the atmospheric boundary layer with turbines and multi-turbine arrays at utility scale remains poorly understood today. This lack of knowledge stems from the limited number of utility-scale research facilities and a number of technical challenges associated with obtaining high-resolution measurements at field scale. We review recent results obtained at the University of Minnesota utility-scale wind energy research station (the EOLOS facility), which is comprised of a 130 m tall meteorological tower and a fully instrumented 2.5MW Clipper Liberty C96 wind turbine. The results address three major areas: 1) The detailed characterization of the wake structures at a scale of 36×36 m2 using a novel super-large-scale particle image velocimetry based on natural snowflakes, including the rich tip vortex dynamics and their correlation with turbine operations, control, and performance; 2) The use of a WindCube Lidar profiler to investigate how wind at various elevations influences turbine power fluctuation and elucidate the role of wind gusts on individual blade loading; and 3) The systematic quantification of the interaction between the turbine instantaneous power output and tower foundation strain with the incoming flow turbulence, which is measured from the meteorological tower

  20. Development of a General Analysis and Unfolding Scheme and its Application to Measure the Energy Spectrum of Atmospheric Neutrinos with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H P; Brown, A M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; deAndré, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H G; Sandroos, J; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zoll, M; Morik, K

    2014-01-01

    We present the development and application of a generic analysis scheme for the measurement of neutrino spectra with the IceCube detector. This scheme is based on regularized unfolding, preceded by an event selection which uses a Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance algorithm to select the relevant variables and a Random Forest as a classifier. The analysis has been developed using IceCube data from the 59-string configuration of the detector. 27,771 neutrino candidates were detected in 346 days of livetime. A rejection of 99.9999 % of the atmospheric muon background is achieved. The energy spectrum of the atmospheric neutrino flux is obtained using the TRUEE unfolding program. The unfolded spectrum of atmospheric muon neutrinos covers an energy range from 100 GeV to 1 PeV. Compared to the previous measurement using the detector in the 40-string configuration, the analysis presented here, extends the upper end of the atmospheric neutrino spectrum by more than a factor of two, reaching an energy region that ha...

  1. The impact of land use change on the energy and water fluxes between atmosphere and tropical vegetation in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, U.; Ibrom, A.; Kreilein, H.; Oltchev, A.; Gravenhorst, G.

    2003-12-01

    The conversion of tropical rain forest to agriculturally used land is a widespread process throughout Indonesia. Besides the effects on the biological diversity and the hydrological functions of a forest, this also has an impact on the turbulent exchange processes between vegetation and atmosphere, the radiative properties of the surface and therefore on atmospheric boundary layer and local climate. Within the framework of the project STORMA "Stability of rain forest margins" (SFB 552, University Goettingen, financed by the German Research Foundation), the energy and water fluxes above one of the major land use types, a Cacao plantation, were investigated using the Eddy-Covariance method. Simultaneously meteorological measurements of the variables wind speed and velocity, temperature, humidity, rainfall, soil heat flux and the components of the radiation budget were performed, in order to complete the energy balance and investigate the dependencies of the turbulent exchange processes on the atmospheric boundary conditions. The measurements are being compared to a SVAT model, providing the heat flux into the vegetation. Energy balance closure is used as a means to check the quality of the measured fluxes. The comparison to measurements above undisturbed rain forest by means of the ratio of sensible to latent heat flux, the Bowen ratio, indicates a significantly different boundary layer regime of the atmosphere above the Cacao.

  2. An improved crude oil atmospheric distillation process for energy integration: Part II: New approach for energy saving by use of residual heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Part I of this paper, it was shown on thermodynamic grounds that introducing a flash in the preheating train of an atmospheric oil distillation process, together with an appropriate introduction of the resulting vapour into the column, could potentially bring substantial energy savings, by reducing the duty of the preheating furnace, by doing some pre-fractionation and by reducing the column irreversibilities. Part II expands on this idea by showing how this can be done while keeping the throughput and the product characteristics unchanged. The outcome is that placing several flashes after the heat exchangers and feeding the corresponding vapour streams to the appropriate trays of the column reduces the pumparound flows and the heat brought to the preheating train. The resulting heat deficit may then be compensated in an additional heat exchanger by using low level heat recuperated from the products of the distillation and/or imported from other processes. The use of this residual heat reduces the furnace duty by approximately an equivalent amount. Thus high level energy (fuel-gas burnt in the furnace) is replaced by residual low level heat. The simulation with an example flowsheet shows that the savings on fuel could be as high as 21%. - Highlights: ► Flash installation in the preheating train of the crude oil distillation process. ► Pumparound streams and heat sent to the preheating train are reduced. ► A high level heat deficit is induced and replaced by low level heat. ► Considerable energy savings and greenhouse gas emissions are achieved.

  3. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales. In 1986, atmospheric research examined the transport and diffusion of atmospheric contaminants in areas of complex terrain and participated in a large, multilaboratory program to assess the precipitation scavenging processes important to the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, during 1986, a special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity occurred after the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual projects

  4. Managing fleet capacity effectively under second-hand market redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillérou, Emmanuelle; Roudaut, Nolwenn; Guyader, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    Fishing capacity management policies have been traditionally implemented at national level with national targets for capacity reduction. More recently, capacity management policies have increasingly targeted specific fisheries. French fisheries spatially vary along the French coastline and are associated to specific regions. Capacity management policies, however, ignore the capital mobility associated with second-hand vessel trade between regions. This is not an issue for national policies but could limit the effectiveness of regional capacity management policies. A gravity model and a random-effect Poisson regression model are used to analyze the determinants and spatial extent of the second-hand market in France. This study is based on panel data from the French Atlantic Ocean between 1992 and 2009. The trade flows between trading partners is found to increase with their sizes and to be spatially concentrated. Despite the low trade flows between regions, a net impact analysis shows that fishing capacity is redistributed by the second-hand market to regions on the Channel and Aquitaine from central regions. National capacity management policies (constructions/destructions) have induced a net decrease in regional fleet capacity with varying magnitude across regions. Unless there is a change of policy instruments or their scale of implementation, the operation of the second-hand market decreases the effectiveness of regional capacity management policies in regions on the Channel and Aquitaine. PMID:23288614

  5. Puromycin induces SUMO and ubiquitin redistribution upon proteasome inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-07-29

    We have previously reported the co-localization of O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying a role for the ubiquitin family in sequestering OP-puromycylated immature polypeptides to the nucleus during impaired proteasome activity. Here, we found that as expected puromycin induced SUMO-1/2/3 accumulation with ubiquitin at multiple nuclear foci in HeLa cells when co-exposed to MG132. Co-administration of puromycin and MG132 also facilitated redistribution of PML and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 concurrently with SUMO-2/3. As removal of the drugs from the medium led to disappearance of the SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin nuclear foci, our findings indicated that nuclear assembly/disassembly of SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin was pharmacologically manipulable, supporting our previous observation on OP-Puro, which predicted the ubiquitin family function in sequestrating aberrant proteins to the nucleus. PMID:27181354

  6. Cascading failures in interconnected networks with dynamical redistribution of loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhuang; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Hujiang

    2015-09-01

    Cascading failures of loads in isolated networks and coupled networks have been studied in the past few years. In most of the corresponding results, the topologies of the networks are destroyed. Here, we present an interconnected network model considering cascading failures based on the dynamic redistribution of flow in the networks. Compared with the results of single scale-free networks, we find that interconnected scale-free networks have higher vulnerability. Additionally, the network heterogeneity plays an important role in the robustness of interconnected networks under intentional attacks. Considering the effects of various coupling preferences, the results show that there are almost no differences. Finally, the application of our model to the Beijing interconnected traffic network, which consists of a subway network and a bus network, shows that the subway network suffers more damage under the attack. Moreover, the interconnected traffic network may be more exposed to damage after initial attacks on the bus network. These discussions are important for the design and optimization of interconnected networks.

  7. Interactive graphical tools for three-dimensional mesh redistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, L.A.

