WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric energy redistribution

  1. Solar Atmospheric Magnetic Energy Coupling: Radiative Redistribution Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, N. Brice; Gendre, Bruce; Morris, David C.; Chesny, David

    2016-07-01

    Essential to many outstanding solar and stellar physics problems is elucidating the dynamic magnetic to radiative energy coupling of their atmospheres. Using three years of Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Heliosemic Magnetic Imager data of gross atmospheric feature classes, an investigation of magnetic and radiative energy redistribution is detailed. Self-consistent radiative to temperature distributions, that include magnetic weighting, of each feature class is revealed via utilizing the upper limit of thermodynamic atmospheric conditions provided by Active Region Cores (ARCs). Distinctly interesting is that our radiative energy distributions, though indicative to a linearly coupling with temperature, highlight the manifestation of diffuse ``unorganized" emission at upper transition region -- lower coronal regimes. Results we emphasize as correlating remarkably with emerging evidence for similar dependencies of magnetic energy redistribution efficiency with temperature, i.e., linearly with an embedded diffuse emitting region. We present evidence that our magnetic and radiative energy coupling descriptions are consistent with established universal scaling laws for large solar atmospheric temperature gradients and descriptions to the unresolved emission, as well as their insight to a potential origin of large variability in their previous reports. Finally, our work casts new light on the utility of narrowband observations as ad hoc tools for detailing solar atmospheric thermodynamic profiles, thus, presenting significant provisions to the field of solar and stellar physics, i.e., nature of coronae heating.

  2. THE EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION ON HOT JOVIAN ATMOSPHERES: HEAT REDISTRIBUTION AND ENERGY DISSIPATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, Rosalba [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Heng, Kevin [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Astronomy, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Pont, Frederic [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-20

    Hot Jupiters, due to the proximity to their parent stars, are subjected to a strong irradiating flux that governs their radiative and dynamical properties. We compute a suite of three-dimensional circulation models with dual-band radiative transfer, exploring a relevant range of irradiation temperatures, both with and without temperature inversions. We find that, for irradiation temperatures T{sub irr} {approx}< 2000 K, heat redistribution is very efficient, producing comparable dayside and nightside fluxes. For T{sub irr} Almost-Equal-To 2200-2400 K, the redistribution starts to break down, resulting in a high day-night flux contrast. Our simulations indicate that the efficiency of redistribution is primarily governed by the ratio of advective to radiative timescales. Models with temperature inversions display a higher day-night contrast due to the deposition of starlight at higher altitudes, but we find this opacity-driven effect to be secondary compared to the effects of irradiation. The hotspot offset from the substellar point is large when insolation is weak and redistribution is efficient, and decreases as redistribution breaks down. The atmospheric flow can be potentially subjected to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (as indicated by the Richardson number) only in the uppermost layers, with a depth that penetrates down to pressures of a few millibars at most. Shocks penetrate deeper, down to several bars in the hottest model. Ohmic dissipation generally occurs down to deeper levels than shock dissipation (to tens of bars), but the penetration depth varies with the atmospheric opacity. The total dissipated Ohmic power increases steeply with the strength of the irradiating flux and the dissipation depth recedes into the atmosphere, favoring radius inflation in the most irradiated objects. A survey of the existing data, as well as the inferences made from them, reveals that our results are broadly consistent with the observational trends.

  3. Atmospheric Heat Redistribution on Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Becker, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Infrared lightcurves of transiting hot Jupiters present a trend in which the atmospheres of the hottest planets are less efficient at redistributing the stellar energy absorbed on their daysides---and thus have a larger day-night temperature contrast---than colder planets. No predictive atmospheric model has been published that identifies which dynamical mechanisms determine the atmospheric heat redistribution efficiency on tidally locked exoplanets. Here we present a two-layer shallow water model of the atmospheric dynamics on synchronously rotating planets that explains the observed trend. Our model shows that planets with weak friction and weak irradiation exhibit a banded zonal flow with minimal day-night temperature differences, while models with strong irradiation and/or strong friction exhibit a day-night flow pattern with order-unity fractional day-night temperature differences. To interpret the model, we develop a scaling theory that shows that the timescale for gravity waves to propagate horizontall...

  4. The Effects of Irradiation on Hot Jovian Atmospheres: Heat Redistribution and Energy Dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Perna, Rosalba; Pont, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Hot Jupiters, due to the proximity to their parent stars, are subjected to a strong irradiating flux which governs their radiative and dynamical properties. We compute a suite of 3D circulation models with dual-band radiative transfer, exploring a relevant range of irradiation temperatures (770K <~ Tirr <~ 3000K), both with and without temperature inversions. We find that, for irradiation temperatures Tirr <~ 2000K, heat redistribution is very efficient, producing comparable day- and night-side fluxes. For Tirr ~ 2200-2400K, redistribution starts to break down, resulting in a high day-night flux contrast. Our simulations support the physical intuition that the efficiency of heat transfer is primarily governed by the ratio of advective to radiative timescales. For the same Tirr, models with temperature inversions display a higher day-night contrast, but we find this opacity-driven effect to be secondary to irradiation. The hotspot offset from the substellar point is large when insolation is weak and r...

  5. Atmospheric heat redistribution and collapse on tidally locked rocky planets

    CERN Document Server

    Wordsworth, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric collapse is likely to be of fundamental importance to tidally locked rocky exoplanets but remains understudied. Here, general results on the heat transport and stability of tidally locked terrestrial-type atmospheres are reported. First, the problem is modeled with an idealized 3D general circulation model (GCM) with gray gas radiative transfer. It is shown that over a wide range of parameters the atmospheric boundary layer, rather than the large-scale circulation, is the key to understanding the planetary energy balance. Through a scaling analysis of the interhemispheric energy transfer, theoretical expressions for the day-night temperature difference and surface wind speed are created that reproduce the GCM results without tuning. Next, the GCM is used with correlated-k radiative transfer to study heat transport for two real gases (CO2 and CO). For CO2, empirical formulae for the collapse pressure as a function of planetary mass and stellar flux are produced, and critical pressures for atmospher...

  6. Income- and energy-taxation for redistribution in general equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a 3-factor General Equilibrium (GE)-model with a continuum of ability, the employed choose optimal labour supply, and equilibrium unemployment is determined by benefits funded by wage- and energy-taxes. Aggregate labour and the net wage may increase or decrease with taxation (and unemployment), and conditions for a reduction in redistributive wage-taxes to be Pareto-improving are derived. A small energy tax always raises the net wage, providing the wage tax is reduced to maintain constant employment and a balanced budget. High ability households prefer higher energy taxes when externalities are uniformly distributed and non-distorting. (author)

  7. Partial redistribution in 3D non-LTE radiative transfer in solar atmosphere models

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhorukov, Andrii V

    2016-01-01

    Resonance spectral lines such as H I Ly {\\alpha}, Mg II h&k, and Ca II H&K that form in the solar chromosphere are influenced by the effects of 3D radiative transfer as well as partial redistribution (PRD). So far no one has modeled these lines including both effects simultaneously owing to the high computing demands of existing algorithms. Such modeling is however indispensable for accurate diagnostics of the chromosphere. We present a computationally tractable method to treat PRD scattering in 3D model atmospheres using a 3D non-LTE radiative transfer code. To make the method memory-friendly, we use the hybrid approximation of Leenaarts et al. (2012) for the redistribution integral. To make it fast, we use linear interpolation on equidistant frequency grids. We verify our algorithm against computations with the RH code and analyze it for stability, convergence, and usefulness of acceleration using model atoms of Mg II with the h&k lines and H I with the Ly {\\alpha} line treated in PRD. A typical...

  8. Biomass burning drives atmospheric nutrient redistribution within forested peatlands in Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponette-González, Alexandra G.; Curran, Lisa M.; Pittman, Alice M.; Carlson, Kimberly M.; Steele, Bethel G.; Ratnasari, Dessy; Mujiman; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2016-08-01

    Biomass burning plays a critical role not only in atmospheric emissions, but also in the deposition and redistribution of biologically important nutrients within tropical landscapes. We quantified the influence of fire on biogeochemical fluxes of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and sulfur (S) in a 12 ha forested peatland in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Total (inorganic + organic) N, {{{{NO}}}3}- -N, {{{{NH}}}4}+ -N, total P, {{{{PO}}}4}3- -P, and {{{{SO}}}4}2- -S fluxes were measured in throughfall and bulk rainfall weekly from July 2013 to September 2014. To identify fire events, we used concentrations of particulate matter (PM10) and MODIS Active Fire Product counts within 20 and 100 km radius buffers surrounding the site. Dominant sources of throughfall nutrient deposition were explored using cluster and back-trajectory analysis. Our findings show that this Bornean peatland receives some of the highest P (7.9 kg {{{{PO}}}4}3- -P ha-1yr-1) and S (42 kg {{{{SO}}}4}2- -S ha-1yr-1) deposition reported globally, and that N deposition (8.7 kg inorganic N ha-1yr-1) exceeds critical load limits suggested for tropical forests. Six major dry periods and associated fire events occurred during the study. Seventy-eight percent of fires within 20 km and 40% within 100 km of the site were detected within oil palm plantation leases (industrial agriculture) on peatlands. These fires had a disproportionate impact on below-canopy nutrient fluxes. Post-fire throughfall events contributed >30% of the total inorganic N ({{{{NO}}}3}- -N + {{{{NH}}}4}+ -N) and {{{{PO}}}4}3- -P flux to peatland soils during the study period. Our results indicate that biomass burning associated with agricultural peat fires is a major source of N, P, and S in throughfall and could rival industrial pollution as an input to these systems during major fire years. Given the sheer magnitude of fluxes reported here, fire-related redistribution of nutrients may have significant fertilizing or acidifying effects on

  9. Pressure-strain energy redistribution in compressible turbulence: return-to-isotropy versus kinetic-potential energy equipartition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kurnchul; Venugopal, Vishnu; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2016-08-01

    Return-to-isotropy and kinetic-potential energy equipartition are two fundamental pressure-moderated energy redistributive processes in anisotropic compressible turbulence. Pressure-strain correlation tensor redistributes energy among various Reynolds stress components and pressure-dilatation is responsible for energy reallocation between dilatational kinetic and potential energies. The competition and interplay between these pressure-based processes are investigated in this study. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of low turbulent Mach number dilatational turbulence are performed employing the hybrid thermal Lattice Boltzman method (HTLBM). It is found that a tendency towards equipartition precedes proclivity for isotropization. An evolution towards equipartition has a collateral but critical effect on return-to-isotropy. The preferential transfer of energy from strong (rather than weak) Reynolds stress components to potential energy accelerates the isotropization of dilatational fluctuations. Understanding of these pressure-based redistributive processes is critical for developing insight into the character of compressible turbulence.

  10. Symmetry, vibrational energy redistribution and vibronic coupling: The internal conversion processes of cycloketones

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhlman, Thomas Scheby; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Sølling, Theis I.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we discern two basic mechanisms of internal conversion processes; one direct, where immediate activation of coupling modes leads to fast population transfer and one indirect, where internal vibrational energy redistribution leads to equidistribution of energy, i.e., ergodicity, and slower population transfer follows. Using model vibronic coupling Hamiltonians parameterized on the basis of coupled-cluster calculations, we investigate the nature of the Rydberg to valence excited-...

  11. Analyzing intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution via the overlap intensity-level velocity correlator

    OpenAIRE

    Keshavamurthy, Srihari; Cerruti, Nicholas R.; Tomsovic, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Numerous experimental and theoretical studies have established that intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) in isolated molecules has a heirarchical tier structure. The tier structure implies strong correlations between the energy level motions of a quantum system and its intensity-weighted spectrum. A measure, which explicitly accounts for this correaltion, was first introduced by one of us as a sensitive probe of phase space localization. It correlates eigenlevel velocities w...

  12. The anisotropic redistribution of free energy for gyrokinetic plasma turbulence in a Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Alejandro Bañón; Teaca, Bogdan; Jenko, Frank

    2016-04-01

    For a Z-pinch geometry, we report on the nonlinear redistribution of free energy across scales perpendicular to the magnetic guide field, for a turbulent plasma described in the framework of gyrokinetics. The analysis is performed using a local flux-surface approximation, in a regime dominated by electrostatic fluctuations driven by the entropy mode, with both ion and electron species being treated kinetically. To explore the anisotropic nature of the free energy redistribution caused by the emergence of zonal flows, we use a polar coordinate representation for the field-perpendicular directions and define an angular density for the scale flux. Positive values for the classically defined (angle integrated) scale flux, which denote a direct energy cascade, are shown to be also composed of negative angular sections, a fact that impacts our understanding of the backscatter of energy and the way in which it enters the modeling of sub-grid scales for turbulence. A definition for the flux of free energy across each perpendicular direction is introduced as well, which shows that the redistribution of energy in the presence of zonal flows is highly anisotropic.

  13. Experimental study of a transformer with superconducting elements for fault current limitation and energy redistribution

    OpenAIRE

    Meerovich, V.; V. Sokolovsky

    2005-01-01

    Numerous proposed and developed superconducting fault current limiters and self-limiting transformers limit successfully fault currents but do not provide uninterrupted supplying of consumers. A design investigated in the work combines the functions of a conventional transformer with the functions of fast energy redistribution and fault protection. The device constitutes a transformer containing an additional high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil short-circuited by a thin film HTS switc...

  14. Polarized scattering with Paschen-Back effect, hyperfine structure, and partial frequency redistribution in magnetized stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Sowmya, K; Stenflo, J O; Sampoorna, M

    2015-01-01

    $F$-state interference significantly modifies the polarization produced by scattering processes in the solar atmosphere. Its signature in the emergent Stokes spectrum in the absence of magnetic fields is depolarization in the line core. In the present paper, we derive the partial frequency redistribution (PRD) matrix that includes interference between the upper hyperfine structure states of a two-level atom in the presence of magnetic fields of arbitrary strengths. The theory is applied to the Na I D$_2$ line that is produced by the transition between the lower $J=1/2$ and upper $J=3/2$ states which split into $F$ states because of the coupling with the nuclear spin $I_s=3/2$. The properties of the PRD matrix for the single-scattering case is explored, in particular, the effects of the magnetic field in the Paschen--Back regime and their usefulness as a tool for the diagnostics of solar magnetic fields.

  15. Symmetry, vibrational energy redistribution and vibronic coupling: The internal conversion processes of cycloketones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlman, Thomas Scheby; Sauer, Stephan P.A.; Sølling, Theis I.;

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we discern two basic mechanisms of internal conversion processes; one direct, where immediate activation of coupling modes leads to fast population transfer and one indirect, where internal vibrational energy redistribution leads to equidistribution of energy, i.e., ergodicity, and...... slower population transfer follows. Using model vibronic coupling Hamiltonians parameterized on the basis of coupled-cluster calculations, we investigate the nature of the Rydberg to valence excited-state internal conversion in two cycloketones, cyclobutanone and cyclopentanone. The two basic mechanisms...

  16. The anisotropic redistribution of free energy for gyrokinetic plasma turbulence in a Z-pinch

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro, Alejandro Banon; Jenko, Frank

    2015-01-01

    For a Z-pinch geometry, we report on the nonlinear redistribution of free energy across scales perpendicular to the magnetic guide field, for a turbulent plasma described in the framework of gyrokinetics. The analysis is performed using a local flux-surface approximation, in a regime dominated by electrostatic fluctuations driven by the entropy mode, with both ion and electron species being treated kinetically. To explore the anisotropic nature of the free energy redistribution caused by the emergence of zonal flows, we use a polar coordinate representation for the field-perpendicular directions and define an angular density for the scale flux. Positive values for the classically defined (angle integrated) scale flux, which denote a direct energy cascade, are shown to be also composed of negative angular sections, a fact that impacts our understanding of the backscatter of energy and the way in which it enters the modeling of sub-grid scales for turbulence. A definition for the flux of free energy across each...

  17. State transitions redistribute rather than dissipate energy between the two photosystems in Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocki, Wojciech J; Santabarbara, Stefano; Mosebach, Laura; Wollman, Francis-André; Rappaport, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis converts sunlight into biologically useful compounds, thus fuelling practically the entire biosphere. This process involves two photosystems acting in series powered by light harvesting complexes (LHCs) that dramatically increase the energy flux to the reaction centres. These complexes are the main targets of the regulatory processes that allow photosynthetic organisms to thrive across a broad range of light intensities. In microalgae, one mechanism for adjusting the flow of energy to the photosystems, state transitions, has a much larger amplitude than in terrestrial plants, whereas thermal dissipation of energy, the dominant regulatory mechanism in plants, only takes place after acclimation to high light. Here we show that, at variance with recent reports, microalgal state transitions do not dissipate light energy but redistribute it between the two photosystems, thereby allowing a well-balanced influx of excitation energy. PMID:27249564

  18. Twin boundary energy and characterization of charge redistribution near the twin boundaries of cupperate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Mahnaz [Faculty of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoshnevisan, Bahram, E-mail: m.mohammadi_2@grad.kashanu.ac.ir [Faculty of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Javad Hashemifar, S. [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Ab initio simulation for twin boundary energy in YBCO system for the 1st time. • Study of the twin boundary energy variation versus the inserted strain. • Proportionality of twin lamella width by the inserted strain. • Local charge transfer and charge redistribution on the twin planes. • Total DOSs for the twined system at Fermi level is higher than the untwined one. • This explain the effect of twin boundaries in agreement with experimental data. - Abstract: Ab-initio calculations under general gradient approximation have been employed for the first time to find out twin boundary energy, γ, in twined YBCO systems. Despite a vast discrepancy in reported experimental values, our results show that the γ value falls in the range of 40–85 mJ/m{sup 2}. On the other hand, functional form of γ versus inserted strains shows that the mean value for the twin width lamella would tend to approach zero as the strain goes to zero. We have also investigated the local charge transfer and the modification of the electronic states of the basal and twin planes in YBCO, because the charge redistribution at interfaces can modify transport across the grains considerably and determine the applicability of high-T{sub c} superconductors in the electronic applications. The total density of electronic states at the Fermi level for the twined system is enhanced in comparison with the untwined one. Our results explain the influence of twin boundaries in superconductive properties of YBCO, in experimental situations.

  19. Theoretical investigation of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution in HFCO and DFCO induced by an external field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasin, Gauthier; Iung, Christophe; Gatti, Fabien; Richter, Falk; Léonard, Céline; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2008-10-14

    The present paper is devoted to a full quantum mechanical study of the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution in HFCO and DFCO. In contrast to our previous studies [Pasin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 124, 194304 (2006) and 126, 024302 (2007)], the dynamics is now performed in the presence of an external time-dependent field. This more closely reflects the experimental conditions. A six-dimensional dipole surface is computed. The multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method is exploited to propagate the corresponding six-dimensional wave packets. Special emphasis is placed on the excitation of the out-of-plane bending vibration and on the dissociation of the molecule. In the case of DFCO, we predict that it is possible to excite the out-of-plane bending mode of vibration and to drive the dissociation to DF+CO with only one laser pulse with a fixed frequency and without excitation of an electronic state. PMID:19045144

  20. Quantum dynamics simulations of energy redistribution in HO-SO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Stewart K., E-mail: S.K.Reed@physics.org [School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Glowacki, David R., E-mail: drglowacki@yahoo.com [School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Shalashilin, Dmitrii V., E-mail: D.Shalashilin@leeds.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-12

    Graphical abstract: This paper presents quantum dynamics simulations using the coupled coherent states method of the dissociation of HO-SO{sub 2} and compares the results to those from classical dynamics calculations. The pictogram illustrates the time dependence of the energy in the HO-SO{sub 2} stretch mode and a typical square modulus of a morse wave function in phase space. - Abstract: Quantum dynamics simulations of HO-SO{sub 2} using the coupled coherent state methodology are described in detail. Motivated by the assumption of fast intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) within the nascent collision complex in measurements of the association rate coefficients using the 'proxy' method, we examine IVR within HO-SO{sub 2}. Like our earlier classical dynamics calculations [D.R. Glowacki, S.K. Reed, M.J. Pilling, D.V. Shalashilin, E. Martinez-Nunez, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11 (2009) 963], the quantum dynamics results suggest that OH vibrational excitation is deactivated within HO-SO{sub 2} prior to its dissociation, although the quantum IVR rates are greater than those in the classical simulations. The ubiquitous question of zero point energy in classical dynamics calculations is also considered. Reducing the quantity of zero point energy included in classical dynamics calculations decreases the HO-SO{sub 2} dissociation rate and increases the deactivation of the OH stretch thereby producing vibrational energy distributions for the dissociated OH that more closely resemble those from the quantum dynamics calculations.

  1. High-energy atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

    2010-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons that were produced through the cosmic rays collisions with air nuclei, form unavoidable background noise in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. The atmospheric neutrino flux above 1 PeV should be supposedly dominated by the contribution of charmed particle decays. These (prompt) neutrinos originated from decays of massive and shortlived particles, $D^\\pm$, $D^0$, $\\bar{D}{}^0$, $D_s^\\pm$, $\\Lambda^+_c$, form the most uncertain fraction of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux because of poor explored processes of the charm production. Besides, an ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. There is the energy region where above flux uncertainties superimpose. A new calculation presented here reveals sizable differences, up to the factor of 1.8 above 1 TeV, in muon neutrino flux predictions obtained with usage of known...

  2. Relaxation dynamics in quantum dissipative systems: The microscopic effect of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the effect of inter-mode coupling on the vibrational relaxation dynamics of molecules in weak dissipative environments. The simulations are performed within the reduced density matrix formalism in the Markovian regime, assuming a Lindblad form for the system-bath interaction. The prototypical two-dimensional model system representing two CO molecules approaching a Cu(100) surface is adapted from an ab initio potential, while the diatom-diatom vibrational coupling strength is systematically varied. In the weak system-bath coupling limit and at low temperatures, only first order non-adiabatic uni-modal coupling terms contribute to surface-mediated vibrational relaxation. Since dissipative dynamics is non-unitary, the choice of representation will affect the evolution of the reduced density matrix. Two alternative representations for computing the relaxation rates and the associated operators are thus compared: the fully coupled spectral basis, and a factorizable ansatz. The former is well-established and serves as a benchmark for the solution of Liouville-von Neumann equation. In the latter, a contracted grid basis of potential-optimized discrete variable representation is tailored to incorporate most of the inter-mode coupling, while the Lindblad operators are represented as tensor products of one-dimensional operators, for consistency. This procedure results in a marked reduction of the grid size and in a much more advantageous scaling of the computational cost with respect to the increase of the dimensionality of the system. The factorizable method is found to provide an accurate description of the dissipative quantum dynamics of the model system, specifically of the time evolution of the state populations and of the probability density distribution of the molecular wave packet. The influence of intra-molecular vibrational energy redistribution appears to be properly taken into account by the new model on the whole range of coupling strengths. It

  3. Energy spectra of high energy atmospheric neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, K.; Minorikawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on high energy neutrinos ( or = 1 TeV), a new calculation of atmospheric neutrino intensities was carried out taking into account EMC effects observed in P-A collisions by accelerator, recent measurement of primary cosmic ray spectrum and results of cosmic ray muon spectrum and charge ratio. Other features of the present calculation are (1) taking into account kinematics of three body decays of kaons and charm particles in diffusion equations and (2) taking into account energy dependence of kaon production.

  4. Rethinking Redistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Nilsson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In “From Redistribution to Recognition?” Nancy Fraser formulates a theory aiming at defending only those versions of identity politics that can be coherently combined with socialist politics. Many commentators have criticized the analytical distinction between economic and cultural injustice underpinning this theory. I argue, however, that it is Fraser’s inability to uphold this distinction that makes her argument problematic, and that a clearer analytical distinction between the categories class and identity, makes possible both a more theoretically satisfying critique of the “postsocialist” condition and the formulation of a radical politics that addresses economic as well as cultural injustices.

  5. Middle atmosphere electrical energy coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    The middle atmosphere (MA) has long been known as an absorber of radio waves, and as a region of nonlinear interactions among waves. The region of highest transverse conductivity near the top of the MA provides a common return for global thunderstorm, auroral Birkeland, and ionospheric dynamo currents, with possibilities for coupling among them. Their associated fields and other transverse fields map to lower altitudes depending on scale size. Evidence now exists for motion-driven aerosol generators, and for charge trapped at the base of magnetic field lines, both capable of producing large MA electric fields. Ionospheric Maxwell currents (curl H) parallel to the magnetic field appear to map to lower altitudes, with rapidly time-varying components appearing as displacement currents in the stratosphere. Lightning couples a (primarily ELF and ULF) current transient to the ionosphere and magnetosphere whose wave shape is largely dependent on the MA conductivity profile. Electrical energy is of direct significance mainly in the upper MA, but electrodynamic transport of minor constituents such as smoke particles or CN may be important at other altitudes.

  6. Atmospheric energy for subsurface life on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, B. P.; Yung, Y. L.; Nealson, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    The location and density of biologically useful energy sources on Mars will limit the biomass, spatial distribution, and organism size of any biota. Subsurface Martian organisms could be supplied with a large energy flux from the oxidation of photochemically produced atmospheric H(2) and CO diffusing into the regolith. However, surface abundance measurements of these gases demonstrate that no more than a few percent of this available flux is actually being consumed, suggesting that biological activity driven by atmospheric H(2) and CO is limited in the top few hundred meters of the subsurface. This is significant because the available but unused energy is extremely large: for organisms at 30-m depth, it is 2,000 times previous estimates of hydrothermal and chemical weathering energy and far exceeds the energy derivable from other atmospheric gases. This also implies that the apparent scarcity of life on Mars is not attributable to lack of energy. Instead, the availability of liquid water may be a more important factor limiting biological activity because the photochemical energy flux can only penetrate to 100- to 1,000-m depth, where most H(2)O is probably frozen. Because both atmospheric and Viking lander soil data provide little evidence for biological activity, the detection of short-lived trace gases will probably be a better indicator of any extant Martian life.

  7. Redistribution effects resulting from cross-border cooperation in support for renewable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unteutsch, Michaela

    2014-01-15

    It has been shown that international cooperation in achieving renewable energy targets, e.g., via a common tradable green certificate market, increases overall welfare. However, cooperation in the support of electricity from renewable energy sources also leads to regional price effects, from which some groups benefit while others lose. On a regional level, the introduction of cross-border cooperation in RES-E support generally has an opposite effect on support expenditures and wholesale electricity prices, as long as grid congestion between the different regions exists. In this paper, a theoretical model is used to analyze under which conditions different groups bene t or suffer from the introduction of cooperation. Findings of the analysis include that effects on consumers and total producers per country can only be clearly determined if no grid congestions between the countries exist. If bottlenecks in the transmission system exist, the relationship between the slopes of the renewable and the non-renewable marginal generation cost curves for electricity generation as well as the level of the RES-E target essentially determine whether these groups bene t or lose from the introduction of green certificate trading. In contrast, system-wide welfare always increases once cooperation in RES-E support is introduced. Similarly, welfare on the country level always increases (compared to a situation without RES-E cooperation) if the countries are perfectly or not at all physically interconnected. In the case of congested interconnectors, each country always at least potentially benefits from the introduction of certificate trade, taking into account possible distributions of congestion rents between the countries.

  8. Redistribution of whole-body energy metabolism by exercise. A positron emission tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our aim was to evaluate changes in glucose metabolism of skeletal muscles and viscera induced by different workloads using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) and three-dimensional positron emission tomography (3-D PET). Five male volunteers performed ergometer bicycle exercise for 40 min at 40% and 70% of the maximal O2 consumption (VO2max). [18]FDG was injected 10 min later following the exercise task. Whole-body 3-D PET was performed. Five other male volunteers were studied as a control to compare with the exercise group. The PET image data were analyzed using manually defined regions of interest to quantify the regional metabolic rate of glucose (rMRGlc). Group comparisons were made using analysis of variance, and significant differences (P18F]FDG-PET can be used as an index of organ energy metabolism for moderate exercise workloads (70% VO2max). The results of this investigation may contribute to sports medicine and rehabilitation science. (author)

  9. Competition between Reaction and Intramolecular Energy Redistribution in Solution. Observation and Nature of Nonstatistical Dynamics in the Ozonolysis of Vinyl Ethers

    OpenAIRE

    Quijano, Larisa Mae M.; Singleton, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental product ratios in ozonolyses of alkyl vinyl ethers in solution do not fit with expectations from statistical rate theories. The selectivity among cleavage pathways increases with the size of the alkyl group but to an extent that is far less than RRKM theory would predict. Trajectory studies account for the observed selectivities and support a mechanism involving a competition between cleavage of the primary ozonide and intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution. An approxim...

  10. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 3: Atmospheric Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This 1989 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment, safety, and health conducted during fiscal year 1989. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. This volume contains research in the atmospheric sciences. Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at PNL are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, continental, and global scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. The redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. Eventually, large-scale experiments on cloud processing and redistribution of contaminants will be integrated into the national program on global change, investigating how energy pollutants affect aerosols and clouds and the transfer of radiant energy through them. As the significance of this effect becomes clear, its global impact on climate will be studied through experimental and modeling research. The description of ongoing atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: atmospheric studies in complex terrain, large-scale atmospheric transport and processing of emissions, and climate change. This report describes the progress in FY 1989 in each of these areas. A divider page summarizes the goals of each area and lists project titles that support research activities. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Redistributed Regional Ventilation after the Administration of a Bronchodilator Demonstrated on Xenon-Inhaled Dual-Energy CT in a Patient with Asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Yu, Jin Ho [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    We report here on the redistributed regional ventilation abnormalities after the administration of a bronchodilator and as seen on xenon-inhaled dual-energy CT in a patient with asthma. The improved ventilation seen in the right lower lobe and the decreased ventilation seen in the right middle lobe after the administration of a bronchodilator on xenon-inhaled dual-energy CT could explain a positive bronchodilator response on a pulmonary function test. These changes may reflect the heterogeneity of the airway responsiveness to a bronchodilator in patients with asthma.

  12. Competition between reaction and intramolecular energy redistribution in solution: observation and nature of nonstatistical dynamics in the ozonolysis of vinyl ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, Larisa Mae M; Singleton, Daniel A

    2011-09-01

    Experimental product ratios in ozonolyses of alkyl vinyl ethers in solution do not fit with expectations based on statistical rate theories. The selectivity among cleavage pathways increases with the size of the alkyl group but to an extent that is far less than RRKM theory would predict. Trajectory studies account for the observed selectivities and support a mechanism involving a competition between cleavage of the primary ozonide and intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution. A statistical model is presented that assumes that RRKM theory holds for a molecular subset of the primary ozonides, allowing the rates of energy loss from the ozonides to be estimated from the observed product ratios. PMID:21812422

  13. Redistributed Regional Ventilation after the Administration of a Bronchodilator Demonstrated on Xenon-Inhaled Dual-Energy CT in a Patient with Asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here on the redistributed regional ventilation abnormalities after the administration of a bronchodilator and as seen on xenon-inhaled dual-energy CT in a patient with asthma. The improved ventilation seen in the right lower lobe and the decreased ventilation seen in the right middle lobe after the administration of a bronchodilator on xenon-inhaled dual-energy CT could explain a positive bronchodilator response on a pulmonary function test. These changes may reflect the heterogeneity of the airway responsiveness to a bronchodilator in patients with asthma.

  14. Solar Atmospheric Magnetic Energy Coupling: Broad Plasma Conditions and Temperature Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Orange, N Brice; Gendre, Bruce; Morris, David C; Oluseyi, Hakeem M

    2016-01-01

    Solar variability investigations that include its magnetic energy coupling are paramount to solving many key solar/stellar physics problems. Particularly understanding the temporal variability of magnetic energy redistribution and heating processes. Using three years of observations from the {\\it Solar Dynamics Observatory's} Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Heliosemic Magnetic Imager, radiative and magnetic fluxes were measured from coronal hole, quiet Sun, active regions, active region cores (i.e., inter moss), and at full-disk scales, respectively. We present, and mathematically describe, their coupling of radiative fluxes, across broad temperature gradients, to the available photospheric magnetic energy. A comparison of the common linear relationship of radiative to magnetic coupling is performed against our extended broken power-law description, which reveals a potential entanglement of thermodynamic and magnetic energy contributions in existing literature. As such, our work provides an improved approach...

  15. Renewable energy and the atmospheric sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, T. Y.; Takenaka, H.; Watanabe, T.; Nakajima, T.; Takamura, T.; Kurino, T.

    2013-12-01

    The demand for renewable energy in social energy systems has grown in recent years. In the atmospheric sciences, the energy balances and dynamics in the atmosphere are studied on both local and global scales, and thus estimation of renewable energy is an important practical application. For instance, shortwave solar radiation that reaches Earth's surface is an essential quantity for evaluating the photovoltaic (PV) power generation. Indeed, shortwave solar radiation can be calculated by a radiative transfer solver and an accurate electromagnetic wave scattering theory. A beneficial application of atmospheric sciences is obtaining of solar radiation on the basis of geostationary satellite measurements. Such satellites provide data covering most parts of the Earth every 30 min to 1 h. Geo-parameters such as cloud and aerosol properties are needed for calculating the amount of solar radiation that reaches Earth's surface. Multispectral images acquired by geostationary satellites allow for such geo-parameters to be evaluated. Additionally, polar-orbiting Earth observation satellites are also needed for improving data analysis techniques. For instance, multispectral imagers (e.g., MODIS) and cloud radars (e.g., CloudSat) aboard polar-orbiting satellites can be used to reveal the relationship between multispectral imaging results and the vertical structure of clouds. The EarthCARE (JAXA, ESA, NICT) and the GCOM-C (JAXA) satellites that will be launched in the middle of 2010-era are also used for improving cloud and aerosol process. This paper presents a method using satellite data to evaluate the optical and microphysical parameters of clouds that affect solar radiation. Also presented is a method for evaluating solar radiation that reaches Earth's surface. A new research project in Japan, JST-CREST-EMS (Energy Management System)-TEEDDA (Terrestrial Energy Estimation by Diurnal Data Analyses), which was started in October 2012, is also introduced.

  16. High-energy fluxes of atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovskaya, T S; Sinegovsky, S I

    2013-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos from decays of mesons, produced in collisions of cosmic ray particles with air nuclei, form unavoidable background for detection of astrophysical neutrinos. More precise calculations of the high-energy neutrino spectrum are required since measurements in the IceCube experiment reach the intriguing energy region where a contribution of the prompt neutrinos and/or astrophysical ones should be discovered. Basing on the referent hadronic models QGSJET II-03, SIBYLL 2.1, we calculate high-energy spectra, both of the muon and electron atmospheric neutrinos, averaged over zenith-angles. The computation is made using three parameterizations of cosmic ray spectra which include the knee region. All calculations are compared with the atmospheric neutrino measurements by Frejus and IceCube. The prompt neutrino flux predictions obtained with thequark-gluon string model (QGSM) for the charm production by Kaidalov & Piskunova do not contradict to the IceCube measurements and upper limit on the astr...

  17. Globalisation, inequality and redistribution

    OpenAIRE

    Cappelen, Alexander W.; Bjorvatn, Kjetil

    2004-01-01

    The present paper seeks to explain the pattern of income redistribution in a globalised world of increased market income inequality and lower costs of factor mobility. In some countries, larger market income inequality has been met by an increased redistributive effort, thus keeping the distribution of disposable incomes relatively stable. In other countries, larger market inequality has been accompanied by a reduction in transfers, thus leading to growth in disposable income inequality. In o...

  18. The role of physiological elements in the future therapies of rheumatoid arthritis. II. The relevance of energy redistribution in the process of chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Michał; Rzodkiewicz, Przemysław; Wojtecka-Łukasik, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The reasons for development of chronic inflammation are complex and not fully understood. One of the factors affecting the prolongation of inflammation is changes in cell metabolism, occurring at the center of the inflammatory process. In chronic inflammation there is an imbalance between the processes of storage and consumption of energy reserves. Hypoxia that is a consequence of edema results in transition of white blood cells to anaerobic metabolism. Neutrophils, lymphocytes and macrophages produce active oxygen metabolites which on one hand facilitate the elimination of pathogens, and on the other hand, can cause damage to healthy cells located in the inflamed tissue. In this paper, we discuss the importance of disturbed redistribution of energy as one of the main reasons for transformation of the acute inflammatory process into the chronic one.

  19. Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.; Thomas, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV . An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chem...

  20. Food Redistribution as Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, Caleb; Higbee, Becky

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the simultaneous problems of food waste and hunger in the context of the possible solution of food (waste) rescue and redistribution. To this end, we develop an empirical model that can be used in Monte Carlo simulations to study the dynamics of the underlying problem. Our model's parameters are derived from a unique data set provided by a large food bank and food rescue organization in north central Colorado. We find that food supply is a non-parametric heavy-tailed process that is well-modeled with an extreme value peaks-over-threshold model. Although the underlying process is stochastic, the basic approach of food rescue and redistribution appears to be feasible both at small and large scales. The ultimate efficacy of this model is intimately tied to the rate at which food expires and hence the ability to preserve and quickly transport and redistribute food. The cost of the redistribution is tied to the number and density of participating suppliers, and costs can be reduced (and supp...

  1. Difference, Power and, Redistribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Morten

    perceived as structures of domination and expressions of emancipating modernisation. Welfare states are perceived as both structures of democratic redistribution and as power based resource appropriation. Finally welfare states are perceived as normative structures and institutions. Pierre Bourdieu's theory...... of capital and the establishment of universality as normative standard of evaluation in the field of power as well as in social space as such....

  2. Education and Efficient Redistribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Dur (Robert); C.N. Teulings (Coen)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractShould education be subsidized for the purpose of redistribution? The usual argument against subsidies to education above the primary level is that the rich take up most education, so a subsidy would increase inequality. We show that there is a counteracting effect: an increase in the st

  3. Energy, atmospheric chemistry, and global climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1991-01-01

    Global atmospheric changes due to ozone destruction and the greenhouse effect are discussed. The work of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is reviewed, including its judgements regarding global warming and its recommendations for improving predictive capability. The chemistry of ozone destruction and the global atmospheric budget of nitrous oxide are reviewed, and the global sources of nitrous oxide are described.

  4. Triton's surface-atmosphere energy balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, J.A.; Yelle, R.V.; Lunine, J.I.; McEwen, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    We explore the energetics of Triton's surface-atmosphere system using a model that includes the turbulent transfer of sensible heat as well as insolation, reradiation, and latent heat transport. The model relies on a 1?? by 1?? resolution hemispheric bolometric albedo map of Triton for determining the atmospheric temperature, the N2 frost emissivity, and the temperatures of unfrosted portions of the surface consistent with a frost temperature of ???38 K. For a physically plausible range of heat transfer coefficients, we find that the atmospheric temperature roughly 1 km above the surface is approximately 1 to 3 K hotter than the surface. Atmospheric temperatures of 48 K suggested by early analysis of radio occultation data cannot be obtained for plausible values of the heat transfer coefficients. Our calculations indicate that Triton's N2 frosts must have an emissivity well below unity in order to have a temperature of ???38 K, consistent with previous results. We also find that convection over small hot spots does not significantly cool them off, so they may be able to act as continous sources of buoyancy for convective plumes, but have not explored whether the convection is vigorous enough to entrain particulate matter thereby forming a dust devil. Our elevated atmospheric temperatures make geyser driven plumes with initial upward velocities ???10 m s-1 stagnate in the lower atmosphere. These "wimpy" plumes provide a possible explanation for Triton's "wind streaks.". ?? 1992.

  5. Democracy, Redistribution, and Equality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Przeworski

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article argues that economic inequality inevitably generates politicalinequality, which in turn reproduces economic inequality. Basic concepts areintroduced first along with strong caveats concerning the quality of the crossnationaldata on income distributions; historical patterns of income inequalityare summarized next, and with these preliminaries, a distinction is made betweenredistribution of consumption at a particular time and equalization of incomeearning capacities over time. Following this economic considerations, the articlediscussion moves to political factors that may block redistributions.

  6. Annual progress report 2000. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B. [eds.

    2001-05-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2000 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  7. Annual progress report 2000. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2000 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  8. Annual progress report 2000. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B. (eds.)

    2001-05-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2000 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  9. Annual report 1997. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, P.H.; Dannemand Andersen, P.; Skrumsager, B. [eds.

    1998-08-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1997. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. (au)

  10. Triton's surface-atmosphere energy balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, John A.; Yelle, Roger V.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Mcewen, Alfred S.

    1992-01-01

    A model encompassing the turbulent transfer of sensible heat as well as insolation, reradiation, and latent heat transport is presently used to investigate the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system of Triton. Under the assumption of a physically plausible range of heat transfer coefficients, the atmospheric temperature 1 km above the surface is found to be 1-3 K hotter than the Triton surface. The observed N2 frosts must have an emissivity lower than unity in order to match a frost temperature at the surface of about 38 K.

  11. Comparison of Atmospheric Neutrino Flux Calculations at Low Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, T K; Kasahara, K; Lee, H; Midorikawa, S; Naumov, V; Stanev, T; Stanev, Todor

    1996-01-01

    We compare several different calculations of the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy range relevant for contained neutrino interactions, and we identify the major sources of difference among the calculations. We find nothing that would affect the predicted ratio of $\

  12. Energy and angular distributions of atmospheric muons at the Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    A fair knowledge of the atmospheric muon distributions at Earth is a prerequisite for the simulations of cosmic ray setups and rare event search detectors. A modified power law is proposed for atmospheric muon energy distribution which gives good description of the cosmic muon data in low as well as high energy regime. Using this distribution, analytical forms for zenith angle ($\\theta$) distribution are obtained. Assuming a flat Earth, it leads to the $\\cos^{n-1}\\theta$ form where it is show...

  13. Food Redistribution as Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Caleb; Hoenigman, Rhonda; Higbee, Becky

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the simultaneous problems of food waste and hunger in the context of the possible solution of food (waste) rescue and redistribution. To this end, we develop an empirical model that can be used in Monte Carlo simulations to study the dynamics of the underlying problem. Our model's parameters are derived from a unique data set provided by a large food bank and food rescue organization in north central Colorado. We find that food supply is a non-parametric heavy-tailed pr...

  14. Racism, xenophobia, and redistribution

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Woojin; Roemer, John; Van der Straeten, Karine

    2005-01-01

    We report here a summary of our recent research on the effect that the race issue, in the United States, and the immigration issue in European countries, is having on the degree of redistribution and the size of the public sector that is implemented through political competition. We model political competition as taking place on a two dimensional policy space, where the first issue is the tax rate, or the size of the public sector, and the second issue is the race or immigration issue. Our su...