    1996-03-01

    Three-dimensional meshes modeling nonlinear problems such as sheet metal forming, metal forging, heat transfer during welding, the propagation of microwaves through gases, and automobile crashes require highly refined meshes in local areas to accurately represent areas of high curvature, stress, and strain. These locally refined areas develop late in the simulation and/or move during the course of the simulation, thus making it difficult to predict their exact location. This thesis is a systematic study of new tools scientists can use with redistribution algorithms to enhance the solution results and reduce the time to build, solve, and analyze nonlinear finite element problems. Participatory design techniques including Contextual Inquiry and Design were used to study and analyze the process of solving such problems. This study and analysis led to the in-depth understanding of the types of interactions performed by FEM scientists. Based on this understanding, a prototype tool was designed to support these interactions. Scientists participated in evaluating the design as well as the implementation of the prototype tool. The study, analysis, prototype tool design, and the results of the evaluation of the prototype tool are described in this thesis.

  8. Estradiol induces functional inactivation of p53 by intracellular redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, A M; Bontempo, P; Schiavone, E M; Tortora, V; Verdicchio, M A; Napolitano, M; Nola, E; Moncharmont, B; Medici, N; Nigro, V; Armetta, I; Abbondanza, C; Puca, G A

    2000-05-15

    Estrogen treatment of MCF-7 cells grown in serum-free medium induced a modification of the intracellular distribution of p53 protein. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining showed that p53 was localized in the nucleus of untreated cell and that after 48 h of hormone treatment, it was mostly localized in the cytoplasm. This effect was blocked by the antiestrogen ICI182,780. Intracellular redistribution of p53 was correlated to a reduced expression of the WAF1/CIP1 gene product and to the presence of degradation fragments of p53 in the cytosol. Estradiol treatment prevented the growth inhibition induced by oligonucleotide transfection, simulating DNA damage. This observation indicated that the wild-type p53 gene product present in the MCF-7 cell could be inactivated by estradiol through nuclear exclusion to permit the cyclin-dependent phosphorylation events leading to the G1-S transition. In addition, the estradiol-induced inactivation of p53 could be involved in the tumorigenesis of estrogen-dependent neoplasm. PMID:10825127

  9. Emission redistribution from a quantum dot-bowtie nanoantenna

    CERN Document Server

    Regler, A; Lyamkina, A; Spiegl, M; Müller, K; Vuckovic, J; Finley, J J; Kaniber, M

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and simulation study of a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot coupled to a nearby ($\\sim 25nm$) plasmonic antenna. Micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy shows a $\\sim 2.4\\times$ increase of intensity, which is attributed to spatial far-field redistribution of the emission from the quantum dot-antenna system. Power-dependent studies show similar saturation powers of $2.5\\mu W$ for both coupled and uncoupled quantum dot emission in polarization-resolved measurements. Moreover, time-resolved spectroscopy reveals the absence of Purcell-enhancement of the quantum dot coupled to the antenna as compared to an uncoupled dot, yielding comparable exciton lifetimes of $\\tau\\sim0.5ns$. This observation is supported by numerical simulations, suggesting only minor Purcell-effects of $25nm$. The observed increased emission from a coupled quantum dot-plasmonic antenna system is found to be in good qualitative agreement with numerical simulations and will lead to a better understanding o...

  10. "Redistribution" Effect of Lumpy Zone for Gas Flow in BF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The gas flow from tuyere to raceway zone by blasting involves three distributional zones, such as dripping,cohesive, and lumpy zone. The gas flow distribution in lumpy zone directly affects the gas utilization ration and smooth operation in the blast furnace. However, the furnace closeness brings about great difficulty in the study of high-temperature gas flow. The charging and blasting system affecting the gas flow and whether the top gas flow distribution could reflect its inner condition as well as the furnace state, such as hanging or scaffolding, which have become the main problems for the research on gas flow. Recently, several researches overseas studied gas flow distribution using the numerical simulation method; however, such a research was rare amongst the natives. In this study, the flow model of gas in cohesive and lumpy zone was established using the numerical simulation software and the gas flow distributions with uniform distribution of burden permeability, scaffolding of wall, and nonuniform charge level were analyzed. As a result, the effects of cohesive zone and lower parts on the gas flow are very limited and the charge level largely affects the distribution of top gas flow. Therefore, it was found that the distribution of top gas flow could hardly reflect the inner gas flow. The process is called "redistribution" effect, which means that the gas flow after passing through the raceway, dripping, and cohesive zone is distributed when it flows into the lumpy zone.

  11. Climate velocity and the future global redistribution of marine biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Molinos, Jorge; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Schoeman, David S.; Brown, Christopher J.; Kiessling, Wolfgang; Moore, Pippa J.; Pandolfi, John M.; Poloczanska, Elvira S.; Richardson, Anthony J.; Burrows, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Anticipating the effect of climate change on biodiversity, in particular on changes in community composition, is crucial for adaptive ecosystem management but remains a critical knowledge gap. Here, we use climate velocity trajectories, together with information on thermal tolerances and habitat preferences, to project changes in global patterns of marine species richness and community composition under IPCC Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5. Our simple, intuitive approach emphasizes climate connectivity, and enables us to model over 12 times as many species as previous studies. We find that range expansions prevail over contractions for both RCPs up to 2100, producing a net local increase in richness globally, and temporal changes in composition, driven by the redistribution rather than the loss of diversity. Conversely, widespread invasions homogenize present-day communities across multiple regions. High extirpation rates are expected regionally (for example, Indo-Pacific), particularly under RCP8.5, leading to strong decreases in richness and the anticipated formation of no-analogue communities where invasions are common. The spatial congruence of these patterns with contemporary human impacts highlights potential areas of future conservation concern. These results strongly suggest that the millennial stability of current global marine diversity patterns, against which conservation plans are assessed, will change rapidly over the course of the century in response to ocean warming.

  12. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO{sub 2} molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, A., E-mail: ebiu2005@gmail.com; Faginas-Lago, N.; Pacifici, L.; Grossi, G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Perugia, via Elce di Sotto 8, 06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2015-07-21

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO{sub 2} characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO{sub 2} + CO{sub 2} collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO{sub 2} structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7.

  13. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO2 molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, A; Faginas-Lago, N; Pacifici, L; Grossi, G

    2015-07-21

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO2 characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO2 + CO2 collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO2 structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7. PMID:26203027

  14. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO2 molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO2 characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO2 + CO2 collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO2 structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7

  15. Inequality and Fiscal Redistribution in Middle Income Countries: Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Indonesia, Mexico, Peru and South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Nora Lustig

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the redistributive impact of fiscal policy for Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Indonesia, Mexico, Peru and South Africa using comparable fiscal incidence analysis with data from around 2010. The largest redistributive effect is in South Africa and the smallest in Indonesia. Success in fiscal redistribution is driven primarily by redistributive effort (share of social spending to GDP in each country) and the extent to which transfers/subsidies are targeted to the poor and direct t...