  15. Did high energy astrophysical sources contribute to Martian atmospheric loss?

    CERN Document Server

    Atri, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Mars is believed to have had a substantial atmosphere in the past. Atmospheric loss led to depressurization and cooling, and is thought to be the primary driving force responsible for the loss of liquid water from its surface. Recently, MAVEN observations have provided new insight into the physics of atmospheric loss induced by ICMEs and solar wind interacting with the Martian atmosphere. In addition to solar radiation, it is likely that its atmosphere has been exposed to radiation bursts from high-energy astrophysical sources which become highly probable on timescales of ~Gy and beyond. These sources are capable of significantly enhancing the rates of photoionization and charged particle-induced ionization in the upper atmosphere. Here, we explore the possibility of damage from Galactic Gamma Ray Bursts, nearby supernovae, encounter with dense interstellar clouds and extreme solar events. We use Monte Carlo simulations to model the interaction of charged particles and photons from astrophysical sources in th...

  16. Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method...

  17. Seasonal variation of the atmospheric energy budget on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabataba-Vakili, F.; Read, P. L.; Lewis, S. R.; Montabone, L.; Ruan, T.; Valeanu, A.; Wang, Y.; Young, R. M. B.

    2014-04-01

    We compute a detailed Lorenz energy budget [1] to improve our understanding of the dynamical circulation of the martian atmosphere. Results suggest that the circulation of the martian atmosphere is is governed mostly by baroclinic instability, except during a 2 to 3 month long period around the northern hemisphere winter solstice when barotropic and baroclinic instabilites coincide. The difference between diurnally averaged quantities and the full energy budget also indicate a major role for diurnal tides in enabling a direct transfer of energy from diurnal heating to eddy potential and kinetic energy.

  18. Energy and the Protection of the Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Nakicenovic, N.; Grubler, A

    2000-01-01

    The essay reviews major environmental problems of energy development within a broader development and sustainability context. The role of energy in human development and major historical trends as well as their implications for carbon dioxide emissions are discussed. After summarizing the scientific understanding of current and possible future climate change, the paper reviews the available mitigation and adaptation options, including: energy efficiency improvements, fuels switching, zero-car...

  19. Three dimensional calculation of flux of low energy atmospheric neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.; Bludman, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Results of three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation of low energy flux of atmospheric neutrinos are presented and compared with earlier one-dimensional calculations 1,2 valid at higher neutrino energies. These low energy neutrinos are the atmospheric background in searching for neutrinos from astrophysical sources. Primary cosmic rays produce the neutrino flux peaking at near E sub=40 MeV and neutrino intensity peaking near E sub v=100 MeV. Because such neutrinos typically deviate by 20 approximately 30 from the primary cosmic ray direction, three-dimensional effects are important for the search of atmospheric neutrinos. Nevertheless, the background of these atmospheric neutrinos is negligible for the detection of solar and supernova neutrinos.

  20. Energy and angular distributions of atmospheric muons at the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    A fair knowledge of the atmospheric muon distributions at Earth is a prerequisite for the simulations of cosmic ray setups and rare event search detectors. A modified power law is proposed for atmospheric muon energy distribution which gives good description of the cosmic muon data in low as well as high energy regime. Using this distribution, analytical forms for zenith angle ($\\theta$) distribution are obtained. Assuming a flat Earth, it leads to the $\\cos^{n-1}\\theta$ form where it is shown that the parameter $n$ is nothing but the power of the energy distribution. A new analytical form for zenith angle distribution is obtained without assuming a flat Earth which gives an improved description of the data at all angles even above $70^o$. These distributions are tested with the available atmospheric muon data of energy and angular distributions. The parameters of these distributions can be used to characterize the cosmic muon data as a function of energy, angle and altitude.

  1. Modeling Planetary Atmospheric Energy Deposition By Energetic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Bougher, Stephen; Gronoff, Guillaume; Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    The structure, dynamics, chemistry, and evolution of planetary upper atmospheres are in large part determined by the available sources of energy. In addition to the solar EUV flux, the solar wind and solar energetic particle (SEP) events are also important sources. Both of these particle populations can significantly affect an atmosphere, causing atmospheric loss and driving chemical reactions. Attention has been paid to these sources from the standpoint of the radiation environment for humans and electronics, but little work has been done to evaluate their impact on planetary atmospheres. At unmagnetized planets or those with crustal field anomalies, in particular, the solar wind and SEPs of all energies have direct access to the atmosphere and so provide a more substantial energy source than at planets having protective global magnetic fields. Additionally, solar wind and energetic particle fluxes should be more significant for planets orbiting more active stars, such as is the case in the early history of the solar system for paleo-Venus and Mars. Therefore quantification of the atmospheric energy input from the solar wind and SEP events is an important component of our understanding of the processes that control their state and evolution. We have applied a full Lorentz motion particle transport model to study the effects of particle precipitation in the upper atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Such modeling has been previously done for Earth and Mars using a guiding center precipitation model. Currently, this code is only valid for particles with small gyroradii in strong uniform magnetic fields. There is a clear necessity for a Lorentz formulation, hence, a systematic study of the ionization, excitation, and energy deposition has been conducted, including a comparison of the influence relative to other energy sources (namely EUV photons). The result is a robust examination of the influence of energetic ion transport on the Venus and Mars upper atmosphere which

  2. Assessment of Global Annual Atmospheric Energy Balance from Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Stackhouse, Paul; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Sun, Wenbo; Fan, Tai-Fang (Alice); Hinkelman, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Global atmospheric energy balance is one of the fundamental processes for the earth's climate system. This study uses currently available satellite data sets of radiative energy at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface and latent and sensible heat over oceans for the year 2000 to assess the global annual energy budget. Over land, surface radiation data are used to constrain assimilated results and to force the radiation, turbulent heat, and heat storage into balance due to a lack of observation-based turbulent heat flux estimations. Global annual means of the TOA net radiation obtained from both direct measurements and calculations are close to zero. The net radiative energy fluxes into the surface and the surface latent heat transported into the atmosphere are about 113 and 86 Watts per square meter, respectively. The estimated atmospheric and surface heat imbalances are about -8 9 Watts per square meter, values that are within the uncertainties of surface radiation and sea surface turbulent flux estimates and likely systematic biases in the analyzed observations. The potential significant additional absorption of solar radiation within the atmosphere suggested by previous studies does not appear to be required to balance the energy budget the spurious heat imbalances in the current data are much smaller (about half) than those obtained previously and debated at about a decade ago. Progress in surface radiation and oceanic turbulent heat flux estimations from satellite measurements significantly reduces the bias errors in the observed global energy budgets of the climate system.

  3. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department annual progress report 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risø National Laboratory in 1999. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviateatmospheric aspects of environmental problems....... The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danishand international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A sum......-mary of the department's activities in 1999 is presented, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members....

  4. High Energy Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes From a Realistic Primary Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Penha, Felipe; Dembinski, Hans; Gaisser, Thomas K.; Tilav, Serap

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric neutrino fluxes depend on the energy spectrum of primary nucleons entering the top of the atmosphere. Before the advent of AMANDA and the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, measurements of the neutrino fluxes were generally below ~ 1TeV , a regime in which a simple energy power law sufficed to describe the primary spectrum. Now, IceCube's muon neutrino data extends beyond 1PeV , including a combination of neutrinos from astrophysical sources with background from atmospheric neutrinos. At such high energies, the steepening at the knee of the primary spectrum must be accounted for. Here, we describe a semi-analytical approach for calculating the atmospheric differential neutrino fluxes at high energies. The input is a realistic primary spectrum consisting of 4 populations with distinct energy cutoffs, each with up to 7 representative nuclei, where the parameters were extracted from a global fit. We show the effect of each component on the atmospheric neutrino spectra, above 10TeV . The resulting features follow directly from recent air shower measurements included in the fit. Felipe Campos Penha gratefully acknowledges financial support from CAPES (Processo BEX 5348/14-5), CNPq (Processo 142180/2012-2), and the Bartol Research Institute.

  5. Aircraft Measurements of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Lilly, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Wind velocity data obtained from a jet airliner are used to construct kinetic energy spectra over the range of wavelengths from 2.5 to 2500 km. The spectra exhibit an approximate -5/3 slope for wavelengths of less than about 150 km, steepening to about -2.2 at larger scales. These results support...

  6. Weakened atmospheric energy transport feedback in cold glacial climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cvijanovic

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The response of atmospheric energy transport during Northern Hemisphere cooling and warming from present day (PD and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM conditions is investigated using sea surface temperature anomalies derived from a freshwater hosing experiment. The present day climate shows enhanced sensitivity of the atmospheric energy transport compared to that of the LGM suggesting an ability of the PD atmosphere to reorganize more easily and thereby dampen temperature anomalies that may arise from changes in the oceanic transport. The increased PD sensitivity relative to that of the LGM is due mainly to a stronger dry static energy transport response which, in turn, is driven chiefly by larger changes in the transient eddy heat flux. In comparison, changes in latent heat transport play a minor role in the overall transport sensitivity.

  7. The potential impact of hydrogen energy use on the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ruijven, B. J.; Lamarque, J. F.; van Vuuren, D. P.; Kram, T.; Eerens, H.

    2009-04-01

    Energy models show very different trajectories for future energy systems (partly as function of future climate policy). One possible option is a transition towards a hydrogen-based energy system. The potential impact of such hydrogen economy on atmospheric emissions is highly uncertain. On the one hand, application of hydrogen in clean fuel cells reduces emissions of local air pollutants, like SOx and NOx. On the other hand, emissions of hydrogen from system leakages are expected to change the atmospheric concentrations and behaviour (see also Price et al., 2007; Sanderson et al., 2003; Schultz et al., 2003; Tromp et al., 2003). The uncertainty arises from several sources: the expected use of hydrogen, the intensity of leakages and emissions, and the atmospheric chemical behaviour of hydrogen. Existing studies to the potential impacts of a hydrogen economy on the atmosphere mostly use hydrogen emission scenarios that are based on simple assumptions. This research combines two different modelling efforts to explore the range of impacts of hydrogen on atmospheric chemistry. First, the potential role of hydrogen in the global energy system and the related emissions of hydrogen and other air pollutants are derived from the global energy system simulation model TIMER (van Vuuren, 2007). A set of dedicated scenarios on hydrogen technology development explores the most pessimistic and optimistic cases for hydrogen deployment (van Ruijven et al., 2008; van Ruijven et al., 2007). These scenarios are combined with different assumptions on hydrogen emission factors. Second, the emissions from the TIMER model are linked to the NCAR atmospheric model (Lamarque et al., 2005; Lamarque et al., 2008), in order to determine the impacts on atmospheric chemistry. By combining an energy system model and an atmospheric model, we are able to consistently explore the boundaries of both hydrogen use, emissions and impacts on atmospheric chemistry. References: Lamarque, J.-F., Kiehl, J. T

  8. Comparison of atmospheric neutrino flux calculations at low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaisser, T.K.; Honda, M.; Kasahara, K.; Lee, H.; Midorikawa, S.; Naumov, V.; Stanev, T. [Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)]|[Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Tanashi, Tokyo 188 (Japan)]|[Faculty of Engineering, Kanagawa University, Yokohama 221 (Japan)]|[Department of Physics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea)]|[Faculty of Engineering, Aomori University, Aomori 030 (Japan)]|[Instituto Nazionale de Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, Firenze I-50125 (Italy)

    1996-11-01

    We compare several different calculations of the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy range relevant for contained neutrino interactions, and we identify the major sources of difference among the calculations. We find nothing that would affect the predicted ratio of {nu}{sub {ital e}}/{nu}{sub {mu}}, which is nearly the same in all calculations. Significant differences in normalization arise primarily from different treatments of pion production by interactions of protons in the atmosphere. Different assumptions about the primary spectrum and treatments of the geomagnetic field are also of some importance. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Energy implications of future stabilization of atmospheric CO2 content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change calls for ''stabilization of greenhouse-gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system...''. A standard baseline scenario that assumes no policy intervention to limit greenhouse-gas emissions has 10 TW (10 x 1012 watts) of carbon-emission-free power being produced by the year 2050, equivalent to the power provided by all today's energy sources combined. Here we employ a carbon-cycle/energy model to estimate the carbon-emission-free power needed for various atmospheric CO2 stabilization scenarios. We find that CO2 stabilization with continued economic growth will require innovative, cost-effective and carbon-emission-free technologies that can provide additional tens of terawatts of primary power in the coming decades, and certainly by the middle of the twenty-first century, even with sustained improvement in the economic productivity of primary energy. (author)

  10. Feeling guilty and redistributive politics

    OpenAIRE

    Le Garrec, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    In mainstream economics individuals are supposed driven only by their self interest. By contrast, in this article, in the line of a "new synthesis" in moral psychology we assert that the voting behavior over redistribution is best characterized by first an automatic cognitive process which generates quicly intuitions on the fair level of redistribution, and second by a rational self oriented reasoning which controls the feeling of guilt associated with the fair intuitions. As a result of this ...

  11. Redistributive Taxation and Public Expenditures

    OpenAIRE

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Esteban, Joan

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a model of redistributive income taxation and public expenditure. Besides redistributing personal income by means of taxes and transfers, the government supplies goods and services. The government chooses the tax schedule that is found acceptable by the largest share possible of the population. We show that there is a unique income tax schedule that is universally acceptable. The progressivity of the income tax is shown to depend on the composition of the public expenditure and o...

  12. Spectral Gap Energy Transfer in Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, S.; Walters, K.; Barros, A. P.; Nogueira, M.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental measurements of atmospheric turbulence energy spectra show E(k) ~ k-3 slopes at synoptic scales (~ 600 km - 2000 km) and k-5/3 slopes at the mesoscales (theory, it is expected that a strong backward energy cascade would develop at the synoptic scale, and that circulation would grow infinitely. To limit this backward transfer, energy arrest at macroscales must be introduced. The most commonly used turbulence models developed to mimic the above energy transfer include the energy backscatter model for 2D turbulence in the horizontal plane via Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models, dissipative URANS models in the vertical plane, and Ekman friction for the energy arrest. One of the controversial issues surrounding the atmospheric turbulence spectra is the explanation of the generation of the 2D and 3D spectra and transition between them, for energy injection at the synoptic scales. Lilly (1989) proposed that the existence of 2D and 3D spectra can only be explained by the presence of an additional energy injection in the meso-scale region. A second issue is related to the observations of dual peak spectra with small variance in meso-scale, suggesting that the energy transfer occurs across a spectral gap (Van Der Hoven, 1957). Several studies have confirmed the spectral gap for the meso-scale circulations, and have suggested that they are enhanced by smaller scale vertical convection rather than by the synoptic scales. Further, the widely accepted energy arrest mechanism by boundary layer friction is closely related to the spectral gap transfer. This study proposes an energy transfer mechanism for atmospheric turbulence with synoptic scale injection, wherein the generation of 2D and 3D spectra is explained using spectral gap energy transfer. The existence of the spectral gap energy transfer is validated by performing LES for the interaction of large scale circulation with a wall, and studying the evolution of the energy spectra both near to and far from the wall

  13. Studies of influence of energy distribution on the upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Cheng

    The energy inputs into the upper atmosphere including both solar irradiation and geomagnetic energy can significantly change the upper atmosphere such as the neutral and plasma densities, velocities and temperatures. Therefore, the precise specification of the energy inputs is critical to estimate the ionosphere/thermosphere variation during both quiet and storm times. In order to improve the understanding of the energy distribution and its influence at high latitudes, specifically, we have conducted the following studies. (1) Estimation of the altitudinal distribution of Joule heating from COSMIC observations. Joule heating is the most significant way to dissipate geomagnetic energy at high latitudes. But the altitudinal distribution of Joule heating has not been studied in detail. Based on the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) observations from 2008 to 2011, the height-integrated Pedersen conductivities in both E (100-150 km) and F (150-600 km) regions and their ratio lambdaP (sumPE/sumPF) have been calculated. The result from data analysis (˜5.5) shows a smaller value than that from model (˜9), which indicates that the energy inputs into the F region may be underestimated in the model. Dependences of the ratio and the conductance in both E and F regions on the solar and geomagnetic activities have been studied as well. (2) The influence of cusp energy on the thermospheric winds has also been studied, through simulating a real event. The Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (GITM) has been run in different cases and under different resolutions to investigate the neutral dynamics around the cusp region. The results indicate that the heating added in the cusp causes the change of pressure gradient around the cusp and changes the neutral wind dynamics there. (3) Correlation of Poynting flux and soft particle precipitation in the dayside polar cap boundary regions has been investigated using DMSP satellite measurements

  14. Energetic particle energy deposition in Titan's upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, J. H.; Smith, H. T.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C. P.; Rymer, A. M.; Bell, J. M.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Mandt, K. E.

    2012-04-01

    Titan’s upper atmosphere has been observed to be variable on a pass-by-pass basis. During the nominal mission where the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) only sampled the northern hemisphere this variability was initially believed to be tied to solar drivers manifest in latitudinal variations in the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere. However, when Cassini delved into the southern hemisphere the latitudinal dependence was not present in the data. Recently, Westlake et al. (2011) showed that the pass-by-pass variability is correlated with the deviations in the plasma environment as identified by Rymer et al. (2009) and Simon et al. (2010). Furthermore, the studies of Westlake et al. (2011) and Bell et al. (2011) showed that Titan’s upper atmosphere responds to changes in the ambient magnetospheric plasma on timescales of roughly one Titan day (16 Earth days). We report on recent studies of energy deposition in Titan’s upper atmosphere. Previous studies by Smith et al. (2009), Cravens et al. (2008), Tseng et al. (2008), and Shah et al. (2009) reported on energetic proton and oxygen ion precipitation. Back of the envelope calculations by Sittler et al. (2009) showed that magnetospheric energy inputs are expected to be of the order of or greater than the solar processes. We report on further analysis of the plasma environment around Titan during the flybys that the INMS has good data. We utilize data from the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument to determine how the magnetospheric particle population varies from pass to pass and how this influences the net magnetospheric energy input prior to the flyby. We also report on enhanced energetic neutral atom emissions during select highly energetic passes. References: Bell, J., et al.: “Simulating the time-dependent response of Titan's upper atmosphere to periods of magnetospheric forcing”. Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 38, L06202, 2011. Rymer, A. M., et al.: “Discrete classification and electron

  15. The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Chemistry Program: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to a request from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry has reviewed OHER's Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). This report contains the committee's evaluation and critique arising from that review. The review process included a two-day symposium held at the National Academy of Sciences on September 25 and 26, 1990, that focused on presenting the ACP's current components, recent scientific accomplishments, and scientific plans. Following the symposium, committee members met in a one-day executive session to formulate and outline this report. In undertaking this review, OHER and ACP management requested that the committee attempt to answer several specific questions involving the program's technical capability and productivity, its leadership and organization, and its future direction. These questions are given in the Appendix. This report represents the committee's response to the questions posed in the Appendix. Chapter I explores the committee's view of the role that atmospheric chemistry could and should assume within the DOE and its prospective National Energy Strategy. Chapter 2 assesses the current ACP, Chapter 3 presents recommendations for revising and strengthening it, and Chapter 4 restates the committee's conclusions and recommendations

  16. Numerical simulations of hydraulic redistribution across climates: The role of the root hydraulic conductivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, Juan C.; Kumar, Praveen

    2015-10-01

    Hydraulic redistribution, a process by which vegetation roots redistribute soil moisture, has been recognized as an important mechanism impacting several processes that regulate plant water uptake, energy and water partitioning, and biogeochemical cycling. We analyze how the magnitude of hydraulic redistribution varies across ecosystems that are exposed to different climates and seasonal patterns of incoming shortwave radiation and precipitation. Numerical simulation studies are performed over 10 Ameriflux sites, which show that hydraulic redistribution predictions are significantly influenced by the specified root hydraulic conductivities. We performed sensitivity analyses by considering expected ranges of root conductivities based on previous experimental studies, and found contrasting patterns in energy-limited and water-limited ecosystems. In energy-limited ecosystems, there is a threshold above which high root conductivities enhance hydraulic redistribution with no increase in transpiration, while in water-limited ecosystems increase in root conductivities was always associated with enhancements in both transpiration and hydraulic redistribution. Further we found differences in the magnitude and seasonality of hydraulic redistribution and transpiration across different climates, regulated by interplay between precipitation and transpiration. The annual hydraulic redistribution to transpiration flux ratio (HR/Tr) was significant in Mediterranean climates (HR/Tr ≈ 30%), and in the tropical humid climates (HR/Tr ≈ 15%). However, in the continental climates hydraulic redistribution occurs only during sporadic precipitation events throughout the summer resulting in lower annual magnitudes (HR/Tr hydrology, and enhance our understanding about the variability of hydraulic redistribution across different climates.

  17. Density redistribution effects in fermionic optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, Medha; Troyer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    We simulate a one dimensional fermionic optical lattice to analyse heating due to non-adiabatic lattice loading. Our simulations reveal that, similar to the bosonic case, density redistribution effects are the major cause of heating in harmonic traps. We suggest protocols to modulate the local density distribution during the process of lattice loading, in order to reduce the excess energy. Our numerical results confirm that linear interpolation of the trapping potential and/or the interaction strength is an efficient method of doing so, bearing practical applications relevant to experiments.

  18. Atmospheric Energy Limits on Subsurface Life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, B. P.; Yung, Y. L.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    It has been suggested that the terrestrial biomass of subterranean organisms may equal or exceed that at the surface. Taken as a group, these organisms can live in heavily saline conditions at temperatures from 115 C to as low as -20 C. Such conditions might exist on Mars beneath the surface oxidant in an aquifer or hydrothermal system, where the surrounding rock would also protect against the solar ultraviolet radiation. The way that such systems could obtain energy and carbon is not completely clear, although it is believed that on Earth, energy flows from the interaction of highly reduced basalt with groundwater produce H2, while carbon is derived from CO2 dissolved in the groundwater. Another potential source is the Martian atmosphere, acting as a photochemical conduit of solar insolation.

  19. Preferences for redistribution in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Kakes; Jasper de Winter

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the determinants of Dutch households' preferences for income redistribution, using survey data. Our results show that support for redistributive policies is related to self-interest, exposure to misfortune and risk-aversion. In addition, people who believe that prosperity is primarily due to luck rather than hard work tend to favour redistribution, indicating that equal opportunities are considered important. Interestingly, support for redistributive policies is positively rela...

  20. Response of Atmospheric Energy to Historical Climate Change in CMIP5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩博; 吕世华; 高艳红; 奥银焕; 李瑞青

    2015-01-01

    Three forms of atmospheric energy, i.e., internal, potential, and latent, are analyzed based on the histor-ical simulations of 32 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models and two reanalysis datasets (NCEP/NCAR and ERA-40). The spatial pattern of climatological mean atmospheric energy is well reproduced by all CMIP5 models. The variation of globally averaged atmospheric energy is similar to that of surface air temperature (SAT) for most models. The atmospheric energy from both simulation and reanalysis decreases following the volcanic eruption in low-latitude zones. Generally, the climatological mean of simulated atmospheric energy from most models is close to that obtained from NCEP/NCAR, while the simulated atmospheric energy trend is close to that obtained from ERA-40. Under a certain variation of SAT, the simulated global latent energy has the largest increase ratio, and the increase ratio of potential energy is the smallest.

  1. Preferences for redistribution after the economic crisis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the effects of the recent Economic Crisis on individual preferences for redistribution in 23 European countries. After implementing a decomposition of the variation in these preferences, it is showed that the crisis was highly significant in increasing support for redistribution. It is found that more unemployment and, in particular, youth unemployment has considerably raised the citizens’ demand for redistribution.

  2. Redistributive Social Protection. Mapping Study

    OpenAIRE

    Fonteneau, Bénédicte; Van Ongevalle, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, social protection has come to feature more and more prominently on international and national development agendas. One key challenge that the quest for social protection currently faces, is the domestic resource mobilization to finance social protection. This paper intends to contribute to addressing this challenge by exploring the different dimensions of redistributive social protection and by analyzing how donors are currently engaging with this issue. Recognizing that...

  3. Optimal Management and Design of Energy Systems under Atmospheric Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitescu, M.; Constantinescu, E. M.; Zavala, V.

    2010-12-01

    The generation and distpatch of electricity while maintaining high reliability levels are two of the most daunting engineering problems of the modern era. This was demonstrated by the Northeast blackout of August 2003, which resulted in the loss of 6.2 gigawatts that served more than 50 million people and which resulted in economic losses on the order of $10 billion. In addition, there exist strong socioeconomic pressures to improve the efficiency of the grid. The most prominent solution to this problem is a substantial increase in the use of renewable energy such as wind and solar. In turn, its uncertain availability—which is due to the intrinsic weather variability—will increase the likelihood of disruptions. In this endeavors of current and next-generation power systems, forecasting atmospheric conditions with uncertainty can and will play a central role, at both the demand and the generation ends. User demands are strongly correlated to physical conditions such as temperature, humidity, and solar radiation. The reason is that the ambient temperature and solar radiation dictate the amount of air conditioning and lighting needed in residential and commercial buildings. But these potential benefits would come at the expense of increased variability in the dynamics of both production and demand, which would become even more dependent on weather state and its uncertainty. One of the important challenges for energy in our time is how to harness these benefits while “keeping the lights on”—ensuring that the demand is satisfied at all times and that no blackout occurs while all energy sources are optimally used. If we are to meet this challenge, accounting for uncertainty in the atmospheric conditions is essential, since this will allow minimizing the effects of false positives: committing too little baseline power in anticipation of demand that is underestimated or renewable energy levels that fail to materialize. In this work we describe a framework for the

  4. Did high energy astrophysical sources contribute to Martian atmospheric loss?

    OpenAIRE

    Atri, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Mars is believed to have had a substantial atmosphere in the past. Atmospheric loss led to depressurization and cooling, and is thought to be the primary driving force responsible for the loss of liquid water from its surface. Recently, MAVEN observations have provided new insight into the physics of atmospheric loss induced by ICMEs and solar wind interacting with the Martian atmosphere. In addition to solar radiation, it is likely that its atmosphere has been exposed to radiation bursts fro...

  5. High energy laser propagation in various atmospheric conditions utilizing a new, accelerated scaling code

    OpenAIRE

    Fussman, Chris R.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited For this thesis, an atmospheric propagation code named ANCHOR (Atmospheric NPS Code for High Energy Laser Optical pRopagation) was developed and utilized to study the propagation of high energy lasers in various atmospheric conditions and for numerous laser configurations. The ANCHOR code accesses existing industry databases to obtain relevant optical properties for various atmospheres and then uses scaling laws to simulate laser propa...

  6. The energy balance of plasmoids in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, P. J.; Pneuman, G. W.

    1986-01-01

    The properties of an isolated magnetized plasmoid in a nonuniform magnetic field such as arises in stellar atmospheres are studied. The work of Pneuman and Cargill (1985) on the so-called melon-seed effect is extended to include an equation describing the energy balance, so giving a unified picture of the shape, motion, and energetics of the plasmoid. Three treatments of plasmoid energy balance are considered: (1) a polytropic law, (P = about N to the gamma); (2) one in which the plasmoid cools radiatively; and (3) one in which a heating function proportional to the local density balances the radiation. For a gamma = 4/3 polytrope the evolution is self-similar, so that the plasmoid maintains its shape as it moves out from the stellar surface. If gamma is less than 4/3, the final shape is a long thin cigar-shaped body, whereas if gamma is greater than or equal to 4/3, it ultimately becomes self-similar. In cases with radiation and also with heating, the ultimate shape of the plasmoid is determined by whether its gas or magnetic pressure dominate. The former is equivalent to the gamma-less-than-4/3 polytrope, and the latter to the gamma-greater-than-4/3 one. If radiation alone is present, the plasmoid cools rapidly and subsequently evolves self-similarly. If heating balances radiation initially, then the plasmoid heats up as it moves out, but, if the ratio of the transit of time of Alfven waves across it is much less than the radiative cooling time, it ultimately evolves as a gamma = 5/3 polytrope. In each case the plasmoid can be ejected to large distances (several radii) in a stellar atmosphere, for a reasonable choice of surface parameters.

  7. Computations of Compton scattering redistribution function in plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Madej, J; Majczyna, A; Należyty, M

    2016-01-01

    Compton scattering is the dominant opacity source in hot neutron stars, accretion disks around black holes and hot coronae. We present here a set of numerical expressions of the Compton scattering redistribution functions for unpolarized radiation, which are more exact than the widely used Kompaneets equation. This paper fulfills three goals: 1. We have organized three existing algorithms into a form ready to use in radiative transfer and model atmosphere codes. 2. We present the correct algorithm derived first by Guilbert (1981). 3. We modify the exact algorithm by Suleimanov et al. (2012) in order to use it for the scattering in a very wide spectral range from hard X- rays to radio waves. We present sample computations of the Compton scattering redistribution functions in thermal plasma at temperatures corresponding to the atmospheres of bursting neutron stars and hot intergalactic medium. Our formulae are also useful to the study Compton scattering of unpolarised microwave background radiation in hot intra...

  8. Charge Redistribution from Anomalous Magnetovorticity Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Koichi; Yin, Yi

    2016-10-01

    We investigate novel transport phenomena in a chiral fluid originated from an interplay between a vorticity and strong magnetic field, which induces a redistribution of vector charges in the system and an axial current along the magnetic field. The corresponding transport coefficients are obtained from an energy-shift argument for the chiral fermions in the lowest Landau level due to a spin-vorticity coupling and also from diagrammatic computations on the basis of the linear response theory. Based on consistent results from both methods, we observe that the transport coefficients are proportional to the anomaly coefficient and are independent of temperature and chemical potential. We therefore speculate that these transport phenomena are connected to quantum anomaly.

  9. AtmoHEAD 2013 workshop / Atmospheric Monitoring for High-Energy Astroparticle Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bernlöhr, K; Blanch, O; Bourgeat, M; Bruno, P; Buscemi, M; Cassardo, C; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chouza, F; Cilmo, M; Coco, M; Colombi, J; Compin, M; Daniel, M K; Reyes, R De Los; Ebr, J; D'Elia, R; Deil, C; Etchegoyen, A; Doro, M; Ferrarese, S; Fiorini, M; Font, LL; Garrido, D; Gast, H; Gaug, M; Gonzales, F; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Hahn, J; Hrabovsky, M; Kosack, K; Krüger, P; La Rosa, G; Leto, G; Lo, Y T E; López-Oramas, A; Louedec, K; Maccarone, M C; Mandat, D; Marandon, V; Martinetti, E; Martinez, M; de Naurois, M; Neronov, A; Nolan, S J; Otero, L; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Pech, M; Puhlhofer, G; Prouza, M; Quel, E; Raul, D; Ristori, P; Frias, M D Rodriguez; Rivoire, S; Rulten, C B; Schovanek, P; Segreto, A; Sottile, G; Stringhetti, L; Tavernet, J -P; Tonachini, A S; Toscano, S; Travnicek, P; Valore, L; Vasileiadis, G; Vincent, S; Wada, S; Wiencke, L; Will, M

    2014-01-01

    A 3-day international workshop on atmospheric monitoring and calibration for high-energy astroparticle detectors, with a view towards next-generation facilities. The atmosphere is an integral component of many high-energy astroparticle detectors. Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and cosmic-ray extensive air shower detectors are the two instruments driving the rapidly evolving fields of very-high- and ultra-high-energy astrophysics. In these instruments, the atmosphere is used as a giant calorimeter where cosmic rays and gamma rays deposit their energy and initiate EASs; it is also the medium through which the resulting Cherenkov light propagates. Uncertainties in real-time atmospheric conditions and in the fixed atmospheric models typically dominate all other systematic errors. With the improved sensitivity of upgraded IACTs such as H.E.S.S.-II and MAGIC-II and future facilities like the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and JEM-EUSO, statistical uncertainties are expected to be significantly reduced, l...

  10. Inequality Aversion and Voting on Redistribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höchtl, Wolfgang; Sausgruber, Rupert; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    Some people have a concern for a fair distribution of incomes while others do not. Does such a concern matter for majority voting on redistribution? Fairness preferences are relevant for redistribution outcomes only if fair-minded voters are pivotal. Pivotality, in turn, depends on the structure...... of income classes. We experimentally study voting on redistribution between two income classes and show that the effect of inequality aversion is asymmetric. Inequality aversion is more likely to matter if the “rich” are in majority. With a “poor” majority, we find that redistribution outcomes look...

  11. Inequality aversion and voting on redistribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höchtl, Wolfgang; Sausgruber, Rupert; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    2012-01-01

    Some people have a concern for a fair distribution of incomes while others do not. Does such a concern matter for majority voting on redistribution? Fairness preferences are relevant for redistribution outcomes only if fair-minded voters are pivotal. Pivotality, in turn, depends on the structure...... of income classes. We experimentally study voting on redistribution between two income classes and show that the effect of inequality aversion is asymmetric. Inequality aversion is more likely to matter if the “rich” are in majority. With a “poor” majority, we find that redistribution outcomes look...

  12. The Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Chemistry Program: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    In response to a request from the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry has reviewed OHER`s Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). This report contains the committee`s evaluation and critique arising from that review. The review process included a two-day symposium held at the National Academy of Sciences on September 25 and 26, 1990, that focused on presenting the ACP`s current components, recent scientific accomplishments, and scientific plans. Following the symposium, committee members met in a one-day executive session to formulate and outline this report. In undertaking this review, OHER and ACP management requested that the committee attempt to answer several specific questions involving the program`s technical capability and productivity, its leadership and organization, and its future direction. These questions are given in the Appendix. This report represents the committee`s response to the questions posed in the Appendix. Chapter I explores the committee`s view of the role that atmospheric chemistry could and should assume within the DOE and its prospective National Energy Strategy. Chapter 2 assesses the current ACP, Chapter 3 presents recommendations for revising and strengthening it, and Chapter 4 restates the committee`s conclusions and recommendations.

  13. Energy balance and plume dynamics in Triton's lower atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelle, Roger V.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Hunten, Donald M.

    1991-01-01

    The present study of the thermal balance-affecting relationships among Triton lower atmosphere thermal conduction, eddy mixing, condensation, and radiative heating indicates that, while the temperature gradient is negative in the lower atmosphere, it becomes positive at higher altitudes due to the downward conduction of ionospheric heat. This temperature profile is essentially consistent with radio-occultation experiment data; the geyser-like plumes observed by Voyager suggest that the Trioton atmosphere's convective and conductive regions join near 10-km altitude, and that the values inferred for the eddy diffusion and heat-transport coefficients indicate a profile reminiscent of the earth's.

  14. Energy Estimation of UHE Cosmic Rays using the Atmospheric Fluorescence Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Song, C; Dawson, B R; Fick, B E; Lee, W; Sokolsky, P; Zhang, X

    2000-01-01

    We use the CORSIKA air shower simulation program to review the method for assigning energies to ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic rays viewed with the air fluorescence technique. This technique uses the atmosphere as a calorimeter, and we determine the corrections that must be made to the calorimetric energy to yield the primary cosmic ray energy.

  15. Annual progress report for 1999. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B. [eds.

    2000-06-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 1999. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the departments is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 1999 is presented, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  16. Annual progress report for 1999. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 1999. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the departments is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 1999 is presented, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  17. A Code to Compute High Energy Cosmic Ray Effects on Terrestrial Atmospheric Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Krejci, Alex J; Thomas, Brian C

    2008-01-01

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), can be used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. The effect on atmospheric chemistry from astrophysically created high energy cosmic rays can now be studied using the NGSFC code. A table has been created that, with the use of the NGSFC code can be used to simulate the effects of high energy cosmic rays (10 GeV to 1 PeV) ionizing the atmosphere. We discuss the table, its use, weaknesses, and strengths.

  18. Redistributive effects in public health care financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honekamp, Ivonne; Possenriede, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    This article focuses on the redistributive effects of different measures to finance public health insurance. We analyse the implications of different financing options for public health insurance on the redistribution of income from good to bad health risks and from high-income to low-income individuals. The financing options considered are either income-related (namely income taxes, payroll taxes, and indirect taxes), health-related (co-insurance, deductibles, and no-claim), or neither (flat fee). We show that governments who treat access to health care as a basic right for everyone should consider redistributive effects when reforming health care financing. PMID:18347823

  19. Studies of the Atmospheric Chemsitry of Energy-Related Volatile Organic Compounds and of their Atmospheric Reaction Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger Atkinson; Janet Arey

    2007-04-14

    The focus of this contract was to investigate selected aspects of the atmospheric chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted into the atmosphere from energy-related sources as well as from biogenic sources. The classes of VOCs studied were polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitro-PAHs, the biogenic VOCs isoprene, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol and cis-3-hexen-1-ol, alkenes (including alkenes emitted from vegetation) and their oxygenated atmospheric reaction products, and a series of oxygenated carbonyl and hydroxycarbonyl compounds formed as atmospheric reaction products of aromatic hydrocarbons and other VOCs. Large volume reaction chambers were used to investigate the kinetics and/or products of photolysis and of the gas-phase reactions of these organic compounds with hydroxyl (OH) radicals, nitrate (NO3) radicals, and ozone (O3), using an array of analytical instrumentation to analyze the reactants and products (including gas chromatography, in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and direct air sampling atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry). The following studies were carried out. The photolysis rates of 1- and 2-nitronaphthalene and of eleven isomeric methylnitronaphthalenes were measured indoors using blacklamp irradiation and outdoors using natural sunlight. Rate constants were measured for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals, Cl atoms and NO3 radicals with naphthalene, 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene, 1- and 2-ethylnaphthalene and the ten dimethylnaphthalene isomers. Rate constants were measured for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with four unsaturated carbonyls and with a series of hydroxyaldehydes formed as atmospheric reaction products of other VOCs, and for the gas-phase reactions of O3 with a series of cycloalkenes. Products of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and O3 with a series of biogenically emitted VOCs were identified and quantified. Ambient atmospheric measurements of the concentrations of a

  20. Mechanical energy input to the world oceans due to atmospheric loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; QIAN Chengchun; HUANG Ruixin

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical energy input to the oceans is one of the most important factors controlling the oceanic general circulation. The atmosphere transports mechanical energy to the oceans primarily through wind stress, plus changes of the sea level pressure (the so-called atmospheric loading). The rate of mechanical energy transfer into the ocean due to atmospheric loading is calculated, based on TOPEX/POSEIDON data over ten-year period (1993-2002). The rate of total energy input for the world oceans is estimated at 0.04TW (1TW=1012Watt), and most of this energy input is concentrated in the Southern Oceans and the Storm Tracks in the Northern Hemisphere. This energy input varied greatly with time, and the amplitude of the interannual variability over the past ten years is about 15%.

  1. Cloud Effects on Meridional Atmospheric Energy Budget Estimated from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Seiji; Rose, Fred G.; Rutan, David A.; Charlock, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    The zonal mean atmospheric cloud radiative effect, defined as the difference of the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface cloud radiative effects, is estimated from three years of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data. The zonal mean shortwave effect is small, though it tends to be positive (warming). This indicates that clouds increase shortwave absorption in the atmosphere, especially in midlatitudes. The zonal mean atmospheric cloud radiative effect is, however, dominated by the longwave effect. The zonal mean longwave effect is positive in the tropics and decreases with latitude to negative values (cooling) in polar regions. The meridional gradient of cloud effect between midlatitude and polar regions exists even when uncertainties in the cloud effect on the surface enthalpy flux and in the modeled irradiances are taken into account. This indicates that clouds increase the rate of generation of mean zonal available potential energy. Because the atmospheric cooling effect in polar regions is predominately caused by low level clouds, which tend to be stationary, we postulate that the meridional and vertical gradients of cloud effect increase the rate of meridional energy transport by dynamics in the atmosphere from midlatitude to polar region, especially in fall and winter. Clouds then warm the surface in polar regions except in the Arctic in summer. Clouds, therefore, contribute in increasing the rate of meridional energy transport from midlatitude to polar regions through the atmosphere.

  2. When Redistribution Leads to Regressive Taxation

    OpenAIRE

    Cyril Hariton; Gwen�el Piaser; Gwena�l Piaser

    2006-01-01

    We introduce labor contracts, in a framework of optimal redistribution: firms have some local market power and try to discriminate among heterogeneous workers. In this setting we show that if the firms have perfect information, i.e, they perfectly discriminate against workers and take all the surplus, the best tax function is flat. If the firms have imperfect information, i.e, if they offert incentive contracts, then (under some assumptions) the best redistributive taxation is regressive.

  3. When redistribution leads to regressive taxation

    OpenAIRE

    HARITON, Cyril; PIASER, Gwenaël

    2004-01-01

    We introduce labor contracts, in a framework of optimal redistribution: firms have some local market power and try to discriminate among heterogeneous workers. In this setting we show that if the firms have perfect information, i.e, they perfectly discriminate against workers and take all the surplus, the best tax function is flat. If the firms have imperfect information, i.e, if they offert incentive contracts, then (under some assumptions) the best redistributive taxation is regressive.

  4. Redistributive Taxation and PublicExpenditures

    OpenAIRE

    Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay; Joan Esteban

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a model of redistributive income taxation and publicexpenditure. Besides redistributing personal income by means of taxesand transfers, the government supplies goods and services. Thegovernment chooses the tax schedule that is found acceptable by thelargest share possible of the population. We show that there is a uniqueincome tax schedule that is universally acceptable. The progressivity ofthe income tax is shown to depend on the composition of the publicexpenditure and on the s...

  5. CELESTE an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for high energy gamma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Paré, E; Bazer-Bachi, R; Bergeret, H; Berny, F; Briand, N; Bruel, P; Cerutti, M; Collon, J; Cordier, A; Cornebise, P; Debiais, G; Dezalay, J P; Dumora, D; Durand, E; Eschstruth, P T; Espigat, P; Fabre, B; Fleury, P; Gilly, J; Gouillaud, J C; Gregory, C; Herault, N; Holder, J; Hrabovsky, M; Incerti, S; Jouenne, A; Kalt, L; Legallou, R; Lott, B; Lodygensky, O; Manigot, P; Manseri, H; Manitaz, H; Martin, M; Morano, R; Morineaud, G; Muenz, F; Musquere, A; Naurois, M D; Neveu, J; Noppe, J M; Olive, J F; Palatka, M; Pérez, A; Quebert, J; Rebii, A; Reposeur, T; Rob, L; Roy, P; Sans, J L; Sako, T; Schovanek, P; Smith, D A; Snabre, P; Villard, G

    2002-01-01

    CELESTE is an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope based on the sampling method which makes use of the de-commissioned THEMIS solar electrical plant in the French Pyrenees. A large (2000 m sup 2) mirror surface area from 40 independent heliostats followed by a secondary optic, a trigger system using analog summing techniques and signal digitization with 1 GHz flash ADCs make possible the detection of cosmic gamma-rays down to 30 GeV. This paper provides a detailed technical description of the CELESTE installation.

  6. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department annual progress report for 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    . The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danishand international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary......The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risø National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviateatmospheric aspects of environmental problems...

  7. Magnetospheric energy inputs into the upper atmospheres of the giant planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. A. Smith

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the effects of Joule heating upon the upper atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. We show that in addition to direct Joule heating there is an additional input of kinetic energy – ion drag energy – which we quantify relative to the Joule heating. We also show that fluctuations about the mean electric field, as observed in the Earth's ionosphere, may significantly increase the Joule heating itself. For physically plausible parameters these effects may increase previous estimates of the upper atmospheric energy input at Saturn from ~10 TW to ~20 TW.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Electric fields and currents; Planetary ionosphere – Magnetospheric physics (Auroral phenomena

  8. Aerosol influence on energy balance of the middle atmosphere of Jupiter

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xi; West, Robert A.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Nixon, Conor A.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosols are ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres in the Solar System. However, radiative forcing on Jupiter has traditionally been attributed to solar heating and infrared cooling of gaseous constituents only, while the significance of aerosol radiative effects has been a long-standing controversy. Here we show, based on observations from the NASA spacecraft Voyager and Cassini, that gases alone cannot maintain the global energy balance in the middle atmosphere of Jupiter. Instead, a thick ae...

  9. Spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density of partially coherent electromagnetic beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianlong; Lü, Baida; Zhu, Shifu

    2009-07-01

    The formulas of the energy and energy flux density of partially coherent electromagnetic beams in atmospheric turbulence are derived by using Maxwell's equations. Expressions expressed by elements of electric cross spectral density matrixes of the magnetic and the mutual cross spectral density matrix are obtained for the partially coherent electromagnetic beams. Taken the partially coherent Cosh-Gaussian (ChG) electromagnetic beam as a typical example, the spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density in atmospheric turbulence are numerically calculated. It is found that the turbulence shows a broadening effect on the spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density. Some interesting results are obtained and explained with regard to their physical nature.

  10. Stellar model atmospheres with magnetic line blanketing

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O; Shulyak, D

    2004-01-01

    Model atmospheres of A and B stars are computed taking into account magnetic line blanketing. These calculations are based on the new stellar model atmosphere code LLModels which implements direct treatment of the opacities due to the bound-bound transitions and ensures an accurate and detailed description of the line absorption. The anomalous Zeeman effect was calculated for the field strengths between 1 and 40 kG and a field vector perpendicular to the line of sight. The model structure, high-resolution energy distribution, photometric colors, metallic line spectra and the hydrogen Balmer line profiles are computed for magnetic stars with different metallicities and are discussed with respect to those of non-magnetic reference models. The magnetically enhanced line blanketing changes the atmospheric structure and leads to a redistribution of energy in the stellar spectrum. The most noticeable feature in the optical region is the appearance of the 5200 A depression. However, this effect is prominent only in ...

  11. Water savings of redistributing global crop production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kyle; Seveso, Antonio; Rulli, Maria Cristina; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Human demand for crop production is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades as a result of population growth, richer diets and biofuel use. For food production to keep pace, unprecedented amounts of resources - water, fertilizers, energy - will be required. This has led to calls for 'sustainable intensification' in which yields are increased on existing croplands while seeking to minimize impacts on water and other agricultural resources. Recent studies have quantified aspects of this, showing that there is a large potential to improve crop yields and increase harvest frequencies to better meet human demand. Though promising, both solutions would necessitate large additional inputs of water and fertilizer in order to be achieved under current technologies. However, the question of whether the current distribution of crops is, in fact, the best for realizing maximized production has not been considered to date. To this end, we ask: Is it possible to minimize water demand by simply growing crops where soil and climate conditions are best suited? Here we use maps of agro-ecological suitability - a measure of physical and chemical soil fertility - for 15 major food crops to identify differences between current crop distributions and where they can most suitably be planted. By redistributing crops across currently cultivated lands, we determine what distribution of crops would maintain current calorie production and agricultural value while minimizing the water demand of crop production. In doing this, our study provides a novel tool for policy makers and managers to integrate food security, environmental sustainability, and rural livelihoods by improving the use of freshwater resources without compromising crop calorie production or rural livelihoods.

  12. Proportional Conflict Redistribution Rules for Information Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Smarandache, Florentin; Dezert, Jean

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose five versions of a Proportional Conflict Redistribution rule (PCR) for information fusion together with several examples. From PCR1 to PCR2, PCR3, PCR4, PCR5 one increases the complexity of the rules and also the exactitude of the redistribution of conflicting masses. PCR1 restricted from the hyper-power set to the power set and without degenerate cases gives the same result as the Weighted Average Operator (WAO) proposed recently by J{\\o}sang, Daniel and Vannoorenber...

  13. Solute Redistribution in Directional Melting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The solute redistribution in directional melting process is theoretically studied. Based on quantitative evaluations, uniform solute distribution in liquid and a quasi-steady solute distribution in solid are supposed. The discussion on the solute balance comes to a simple model for the solute redistribution in directional melting process. As an example, the variation of liquid composition during melting process of carbon steel is quantitatively evaluated using the model. Results show that the melting of an alloy starts at solidus temperature, but approaches the liquidus temperature after a very short transient process.

  14. Wind energy meteorology atmospheric physics for wind power generation

    CERN Document Server

    Emeis, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    This book is intended to give an introduction into the meteorological boundary conditions for power generation from the wind, onshore and offshore. It aims to provide reliable meteorological information for the planning and running of this important kind of renewable energy. This includes the derivation of wind laws and wind profile descriptions, especially those above the logarithmic surface layer. Winds over complex terrain and nocturnal low-level jets are considered as well. A special chapter is devoted to the efficiency of large wind parks and their wakes.

  15. High energy cosmic ray particles and the most powerful discharges in thunderstorm atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The runaway breakdown-extensive atmospheric shower discharge (RB-EAS) excited in thunderstorm atmosphere by high energy cosmic ray particles (εp>1017-1019 eV) generate very powerful radio pulse. The RB-EAS theory is compared with observations of radio pulses. An agreement between the theory and experiment is established. The existence of nowaday satellite and ground based systems which obtain regularly a large amount of observational radio data could allow to use them in combination with other methods for effective study of high energy cosmic ray particles

  16. High energy cosmic ray particles and the most powerful new type discharges in thunderstorm atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Gurevich, A V

    2004-01-01

    The runaway breakdown -- extensive atmospheric shower discharge (RB - EAS) excited in thunderstorm atmosphere by high energy cosmic ray particles ($\\epsilon_p>10^{17} - 10^{19}$ eV) generate very powerful radio pulse. The RB - EAS theory is compared with observations of radio pulses. An agreement between the theory and experiment is established. The existence of nowaday satellite and ground based systems which obtain regularly a large amount of observational radio data could allow to use them in combination with other methods for effective study of high energy cosmic ray particles

  17. Solar wind and high energy particle effects in the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastovicka, Jan

    1989-01-01

    The solar wind variability and high energy particle effects in the neutral middle atmosphere are not much known. These factors are important in the high latitude upper mesosphere, lower thermosphere energy budget. They influence temperature, composition (minor constituents of nitric oxide, ozone), circulation (wind system) and airflow. The vertical and latitudinal structures of such effects, mechanisms of downward penetration of energy and questions of energy abundance are largely to be solved. The most important recent finding seems to be the discovery of the role of highly relativistic electrons in the middle atmosphere at L = 3 - 8 (Baker et al., 1987). The solar wind and high energy particle flux variability appear to form a part of the chain of possible Sun-weather (climate) relationships. The importance of such studies in the nineties is emphasized by their role in big international programs STEP and IGBP - Global Change.

  18. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1988-08-01

    Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. For several years, studies of transport and diffusion have been extended to mesoscale areas of complex terrain. Atmospheric cleansing research has expanded to a regional scale, multilaboratory investigation of precipitation scavenging processes involving the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, the redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. A few long-range tracer experiments conducted in recent years and the special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity following the Chernobyl reactor accident of April 1986 offer important initial data bases for studying atmospheric processes at these super-regional scales.

  19. Climate warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2 - Simulations with a multilayer coupled atmosphere-ocean seasonal energy balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Chou, Ming-Dah; Arking, Albert

    1987-01-01

    The transient response of the climate to increasing CO2 is studied using a modified version of the multilayer energy balance model of Peng et al. (1982). The main characteristics of the model are described. Latitudinal and seasonal distributions of planetary albedo, latitude-time distributions of zonal mean temperatures, and latitudinal distributions of evaporation, water vapor transport, and snow cover generated from the model and derived from actual observations are analyzed and compared. It is observed that in response to an atmospheric doubling of CO2, the model reaches within 1/e of the equilibrium response of global mean surface temperature in 9-35 years for the probable range of vertical heat diffusivity in the ocean. For CO2 increases projected by the National Research Council (1983), the model's transient response in annually and globally averaged surface temperatures is 60-75 percent of the corresponding equilibrium response, and the disequilibrium increases with increasing heat diffusivity of the ocean.

  20. Cognitive ability and the demand for redistribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Mollerstrom

    Full Text Available Empirical research suggests that the cognitively able are politically more influential than the less able, by being more likely to vote and to assume leadership positions. This study asks whether this pattern matters for public policy by investigating what role a person's cognitive ability plays in determining his preferences for redistribution of income among citizens in society. To answer this question, we use a unique Swedish data set that matches responses to a tailor-made questionnaire to administrative tax records and to military enlistment records for men, with the latter containing a measure of cognitive ability. On a scale of 0 to 100 percent redistribution, a one-standard-deviation increase in cognitive ability reduces the willingness to redistribute by 5 percentage points, or by the same amount as a $35,000 increase in mean annual income. We find support for two channels mediating this economically strong and statistically significant relation. First, higher ability is associated with higher income. Second, ability is positively correlated with the view that economic success is the result of effort, rather than luck. Both these factors are, in turn, related to lower demand for redistribution.

  1. Trade and the political economy of redistribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vannoorenberghe, Gonzague; Janeba, E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper shows how international trade affects the support for policies which redistribute income between workers across sectors, and how the existence of such policies changes the support for trade liberalization. Workers, who are imperfectly mobile across sectors, vote on whether to subsidize ai

  2. Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial and atmospheric neutron flux: A lookup table

    CERN Document Server

    Overholt, Andrew; Atri, Dimitra

    2013-01-01

    Under current conditions, the cosmic ray spectrum incident on the Earth is dominated by particles with energies < 1 GeV. Astrophysical sources including high energy solar flares, supernovae and gamma ray bursts produce high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) with drastically higher energies. The Earth is likely episodically exposed to a greatly increased HECR flux from such events, some of which lasting thousands to millions of years. The air showers produced by HECRs ionize the atmosphere and produce harmful secondary particles such as muons and neutrons. Neutrons currently contribute a significant radiation dose at commercial passenger airplane altitude. With higher cosmic ray energies, these effects will be propagated to ground level. This work shows the results of Monte Carlo simulations quantifying the neutron flux due to high energy cosmic rays at various primary energies and altitudes. We provide here lookup tables that can be used to determine neutron fluxes from primaries with total energies 1 GeV - 1 PeV...

  3. Wave-mean flow interaction and its relationship with the atmospheric energy cycle with diabatic heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN; Anmin

    2005-01-01

    Based on the traditional theory of wave mean flow interaction, an improved quasi-geostrophic Eliassen-Palm flux with diabatic heating included is deduced. It is shown that there exists an intrinsic relation between the atmospheric energy cycle derived by Lorenz and the wave energy transfer derived by Eliassen and Palm. From this relation it becomes clear that the energy propagation process of large-scale stationary wave is indeed a part of Lorenz energy cycle, and the energy transform from mean flow to wave equals the global mass integral of the divergence of local wave energy flux or the global integral of local wave energy. The diagnostic results by using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data suggest that the classical adiabatic Eliassen-Palm flux relation can present only the wintertime wave energy transformation. For other seasons, however, the diabatic effect must be taken into account.

  4. Atmospheric proton and deuterium energy spectra determination with the MASS2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C.; Brunetti, M.T.; Codino, A.; Finetti, N. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); Papini, P.; Massimo Brancaccio, F. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Basini, G.; Bongiorno, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.; Hof, M. [Siegen Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich Physik

    1995-09-01

    The energy spectra of atmospheric-secondary protons and deuterium nuclei have been measured during the September 23, 1991, balloon flight of the NMSU/Wizard - MASS2 instrument. The apparatus was launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The geomagnetic cutoff at the launch site is about 4.5 GV/c. The instrument was flown for 9.8 hours at an altitude of over 100,000 feet. Particles detected below the geomagnetic cutoff have been produced mainly by the interactions of the primary cosmic rays with the atmosphere. The measurement of cosmic ray energy spectra below the geomagnetic cutoff provide direct insights into the particle production mechanism and allows comparison to atmospheric cascade calculations.

  5. Liquid-Desiccant Vapor Separation Reduces the Energy Requirements of Atmospheric Moisture Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gido, Ben; Friedler, Eran; Broday, David M

    2016-08-01

    An innovative atmospheric moisture harvesting system is proposed, where water vapor is separated from the air prior to cooling and condensation. The system was studied using a model that simulates its three interconnected cycles (air, desiccant, and water) over a range of ambient conditions, and optimal configurations are reported for different operation conditions. Model results were compared to specifications of commercial atmospheric moisture harvesting systems and found to represent saving of 5-65% of the electrical energy requirements due to the vapor separation process. We show that the liquid desiccant separation stage that is integrated into atmospheric moisture harvesting systems can work under a wide range of environmental conditions using low grade or solar heating as a supplementary energy source, and that the performance of the combined system is superior. PMID:27435379

  6. Ash Redistribution Following a Potential Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J. D.; Delong, S. B.; Cline, M. L.; Harrington, C. D.; Keating, G.

    2005-12-01

    The redistribution of contaminated tephra by hillslope, fluvial, and pedologic processes is a poorly-constrained but important aspect of evaluating the radiological dose from an unlikely volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain (YM). To better evaluate this hazard, we developed a spatially-distributed numerical model of tephra redistribution that integrates contaminated tephra from hill slopes and active channels, mixes it with clean sediment in the channel system, distributes it on the fan, and migrates it into the soil column. The model is coupled with an atmospheric dispersion model that predicts the deposition of radioactive waste-contaminated tephra at specified grid points. The redistribution model begins in the upper Fortymile Wash drainage basin where it integrates the tephra deposited on steep slopes and active channel beds within a spatially-distributed framework. The Fortymile Wash drainage basin is the focus of this model because tephra from only this basin reaches the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan by fluvial processes, and it is on this fan where the radiological dose to a hypothetical individual is compared to the regulatory standard (via additional biosphere models). The dilution effect of flood scour, mixing, and re-deposition within the upper basin is modeled using a dilution-mixing model widely used in the contaminant-transport literature. The accuracy of this model is established by comparing the model prediction with tephra concentrations measured in channels draining the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. The model combines the contaminated tephra transported from the upper basin with the tephra deposited directly on the fan as primary fallout. On the Fortymile Wash fan, channels and interchannel-divide areas are divided on the basis of soil-geomorphic mapping according to whether they are Holocene or Pleistocene in age. This approach allows the model to incorporate the effects of channel migration on the fan within the past 10,000 yr. The model treats

  7. Use of anthropogenic radioisotopes to estimate rates of soil redistribution by wind I: Historic use of 137Cs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pelt, R. Scott

    2013-06-01

    Wind erosion is increasingly scrutinized as a causative factor in soil degradation and fugitive dust emissions. Although models have been developed to predict wind erosion and dust emissions, they are not accurate in all locations. The temporal and spatial variability of aeolian processes makes local estimates of long-term average erosion costly and time consuming. Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and 1960s resulted in anthropogenic radioisotopes that had not previously existed being injected into stratospheric global circulation and subsequently deposited on the Earth's surface. Many of these radioisotopes are strongly adsorbed to soil particles and their movement on the landscape is a powerful method for investigating soil redistribution by wind, water, and tillage. 137Cs is the most commonly used anthropogenic radioisotope used to assess soil redistribution rates. Models have been developed to equate differences of radioisotope inventories with rates of soil redistribution and these models have been employed globally to assess soil redistribution on agricultural and natural landscapes. The radioisotope method for assessing soil redistribution rates has many advantages, but also a few limitations. One of the major limitations occurs when local sources of radioisotope contamination, particularly 137Cs, mask the pulse from global fallout, making temporal estimates of redistribution difficult or impossible. In this paper, I explore the importance, history, and applications of the radioisotopic technique using 137Cs, particularly as it applies to soil redistribution by wind.

  8. Modelling evapotranspiration using the surface energy balance systems (sebs) and landsat tm data (rabat region, morocco)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwast, J. van der; Jong, S.M. de

    2004-01-01

    Modelling and understanding the surface energy balance is important for assessing the re-distribution of moisture and heat in soil and atmosphere. The Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) estimates turbulent heat fluxes using satellite earth observation data in the visible, near infrared, and therma

  9. Redistribution and the Efficiency-Justice Trade-off

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Hans-Georg

    2004-01-01

    Contents: Justice of Needs and Redistribution -The Basics of the Utility Theory -Social Welfare Functions and Redistribution -Utility Possibility Curves on Egoism, Altruism and Envy -Types of Social Welfare Functions The Trade-off Problem Concluding Remarks

  10. The effects on oceanic planetary waves of coupling with an atmospheric energy balance model

    OpenAIRE

    Farneti, Riccardo; Killworth, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper shows the existence of a growing planetary-wave-like ocean mode, with a decadal period and growth rate, which appears when a stratified, diffusive ocean is coupled to a simple atmosphere via an energy balance model (EBM). Such modes are not found when simpler surface ocean conditions are applied. The mode is low order in the vertical and, because of its slow growth, is likely to be observed in Earth System Models using an EBM in place of a fuller set of atmospheric dynamics. There ...

  11. LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF PICOFLARE CATEGORY ENERGY RELEASES IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report low-frequency (80 MHz) radio observations of circularly polarized non-thermal type I radio bursts (noise storms) in the solar corona whose estimated energy is ∼1021 erg. These are the weakest energy release events reported to date in the solar atmosphere. The plot of the distribution of the number of bursts (dN) versus their corresponding peak flux density in the range S to S+dS shows a power-law behavior, i.e., dN ∝ S γ dS. The power-law index γ is in the range –2.2 to –2.7 for the events reported in the present work. The present results provide independent observational evidence for the existence of picoflare category energy releases in the solar atmosphere which are yet to be explored.

  12. Measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux by Super-Kamiokande: energy spectra, geomagnetic effects, and solar modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, E; Abe, K; Haga, Y; Hayato, Y; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakajima, T; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Orii, A; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Takeda, A; Tanaka, H; Tomura, T; Wendell, R A; Akutsu, R; Irvine, T; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Nishimura, Y; Labarga, L; Fernandez, P; Gustafson, J; Kachulis, C; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Berkman, S; Nantais, C M; Tanaka, H A; Tobayama, S; Goldhaber, M; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Weatherly, P; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Takhistov, V; Ganezer, K S; Hartfiel, B L; Hill, J; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Park, R G; Himmel, A; Li, Z; OSullivan, E; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Friend, M; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Yano, T; Cao, S V; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Fukuda, Y; Choi, K; Itow, Y; Suzuki, T; Mijakowski, P; Frankiewicz, K; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Li, X; Palomino, J L; Wilking, M J; Yanagisawa, C; Fukuda, D; Ishino, H; Kayano, T; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Xu, C; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Suda, Y; Yokoyama, M; Bronner, C; Hartz, M; Martens, K; Marti, Ll; Suzuki, Y; Vagins, M R; Martin, J F; Konaka, A; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Wilkes, R J

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study on the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy region from sub-GeV up to several TeV using the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector is presented in this paper. The energy and azimuthal spectra of the atmospheric ${\

  13. Wind Turbine Power Production and Annual Energy Production Depend on Atmospheric Stability and Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St. Martin, Clara M.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Clifton, Andrew; Poulos, Gregory S.; Schreck, Scott J.

    2016-06-17

    Using detailed upwind and nacelle-based measurements from a General Electric [GE] 1.5 sle model with a 77 m rotor diameter, we calculated power curves and annual energy production (AEP) and explored their sensitivity to different atmospheric parameters. This work provides guidelines for the use of stability and turbulence filters in segregating power curves to gain a clearer picture of the power performance of a turbine. The wind measurements upwind of the turbine include anemometers mounted on a 135 m meteorological tower and lidar vertical profiles. We calculated power curves for different regimes based on turbulence parameters such as turbulence intensity (TI) and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), as well as atmospheric stability parameters such as Bulk Richardson number (RB). AEP was also calculated with and without these atmospheric filters and differences between these calculations are highlighted in this article. The power curves for different TI and TKE regimes revealed that, at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), increased TI and TKE undermined power production at wind speeds near rated, but increased power production at lower wind speeds. Similarly, power curves for different RB regimes revealed that periods of stable conditions produced more power at wind speeds near rated and periods of unstable conditions produced more power at lower wind speeds. AEP results suggest that calculations done without filtering for these atmospheric regimes may be overestimating the AEP. Because of statistically significant differences between power curves and AEP calculated with these turbulence and stability filters for this turbine at this site, we suggest implementing an additional step in analyzing power performance data to take atmospheric stability and turbulence across the rotor disk into account.

  14. Global Redistributive Obligations in the Face of Severe Poverty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, David Vestergaard

    as a matter of justice. This moral discrepancy is reflected in our current levels of redistribution, by which we redistribute up to 50 % of our income on the domestic level and less than 1% to poor foreigners through development aid. But can this overwhelming redistributive partiality be justified...

  15. Redistributive effects of Swedish health care finance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdtham, U G; Sundberg, G

    1998-01-01

    This paper investigates the redistributive effects of the Swedish health care financing system in 1980 and 1990 for four different financial sources: county council taxes, payroll taxes, direct payments and state grants. The redistributive effects are decomposed into vertical, horizontal and 'reranking' segments for each of the four financial sources. The data used are based on probability samples of the Swedish population, from the Level of Living Survey (LNU) from 1981 and 1991. The paper concludes that the Swedish health care financing system is weakly progressive, although direct payments are regressive. There is some horizontal inequity and 'reranking', which mainly comes from the county council taxes, since those tax rates vary for each county council. The implication is that, to some extent, people with equal incomes are treated unequally.

  16. Redistributive taxation, multinational enterprises, and economic integration

    OpenAIRE

    Haufler, Andreas; Klemm, Alexander; Schjelderup, Guttorm

    2008-01-01

    Increased activity of multinational firms exposes national corporate tax bases to cross-country profit-shifting, but also leads to rising profitability of the corporate sector. We incorporate these two effects of economic integration into a simple political economy model where the median voter decides on a redistributive income tax rate. In this setting economic integration may raise or lower the equilibrium tax rate, and it is more likely to raise the tax rate of a low-tax country. The impli...

  17. Relative income, redistribution and well-being

    OpenAIRE

    FitzRoy, Felix; Nolan, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In a model with heterogeneous workers and both intensive and extensive margins of employment, we consider two systems of redistribution: a universal basic income, and a categorical unemployment benefit. Well-being depends on own-consumption relative to average employed workers’ consumption, and concern for relativity is a parameter that affects model outcomes. While labour supply incurs positive marginal disutility, we allow negative welfare effects of unemployment. We also compare Rawlsian a...

  18. Moisture redistribution in screeded concrete slabs

    OpenAIRE

    Åhs, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    The principal objective for this licentiate thesis is to develop a methodology and evaluation model in order to make the future relative humidity in a screeded concrete slab predictable. Residual moisture in screeded concrete slabs may redistribute to the top screed surface under semi-permeable flooring, thus elevating the relative humidity, RH, and possibly exceed the critical humidity level. Passing the critical humidity level may result in material damages on the flooring and adhesive. ...

  19. Observation of high energy atmospheric neutrinos with antarctic muon and neutrino detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.; Andres, E.; Bai, X.; Barouch, G.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.C.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Bertrand, D.; Binon, F.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Bouhali, O.; Boyce, M.M.; Carius, S.; Chen, A.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Costa, C.G.S.; Cowen, D.F.; Dalberg, E.; De Clercq, C.; DeYoung, T.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Doksus, P.; Edsjo, J.; Ekstrom, P.; Feser, T.; Frere, J.-M.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gaug, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hellwig, M.; Heukenkamp, H.; Hill, G.C.; Hulth, P.O.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Koci, B.; Kopke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Loaiza, P.; Lowder, D.M.; Madsen, J.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.S.; McParland, C.P.; Miller, T.C.; Minaeva, Y.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.C.; Morse, R.; Neunhoffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Ogelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pohl, A.C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.B.; Przybylski, G.T.; Rawlins, K.; Reed, C.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Starinsky, N.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Streicher, O.; Sudhoff, P.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Vander Donckt, M.; Walck, C.; Weinheimer, C.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Wiedeman, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S.

    2002-05-07

    The Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) began collecting data with ten strings in 1997. Results from the first year of operation are presented. Neutrinos coming through the Earth from the Northern Hemisphere are identified by secondary muons moving upward through the array. Cosmic rays in the atmosphere generate a background of downward moving muons, which are about 10{sup 6} times more abundant than the upward moving muons. Over 130 days of exposure, we observed a total of about 300 neutrino events. In the same period, a background of 1.05 x 10{sup 9} cosmic ray muon events was recorded. The observed neutrino flux is consistent with atmospheric neutrino predictions. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that 90 percent of these events lie in the energy range 66 GeV to 3.4 TeV. The observation of atmospheric neutrinos consistent with expectations establishes AMANDA-B10 as a working neutrino telescope.

  20. Effects of atmospheric deposition of energy-related pollutants on water quality: a review and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects on surface-water quality of atmospheric pollutants that are generated during energy production are reviewed and evaluated. Atmospheric inputs from such sources to the aquatic environment may include trace elements, organic compounds, radionuclides, and acids. Combustion is the largest energy-related source of trace-element emissions to the atmosphere. This report reviews the nature of these emissions from coal-fired power plants and discusses their terrestrial and aquatic effects following deposition. Several simple models for lakes and streams are developed and are applied to assess the potential for adverse effects on surface-water quality of trace-element emissions from coal combustion. The probability of acute impacts on the aquatic environment appears to be low; however, more subtle, chronic effects are possible. The character of acid precipitation is reviewed, with emphasis on aquatic effects, and the nature of existing or potential effects on water quality, aquatic biota, and water supply is considered. The response of the aquatic environment to acid precipitation depends on the type of soils and bedrock in a watershed and the chemical characteristics of the water bodies in question. Methods for identifying regions sensitive to acid inputs are reviewed. The observed impact of acid precipitation ranges from no effects to elimination of fish populations. Coal-fired power plants and various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle release radionuclides to the atmosphere. Radioactive releases to the atmosphere from these sources and the possible aquatic effects of such releases are examined. For the nuclear fuel cycle, the major releases are from reactors and reprocessing. Although aquatic effects of atmospheric releases have not been fully quantified, there seems little reason for concern for man or aquatic biota

  1. Effects of atmospheric deposition of energy-related pollutants on water quality: a review and assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.J.

    1981-05-01

    The effects on surface-water quality of atmospheric pollutants that are generated during energy production are reviewed and evaluated. Atmospheric inputs from such sources to the aquatic environment may include trace elements, organic compounds, radionuclides, and acids. Combustion is the largest energy-related source of trace-element emissions to the atmosphere. This report reviews the nature of these emissions from coal-fired power plants and discusses their terrestrial and aquatic effects following deposition. Several simple models for lakes and streams are developed and are applied to assess the potential for adverse effects on surface-water quality of trace-element emissions from coal combustion. The probability of acute impacts on the aquatic environment appears to be low; however, more subtle, chronic effects are possible. The character of acid precipitation is reviewed, with emphasis on aquatic effects, and the nature of existing or potential effects on water quality, aquatic biota, and water supply is considered. The response of the aquatic environment to acid precipitation depends on the type of soils and bedrock in a watershed and the chemical characteristics of the water bodies in question. Methods for identifying regions sensitive to acid inputs are reviewed. The observed impact of acid precipitation ranges from no effects to elimination of fish populations. Coal-fired power plants and various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle release radionuclides to the atmosphere. Radioactive releases to the atmosphere from these sources and the possible aquatic effects of such releases are examined. For the nuclear fuel cycle, the major releases are from reactors and reprocessing. Although aquatic effects of atmospheric releases have not been fully quantified, there seems little reason for concern for man or aquatic biota.

  2. Meridional energy transport in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system: Compensation and partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farneti, R.; Vallis, G. K.

    2012-04-01

    The variability and compensation of the energy transport in the atmosphere and ocean are discussed with a hierarchy of coupled models. A state-of-the-art Coupled Model (GFDL CM2.1), an Intermediate Complexity Climate Model (GFDL ICCM) and a simple Energy Balance Model (EBM) are used in this study. For decadal time scales, a high degree of compensation is found for the transport in the Northern Hemisphere in the Atlantic sector. The variability of the total, or planetary, heat transport (PHT) is much smaller than the variability in either the atmosphere (AHT) or ocean (OHT) alone, a feature sometimes referred to as `Bjerknes compensation'. In the coupled models used, natural decadal variability stems from the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), and variations in the strength of the AMOC tend to lead the variability in the OHT. Furthermore, the PHT is positively correlated with the OHT, implying that the atmosphere is compensating, but imperfectly, for variations in the ocean transport. In the Southern Hemisphere no significant anticorrelation is found between OHT and AHT, consistent with the absence of decadal scale variability in the ocean. For both coupled models, the strongest anticorrelation between transports is found at the period of AMOC variability and decreases as the time scale decreases. Unlike the AHT and AMOC, the AHT and the transport in the oceanic gyres are positively correlated, suggesting that coupling between the wind-driven ocean circulation and the atmosphere militates against long-term variability involving the wind-driven flow. Moisture and sensible heat transports in the atmosphere are also positively correlated at decadal time scales. In the Northern Hemisphere compensation is weaker at low latitudes than at high. This is consistent with the notion that at low latitudes a larger fraction of the oceanic transport is due to the wind-driven warm cell, and the atmospheric and wind-driven oceanic energy transports vary in unison

  3. Global atmospheric energy deposition by energetic electrons - Quantitative spatial and temporal characteristics inferred from the Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (PEM/AXIS) on UARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenette, D. L.; Datlowe, D. W.; Robinson, R. M.; Schumaker, T. L.; Vondrak, R. R.; Frahm, R. A.; Sharber, J. R.; Winningham, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    The primary purpose of PEM/AXIS is to provide a global monitor of the energy input to the upper atmosphere due to energetic electrons. The design, development, and calibration of AXIS are described and an assessment of its excellent on-orbit performance is presented. The unique capabilities of X-ray imaging spectrometers to monitor the global patterns of electron energy deposition in the atmosphere are shown through an analysis of some specific cases during the first year of the UARS mission.

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1984-02-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to assess, describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to study the impacts of contaminants on local, regional and global climates. The contaminants being investigated are those resulting from the development and use of conventional energy resources (coal, gas, oil, and nuclear power) as well as alternative energy resources. The description of atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of generic studies including Contaminant Characterizations and Transformation; Boundary Layer Meteorology; and Dispersion, Deposition and Resupension of Atmospheric Contaminants.

  5. Extensive Cloud Showers (ECS) – New High-Energy Phenomena Resulting from the Thunderstorm Atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the phenomenon of the Extensive Cloud Showers (ECS) detected by the surface particle detectors at mountain altitudes in correlation with thunderstorms. Measured microsecond duration particle bursts are first direct evidence of the electron-photon avalanches in the thunderstorm atmospheres, reaching the mountain altitudes from low located thunderclouds. In the report we present analysis of these rare events including spatial distribution, density spectra and particle energy.

  6. Addition Laws for Intensities of Radiation Emerging from Scattering Atmospheres Containing Energy Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoghossian, A. G.; Kapanadze, N. G.

    2016-03-01

    A group theoretical approach is developed for solving astrophysical radiative transfer problems described in a previous series of papers. Addition laws for observed radiative intensities are derived for the case in which atmospheres not only absorb and scatter radiation incident on them, but radiate themselves because of energy sources contained within them. As an illustration of the application of these laws, several special radiative transfer problems which we believe are of practical interest are discussed.

  7. Mesoscale atmosphere ocean coupling enhances the transfer of wind energy into the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, D; Munnich, M.; Frenger, Ivy; Gruber, N.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well established that the large-scale wind drives much of the world’s ocean circulation, the contribution of the wind energy input at mesoscales (10–200 km) remains poorly known. Here we use regional simulations with a coupled high-resolution atmosphere–ocean model of the South Atlantic, to show that mesoscale ocean features and, in particular, eddies can be energized by their thermodynamic interactions with the atmosphere. Owing to their sea-surface temperature ...

  8. Carbon and energy yields in prebiotic syntheses using atmospheres containing CH4, CO and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. L.; Schlesinger, G.

    1984-01-01

    Yields based on carbon are usually reported in prebiotic experiments, while energy yields (moles/cal) are more useful in estimating the yields of products that would have been obtained from the primitive atmosphere of the earth. Energy yields for the synthesis of HCN and H2CO from a spark discharge were determined for various mixtures of CH4, CO, CO2, H2, H2O, N2 an NH3. The maximum yields of HCN and H2CO from CH4, CO, and CO2 as carbon sources are about 4 x 10 to the -8th moles/cal.

  9. Observation and interpretation of energy efficient, diffuse direct current glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jie, E-mail: tangjie1979@opt.ac.cn; Jiang, Weiman; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi' an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of CAS, Xi' an 710119 (China); Li, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi' an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of CAS, Xi' an 710119 (China); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian 223003 (China); Duan, Yixiang [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi' an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of CAS, Xi' an 710119 (China); Research Center of Analytical Instrumentation, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2015-08-24

    A diffuse direct-current glow discharge was realized with low energy consumption and high energy utilization efficiency at atmospheric pressure. The formation of diffuse discharge was demonstrated by examining and comparing the electrical properties and optical emissions of plasmas. In combination with theoretical derivation and calculation, we draw guidelines that appearance of nitrogen ions at low electron density is crucial to enhance the ambipolar diffusion for the expansion of discharge channel and the increasing ambipolar diffusion near the cathode plays a key role in the onset of diffuse discharge. An individual-discharge-channel expansion model is proposed to explain the diffuse discharge formation.

  10. A new correlation between solar energy radiation and some atmospheric parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Dumas, Antonio; Bonnici, Maurizio; Madonia, Mauro; Trancossi, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The energy balance for an atmospheric layer near the soil is evaluated. By integrating it over the whole day period a linear relationship between the global daily solar radiation incident on a horizontal surface and the product of the sunshine hours at clear sky with the maximum temperature variation in the day is achieved. The results show a comparable accuracy with some well recognized solar energy models such as the \\ang-Prescott one, at least for Mediterranean climatic area. Validation of the result has been performed using old dataset which are almost contemporary and relative to the same sites with the ones used for comparison.

  11. Rapid Atmospheric-Pressure-Plasma-Jet Processed Porous Materials for Energy Harvesting and Storage Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Zhang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ technology is a versatile technology that has been applied in many energy harvesting and storage devices. This feature article provides an overview of the advances in APPJ technology and its application to solar cells and batteries. The ultrafast APPJ sintering of nanoporous oxides and 3D reduced graphene oxide nanosheets with accompanying optical emission spectroscopy analyses are described in detail. The applications of these nanoporous materials to photoanodes and counter electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells are described. An ultrashort treatment (1 min on graphite felt electrodes of flow batteries also significantly improves the energy efficiency.

  12. A conceptual, distributed snow redistribution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, S.; Holzmann, H.

    2015-11-01

    When applying conceptual hydrological models using a temperature index approach for snowmelt to high alpine areas often accumulation of snow during several years can be observed. Some of the reasons why these "snow towers" do not exist in nature are vertical and lateral transport processes. While snow transport models have been developed using grid cell sizes of tens to hundreds of square metres and have been applied in several catchments, no model exists using coarser cell sizes of 1 km2, which is a common resolution for meso- and large-scale hydrologic modelling (hundreds to thousands of square kilometres). In this paper we present an approach that uses only gravity and snow density as a proxy for the age of the snow cover and land-use information to redistribute snow in alpine basins. The results are based on the hydrological modelling of the Austrian Inn Basin in Tyrol, Austria, more specifically the Ötztaler Ache catchment, but the findings hold for other tributaries of the river Inn. This transport model is implemented in the distributed rainfall-runoff model COSERO (Continuous Semi-distributed Runoff). The results of both model concepts with and without consideration of lateral snow redistribution are compared against observed discharge and snow-covered areas derived from MODIS satellite images. By means of the snow redistribution concept, snow accumulation over several years can be prevented and the snow depletion curve compared with MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data could be improved, too. In a 7-year period the standard model would lead to snow accumulation of approximately 2900 mm SWE (snow water equivalent) in high elevated regions whereas the updated version of the model does not show accumulation and does also predict discharge with more accuracy leading to a Kling-Gupta efficiency of 0.93 instead of 0.9. A further improvement can be shown in the comparison of MODIS snow cover data and the calculated depletion curve, where

  13. Differential flux measurement of atmospheric pion, muon, electron and positron energy spectra at balloon altitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C.; Brunetti, M.T.; Codino, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); Papini, P.; Massimo Brancaccio, F.; Finetti, N. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Researc, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements); Basini, G.; Bongiorno, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ. Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.

    1995-09-01

    The fluxes of atmospheric electrons, positrons, positive and negative muons and negative pions have been determined using the NMSU Wizard-MASS2 balloons-borne instrument. The instrument was launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico, (geomagnetic cut-off about 4.5 GV/c) on september 23, 1991. The flight lasted 9.8 hours and remained above 100.000 ft. Muons and negative pions were observed and their momenta were determined. Since these particles are not a part of the primary component, the measurement of their fluxes provides information regarding production and propagation of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Similarly, observations of electrons and positrons well below the geomagnetic cut-off provides insight into electromagnetic cascade processes in the upper atmosphere. In addition, the determination of the energy spectra of rare particles such as positrons can be used for background subtraction for cosmic ray experiments gathering data below a few g/cm{sup 2} of overlying atmosphere.

  14. Atmospheric CO2 enrichment alters energy assimilation, investment and allocation in Xanthium strumarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jennifer M; Wang, Xianzhong; Lewis, James D; Fung, Howard A; Tissue, David T; Griffin, Kevin L

    2005-05-01

    Energy-use efficiency and energy assimilation, investment and allocation patterns are likely to influence plant growth responses to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]). Here, we describe the influence of elevated [CO2] on energetic properties as a mechanism of growth responses in Xanthium strumarium. Individuals of X. strumarium were grown at ambient or elevated [CO2] and harvested. Total biomass and energetic construction costs (CC) of leaves, stems, roots and fruits and percentage of total biomass and energy allocated to these components were determined. Photosynthetic energy-use efficiency (PEUE) was calculated as the ratio of total energy gained via photosynthetic activity (Atotal) to leaf CC. Elevated [CO2] increased leaf Atotal, but decreased CC per unit mass of leaves and roots. Consequently, X. strumarium individuals produced more leaf and root biomass at elevated [CO2] without increasing total energy investment in these structures (CCtotal). Whole-plant biomass was associated positively with PEUE. Whole-plant construction required 16.1% less energy than modeled whole-plant energy investment had CC not responded to increased [CO2]. As a physiological mechanism affecting growth, altered energetic properties could positively influence productivity of X. strumarium, and potentially other species, at elevated [CO2]. PMID:15819914

  15. The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Chemistry Program: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    In response to a request from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry has reviewed OHER's Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). This report contains the committee's evaluation and critique arising from that review. The review process included a two-day symposium held at the National Academy of Sciences on September 25 and 26, 1990, that focused on presenting the ACP's current components, recent scientific accomplishments, and scientific plans. Following the symposium, committee members met in a one-day executive session to formulate and outline this report. In undertaking this review, OHER and ACP management requested that the committee attempt to answer several specific questions involving the program's technical capability and productivity, its leadership and organization, and its future direction. These questions are given in the Appendix. This report represents the committee's response to the questions posed in the Appendix. Chapter I explores the committee's view of the role that atmospheric chemistry could and should assume within the DOE and its prospective National Energy Strategy. Chapter 2 assesses the current ACP, Chapter 3 presents recommendations for revising and strengthening it, and Chapter 4 restates the committee's conclusions and recommendations.

  16. Sampling of ions at atmospheric pressure: ion transmission and ion energy studied by simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Große-Kreul, Simon; Hübner, Simon; Benedikt, Jan; von Keudell, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry of ions from atmospheric pressure plasmas is a challenging diagnostic method that has been applied to a large variety of cold plasma sources in the past. However, absolute densities can usually not be obtained, moreover, the process of sampling of ions and neutrals from such a plasma inherently influences the measured composition. These issues are studied in this contribution by a combination of experimental and numerical methods. Different numerical domains are sequentially coupled to calculate the ion transmission from the source to the mass analyzer. It is found that the energy of the sampled ions created by a radio-frequency microplasma operated in a He-N2 mixture at atmospheric pressure is of the order of 0.1 eV and that it depends linearly on the ion mass in good agreement with the expectation for seeded particles accelerated in a supersonic expansion. Moreover, the measured ion energy distribution from an afterglow of an atmospheric pressure plasma can be reproduced on basis of the particle trajectories in the sampling system. Eventually, an estimation of the absolute flux of ions to the detector is deduced.

  17. Non-standard interactions with high-energy atmospheric neutrinos at IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Salvado, Jordi; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Rius, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Non-standard interactions in the propagation of neutrinos in matter can lead to significant deviations from expectations within the standard neutrino oscillation framework and atmospheric neutrino detectors have been considered to set constraints. However, most previous works have focused on relatively low-energy atmospheric neutrino data. Here, we consider the one-year high-energy through-going muon data in IceCube, which has been already used to search for light sterile neutrinos, to constrain new interactions in the $\\mu\\tau$-sector. In our analysis we include several systematic uncertainties on both, the atmospheric neutrino flux and on the detector properties, which are accounted for via nuisance parameters. After considering different primary cosmic-ray spectra and hadronic interation models, we obtain the most stringent bound on the off-diagonal $\\varepsilon_{\\mu \\tau}$ parameter to date, with the 90\\% credible interval given by $-6.0 \\times 10^{-3} < \\varepsilon_{\\mu \\tau} < 5.4 \\times 10^{-3}$....

  18. Strengthening of the hydrological cycle in future scenarios: atmospheric energy and water balance perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alessandri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Future climate scenarios experiencing global warming are expected to strengthen hydrological cycle during 21st century by comparison with the last decades of 20th century. We analyze strengthening of the global-scale increase in precipitation from the perspective of changes in whole atmospheric water and energy balances. Furthermore, by combining energy and water equations for the whole atmosphere we profitably obtain constraints for the changes in surface fluxes and for the partitioning at the surface between sensible and latent components.

    Above approach is applied to investigate difference in strengthening of hydrological cycle in two scenario centennial simulations performed with an Earth System model forced with specified atmospheric concentration pathways. Alongside the medium-high non-mitigation scenario SRES A1B, we considered a new aggressive-mitigation scenario (E1 with reduced fossil fuel use for energy production aimed at stabilizing global warming below 2 K. Quite unexpectedly, mitigation scenario is shown to strengthen hydrological cycle more than SRES A1B till around 2070. Our analysis shows that this is mostly a consequence of the larger increase in the negative radiative imbalance of atmosphere in E1 compared to A1B. This appears to be primarily related to the abated aerosol concentration in E1, which considerably reduces atmospheric absorption of solar radiation compared to A1B.