  16. Development and analysis of prognostic equations for mesoscale kinetic energy and mesoscale (subgrid scale) fluxes for large-scale atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avissar, Roni; Chen, Fei

    1993-01-01

    Generated by landscape discontinuities (e.g., sea breezes) mesoscale circulation processes are not represented in large-scale atmospheric models (e.g., general circulation models), which have an inappropiate grid-scale resolution. With the assumption that atmospheric variables can be separated into large scale, mesoscale, and turbulent scale, a set of prognostic equations applicable in large-scale atmospheric models for momentum, temperature, moisture, and any other gaseous or aerosol material, which includes both mesoscale and turbulent fluxes is developed. Prognostic equations are also developed for these mesoscale fluxes, which indicate a closure problem and, therefore, require a parameterization. For this purpose, the mean mesoscale kinetic energy (MKE) per unit of mass is used, defined as E-tilde = 0.5 (the mean value of u'(sub i exp 2), where u'(sub i) represents the three Cartesian components of a mesoscale circulation (the angle bracket symbol is the grid-scale, horizontal averaging operator in the large-scale model, and a tilde indicates a corresponding large-scale mean value). A prognostic equation is developed for E-tilde, and an analysis of the different terms of this equation indicates that the mesoscale vertical heat flux, the mesoscale pressure correlation, and the interaction between turbulence and mesoscale perturbations are the major terms that affect the time tendency of E-tilde. A-state-of-the-art mesoscale atmospheric model is used to investigate the relationship between MKE, landscape discontinuities (as characterized by the spatial distribution of heat fluxes at the earth's surface), and mesoscale sensible and latent heat fluxes in the atmosphere. MKE is compared with turbulence kinetic energy to illustrate the importance of mesoscale processes as compared to turbulent processes. This analysis emphasizes the potential use of MKE to bridge between landscape discontinuities and mesoscale fluxes and, therefore, to parameterize mesoscale fluxes

  17. Atmospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is about the levels of contamination in center America, the population's perception on the problem, effects of the atmospheric contamination, effects in the environment, causes of the atmospheric contamination, possibilities to reduce the atmospheric contamination and list of Roeco Swisscontac in atmospheric contamination

  18. Clinical significance of 24-hour delayed thallium-201 imaging after exercise-redistribution imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional exercise and delayed thallium-201 (Tl) SPECT with 24-h delayed imaging were performed in 39 patients with coronary heart disease. Delayed redistribution of 24-h delayed images were compared with that of 3-h delayed images, and were visually interpreted as positive or negative. Twenty-three patients showed positive delayed redistribution at 24-h imaging, including 8 of 27 areas (30%) with myocardial infarction (MI), and 10 of 36 areas (28%) without MI. Percent Tl uptake immediately after exercise was significantly lower in patients with MI who revealed positive late redistribution than those who revealed negative late redistribution (50.2% vs 62.5%, p<0.005). The severity of coronary stenoses was significantly greater in patients with MI who showed positive late redistribution than those who showed negative late redistribution (96.5% vs 82.3%, p<0.01). All patients with MI who revealed positive late redistribution had good collaterals. Conventional exercise Tl SPECT imaging underestimates myocardial viability, and additional 24-h imaging provides a more accurate assessment of myocardial viability without excessive economical expense and exposure to radiation. This method is especially useful for patients with myocardial infarction who have severe coronary stenoses or good collaterals. (author)

  19. From the bedroom to the budget deficit: mate competition changes men's attitudes toward economic redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrew Edward; Kenrick, Douglas T; Neel, Rebecca; Neuberg, Steven L

    2013-12-01

    How do economic recessions influence attitudes toward redistribution of wealth? From a traditional economic self-interest perspective, attitudes toward redistribution should be affected by one's financial standing. A functional evolutionary approach suggests another possible form of self-interest: That during periods of economic threat, attitudes toward redistribution should be influenced by one's mate-value-especially for men. Using both lab-based experiments and real-world data on voting behavior, we consistently find that economic threats lead low mate-value men to become more prosocial and supportive of redistribution policies, but that the same threats lead high mate-value men to do the opposite. Economic threats do not affect women's attitudes toward redistribution in the same way, and, across studies, financial standing is only weakly associated with attitudes toward redistribution. These findings suggest that during tough economic times, men's attitudes toward redistribution are influenced by something that has seemingly little to do with economic self-interest-their mating psychology. PMID:23895267

  20. A test of hypothetical hill-slope-gully-streambed soil redistribution model using fallout cs-137 a first use of the technique in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil degradation by water erosion, which is further responsible for sedimentation in the conveyance systems and reservoirs, is a matter of growing concern in Pakistan. Caesium-137, a fallout radioisotope produced from atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, has become a well-established radiotracer of soil movement. To assess the potential for application of caesium-137 as an indicator of soil erosion and sedimentation, a hypothetical hill slope-gully-streambed redistribution model was tested in Mangla Watershed, Pakistan, as a first use of the technique in the country. The results indicate that the soil redistribution along the different components follows the hypothetical model, with severe net soil loss (sheet erosion) at the hill-slope, no labeling of gully head, and high sedimentation on the streambed. The reference inventory of 137CS obtained by scraper plate (4380 Bq m-2 was in agreement with the mean value of bulk cores (i.e. 3945 +- 457 Bq m-2). The net soil loss along the hill slope estimated by the profile distribution model was 17.2 t ha-1 yr-l. The sedimentation rate in the main stream was more before the year 1974 (8 cm yr-l) than afterwards reducing to 5.9 cm yr-1 due to re-vegetation. The 137CS technique proved to be less time consuming in the provision of information on soil redistribution rates than direct measurement would have been and can be used to assess watershed management practices in Pakistan. (author)

  1. Strain redistribution around holes and notches in fiber-reinforced cross-woven brittle matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben Krogsdal; Brøndsted, Povl

    A study of the strain redistribution around holes in two different cross-woven ceramic matrix composites is presented. The strain redistribution around holes in C-f/SiCm and SiCf/SiCm has been measured experimentally under plane stress conditions. Using micro-mechanics and Continuum Damage...... Mechanics, and an identification procedure based on a uni-axial tensile test and a shear test the strain redistribution around a hole or a notch due to matrix cracking can be predicted. Damage due to fiber breakage is not included in the model. Initial matrix damage in the C-f/SiCm material has to be...

  2. Forest fires as possible mechanism of redistribution of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systematic observations of radionuclide composition and concentration in the atmosphere have been carried out at the Institute of Physics in Vilnius since 1963. An increase in activity concentration of radionuclides in the atmosphere was observed after nuclear weapon tests and the Chernobyl NPP accident. At present the radiation situation in Lithuania is determined by two main sources of radionuclides, forest fire and resuspension products transferred from highly polluted region of the Ukraine and Belarus. This year the increase in activity concentration of 137Cs in the atmosphere was registered in many countries and in Lithuania as well. In this paper the analyses of the events of the increase activity concentration, metrological situation, speciation of radionuclides and mechanisms of formation and transformation of aerosol carriers of radionuclides are presented. (author)

  3. Measurement of the atmospheric νμ energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 200 TeV with the ANTARES telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced during cascades initiated by the interaction of primary cosmic rays with air nuclei. In this paper, a measurement of the atmospheric νμ + anti νμ energy spectrum in the energy range 0.1-200 TeV is presented, using data collected by the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope from 2008 to 2011. Overall, the measured flux is ∝25 % higher than predicted by the conventional neutrino flux, and compatible with the measurements reported in ice. The flux is compatible with a single power-law dependence with spectral index γmeas=3.58±0.12. With the present statistics the contribution of prompt neutrinos cannot be established. (orig.)