    In contrast, last decades of 21st century (21C show marked increase of global precipitation in A1B compared to E1, despite the fact that the two scenarios display almost same overall increase of radiative imbalance with respect to 20th century. Our results show that radiative cooling is weakly effective in A1B throughout all 21C, so that two distinct mechanisms characterize the diverse strengthening of hydrological cycle in mid and end 21C. It is only through a very large perturbation of surface fluxes that A1B achieves larger increase

  19. Mesoscale atmosphere ocean coupling enhances the transfer of wind energy into the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, D; Münnich, M; Frenger, I; Gruber, N

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well established that the large-scale wind drives much of the world's ocean circulation, the contribution of the wind energy input at mesoscales (10-200 km) remains poorly known. Here we use regional simulations with a coupled high-resolution atmosphere-ocean model of the South Atlantic, to show that mesoscale ocean features and, in particular, eddies can be energized by their thermodynamic interactions with the atmosphere. Owing to their sea-surface temperature anomalies affecting the wind field above them, the oceanic eddies in the presence of a large-scale wind gradient provide a mesoscale conduit for the transfer of energy into the ocean. Our simulations show that this pathway is responsible for up to 10% of the kinetic energy of the oceanic mesoscale eddy field in the South Atlantic. The conditions for this pathway to inject energy directly into the mesoscale prevail over much of the Southern Ocean north of the Polar Front.

  20. Mesoscale atmosphere ocean coupling enhances the transfer of wind energy into the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, D; Münnich, M; Frenger, I; Gruber, N

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well established that the large-scale wind drives much of the world's ocean circulation, the contribution of the wind energy input at mesoscales (10-200 km) remains poorly known. Here we use regional simulations with a coupled high-resolution atmosphere-ocean model of the South Atlantic, to show that mesoscale ocean features and, in particular, eddies can be energized by their thermodynamic interactions with the atmosphere. Owing to their sea-surface temperature anomalies affecting the wind field above them, the oceanic eddies in the presence of a large-scale wind gradient provide a mesoscale conduit for the transfer of energy into the ocean. Our simulations show that this pathway is responsible for up to 10% of the kinetic energy of the oceanic mesoscale eddy field in the South Atlantic. The conditions for this pathway to inject energy directly into the mesoscale prevail over much of the Southern Ocean north of the Polar Front. PMID:27292447

  1. A conceptual, distributed snow redistribution model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Frey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When applying conceptual hydrological models using a temperature index approach for snowmelt to high alpine areas often accumulation of snow during several years can be observed. Some of the reasons why these "snow towers" do not exist in nature are vertical and lateral transport processes. While snow transport models have been developed using grid cell sizes of tens to hundreds of square meters and have been applied in several catchments, no model exists using coarser cell sizes of one km2. In this paper we present an approach that uses only gravity and snow density as a proxy for the age of the snow cover and land-use information to redistribute snow in the catchment of Ötztaler Ache, Austria. This transport model is implemented in the distributed rainfall–runoff model COSERO and a comparison between the standard model without using snow transport and the updated version is done using runoff and MODIS data for model validation. While the signal of snow redistribution can hardly be seen in the binary classification compared with MODIS, snow accumulation over several years can be prevented. In a seven year period the classic model would lead to snow accumulation of approximately 2900 mm SWE in high elevated regions whereas the updated version of the model does not show accumulation and does also predict discharge more precisely leading to a Kling–Gupta-Efficiency of 0.93 instead of 0.9.

  2. Contributions from the Department of Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics to EWEC `99 in Nice, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Gunner C.; Westermann, Kirsten; Noergaard, Per [eds.

    1999-03-01

    The first conference following the merger of the series of European Union Wind Energy Conference and the European Wind Energy Conferences - EWEC`99 - was held in Nice, France during the period 1-5 March 1999. About 600 delegates, mainly from Europe but also from other parts of the world, attended the conference. The conference contributions included 96 oral presentations and 305 posters. The Department of Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics contributed with 29 oral presentations and 36 posters with members of the department as authors or co-authors. The present report contains the set of these papers available at the deadline 19 March 1999. The contributions cover a wide spectrum of subjects including wind resources, aerodynamics, reliability and load assessment, grid connection, measurement methods, innovative wind turbines and market aspects. (au)

  3. The Sobolev approximation for line formation with partial frequency redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, D. G.; Rybicki, G. B.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to the formation of a spectral line in a uniformly expanding infinite medium in the Sobolev approximation, with emphasis on the various mechanisms for frequency redistribution. Numerical and analytic solutions of the transfer equation are presented of a number of redistribution functions and their approximations, including type I and type II partial redistribution, coherent scattering and complete redistribution, and the Fokker-Planck and uncorrelated approximation to the R sub II function. The solutions for the mean intensity are shown to depend very much on the type of redistribution mechanism, while for the frequency-weighted mean intensity, which enters the rate equations, this dependence is weak. It is inferred that use of Sobolev escape probabilities based on complete redistribution can be an adequate approximation for many calculations for which only the radiative excitation rates are needed.

  4. Future monitoring of charged particle energy deposition into the upper atmosphere and comments on possible relationships between atmospheric phenomena and solar and/or geomagnetic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. J.; Grubb, R. N.; Evans, D. S.; Sauer, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Monitoring of earth's atmosphere was conducted for several years utilizing the ITOS series of low-altitude, polar-orbiting weather satellites. A space environment monitoring package was included in these satellites to perform measurements of a portion of earth's charged particle environment. The charged particle observations proposed for the low-altitude weather satellite TIROS N, are described which will provide the capability of routine monitoring of the instantaneous total energy deposition into the upper atmosphere by the precipitation of charged particles from higher altitudes. Such observations may be of use in future studies of the relationships between geomagnetic activity and atmospheric weather pattern developments. Estimates are given to assess the potential importance of this type of energy deposition. Discussion and examples are presented illustrating the importance of distinguishing between solar and geomagnetic activity as possible causative sources. Such differentiation is necessary because of the widely different spatial and time scales involved in the atmospheric energy input resulting from these various sources of activity.

  5. Charge redistribution from anomalous magneto-vorticity coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate novel transport phenomena in a chiral fluid originated from an interplay between a vorticity and strong magnetic field, which induces a redistribution of vector charges in the system and an axial current along the magnetic field. The corresponding transport coefficients are obtained from an energy-shift argument for the chiral fermions in the lowest Landau level (LLL) due to a spin-vorticity coupling and also from diagrammatic computations on the basis of the linear response theory. Based on consistent results from the both methods, we observe that the transport coefficients are proportional to the anomaly coefficient and are independence of temperature and chemical potential. We therefore speculate that these transport phenomena are connected to quantum anomaly.

  6. Landform Erosion and Volatile Redistribution on Ganymede and Callisto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey Morgan; Howard, Alan D.; McKinnon, William B.; Schenk, Paul M.; Wood, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    We have been modeling landscape evolution on the Galilean satellites driven by volatile transport. Our work directly addresses some of the most fundamental issues pertinent to deciphering icy Galilean satellite geologic histories by employing techniques currently at the forefront of terrestrial, martian, and icy satellite landscape evolution studies [e.g., 1-6], including modeling of surface and subsurface energy and volatile exchanges, and computer simulation of long-term landform evolution by a variety of processes. A quantitative understanding of the expression and rates of landform erosion, and of volatile redistribution on landforms, is especially essential in interpreting endogenic landforms that have, in many cases, been significantly modified by erosion [e.g., 7-9].

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1985-02-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to assess, describe, and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to study the impacts of contaminants on local, regional, and global climates. The contaminants being investigated are those resulting from the development and use of conventional resources (coal, gas, oil, and nuclear power) as well as alternative energy sources. The description of the research is organized into 3 sections: (1) Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT); (2) Boundary Layer Meteorology; and (3) Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants. Separate analytics have been done for each of the sections and are indexed and contained in the EDB. (MDF)

  8. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to assess, describe, and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to study the impacts of contaminants on local, regional, and global climates. The contaminants being investigated are those resulting from the development and use of conventional resources (coal, gas, oil, and nuclear power) as well as alternative energy sources. The description of the research is organized into 3 sections: (1) Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT); (2) Boundary Layer Meteorology; and (3) Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants. Separate analytics have been done for each of the sections and are indexed and contained in the EDB

  9. Redistributive effect of personal income taxation in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Vaqar; O'Donoghue, Cathal

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the redistribution effect of personal income tax in Pakistan. We decompose the overall tax system in order to evaluate the contribution of rate, allowances, deductions, exemptions and credits. The structure given in Income Tax Ordinance, 2001, is applied to gross household incomes in 2002 (low growth year) and 2005 (high growth year). Our findings reveal that the reforms laid down in this Ordinance resulted in a greater redistribution of incomes. The redistributive effect i...

  10. Synthetic oligomer analysis using atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry at different photon energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmazières, Bernard [Global Bioenergies, 5 rue Henri Desbruyeres, 91030 Evry (France); Legros, Véronique [CNRS, UMR8587, Université d’Evry-Val-d’Essonne, Laboratoire Analyse et Modélisation pour la Biologie et l’Environnement, F-91025 Evry (France); Giuliani, Alexandre [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); UAR1008, CEPIA, INRA, Rue de la Geraudiere, F-44316 Nantes (France); Buchmann, William, E-mail: william.buchmann@univ-evry.fr [CNRS, UMR8587, Université d’Evry-Val-d’Essonne, Laboratoire Analyse et Modélisation pour la Biologie et l’Environnement, F-91025 Evry (France)

    2014-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Atmospheric pressure photoIonization mass spectra of synthetic oligomers were recorded in the negative mode by varying the photon energy using synchrotron radiation. Photon energy required for an efficient ionization of the polymer was correlated to ionization potential of the solvent (for example 9.4 eV for tetrahydrofuran). -- Highlights: •Atmospheric pressure photoionization was performed using synchrotron radiation. •Photoionization of oligomers in THF with 10% CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} produces intact [M + Cl]{sup −} ions. •The photon energy required corresponds to ionization potential of the solvent. •Polymer distributions depend on source parameters such T °C and applied voltages. •Liquid chromatography was coupled to MS using an APPI interface for polymer analysis. -- Abstract: Atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) followed by mass spectrometric detection was used to ionize a variety of polymers: polyethylene glycol, polymethyl methacrylate, polystyrene, and polysiloxane. In most cases, whatever the polymer or the solvent used (dichloromethane, tetrahydrofuran, hexane, acetone or toluene), only negative ion mode produced intact ions such as chlorinated adducts, with no or few fragmentations, in contrast to the positive ion mode that frequently led to important in-source fragmentations. In addition, it was shown that optimal detection of polymer distributions require a fine tuning of other source parameters such as temperature and ion transfer voltage. Series of mass spectra were recorded in the negative mode, in various solvents (dichloromethane, tetrahydrofuran, hexane, toluene, and acetone), by varying the photon energy from 8 eV up to 10.6 eV using synchrotron radiation. To these solvents, addition of a classical APPI dopant (toluene or acetone) was not necessary. Courtesy of the synchrotron radiation, it was demonstrated that the photon energy required for an efficient ionization of the polymer was correlated to the

  11. The model study of water mass and energy exchange between the inland water body and atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN ShuFen; YAN JinFeng; XIA Nan; LI Qian

    2008-01-01

    Based on a one-dimensional eddy diffusion model, a model to study the water mass and energy exchange between the water body (such as lake and wetland) and the atmosphere is developed, which takes the phase change process due to the seasonal melting and freezing of water and the convection mixing process of en-ergy caused by temperature stratification into consideration. The model uses en-thalpy instead of temperature as predictive variable, which will help to deal with the phase change process and to design an efficient numerical scheme for obtaining the solution more easily. The performance of the model and the rationality of taking convection mixing into the consideration are validated by using observed data of Kinneret Lake in Israel and Lower Two Medicine Lake in Montana State in America. The comparison of model results with observed data indicates that the model pre-sented here is capable of describing the physical process of water mass and en-ergy between the water body (lake and wetland) and atmosphere. Comparison of the result from wetland with shallow and deep lakes under the same forcing condi-tions shows that the evaporation from wetland is much greater than that from lakes,which accords with the real observation fact and physical mechanism.

  12. The model study of water mass and energy exchange between the inland water body and atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on a one-dimensional eddy diffusion model,a model to study the water mass and energy exchange between the water body(such as lake and wetland) and the atmosphere is developed,which takes the phase change process due to the seasonal melting and freezing of water and the convection mixing process of energy caused by temperature stratification into consideration. The model uses enthalpy instead of temperature as predictive variable,which will help to deal with the phase change process and to design an efficient numerical scheme for obtaining the solution more easily. The performance of the model and the rationality of taking convection mixing into the consideration are validated by using observed data of Kinneret Lake in Israel and Lower Two Medicine Lake in Montana State in America. The comparison of model results with observed data indicates that the model presented here is capable of describing the physical process of water mass and energy between the water body(lake and wetland) and atmosphere. Comparison of the result from wetland with shallow and deep lakes under the same forcing conditions shows that the evaporation from wetland is much greater than that from lakes,which accords with the real observation fact and physical mechanism.

  13. Wind Energy Forecasting: A Collaboration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Xcel Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, K.; Wan, Y. H.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    The focus of this report is the wind forecasting system developed during this contract period with results of performance through the end of 2010. The report is intentionally high-level, with technical details disseminated at various conferences and academic papers. At the end of 2010, Xcel Energy managed the output of 3372 megawatts of installed wind energy. The wind plants span three operating companies1, serving customers in eight states2, and three market structures3. The great majority of the wind energy is contracted through power purchase agreements (PPAs). The remainder is utility owned, Qualifying Facilities (QF), distributed resources (i.e., 'behind the meter'), or merchant entities within Xcel Energy's Balancing Authority footprints. Regardless of the contractual or ownership arrangements, the output of the wind energy is balanced by Xcel Energy's generation resources that include fossil, nuclear, and hydro based facilities that are owned or contracted via PPAs. These facilities are committed and dispatched or bid into day-ahead and real-time markets by Xcel Energy's Commercial Operations department. Wind energy complicates the short and long-term planning goals of least-cost, reliable operations. Due to the uncertainty of wind energy production, inherent suboptimal commitment and dispatch associated with imperfect wind forecasts drives up costs. For example, a gas combined cycle unit may be turned on, or committed, in anticipation of low winds. The reality is winds stayed high, forcing this unit and others to run, or be dispatched, to sub-optimal loading positions. In addition, commitment decisions are frequently irreversible due to minimum up and down time constraints. That is, a dispatcher lives with inefficient decisions made in prior periods. In general, uncertainty contributes to conservative operations - committing more units and keeping them on longer than may have been necessary for purposes of maintaining reliability

  14. The Energy Spectrum of Atmospheric Neutrinos between 2 and 200 TeV with the AMANDA-II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.

    2010-05-11

    The muon and anti-muon neutrino energy spectrum is determined from 2000-2003 AMANDA telescope data using regularised unfolding. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos in the energy range 2-200 TeV. The result is compared to different atmospheric neutrino models and it is compatible with the atmospheric neutrinos from pion and kaon decays. No significant contribution from charm hadron decays or extraterrestrial neutrinos is detected. The capabilities to improve the measurement of the neutrino spectrum with the successor experiment IceCube are discussed.

  15. Energy distribution of runaway electrons generated by a nanosecond discharge in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Lomaev, M. I.; Petin, V. K.; Rybka, D. V.; Shlyakhtun, S. V.

    2008-12-01

    The spectra of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam generated by a nanosecond discharge in atmospheric-pressure air were investigated. The temporal characteristics of the beam current pulses, gap voltage, and discharge current in a gas diode were measured with a time resolution of ˜0.1 ns. A simple technique was developed for recovering electron spectra from the curves of beam attenuation by aluminum foils. The effect of the cathode design, electrode gap length, and generator parameters on the electron spectra were studied using seven setups. It is shown that generation of electrons with anomalously high energies requires the use of cathodes with increased curvature radius.

  16. Towards redistribution laser cooling of molecular gases: Production of candidate molecules SrH by laser ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Philipp; Weller, Lars; Sass, Anne; Weitz, Martin; 10.1117/12.2002379

    2013-01-01

    Laser cooling by collisional redistribution of radiation has been successfully applied in the past for cooling dense atomic gases. Here we report on progress of work aiming at the demonstration of redistribution laser cooling in a molecular gas. The candidate molecule strontium monohydride is produced by laser ablation of strontium dihydride in a pressurized noble gas atmosphere. The composition of the ablation plasma plume is analyzed by measuring its emission spectrum. The dynamics of SrH molecular density following the ablation laser pulse is studied as a function of the buffer gas pressure and the laser intensity.

  17. Radiative energy balance of Venus based on improved models of the middle and lower atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Tellmann, S.; Arnold, G.; Piccioni, G.; Drossart, P.; Häusler, B.

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of sources and sinks of radiative energy forces the atmospheric dynamics. The radiative transfer simulation model described by Haus et al. (2015b) is applied to calculate fluxes and temperature change rates in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus (0-100 km) covering the energetic significant spectral range 0.125-1000 μm. The calculations rely on improved models of atmospheric parameters (temperature profiles, cloud parameters, trace gas abundances) retrieved from Venus Express (VEX) data (mainly VIRTIS-M-IR, but also VeRa and SPICAV/SOIR with respect to temperature results). The earlier observed pronounced sensitivity of the radiative energy balance of Venus to atmospheric parameter variations is confirmed, but present detailed comparative analyses of possible influence quantities ensure unprecedented insights into radiative forcing on Venus by contrast with former studies. Thermal radiation induced atmospheric cooling rates strongly depend on temperature structure and cloud composition, while heating rates are mainly sensitive to insolation conditions and UV absorber distribution. Cooling and heating rate responses to trace gas variations and cloud mode 1 abundance changes are small, but observed variations of cloud mode 2 abundances and altitude profiles reduce cooling at altitudes 65-80 km poleward of 50°S by up to 30% compared to the neglect of cloud parameter changes. Cooling rate variations with local time below 80 km are in the same order of magnitude. Radiative effects of the unknown UV absorber are modeled considering a proxy that is based on a suitable parameterization of optical properties, not on a specific chemical composition, and that is independent of the used cloud model. The UV absorber doubles equatorial heating near 68 km. Global average radiative equilibrium at the top of atmosphere (TOA) is characterized by the net flux balance of 156 W/m2, the Bond albedo of 0.76, and the effective planetary emission temperature of 228

  18. Resonant energy conversion of 3-minute intensity oscillations into Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinear coupling between 3-minute oscillations and Alfven waves in the solar lower atmosphere is studied. 3-minute oscillations are considered as acoustic waves trapped in a chromospheric cavity and oscillating along transversally inhomogeneous vertical magnetic field. It is shown that under the action of the oscillations the temporal dynamics of Alfven waves is governed by Mathieu equation. Consequently, the harmonics of Alfven waves with twice period and wavelength of 3-minute oscillations grow exponentially in time near the layer where the sound and Alfven speeds equal. Thus the 3-minute oscillations are resonantly absorbed by pure Alfven waves near this resonant layer. The resonant Alfven waves may penetrate into the solar corona taking energy from the chromosphere. Therefore the layer c_s=v_A may play a role of energy channel for otherwise trapped acoustic oscillations.

  19. High-energy spectrum and zenith-angle distribution of atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

    2011-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons produced through the collisions of cosmic ray particles with air nuclei, form the background in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. An ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. We present results of the calculation of the energy spectrum and zenith-angle distribution of the muon and electron atmospheric neutrinos in the energy range 10 GeV to 10 PeV. The calculation was performed with usage of known hadronic models (QGSJET-II-03, SIBYLL 2.1, Kimel & Mokhov) for two of the primary spectrum parametrizations, by Gaisser & Honda and by Zatsepin & Sokolskaya. The comparison of the calculated muon neutrino spectrum with the IceCube40 experiment data make it clear that even at energies above 100 TeV the prompt neutrino contribution is not so apparent because of tangled uncertainties of the strange (kaons) and charm...

  20. Will greater shrub abundance greatly impact tundra surface-atmosphere exchanges of energy and carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, E.; Lafleur, P.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing deciduous shrub abundance, productivity, and range in the Arctic comes with the potential for both negative and positive feedbacks to the climate system. This study presents six seasons of eddy covariance measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) and latent and sensible heat fluxes along a shrub gradient in Canada's Low Arctic. Three flux tower sites with 17, 45, and 64% dwarf birch cover were established within a few kilometers of each other to investigate differences in microclimate, energy and carbon exchanges. As expected, there was greater winter snow depth but less summer soil thaw with greater shrub cover. However, snowmelt timing and speed were usually similar among sites. Despite a reduction in albedo in spring and greater leaf area through summer, latent heat fluxes were consistently lower with greater shrub cover. Offset by small differences in sensible heat fluxes, total seasonal atmospheric heating (combined sensible and latent heat fluxes) was similar among sites. We anticipated greater net uptake of CO2 through the growing season with greater shrub cover. However, that was only the case in some years. There was much more week-to-week and year-to-year variability in CO2 fluxes at the shrubbiest site suggesting photosynthesis and respiration processes were more sensitive to weather variations. Shrub abundance does impact tundra surface-atmosphere exchanges of energy and carbon but these observations also highlight the complexity involved in predicting the net climate feedback effect of current and future Arctic vegetation change.

  1. Evidence for Energy Supply by Active Region Spicules to the Solar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Zeighami, S; Tavabi, E; Ajabshirizadeh, A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the role of active region spicules in the mass balance of the solar wind and energy supply for heating the solar atmosphere. We use high cadence observations from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Hinode satellite in the Ca II H line filter obtained on 26 January 2007. The observational technique provides the high spatio-temporal resolution required to detect fine structures such as spicules. We apply Fourier power spectrum and wavelet analysis to SOT/Hinode time series of an active region data to explore the existence of coherent intensity oscillations. The presence of coherent waves could be an evidence for energy transport to heat the solar atmosphere. Using time series, we measure the phase difference between two intensity profiles obtained at two different heights, which gives information about the phase difference between oscillations at those heights as a function of frequency. The results of a fast Fourier transform (FFT) show peaks in the power spectrum at frequencies in th...

  2. Transition from geostrophic turbulence to inertia-gravity waves in the atmospheric energy spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Bühler, Oliver

    2014-12-01

    Midlatitude fluctuations of the atmospheric winds on scales of thousands of kilometers, the most energetic of such fluctuations, are strongly constrained by the Earth's rotation and the atmosphere's stratification. As a result of these constraints, the flow is quasi-2D and energy is trapped at large scales—nonlinear turbulent interactions transfer energy to larger scales, but not to smaller scales. Aircraft observations of wind and temperature near the tropopause indicate that fluctuations at horizontal scales smaller than about 500 km are more energetic than expected from these quasi-2D dynamics. We present an analysis of the observations that indicates that these smaller-scale motions are due to approximately linear inertia-gravity waves, contrary to recent claims that these scales are strongly turbulent. Specifically, the aircraft velocity and temperature measurements are separated into two components: one due to the quasi-2D dynamics and one due to linear inertia-gravity waves. Quasi-2D dynamics dominate at scales larger than 500 km; inertia-gravity waves dominate at scales smaller than 500 km. PMID:25404349

  3. A multi-layer land surface energy budget model for implicit coupling with global atmospheric simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ryder

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In Earth system modelling, a description of the energy budget of the vegetated surface layer is fundamental as it determines the meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer and as such contributes to the atmospheric conditions and its circulation. The energy budget in most Earth system models has long been based on a "big-leaf approach", with averaging schemes that represent in-canopy processes. Such models have difficulties in reproducing consistently the energy balance in field observations. We here outline a newly developed numerical model for energy budget simulation, as a component of the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems – CANopy. This new model implements techniques from single-site canopy models in a practical way. It includes representation of in-canopy transport, a multilayer longwave radiation budget, height-specific calculation of aerodynamic and stomatal conductance, and interaction with the bare soil flux within the canopy space. Significantly, it avoids iterations over the height of tha canopy and so maintains implicit coupling to the atmospheric model LMDz. As a first test, the model is evaluated against data from both an intensive measurement campaign and longer term eddy covariance measurements for the intensively studied Eucalyptus stand at Tumbarumba, Australia. The model performs well in replicating both diurnal and annual cycles of fluxes, as well as the gradients of sensible heat fluxes. However, the model overestimates sensible heat flux against an underestimate of the radiation budget. Improved performance is expected through the implementation of a more detailed calculation of stand albedo and a more up-to-date stomatal conductance calculation.

  4. Modeling the atmospheric and terrestrial water and energy cycles in the ScaleX experiment through a fully-coupled atmosphere-hydrology model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatore, Alfonso; Benjamin, Fersch; Thomas, Rummler; Caroline, Brosy; Christian, Chwala; Junkermann, Wolfgang; Ingo, Völksch; Harald, Kunstmann

    2016-04-01

    The TERENO preAlpine Observatory, comprising a series of observatory sites along an altitudinal gradient within the Ammer catchment (southern Bavaria, Germany), has been designed as an international research platform, open for participation and integration, and has been provided with comprehensive technical infrastructure to allow joint analyses of water-, energy- and nutrient fluxes. In June and July 2015 the operational monitoring has been complemented by the ScaleX intensive measurement campaign, where additional precipitation and soil moisture measurements, remote sensing measurements of atmospheric wind, humidity and temperature profiles have been performed, complemented by micro-light aircraft- and UAV-based remote sensing for three-dimensional pattern information. The comprehensive observations serve as validation and evaluation basis for compartment-crossing modeling systems. Specifically, the fully two-way dynamically coupled atmosphere-hydrology modeling system WRF-Hydro has been used to investigate the interplay of energy and water cycles at the regional scale and across the compartments atmosphere, stream, vadose zone and groundwater during the ScaleX campaign and to assess the closure of the budgets involved. Here, several high-resolution modeled hydro-meteorological variables, such as precipitation, soil moisture, river discharge and air moisture and temperature along vertical profiles are compared with observations from multiple sources, such as rain gauges and soil moisture networks, rain radars, stream gauges, UAV and a micro-light aircraft. Results achieved contribute to the objective of addressing questions on energy- and water-cycling within the TERENO-Ammer region at a very high scale and degree of integration, and provides hints on how well can observations constrain uncertainties associated with the modeling of atmospheric and terrestrial water and energy balances.

  5. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3: Atmospheric and climate research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the Environmental Sciences Division of OHER, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program continues DOE`s long-term commitment to understanding the local, regional, and global effects of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and analytical studies in the Atmospheric Chemistry Program emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, photochemically produced oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The atmospheric studies in Complex Terrain Program applies basic research on atmospheric boundary layer structure and evolution over inhomogeneous terrain to DOE`s site-specific and generic mission needs in site safety, air quality, and climate change. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements, the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics, and Quantitative Links program to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The description of ongoing atmospheric and climate research at PNL is organized in two broad research areas: atmospheric research; and climate research. This report describes the progress in fiscal year 1993 in each of these areas. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  6. Lead sequestration and species redistribution during soil organic matter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, A.W.; Bostick, B.C.; Kaste, J.M.; Friedland, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    The turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) maintains a dynamic chemical environment in the forest floor that can impact metal speciation on relatively short timescales. Here we measure the speciation of Pb in controlled and natural organic (O) soil horizons to quantify changes in metal partitioning during SOM decomposition in different forest litters. We provide a link between the sequestration of pollutant Pb in O-horizons, estimated by forest floor Pb inventories, and speciation using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. When Pb was introduced to fresh forest Oi samples, it adsorbed primarily to SOM surfaces, but as decomposition progressed over two years in controlled experiments, up to 60% of the Pb was redistributed to pedogenic birnessite and ferrihydrite surfaces. In addition, a significant fraction of pollutant Pb in natural soil profiles was associated with similar mineral phases (???20-35%) and SOM (???65-80%). Conifer forests have at least 2-fold higher Pb burdens in the forest floor relative to deciduous forests due to more efficient atmospheric scavenging and slower organic matter turnover. We demonstrate that pedogenic minerals play an important role in surface soil Pb sequestration, particularly in deciduous forests, and should be considered in any assessment of pollutant Pb mobility. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  7. Immigration, integration and support for redistribution in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Burgoon

    2011-01-01

    Immigration can be expected to have offsetting implications for public support for redistribution. On the one hand, immigration poses individual or collective economic risks that might make citizens more likely to support government redistribution, but on the other it can generate fiscal pressure or

  8. The influence of flow redistribution on working rat muscle oxygenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoofd, L.J.C.; Degens, H.

    2009-01-01

    We applied a theoretical model of muscle tissue O2 transport to investigate the effects of flow redistribution on rat soleus muscle oxygenation. The situation chosen was the anaerobic threshold where redistribution of flow is expected to have the largest impact. In the basic situation all capillarie

  9. Measurements and Simulations of nonlinear noise redistribution in an SOA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Tromborg, Bjarne; Mørk, Jesper;

    2005-01-01

    Measurements and numerical simulations of the noise statistics after a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) demonstrate nonlinear noise redistribution. The redistribution, which relies on self-modulation due to gain saturation and carrier dynamics, shows a strong power and bandwidth dependence...... and can be important for SOA-based regenerators....

  10. Pure Redistribution and the Provision of Public Goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sausgruber, Rupert; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    We study pure redistribution as a device to increase cooperation and efficiency in the provision of public goods. Experimental subjects play a two-stage game. The first stage is the standard linear public goods game. In the second stage, subjects can redistribute payoffs among other subjects...... cooperation in the provision of public goods...

  11. Pure redistribution and the provision of public goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sausgruber, Rupert; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    2007-01-01

    We show that a simple redistribution scheme can increase the provision of public goods and that the scheme is popular. This suggests that imposed redistribution as in the mechanism by Falkinger [Falkinger, J., 1996. Efficient private provision of public goods when deviations from average...

  12. Strengthening of the hydrological cycle in future scenarios: atmospheric energy and water balance perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alessandri

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Future climate scenarios experiencing global warming are expected to strengthen the hydrological cycle during the 21st century (21C. We analyze the strengthening of the global-scale increase in precipitation from the perspective of changes in whole atmospheric water and energy balances. By combining energy and water equations for the whole atmosphere, we obtain constraints for the changes in surface fluxes and partitioning at the surface between sensible and latent components. We investigate the differences in the strengthening of the hydrological cycle in two centennial simulations performed with an Earth system model forced with specified atmospheric concentration pathways. Alongside the Special Report on Emissions Scenario (SRES A1B, which is a medium-high non-mitigation scenario, we consider a new aggressive-mitigation scenario (E1 with reduced fossil fuel use for energy production aimed at stabilizing global warming below 2 K.

    Our results show that the mitigation scenario effectively constrains the global warming with a stabilization below 2 K with respect to the 1950–2000 historical period. On the other hand, the E1 precipitation does not follow the temperature field toward a stabilization path but continues to increase over the mitigation period. Quite unexpectedly, the mitigation scenario is shown to strengthen the hydrological cycle even more than SRES A1B till around 2070. We show that this is mostly a consequence of the larger increase in the negative radiative imbalance of atmosphere in E1 compared to A1B. This appears to be primarily related to decreased sulfate aerosol concentration in E1, which considerably reduces atmospheric absorption of solar radiation compared to A1B.

    The last decades of the 21C show a marked increase in global precipitation in A1B compared to E1, despite the fact that the two scenarios display almost the same overall increase of radiative imbalance with respect to the 20th century. Our

  13. Mesoscale atmosphere ocean coupling enhances the transfer of wind energy into the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, D.; Münnich, M.; Frenger, I.; Gruber, N.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well established that the large-scale wind drives much of the world's ocean circulation, the contribution of the wind energy input at mesoscales (10–200 km) remains poorly known. Here we use regional simulations with a coupled high-resolution atmosphere–ocean model of the South Atlantic, to show that mesoscale ocean features and, in particular, eddies can be energized by their thermodynamic interactions with the atmosphere. Owing to their sea-surface temperature anomalies affecting the wind field above them, the oceanic eddies in the presence of a large-scale wind gradient provide a mesoscale conduit for the transfer of energy into the ocean. Our simulations show that this pathway is responsible for up to 10% of the kinetic energy of the oceanic mesoscale eddy field in the South Atlantic. The conditions for this pathway to inject energy directly into the mesoscale prevail over much of the Southern Ocean north of the Polar Front. PMID:27292447

  14. High-energy neutrino fluxes and flavor ratio in the Earth atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovskaya, T S; Sinegovsky, S I

    2014-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos from decays of mesons, produced in collisions of cosmic-ray particles with air nuclei, form unavoidable background for detection of astrophysical neutrinos. More precise calculations of the high-energy neutrino spectrum are required since measurements in the IceCube experiment reach the intriguing energy range where a contribution of the prompt neutrinos and/or astrophysical ones should be uncovered. The calculation of muon and electron neutrino fluxes in the energy range 100 GeV - 10 PeV is performed for three hadronic models, QGSJET II, SIBYll 2.1 and Kimel & Mokhov, taking into consideration the "knee" of the cosmic-ray spectrum. All calculations are compared with the atmospheric neutrino measurements by Frejus, AMANDA, IceCube and ANTARES. The prompt neutrino flux predictions obtained with the quark-gluon string model (QGSM) for the charm production by Kaidalov & Piskunova do not contradict to the measurements and upper limits on the astrophysical muon neutrino flux obtained ...

  15. Lightning driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: regional and global estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examine energetic electron precipitation fluxes driven by lightning, in order to determine the global distribution of energy deposited into the middle atmosphere. Previous studies using lightning-driven precipitation burst rates have estimated losses from the inner radiation belts. In order to confirm the reliability of those rates and the validity of the conclusions drawn from those studies, we have analyzed New Zealand data to test our global understanding of troposphere to magnetosphere coupling. We examine about 10000h of AbsPAL recordings made from 17 April 2003 through to 26 June 2004, and analyze subionospheric very-low frequency (VLF perturbations observed on transmissions from VLF transmitters in Hawaii (NPM and western Australia (NWC. These observations are compared with those previously reported from the Antarctic Peninsula. The perturbation rates observed in the New Zealand data are consistent with those predicted from the global distribution of the lightning sources, once the different experimental configurations are taken into account. Using lightning current distributions rather than VLF perturbation observations we revise previous estimates of typical precipitation bursts at L~2.3 to a mean precipitation energy flux of ~1×10-3 ergs cm-2s-1. The precipitation of energetic electrons by these bursts in the range L=1.9-3.5 will lead to a mean rate of energy deposited into the atmosphere of 3×10-4 ergs cm-2min-1, spatially varying from a low of zero above some ocean regions to highs of ~3-6×10-3 ergs cm-2min-1 above North America and its conjugate region.

  16. Carbon Dioxide Extraction from the Atmosphere Through Engineered Chemical Sinkage: Enabling Energy and Environmental Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, M. K.; Ziock, H.; Rueff, G.; Smith, W. S.; Colman, J.; Elliott, S.; Lackner, K.; Johnston, N. A.

    2002-05-01

    We present the case for carbon dioxide (CO2) extraction from air using engineered chemical sinks as a means of sustaining fossil energy use by avoiding climate change. Existing carbon sequestration strategies such as CO2 injection into geologic formations or the deep ocean and mineral carbonation, require a pure stream of concentrated CO2 to be viable. Furthermore, current emphasis on reducing the global CO2 emissions is on large centralized power plants. However, more than half of all emissions are from the transportation sector and small, distributed sources such as home heating, etc. Most solutions for dealing with these sources explicitly or implicitly entail completely overhauling the existing infrastructure. To solve these problems, Los Alamos National Laboratory has conceived a novel approach for directly extracting CO2 from the atmosphere. Direct extraction converts the dilute CO2 (370 parts per million) in the atmosphere into a pure CO2 stream ready for permanent sequestration. It provides the following advantages: (1) Preserves our existing energy use and fuel distribution systems, which represent a large investment, (2) Indirectly captures CO2 from the myriad of small, distributed, and mobile sources that otherwise are not accessible to sequestration, (3) Allows atmospheric CO2 levels to be restored to their pre-industrial age value, (4) Provides free transport of CO2 to suitable sequestration sites by using natural atmospheric circulation, and (5) Is relatively compact and therefore inexpensive when compared to renewable concepts. Our concept harnesses atmospheric circulation to transport CO2 to sites where the CO2 is extracted by binding it to an adsorbent. The bound CO2 is then recovered as pure gas by heating together with the solid adsorbent that is recycled. As a proof of concept, we show that an aqueous Ca(OH)2 solution efficiently converts CO2 to a CaCO3 solid that can be heated to obtain pure CO2 and recover the CaO. Even with recycling costs

  17. Energy Transport Effects in Flaring Atmospheres Heated by Mixed Particle Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Zharkov, Sergei; Macrae, Connor; Druett, Malcolm; Scullion, Eamon

    2016-07-01

    We investigate energy and particle transport in the whole flaring atmosphere from the corona to the photosphere and interior for the flaring events on the 1st July 2012, 6 and 7 September 2011 by using the RHESSI and SDO instruments as well as high-resolution observations from the Swedish 1-metre Solar Telescope (SST3) CRISP4 (CRisp Imaging Spectro-polarimeter). The observations include hard and soft X-ray emission, chromospheric emission in both H-alpha 656.3 nm core and continuum, as well as, in the near infra-red triplet Ca II 854.2 nm core and continuum channels and local helioseismic responses (sunquakes). The observations are compared with the simulations of hard X-ray emission and tested by hydrodynamic simulations of flaring atmospheres of the Sun heated by mixed particle beams. The temperature, density and macro-velocity variations of the ambient atmospheres are calculated for heating by mixed beams and the seismic response of the solar interior to generation of supersonic shocks moving into the solar interior. We investigate the termination depths of these shocks beneath the quiet photosphere levels and compare them with the parameters of seismic responses in the interior, or sunquakes (Zharkova and Zharkov, 2015). We also present an investigation of radiative conditions modelled in a full non-LTE approach for hydrogen during flare onsets with particular focus on Balmer and Paschen emission in the visible, near UV and near IR ranges and compare them with observations. The links between different observational features derived from HXR, optical and seismic emission are interpreted by different particle transport models that will allow independent evaluation of the particle transport scenarios.

  18. Observational Investigation of Energy Release in the Lower Solar Atmosphere of a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Sharykin, I N; Kosovichev, A G; Vargas-Dominguez, S; Zimovets, I V

    2016-01-01

    We study flare processes in the lower solar atmosphere using observational data for a M1-class flare of June 12, 2014, obtained by New Solar Telescope (NST/BBSO) and Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI/SDO). The main goal is to understand triggers and manifestations of the flare energy release in the lower layers of the solar atmosphere (the photosphere and chromosphere) using high-resolution optical observations and magnetic field measurements. We analyze optical images, HMI Dopplergrams and vector magnetograms, and use Non-Linear Force-Free Field (NLFFF) extrapolations for reconstruction of the magnetic topology. The NLFFF modelling reveals interaction of oppositely directed magnetic flux-tubes in the PIL. These two interacting magnetic flux tubes are observed as a compact sheared arcade along the PIL in the high-resolution broad-band continuum images from NST. In the vicinity of the PIL, the NST H alpha observations reveal formation of a thin three-ribbon structure corresponding to the small-scale photospher...

  19. Atmospheric corrosion monitoring at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6) at the US Department of Energy's K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, TN has been stored in large steel cylinders which have undergone significant atmospheric corrosion damage over the last 35 years. A detailed experimental program to characterize and monitor the corrosion damage was initiated in 1992. Large amounts of corrosion scale and deep pits are found to cover cylinder surfaces. Ultrasonic wall thickness measurements have shown uniform corrosion losses up to 20 mils (0.5 mm) and pits up to 100 mils (2.5 mm) deep. Electrical resistance corrosion probes, time-of-wetness sensors and thermocouples have been attached to cylinder bodies. Atmospheric conditions are monitored using rain gauges, relative humidity sensors and thermocouples. Long-term (16 years) data are being obtained from mild steel corrosion coupons on test racks as well as attached directly to cylinder surfaces. Corrosion rates have been found to intimately related to the times-of-wetness, both tending to be higher on cylinder tops due to apparent sheltering effects. Data from the various tests are compared, discrepancies are discussed and a pattern of cylinder corrosion as a function of cylinder position and location is described

  20. Inflation Game Redistributions and Economic Crisis Path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorel AILENEI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the effects of the socially redistribution of wealth generated by inflation, the authors aim to identify the system of interests that supports this process, namely the connections with the economic crisis. In this aim, this work launches the hypothesis that the contagious disease of the market imbalances represents the basis for the manifestation of the inflationary process. By analyzing the assumptions and the causes of the market imbalances manifestation, the authors reveal a system of interest alliances that added to the complicit attitude of the consumers supports the manifestation of the inflationary process. The confrontation between this hypothesis and the inflationary trends in developed countries over the last four decades, respectively the recent lesson of the global economic crisis, leads to the confirmation of a common root of the inflationary phenomenon and the economic crises. The authors think that in order to avoid the emergence of new global economic crises and the negative effects of inflation, a radical behavioural change is required from both consumers and other economic agents.

  1. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrempf, R.E. [ed.

    1993-04-01

    Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the ESD, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) continues DOE`s long-term commitment to study the continental and oceanic fates of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and laboratory studies in the ACP emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program continues to apply basic research on density-driven circulations and on turbulent mixing and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer to the micro- to mesoscale meteorological processes that affect air-surface exchange and to emergency preparedness at DOE and other facilities. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and Quantitative Links programs to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program.

  2. Optimal capture and sequestration from the carbon emission flow and from the atmospheric carbon stock with heterogeneous energy consuming sectors

    OpenAIRE

    Amigues, Jean-Pierre; Lafforgue, Gilles; MOREAUX Michel

    2010-01-01

    We characterize the optimal exploitation paths of two primary energy resources. The first one is a non-renewable polluting resource, the second one a pollution-free renewable resource. Both resources can supply the energy needs of two sectors. Sector 1 is able to reduce the potential carbon emissions generated by its non-renewable energy consumption at a reasonable cost while sector 2 cannot. Another possibility is to capture the carbon spread in the atmosphere but at a significantly higher c...

  3. Comparison of energy fluxes at the land surface-atmosphere interface in an Alpine valley as simulated with different models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Grossi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of a research project coupling meteorological and hydrological models in mountainous areas a distributed Snow-Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model was developed and applied to simulate the energy fluxes at the land surface – atmosphere interface in an Alpine valley (Toce Valley - North Italy during selected flood events in the last decade. Energy fluxes simulated by the distributed energy transfer model were compared with those simulated by a limited area meteorological model for the event of June 1997 and the differences in the spatial and temporal distribution. The Snow/Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model was also applied to simulate the energy fluxes at the land surface-atmosphere interface for a single cell, assumed to be representative of the Siberia site (Toce Valley, where a micro-meteorological station was installed and operated for 2.5 months in autumn 1999. The Siberia site is very close to the Nosere site, where a standard meteorological station was measuring precipitation, air temperature and humidity, global and net radiation and wind speed during the same special observing period. Data recorded by the standard meteorological station were used to force the energy transfer model and simulate the point energy fluxes at the Siberia site, while turbulent fluxes observed at the Siberia site were used to derive the latent heat flux from the energy balance equation. Finally, the hourly evapotranspiration flux computed by this procedure was compared to the evapotranspiration flux simulated by the energy transfer model. Keywords: energy exchange processes, land surface-atmosphere interactions, turbulent fluxes

  4. Root controls on water redistribution and carbon uptake in the soil-plant system under current and future climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, V.; Marani, M.; Albertson, J. D.; Katul, G.

    2013-10-01

    Understanding photosynthesis and plant water management as a coupled process remains an open scientific problem. Current eco-hydrologic models characteristically describe plant photosynthetic and hydraulic processes through ad hoc empirical parameterizations with no explicit accounting for the main pathways over which carbon and water uptake interact. Here, a soil-plant-atmosphere continuum model is proposed that mechanistically couples photosynthesis and transpiration rates, including the main leaf physiological controls exerted by stomata. The proposed approach links the soil-to-leaf hydraulic transport to stomatal regulation, and closes the coupled photosynthesis-transpiration problem by maximizing leaf carbon gain subject to a water loss constraint. The approach is evaluated against field data from a grass site and is shown to reproduce the main features of soil moisture dynamics and hydraulic redistribution. In particular, it is shown that the differential soil drying produced by diurnal root water uptake drives a significant upward redistribution of moisture both through a conventional Darcian flow and through the root system, consistent with observations. In a numerical soil drying experiment, it is demonstrated that more than 50% of diurnal transpiration is supplied by nocturnal upward water redistribution, and some 12% is provided directly through root hydraulic redistribution. For a prescribed leaf area density, the model is then used to diagnose how elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and increased air temperature jointly impact soil moisture, transpiration, photosynthesis, and whole-plant water use efficiency, along with compensatory mechanisms such as hydraulic lift using several canonical forms of root-density distribution.

  5. Heterogeneity and scaling land-atmospheric water and energy fluxes in climate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of small-scale heterogeneity in land surface characteristics on the large-scale fluxes of water and energy in land-atmosphere system has become a central focus of many of the climatology research experiments. The acquisition of high resolution land surface data through remote sensing and intensive land-climatology field experiments (like HAPEX and FIFE) has provided data to investigate the interactions between microscale land-atmosphere interactions and macroscale models. One essential research question is how to account for the small scale heterogeneities and whether 'effective' parameters can be used in the macroscale models. To address this question of scaling, three modeling experiments were performed and are reviewed in the paper. The first is concerned with the aggregation of parameters and inputs for a terrestrial water and energy balance model. The second experiment analyzed the scaling behavior of hydrologic responses during rain events and between rain events. The third experiment compared the hydrologic responses from distributed models with a lumped model that uses spatially constant inputs and parameters. The results show that the patterns of small scale variations can be represented statistically if the scale is larger than a representative elementary area scale, which appears to be about 2 - 3 times the correlation length of the process. For natural catchments this appears to be about 1 - 2 sq km. The results concerning distributed versus lumped representations are more complicated. For conditions when the processes are nonlinear, then lumping results in biases; otherwise a one-dimensional model based on 'equivalent' parameters provides quite good results. Further research is needed to fully understand these conditions.

  6. Who Supports Redistribution? Subjective Income Inequality in Japan and China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    STEPHEN; TAY

    2015-01-01

    Governments reduce income inequality with redistribution policies. These policies are often contentious because people who live in the same country have different preferences for redistribution. Some prefer the government to do more while others prefer the government to do less. Hence what explains the difference in preferences? Using the methodologically suitable cases of Japan and China, this paper contributes to the redistributive preference literature by proposing an alternative theory of how a person’s subjective evaluation of and experiences with income inequality—subjective income inequality—affect his/her redistributive preferences. Specifically, a person who feels that his/her country’s level of income inequality is too high is more likely to support government redistribution. But contrary to extant studies, this paper finds that a spatial locality’s level of objective income inequality does not systematically affect its citizens’ preference for redistribution. This finding has implications for redistribution policies because government policies in Japan and China—as with other countries—narrowly frame income inequality in the objective dimensions by pegging it to "objective" income inequality indices(e.g., Gini ratio), thereby ignoring the more important subjective dimensions of income inequality.

  7. Analysis of CHO cells metabolic redistribution in a glutamate-based defined medium in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, C; Illanes, A; Casablancas, A; Gámez, X; Cairó, J J; Gòdia, C

    2001-01-01

    The effect of glutamine replacement by glutamate and the balance between glutamate and glucose metabolism on the redistribution of t-PA-producing recombinant CHO cells metabolism is studied in a series of glucose shift down and shift up experiments in continuous culture. These experiments reveal the existence of multiple steady states, and experimental data are used to perform metabolic flux analysis to gain a better insight into cellular metabolism and its redistribution. Regulation of glucose feed rate promotes a higher efficiency of glucose and nitrogen source utilization, with lower production of metabolic byproducts, but this reduces t-PA specific production rate. This reduction under glucose limitation can be attributed to the fact that the cells are forced to efficiently utilize the carbon and energy source for growth, impairing the production of dispensable metabolites. It is, therefore, the combination of growth rate and carbon and energy source availability that determines the level of t-PA production in continuous culture.

  8. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses...

  9. Study of natural energy system and downward atmospheric radiation. Part 1. Outline on measurement and result on downward atmospheric radiation; Shizen energy system to tenku hosharyo no kansoku kenkyu. 1. Kisho kansoku gaiyo to tenku hosharyo no kansoku kekka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, K. [Kogakuin University, Tokyo (Japan); Masuoka, Y. [Yokogawa Architects and Engineers, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    For the study of a natural energy system taking advantage of radiation cooling, a simplified method for estimating downward atmospheric radiation quantities was examined, using observation records supplied from Hachioji City, Aerological Observatory in Tsukuba City, and four other locations. Downward atmospheric radiation quantities are closely related to partial vapor pressure in the atmosphere. Because partial vapor pressure changes according to the season, it was classified into two, for summer and for winter, and was referred to downward atmospheric radiation quantities for the establishment of their correlationships. Downward atmospheric radiation quantities were predicted on the basis of meteorological factors such as partial vapor pressure and free air temperature. Accuracy was examined of the simplified estimation equation for downward atmospheric radiation that had been proposed. A multiple regression analysis was carried out for calculating constants for the estimation equation, using partial vapor pressure, Stefan-Boltzmann constant, and free air dry-bulb absolute temperature, all closely correlated with atmospheric downward radiation quantities. Accuracy improved by time-based classification. At night, use of SAT (equivalent free air temperature) produced more accurate estimation. Though dependent upon local characteristics of the observation spot, the estimation equation works effectively. 10 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Complex equality - some notes on redistribution in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Coetzee

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article I attempt to show that a theory o f redistribution can be derived from Walzer's political theory as presented in his Spheres o f justice. I argue that this theory shows in what areas o f South Africa’s public life redistribution is required, and what patterns of redistribution should be followed Walzer’s political theory leans heavily on the notion of shared understandings. In South Africa there are many areas of public life in which interpretations of these understandings are in conflict. I attempt to identify these areas and to show what premisses underlie the conflicting interpretations.

  11. Redistribution of the solar radiation and the rain inside of coffee plantations (Arabic Coffea L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following review presents a series of studies on microclimates of non-shaded and shaded conditions of coffee plantations (Coffea arabica L.) in Colombia. Likewise, The redistribution of solar radiation and the temperature, as well as the energy balance, of the coffee plant and the crop are described. The results on the components of water balance and transport of nutrients within the coffee plantations are reported

  12. Characteristics of land-atmosphere energy and turbulentfluxes over the plateau steppe in central Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    The land-atmosphere energy and turbulence exchange is key to understanding land surface processes on the TibetanPlateau (TP). Using observed data for Aug. 4 to Dec. 3, 2012 from the Bujiao observation point (BJ) of the Nagqu PlateauClimate and Environment Station (NPCE-BJ), different characteristics of the energy flux during the Asian summermonsoon (ASM) season and post-monsoon period were analyzed. This study outlines the impact of the ASM on energyfluxes in the central TP. It also demonstrates that the surface energy closure rate during the ASM season is higher than thatof the post-monsoon period. Footprint modeling shows the distribution of data quality assessments (QA) and qualitycontrols (QC) surrounding the observation point. The measured turbulent flux data at the NPCE-BJ site were highly representativeof the target land-use type. The target surface contributed more to the fluxes under unstable conditions thanunder stable conditions. The main wind directions (180° and 210°) with the highest data density showed flux contributionsreaching 100%, even under stable conditions. The lowest flux contributions were found in sectors with low data density,e.g., 90.4% in the 360° sector under stable conditions during the ASM season. Lastly, a surface energy water balance(SEWAB) model was used to gap-fill any absent or corrected turbulence data. The potential simulation error was alsoexplored in this study. The Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficients (NSEs) of the observed fluxes with the SEWABmodel runs were 0.78 for sensible heat flux and 0.63 for latent heat flux during the ASM season, but unrealistic values of?0.9 for latent heat flux during the post-monsoon period.

  13. Evidence of Energy Supply by Active-Region Spicules to the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeighami, S.; Ahangarzadeh Maralani, A. R.; Tavabi, E.; Ajabshirizadeh, A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the role of active-region spicules in the mass balance of the solar wind and energy supply in heating the solar atmosphere. We use high-cadence observations from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Hinode satellite in the Ca ii H-line filter obtained on 26 January 2007. The observational technique provides the high spatio-temporal resolution required to detect fine structures such as spicules. We apply a Fourier power spectrum and wavelet analysis to Hinode/SOT time series of an active-region data set to explore the existence of coherent intensity oscillations. Coherent waves could be evidence of energy transport that serves to heat the solar atmosphere. Using time series, we measure the phase difference between two intensity profiles obtained at two different heights, which gives information about the phase difference between oscillations at those heights as a function of frequency. The results of a fast Fourier transform (FFT) show peaks in the power spectrum at frequencies in the range from 2 to 8 mHz at four different heights (above the limb), while the wavelet analysis indicates dominant frequencies similar to those of the Fourier power spectrum results. A coherency study indicates coherent oscillations at about 5.5 mHz (3 min). We measure mean phase speeds in the range 250-425 km s^{-1} increasing with height. The energy flux of these waves is estimated to be F = 1.8 × 106-11.2 × 106 erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} or 1.8-11.2 kW m^{-2}, which indicates that they are sufficiently energetic to accelerate the solar wind and heat the corona to temperatures of several million degrees. We compute the the mass flux carried by spicules of 3 × 10^{-10}-2 × 10^{-9} g cm^{-2} s^{-1}, which is 10-60 times higher than the mass that is carried away from the corona because of the solar wind (about 3 × 10^{-11} g cm^{-2} s^{-1}). Therefore, our results indicate that about 0.02-0.1 of the spicule mass is ejected from the corona, while the remainder reverts

  14. Atmospheric considerations regarding the impact of heat dissipation from a nuclear energy center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential changes in climate resulting from a large nuclear energy center are discussed. On a global scale, no noticeable changes are likely, but on both a regional and a local scale, changes can be expected. Depending on the cooling system employed, the amount of fog may increase, the amount and distribution of precipitation will change, and the frequency or location of severe storms may change. Very large heat releases over small surface areas can result in greater atmospheric instability; a large number of closely spaced natural-draft cooling towers have this disadvantage. On the other hand, employment of natural-draft towers makes an increase in the occurrence of ground fog unlikely. The analysis suggests that the cooling towers for a large nuclear energy center should be located in clusters of four with at least 2.5-mile spacing between the clusters. This is equivalent to the requirement of one acre of land surface per each two megawatts of heat being rejected

  15. Macroeconomic and social change and popular demand for redistribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Mads Meier

    This paper tests the self-interest hypothesis arguing that changes in macroeconomic and social conditions affect popular demand for redistribution. I analyze data from four waves of the European Social Survey and use a synthetic cohort design to generate pseudo panel data for socio......-demographic groups that are matched over time. I estimate fixed effect models and find that (1) changes in macroeconomic and social conditions affect the demand for redistribution; (2) results are mostly consistent with the self-interest hypothesis claiming that agents demand more redistribution in economically hard...... times (and vice versa in good times); and (3) the effect of macroeconomic and social conditions on the demand for redistribution are highly non-linear....

  16. Radial plutonium redistribution in mixed-oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha autoradiographs from all HEDL fuel pin metallography samples are evaluated and catalogued according to different plutonium distribution patterns. The data base is analyzed for effects of fabrication and operating parameters on redistribution

  17. New Planetary Energy Balance, Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction and their Effects on Extreme Events in North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrouk, Mohammed-Said

    2016-04-01

    Global warming has now reached the energetic phase of H2O's return to the ground after the saturation of the atmosphere in evaporation since the 80s and 90s of the last century, which were characterized by severe droughts, mainly in Africa. This phase is the result of the accumulation of thermal energy exchanges in the Earth-Ocean-Atmosphere system that resulted in the thrust reversal of the energy balance toward the poles. This situation is characterized by a new thermal distribution: above the ocean, the situation is more in surplus compared to the mainland, or even opposite when the balance is negative on the land, and in the atmosphere, warm thermal advection easily reach the North Pole (planetary crests), as well as cold advection push deep into North Africa and the Gulf of Mexico (planetary valleys). This "New Ground Energy Balance" establishes a "New Meridian Atmospheric Circulation (MAC)" with an undulating character throughout the year, including the winter characterized by intense latitudinal very active energy exchanges between the surplus areas (tropical) and the deficit (polar) on the one hand, and the atmosphere, the ocean and the continent on the other. The excess radiation balance increases the potential evaporation of the atmosphere and provides a new geographical distribution of H2O worldwide: the excess water vapor is easily converted by cold advection (polar vortex) to heavy rains that cause floods or snow storms that paralyze the normal functioning of human activities, which creates many difficulties for users and leaves damage and casualties, but ensures water availability missing since a long time in many parts of the world, in Africa, Europe and America. The new thermal distribution reorganizes the geography of atmospheric pressure: the ocean energy concentration is transmitted directly to the atmosphere, and the excess torque is pushed northward. The Azores anticyclone is strengthened and is a global lock by the Atlantic ridge at Greenland

  18. Capital mobility, tax competition, and lobbying for redistributive capital taxation

    OpenAIRE

    Lorz, Jens Oliver

    1996-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of international capital mobility on redistributive capital taxation and on lobbying activities by interest groups. It employs a model where different capital endowments lead to a conflict between households concerning their most preferred capital tax rate. Three main results are derived: First, redistributive source based capital taxes or subsidies decline as international tax competition intensifies. Second, lobbying activities of certain interest groups may e...

  19. Redistributive Constraints under High Inequality: The Case of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    John Scott

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a comprehensive analysis and interpretation of redistributive spending in Mexico. It reviews the evolution over the last two decades of the principal redistributive instruments and the distributive outcomes targeted by these instruments (income, land, education, health, nutrition). Using recent income and expenditure surveys, the paper presents a comparative benefit incidence analysis (BIA) of 25 mayor programs or spending categories covering all public spending on educatio...

  20. Income Redistribution and the Diversity of Consumer Goods

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Maarek; Renaud Bourlès; Michael T.Dorsch

    2014-01-01

    Reductions in the generosity of welfare benefits and less progressive taxation have decreased the redistributive impact of fiscal policy since the mid-1990’s across the advanced democracies. We argue that the strong increase in the diversity of goods observed those last decades may have modified preferences for redistribution differently across groups in society and affected the political equilibrium tax rate. We show that if the share of diversified goods compared to that of basic (necessary...

  1. Redistribution natural resource rents for welfare society: experience Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Sherstyukova, Karyna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of article is an investigation of mechanism and conditions of the efficiency of distribution and redistribution models of natural resources rents, as well as the World Experience of. Using of redistribution mechanism of rents for the public welfare.The study used general scientific and special methods, in particular: the dialectic, the theoretical generalization and comparison, analysis and synthesis - when determining the basic principles of the system and elements of rent redistribu...

  2. Simulation of Water Movement through Unsaturated Infiltration- Redistribution System

    OpenAIRE

    T Bunsri; Sivakumar, M.; D Hagare

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the movement of water in a natural unsaturated zone, focusing on infiltration-redistribution system. Infiltration refers to the downward movement of water due to the gravitational force and redistribution defines the upward movement of water due to the capillary rise. Under natural conditions, the movement of water through an infiltrationredistribution depended upon the relations among water content, hydraulic conductivity and tension of soil pore. Various...

  3. The Structure of Inequality and the Politics of Redistribution

    OpenAIRE

    Lupu, Noam; Pontusson, Harry Jonas

    2011-01-01

    Against the current consensus among comparative political economists, we argue that inequality matters for redistributive politics in advanced capitalist societies, but it is the structure of inequality, not the level of inequality, that matters. Our theory posits that middle-income voters will be inclined to ally with low-income voters and support redistributive policies when the distance between the middle and the poor is small relative to the distance between the middle and the rich. We te...

  4. WRFv3.2-SPAv2: development and validation of a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model, scaling from surface fluxes of CO2 and energy to atmospheric profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallman, T. L.; Moncrieff, J. B.; Williams, M.

    2013-07-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting meteorological (WRF) model has been coupled to the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere (SPA) terrestrial ecosystem model, to produce WRF-SPA. SPA generates realistic land-atmosphere exchanges through fully coupled hydrological, carbon and energy cycles. The addition of a~land surface model (SPA) capable of modelling biospheric CO2 exchange allows WRF-SPA to be used for investigating the feedbacks between biosphere carbon balance, meteorology, and land use and land cover change. We have extensively validated WRF-SPA using multi-annual observations of air temperature, turbulent fluxes, net radiation and net ecosystem exchange of CO2 at three sites, representing the dominant vegetation types in Scotland (forest, managed grassland and arable agriculture). For example air temperature is well simulated across all sites (forest R2 = 0.92, RMSE = 1.7 °C, bias = 0.88 °C; managed grassland R2 = 0.73, RMSE = 2.7 °C, bias = -0.30 °C; arable agriculture R2 = 0.82, RMSE = 2.2 °C, bias = 0.46 °C; RMSE, root mean square error). WRF-SPA generates more realistic seasonal behaviour at the site level compared to an unmodified version of WRF, such as improved simulation of seasonal transitions in latent heat flux in arable systems. WRF-SPA also generates realistic seasonal CO2 exchanges across all sites. WRF-SPA is also able to realistically model atmospheric profiles of CO2 over Scotland, spanning a 3 yr period (2004-2006), capturing both profile structure, indicating realistic transport, and magnitude (model-data residual <±4 ppm) indicating appropriate source sink distribution and CO2 exchange. WRF-SPA makes use of CO2 tracer pools and can therefore identify and quantify land surface contributions to the modelled atmospheric CO2 signal at a specified location.

  5. A Standardized Based Approach to Managing Atmosphere Studies For Wind Energy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, E.; Sivaraman, C.

    2015-12-01

    Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) is a multi-year U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research initiative targeting significant reductions in the cost of wind energy through an improved understanding of the complex physics governing wind flow into and through wind farms. Better insight into the flow physics has the potential to reduce wind farm energy losses by up to 20%, to reduce annual operational costs by hundreds of millions of dollars, and to improve project financing terms to more closely resemble traditional capital projects. The Data Archive and Portal (DAP) is a key capability of the A2e initiative. The DAP is a cloud-based distributed system known as the 'Wind Cloud' that functions as a repository for all A2e data. This data includes numerous historic and on-going field studies involving in situ and remote sensing instruments, simulations, and scientific analysis. Significantly it is the integration and sharing of these diverse data sets through the DAP that is key to meeting the goals of A2e. This cloud will be accessible via an open and easy-to navigate user interface that facilitates community data access, interaction, and collaboration. DAP management is working with the community, industry, and international standards bodies to develop standards for wind data and to capture important characteristics of all data in the Wind Cloud. Security will be provided to facilitate storage of proprietary data alongside publicly accessible data in the Wind Cloud, and the capability to generate anonymized data will be provided to facilitate using private data by non-privileged users (when appropriate). Finally, limited computing capabilities will be provided to facilitate co-located data analysis, validation, and generation of derived products in support of A2e science.

  6. Measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum with IceCube in the 79- and 86-String configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe, T.; Scheriau, F.; Schmitz, M.

    2016-04-01

    IceCube is a neutrino telescope with an instrumented volume of one cubic kilometer. A total of 5160 Digital Optical Modules (DOMs) is deployed on 86 strings forming a three dimensional detector array. Although primarily designed for the detection of neutrinos from astrophysical sources, the detector can be used for spectral measurements of atmospheric neutrinos. These spectral measurements are hindered by a dominant background of atmospheric muons. State-of-the-art techniques from Machine Learning and Data Mining are required to select a high-purity sample of atmospheric neutrino candidates. The energy spectrum of muon neutrinos is obtained from energy-dependent input variables by utilizing regularized unfolding. The results obtained using IceCube in the 79- and 86-string configuration are presented in this paper.

  7. Direct observation of charge re-distribution in a MgB2 superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng Yun; Shih, Po-Hsun; Ji, Jhong-Yi; Chan, Ting-Shan; Yang, Chun Chuen

    2016-04-01

    To study the origin of negative thermal expansion effects near the superconducting transition temperature TC in MgB2, low-temperature high-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction was used to probe the charge redistribution near the boron atoms. Our results reveal that the in-plane hole-distribution of B- hops through the direct orbital overlap of Mg2+ along the c-axis at 50 K and is re-distributed out-of-plane. This study shows that the out-of-plane π-hole distribution plays a dominant role in the possible origin of superconductivity and negative thermal effects in MgB2.

  8. Light extinction in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laulainen, N.

    1992-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles originating from natural sources, such as volcanos and sulfur-bearing gas emissions from the oceans, and from human sources, such as sulfur emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, strongly affect visual air quality and are suspected to significantly affect radiative climate forcing of the planet. During the daytime, aerosols obscure scenic vistas, while at night they diminish our ability to observe stellar objects. Scattering of light is the main means by which aerosols attenuate and redistribute light in the atmosphere and by which aerosols can alter and reduce visibility and potentially modify the energy balance of the planet. Trends and seasonal variability of atmospheric aerosol loading, such as column-integrated light extinction or optical depth, and how they may affect potential climate change have been difficult to quantify because there have been few observations made of important aerosol optical parameters, such as optical depth, over the globe and over time and often these are of uneven quality. To address questions related to possible climate change, there is a pressing need to acquire more high-quality aerosol optical depth data. Extensive deployment of improved solar radiometers over the next few years will provide higher-quality extinction data over a wider variety of locations worldwide. An often overlooked source of turbidity data, however, is available from astronomical observations, particularly stellar photoelectric photometry observations. With the exception of the Project ASTRA articles published almost 20 years ago, few of these data ever appear in the published literature. This paper will review the current status of atmospheric extinction observations, as highlighted by the ASTRA work and augmented by more recent solar radiometry measurements.

  9. Fixing atmospheric CO2 by environment adaptive sorbent and renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Liu, J.; Ge, K.; Fang, M.

    2014-12-01

    Fixing atmospheric CO2, followed by geologic storage in remote areas is considered an environmentally secure approach to climate mitigation. A moisture swing sorbent was investigated in the laboratory for CO2 capture at a remote area with humid and windy conditions. The energy requirement of moisture swing absorption could be greatly reduced compared to that of traditional high-temperature thermal swing, by assuming that the sorbent can be naturally dried and regenerated at ambient conditions. However, for currently developed moisture swing materials, the CO2 capacity would drop significantly at high relative humidity. The CO2 capture amount can be reduced by the poor thermodynamics and kinetics at high relative humidity or low temperature. Similar challenges also exist for thermal or vacuum swing sorbents. Developing sorbent materials which adapt to specific environments, such as high humidity or low temperature, can ensure sufficient capture capacity on the one hand, and realize better economics on the other hand (Figure 1) .An environment adaptive sorbent should have the abilities of tunable capacity and fast kinetics at extreme conditions, such as high humidity or low temperature. In this presentation, the possibility of tuning CO2 absorption capacity of a polymerized ionic liquid material is discussed. The energy requirement evaluation shows that tuning the CO2 binding energy of sorbent, rather than increasing the temperature or reducing the humidity of air, could be much more economic. By determining whether the absorption process is controlled by physical diffusion controlled or chemical reaction, an effective approach to fast kinetics at extreme conditions is proposed. A shrinking core model for mass transfer kinetics is modified to cope with the relatively poor kinetics of air capture. For the studied sample which has a heterogeneous structure, the kinetic analysis indicates a preference of sorbent particle size optimization, rather than support layer

  10. A comparison between energy transfer and atmospheric turbulent exchanges over alpine meadow and banana plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhangwei; Ma, Yaoming; Wen, Zhiping; Ma, Weiqiang

    2016-04-01

    Banana plantation and alpine meadow ecosystems in southern China and the Tibetan Plateau are unique in the underlying surfaces they exhibit. In this study, we used eddy covariance and a micrometeorological tower to examine the characteristics of land surface energy exchanges over a banana plantation in southern China and an alpine meadow in the Tibetan Plateau from May 2010 to August 2012. The results showed that the diurnal and seasonal variations in upward shortwave radiation flux and surface soil heat flux were larger over the alpine meadow than over the banana plantation surface. Dominant energy partitioning varied with season. Latent heat flux was the main consumer of net radiation flux in the growing season, whereas sensible heat flux was the main consumer during other periods. The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory was employed for comparative purposes, using sonic anemometer observations of flow over the surfaces of banana plantations in the humid southern China monsoon region and the semi-arid areas of the TP, and was found to be applicable. Over banana plantation and alpine meadow areas, the average surface albedo and surface aerodynamic roughness lengths under neutral atmospheric conditions were ~0.128 and 0.47m, and ~0.223 and 0.01m, respectively. During the measuring period, the mean annual bulk transfer coefficients for momentum and sensible heat were 1.47×10-2 and 7.13×10-3, and 2.91×10-3 and 1.96×10-3, for banana plantation and alpine meadow areas, respectively. This is the first time in Asia that long-term open field measurements have been taken with the specific aim of making comparisons between banana plantation and alpine meadow surfaces.

  11. Atmospheric Lepton Fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric $\

  12. Lightning-driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: implications for ionisation-levels and neutral chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Lightning-generated whistlers lead to coupling between the troposphere, the Van Allen radiation belts and the lower-ionosphere through Whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP. Lightning produced whistlers interact with cyclotron resonant radiation belt electrons, leading to pitch-angle scattering into the bounce loss cone and precipitation into the atmosphere. Here we consider the relative significance of WEP to the lower ionosphere and atmosphere by contrasting WEP produced ionisation rate changes with those from Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR and solar photoionisation. During the day, WEP is never a significant source of ionisation in the lower ionosphere for any location or altitude. At nighttime, GCR is more significant than WEP at altitudes <68 km for all locations, above which WEP starts to dominate in North America and Central Europe. Between 75 and 80 km altitude WEP becomes more significant than GCR for the majority of spatial locations at which WEP deposits energy. The size of the regions in which WEP is the most important nighttime ionisation source peaks at ~80 km, depending on the relative contributions of WEP and nighttime solar Lyman-α. We also used the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC model to consider the atmospheric consequences of WEP, focusing on a case-study period. Previous studies have also shown that energetic particle precipitation can lead to large-scale changes in the chemical makeup of the neutral atmosphere by enhancing minor chemical species that play a key role in the ozone balance of the middle atmosphere. However, SIC modelling indicates that the neutral atmospheric changes driven by WEP are insignificant due to the short timescale of the WEP bursts. Overall we find that WEP is a significant energy input into some parts of the lower ionosphere, depending on the latitude/longitude and altitude, but does not play a significant role in the neutral chemistry of the mesosphere.

  13. Lightning-driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: implications for ionisation-levels and neutral chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, C. J.; Enell, C.-F.; Turunen, E.; Clilverd, M. A.; Thomson, N. R.; Verronen, P. T.

    2007-08-01

    Lightning-generated whistlers lead to coupling between the troposphere, the Van Allen radiation belts and the lower-ionosphere through Whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP). Lightning produced whistlers interact with cyclotron resonant radiation belt electrons, leading to pitch-angle scattering into the bounce loss cone and precipitation into the atmosphere. Here we consider the relative significance of WEP to the lower ionosphere and atmosphere by contrasting WEP produced ionisation rate changes with those from Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) and solar photoionisation. During the day, WEP is never a significant source of ionisation in the lower ionosphere for any location or altitude. At nighttime, GCR is more significant than WEP at altitudes WEP starts to dominate in North America and Central Europe. Between 75 and 80 km altitude WEP becomes more significant than GCR for the majority of spatial locations at which WEP deposits energy. The size of the regions in which WEP is the most important nighttime ionisation source peaks at ~80 km, depending on the relative contributions of WEP and nighttime solar Lyman-α. We also used the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC) model to consider the atmospheric consequences of WEP, focusing on a case-study period. Previous studies have also shown that energetic particle precipitation can lead to large-scale changes in the chemical makeup of the neutral atmosphere by enhancing minor chemical species that play a key role in the ozone balance of the middle atmosphere. However, SIC modelling indicates that the neutral atmospheric changes driven by WEP are insignificant due to the short timescale of the WEP bursts. Overall we find that WEP is a significant energy input into some parts of the lower ionosphere, depending on the latitude/longitude and altitude, but does not play a significant role in the neutral chemistry of the mesosphere.

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division Is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and Implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and quantitative links programs to form DOEs contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. Climate research in the ESD has the common goal of improving our understanding of the physical, chemical, biological, and social processes that influence the Earth system so that national and international policymaking relating to natural and human-induced changes in the Earth system can be given a firm scientific basis. This report describes the progress In FY 1991 in each of these areas.

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION ON THE STRUCTURE AND COMPOSITION OF THE UPPER ATMOSPHERE OF EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J. H. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011 (China); Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi, E-mail: guojh@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: bjaffel@iap.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 6 et CNRS, UMR 7095, Institut Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2016-02-20

    By varying the profiles of stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we tested the influences of stellar EUV SEDs on the physical and chemical properties of an escaping atmosphere. We apply our model to study four exoplanets: HD 189733b, HD 209458b, GJ 436b, and Kepler-11b. We find that the total mass loss rates of an exoplanet, which are determined mainly by the integrated fluxes, are moderately affected by the profiles of the EUV SED, but the composition and species distributions in the atmosphere can be dramatically modified by the different profiles of the EUV SED. For exoplanets with a high hydrodynamic escape parameter (λ), the amount of atomic hydrogen produced by photoionization at different altitudes can vary by one to two orders of magnitude with the variation of stellar EUV SEDs. The effect of photoionization of H is prominent when the EUV SED is dominated by the low-energy spectral region (400–900 Å), which pushes the transition of H/H{sup +} to low altitudes. In contrast, the transition of H/H{sup +} moves to higher altitudes when most photons are concentrated in the high-energy spectral region (50–400 Å). For exoplanets with a low λ, the lower temperatures of the atmosphere make many chemical reactions so important that photoionization alone can no longer determine the composition of the escaping atmosphere. For HD 189733b, it is possible to explain the time variability of Lyα between 2010 and 2011 by a change in the EUV SED of the host K-type star, yet invoking only thermal H i in the atmosphere.

  16. The Redistribution of Trade Gains When Income Inequality Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco de Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available How does a redistribution of trade gains affect welfare when income inequality matters? To answer this question, we extend the [1] model to unionized labor markets and heterogeneous workers. As redistribution schemes, we consider unemployment benefits that are financed either by a wage tax, a payroll tax or a profit tax. Assuming that welfare declines in income inequality, we find that welfare increases up to a maximum in the case of wage tax funding, while welfare declines weakly (sharply if a profit tax (payroll tax is implemented. These effects are caused by the wage tax neutrality (due to union wage setting and by a profit tax-induced decline in long-term unemployment. As a result, the government’s optimal redistribution scheme is to finance unemployment benefits by a wage tax.

  17. Ultrafast charge redistribution in small iodine containing molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Hollstein, Maximilian; Gerken, Nils; Klumpp, Stephan; Palutke, Steffen; Baev, Ivan; Brenner, Günter; Dziarzhytski, Siarhei; Wurth, Wilfried; Pfannkuche, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The competition between intra molecular charge redistribution and fragmentation has been studied in small molecules containing iodine by using intense ultrashort pulses in the extreme ultraviolet regime (XUV). We show that after an element specific inner-shell photoionization of diiodomethane (CH$_2$I$_2$) and iodomethane (CH$_3$I), the induced positive charge is redistributed with a significantly different efficiency. Therefore, we analyze ion time-of-flight data obtained from XUV-pump XUV-probe experiments at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH). Theoretical considerations on the basis of ab initio electronic structure calculations including correlations relate this effect to a strongly molecule specific, purely electronic charge redistribution process that takes place directly after photoionization causing a distribution of the induced positive charge predominantly on the atoms which exhibit the lowest atomic ionization potential, i.e, in the molecules considered, the iodine atom(s). As a result of t...

  18. Efficient Multidimensional Data Redistribution for Resizable Parallel Computations

    CERN Document Server

    Sudarsan, Rajesh

    2007-01-01

    Traditional parallel schedulers running on cluster supercomputers support only static scheduling, where the number of processors allocated to an application remains fixed throughout the execution of the job. This results in under-utilization of idle system resources thereby decreasing overall system throughput. In our research, we have developed a prototype framework called ReSHAPE, which supports dynamic resizing of parallel MPI applications executing on distributed memory platforms. The resizing library in ReSHAPE includes support for releasing and acquiring processors and efficiently redistributing application state to a new set of processors. In this paper, we derive an algorithm for redistributing two-dimensional block-cyclic arrays from $P$ to $Q$ processors, organized as 2-D processor grids. The algorithm ensures a contention-free communication schedule for data redistribution if $P_r \\leq Q_r$ and $P_c \\leq Q_c$. In other cases, the algorithm implements circular row and column shifts on the communicat...

  19. A new formulation of the atmospheric spectral energy budget, with application to two high-resolution general circulation models

    CERN Document Server

    Augier, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    A new formulation of the spectral energy budget of kinetic and available potential energies of the atmosphere is derived, with spherical harmonics as base functions. Compared to previous formulations, there are three main improvements: (i) the topography is taken into account, (ii) the exact three-dimensional advection terms are considered and (iii) the vertical flux is separated from the energy transfer between different spherical harmonics. Using this formulation, results from two different high resolution GCMs are analyzed: the AFES T639L24 and the ECMWF IFS T1279L91. The spectral fluxes show that the AFES, which reproduces realistic horizontal spectra with a $k^{-5/3}$ inertial range at the mesoscales, simulates a strong downscale energy cascade. % In contrast, neither the $k^{-5/3}$ vertically integrated spectra nor the downscale energy cascade are produced by the ECMWF IFS.

  20. Cheap Artificial AB-Mountains, Extraction of Water and Energy from Atmosphere and Change of Regional Climate

    CERN Document Server

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary method for changing the climates of entire countries or portions thereof, obtaining huge amounts of cheap water and energy from the atmosphere. In this paper is presented the idea of cheap artificial inflatable mountains, which may cardinally change the climate of a large region or country. Additional benefits: The potential of tapping large amounts of fresh water and energy. The mountains are inflatable semi-cylindrical constructions from thin film (gas bags) having heights of up to 3 - 5 km. They are located perpendicular to the main wind direction. Encountering these artificial mountains, humid air (wind) rises to crest altitude, is cooled and produces rain (or rain clouds). Many natural mountains are sources of rivers, and other forms of water and power production - and artificial mountains may provide these services for entire nations in the future. The film of these gasbags is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric overpressure and may be...

  1. Calorie increase and water savings of redistributing global crop production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K. F.; Seveso, A.; Rulli, M. C.; D'Odorico, P.

    2015-12-01

    Human demand for crop production is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades as a result of population growth, richer diets and biofuel use. In order for food production to keep pace, unprecedented amounts of resources - water, fertilizers, energy - will be required. This has led to calls for 'sustainable intensification' in which yields are increased on existing croplands while seeking to minimize impacts on water and other agricultural resources. Recent studies have quantified aspects of this, showing that there is a large potential to improve crop yields and increase harvest frequencies to better meet human demand. Though promising, both solutions would necessitate large additional inputs of water and fertilizer in order to be achieved under current technologies. However, the question of whether the current distribution of crops is, in fact, the best for realizing maximized production has not been considered to date. To this end, we ask: Is it possible to increase calorie production and minimize water demand by simply growing crops where soil and climate conditions are best suited? Here we use maps of agro-ecological suitability - a measure of physical and chemical soil fertility - for 15 major food crops to identify differences between current crop distributions and where they can most suitably be planted. By redistributing crops across currently cultivated lands, we determine the potential improvement in calorie production as well as the associated change in water demand. We also consider what distribution of crops would maintain current calorie production while minimizing crop water demand. In doing all of this, our study provides a novel tool for improving crop calorie production without necessarily increasing resource demands.

  2. Redistribution of ruthenium in UO2 in a temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The redistribution of Ru in UO2 in a thermal gradient is substantial, with Ru moving up the temperature gradient. The apparent heat of transport of Ru in UO2 is negative. This is believed to be the same mechanism which causes fission product Ru to redistribute in oxide fuels. The tungsten crucible reduces stoichiometric urania, and the oxygen in UO2 under steep temperature gradient moves down the temperature. The heat of transport of oxygen vacancy in UO2 is -138 +- 53 KJ/mole

  3. Core temperature fluctuations and redistributions at Fort St. Vrain HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fort St. Vrain high temperature gas-cooled reactor in the USA has exhibited two types of anomalous behavior called core temperature fluctuations and redistributions during the rise-to-power test program. These originally unexpected phenomena pose an important technical issue to the design, research and development works for JAERI experimental VHTR consisting of prismatic block type fuel elements similar to those of Fort St. Vrain. This report reviews the fluctuation/redistribution problem encountered in Fort St. Vrain along with its resolution. (author)

  4. Potential energy of atmospheric water vapor and the air motions induced by water vapor condensation on different spatial scales

    OpenAIRE

    Makarieva, Anastassia M.; Gorshkov, Victor G.

    2010-01-01

    Basic physical principles are considered that are responsible for the origin of dynamic air flow upon condensation of water vapor, the partial pressure of which represents a store of potential energy in the atmosphere of Earth. Quantitative characteristics of such flow are presented for several spatial scales. It is shown that maximum condensation-induced velocities reach 160 m/s and are realized in compact circulation patterns like tornadoes.

  5. Atmospheric radiative transfer parametrization for solar energy yield calculations on buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Jochen E

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the practical approach to evaluate the incoming solar radiation on buildings based on atmospheric composition and cloud cover is presented. The effects of absorption and scattering due to atmospheric composition is taken into account to calculate, using radiative transfer models, the net incoming solar radiation at surface level. A specific validation of the Alpine Region in Europe is presented with a special focus on the region of South Tyrol.

  6. Measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux by Super-Kamiokande: Energy spectra, geomagnetic effects, and solar modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, E.; Okumura, K.; Abe, K.; Haga, Y.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakajima, T.; Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Orii, A.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Takeda, A.; Tanaka, H.; Tomura, T.; Wendell, R. A.; Akutsu, R.; Irvine, T.; Kajita, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Labarga, L.; Fernandez, P.; Gustafson, J.; Kachulis, C.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Berkman, S.; Nantais, C. M.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tobayama, S.; Goldhaber, M.; Kropp, W. R.; Mine, S.; Weatherly, P.; Smy, M. B.; Sobel, H. W.; Takhistov, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Hill, J.; Hong, N.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Park, R. G.; Himmel, A.; Li, Z.; O'Sullivan, E.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Jang, J. S.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S. N.; Friend, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A. T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yano, T.; Cao, S. V.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Huang, K.; Kikawa, T.; Minamino, A.; Nakaya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Mijakowski, P.; Frankiewicz, K.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C. K.; Li, X.; Palomino, J. L.; Wilking, M. J.; Yanagisawa, C.; Fukuda, D.; Ishino, H.; Kayano, T.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Xu, C.; Kuno, Y.; Tacik, R.; Kim, S. B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Totsuka, Y.; Suda, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Bronner, C.; Hartz, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Suzuki, Y.; Vagins, M. R.; Martin, J. F.; Konaka, A.; Chen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Wilkes, R. J.; Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive study of the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy region from sub-GeV up to several TeV using the Super-Kamiokande (SK) water Cherenkov detector is presented in this paper. The energy and azimuthal spectra, and variation over time, of the atmospheric νe+ν¯ e and νμ+ν¯μ fluxes are measured. The energy spectra are obtained using an iterative unfolding method by combining various event topologies with differing energy responses. The azimuthal spectra depending on energy and zenith angle, and their modulation by geomagnetic effects, are also studied. A predicted east-west asymmetry is observed in both the νe and νμ samples at 8.0 σ and 6.0 σ significance, respectively, and an indication that the asymmetry dipole angle changes depending on the zenith angle was seen at the 2.2 σ level. The measured energy and azimuthal spectra are consistent with the current flux models within the estimated systematic uncertainties. A study of the long-term correlation between the atmospheric neutrino flux and the solar magnetic activity cycle is performed, and a weak preference for a correlation was seen at the 1.1 σ level, using SK-I-SK-IV data spanning a 20-year period. For several particularly strong solar activity periods, corresponding to Forbush decrease events, no theoretical prediction is available but a deviation below the typical neutrino event rate is seen at the 2.4 σ level. The seasonal modulation of the neutrino flux is also examined, but the change in flux at the SK site is predicted to be negligible, and, as expected, no evidence for a seasonal correlation is seen.

  7. The role of quantum interference and partial redistribution in the solar Ba II D2 4554 A line

    CERN Document Server

    Smitha, H N; Stenflo, J O; Sampoorna, M

    2014-01-01

    The Ba II D2 line at 4554 A is a good example, where the F-state interference effects due to the odd isotopes produce polarization profiles, which are very different from those of the even isotopes that do not exhibit F-state interference. It is therefore necessary to account for the contributions from the different isotopes to understand the observed linear polarization profiles of this line. In this paper we present radiative transfer modeling with partial frequency redistribution (PRD), which is shown to be essential to model this line. This is because complete frequency redistribution (CRD) cannot reproduce the observed wing polarization. We present the observed and computed Q/I profiles at different limb distances. The theoretical profiles strongly depend on limb distance (\\mu) and the model atmosphere which fits the limb observations fails at other \\mu\\ positions.