  4. Measurement of the atmospheric {nu}{sub {mu}} energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 200 TeV with the ANTARES telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ardid, M.; Larosa, G.; Martinez-Mora, J.A. [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Institut d' Investigacio per a la Gestio Integrada de les Zones Costaneres (IGIC), Gandia (Spain); Albert, A.; Drouhin, D.; Racca, C. [GRPHE - Institut universitaire de technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit, BP 50568, Colmar (France); Al Samarai, I.; Aubert, J.J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Carr, J.; Charif, Z.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Dornic, D.; Ernenwein, J.P.; Escoffier, S.; Lambard, E.; Riviere, C.; Vallee, C.; Yatkin, K. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Andre, M. [Technical University of Catalonia, Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics, Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Anghinolfi, M.; Sanguineti, M. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Anton, G.; Classen, F.; Eberl, T.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Fehn, K.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Geisselsoeder, S.; Geyer, K.; Gleixner, A.; Graf, K.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; James, C.W.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Sieger, C.; Spies, A.; Wagner, S. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Anvar, S.; Louis, F. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere - Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers - Service d' Electronique des Detecteurs et d' Informatique, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Astraatmadja, T.; Bogazzi, C.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Heijboer, A.J.; Jong, M. de; Michael, T.; Palioselitis, D.; Schulte, S.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Visser, E. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baret, B.; Bouhou, B.; Creusot, A.; Galata, S.; Kouchner, A.; Elewyck, V. van [Universite Paris Diderot, APC, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Paris (France); Barrios-Marti, J.; Bigongiari, C.; Emanuele, U.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.P.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Lambard, G.; Mangano, S.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Yepes, H.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zuniga, J. [CSIC - Universitat de Valencia, IFIC - Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Basa, S.; Marcelin, M.; Nezri, E. [Pole de l' Etoile Site de Chateau-Gombert, LAM - Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Biagi, S.; Fusco, L.A.; Giacomelli, G.; Margiotta, A.; Spurio, M. [INFN - Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy); Bruijn, R.; Decowski, M.P.; Wolf, E. de [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Capone, A.; De Bonis, G.; Fermani, P.; Perrina, C.; Simeone, F. [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Caramete, L.; Pavalas, G.E.; Popa, V. [Institute for Space Sciences, Bucharest (Romania); Carloganu, C.; Dumas, A.; Gay, P.; Guillard, G. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Cecchini, S.; Chiarusi, T. [INFN - Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Charvis, P.; Deschamps, A.; Hello, Y. [Universite Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Geoazur, CNRS/INSU, IRD, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Sophia Antipolis (France); Circella, M. [INFN - Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Dekeyser, I.; Lefevre, D.; Martini, S.; Robert, A.; Tamburini, C. [Aix-Marseille University, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO), Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Universite du Sud Toulon-Var, CNRS-INSU/IRD UM 110, La Garde Cedex (France); Distefano, C.; Lattuada, D.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Trovato, A. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS), Catania (Italy); Donzaud, C. [Universite Paris Diderot, APC, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Paris (France); Univ Paris-Sud, Orsay Cedex (France); Dorosti, Q.; Loehner, H. [University of Groningen, Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI), Groningen (Netherlands); Flaminio, V. [INFN - Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Pisa (Italy); Giordano, V. [INFN - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Haren, H. van [Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), ' t Horntje (Texel) (Netherlands); Kadler, M. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kooijman, P. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit Utrecht, Faculteit Betawetenschappen, Utrecht (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kreykenbohm, I.; Mueller, C.; Wilms, J. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Bamberg (Germany); Kulikovskiy, V. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D. [INFN - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Universita, Catania (IT); Loucatos, S.; Schuessler, F.; Stolarczyk, T.; Vallage, B.; Vernin, P. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (FR); Montaruli, T. [INFN - Sezione di Bari, Bari (IT); Universite de Geneve, Departement de Physique Nucleaire et Corpusculaire, Geneva (CH); Morganti, M. [INFN - Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (IT); Pradier, T. [Universite de Strasbourg et CNRS/IN2P3, IPHC-Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, Strasbourg Cedex 2 (FR); Rostovtsev, A. [ITEP - Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (RU); Samtleben, D.F.E. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (NL); Universiteit Leiden, Leids Instituut voor Onderzoek in Natuurkunde, Leiden (NL); Taiuti, M. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Genova (IT); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Genova (IT); Tayalati, Y. [University Mohammed I, Laboratory of Physics of Matter and Radiations, B.P. 717, Oujda (MA)

    2013-10-15

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced during cascades initiated by the interaction of primary cosmic rays with air nuclei. In this paper, a measurement of the atmospheric {nu}{sub {mu}} + anti {nu}{sub {mu}} energy spectrum in the energy range 0.1-200 TeV is presented, using data collected by the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope from 2008 to 2011. Overall, the measured flux is {proportional_to}25 % higher than predicted by the conventional neutrino flux, and compatible with the measurements reported in ice. The flux is compatible with a single power-law dependence with spectral index {gamma}{sub meas}=3.58{+-}0.12. With the present statistics the contribution of prompt neutrinos cannot be established. (orig.)

  5. Atmospheric muons: experimental aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Cecchini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    We present a review of atmospheric muon flux and energy spectrum measurements over almost six decades of muon momentum. Sea-level and underground/water/ice experiments are considered. Possible sources of systematic errors in the measurements are examinated. The characteristics of underground/water muons (muons in bundle, lateral distribution, energy spectrum) are discussed. The connection between the atmospheric muon and neutrino measurements are also reported.

  6. Novel approaches to understanding carbon redistribution at multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungait, Jennifer; Beniston, Joshua; Lal, Rattan; Horrocks, Claire; Collins, Adrian; Mariappen, Sankar; Quine, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    Established biogeochemical techniques are used to trace organic inputs typically derived directly or indirectly from plants into soils, sediments and water using lipid biomarkers. Recently, advances in bulk and compound specific stable 13C isotope analyses have provided novel ways of exploring the source and residence times of organic matter in soils using the natural abundance stable 13C isotope signature of C3 and C4 plant end member values. However, the application of biogeochemical source tracing technologies at the molecular level at field to catchment scales has been slow to develop because of perceived problems with dilution of molecular-scale signals. This paper describes the results of recent experiments in natural and agricultural environments in the UK (Collins et al., 2013; Dungait et al., 2013) and United States (Beniston et al., submitted) that have successfully applied new tracing techniques using stable 13C isotope and complementary approaches to explore the transport of sediment-bound organic carbon at a range of scales from the small plot (m2) to field (ha) and small catchment (10's ha). References Beniston et al (submitted) The effects of crop residue removal on soil erosion and macronutrient dynamics on soils under no till for 42 years. Biogeosciences Collins et al (2013) Catchment source contributions to the sediment-bound organic matter degrading salmonid spawning gravels in a lowland river, southern England. Science of the Total Environment 456-457, 181-195. Dungait et al (2013) Microbial responses to the erosional redistribution of soil organic carbon in arable fields. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 60, 195-201. Puttock et al (2012) Stable carbon isotope analysis of fluvial sediment fluxes over two contrasting C4-C3 semi-arid vegetation transitions. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 26, 2386-2392.

  7. Roentgenologic evaluation of the intrahepatic redistribution after thorotrast administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intrahepatic homogeneous opacity due to the thorotrast deposits slowly decrease with time and develop an uneven redistribution. The contrast materia initially settles in the peripancreatic lymph nodes and then moves to the hepatic surface under the diaphragm along the intrahepatic lymphatic flows. The uneven hepatic distribution of the thorotrast deposits in early stage is a high dense zone near the subdiaphragmatic region, while that of the late stage is a high density area in the right lobe. Due to the long exposure of the thorotrast, a fibrotic scarring and a shrinkage may condense the intrahepatic thorotrast deposit and create the uneven high density areas in the right hepatic lobe. Neoplastic changes brought about by the thorotrast deposits may be divided into following two major groups: a neoplastic high density areas and a neoplastic low density areas. The neoplastic high density distributions are seen in 6 cases of cholangiocarcinoma and a case of mixed hepatocellular and cholangiocellular carcinoma. These neoplasms might have a strong affinity for thorotrast particles and condense the thorotrast partcles in the tumor. The neoplastic high density distribution mimics the non-neoplastic high density, thus, it is difficult to detect a thorotrast-induced cholangiocarcinoma at an early stage. Conversely, it is easy to detect a thorotrast-induced hypatocellular carcinoma, because hepatocellular carcinoma has no affinity for thorotrast particle and displace the thorotrast opacifying liver. We call it ''the neoplastic high density distribution''. Knowledge of the uneven intrahepatic distribution of thorotrast deposits is important to the radiologist in order to diagnose a thorotrast-induced neoplasm at the earliest time possible. (author)

  8. Clinical significance of thallium-201 redistribution in old myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to determine the clinical usefulness of thallium-201 stress myocardial scintigrapny (Tl SMS) in the evaluation of peri-infarct ischemia. Tl SMS and right heart sided hemodynamic measurement during exercise (EX) were performed in 68 pts with old myocardial infarction. The myocardium was devided into 10 segments and regional Tl defect score was visually determined as 0 = normal to 3 = background. Redistribution (Rd) was defined by a decrease in regional defect score > 1 from immediately to 2.5 hours after EX. Of 68 pts. 66 (97 %) showed perfusion defect on images immediately after EX in the infact regions suspected from ECG. Rd in the infarct region occurred in 26 (38 %) of 68 pts with infarction, 18 (44 %) of 41 pts with anterior and 8 (30 %) of 27 pts with inferior infarction. ST-depression in the lead without abnormal Q-wave was demonstrated in 22 (85 %) of 26 pts with Rd, while in 21 (50 %) of 42 pts without Rd (p > 0.005). Chest pain on EX was noticed in 14 (54 %) with Rd, but only in 6 (14 %) without Rd (p > 0.005). Mean pulmonary artery wedge pressure during EX was higher in pts with Rd than in pts without Rd(33.6 +- 12.3 vs 22.4 +- 12.2 mmHg, p < 0.01). There was no relation between Rd and coronary stenosis perfusing infarct area, but pts with Rd were accompanied with jeopardized collateral vessels more frequently compared with pts without Rd (63 vs 28 %, p < 0.05). In conclusion, Tl Rd in the infarct region may be a sign of peri-infarct ischemia and Tl SMS is a useful tool for evaluating the pathologic aspects of old myocardial infarction. (author)

  9. Roentgenologic evaluation of the intrahepatic redistribution after thorotrast administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Fumio; Kido, Choichiro

    1988-11-01

    The intrahepatic homogeneous opacity due to the thorotrast deposits slowly decrease with time and develop an uneven redistribution. The contrast materia initially settles in the peripancreatic lymph nodes and then moves to the hepatic surface under the diaphragm along the intrahepatic lymphatic flows. The uneven hepatic distribution of the thorotrast deposits in early stage is a high dense zone near the subdiaphragmatic region, while that of the late stage is a high density area in the right lobe. Due to the long exposure of the thorotrast, a fibrotic scarring and a shrinkage may condense the intrahepatic thorotrast deposit and create the uneven high density areas in the right hepatic lobe. Neoplastic changes brought about by the thorotrast deposits may be divided into following two major groups: a neoplastic high density areas and a neoplastic low density areas. The neoplastic high density distributions are seen in 6 cases of cholangiocarcinoma and a case of mixed hepatocellular and cholangiocellular carcinoma. These neoplasms might have a strong affinity for thorotrast particles and condense the thorotrast partcles in the tumor. The neoplastic high density distribution mimics the non-neoplastic high density, thus, it is difficult to detect a thorotrast-induced cholangiocarcinoma at an early stage. Conversely, it is easy to detect a thorotrast-induced hypatocellular carcinoma, because hepatocellular carcinoma has no affinity for thorotrast particle and displace the thorotrast opacifying liver. We call it ''the neoplastic high density distribution''. Knowledge of the uneven intrahepatic distribution of thorotrast deposits is important to the radiologist in order to diagnose a thorotrast-induced neoplasm at the earliest time possible.

  10. Manganese uptake and redistribution in soybean as affected by glyphosate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Antonio Rosolem

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Detrimental effects of glyphosate on plant mineral nutrition have been reported in the literature, particularly on Mn uptake and redistribution. However, in most of the experiments conducted so far glyphosate-susceptible plants were used. Effects of glyphosate on Mn absorption kinetics, accumulation, and distribution within the plant, as well as soybean response to Mn as affected by glyphosate were studied in three experiments. In the first experiment, in nutrient solution, the effect of glyphosate on soybean Mn uptake kinetic parameters (Imax, Km and Cmin was determined. In a second experiment, also in nutrient solution, differential Mn accumulation and distribution were studied for a conventional soybean cultivar and its near-isogenic glyphosate-resistant counterpart as affected by glyphosate. In a third experiment, response of glyphosate-resistant soybean cultivars to Mn application was studied in the presence of glyphosate, in pots with Mn-deficient soil. Maximum Mn influx (Imax was higher in the herbicide-resistant (GR cultivar than in its conventional counterpart. Glyphosate applied to nutrient solution at low rates decreased Km and Cmin. A few days after herbicide treatment, RR soybean plants developed yellowish leaves, a symptom which, in the field, could be misinterpreted as Mn deficiency, but herbicide application had no effect on Mn uptake or distribution within the plant. In the soil experiment, soybean Mn uptake was increased by Mn application, with no effect of glyphosate. Under greenhouse conditions, there was no evidence of deleterious effects of glyphosate on Mn absorption, accumulation and distribution in the plant and on soybean cultivars response to Mn application.

  11. Analysis of climate change impacts on surface energy balance of Lake Huron (estimation of surface energy balance components: Remote sensing approach for water -- atmosphere parameterization)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petchprayoon, Pakorn

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the physical processes of energy exchange between the water surface and atmosphere of Lake Huron in order to explain the processes behind such changes in long-term water levels and to monitor their spatial and temporal fluctuations. The lake surface water temperature and the four components of surface energy balance, including net radiation, latent heat, sensible heat, and heat storage, as well as evaporation rate, were estimated using the daily remotely sensed data from eleven years (2002--2012) with a multi-spatial resolution of 1 km to 5 km using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board Terra satellite, together with in-situ measurements. The regression analysis of the entire lake daily mean water surface temperature revealed a positive trend of 0.1 °C per year, indicating that the lake surface temperature increased by 1.1°C during the period 2002-2012. The warming rate was found to be greatest in the deepest areas of the lake, with a statistically-significant correlation between warming rate and depth. The four components of surface energy balance showed temporal and spatial heterogeneities. There were strong seasonal patterns for all of the components, which were very high in summer and low in winter for net radiation and heat storage. In contrast, the latent heat and sensible heat were very high in the winter and very low in the summer. Approximately 70% of the annual mean 30 min evaporation occurred during the fall and winter seasons, whereas the lowest evaporation rate occurred in March, which was only 3% of the annual mean of 30 min evaporation. There was an increase in the evaporation rate of approximately 1.4 mm m-2 over the 2005--2012 observation period, the water level decreased by 0.04 m during the period 2002--2012, and there was a decrease in total water storage by 1.18 cm during the entire study period (2004--2012). There was obviously a negative correlation between lake

  12. A Case Study of the Impacts of Dust Aerosols on Surface Atmospheric Variables and Energy Budgets in a Semi-Arid Region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Xiao-Lu; GUO Wei-Dong; ZHANG Le; ZHANG Ren-Jian

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a case study investigatingthe impacts of dust aerosols on surface atmospheric variables and energy budgets in a semi-arid region of China.Enhanced observational meteorological data, radiative fluxes, near-surface heat fluxes, and concentrations of dust aerosols were collected from Tongyu station, one of the reference sites of the International Coordinated Energy and Water Cycle Observations Project (CEOP), during a typical dust storm event in June 2006. A comprehensive analysis of these data show that in this semi-arid area, higher wind velocities and a continuously reduced air pressure were identified during the dust storm period.Dust storm events are usually associated with low relative humidity weather conditions, which result in low latent heat flux values. Dust aerosols suspended in the air decrease the net radiation, mainly by reducing the direct solar radiation reaching the land surface. This reduction in net radiation results in a decrease in soil temperatures at a depth of 2 cm. The combination of increased air temperature and decreased soil temperature strengthens the energy exchange of the atmosphere-earth system, increasing the surface sensible heat flux. After the dust storm event,the atmosphere was dominated by higher pressures and was relatively wet and cold. Net radiation and latent heat flux show an evident increase, while the surface sensible heat flux shows a clear decrease.

  13. Sediment redistribution during simulated benthic disturbance and its implications on deep seabed mining

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.; Nath, B.N.; Parthiban, G.; Sankar, S.J.

    A benthic disturbance experiment was conducted in the Central Indian Basin to evaluate the possible effects of sediment redistribution on marine ecosystem during deep-sea mining. The analyses of disturbance features on the seafloor and particle...