  8. Relative Influence of Initial Surface and Atmospheric Conditions on Seasonal Water and Energy Balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglesby, Robert J.; Marshall, Susan; Roads, John O.; Robertson, Franklin R.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We constructed and analyzed wet and dry soil moisture composites for the mid-latitude GCIP region of the central US using long climate model simulations made with the NCAR CCM3 and reanalysis products from NCEP. Using the diagnostic composites as a guide, we have completed a series of predictability experiments in which we imposed soil water initial conditions in CCM3 for the GCIP region for June 1 from anomalously wet and dry years, with atmospheric initial conditions taken from June 1 of a year with 'near-normal' soil water, and initial soil water from the near-normal year and atmospheric initial conditions from the wet and dry years. Preliminary results indicate that the initial state of the atmosphere is more important than the initial state of soil water determining the subsequent late spring and summer evolution of sod water over the GCIP region. Surprisingly, neither the composites or the predictability experiments yielded a strong influence of soil moisture on the atmosphere. To explore this further, we have made runs with extreme dry soil moisture initial anomalies imposed over the GCIP region (the soil close to being completely dry). These runs did yield a very strong effect on the atmosphere that persisted for at least three months. We conclude that the magnitude of the initial soil moisture anomaly is crucial, at least in CCM3, and are currently investigating whether a threshold exists, below which little impact is seen. In a complementary study, we compared the impact of the initial condition of snow cover versus the initial atmospheric state over the western US (corresponding to the westward extension of the GAPP program follow-on to GCIP). In this case, the initial prescription of snow cover is far more important than the initial atmospheric state in determining the subsequent evolution of snow cover. We are currently working to understand the very different soil water and snow cover results.

  9. Energy distribution of cosmic rays in the Earth’s atmosphere and avionic area using Monte Carlo codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MOHAMED M OULD; DIB A S A; BELBACHIR A H

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic rays cause significant damage to the electronic equipments of the aircrafts. In this paper, we have investigated the accumulation of the deposited energy of cosmic rays on the Earth’s atmosphere, especially in the aircraft area. In fact, if a high-energy neutron or proton interacts with a nanodevice having only a few atoms, this neutron or proton particle can change the nature of this device and destroy it. Our simulation based on Monte Carlo using Geant4 code shows that the deposited energy of neutron particles ranging between 200MeV and 5 GeV are strongly concentrated in the region between 10 and 15 km from the sea level which is exactly the avionic area. However, the Bragg peak energy of proton particle is slightly localized above the avionic area.

  10. Decentralisation and Interregional Redistribution in the Italian Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Irene; Zanardi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the potential impact of the reform designed to decentralise public education in Italy, currently under discussion, on interregional redistribution. The central government has always played a prominent financial and administrative role in the provision of compulsory education in Italy. This has had a strong…

  11. Redistribution of damping in hyperbolic systems of conservation laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantine M. Dafermos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By a change of variables that redistributes damping among the equations of systems of balance laws in one space dimension, it is demonstrated that dissipation induced by friction, viscosity or other physical mechanism, manifested in the decay of “entropy” functionals of quadratic order, also controls the total variation of solutions.

  12. Fast Ion Redistribution and Implications for the Hybrid Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazikian, R; Austin, M E; Budny, R V; Chu, M S; Heidbrink, W W; Makowski, M A; Petty, C C; Politzer, P A; Solomon, W M; Van Zeeland, M A

    2007-06-26

    Time dependent TRANSP analysis indicates that radial redistribution of fast ions is unlikely to affect the central current density in hybrid plasmas sufficient to raise q(0) above unity. The results suggest that some other mechanism other than fast ion transport must be involved in raising q(0) and preventing sawteeth in hybrid plasmas.

  13. The redistribution of granulocytes following E. coli endotoxin induced sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Lillevang, S T; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine;

    1994-01-01

    Infusion of endotoxin elicits granulocytopenia followed by increased numbers of granulocytes in peripheral blood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the redistribution and sequestration of granulocytes in the tissues following E. coli endotoxin induced sepsis. From 16 rabbits granulocytes...

  14. Modeling of horizontal water redistribution in an unsaturated soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhuang, Luwen; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; Genuchten, van Martinus Th.; Leijnse, Toon; Raoof, Amir; Qin, Chaozhong

    2016-01-01

    When two soil samples with the same hydraulic properties but different initial water saturations are brought into contact, water will redistribute horizontally between the samples until some equilibrium is reached. The part with a higher initial saturation undergoes drainage while imbibition occu

  15. Population Redistribution and Migration of Asian Americans, 1970-1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Stephen H.; Liu, William T.

    This paper uses 1980 Census data to assess the patterns of population redistribution and migration of Asian Americans. Analyzing migration flows, it argues that Asian Americans who immigrated to the United States before 1975 followed a national trend of regional population shift from the Northeast and the North Central to the West and South.…

  16. Manganese uptake and its redistribution in sugar cane settlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation was conducted to study manganese uptake and partitioning after 2 hr of feeding and its redistribution in settlings after 30 days of growth in two cultivars of sugar cane which differed in their yield, maturity and nutritional and physiological characteristics. (author). 6 refs

  17. Redistribution, Recognition and Representation: Working against Pedagogies of Indifference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingard, Bob; Keddie, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on an Australian government-commissioned research study that documented classroom pedagogies in 24 Queensland schools. The research created the model of "productive pedagogies", which conjoined what Nancy Fraser calls a politics of redistribution, recognition and representation. In this model pedagogies are…

  18. Income distributions, inequality perceptions and redistributive claims in European societies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.G. Tóth; T. Keller

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyse how redistributive preference relates to actual income and to its distribution. For measuring the relationship on macro level, we defi ne distance based measures of income inequality (P-ratios, based on data from LIS) and test them for their direct and for their contextual ef

  19. Plant transpiration and groundwater dynamics in water-limited climates: Impacts of hydraulic redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiangyu; Liang, Xu; Lin, Jeen-Shang

    2016-06-01

    The role of groundwater in sustaining plant transpiration constitutes an important but not well-understood aspect of the interactions between groundwater, vegetation, the land surface, and the atmosphere. The effect of the hydraulic redistribution (HR) process by plant roots on the interplay between plant transpiration and groundwater dynamics under water-limited climates is investigated by using the Variable Infiltration Capacity Plus (VIC+) land surface model. Numerical experiments, with or without explicitly considering HR, are conducted on soil columns over a range of groundwater table depths (GWTDs) under different vegetative land covers, soil types, and precipitation conditions. When HR is not included, this study obtains transpiration-GWTD relationships consistent with those from watershed studies that do not include HR. When HR is included, the transpiration-GWTD relationships are modified. The modification introduced by HR is manifested in the soil moisture of the root zone. The mechanism of HR is explained by detailing the roles of the hydraulically redistributed water, the upward diffusion of soil water, and the daytime root uptake. We have found that HR is particularly important in water-limited climates under which plants have high transpiration demand. At the beginning stage of a dry period, HR modulates the severe impacts that climate has on plant transpiration. Only after a prolonged dry period, impacts of HR are lessened when the groundwater table drops below the depth of water uptake by roots and are diminished when plant transpiration is decoupled from groundwater dynamics.

  20. Experimental and numerical analysis of atmospheric propagation of high energy laser

    OpenAIRE

    Pargmann, Carsten; Hall, Thomas; Duschek, Frank; Fischbach, Thomas; Grünewald, Karin; Klaffki, Kirsten; Thieser, Jim; Handke, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The transmission of high power laser radiation through the atmosphere is influenced by turbulent motion of the air. As a result the beam experiences an alteration regarding its position and its distribution, which increases with increasing propagation length. In order to analyze the atmospheric influence on the laser beam propagation a disk laser with a maximum output power of 6 kW and a wavelength of 1.03 µm is operated on a 130 m long free transmission laser test range in Lampoldshausen. Th...

  1. Simulation of Water Movement through Unsaturated Infiltration- Redistribution System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Bunsri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the movement of water in a natural unsaturated zone, focusing on infiltration-redistribution system. Infiltration refers to the downward movement of water due to the gravitational force and redistribution defines the upward movement of water due to the capillary rise. Under natural conditions, the movement of water through an infiltrationredistribution depended upon the relations among water content, hydraulic conductivity and tension of soil pore. Various combinations of water balance concepts, Richards’ equation, soil-physics theory and capillary height concepts were applied to mathematically model the movement of water through infiltration-redistribution system. The accuracy and computational efficiency of the developed model were evaluated for the case study. Besides the laboratory scale sand/soil columns with the inner diameter of 10.4 cm were investigated in order to provide the supporting data for model calibration. Sand/soil layers were packed with a bulk density of 1.80 and 1.25 g/cm3, respectively. The infiltration was sprayed uniformly at the soil surface with the constant rate of 66.1 and 7.18 cm3/h for sand and soil columns, respectively. The redistribution process was developed by which water arriving at the column base enter to the sand/soil column due to capillary rise. The laboratory observations were simulated using the developed model. The results indicate that the developed model could well estimate the movement of water in the infiltration-redistribution system that observed in the case study and the experiments.

  2. The ecohydrologic significance of hydraulic redistribution in a semiarid savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Russell L.; Cable, William L.; Hultine, Kevin R.

    2008-02-01

    Recent studies have illuminated the process of hydraulic redistribution, defined as the translocation of soil moisture via plant root systems, but the long-term ecohydrologic significance of this process is poorly understood. We investigated hydraulic redistribution (HR) by Prosopis velutina Woot. (velvet mesquite) in an upland savanna ecosystem over a two-year period. Our goal was to quantify patterns of HR by mesquite roots and assess how this affects tree water use and productivity. We used the heat ratio method to monitor bi-directional sap flow, an analog of HR, in both lateral and tap roots. Additionally, we monitored soil water content and used the eddy covariance technique to quantify ecosystem carbon dioxide and water exchange. Mesquite roots redistributed large amounts of water throughout the year, even during periods of canopy dormancy. Dormant season precipitation (November-March) was often taken up by shallow lateral roots and transferred downward in the soil profile by deeper lateral and tap roots. Such a transfer was also apparent when the trees were active and moisture from summer rainfall was plant available in the upper soil layers. As the upper soil layers dried, sap flow moving toward the canopy in the lateral roots diminished and water use from deeper soils increased via the taproots. The relationship between root sap flow and above-canopy fluxes suggested that deeper "stored" water from HR allowed the trees to transpire more in the spring that followed a winter with significant downward redistribution. Patterns of lateral and tap root sap flow also implied that redistribution may extend the growing season of the trees after summer rains have ended and surface soils are dry, thus allowing the trees to photosynthesize through periods of seasonal drought. The large hydrologic magnitude and the ecological effects of HR we studied, along with mounting evidence of this process occurring in many other ecosystems, indicates that HR should be accounted

  3. Intrahepatic Flow Redistribution in Patients Treated with Radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spreafico, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.spreafico@istitutotumori.mi.it; Morosi, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.morosi@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Radiology (Italy); Maccauro, Marco, E-mail: marco.maccauro@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Italy); Romito, Raffaele, E-mail: raffaele.romito@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Liver Surgery and Transplant (Italy); Lanocita, Rodolfo, E-mail: rodolfo.lanocita@istitutotumori.mi.it; Civelli, Enrico M., E-mail: enrico.civelli@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Radiology (Italy); Sposito, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.sposito@istitutotumori.mi.it; Bhoori, Sherrie, E-mail: sherrie.bhoori@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Liver Surgery and Transplant (Italy); Chiesa, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.chiesa@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Italy); Frigerio, Laura F., E-mail: laura.frigerio@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Radiology (Italy); Lorenzoni, Alice, E-mail: alice.lorenzoni@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Italy); Cascella, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.cascella@istitutotumori.mi.it; Marchianò, Alfonso, E-mail: alfonso.marchiano@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Radiology (Italy); Mazzaferro, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.mazzaferro@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Liver Surgery and Transplant (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    IntroductionIn planning Yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y)-radioembolizations, strategy problems arise in tumours with multiple arterial supplies. We aim to demonstrate that tumours can be treated via one main feeding artery achieving flow redistribution by embolizing accessory vessels.MethodsOne hundred {sup 90}Y-radioembolizations were performed on 90 patients using glass microspheres. In 19 lesions/17 patients, accessory branches were found feeding a minor tumour portion and embolized. In all 17 patients, the assessment of the complete perfusion was obtained by angiography and single photon emission computerized tomography–computerized tomography (SPECT–CT). Dosimetry, toxicity, and tumor response rate of the patients treated after flow redistribution were compared with the 83 standard-treated patients. Seventeen lesions in 15 patients with flow redistribution were chosen as target lesions and evaluated according to mRECIST criteria.ResultsIn all patients, the complete tumor perfusion was assessed immediately before radioembolization by angiography in all patients and after the {sup 90}Y-infusion by SPECT–CT in 15 of 17 patients. In the 15 assessable patients, the response rate in their 17 lesions was 3 CR, 8 PR, and 6 SD. Dosimetric and toxicity data, as well tumour response rate, were comparable with the 83 patients with regular vasculature.ConclusionsAll embolization procedures were performed successfully with no complications, and the flow redistribution was obtained in all cases. Results in term of toxicity, median dose administered, and radiological response were comparable with standard radioembolizations. Our findings confirmed the intratumoral flow redistribution after embolizing the accessory arteries, which makes it possible to treat the tumour through its single main feeding artery.

  4. High Energy Gamma-Ray Observations of the Crab Nebula and Pulsar with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Oser, S; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gregorich, D T; Hanna, D S; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schuette, D R; Theoret, C G; Tumer, T O; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2015-01-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a new ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for gamma-ray astronomy. STACEE uses the large mirror area of a solar heliostat facility to achieve a low energy threshold. A prototype experiment which uses 32 heliostat mirrors with a total mirror area of ~ 1200\\unit{m^2} has been constructed. This prototype, called STACEE-32, was used to search for high energy gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and Pulsar. Observations taken between November 1998 and February 1999 yield a strong statistical excess of gamma-like events from the Crab, with a significance of $+6.75\\sigma$ in 43 hours of on-source observing time. No evidence for pulsed emission from the Crab Pulsar was found, and the upper limit on the pulsed fraction of the observed excess was E_{th}) = (2.2 \\pm 0.6 \\pm 0.2) \\times 10^{-10}\\unit{photons cm^{-2} s^{-1}}. The observed flux is in agreement with a continuation to lower energies of the power law spectrum seen at TeV energies...

  5. Mitigation of MHD induced fast-ion redistribution in MAST and implications for MAST-Upgrade design

    CERN Document Server

    Keeling, D L; Cecconello, M; Challis, C D; Hawkes, N; Jones, O M; Klimek, I; McClements, K G; Meakins, A; Milnes, J; Turnyanskiy, M

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of redistribution of neutral beam fast-ions due to MHD activity in plasma has been observed on many tokamaks and more recently has been a focus of research on MAST (Turnyanskiy M. et al, 2011 Nucl. Fusion 53 053016). n=1 fishbone modes are observed to cause a large decrease in the neutron emission rate corresponding to a significant perturbation of the fast-ion population in the plasma. Theoretical work on fishbone modes states that the fast-ion distribution itself acts as the source of free energy driving the modes that cause the redistribution. Therefore a series of experiments have been carried out on MAST to investigate a range of plasma density levels at two neutral beam power levels to determine the region within this parameter space in which MHD activity and consequent fast-ion redistribution is suppressed. Analysis of these experiments shows complete suppression of MHD activity at high density with increasing activity and fast-ion redistribution at lower densities and higher NB power ac...

  6. Wind Energy-Related Atmospheric Boundary Layer Large-Eddy Simulation Using OpenFOAM: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchfield, M.J.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J.G.; Moriarty, P.J.

    2010-08-01

    This paper develops and evaluates the performance of a large-eddy simulation (LES) solver in computing the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat terrain under a variety of stability conditions, ranging from shear driven (neutral stratification) to moderately convective (unstable stratification).

  7. Spectral energy distribution of M-subdwarfs: A study of their atmospheric properties

    CERN Document Server

    Rajpurohit, A S; Allard, F; Homeier, D; Bayo, A; Mousis, O; Rajpurohit, S; Fernandez-Trincado, J G

    2016-01-01

    Context. M-type subdwarfs are metal-poor low-mass stars and probe for the old populations in our Galaxy. Accurate knowledge of their atmospheric parameters and especially the composition is essential for understanding the chemical history of our Galaxy. Aims. The purpose of this work is to perform a detailed study of M-subdwarf spectra covering the full wavelength range from the optical to the near-infrared. It allows to do a more detailed analysis of the atmospheric composition in order to determine the stellar parameters, and to constrain the atmospheric models. The study will allow us to further understand physical and chemical processes such as increasing condensation of gas into dust, to point out the missing continuum opacities and see how the main band features are reproduced by the models. The spectral resolution and the large wavelength coverage used is a unique combination to constrain the process that occur in cool atmosphere. Methods. We obtained medium-resolution (R = 5000-7000) spectra over the ...

  8. Improvement of Polytetrafluoroethylene Surface Energy by Repetitive Pulse Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in Atmospheric Air%Improvement of Polytetrafluoroethylene Surface Energy by Repetitive Pulse Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in Atmospheric Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国清; 张冠军; 张文元

    2011-01-01

    Improvement of polytetrafluoroethylene surface energy by non-thermal plasma treatment is presented, using a nanosecond-positive-edge repetitive pulsed dielectric barrier discharge generator in atmospheric air. The electrical parameters including discharging power, peak and density of micro-discharge current were calculated, and the electron energy was estimated. Surface treatment experiments of polytetrafluoroethylene films were conducted for both different applied voltages and different treating durations. Results show that the surface energy of polytetrafluoroethylene film could be improved to 40 mJ/m2 or more by plasma treatment. Surface roughness measurement and surface X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicate that there are chemical etching and implantation of polar oxygen groups in the sample surface treating process, resulting in the improvement of the sample surface energy. Compared with an AC source of 50 Hz, the dielectric barrier discharges generated by a repetitive pulsed source could provide higher peak power, lower mean power, larger micro-discharge current density and higher electron energy. Therefore, with the same applied peak voltage and treating duration, the improvement of polytetrafluoroethylene surface energy using repetitive pulsed plasma is more effective, and the plasma treatment process based on repetitive pulsed dielectric barrier discharges in air is thus feasible and applicable.

  9. Absorption of solar energy heats up our planet's surface and the atmosphere and makes life for us po

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Credit: Image courtesy Barbara Summey, NASA Goddard Visualization Analysis Lab, based upon data processed by Takmeng Wong, CERES Science Team, NASA Langley Research Center Satellite: Terra Sensor: CERES Image Date: 09-30-2001 VE Record ID: 11546 Description: Absorption of solar energy heats up our planet's surface and the atmosphere and makes life for us possible. But the energy cannot stay bound up in the Earth's environment forever. If it did then the Earth would be as hot as the Sun. Instead, as the surface and the atmosphere warm, they emit thermal longwave radiation, some of which escapes into space and allows the Earth to cool. This false-color image of the Earth was produced on September 30, 2001, by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The image shows where more or less heat, in the form of longwave radiation, is emanating from the top of Earth's atmosphere. As one can see in the image, the thermal radiation leaving the oceans is fairly uniform. The blue swaths across the central Pacific represent thick clouds, the tops of which are so high they are among the coldest places on Earth. In the American Southwest, which can be seen in the upper righthand corner of the globe, there is often little cloud cover to block outgoing radiation and relatively little water to absorb solar energy. Consequently, the amount of outgoing radiation in the American Southwest exceeds that of the oceans. Also, that region was experiencing an extreme heatwave when these data were acquired. Recently, NASA researchers discovered that incoming solar radiation and outgoing thermal radiation increased in the tropics from the 1980s to the 1990s. (Click to read the press release .) They believe that the reason for the unexpected increase has to do with an apparent change in circulation patterns around the globe, which effectively reduced the amount of water vapor and cloud cover in the upper reaches of the atmosphere

  10. Mechanism of Radial Redistribution of Energetic Trapped Ions Due to m=2/n=1 Internal Reconnection in Joint European Torus Shear Optimized Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.N. Gorelenkov; A. Gondhalekar; A.A. Korotkov; S.E. Sharapov; D. Testa; and Contributors to the EFDA-JET Workprogramme

    2002-01-18

    Internal radial redistribution of MeV energy ICRF-driven hydrogen minority ions was inferred from neutral particle analyzer measurements during large amplitude MHD activity leading to internal reconnection in Shear Optimized plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET). A theory is developed for energetic ion redistribution during a reconnection driven by an m=2/n=1 internal kink mode. Plasma motion during reconnection generates an electric field which can change the energy and radial position of the energetic ions. The magnitude of ion energy change depends on the value of the safety factor at the plasma core from which the energetic ions are redistributed. A relation is found for corresponding change in canonical momentum. P(subscript phi), which leads to radial displacement of the ions. The model yields distinctive new features of energetic ion redistribution under such conditions. Predicted characteristics of ion redistribution are compared with the NPA measurements, and good correlation is found. Sometimes fast ions were transported to the plasma edge due to interaction with a long-lived magnetic island which developed after the reconnection and had chirping frequency in the laboratory frame. Convection of resonant ions trapped in a radially moving phase-space island is modeled to understand the physics of such events.

  11. Improvement of noise redistribution by employing an SOA-EA cascade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Bischoff, Svend; Christiansen, Lotte Jin;

    2001-01-01

    Noise redistribution and pulse reshaping in an optical transmission link, by concatenated pairs of SOAs and electro absorbers, is investigated theoretically. The results show sharper nonlinear transfer function, better noise redistribution and stronger pulse compression for increasing number...

  12. Influence of the atmosphere on the space detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays; Influence de l'atmosphere sur la detection spatiale des rayons cosmiques d'ultra-haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreggia, S

    2007-06-15

    EUSO (Extreme Universe Space Observatory) is a project of ultra-high energy (> 10{sup 20} eV) cosmic rays detection from space. Its concept relies on the observation of fluorescence and Cerenkov photons emitted by extensive air showers from a telescope located on the International Space Station. A simulation software has been developed to study the characteristics of this innovative concept of detection. It deals with the different steps of the detection chain: extensive air shower development, emission of fluorescence and Cerenkov light, and radiative transfer to the telescope. A Monte-Carlo code has been implemented to simulate the propagation of photons through the atmosphere, dealing with multiple scattering in clear sky conditions as well as in presence of aerosols and clouds. With this simulation program, the impact of atmospheric conditions on the performance of a space-located detector has been studied. The precise treatment of photons propagation through the atmosphere has permitted to quantify the scattered light contribution to the detected signal. (author)

  13. Canonical transfer and multiscale energetics for primitive and quasi-geostrophic atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, X San

    2016-01-01

    The past years have seen the success of a novel multiscale energetic formalism in a variety of ocean and engineering fluid applications. In a self-contained way, this study introduces it to the atmospheric dynamical diagnostics, with important theoretical updates. Multiscale energy equations are derived using a new analysis apparatus, namely, multiscale window transform, with respect to both the primitive equation and quasi-geostrophic models. A reconstruction of the "atomic" energy fluxes on the multiple scale windows allows for a natural and unique separation of the in-scale transports and cross-scale transfers from the intertwined nonlinear processes. The resulting energy transfers bear a Lie bracket form, reminiscent of the Poisson bracket in Hamiltonian mechanics, we hence would call them "canonical". A canonical transfer process is a mere redistribution of energy among scale windows, without generating or destroying energy as a whole. By classification, a multiscale energetic cycle comprises of availabl...

  14. Energy conversion and momentum coupling of the sub-kJ laser ablation of aluminum in air atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Koichi; Maruyama, Ryo [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Shimamura, Kohei [Department of Engineering Mechanics and Energy, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

    2015-08-21

    Energy conversion and momentum coupling using nano-second 1-μm-wavelength pulse laser irradiation on an aluminum target were measured in air and nitrogen gas atmospheres over a wide range of laser pulse energies from sub-J to sub-kJ. From the expansion rate of the shock wave, the blast-wave energy conversion efficiency, η{sub bw}, was deduced as 0.59 ± 0.02 in the air atmosphere at an ambient pressure from 30 to 101 kPa for a constant laser fluence at 115 J/cm{sup 2}. Moreover, the momentum coupling of a circular disk target was formulated uniquely as a function of the dimensionless shock-wave radius and the ratio of the laser spot radius to the disk radius, while η{sub bw} could be approximated as constant for the laser fluence from 4.7 to 4.1 kJ/cm{sup 2}, and the ambient pressure from 0.1 to 101 kPa.

  15. Benzylammonium Thermometer Ions: Internal Energies of Ions Formed by Low Temperature Plasma and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Edward R.; Dumlao, Morphy; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Daming; Donald, William A.

    2015-12-01

    The extent of internal energy deposition upon ion formation by low temperature plasma and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was investigated using novel benzylammonium thermometer ions. C-N heterolytic bond dissociation enthalpies of nine 4-substituted benzylammoniums were calculated using CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), which was significantly more accurate than B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), MP2/6-311++G(d,p), and CBS-QB3 for calculating the enthalpies of 20 heterolytic dissociation reactions that were used to benchmark theory. All 4-substituted benzylammonium thermometer ions fragmented by a single pathway with comparable dissociation entropies, except 4-nitrobenzylammonium. Overall, the extent of energy deposition into ions formed by low temperature plasma was significantly lower than those formed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization under these conditions. Because benzylamines are volatile, this new suite of thermometer ions should be useful for investigating the extent of internal energy deposition during ion formation for a wide range of ionization methods, including plasma, spray and laser desorption-based techniques.

  16. Energy conversion and momentum coupling of the sub-kJ laser ablation of aluminum in air atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy conversion and momentum coupling using nano-second 1-μm-wavelength pulse laser irradiation on an aluminum target were measured in air and nitrogen gas atmospheres over a wide range of laser pulse energies from sub-J to sub-kJ. From the expansion rate of the shock wave, the blast-wave energy conversion efficiency, ηbw, was deduced as 0.59 ± 0.02 in the air atmosphere at an ambient pressure from 30 to 101 kPa for a constant laser fluence at 115 J/cm2. Moreover, the momentum coupling of a circular disk target was formulated uniquely as a function of the dimensionless shock-wave radius and the ratio of the laser spot radius to the disk radius, while ηbw could be approximated as constant for the laser fluence from 4.7 to 4.1 kJ/cm2, and the ambient pressure from 0.1 to 101 kPa

  17. Benzylammonium Thermometer Ions: Internal Energies of Ions Formed by Low Temperature Plasma and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Edward R; Dumlao, Morphy; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Daming; Donald, William A

    2015-12-01

    The extent of internal energy deposition upon ion formation by low temperature plasma and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was investigated using novel benzylammonium thermometer ions. C-N heterolytic bond dissociation enthalpies of nine 4-substituted benzylammoniums were calculated using CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), which was significantly more accurate than B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), MP2/6-311++G(d,p), and CBS-QB3 for calculating the enthalpies of 20 heterolytic dissociation reactions that were used to benchmark theory. All 4-substituted benzylammonium thermometer ions fragmented by a single pathway with comparable dissociation entropies, except 4-nitrobenzylammonium. Overall, the extent of energy deposition into ions formed by low temperature plasma was significantly lower than those formed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization under these conditions. Because benzylamines are volatile, this new suite of thermometer ions should be useful for investigating the extent of internal energy deposition during ion formation for a wide range of ionization methods, including plasma, spray and laser desorption-based techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  18. Political competition and the (in)effectiveness of redistribution in a federation

    OpenAIRE

    Ikuho Kochi & Raúl Ponce Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    We analyze political and economic conditions in which the effectiveness of public redistribution might be low in a federation. In our economy, the central government redistributes income while local governments provide a pro poor local public good. If local public spending falls as a response to the ex-post tax-transfer distribution of income engineered by the policy of the central government then public redistribution might be ineffective in redistributing welfare. In this paper we address t...

  19. Analytical Solutions to the Near-Neutral Atmospheric Surface Energy Balance with and without Heat Storage for Urban Climatological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, C. P.; Chan, B. K.; Hashim, M. A.

    1991-04-01

    Analytical solutions are presented to the near-neutral atmospheric surface energy balance with the new approach of including the participation of heat storage in the building substrate. Analytical solutions are also presented for the first time for the case without heat storage effect. By a linearization process, the governing equations are simplified to a set of time-dependent, linear, first-order equations from which explicit solutions are readily obtainable. The results compare well with those obtained by numerical solutions upon the set without linearization when applied to the tropical city of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

  20. Business groups and profit redistribution: a boon or bane for firms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, Rejie; Kabir, Rezaul

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the phenomenon of profit redistribution in Indian business groups and relates redistribution with the underperformance of group-affiliated firms relative to unaffiliated firms. The study also documents that profit redistribution is more pronounced in groups of large sizes and h

  1. Protostellar Accretion Flows Destabilized by Magnetic Flux Redistribution

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Zhao, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic flux redistribution lies at the heart of the problem of star formation in dense cores of molecular clouds that are magnetized to a realistic level. If all of the magnetic flux of a typical core were to be dragged into the central star, the stellar field strength would be orders of magnitude higher than the observed values. This well-known "magnetic flux problem" can in principle be resolved through non-ideal MHD effects. Two dimensional (axisymmetric) calculations have shown that ambipolar diffusion, in particular, can transport magnetic flux outward relative to matter, allowing material to enter the central object without dragging the field lines along. We show through simulations that such axisymmetric protostellar accretion flows are unstable in three dimensions to magnetic interchange instability in the azimuthal direction. The instability is driven by the magnetic flux redistributed from the matter that enters the central object. It typically starts to develop during the transition from the pres...

  2. Analysis of pressure buildup data influenced by wellbore phase redistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, L.G.; Jones, J.R.; Reynolds, A.C.

    1986-10-01

    This work considers the influence of wellbore phase redistribution effects on the analysis of pressure buildup data. First, the authors show that the pressure responses observed when phase redistribution effects exist consist of three distinct types and delineate the conditions under which each type exists. Second, they investigate the reliability of Fair's type curves for analyzing pressure data. Third, for each type of pressure response, they provide rules for determining when the conventional semilog straight line will begin on a semilog plot of pressure data vs. time. They also consider general procedures that are based on Duhamel's principle for analyzing pressure data when sandface flow rates are also available. They discuss the application of these methods to analyze pressure data influenced by wellbore storage effects and investigate the effect that errors in the measured sandface rate have on the analysis.

  3. The redistribution of granulocytes following E. coli endotoxin induced sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Lillevang, S T; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine;

    1994-01-01

    Infusion of endotoxin elicits granulocytopenia followed by increased numbers of granulocytes in peripheral blood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the redistribution and sequestration of granulocytes in the tissues following E. coli endotoxin induced sepsis. From 16 rabbits granulocytes...... were isolated, labelled with Indium and reinjected intravenously. Eight rabbits received an infusion of E. coli endotoxin 2 micrograms kg-1 while eight received isotonic saline. The redistribution of granulocytes was imaged with a gamma camera and calculated with a connected computer before and 2 and 6...... hours after infusion of endotoxin or saline. Serum cortisol and interleukin-1 beta were measured. In another seven rabbits, respiratory burst activity and degranulation of granulocytes were measured prior to and from 5 min to 6 hours after infusion of E. coli endotoxin 2 micrograms kg-1 BW. Following...

  4. Analytical solution for soil water redistribution during evaporation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Jidong; Yasufuku, Noriyuki; Liu, Qiang; Liu, Shiyu

    2013-01-01

    Simulating the dynamics of soil water content and modeling soil water evaporation are critical for many environmental and agricultural strategies. The present study aims to develop an analytical solution to simulate soil water redistribution during the evaporation process. This analytical solution was derived utilizing an exponential function to describe the relation of hydraulic conductivity and water content on pressure head. The solution was obtained based on the initial condition of saturation and an exponential function to model the change of surface water content. Also, the evaporation experiments were conducted under a climate control apparatus to validate the theoretical development. Comparisons between the proposed analytical solution and experimental result are presented from the aspects of soil water redistribution, evaporative rate and cumulative evaporation. Their good agreement indicates that this analytical solution provides a reliable way to investigate the interaction of evaporation and soil water profile. PMID:24355839

  5. State redistribution as merging: introducing the coherent relay

    OpenAIRE

    Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    State redistribution allows one party to optimally send part of her state to another party. Here we show that this can be derived simply from two applications of coherent state-merging. This provides a protocol whereby a middle party acts as a relay station to help another party more efficiently transfer quantum states. This also gives a protocol for state splitting and the reverse Shannon theorem (assisted or unassisted by side information), and allows one to use less classical communication...

  6. Alternatives to Redistribution Communities in Inter-domain traffic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivekanandan Mahadevan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Today’s internet routing mainly concentrates on controlling the ingress and egress traffic which occurs through border routers. There are different ways by which we can control the traffic between autonomous systems. In most cases redistribution communities are used for the control over traffic engineering. In this paper we focus on alternative approaches like Multi Protocol Label Switching (MPLS and Ambient Networks, through which there can be an effective control over traffic engineering.

  7. Alternatives to Redistribution Communities in Inter-domain traffic Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Vivekanandan Mahadevan

    2012-01-01

    Today’s internet routing mainly concentrates on controlling the ingress and egress traffic which occurs through border routers. There are different ways by which we can control the traffic between autonomous systems. In most cases redistribution communities are used for the control over traffic engineering. In this paper we focus on alternative approaches like Multi Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Ambient Networks, through which there can be an effective control over traffi...

  8. Trade and Foreign Capital: Income Redistribution in Simulated Trade Models

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Thompson

    2002-01-01

    The present paper compares quantitative impacts of a free trade "program" of 1% price changes across simulations of general equilibrium models of countries and aggregates of skilled labor. These simulations of factor proportions and specific factors models illustrate two quantitative properties of competitive models of production and trade. First, factor intensity has a much stronger influence than factor substitution on the pattern of income redistribution due to price changes and foreign ca...

  9. Manganese uptake and redistribution in soybean as affected by glyphosate

    OpenAIRE

    Ciro Antonio Rosolem; Gabriel José Massoni de Andrade; Izaias Pinheiro Lisboa; Samuel Menegatti Zoca

    2010-01-01

    Detrimental effects of glyphosate on plant mineral nutrition have been reported in the literature, particularly on Mn uptake and redistribution. However, in most of the experiments conducted so far glyphosate-susceptible plants were used. Effects of glyphosate on Mn absorption kinetics, accumulation, and distribution within the plant, as well as soybean response to Mn as affected by glyphosate were studied in three experiments. In the first experiment, in nutrient solution, the effect of glyp...

  10. Petrol consumption and redistributive effects of its taxation in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Asensio Ruiz de Alda, Francisco Javier; Matas i Prat, Anna; Raymond Bara, José Luis

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to estimate a petrol consumption function for Spain and to evaluate the redistributive effects of petrol taxation. We use micro data from the Spanish Household Budget Survey of 1990/91 and model petrol consumption taking into account the effect that income changes may have on car ownership levels, as well as the differences that exist between expenditure and consumption. Our results show the importance that household structure, place of residence and income have...

  11. The intra-generational redistributive effects of social security

    OpenAIRE

    Luis M. Cubeddu

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides a quantitative evaluation of the intra--cohort redistributive elements of the United States social security system in the context of a computable general equilibrium model. I determine how the well--being of individuals that differ across {\\sl gender, race} and {\\sl education} is affected by government social security policy. I find that females, whites and non--college graduates stand less to gain (lose) from reductions (increases) in the size of social ...

  12. Federal transfers, interregional inequality and redistribution in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas GONZÁLEZ

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This work analyzes the impact of federal transfers and subnational expenditure in human development and interregional equity. Data on federal transfers and subnational spending in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Chile, and Colombia, between 1983 and 2011, indicate that the redistributive power of the central government is statistically associated with improvements in interregional equity but not with better values in the human development index. Exactly the opposite results are found for subnational social spending.

  13. The Redistributive Role of Minimum Wage Legislation and Unemployment Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Marceau; Robin Boadway

    1991-01-01

    The use of unemployment insurance and minimum wages as instruments for redistributing income are analyzed. The government is assumed to be able to implement an optimal income tax in an economy consisting of two ability-types of persons. The effect of introducing a minimum wage which induces involuntary unemployment combined with unemployment insurance is considered. Social welfare can be improved despite the possible revenue costs to the government if the policy causes a self-selection constr...

  14. ECONOMIC GROWTH AND REDISTRIBUTION: EVIDENCE FROM DYNAMIC GAMES

    OpenAIRE

    James Robert E. Sampi Bravo

    2012-01-01

    This work is based on a differential game proposed by Kelvin Lancaster. The game between two agents called workers and capitalists is based on the accumulation and redistribution of benefits among social classes concluding that cooperative outcomes outperform non-cooperative. This approach determines the optimum solution in a centralized economy as a non-cooperative game and cooperative Pareto solutions forced by the social planner. We compare the model solution in a decentralized economy, wh...

  15. Alloy element redistribution during sintering of powder metallurgy steels

    OpenAIRE

    Tahir, Abdul Malik

    2014-01-01

    Homogenization of alloying elements is desired during sintering of powder metallurgy components. The redistribution processes such as penetration of liquid phase into the interparticle/grain boundaries of solid particles and subsequent solid-state  diffusion of alloy element(s) in the base powder, are important for the effective homogenization of alloy element(s) during liquid phase sintering of the mixed powders. The aim of this study is to increase the understanding of alloy element redistr...

  16. Globalization and Redistribution: Feasible Egalitarianism in a Competitive World

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Bowles

    2000-01-01

    A reduction of impediments to international flows of goods, capital and professional labor is thought to raise the economic costs of programs by the nation state (and labor unions) to redistribute income to the poor and to provide economic security. But some of the more politically and economically successful examples of such policies --for example Nordic social democracy and East Asian land reform-- have occurred in small open economies which would, on the above account, provide a prohibitiv...

  17. Disentangling the response of forest and grassland energy exchange to heatwaves under idealized land–atmosphere coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. van Heerwaarden

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the difference in land–atmosphere interactions between grassland and forest during typical heat wave conditions in order to understand the controversial results of Teuling et al. (2010 (T10, hereafter, who have found the systematic occurrence of higher sensible heat fluxes over forest than over grassland during heat wave conditions. With a simple, but accurate coupled land–atmosphere model, we are able to reproduce the findings of T10 for both normal summer and heat wave conditions, and to carefully explore the sensitivity of the coupled land–atmosphere system to changes in incoming radiation and early-morning temperature. Our results emphasize the importance of fast processes during the onset of heat waves, since we are able to explain the results of T10 without having to take into account changes in soil moisture. In order to disentangle the contribution of differences in several static and dynamic properties between forest and grassland, we have performed an experiment in which new land use types are created that are equal to grassland, but with one of its properties replaced by that of forest. From these, we conclude that the closure of stomata in the presence of dry air is by far the most important process in creating the different behavior of grassland and forest during the onset of a heat wave. However, we conclude that for a full explanation of the results of T10 also the other properties (albedo, roughness and the ratio of minimum stomatal resistance to leaf-area index play an important, but indirect role; their influences mainly consist of strengthening the feedback that leads to the closure of the stomata by providing more energy that can be converted into sensible heat. The model experiment also confirms that, in line with the larger sensible heat flux, higher atmospheric temperatures occur over forest.

  18. Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs) – New High-Energy Phenomenon Originated in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong electric fields inside thunderclouds give rise to enhanced fluxes of high- energy electrons and, consequently, gamma rays and neutrons. During thunderstorms at Mount Aragats, hundreds of Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs) comprising millions of energetic electrons and gamma rays, as well as neutrons, were detected at Aragats Space Environmental Center (ASEC) on 3200 m altitude. Observed large TGE events allow for the first time to measure the energy spectra of electrons and gamma rays well above the cosmic ray background. The energy spectra of the electrons have an exponential shape and extend up to 30-40 MeV. Recovered energy spectra of the gamma rays is also exponential in energy range 5-10 MeV, then turns to power law and extends up to 100 MeV.

  19. The influence of the Extreme Ultraviolet spectral energy distribution on the structure and composition of the upper atmosphere of exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, J H

    2015-01-01

    By varying the profiles of stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral energy distribution (SED), we tested the influences of stellar EUV SEDs on the physical and chemical properties of the escaping atmosphere. We apply our model to study four exoplanets, HD\\,189733b, HD\\,209458b, GJ \\,436b, and Kepler-11b. We found that the total mass loss rates of an exoplanet, which are determined mainly by the integrated fluxes, are moderately affected by the profiles of the EUV SED, but the composition and species distributions in the atmosphere can be dramatically modified by the different profiles of the EUV SED. For exoplanets with a high hydrodynamic escape parameter ($\\lambda$), the amount of atomic hydrogen produced by photoionization at different altitudes can vary by one to two orders of magnitude with the variation of stellar EUV SEDs. The effect of photoionization of H is prominent when the EUV SED is dominated by the low-energy spectral region (400-900${\\AA}$), which pushes the transition of H/H$^{+}$ to low al...

  20. Ecosystem-Atmosphere Exchange of Carbon, Water and Energy over a Mixed Deciduous Forest in the Midwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilo Dragoni; Hans Peter Schmid; C.S.B. Grimmond; J.C. Randolph; J.R. White

    2012-12-17

    During the project period we continued to conduct long-term (multi-year) measurements, analysis, and modeling of energy and mass exchange in and over a deciduous forest in the Midwestern United States, to enhance the understanding of soil-vegetation-atmosphere exchange of carbon. At the time when this report was prepared, results from nine years of measurements (1998 - 2006) of above canopy CO2 and energy fluxes at the AmeriFlux site in the Morgan-Monroe State Forest, Indiana, USA (see Table 1), were available on the Fluxnet database, and the hourly CO2 fluxes for 2007 are presented here (see Figure 1). The annual sequestration of atmospheric carbon by the forest is determined to be between 240 and 420 g C m-2 a-1 for the first ten years. These estimates are based on eddy covariance measurements above the forest, with a gap-filling scheme based on soil temperature and photosynthetically active radiation. Data gaps result from missing data or measurements that were rejected in qua)lity control (e.g., during calm nights). Complementary measurements of ecological variables (i.e. inventory method), provided an alternative method to quantify net carbon uptake by the forest, partition carbon allocation in each ecosystem components, and reduce uncertainty on annual net ecosystem productivity (NEP). Biometric datasets are available on the Fluxnext database since 1998 (with the exclusion of 2006). Analysis for year 2007 is under completion.

  1. Three-dimensional parameterizations of the synoptic scale kinetic energy and momentum flux in the Earth's atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Coumou

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a new set of statistical-dynamical equations (SDEs which can accurately reproduce the three-dimensional atmospheric fields of synoptic scale kinetic energy and momentum flux. The set of equations is closed by finding proper parameterizations for the vertical macro-turbulent diffusion coefficient and ageostrophic terms. The equations have been implemented in a new SD atmosphere model, named Aeolus. We show that the synoptic scale kinetic energy and momentum fluxes generated by the model are in good agreement with empirical data, which were derived from bandpass-filtered ERA-40 data. In addition to present-day climate, the model is tested for substantially colder (last glacial maximum and warmer (2×CO2 climates, and shown to be in agreement with general circulation model (GCM results. With the derived equations, one can efficiently study the position and strength of storm tracks under different climate scenarios with calculation time a fraction of those of GCMs. This work prepares ground for the development of a new generation of fast Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity which are able to perform multi-millennia simulations in a reasonable time frame while appropriately accounting for the climatic effect of storm tracks.

  2. Current Redistribution in Resistor Networks: Fat-Tail Statistics in Regular and Small-World Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The redistribution of electrical currents in resistor networks after single-bond failures is analyzed in terms of current-redistribution factors that are shown to depend only on the topology of the network and on the values of the bond resistances. We investigate the properties of these current-redistribution factors for regular network topologies (e.g. $d$-dimensional hypercubic lattices) as well as for small-world networks. In particular, we find that the statistics of the current redistribution factors exhibits a fat-tail behavior, which reflects the long-range nature of the current redistribution as determined by Kirchhoff's circuit laws.

  3. ATLAS vs. NextGen model atmospheres: a combined analysis of synthetic spectral energy distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, E; Chavez, M; Rodríguez-Merino, L H

    2004-01-01

    We carried out a critical appraisal of the two theoretical models, Kurucz' ATLAS9 and PHOENIX/NextGen, for stellar atmosphere synthesis. Our tests relied on the theoretical fit of SEDs for a sample of 334 target stars along the whole spectral-type sequence. The best-fitting physical parameters of stars allowed a calibration of the temperature and bolometric scale. The main conclusions of our analysis are: i) the fitting accuracy of both theoretical libraries drastically degrades at low Teff; ii) comparing with empirical calibrations, both ATLAS and NextGen fits tend to predict slightly warmer Teff, but ATLAS provides in general a sensibly better fit; iii) there is a striking tendency of NextGen to label target stars with an effective temperature and surface gravity in excess with respect to ATLAS. This is a consequence of some ``degeneracy'' in the solution space, partly induced by the different input physics and geometry constraints. A different T(\\tau) vertical structure of stellar atmosphere seems also req...

  4. Atmospheric and Surface Contributions to Planetary Albedo and their Relationship to the Total Meridional Energy Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, A.; Battisti, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    The meridional distribution of incident solar radiation and planetary albedo both contribute to the equator-to-pole gradient in absorbed solar radiation (ASR) in the observed climate system. While the former component is determined by the Earth-Sun geometry and composes 60% of the equator-to-pole gradient in ASR, the latter component makes a significant (40%) contribution to the ASR gradient and is potentially a function of climate state due to its dependence on both atmospheric and surface albedo. In turn, the equator-to-pole gradient in planetary albedo is found to be primarily (86% -89%) dictated by atmospheric albedo with meridional gradients in surface albedo playing a much smaller role in forcing the climate system on the equator-to-pole scale. Simulations of the pre-industrial climate system using the CMIP3 coupled models show large differences in the equator-to-pole gradient in planetary albedo which are mainly due to differences in the simulated cloud distribution, with surface processes playing a much smaller role. The inter-model spread in total meridional heat transport is also primarily (85% of the inter-model spread) due to differences in the simulated cloud distribution. Further model simulations demonstrate that the surface albedo changes associated with moving from the present climate to an ice free climate have a small effect on the equator-to-pole gradient of ASR as compared to the uncertainty in simulated cloud distributions, and hence a small effect on the meridional heat transport.

  5. Spectral energy transfer of atmospheric gravity waves through sum and difference nonlinear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, K.M. [Wuhan Univ. (China). School of Electronic Information; Chinese Academey of Sciences, Hefei (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment; Embry Riddle Aeronautical Univ., Daytona Beach, FL (United States). Dept. of Physical Science; Ministry of Education, Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment and Geodesy; State Observatory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Wuhan (China); Liu, A.Z.; Li, Z. [Embry Riddle Aeronautical Univ., Daytona Beach, FL (United States). Dept. of Physical Science; Zhang, S.D.; Yi, F. [Wuhan Univ. (China). School of Electronic Information; Ministry of Education, Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment and Geodesy; State Observatory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Wuhan (China)

    2012-07-01

    Nonlinear interactions of gravity waves are studied with a two-dimensional, fully nonlinear model. The energy exchanges among resonant and near-resonant triads are examined in order to understand the spectral energy transfer through interactions. The results show that in both resonant and near-resonant interactions, the energy exchange between two high frequency waves is strong, but the energy transfer from large to small vertical scale waves is rather weak. This suggests that the energy cascade toward large vertical wavenumbers through nonlinear interaction is inefficient, which is different from the rapid turbulence cascade. Because of considerable energy exchange, nonlinear interactions can effectively spread high frequency spectrum, and play a significant role in limiting wave amplitude growth and transferring energy into higher altitudes. In resonant interaction, the interacting waves obey the resonant matching conditions, and resonant excitation is reversible, while near-resonant excitation is not so. Although near-resonant interaction shows the complexity of match relation, numerical experiments show an interesting result that when sum and difference near-resonant interactions occur between high and low frequency waves, the wave vectors tend to approximately match in horizontal direction, and the frequency of the excited waves is also close to the matching value. (orig.)

  6. Atmospheric aerosols at the Pierre Auger Observatory: characterization and effect on the energy estimation for ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located in the Province of Mendoza in Argentina, is making good progress in understanding the nature and origin of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays. Using a hybrid detection technique, based on surface detectors and fluorescence telescopes, it provides large statistics, good mass and energy resolution, and solid control of systematic uncertainties. One of the main challenges for the fluorescence detection technique is the understanding of the atmosphere, used as a giant calorimeter. To minimize as much as possible the systematic uncertainties in fluorescence measurements, the Auger Collaboration has developed an extensive atmospheric monitoring program. The purpose of this work is to improve our knowledge of the atmospheric aerosols, and their effect on fluorescence light propagation. Using a modelling program computing air mass displacements, it has been shown that nights with low aerosol concentrations have air masses coming much more directly from the Pacific Ocean. For the first time, the effect of the aerosol size on the light propagation has been estimated. Indeed, according to the Ramsauer approach, large aerosols have the largest effect on the light scattering. Thus, the dependence on the aerosol size has been added to the light scattering parameterizations used by the Auger Collaboration. A systematic overestimation of the energy and of the maximum air shower development Xmax is observed. Finally, a method based on the very inclined laser shots fired by the Auger central laser has been developed to estimate the aerosol size. Large aerosol sizes ever estimated at the Pierre Auger Observatory can now be probed. First preliminary results using laser-shot data collected in the past have identified a population of large aerosols. (author)

  7. High Temperature Energy Storage for In Situ Planetary Atmospheric Measurement Technologies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of energy storage capable of operational temperatures of 380:C and 486oC with a specific capacity 200 Wh/kg for use as a power source on the Venusian...

  8. Role of solar influences on geomagnetosphere and upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Tripathi, Arvind

    The Earth's magnetosphere and upper atmosphere can be greatly perturbed by variations in the solar luminosity caused by disturbances on the solar surface. The state of near-Earth space environment is governed by the Sun and is very dynamic on all spatial and temporal scale. The geomagnetic field which protects the Earth from solar wind and cosmic rays is also essential to the evolution of life; its variations can have either direct or indirect effect on human physiology and health state even if the magnitude of the disturbance is small. Geomagnetic disturbances are seen at the surface of the Earth as perturbations in the components of the geomagnetic field, caused by electric currents flowing in the magnetosphere and upper atmosphere. Ionospheric and thermospheric storms also result from the redistribution of particles and fields. Global thermospheric storm winds and composition changes are driven by energy injection at high latitudes. These storm effects may penetrate downwards to the lower thermosphere and may even perturb the mesosphere. Many of the ionospheric changes at mid-latitude can be understood as a response to thermospheric perturbations. The transient bursts of solar energetic particles, often associated with large solar transients, have been observed to have effects on the Earth's middle and lower atmosphere, including the large-scale destruction of polar stratospheric and tropospheric ozone. In the present, we have discussed effect of solar influences on earth's magnetosphere and upper atmosphere that are useful to space weather and global warming, on the basis of various latest studies.

  9. Comments on "Tropical Convection and the Energy Balance at the Top of the Atmosphere"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Lindzen, Richard S.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data show that the effects of clouds on the solar and thermal infrared radiation in the tropical deep convective regions have a similar magnitude but opposite signs. This small difference in the effects of clouds on radiation led Hartmann et al. (2001) to conclude that the contrast in the net radiation at the top of the atmosphere between the convective and non-convective regions must also be small. However, we have found that the ERBE data do not generally show a small contrast in the radiation between the convective and non-convective regions, and the model used by Hartmann et al., therefore, seems unlikely to represent the real physical processes involving convection, radiation, and climate in an appropriate way.

  10. The. beta. -heating redistribution of DT (deuterium-tritium) solid fuel in glass shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.; Felmlee, W.J.; Mehler, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Recent laboratory observations have confirmed that the energy from ..beta..-heating is sufficient to redistribution DT fuel in Inertial Confinement Fusion, ICF, shells when the shell is held within an isothermal container. There are several steps that now must be taken in the development of this technology. We know that the presence of He/sup 3/ within the interior of the shell will impede the redistribution of the DT. Therefore, the rates at which a DT fuel layer becomes uniform must be experimentally established. To allow target designers to evaluate various options, we need to experimentally determine the limits on the fuel layers uniformity. In addition, to consider realistic hardware systems that can produce these targets, we need to establish the effects that a non-isothermal environment will have on the fuel layer uniformity. To address some of these questions, KMS Fusion has designed and constructed an experimental system that provides an isothermal environment from the shell, and allows the fuel layer uniformity to be documented. Preliminary experiments using this system demonstrate that there are several options for using ..beta..-decay heat to produce a uniform solid fuel layer. These experiments indicate that slowly cooling the shell through the triple points of the DT fuel mixture results in a significant increase in the uniformity of the initial solid layer. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Measurement of the atmospheric neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Duvoort, M R; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Geisler, M; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hülß, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K -H; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kemming, N; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kuehn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lehmann, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Matusik, M; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, A R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nießen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Prikockis, M; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Singh, K; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, B T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Turčan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Voge, M; Voigt, B; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wikström, G; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P

    2010-01-01

    A measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV was performed using a data sample of about 18,000 up-going atmospheric muon neutrino events in IceCube. Boosted decision trees were used for event selection to reject mis-reconstructed atmospheric muons and obtain a sample of up-going muon neutrino events. Background contamination in the final event sample is less than one percent. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos up to 400 TeV, and is fundamental to understanding the impact of this neutrino background on astrophysical neutrino observations with IceCube. The measured spectrum is consistent with predictions for the atmospheric muon neutrino plus muon antineutrino flux.

  12. Measurement of the Atmospheric Muon Charge Ratio at TeV Energies with MINOS

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, P; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Avvakumov, S; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barish, B; Barnes, P D; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Beall, E; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bergfeld, T; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, B; Bock, G J; Böhm, J; Böhnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Border, P M; Bower, C; Buckley-Geer, E; Bungau, C; Cabrera, A; Chapman, J D; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Culling, A J; De Jong, J K; De Santo, A; Dierckxsens, M; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Drakoulakos, D; Durkin, T; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk-Harris, E; Feldman, G J; Fields, T H; Ford, R; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Giurgiu, G A; Godley, A; Gogos, J; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E W; Grossman, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hartouni, E P; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Holin, A; Howcroft, C; Hylen, J; Indurthy, D; Irwin, G M; Ishitsuka, M; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jenner, L; Jensen, D; Joffe-Minor, T; Kafka, T; Kang, H J; Kasahara, S M S; Kim, M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kotelnikov, S K; Kreymer, A; Kumaratunga, S; Lang, K; Lebedev, A; Lee, R; Ling, J; Liu, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marino, A D; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Meier, J R; Merzon, G I; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Milburn, R H; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mislivec, A; Miyagawa, P S; Moore, C D; Morfin, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Osiecki, T; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlovic, Z; Pearce, G F; Peck, C W; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Ping, H; Piteira, R; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Rahman, D; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Reyna, D E; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ruddick, K; Ryabov, V A; Saakyan, R; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Semenov, V K; Seun, S M; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Smirnitsky, V; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Symes, P A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tetteh-Lartey, E; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Trostin, I; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Velissaris, C; Verebryusov, V; Viren, B; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Wu, Q K; Yang, T; Yumiceva, F X; Zheng, H; Zois, M; Zwaska, R

    2007-01-01

    The 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking charge-separated cosmic ray muon data since the beginning of August, 2003 at a depth of 2070 meters-water-equivalent in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. The data with both forward and reversed magnetic field running configurations were combined to minimize systematic errors in the determination of the underground muon charge ratio. When averaged, two independent analyses find the charge ratio underground to be 1.374 +/- 0.004 (stat.) +0.012 -0.010(sys.). Using the map of the Soudan rock overburden, the muon momenta as measured underground were projected to the corresponding values at the surface in the energy range 1-7 TeV. Within this range of energies at the surface, the MINOS data are consistent with the charge ratio being energy independent at the two standard deviation level. When the MINOS results are compared with measurements at lower energies, a clear rise in the charge ratio in the energy range 0.3 -- 1.0 TeV is apparent. A qualitativ...

  13. Spectral re-distribution and surface loss effects in Swift XRT (XMM-Newton EPIC) MOS CCDs

    CERN Document Server

    Short, A D; Turner, M J L

    2002-01-01

    In the course of testing and selecting the EPIC MOS CCDs for the XMM-Newton observatory, the developed a Monte-Carlo model of the CCD response. Among other things, this model was used to investigate surface loss effects evident at low energies. By fitting laboratory data, these losses were characterised as a simple function of X-ray interaction depth and this result enabled the spectral re-distribution itself to be modelled as a simple analytical function. Subsequently, this analytical function has been used to generate the response matrix for the EPIC MOS instruments and will now be employed to model the spectral re-distribution for the Swift XRT CCD.

  14. Carrying away and redistribution of radioisotopes on the Peyne catchment basin. Preliminary report; Entrainement et redistribution des radionucleides sur le bassin versant de la Peyne. Rapport preliminaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffa, C.; Danic, F

    2006-07-01

    The transfers of radioisotopes present in soils and sediments are essentially conditioned by the mobilities of the physical vectors which constitute their supports. The water is the main vector of natural transfer, radioisotopes being associated with it under dissolved or particulate shape. The rainout and the hydrous erosion are responsible in particular for the carrying away and for the redistribution of contaminants following an atmospheric deposit on a catchment basin. However their effect is not the same in any point of the catchment basin. The work begun here aims at elaborating a classification of the grounds sensitivity towards this phenomenon of radioisotopes carrying away. The different factors of sensitivity have been identified: pluviometry, slope, soils occupation and soils nature. The Peyne catchment basin, that presents an important variability of these four parameters, constitutes the experimental site for this study. On this catchment basin, we search to identify the areas the most sensitive to the carrying away of radioisotopes, by combining a theoretical predictive approach based on the cartography and a descriptive approach basing on the sampling and the analysis of soils samples. (N.C.)

  15. Nonlinear optical beam manipulation and high energy beam propagation through the atmosphere; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 18-20, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert A.; Wilson, Leroy E.

    Various papers on nonlinear optical beam manipulation and high-energy beam propagation through the atmosphere are presented. Individual topics addressed include: suppression of Raman amplification using large Stokes seeds, review of multiple-short-pulse SBS experiments and theory, laser-induced gratings for beam manipulation in a gas, considerations for computing realistic atmospheric distortion parameter profiles, effect of turbulent diffusion on laser propagation, use of multiple photon processes in krypton for laser guiding of electron beams, effect of ionization on intense electron beam propagation in low-pressure media, lidar measurements of the troposphere and middle atmosphere, seasonal and diurnal changes in cloud obscuration to visible and IR energy transmission, new cloud composite climatologies using meteorological satellite imagery, effect of neutral atmospheric structure on beam propagation, small-scale electron density fluctuations in a disturbed ionospheric environment, and SDIO radio frequency communications in a structured environment.

  16. On the Sensitivity of Atmospheric Model Implied Ocean Heat Transport to the Dominant Terms of the Surface Energy Balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleckler, P J

    2004-11-03

    The oceanic meridional heat transport (T{sub o}) implied by an atmospheric General Circulation Model (GCM) can help evaluate a model's readiness for coupling with an ocean GCM. In this study we examine the T{sub o} from benchmark experiments of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project, and evaluate the sensitivity of T{sub o} to the dominant terms of the surface energy balance. The implied global ocean TO in the Southern Hemisphere of many models is equatorward, contrary to most observationally-based estimates. By constructing a hybrid (model corrected by observations) T{sub o}, an earlier study demonstrated that the implied heat transport is critically sensitive to the simulated shortwave cloud radiative effects, which have been argued to be principally responsible for the Southern Hemisphere problem. Systematic evaluation of one model in a later study suggested that the implied T{sub o} could be equally as sensitive to a model's ocean surface latent heat flux. In this study we revisit the problem with more recent simulations, making use of estimates of ocean surface fluxes to construct two additional hybrid calculations. The results of the present study demonstrate that indeed the implied T{sub o} of an atmospheric model is very sensitive to problems in not only the surface net shortwave, but the latent heat flux as well. Many models underestimate the shortwave radiation reaching the surface in the low latitudes, and overestimate the latent heat flux in the same region. The additional hybrid transport calculations introduced here could become useful model diagnostic tests as estimates of implied ocean surface fluxes are improved.

  17. Redistribution of paclobutrazol-14C in soil and plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Maria Aparecida; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Ecotoxicologia]. E-mail: macosta@cena.usp.br; vltorrnis@cena.usp.br; regitano@cena.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Paclobutrazol (PBZ) is important to the mango culture since it works as a growth regulator that inhibits gibberellins synthesis controlling the growth of the trees and thus reducing pruning and manipulation during cultivation. Although PBZ has been used for years in mango in Brazil, there are no studies evaluating its environmental fate under Brazilian conditions. Therefore, the objective of the present work is to evaluate the redistribution of PBZ and its metabolites in soil and plant. For this experiment, radiolabeled ({sup 14}C-PBZ) was used once this technique allows detention of minimum amounts of residues in both soil and plant. In addition, plants were cultivated in vessels (100 L and 1 plant /vessel) and the PBZ were applied to the soils at the recommended rate of 1,0 kg ha{sup -1}, having radioactive concentration of 2,0 MBq/vessel. In order to evaluate PBZ redistribution, the volumes of water percolated with rainfall and senescent leaves were collected to monitor their {sup 14}C-residue concentration by liquid scintillation spectrometry (LSS). In parallel, the sorption and leaching potential of PBZ was determined in order to support the previous study. The results showed that PBZ presented relatively low mobility (0.12 % of the applied amount) and high sorption (91.9 % of the applied amount) in the studied soil, being minimal its leached amount; and that majority of the soil applied radioactivity were redistributed in the plant leaves (1.08% of the applied amount). Needing more inquiries in relation to the contamination of the soil and rain water percolated in period of September, 2nd, 2006 to January, 8th, 2007 was of the 0.06% in relation applied radioactivity being very next the radioactivity to deep, indicating that the product still is not being leached during rains. (author)

  18. Frequency redistribution function for the polarized two-term atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, R. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Landi Degl' Innocenti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Manso Sainz, R. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, c/Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Landi Degl' Innocenti, E. [Dipartimento di Astronomia e Scienze dello Spazio, Università di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Landolfi, M. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2014-08-20

    We present a generalized frequency redistribution function for the polarized two-term atom in an arbitrary magnetic field. This result is derived within a new formulation of the quantum problem of coherent scattering of polarized radiation by atoms in the collisionless regime. The general theory, which is based on a diagrammatic treatment of the atom-photon interaction, is still a work in progress. However, the results anticipated here are relevant enough for the study of the magnetism of the solar chromosphere and of interest for astrophysics in general.

  19. Internal Transport Barrier Driven by Redistribution of Energetic Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven instabilities excited by energetic ions are used as a means to reduce the central magnetic shear in a tokamak via redistribution of energetic ions. When the central magnetic shear is low enough, ballooning modes become stable for any plasma pressure gradient and an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a steep pressure gradient can exist. This mechanism can sustain a steady-state ITB as demonstrated by experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. It can also produce a shear in toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. Possible application of this technique to use the energetic alpha particles for improvement of burning plasma performance is discussed

  20. Carbon redistribution by erosion processes in an intensively disturbed catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Martínez-Mena, María; Pérez Cutillas, Pedro; de Vente, Joris; Barberá, Gonzalo G.; Mosch, Wouter; Navarro Cano, Jose Antonio; Gaspar, Leticia; Navas, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Understanding how organic carbon moves with sediments along the fluvial system is crucial to close catchment scale carbon budgets. Especially challenging is the analysis of organic carbon dynamics during fluvial transport in heterogeneous, fragile and disturbed environments with ephemeral and intense hydrological pulses, typical of Mediterranean conditions. This paper explores the catchment scale organic carbon redistribution by lateral flows in extreme Mediterranean environmental conditions from a geomorphological perspective. The study area is a catchment (Cárcavo) in SE Spain with a semiarid climate, erodible lithologies, shallow soils, and highly disturbed by agricultural terraces, land levelling, reforestations and construction of check-dams. To increase understanding of erosion induced catchment scale organic carbon redistribution, we studied the subcatchments of 8 check-dams distributed along the catchment main channel in detail. We determined 137Cs, physicochemical characteristics and organic carbon pools of soils and sediments deposited behind each check-dam, performed spatial analysis of properties of the catchment and buffer areas around check-dams, and carried out geomorphological analysis of the slope-channel connections. Soils showed very low Total Organic Carbon (TOC) values oscillating between 15.2 and 4.4 g Kg-1 for forest and agricultural soils, respectively. Sediments mobilized by erosion were poor in TOC compared to the eroded (forest) soils (6.6±0.7 g Kg-1), and the redistribution of organic carbon through the catchment, especially of the Mineral Associated Organic Carbon (MAC) pool, showed the same pattern as clay particles and 137Cs. The TOC erosion rates (0.031±0.03 Mg ha-1 y-1) were comparable to others reported for subhumid Mediterranean catchments and to those modelled worldwide for pasture land. Those lateral fluxes were equivalent to 10.4 % of the TOC stock from the topsoil at the moment of the check-dam construction and

  1. Internal Transport Barrier Driven by Redistribution of Energetic Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.L. Wong; W.W. Heidbrink; E. Ruskov; C.C. Petty; C.M. Greenfield; R. Nazikian; R. Budny

    2004-11-12

    Alfven instabilities excited by energetic ions are used as a means to reduce the central magnetic shear in a tokamak via redistribution of energetic ions. When the central magnetic shear is low enough, ballooning modes become stable for any plasma pressure gradient and an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a steep pressure gradient can exist. This mechanism can sustain a steady-state ITB as demonstrated by experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. It can also produce a shear in toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. Possible application of this technique to use the energetic alpha particles for improvement of burning plasma performance is discussed.

  2. Isotope exchange investigation of nitrogen redistribution in expanded austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequential plasma and gaseous nitriding of Fe–18Cr–10Ni–3Mo stainless steel at 390 °C with 14N and 15N isotopes followed by denitriding in flowing hydrogen was investigated. Redistribution of plasma-inserted nitrogen atoms (15N) by subsequent gaseous nitriding (14N) was observed. Denitriding after plasma- and gaseous nitriding resulted in predominant retraction of 14N, and only a minor amount of 15N. The nitrogen isotope diffusion behaviour is explained by two different states of nitrogen bonding and short-range ordering between nitrogen and chromium

  3. Isotope exchange investigation of nitrogen redistribution in expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Drouet, M.; Martinavičius, A.;

    2013-01-01

    Sequential plasma and gaseous nitriding of Fe–18Cr–10Ni–3Mo stainless steel at 390°C with 14N and 15N isotopes followed by denitriding in flowing hydrogen was investigated. Redistribution of plasma-inserted nitrogen atoms (15N) by subsequent gaseous nitriding (14N) was observed. Denitriding after...... plasma- and gaseous nitriding resulted in predominant retraction of 14N, and only a minor amount of 15N. The nitrogen isotope diffusion behaviour is explained by two different states of nitrogen bonding and short-range ordering between nitrogen and chromium....

  4. Characteristics of land-atmosphere energy and turbulent fluxes over the plateau steppe in central Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MaoShan Li; ZhongBo Su; YaoMing Ma; XueLong Chen; Lang Zhang; ZeYong Hu

    2016-01-01

    The land-atmosphere energy and turbulence exchange is key to understanding land surface processes on the Tibetan Plateau (TP). Using observed data for Aug. 4 to Dec. 3, 2012 from the Bujiao observation point (BJ) of the Nagqu Plateau Climate and Environment Station (NPCE-BJ), different characteristics of the energy flux during the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) season and post-monsoon period were analyzed. This study outlines the impact of the ASM on energy fluxes in the central TP. It also demonstrates that the surface energy closure rate during the ASM season is higher than that of the post-monsoon period. Footprint modeling shows the distribution of data quality assessments (QA) and quality controls (QC) surrounding the observation point. The measured turbulent flux data at the NPCE-BJ site were highly rep-resentative of the target land-use type. The target surface contributed more to the fluxes under unstable conditions than under stable conditions. The main wind directions (180° and 210°) with the highest data density showed flux contributions reaching 100%, even under stable conditions. The lowest flux contributions were found in sectors with low data density, e.g., 90.4% in the 360° sector under stable conditions during the ASM season. Lastly, a surface energy water balance (SEWAB) model was used to gap-fill any absent or corrected turbulence data. The potential simulation error was also explored in this study. The Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficients (NSEs) of the observed fluxes with the SEWAB model runs were 0.78 for sensible heat flux and 0.63 for latent heat flux during the ASM season, but unrealistic values of−0.9 for latent heat flux during the post-monsoon period.

  5. Changing surface-atmosphere energy exchange and refreezing capacity of the lower accumulation area, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charalampidis, C.; Van As, D.; Box, J. E.;

    2015-01-01

    energy fluxes. The model reproduces the observed melt rates as well as the SMB for each season. A sensitivity analysis reveals that 71 % of the additional solar radiation in 2012 was used for melt, corresponding to 36 % (0.64 m) of the 2012 surface lowering. The remaining 64 % (1.14 m) of surface......We present 5 years (2009-2013) of automatic weather station measurements from the lower accumulation area (1840 m a.s.l.-above sea level) of the Greenland ice sheet in the Kangerlussuaq region. Here, the summers of 2010 and 2012 were both exceptionally warm, but only 2012 resulted in a strongly.......78), as meltwater was present at the ice sheet surface. Consequently, during the 2012 melt season, the ice sheet surface absorbed 28 % (213 MJ m-2) more solar radiation than the average of all other years. A surface energy balance model is used to evaluate the seasonal and interannual variability of all surface...

  6. High-energy spectral complexity from thermal gradients in black hole atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Skibo, J G

    1995-01-01

    We show that Compton scattering of soft photons with energies near 100 eV in thermally stratified black-hole accretion plasmas with temperatures in the range 100 keV - 1 MeV can give rise to an X-ray spectral hardening near 10 keV. This could produce the hardening observed in the X-ray spectra of black holes, which is generally attributed to reflection or partial covering of the incident continuum source by cold optically thick matter. In addition, we show that the presence of very hot (kT=1 MeV) cores in plasmas leads to spectra exibiting high energy tails similar to those observed from Galactic black-hole candidates.

  7. Implications of Super-Kamiokande atmospheric low-energy data for solar neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Giunti, C; Lee, U W; Naumov, V A

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that the high-Delta m^2 part of the the large mixing angle MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem is disfavored by the Super-Kamiokande data for low-energy upward-going events. A quantitative bound is obtained in the three-neutrino scheme with a negligibly small element U_{e3} of the neutrino mixing matrix, as indicated by the result of the CHOOZ long-baseline antinu_e->antinu_e oscillation experiment.

  8. Two-fluid Atmosphere from Decelerating to Accelerating FRW Dark Energy Models

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Anirudh

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of the dark energy parameter within the scope of a spatially homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) model filled with perfect fluid and dark energy components is studied by revisiting the recent results (Amirhashchi et al. in Int. J. Theor. Phys. 50: 3529, 2011). The two sources are claimed to interact minimally so that their energy momentum tensors are conserved separately. To prevail the deterministic solution we consider a time dependent deceleration parameter (DP) i.e. $q = -\\frac{a\\ddot{a}}{\\dot{a}^{2}} = b(a(t))$, which yields a scale factor $a = [\\sinh (\\alpha t)]^{\\frac{1}{n}}$, where $\\alpha$ and $n$ are arbitrary constants. This provides for a model which generates a transition of the universe from the early decelerating phase to the recent accelerating phase. It is observed that the transition red shift ($z_{t}$) for our derived model with $q_{0} = -0.73$ is $\\cong 0.32$. This is in good agreement with the cosmological observations in the literature. The physical a...

  9. Extinction of radiant energy by large atmospheric crystals with different shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shefer, Olga

    2016-07-01

    The calculated results of extinction characteristics of visible and infrared radiation for large semi-transparent crystals are obtained by hybrid technique, which is a combination of the geometric optics method and the physical optics method. Energy and polarization characteristics of the radiation extinction in terms of the elements of the extinction matrix for individual large crystals and ensemble of crystals are discussed. Influences of particle shapes, aspect ratios, parameters of size distribution, complex refractive index, orientation of crystals, wavelength, and the polarization state of an incident radiation on the extinction are illustrated. It is shown that the most expressive and stable features of energy and polarization characteristics of the extinction are observed in the midinfrared region, despite the fact that the ice particles significantly absorb the radiant energy of this spectrum. It is demonstrated that the polarized extinction characteristics can reach several tens of percent at IR wavelengths. For the large crystals, the conditions of occurrence of the spectral behavior of the extinction coefficient in the visible, near-IR, and mid-IR wavelength ranges are determined.

  10. The transfer of resonance line polarization with partial frequency redistribution in the general Hanle-Zeeman regime

    CERN Document Server

    Ballester, Ernest Alsina; Bueno, Javier Trujillo

    2016-01-01

    The spectral line polarization encodes a wealth of information about the thermal and magnetic properties of the solar atmosphere. Modeling the Stokes profiles of strong resonance lines is, however, a complex problem both from the theoretical and computational point of view, especially when partial frequency redistribution (PRD) effects need to be taken into account. In this work, we consider a two-level atom in the presence of magnetic fields of arbitrary intensity (Hanle-Zeeman regime) and orientation, both deterministic and micro-structured. Working within the framework of a rigorous PRD theoretical approach, we have developed a numerical code which solves the full non-LTE radiative transfer problem for polarized radiation, in one-dimensional models of the solar atmosphere, accounting for the combined action of the Hanle and Zeeman effects, as well as for PRD phenomena. After briefly discussing the relevant equations, we describe the iterative method of solution of the problem and the numerical tools that w...

  11. Improved cosmic ray ionization model for the system lower ionosphere-middle atmosphere. Determination of approximation energy interval characteristics for the particle penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velinov, Peter; Mateev, Lachezar

    The effects of galactic and solar cosmic rays (CRs) in the middle atmosphere are considered in this work. We take into account the CR modulation by solar wind and the anomalous CR component also. In fact, CRs determine the electric conductivity in the middle atmosphere and influence the electric processes in it in this way. CRs introduce solar variability in the terrestrial atmosphere and ozonosphere -because they are modulated by solar wind. A new analytical approach for CR ionization by protons and nuclei with charge Z in the lower ionosphere and the middle atmosphere is developed in this paper. For this purpose, the ionization losses (dE/dh) for the energetic charged particles according to the Bohr-Bethe-Bloch formula are approximated in three different energy intervals. More accurate expressions for CR energy decrease E(h) and electron production rate profiles q(h) are derived. The obtained formulas allow comparatively easy computer programming. q(h) is determined by the solution of a 3D integral with account of geomagnetic cut-off rigidity. The integrand in q(h) gives the possibility for application of adequate numerical methods -in this case Gauss quadrature and Romberg extrapolation, for the solution of the mathematical problem. Computations for CR ionization in the middle atmosphere are made. The contributions of the different approximation energy intervals are presented. In this way the process of interaction of CR particles with the upper and middle atmosphere are described much more realistically. The full CR composition is taken into account: protons, helium (alpha-particles), light L, medium M, heavy H and very heavy VH group of nuclei. The computations are made for different geomagnetic cut-off rigidities R in the altitude interval 35-120 km. The COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere CIRA'86 is applied in the computer program for the neutral density and scale height values. The proposed improved CR ionization model will contribute to the

  12. A Comparison of Efficient Algorithms for Scheduling Parallel Data Redistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios-Evangelos Kogias

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Data redistribution in parallel is an often-addressed issue in modern computer networks. In this ontext, we study the case of data redistribution over a switching network. Data from the source stations need to be transferred to the destination stations in the minimum time possible. Unfortunately the time required to complete the transfer is burdened by each switching and thus producing an optimal schedule is proven to be computationally intractable. For the purposes of this paper we consider two algorithms, which have been proved to be very efficient in the past. To get improved results in comparison to previous approaches, we propose splitting the data in two clusters depending on the size of the data to be transferred. To prove the efficiency of our approach we ran experiments on all three algorithms, comparing the time span of the schedules produced as well as the running times to produce those schedules. The test cases we ran indicate that not only our newly proposed algorithm yields better results in terms of the schedule produced but runs faster as well.

  13. Zinc Redistribution in a Soil Developed from Limestone During Pedogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.LAVEUF; S.CORNU; D.BAIZE; M.HARDY; O.JOSIERE; S.DROUIN; A.BRUAND; F.JUILLOT

    2009-01-01

    The long-term redistribution of Zn in a naturally Zn-enriched soil during pedogenesis was quantified based on mass balance calculations.According to their fate,parent limestones comprised three Zn pools:bound to calcite and pyritesphalerite grains,bound to phyllosilicates and bound to goethite in the inherited phosphate nodules.Four pedological processes,i.e.,carbonate dissolution,two stages of redox processes and eluviation,redistributed Zn during pedogenesis.The carbonate dissolution of limestones released Zn bound to calcite into soil solution.Due to residual enrichment,Zn concentrations in the soil are higher than those in parent limestones.Birnessite,ferrihydrite and goethite dispersed in soil horizon trapped high quantities of Zn during their formation.Afterwards,primary redox conditions induced the release of Zn and Fe into soil solution,and the subsequent individualization of Fe and Mn into Zn-rich concretions.Both processes and subsequent aging of the concretions formed induced significant exportation of Zn through the bottom water table.Secondary redox conditions promoted the weathering of Fe and Mn oxides in cements and concretions.This process caused other losses of Zn through lateral exportation in an upper water table.Concomitantly,eluviation occurred at the top of the solum.The lateral exportation of ehiviated minerals through the upper water table limited illuviation.Ehiviation was also responsible for Zn loss,but this Zn bound to phyllosilicates was not bioavailable.

  14. Oxygen redistribution in (UCe)Osub(2-x)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redistribution of oxygen has been investigated in (Usub(0,7)Cesub(0,3))Osub(2-x) mixed oxide subjected to a temperature gradient in laboratory experiments, in order to apply the results to the nuclear fuel (UPu)Osub(2-x). Cylindrical sintered oxide specimens were exposed to temperature up to 13000C with a longitudinal thermal gradient of about 4000C/cm. The most interesting feature of the experimental set-up is a solid-state electrochemical gauge (ThO2 - Y2O3), placed in the cold part of the sample which allows a continuous measurement of the oxygen activity. The experiments showed a fast oxygen migration down the thermal gradient. The calculations performed with a model based on solid-state thermodiffusion are in good agreement with experimental results. The heat of transport Q measured for bare samples reaches (7.2+-0.5)-kcal/mole. When the sample is coated with a tight fitting metallic cladding, an extra term Qe has to be added to the heat of transport Qe. This was interpreted as an electrotransport phenomena. On the same basis, calculations applied to radial oxygen redistribution in (UPu)Osub(2-x) seem to be adequate at least during the first stage of irradiation, taking Q=(20+-5)kcal/mole

  15. Membrane Phospholipid Redistribution in Cytokinesis: A Theoretical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-Wen AN; Wen-Zhou WU; Wei-Yi CHEN

    2005-01-01

    In cell mitosis, cytokinesis is a major deformation process, during which the site of the contractile ring is determined by the biochemical stimulus from asters of the mitotic apparatus, actin and myosin assembly is related to the motion of membrane phospholipids, and local distribution and arrangement of the microfilament cytoskeleton are different at different cytokinesis stages. Based on the Zinemanas-Nir model, a new model is proposed in this study to simulate the entire process by coupling the biochemical stimulus with the mechanical actions. There were three assumptions in this model: the movements of phospholipid proteins are driven by gradients of biochemical stimulus on the membrane surface; the local assembly of actin and myosin filament depends on the amount of phospholipid proteins at the same location;and the surface tension includes membrane tensions due to both the passive deformation of the membrane and the active contraction of actin filament, which is determined by microfilament redistribution and rearrangement. This model could explain the dynamic movement of microfilaments during cytokinesis and predict cell deformation. The calculated results from this model demonstrated that the reorientation of phospholipid proteins and the redistribution and reorientation of microfilaments may play a crucial role in cell division. This model may better represent the cytokinesis process by the introduction of biochemical stimulus.

  16. A Simple Method for Measuring Soil Redistribution on Hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, D. G.

    2002-12-01

    Human activities and associated land-use changes often result in accelerated soil movement on hillslopes. The impacts of such soil movement can be dramatic both on- and off-site. Appropriate strategies for mitigation or control erosion and mass movements are especially critical for application in tropical countries, where steep slopes are increasingly converted from forest to agricultural use and are subject to intense precipitation. The immediacy of the need for erosion control and limited access to research institutions often results in a gap between extension and testing of erosion control strategies for these settings. To address this need, a transect datum technique was developed to assess rates of soil redistribution and loss on steep, deforested slopes with thin, calcareous soil in the Philippines. The method is simple, inexpensive and robust and does not require disturbing the soil surface, as do erosion pins. Application of the technique for three years to several land uses, including contour hedgerows, a contour-plowed field without hedgerows, slash/burn no-till, and pasture demonstrated the technique sensitive enough to measure fluctuations in soil height associated with changing bulk density, soil redistribution and loss and slumping of the terraces within the contour-hedgerow system.

  17. Systemic zinc redistribution and dyshomeostasis in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siren, Pontus M A; Siren, Matti J

    2010-09-01

    Cachexia affects up to two thirds of all cancer patients and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. It is a complex metabolic syndrome associated with the underlying illness and characterized by loss of skeletal muscle tissue with or without loss of fat mass. Cachexia's other prominent clinical symptoms include anorexia, systemic inflammation, pediatric growth failure, and hypogonadism. The relationship between the symptoms of cancer cachexia and the underlying illness is unclear, and there is an urgent need for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Normal Zn metabolism is often disrupted in cancer patients, but the possible effects of systemic Zn dyshomeostasis in cachexia have not been investigated. We propose that the acute phase response can mediate Zn redistribution and accumulation in skeletal muscle tissue and contribute to the activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway that regulates protein catabolism. This chronic redistribution deprives Zn from other tissues and organs and compromises critical physiological functions in the body. The cardinal symptoms of Zn deficiency are anorexia, systemic inflammation, growth failure in children, and hypogonadism. These symptoms also prominently characterize cancer cachexia suggesting that the role of systemic Zn dyshomeostasis in cachexia should be investigated. PMID:21475700

  18. Therapeutic redistribution of metal ions to treat Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Peter J; Barnham, Kevin J

    2012-09-18

    Currently, therapeutics that modify Alzheimer's disease (AD)are not available. Increasing age is the primary risk factor for AD and due to an aging global population the urgent need for effective therapeutics increases every year. This Account presents the development of an AD treatment strategy that incorporates diverse compounds with a common characteristic: the ability to redistribute metal ions within the brain. Central to cognitive decline in AD is the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) that accumulates in the AD brain. A range of therapeutic strategies have been developed based on the premise that decreasing the brain Aβ burden will attenuate the severity of the disease symptoms. Unfortunately these treatments have failed to show any positive outcomes in large-scale clinical trials, raising many questions regarding whether therapeutics for AD can rely solely on decreasing Aβ levels. An alternate strategy is to target the interaction between Aβ and metal ions using compounds with the potential to redistribute metal ions within the brain. The original rationale for this strategy came from studies showing that metal ions promote Aβ toxicity and aggregation. In initial studies using the prototype metal-chelating compound clioquinol (CQ), CQ prevented Aβ toxicity in vitro, out-competed Aβ for metal ions without affecting the activity of metal-dependent enzymes, and attenuated the rate of cognitive decline in AD subjects in a small phase II clinical trial. All these outcomes were consistent with the original hypothesized mechanism of action for CQ where prevention or reversal of the extracellular Aβ-metal interactions could prevent Aβ toxicity. Soon after the completion of these studies, a new body of work began to suggest that this hypothesized mechanism of action for CQ was simplistic and that other factors were also important for the positive therapeutic outcomes. Perhaps most significantly, it was shown that after CQ sequesters metal ions the neutral CQ

  19. Energy Loss of Solar p Modes due to the Excitation of Magnetic Sausage Tube Waves: Importance of Coupling the Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoyne, A.; Jain, R.; Hindman, B. W.

    2014-07-01

    We consider damping and absorption of solar p modes due to their energy loss to magnetic tube waves that can freely carry energy out of the acoustic cavity. The coupling of p modes and sausage tube waves is studied in a model atmosphere composed of a polytropic interior above which lies an isothermal upper atmosphere. The sausage tube waves, excited by p modes, propagate along a magnetic fibril which is assumed to be a vertically aligned, stratified, thin magnetic flux tube. The deficit of p-mode energy is quantified through the damping rate, Γ, and absorption coefficient, α. The variation of Γ and α as a function of frequency and the tube's plasma properties is studied in detail. Previous similar studies have considered only a subphotospheric layer, modeled as a polytrope that has been truncated at the photosphere. Such studies have found that the resulting energy loss by the p modes is very sensitive to the upper boundary condition, which, due to the lack of an upper atmosphere, have been imposed in a somewhat ad hoc manner. The model presented here avoids such problems by using an isothermal layer to model the overlying atmosphere (chromosphere, and, consequently, allows us to analyze the propagation of p-mode-driven sausage waves above the photosphere. In this paper, we restrict our attention to frequencies below the acoustic cut off frequency. We demonstrate the importance of coupling all waves (acoustic, magnetic) in the subsurface solar atmosphere with the overlying atmosphere in order to accurately model the interaction of solar f and p modes with sausage tube waves. In calculating the absorption and damping of p modes, we find that for low frequencies, below ≈3.5 mHz, the isothermal atmosphere, for the two-region model, behaves like a stress-free boundary condition applied at the interface (z = -z 0).