  14. Support for redistribution in Western Europe: Assessing the role of religion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegmüller, D.; Scheepers, P.L.H.; Rossteutscher, S.; Jong, E. de

    2012-01-01

    Previous sociological studies have paid little attention to religion as a central determinant of individual preferences for redistribution. In this article we argue that religious individuals, living in increasingly secular societies, differ in political preferences from their secular counterparts.

  15. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1994 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2: Atmospheric and climate research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) occurs in conjunction with the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) and with the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) Program. Solicitations for proposals and peer review were used to select research projects for funding in FY 1995. Nearly all ongoing projects were brought to a close in FY 1994. Therefore, the articles in this volume include a summary of the long-term accomplishments as well as the FY 1994 progress made on these projects. The following articles present summaries of the progress in FY 1994 under these research tasks: continental and oceanic fate of pollutants; research aircraft operations; ASCOT program management; coupling/decoupling of synoptic and valley circulations; interactions between surface exchange processes and atmospheric circulations; and direct simulations of atmospheric turbulence. Climate change research at PNL is aimed at reducing uncertainties in the fundamental processes that control climate systems that currently prevent accurate predictions of climate change and its effects. PNL is responsible for coordinating and integrating the field and laboratory measurement programs, modeling studies, and data analysis activities of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program. In FY 1994, PNL scientists conducted 3 research projects under the ARM program. In the first project, the sensitivity of GCM grid-ad meteorological properties to subgrid-scale variations in surface fluxes and subgrid-scale circulation patterns is being tested in a single column model. In the second project, a new and computationally efficient scheme has been developed for parameterizing stratus cloud microphysics in general circulation models. In the last project, a balloon-borne instrument package is being developed for making research-quality measurements of radiative flux divergence profiles in the lowest 1,500 meters of the Earth`s atmosphere.

  16. Using 137Cs measurements to investigate the influence of erosion and soil redistribution on soil properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on the interaction between soil erosion and soil properties is an important requirement for sustainable management of the soil resource. The relationship between soil properties and the soil redistribution rate, reflecting both erosion and deposition, is an important indicator of this interaction. This relationship is difficult to investigate using traditional approaches to documenting soil redistribution rates involving erosion plots and predictive models. However, the use of the fallout radionuclide 137Cs to document medium-term soil redistribution rates offers a means of overcoming many of the limitations associated with traditional approaches. The study reported sought to demonstrate the potential for using 137Cs measurements to assess the influence of soil erosion and redistribution on soil properties (particle size composition, total C, macronutrients N, P, K and Mg, micronutrients Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu and Zn and other elements, including Ti and As). 137Cs measurements undertaken on 52 soil cores collected within a 7 ha cultivated field located near Colebrooke in Devon, UK were used to establish the magnitude and spatial pattern of medium-term soil redistribution rates within the field. The soil redistribution rates documented for the individual sampling points within the field ranged from an erosion rate of -12.9 t ha-1 yr-1 to a deposition rate of 19.2 t ha-1 yr-1. Composite samples of surface soil (0-5 cm) were collected immediately adjacent to each coring point and these samples were analysed for a range of soil properties. Individual soil properties associated with these samples showed significant variability, with CV values generally lying in the range 10-30%. The relationships between the surface soil properties and the soil redistribution rate were analysed. This analysis demonstrated statistically significant relationships between some soil properties (total phosphorus, % clay, Ti and As) and the soil redistribution rate, but for most

  17. Comparison of noise redistribution in an SOA in pass-through and wavelength conversion mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Tromborg, Bjarne; Mørk, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    We use numerical simulations to investigate the redistribution of noise in a saturated SOA. A comparison of cross-gain modulation and self-modulation pass-through mode shows fundamental differences relevant to all-optical wavelength converters and regenerators.......We use numerical simulations to investigate the redistribution of noise in a saturated SOA. A comparison of cross-gain modulation and self-modulation pass-through mode shows fundamental differences relevant to all-optical wavelength converters and regenerators....

  18. Measurements and simulations of non-linear noise re-distribution in an SOA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Tromborg, Bjarne; Mørk, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    Measurements and statistical simulations demonstrate that a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) induces non-linear noise re-distribution with a strong power and bandwidth dependence. © 2004 Optical Society of America......Measurements and statistical simulations demonstrate that a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) induces non-linear noise re-distribution with a strong power and bandwidth dependence. © 2004 Optical Society of America...

  19. Postmortem redistribution of the heroin metabolites morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide in rabbits over 24 h

    OpenAIRE

    Maskell, Peter D; Albeishy, Mohammed; De Paoli, Giorgia; Wilson, Nathan E.; Seetohul, L. Nitin

    2016-01-01

    The interpretation of postmortem drug levels is complicated by changes in drug blood levels in the postmortem period, a phenomena known as postmortem drug redistribution. We investigated the postmortem redistribution of the heroin metabolites morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide in a rabbit model. Heroin (1mg/kg) was injected into anesthetised rabbit, after 1 hour an auricular vein blood sample was taken and the rabbit was euthanised. Following death rabbits were placed in a sup...

  20. Rainfall redistribution and change of water quality in tropical forest canopies : patterns and persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Motivations and research objectives: During the passage of rain water through a forest canopy two main processes take place. First, water is redistributed; and second, its chemical properties change substantially. The rain water redistribution and the brief contact with plant surfaces results in a large variability of both throughfall and its chemical composition. Since throughfall and its chemistry influence a range of physical, chemical and biological processes at or below the forest floor ...

  1. Redistribution of heart failure as the cause of death: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, Michelle L.; Love, Shelly-Ann; Sorlie, Paul D.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Antini, Carmen; Metcalf, Patricia A.; Hardy, Shakia; Suchindran, Chirayath M; Shahar, Eyal; Heiss, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure is sometimes incorrectly listed as the underlying cause of death (UCD) on death certificates, thus compromising the accuracy and comparability of mortality statistics. Statistical redistribution of the UCD has been used to examine the effect of misclassification of the UCD attributed to heart failure, but sex- and race-specific redistribution of deaths on coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in the United States has not been examined. Methods We used coarsened exact...

  2. A case for redistribution? Income inequality and wealth concentration in the recent crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Onaran, Özlem; Goda, Thomas; Stockhammer, Engelbert

    2014-01-01

    Several Nobel laureates economists have called for redistributive policies. This paper shows that there is a strong case for redistributive policies because the global increase of income inequality and wealth concentration was an important driver for the financial and Eurozone crisis. The high levels of income inequality resulted in balance of payment imbalances and rising debt levels. Rising wealth concentration contributed to the crisis because the increasing asset demand from the rich play...

  3. The chimera of redistribution: 'Black Economic Empowerment' (BEE) in the South African fishing industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ponte, Stefano; van Sittert, Lance

    2006-01-01

    Redistributive processes do not belong to the pantheon of Neo-liberalism. In this framework, inequality of resources can only be addressed by equality of opportunity. Even in ‘softer’ impersonations of Neo-liberalism, corporate (mis)behaviour is tamed by corporate social responsibility, not by state disciplinary action. Yet, in the context of post-apartheid South Africa, the state can not ignore political pressure for redistribution, even if only rhetorically. The process of Black Economic Em...

  4. Blood flow redistribution and ventilation-perfusion mismatch during embolic pulmonary arterial occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Burrowes, K. S.; Clark, A. R.; Tawhai, M.H

    2011-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism causes redistribution of blood in the lung, which impairs ventilation/perfusion matching and gas exchange and can elevate pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) by increasing pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). An anatomically-based multi-scale model of the human pulmonary circulation was used to simulate pre- and post-occlusion flow, to study blood flow redistribution in the presence of an embolus, and to evaluate whether reduction in perfused vascular bed is sufficient ...

  5. Spatial variation in hydraulic redistribution by the desert shrub, Sarcobatus vermiculatus, at multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, J. H.; Donovan, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    Passive water movement through roots from moist to dry soils, i.e. hydraulic redistribution, can be important for plant water status, vegetation water use, nutrient acquisition and cycling, and competition/facilitation among plant species. Although hydraulic redistribution is known from many species and habitats, little is known about how it varies at multiple spatial scales across species ranges. In the Mono Basin, California ecosystem we documented variation in hydraulic redistribution by the desert halophytic shrub, Sarcobatus vermiculatus, at three spatial scales: landscape, shrub-island versus interspace, and depth. Hydraulic redistribution varied among sites across the landscape. It was most prevalent at a low salinity site with deep groundwater (9.4 m), but of lower magnitude at more saline sites with shallower groundwater. At the low salinity site, infiltration from snowmelt, the predominant precipitation input, was confined to interspaces between shrub islands. Shrub-island soils remained very dry after snowmelt, even in a year with high total snow accumulation. Shrub-island soils, however, had substantial net increases in Ψsoil during week- to month-long periods in the early part of the growing season, concomitant with self-irrigated root growth into these dry soils, as documented with mini-rhizotrons. The source of this root-system-transported water was both moist interspace soils and moist deep soil layers. Wetting up of otherwise dry shrub-island soils is likely essential for nutrient mineralization and acquisition from trapped litter, making hydraulic redistribution an important driver of landscape-scale biogeochemical cycles in these saline basins. In addition, hydraulic redistribution buffered spatial variation in water availability among sites, depths, depth to groundwater, and for plants with different root distributions, such that plant Ψpredawn and Ψmidday differed little across the landscape. Multi-scale variation in hydraulic redistribution

  6. The Enlargement of the European Union and the Redistribution of Seigniorage Wealth

    OpenAIRE

    Feist, Holger

    2001-01-01

    In the course of the EU enlargement process, the participation of accession countries in the European Monetary Union might lead to a significant redistribution of seigniorage wealth if current regulations prevail. In general, accession countries will be winners from this redistribution, for example Poland with 12.9 billion euros, Romania with 9.9 billion euros or Hungary with 3.3 billion euros. Correspondingly, the current member countries of the European Union face costs of 35.3 billion euro...

  7. Preferences for Redistribution and Pensions: What Can We Learn from Experiments?

    OpenAIRE

    Tausch, Franziska; Potters, Jan; Riedl, Arno

    2011-01-01

    Redistribution is an inevitable feature of collective pension schemes. It is still largely an open question what people‘s preferences are regarding redistribution—both through pensions schemes as well as more generally. It would seem that economists have little to say about this question, as they routinely assume that people are predominantly selfish. Economic experiments have revealed, however, that most people do in fact have redistributional preferences that are not merely inspired by self...

  8. Redistribution and Group Participation: Comparative Experimental Evidence from Africa and the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Marcel Fafchamps; Ruth Vargas Hill

    2015-01-01

    We design an original laboratory experiment to investigate whether redistributive actions hinder the formation of Pareto-improving groups. We test, in an anonymous setting with no feedback, whether people choose to destroy or steal the endowment of others and whether they choose to give to others, when granted the option. We then test whether subjects join a group that increases their endowment but exposes them to redistribution. We conduct the experiment in three very different settings with...

  9. Thermally induced cation redistribution in Fe-bearing oxy-dravite and potential geothermometric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Ferdinando; Skogby, Henrik; Hålenius, Ulf

    2016-05-01

    Iron-bearing oxy-dravite was thermally treated in air and hydrogen atmosphere at 800 °C to study potential changes in Fe, Mg and Al ordering over the octahedrally coordinated Y and Z sites and to explore possible applications to intersite geothermometry based on tourmaline. Overall, the experimental data (structural refinement, Mössbauer, infrared and optical absorption spectroscopy) show that heating Fe-bearing tourmalines results in disordering of Fe over Y and Z balanced by ordering of Mg at Y, whereas Al does not change appreciably. The Fe disorder depends on temperature, but less on redox conditions. The degree of Fe3+-Fe2+ reduction is limited despite strongly reducing conditions, indicating that the f O2 conditions do not exclusively control the Fe oxidation state at the present experimental conditions. Untreated and treated samples have similar short- and long-range crystal structures, which are explained by stable Al-extended clusters around the O1 and O3 sites. In contrast to the stable Al clusters that preclude any temperature-dependent Mg-Al order-disorder, there occurs Mg diffusion linked to temperature-dependent exchange with Fe. Ferric iron mainly resides around O2- at O1 rather than (OH)-, but its intersite disorder induced by thermal treatment indicates that Fe redistribution is the driving force for Mg-Fe exchange and that its diffusion rates are significant at these temperatures. With increasing temperature, Fe progressively disorders over Y and Z, whereas Mg orders at Y according to the order-disorder reaction: YFe + ZMg → ZFe + YMg. The presented findings are important for interpretation of the post-crystallization history of both tourmaline and tourmaline host rocks and imply that successful tourmaline geothermometers may be developed by thermal calibration of the Mg-Fe order-disorder reaction, whereas any thermometers based on Mg-Al disorder will be insensitive and involve large uncertainties.

  10. Redistribution of soil water by a saprotrophic fungus enhances carbon mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhr, Alexander; Borken, Werner; Spohn, Marie; Matzner, Egbert

    2015-11-24

    The desiccation of upper soil horizons is a common phenomenon, leading to a decrease in soil microbial activity and mineralization. Recent studies have shown that fungal communities and fungal-based food webs are less sensitive and better adapted to soil desiccation than bacterial-based food webs. One reason for a better fungal adaptation to soil desiccation may be hydraulic redistribution of water by mycelia networks. Here we show that a saprotrophic fungus (Agaricus bisporus) redistributes water from moist (-0.03 MPa) into dry (-9.5 MPa) soil at about 0.3 cm ⋅ min(-1) in single hyphae, resulting in an increase in soil water potential after 72 h. The increase in soil moisture by hydraulic redistribution significantly enhanced carbon mineralization by 2,800% and enzymatic activity by 250-350% in the previously dry soil compartment within 168 h. Our results demonstrate that hydraulic redistribution can partly compensate water deficiency if water is available in other zones of the mycelia network. Hydraulic redistribution is likely one of the mechanisms behind higher drought resistance of soil fungi compared with bacteria. Moreover, hydraulic redistribution by saprotrophic fungi is an underrated pathway of water transport in soils and may lead to a transfer of water to zones of high fungal activity. PMID:26554004

  11. Elemental redistribution behavior in tellurite glass induced by high repetition rate femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Abnormal elements redistribution behavior was observed in tellurite glass. • The refractive index and Raman intensity distribution changed significantly. • The relative glass composition remained unchanged while the glass density changed. • First time report on the abnormal element redistribution behavior in glass. • The glass network structure determines the elemental redistribution behavior. - Abstract: The success in the fabrication of micro-structures in glassy materials using femtosecond laser irradiation has proved its potential applications in the construction of three-dimensional micro-optical components or devices. In this paper, we report the elemental redistribution behavior in tellurite glass after the irradiation of high repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses. The relative glass composition remained unchanged while the glass density changed significantly, which is quite different from previously reported results about the high repetition rate femtosecond laser induced elemental redistribution in silicate glasses. The involved mechanism is discussed with the conclusion that the glass network structure plays the key role to determine the elemental redistribution. This observation not only helps to understand the interaction process of femtosecond laser with glassy materials, but also has potential applications in the fabrication of micro-optical devices

  12. Derivation of upward muon energy spectra in the TeV range produced by neutrinos from 3C273 AGN and diffuse atmospheric sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutrino-induced upward muon energy spectrum on Earth at the TeV energy range emitted by the point source 3C273 AGN has been calculated using the AGN-emitted neutrino spectrum of Szabo and Protheroe and the result has been compared with that expected from background neutrinos. The QCD-based model of Berezinsky et al. has been fairly employed to estimate the muon contribution due to the charge current interactions in rock. The diffuse neutrino-induced upward muon energy spectrum from AGN sources has also been estimated and compared with the expected results from the spectra of prompt neutrinos and atmospheric backgrounds. It is found that the upward muon fluxes generated by AGN neutrinos are dominating the Universe beyond 10 TeV muon energy

  13. Derivation of upward muon energy spectra in the TeV range produced by neutrinos from 3C273 AGN and diffuse atmospheric sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, D.P. [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Theoretical Physics

    1998-01-01

    The neutrino-induced upward muon energy spectrum on Earth at the TeV energy range emitted by the point source 3C273 AGN has been calculated using the AGN-emitted neutrino spectrum of Szabo and Protheroe and the result has been compared with that expected from background neutrinos. The QCD-based model of Berezinsky et al. has been fairly employed to estimate the muon contribution due to the charge current interactions in rock. The diffuse neutrino-induced upward muon energy spectrum from AGN sources has also been estimated and compared with the expected results from the spectra of prompt neutrinos and atmospheric backgrounds. It is found that the upward muon fluxes generated by AGN neutrinos are dominating the Universe beyond 10 TeV muon energy.

  14. Stellar model atmospheres with magnetic line blanketing. II. Introduction of polarized radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, S A

    2006-01-01

    The technique of model atmosphere calculation for magnetic Ap and Bp stars with polarized radiative transfer and magnetic line blanketing is presented. A grid of model atmospheres of A and B stars are computed. These calculations are based on direct treatment of the opacities due to the bound-bound transitions that ensures an accurate and detailed description of the line absorption and anomalous Zeeman splitting. The set of model atmospheres was calculated for the field strengths between 1 and 40 kG. The high-resolution energy distribution, photometric colors and the hydrogen Balmer line profiles are computed for magnetic stars with different metallicities and are compared to those of non-magnetic reference models and to the previous paper of this series. The results of modelling confirmed the main outcomes of the previous study: energy redistribution from UV to the visual region and flux depression at 5200A. However, we found that effects of enhanced line blanketing when transfer for polarized radiation take...

  15. Demographic intermediation between development and population redistribution in Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, A A

    1983-12-01

    degrees and will depend on the pace of decline of each vital rate and the trend of migration. In conclusion, the regional patterns of population growth and redistribution are likely to be uneven in the foreseeable future, unless a genuine policy of regionalizing is effectively implemented. PMID:12312893

  16. Analysis of Charge Redistribution During Self-discharge of Double-Layer Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Chenglong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yin, Yajiang; You, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Self-discharge is an important factor that severely affects the performance of double-layer supercapacitors. This paper studies the self-discharge behavior of double-layer supercapacitors with experimental and modeling methods. The movement of ions, side-reactions, and instability of the double layer are taken into consideration. The influence of various factors, such as the initial voltage, charge duration, short-term history, and current, on the self-discharge is simulated, showing good agreement with experimental data. The simulation of the ion distribution also gives a detailed explanation of the mechanism of self-discharge and verifies the interpretation of the relaxation process proposed in a recent study. It further clarifies the key role of the charging/discharging current in influencing charge redistribution during self-discharge, which was neglected in previous studies. The results show that the relaxation period during which the supercapacitor loses energy very quickly is due to the unbalanced distribution of ions, and it could be avoided by further charging or by applying a small charging current.

  17. Laser cooling of dense atomic gases by collisional redistribution of radiation and spectroscopy of molecular dimers in a dense buffer gas environment

    CERN Document Server

    Saß, Anne; Christopoulos, Stavros; Knicker, Katharina; Moroshkin, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We study laser cooling of atomic gases by collisional redistribution of fluorescence. In a high pressure buffer gas regime, frequent collisions perturb the energy levels of alkali atoms, which allows for the absorption of a far red detuned irradiated laser beam. Subsequent spontaneous decay occurs close to the unperturbed resonance frequency, leading to a cooling of the dense gas mixture by redistribution of fluorescence. Thermal deflection spectroscopy indicates large relative temperature changes down to and even below room temperature starting from an initial cell temperature near 700 K. We are currently performing a detailed analysis of the temperature distribution in the cell. As we expect this cooling technique to work also for molecular-noble gas mixtures, we also present initial spectroscopic experiments on alkali-dimers in a dense buffer gas surrounding.

  18. Simulation of infiltration and redistribution of intense rainfall using Land Surface Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Anna; Verhoef, Anne; Cloke, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    Flooding from intense rainfall (FFIR) can cause widespread damage and disruption. Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models provide distributed information about atmospheric conditions, such as precipitation, that can lead to a flooding event. Short duration, high intensity rainfall events are generally poorly predicted by NWP models, because of the high spatiotemporal resolution required and because of the way the convective rainfall is described in the model. The resolution of NWP models is ever increasing. Better understanding of complex hydrological processes and the effect of scale is important in order to improve the prediction of magnitude and duration of such events, in the context of disaster management. Working as part of the NERC SINATRA project, we evaluated how the Land Surface Model (LSM) components of NWP models cope with high intensity rainfall input and subsequent infiltration problems. Both in terms of the amount of water infiltrated in the soil store, as well as the timing and the amount of surface and subsurface runoff generated. The models investigated are SWAP (Soil Water Air Plant, Alterra, the Netherlands, van Dam 1997), JULES (Joint UK Land Environment Simulator a component of Unified Model in UK Met Office, Best et al. 2011) and CHTESSEL (Carbon and Hydrology- Tiled ECMWF Scheme for Surface Exchanges over Land, Balsamo et al. 2009) We analysed the numerical aspects arising from discontinuities (or sharp gradients) in forcing and/or the model solution. These types of infiltration configurations were tested in the laboratory (Vachaud 1971), for some there are semi-analytical solutions (Philip 1957, Parlange 1972, Vanderborght 2005) or reference numerical solutions (Haverkamp 1977, van Dam 2000, Vanderborght 2005). The maximum infiltration by the surface, Imax, is in general dependent on atmospheric conditions, surface type, soil type, soil moisture content θ, and surface orographic factor σ. The models used differ in their approach to

  19. Charge-state and element-resolved ion energies in the cathodic arc plasma from composite AlCr cathodes in argon, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Robert; Anders, André

    2014-01-01

    The energy distribution functions of ions in the cathodic arc plasma using composite AlCr cathodes were measured as a function of the background gas pressure in the range 0.5 to 3.5 Pa for different cathode compositions and gas atmospheres. The most abundant aluminium ions were Al$^{+}$ regardless of the background gas species, whereas Cr$^{2+}$ ions were dominating in Ar and N$_2$ and Cr$^{+}$ in O$_2$ atmospheres. The energy distributions of the aluminium and chromium ions typically consisted of a high energy fraction due to acceleration in the expanding plasma plume from the cathode spot and thermalised ions that were subjected to collisions in the plasma cloud. The fraction of the latter increased with increasing background gas pressure. Atomic nitrogen and oxygen ions showed similar energy distributions as the aluminium and chromium ions, whereas the argon and molecular nitrogen and oxygen ions were mainly thermalised. In addition to the positively charged metal and gas ions, negatively charged oxygen an...

  20. Energy Loss of Solar $p$ Modes due to the excitation of Magnetic Sausage Tube Waves: Importance of Coupling the Upper Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Gascoyne, Andrew; Hindman, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    We consider damping and absorption of solar $p$ modes due to their energy loss to magnetic tube waves that can freely carry energy out of the acoustic cavity. The coupling of $p$ modes and sausage tube waves is studied in a model atmosphere composed of a polytropic interior above which lies an isothermal upper atmosphere. The sausage tube waves, excited by $p$ modes, propagate along a magnetic fibril which is assumed to be a vertically aligned, stratified, thin magnetic flux-tube. The deficit of $p$-mode energy is quantified through the damping rate, $\\Gamma$ and absorption coefficient, $\\alpha$. The variation of $\\Gamma$ and $\\alpha$ as a function of frequency and the tube's plasma properties is studied in detail. Previous similar studies have considered only a subphotospheric layer, modelled as a polytrope that has been truncated at the photosphere (Bogdan et al. (1996), Hindman & Jain 2008, Gascoyne et al. (2011)). Such studies have found that the resulting energy loss by the $p$ modes is very sensitiv...