  20. Energy loss of solar p modes due to the excitation of magnetic sausage tube waves: Importance of coupling the upper atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascoyne, A.; Jain, R. [Applied Mathematics Department, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Hindman, B. W., E-mail: a.d.gascoyne@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: r.jain@sheffield.ac.uk [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We consider damping and absorption of solar p modes due to their energy loss to magnetic tube waves that can freely carry energy out of the acoustic cavity. The coupling of p modes and sausage tube waves is studied in a model atmosphere composed of a polytropic interior above which lies an isothermal upper atmosphere. The sausage tube waves, excited by p modes, propagate along a magnetic fibril which is assumed to be a vertically aligned, stratified, thin magnetic flux tube. The deficit of p-mode energy is quantified through the damping rate, Γ, and absorption coefficient, α. The variation of Γ and α as a function of frequency and the tube's plasma properties is studied in detail. Previous similar studies have considered only a subphotospheric layer, modeled as a polytrope that has been truncated at the photosphere. Such studies have found that the resulting energy loss by the p modes is very sensitive to the upper boundary condition, which, due to the lack of an upper atmosphere, have been imposed in a somewhat ad hoc manner. The model presented here avoids such problems by using an isothermal layer to model the overlying atmosphere (chromosphere, and, consequently, allows us to analyze the propagation of p-mode-driven sausage waves above the photosphere. In this paper, we restrict our attention to frequencies below the acoustic cut off frequency. We demonstrate the importance of coupling all waves (acoustic, magnetic) in the subsurface solar atmosphere with the overlying atmosphere in order to accurately model the interaction of solar f and p modes with sausage tube waves. In calculating the absorption and damping of p modes, we find that for low frequencies, below ≈3.5 mHz, the isothermal atmosphere, for the two-region model, behaves like a stress-free boundary condition applied at the interface (z = –z{sub 0}).

  1. Field-Induced Point Defect Redistribution in Metal Oxides: Mesoscopic Length Scale Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moballegh, Ali

    continuously monitored. To understand spatial variations in chemistry and possible changes in microstructure, we utilize a combination of cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (CL), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). After electrical degradation, correlating electrical characterization measurements with electron microscopy analyses provides insight into the redistribution of point defects as a function of electric field and time. Diode-like rectification behavior was observed in crystals subjected to an applied voltage in the low electric field regime ( 175 V/cm) in which the concentrations of point defects become large enough to induce higher-dimensional defects such as dislocations and the formation of Magneli phases. We find that the condensation of point defects into Magneli phases at the electrodes depletes point defect concentration in the bulk, thus increasing the bulk resistivity. The Magneli phases formed near the cathode are found to be stable, and not reversible, at 200°C for the times and fields studied. The defect condensation processes have significant impacts on the overall I-V behavior of the material and the ability to switch the total resistance. The electroformation of conductive filaments, another dominant degradation mechanism, is observed on samples with slightly higher initial bulk resistivity (about 80 O.cm) at field levels as low as 150 V/cm. The redistribution of ionic carriers leads to heterogeneity in the chemistry of TiO2 in the form of nonstoichiometric filaments oriented along the applied field direction. The CL spectra taken from conductive filaments and nonfilaments regions indicate a noticeable increase in the concentration of the titanium interstitials of the filaments. We demonstrate that the filaments can be disconnected from the electrodes with subsequent reverse-polarity biasing, demonstrating switching on a macroscopic crystal. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under

  2. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Omidi, N.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversy surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  3. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Burch, J.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Kuntz, Kip; Omidi, N.; Read, A.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversies surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1982 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1983-02-01

    This report is organized in terms of generic studies: theoretical studies of atmospheric processes; pollutant characterizations and transformation; boundary layer meteorology; and dispersion, deposition and resuspension of atmospheric pollutants.

  5. Inferring heat recirculation and albedo for exoplanetary atmospheres: Comparing optical phase curves and secondary eclipse data

    CERN Document Server

    von Paris, P; Bordé, P; Selsis, F

    2015-01-01

    Basic atmospheric properties such as albedo and heat redistribution between day and nightside have been inferred for a number of planets using observations of secondary eclipses and thermal phase curves. Optical phase curves have not yet been used to constrain these atmospheric properties consistently. We re-model previously published phase curves of CoRoT-1b, TrES-2b and HAT-P-7b and infer albedos and recirculation efficiencies. These are then compared to previous estimates based on secondary eclipse data. We use a physically consistent model to construct optical phase curves. This model takes Lambertian reflection, thermal emission, ellipsoidal variations and Doppler boosting into account. CoRoT-1b shows a non-negligible scattering albedo (0.11re-distribution of energy between dayside and nightside. These values are contrary to previous secondary eclipse and phase curve analyses. In the case of ...

  6. Redistribution at the Local Level: The Case of Public Childcare in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Bucciol; Laura Cavalli; Paolo Pertile; Veronica Polin; Alessandro Sommacal

    2013-01-01

    We study the determinants of redistribution at the municipal level in the context of public childcare in Italy. Within a substantially homogeneous legislative framework, different municipalities autonomously define how participation fees vary with a compound indicator of income and wealth (ISEE), thus redistributing resources across households using the service. The nearly one hundred municipalities we take into account exhibit wide heterogeneity in redistributive attitudes. We find statistic...

  7. Diverse preferences over publicly provided goods and the limits to redistribution

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    My thesis mainly discusses the extent of redistribution in a democratic society. In poor and unequal societies, the income distribution is typically skewed to the right. Standard electoral models of politics predict that the above case would lead to a large extent of redistribution. Empirical studies, however, show weak support for this theory. Some researchers even find the opposite relationship between income inequality and redistribution. In my thesis, I will review some theoretical...

  8. The Size and Shape of Government: Preferences over redistributive tax policy

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Why do some people support government redistribution more than others? This article addresses this question with reference to attitudes towards redistributive tax policy. In doing so, it identifies an important distinction between preferences over the level of taxation and preferences over its structure. Using individual-level survey data from 17 advanced industrial countries, I find ‘decoupling’ of pro-redistributive attitudes over the size versus the shape of government. The modal responden...

  9. Inequality perceptions, distributional norms, and redistributive preferences in East and West Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies differences in inequality perceptions, distributional norms, and redistributive preferences between East and West Germany. As expected, there are substantial differences with respect to all three of these measures. Surprisingly, however, differences in distributional norms are much smaller than differences with respect to inequality perceptions or redistributive preferences. Nonetheless, individuals from East Germany tend to be more supportive of state redistribution and pr...

  10. Reducing food waste through direct surplus food redistribution : the Norwegian case

    OpenAIRE

    Capodistrias, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Food waste is a global problem with significant economic and environmental consequences. Food waste management approaches include production of biogas, animal feed and compost and surplus food redistribution. From a sustainability point of view, surplus food redistribution is the most favorable approach. Surplus food redistribution can be either direct (between suppliers of surplus food and charity food services) or indirect (Through Food banks). This paper is a case study on direct surplus f...

  11. Energy spectrum of secondary protons above the atmosphere measured by the instruments NINA and NINA-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidoli, V.; Casolino, M.; de Pascale, M.; Furano, G.; Iannucci, A.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Sparvoli, R.; Bakaldin, A.; Galper, A.; Koldashov, S.; Korotkov, M.; Leonov, A.; Mikhailov, V.; Voronov, S.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Ambriola, M.; Cafagna, F.; Circella, M.; de Marzo, C.; Adriani, O.; Papini, P.; Spillantini, P.; Straulino, S.; Vannuccini, E.; Ricci, M.; Castellini, G.

    2002-10-01

    In this paper we report on the energy spectrum of protons of albedo origin measured by the instruments NINA and NINA-2 at different geomagnetic locations, and the behaviour of the proton flux as a function of altitude out of the South Atlantic Anomaly. The instrument NINA was used on board the satellite Resurs-01-N4 between 1998 and 1999, at an altitude of about 830 km. The NINA-2 apparatus, on board the satellite MITA, was put into orbit in July 2000, at an altitude of about 450 km. A detailed understanding of the fluxes of charged particles in near Earth orbit is important to reach an accurate theoretical description of the Earth’s magnetic field, but also as input for the calculation of the back-ground for scientific instruments aboard satellites, like the future AGILE and GLAST g

  12. Control technology for radioactive emissions to the atmosphere at US Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection agency (EPA) on existing technology for the control of radionuclide emissions into the air from US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, and to provide EPA with information on possible additional control technologies that could be used to further reduce these emissions. Included in this report are generic discussions of emission control technologies for particulates, iodine, rare gases, and tritium. Also included are specific discussions of existing emission control technologies at 25 DOE facilities. Potential additional emission control technologies are discussed for 14 of these facilities. The facilities discussed were selected by EPA on the basis of preliminary radiation pathway analyses. 170 references, 131 figures, 104 tables

  13. Control technology for radioactive emissions to the atmosphere at US Department of Energy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, E.B.

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection agency (EPA) on existing technology for the control of radionuclide emissions into the air from US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, and to provide EPA with information on possible additional control technologies that could be used to further reduce these emissions. Included in this report are generic discussions of emission control technologies for particulates, iodine, rare gases, and tritium. Also included are specific discussions of existing emission control technologies at 25 DOE facilities. Potential additional emission control technologies are discussed for 14 of these facilities. The facilities discussed were selected by EPA on the basis of preliminary radiation pathway analyses. 170 references, 131 figures, 104 tables.

  14. Particle-in-Cell Simulation for the Control of Electron Energy Distribution of Dielectric Barrier Discharges at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyo Won; Yel Lee, Jung; Lee, Ho-Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2011-10-01

    Recently, atmospheric pressure plasmas attract lots of interests for the useful applications such as surface modification and bio-medical treatment. In this study, a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) simulation was adopted to investigate the discharge characteristics of a planar micro dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with a driving frequency from 1 MHz to 50 MHz and with a gap distance from 60 to 500 micrometers. The variation of control parameters such as the gap distance, the driving wave form, and the applied voltage results in the change in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). Through the relation between the ionization mean free path and the gap size, a significant change of EEDFs is achievable with the decrease of gap distance. Therefore, it is possible to categorize the operation range of DBDs for its applications by controlling the interactions between plasmas and neutral gas for the generation of preferable radicals. This work was supported by the Human Resources Development of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No. 20104010100670).

  15. Mapping land water and energy balance relations through conditional sampling of remote sensing estimates of atmospheric forcing and surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Leila; Entekhabi, Dara; Salvucci, Guido

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop and apply a mapping estimation capability for key unknown parameters that link the surface water and energy balance equations. The method is applied to the Gourma region in West Africa. The accuracy of the estimation method at point scale was previously examined using flux tower data. In this study, the capability is scaled to be applicable with remotely sensed data products and hence allow mapping. Parameters of the system are estimated through a process that links atmospheric forcing (precipitation and incident radiation), surface states, and unknown parameters. Based on conditional averaging of land surface temperature and moisture states, respectively, a single objective function is posed that measures moisture and temperature-dependent errors solely in terms of observed forcings and surface states. This objective function is minimized with respect to parameters to identify evapotranspiration and drainage models and estimate water and energy balance flux components. The uncertainty of the estimated parameters (and associated statistical confidence limits) is obtained through the inverse of Hessian of the objective function, which is an approximation of the covariance matrix. This calibration-free method is applied to the mesoscale region of Gourma in West Africa using multiplatform remote sensing data. The retrievals are verified against tower-flux field site data and physiographic characteristics of the region. The focus is to find the functional form of the evaporative fraction dependence on soil moisture, a key closure function for surface and subsurface heat and moisture dynamics, using remote sensing data.

  16. Characteristics of Zonal Propagation of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy at Equatorial Region in Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hui; CHEN Longxun; HE Jinhai; TAO Shiyan; JIN Zuhui

    2006-01-01

    Based on the daily NCEP/NCAR reanalysis dataset from 1980 to 1997, the zonal propagations of 850 hPa kinetic energy (KE) and meridional wind (v) at equatorial region are examined respectively. Results show that the strongest center of KE in the tropical Asian monsoon region is located at 75°-90°E, with the secondary over the Somalia low-level jet channel, i.e., about 50°E. East to 90°E, disturbances of both KE and v observed are mainly coming from the western Pacific Ocean and propagating westward to the Bay of Bengal (BOB) passing through the South China Sea. But the propagation directions of both KE and v are rather disorderly between the BOB and the Somalia jet channel. Therefore, the East Asian summer monsoon and the Indian summer monsoon are different in the propagating features of the disturbances of KE and v. Above facts indicate that East Asian monsoon system exists undoubtedly even at the equatorial region, and quite distinct from the Indian monsoon system, it is mainly affected by the disturbances coming from the tropical western Pacific rather than from the Indian monsoon region. The boundary of the two monsoon systems is around 95°-100°E, which is more westward than the counterpart as proposed in earlier studies by 5-10 degrees in longitude.

  17. Wind structure and variability in the middle atmosphere during the November 1980 energy budget campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Carlson, M.; Rees, D.; Offermann, D.; Philbrick, C. R.; Widdel, H. U.

    1985-01-01

    Between November 6 and December 1, 1980 series of rocket observations were obtained from two sites in northern Scandinavia (68 deg N) as part of the Energy Budget Campaign, revealing the presence of significant vertical and temporal changes in the wind structure. These changes coincided with different geomagnetic conditions, i.e. quiet and enhanced. Large amounts of rocket data were gathered from high latitudes over such a short interval of time. Prior to November 16 the meridional wind component above 60 km was found to be positive (southerly), while the magnitude of the zonal wind component incresed with altitude. After November 16 the meridional component became negative (northerly) and the magnitude of the zonal wind component was noted to decrease with altitude. Time-sections of the perturbations of the zonal wind show the presence of vertically propagating waves, which suggest gravity wave activity. These waves increase in length from 1 km near 30 km to over 12 km near 80 km. The observational techniques employed Andoya (69 deg N), Norway, and Esrange (67.9 deg N), Sweden, consisted of chaff foil, instrumented rigid spheres, chemical trails, inflatable spheres and parachutes.

  18. Climate stability for a Sellers-type model. [atmospheric diffusive energy balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghil, M.

    1976-01-01

    We study a diffusive energy-balance climate model governed by a nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation. Three positive steady-state solutions of this equation are found; they correspond to three possible climates of our planet: an interglacial (nearly identical to the present climate), a glacial, and a completely ice-covered earth. We consider also models similar to the main one studied, and determine the number of their steady states. All the models have albedo continuously varying with latitude and temperature, and entirely diffusive horizontal heat transfer. The diffusion is taken to be nonlinear as well as linear. We investigate the stability under small perturbations of the main model's climates. A stability criterion is derived, and its application shows that the 'present climate' and the 'deep freeze' are stable, whereas the model's glacial is unstable. A variational principle is introduced to confirm the results of this stability analysis. For a sufficient decrease in solar radiation (about 2%) the glacial and interglacial solutions disappear, leaving the ice-covered earth as the only possible climate.

  19. Measurement of the Atmospheric $\

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose1, D; Boser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegard, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glusenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Gora, D; Grant, D; Gross, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klas, J; Klein, S R; Kohne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Kopke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lunemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Meszaros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Perez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Radel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schoneberg, S; Schonherr, L; Schonwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoss, A; Strahler, E A; Strom, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge1, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    We report the first observation in a high energy neutrino telescope of cascades induced by atmospheric electron neutrinos and by neutral current interactions of atmospheric neutrinos of all flavors. Using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low energy extension, a sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data. The number of observed cascades is $N_{\\rm cascade} = 496 \\pm 66 (stat.) \\pm 88(syst.)$ and the rest of the sample consists of residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is determined in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV and is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos.

  20. Atmospheric multiple scattering of fluorescence light from extensive air showers and effect of the aerosol size on the reconstruction of energy and depth of maximum

    CERN Document Server

    Louedec, K

    2013-01-01

    The reconstruction of the energy and the depth of maximum Xmax of an extensive air shower depends on the multiple scattering of fluorescence photons in the atmosphere. In this work, we explain how atmospheric aerosols, and especially their size, scatter the fluorescence photons during their propagation. Using a Monte Carlo simulation for the scattering of light, the dependence on the aerosol conditions of the multiple scattered light contribution to the recorded signal is fully parameterised. A clear dependence on the aerosol size is proposed for the first time. Finally, using this new parameterisation, the effect of atmospheric aerosols on the energy and on the Xmax reconstructions is presented for a typical extensive air shower observed by a ground-based detector: a systematic over-estimation of these two quantities is observed if aerosols of large size are neglected in the estimation of the multiple scattered fraction.

  1. Horizontal flow and capillarity-driven redistribution in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doster, F; Hönig, O; Hilfer, R

    2012-07-01

    A recent macroscopic mixture theory for two-phase immiscible displacement in porous media has introduced percolating and nonpercolating phases. Quasi-analytic solutions are computed and compared to the traditional theory. The solutions illustrate physical insights and effects due to spatiotemporal changes of nonpercolating phases, and they highlight the differences from traditional theory. Two initial and boundary value problems are solved in one spatial dimension. In the first problem a fluid is displaced by another fluid in a horizontal homogeneous porous medium. The displacing fluid is injected with a flow rate that keeps the saturation constant at the injection point. In the second problem a horizontal homogeneous porous medium is considered which is divided into two subdomains with different but constant initial saturations. Capillary forces lead to a redistribution of the fluids. Errors in the literature are reported and corrected.

  2. Distributed Human Resource Redistribution System Based on Agent and Ontology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiangquan; Wang Ningsheng; Long Wen

    2006-01-01

    A computer system for human resource (HR) redistribution system is presented to solve the balance problem of the "surplus resources" and "surplus tasks" among a group of project units. The system architecture is designed in a compositional manner using the elements of agent technology and knowledge technology. A combination of generic agent models, ontology and knowledge provides an effective approach to address the dynamic, distributed and knowledge-intensive characters of the HR management. In the system, the broker agent acting as intermediary provides matchmaking services to the domain agents, and the individual domain agents communicate directly with each other. The HR ontology provides the semantic match of the surplus task and the surplus resource. Finally, an application example is presented to illustrate the achieved solution for a concrete scenario. This novel way offers a comprehensive HR exchange solution and is suitable for both intra-organizational and inter-organizational HR management.

  3. Intergenerational redistribution and risk sharing with changing longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben M.

    2014-01-01

    Trend increases in longevity are a global phenomenon challenging the fiscal sustainability of current welfare arrangements. Policy proposals abound and often build on implicit assertions concerning intergenerational equity. This paper offers a simple but manageable OLG model with endogenous...... retirement and cohort-specific longevity to address intergenerational redistribution and risk sharing. While it is well known that a utilitarian planner strives for consumption smoothing, it is shown that healthy ageing calls for work smoothing in the sense that retirement ages increase with longevity. Hence......, cohorts with higher longevity should contribute to their larger consumption needs via later retirement, although it is shown that the planner still front-loads some financing (pre-saving). Stochastic longevity raises the issue of intergenerational risk sharing, which implies that cohorts turning out...

  4. From microscopic taxation and redistribution models to macroscopic income distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertotti, Maria Letizia; Modanese, Giovanni

    2011-10-01

    We present here a general framework, expressed by a system of nonlinear differential equations, suitable for the modeling of taxation and redistribution in a closed society. This framework allows one to describe the evolution of income distribution over the population and to explain the emergence of collective features based on knowledge of the individual interactions. By making different choices of the framework parameters, we construct different models, whose long-time behavior is then investigated. Asymptotic stationary distributions are found, which enjoy similar properties as those observed in empirical distributions. In particular, they exhibit power law tails of Pareto type and their Lorenz curves and Gini indices are consistent with some real world ones.

  5. From microscopic taxation and redistribution models to macroscopic income distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Bertotti, Maria Letizia; 10.1016/j.physa.2011.06.008

    2011-01-01

    We present here a general framework, expressed by a system of nonlinear differential equations, suitable for the modelling of taxation and redistribution in a closed (trading market) society. This framework allows to describe the evolution of the income distribution over the population and to explain the emergence of collective features based on the knowledge of the individual interactions. By making different choices of the framework parameters, we construct different models, whose long-time behavior is then investigated. Asymptotic stationary distributions are found, which enjoy similar properties as those observed in empirical distributions. In particular, they exhibit power law tails of Pareto type and their Lorenz curves and Gini indices are consistent with some real world ones.

  6. Measurement and control of the fast ion redistribution on MAST

    CERN Document Server

    Turnyanskiy, M; Akers, R J; Cecconello, M; Keeling, D L; Kirk, A; Lake, R; Pinches, S D; Sangaroon, S; Wodniak, I

    2013-01-01

    Previous experiments on MAST and other tokamaks have indicated that the level of fast ion redistribution can exceed that expected from classical diffusion and that this level increases with beam power. In this paper we present a quantification of this effect in MAST plasmas using a recently commissioned scanning neutron camera. The observed fast ion diffusivity correlates with the amplitude of n=1 energetic particle modes, indicating that they are the probable cause of the non-classical fast ion diffusion in MAST. Finally, it will be shown that broadening the fast ion pressure profile by the application of neutral beam injection at an off-axis location can mitigate the growth of these modes and result in the classical fast ion behaviour

  7. Spacecraft Spin Rate Change due to Propellant Redistribution Between Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyu Hong

    1984-09-01

    A bubble trapped in the liquid manifold of INTELSAT IV F-7 spacecraft caused a mass imbalance between the System 1 propellant tanks and a wobble half angle of 0.38 degree to 0.48 degree. A maneuver in May 14, 1980 passed the bubble through the axial jet and allowed propellant to redistribute. A 0.2 rpm change in spin rate was observed with an exponential decay time constant of 6 minutes. In this paper, moment of inertia, tank geometry and hydrodynamics models are derived to match the observed spin rate data. The values of the total mass of the propellant considered were 16, 19 and 20 Kgs with corresponding mass imbalances of 14.3, 15 and 15.1 Kgs, respectively. The result shows excellent agreement with observed spin rate data but it was necessary to assume a greater mass of hydrazine in the tanks than propellant accounting indicated.

  8. Geographical redistribution of radionuclides in forest and wetland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjaernhage, Aasa; Plamboeck, Agnetha; Nylen, Torbjoern; Lidstroem, Kenneth; Aagren, Goeran; Lindgren, Jonas

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes the results from a survey concerning the presence of caesium-137 in soil in two different areas, Verkmyraan in Gaestrikland and Nyaenget in Vaesterbotten. This has been done with a portable NaI gamma spectrometer connected to a GPS, called back pack. Soil samples have also been taken in the two areas to compare the results from these with the back pack measurements. The results from a survey of Cesium-137 1989 in Nyaenget has also been included to see if there has been a redistribution of Cs-137 in the area in the last ten years. At Verkmyraan there is an increase in Cs-137 deposition at the lower part of the catchment which probably depends on a transport of Cs-137 to the outflow. In Nyaenget the results show a possible levelling of the Cs-137 activity between the different soil types, but to verify that, more soil samples must be taken and analysed.

  9. Extracellular fluid redistribution during hemodialysis: bioimpedance measurement and model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intradialytic fluid redistribution may cause hypotension. We hypothesized that measuring extracellular fluid volumes (ECV) with segmental bioimpedance analysis (SBIA) could test a simple, volume-driven model of redistribution among the arm, leg and trunk compartments. Patients (22, 5 females/17 males, with ages 60.2 ± 9 years, weights 80.7 ± 15 kg, heights 174 ± 9 cm) were studied during 30 HD treatments on different days. Hypotensive symptoms (Hypo+) were observed in eight patients. ECVs in the arm, trunk and leg, respectively VA, VT and VL, were measured at initiation of, and throughout, dialysis. Two variables λA and λL were defined as VA/VT and VL/VT. System dynamics, assuming initial equilibrium, are then described by two rate coefficients kRL and kRA and two constants β and γ. These were obtained using a Marquardt–Levenberg least-squares algorithm. Significant differences (Hypo+ versus Hypo−) for λL (0.55 ± 0.13 versus 0.84 ± 0.3, *p A (0.17 ± 0.032 versus 0.23 ± 0.07, **p L might indicate that less leg volume predisposes to hypotension, larger peripheral volume mitigates hypotension. Observed transport ratios indicated that the ratio of limb to trunk volume stabilized during dialysis after an initial adjustment. These data imply encumbered movement of water from the interstitial components around skeletal muscle in the arm and leg to those of the trunk and are useful in predicting anatomical or situational predispositions to hypotension

  10. Observations, measurements and best practices for monitoring hydraulic redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. W.; Liang, X.

    2011-12-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) is a biogeophysical phenomenon where plant roots move water through the soil column from areas of high soil moisture content to areas of low soil moisture content. The impacts of this process on the hydrologic cycle at the regional scale are beginning to be studied through the use of numerical modeling. The extent of plant species which exhibit HR, the magnitude of water redistributed and the conditions under which it occurs are still unknown. Therefore models must rely on some general assumptions to account for this process. More information is needed to understand how to correctly account for HR in land surface models. The ideal method is through direct measurement and observation. HR has been studied through a variety of mediums, e.g. deuterium footprints, soil moisture patterns and sap flow measurements. All three methods capture the moisture fluctuations within the soil layers via measurements of deuterium concentration, volumetric soil moisture content and root sap flow direction. The problem with deuterium labeling is that it does not allow for the persistent long term measurements over natural wetting and drying periods without additional irrigation. Sap flow measurements, despite having the ability to measure specific plant individuals' water dynamics, requires difficult access to the plant's root system which can be complex and difficult to sample. Soil moisture measurements can be made on a variety of sensor types and the installation is much less intensive. This study examines soil moisture measurements as a means for monitoring HR. Field observations in different regions of the United States utilizing different soil moisture sensor types (capacitance and reflectometer) are shown to exhibit similar diurnal soil moisture patterns common to the HR phenomenon. These observations are then compared and contrasted to model simulation results.

  11. The optimal fuel mix and redistribution of social surplus in the Korean power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the difference between the optimal fuel mix incorporating a pre-installed generation capacity constraint and the actual fuel mix in the Korean power market. Since the restructuring of the market, the fuel mix has been determined partly by investors and partly by the Basic Plan for Long-Term Electricity Supply and Demand (BPE). Both the system marginal price (SMP), and the capacity payment (CP), which has been based on the fixed cost of a specific gas turbine generator, were intended to provide an investment incentive in the market; however, they did not bring about an optimal fuel mix in Korea. Under the circumstances of a shortage of base load generators, these generators may garner excessive profits due to a high SMP level. However, the adjustment scheme of profit between KEPCO and Gencos left scant profit for generators. This paper suggests that a contract is needed to create the appropriate profit and tax levels for these base load generators. The redistribution of profit improves equality between consumers and generators, and the proper margin creates incentives for base load technology investment in Korea. - Research highlights: → This paper aims to determine the optimal fuel mix in Korea and shows the difference between the optimal and actual fuel mix; → We discovered that the optimal fuel mix ratio should be 63.5%:20.5%:16.0%for nuclear energy, coal, and LNG, respectively; → Because the pre-installed capacity is taken as given, the optimal fuel mix under the given installed capacity is an addition of a new nuclear unit to the current fuel mix; → The additional profit above the profit margin in the BPE should be collected and redistributed to consumers; → While we provide an incentive to build nuclear and coal units in Korea, we also suggest that a contract is needed to guarantee the profit level for generators based on a government regulation constraint, the BPE, to achieve a fair treatment.

  12. An aqueous chemistry module for a three-dimensional cloud resolving model: Sulfate redistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujović Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An aqueous chemistry module is created and included into a complex 3D cloud-resolving mesoscale ARPS model to examine the characteristics of in-cloud sulfate. The complex orography of Serbia is included in the model. The chemical species included in the module are sulfur dioxide, sulfate ion, ammonium ion, hydrogen peroxide and ozone. Six water categories are considered: water vapor, cloud water, rain, cloud ice, snow and hail. Each chemical species in each microphysical category is represented by a differential equation of mass continuity. This paper gives a detailed description of the chemistry module and demonstrates the utility of an atmospheric model coupled with the chemistry module in forecasting the redistribution of chemical species in all water categories. The main mean microphysical and chemical conversion rates of sulfate averaged over a 2 h simulation period for a base run are for the oxidation of S(IV in rain water and cloud water, SO4 2− scavenging by Brownian diffusion in cloud droplets and cloud ice as well as the impact scavenging of SO4 2− by rain. The calculated values of sulfates in all water categories and the shape of sulfate profiles depend on radar reflectivity.

  13. A little fairness may induce a lot of redistribution in democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyran, Jean-Robert; Sausgruber, Rupert

    2006-01-01

    We use a model of self-centered inequality aversion suggested by Fehr and Schmidt (Quart. J. Econom. 114 (3) (1999) 817) to study voting on redistribution. We theoretically identify two classes of conditions when an empirically plausible amount of fairness preferences induces redistribution through...

  14. Measurements of non-linear noise re-distribution in an SOA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Tromborg, Bjarne; Mørk, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of the noise statistics after a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) demonstrate non-linear noise re-distribution with a strong power and bandwidth dependence.......Measurements of the noise statistics after a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) demonstrate non-linear noise re-distribution with a strong power and bandwidth dependence....

  15. Measurements and simulations of non-linear noise re-distribution in an SOA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Tromborg, Bjarne; Mørk, Jesper;

    2005-01-01

    Measurements and numerical simulations of the noise statistics after a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) demonstrate non-linear noise re-distribution. The re-distribution, which depends on self-modulation due to gain saturation and carrier dynamics, show a strong power and bandwidth dependence...... and can be important for SOA based regenerators....

  16. Development Planning and Population Growth and Redistribution in the Republic of Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Attar, M. E.; Salman, A. D.

    Utilizing the 1947, 1957, and l965 census data and the 1970 preliminary population count, the relationship between population growth and redistribution and development planning in Iraq was examined. Trends in rural-urban population growth, migration, and population redistribution were examined as they pertained to the socioeconomic development…

  17. 43 CFR 44.52 - May a State enact legislation to reallocate or redistribute PILT payments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May a State enact legislation to... After the Department Distributes Payments § 44.52 May a State enact legislation to reallocate or redistribute PILT payments? A State may enact legislation to reallocate or redistribute PILT payments. If...

  18. Business Groups and Profit Redistribution : A Boon or Bane for Firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, R.; Kabir, M.R.; Douma, S.W.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates how profit redistribution affects the performance of firms affiliated to business groups.It shows that inefficient profit redistribution causes group-affiliated firms to perform poorly relative to independent firms.This underperformance persists even after controlling for oth

  19. Development of a General Analysis and Unfolding Scheme and its Application to Measure the Energy Spectrum of Atmospheric Neutrinos with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H P; Brown, A M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; deAndré, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H G; Sandroos, J; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zoll, M; Morik, K

    2014-01-01

    We present the development and application of a generic analysis scheme for the measurement of neutrino spectra with the IceCube detector. This scheme is based on regularized unfolding, preceded by an event selection which uses a Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance algorithm to select the relevant variables and a Random Forest as a classifier. The analysis has been developed using IceCube data from the 59-string configuration of the detector. 27,771 neutrino candidates were detected in 346 days of livetime. A rejection of 99.9999 % of the atmospheric muon background is achieved. The energy spectrum of the atmospheric neutrino flux is obtained using the TRUEE unfolding program. The unfolded spectrum of atmospheric muon neutrinos covers an energy range from 100 GeV to 1 PeV. Compared to the previous measurement using the detector in the 40-string configuration, the analysis presented here, extends the upper end of the atmospheric neutrino spectrum by more than a factor of two, reaching an energy region that ha...

  20. Ground-Atmosphere Interactions at Gale: Determination of the Surface Energy Budget, Thermal Inertia and Water Sorption on the Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, German; Renno, Nilton; Fischer, Erik; Borlina, Caue; Hallet, Bernard; De la Torre Juarez, Manuel; Vasavada, Aswhin; Gomez-Elvira, Javier

    2014-05-01

    The analysis of the Surface Energy Budget (SEB) yields insights into the local climate and the soil-atmosphere interactions, while the analysis of the thermal inertia of the shallow subsurface augments surface observations, providing information about the local geology. The Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System have measured near subsurface thermal inertia from orbit at scales of ~104 m2 to ~10 km2. Here we report analysis of the thermal inertia at a few locations at Gale Crater at scales of 100 m2. The thermal inertia is calculated by solving the heat conduction equation in the soil using hourly measurements by the Rover Environmental Station (REMS) ground temperature sensor as an upper boundary condition. Three Sols representative of different environmental conditions and soil properties, namely, Sol 82 at Rocknest (RCK), Sol 112 at Point Lake (PL) and Sol 139 at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) are analyzed in detail. The largest thermal inertia (I) value is found at YKB, I = 445 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2 or 445 tiu (thermal inertia unit), followed by PL with I= 300 tiu and RCK withI = 280 tiu [1]. These values are consistent with the type of terrain imaged by MastCam and with previous satellite estimates at Gale Crater [2,3]. The SEB is calculated by using all REMS data products as well as dust opacity values derived from MastCam measurements, whereas previously, the SEB has been calculated using numerical models only [4]. At each location and during the daytime, the SEB is dominated by the downwelling shortwave (SW) solar radiation (~450-500 W/m2) and the upwelling longwave (LW) radiation emitted by the surface (~300-400 W/m2). The sum of these two terms accounts for at least 70% of the net surface heating rate between 0900 and 1400 local solar time. At nighttime, the SEB is dominated by the upwelling LW radiation emitted by the surface (~50-100 W/m2) and the downwelling LW radiation from the atmosphere (~50 W/m2

  1. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO2 molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, A; Faginas-Lago, N; Pacifici, L; Grossi, G

    2015-07-21

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO2 characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO2 + CO2 collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO2 structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7. PMID:26203027

  2. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO{sub 2} molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, A., E-mail: ebiu2005@gmail.com; Faginas-Lago, N.; Pacifici, L.; Grossi, G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Perugia, via Elce di Sotto 8, 06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2015-07-21

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO{sub 2} characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO{sub 2} + CO{sub 2} collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO{sub 2} structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7.

  3. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1987-06-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales. In 1986, atmospheric research examined the transport and diffusion of atmospheric contaminants in areas of complex terrain and participated in a large, multilaboratory program to assess the precipitation scavenging processes important to the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, during 1986, a special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity occurred after the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual projects.

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales. In 1986, atmospheric research examined the transport and diffusion of atmospheric contaminants in areas of complex terrain and participated in a large, multilaboratory program to assess the precipitation scavenging processes important to the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, during 1986, a special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity occurred after the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual projects

  5. Development and analysis of prognostic equations for mesoscale kinetic energy and mesoscale (subgrid scale) fluxes for large-scale atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avissar, Roni; Chen, Fei

    1993-01-01

    Generated by landscape discontinuities (e.g., sea breezes) mesoscale circulation processes are not represented in large-scale atmospheric models (e.g., general circulation models), which have an inappropiate grid-scale resolution. With the assumption that atmospheric variables can be separated into large scale, mesoscale, and turbulent scale, a set of prognostic equations applicable in large-scale atmospheric models for momentum, temperature, moisture, and any other gaseous or aerosol material, which includes both mesoscale and turbulent fluxes is developed. Prognostic equations are also developed for these mesoscale fluxes, which indicate a closure problem and, therefore, require a parameterization. For this purpose, the mean mesoscale kinetic energy (MKE) per unit of mass is used, defined as E-tilde = 0.5 (the mean value of u'(sub i exp 2), where u'(sub i) represents the three Cartesian components of a mesoscale circulation (the angle bracket symbol is the grid-scale, horizontal averaging operator in the large-scale model, and a tilde indicates a corresponding large-scale mean value). A prognostic equation is developed for E-tilde, and an analysis of the different terms of this equation indicates that the mesoscale vertical heat flux, the mesoscale pressure correlation, and the interaction between turbulence and mesoscale perturbations are the major terms that affect the time tendency of E-tilde. A-state-of-the-art mesoscale atmospheric model is used to investigate the relationship between MKE, landscape discontinuities (as characterized by the spatial distribution of heat fluxes at the earth's surface), and mesoscale sensible and latent heat fluxes in the atmosphere. MKE is compared with turbulence kinetic energy to illustrate the importance of mesoscale processes as compared to turbulent processes. This analysis emphasizes the potential use of MKE to bridge between landscape discontinuities and mesoscale fluxes and, therefore, to parameterize mesoscale fluxes

  6. An evaluation and parameterization of stably stratified turbulence: Insights on the atmospheric boundary layer and implications for wind energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jordan M.

    This research focuses on the dynamics of turbulent mixing under stably stratified flow conditions. Velocity fluctuations and instabilities are suppressed by buoyancy forces limiting mixing as stability increases and turbulence decreases until the flow relaminarizes. Theories that ubiquitously assume turbulence collapse above a critical value of the gradient Richardson number (e.g. Ri > Ric) are common in meteorological and oceanographic communities. However, most theories were developed from results of small-scale laboratory and numerical experiments with energetic levels several orders of magnitude less than geophysical flows. Geophysical flows exhibit strong turbulence that enhances the transport of momentum and scalars. The mixing length for the turbulent momentum field, L M, serves as a key parameter in assessing large-scale, energy-containing motions. For a stably stratified turbulent shear flow, the shear production of turbulent kinetic energy, P, is here considered to be of greater relevance than the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, epsilon. Thus, the turbulent Reynolds number can be recast as Re ≡ k2/(nuP) where k is the turbulent kinetic energy, allowing for a new perspective on flow energetics. Using an ensemble data set of high quality direct numerical simulation (DNS) results, large-eddy simulation (LES) results, laboratory experiments, and observational field data of the stable atmospheric boundary layer (SABL), the dichotomy of data becomes apparent. High mixing rates persist to strong stability (e.g. Ri ≈ 10) in the SABL whereas numerical and laboratory results confirm turbulence collapse for Ri ˜ O(1). While this behavior has been alluded to in literature, this direct comparison of data elucidates the disparity in universal theories of stably stratified turbulence. From this theoretical perspective, a Reynolds-averaged framework is employed to develop and evaluate parameterizations of turbulent mixing based on the competing forces

  7. Spectroscopy of reactive species produced by low-energy atmospheric-pressure plasma on conductive target material surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiromasa; Sakakita, Hajime; Kato, Susumu; Kim, Jaeho; Kiyama, Satoru; Fujiwara, Masanori; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Okazaki, Toshiya; Ikehara, Sanae; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Ikehara, Yuzuru

    2016-10-01

    A method for blood coagulation using low-energy atmospheric-pressure plasma (LEAPP) is confirmed as an alternative procedure to reduce tissue damage caused by heat. Blood coagulation using LEAPP behaves differently depending on working gas species; helium is more effective than argon in promoting fast coagulation. To analyse the difference in reactive species produced by helium and argon plasma, spectroscopic measurements were conducted without and with a target material. To compare emissions, blood coagulation experiments using LEAPP for both plasmas were performed under almost identical conditions. Although many kinds of reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals and excited nitrogen molecules were observed with similar intensity in both plasmas, intensities of nitrogen ion molecules and nitric oxide molecules were extremely strong in the helium plasma. It is considered that nitrogen ion molecules were mainly produced by penning ionization by helium metastable. Near the target, a significant increase in the emissions of reactive species is observed. There is a possibility that electron acceleration was induced in a local electric field formed on the surface. However, in argon plasma, emissions from nitrogen ion were not measured even near the target surface. These differences between the two plasmas may be producing the difference in blood coagulation behaviour. To control the surrounding gas of the plasma, a gas-component-controllable chamber was assembled. Filling the chamber with O2/He or N2/He gas mixtures selectively produces either reactive oxygen species or reactive nitrogen species. Through selective treatments, this chamber would be useful in studying the effects of specific reactive species on blood coagulation.

  8. Cooling fermions in optical lattices by faster entropy redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Rafael P.; Yang, Tsung-Lin; Paiva, Thereza; Scalettar, Richard T.; Natu, Stefan S.; Hulet, Randall G.; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Lower entropy for fermions in optical lattices would unlock new quantum phases, including antiferromagnetism and potentially superconductivity. We propose a method to cool these systems at temperatures where conventional methods fail: slowly turning on a tightly focused optical potential transports entropy from the Mott insulator to a metallic entropy reservoir formed along the beam. Our scheme places the entropy reservoir close to the targeted cooling region, which allows entropy redistribution to be effective at lower temperatures than in prior proposals. Furthermore we require only a straightforwardly-applied Gaussian potential. We compute the temperatures achieved with this scheme using an analytic T >> t approximation and, for low T, determinantal quantum Monte Carlo. We optimize the waist and depth of the focused beam, and we find that repulsive potentials cool better than attractive ones. We estimate that the time required for entropy transport under nearly adiabatic conditions at these low temperatures is compatible with the system lifetime. Finally, we explore further improvements to cooling enabled by sophisticated potential engineering, e.g. using a spatial light modulator. Work supported by CNPq.

  9. "Redistribution" Effect of Lumpy Zone for Gas Flow in BF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The gas flow from tuyere to raceway zone by blasting involves three distributional zones, such as dripping,cohesive, and lumpy zone. The gas flow distribution in lumpy zone directly affects the gas utilization ration and smooth operation in the blast furnace. However, the furnace closeness brings about great difficulty in the study of high-temperature gas flow. The charging and blasting system affecting the gas flow and whether the top gas flow distribution could reflect its inner condition as well as the furnace state, such as hanging or scaffolding, which have become the main problems for the research on gas flow. Recently, several researches overseas studied gas flow distribution using the numerical simulation method; however, such a research was rare amongst the natives. In this study, the flow model of gas in cohesive and lumpy zone was established using the numerical simulation software and the gas flow distributions with uniform distribution of burden permeability, scaffolding of wall, and nonuniform charge level were analyzed. As a result, the effects of cohesive zone and lower parts on the gas flow are very limited and the charge level largely affects the distribution of top gas flow. Therefore, it was found that the distribution of top gas flow could hardly reflect the inner gas flow. The process is called "redistribution" effect, which means that the gas flow after passing through the raceway, dripping, and cohesive zone is distributed when it flows into the lumpy zone.

  10. Puromycin induces SUMO and ubiquitin redistribution upon proteasome inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-07-29

    We have previously reported the co-localization of O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying a role for the ubiquitin family in sequestering OP-puromycylated immature polypeptides to the nucleus during impaired proteasome activity. Here, we found that as expected puromycin induced SUMO-1/2/3 accumulation with ubiquitin at multiple nuclear foci in HeLa cells when co-exposed to MG132. Co-administration of puromycin and MG132 also facilitated redistribution of PML and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 concurrently with SUMO-2/3. As removal of the drugs from the medium led to disappearance of the SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin nuclear foci, our findings indicated that nuclear assembly/disassembly of SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin was pharmacologically manipulable, supporting our previous observation on OP-Puro, which predicted the ubiquitin family function in sequestrating aberrant proteins to the nucleus. PMID:27181354

  11. Managing fleet capacity effectively under second-hand market redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillérou, Emmanuelle; Roudaut, Nolwenn; Guyader, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    Fishing capacity management policies have been traditionally implemented at national level with national targets for capacity reduction. More recently, capacity management policies have increasingly targeted specific fisheries. French fisheries spatially vary along the French coastline and are associated to specific regions. Capacity management policies, however, ignore the capital mobility associated with second-hand vessel trade between regions. This is not an issue for national policies but could limit the effectiveness of regional capacity management policies. A gravity model and a random-effect Poisson regression model are used to analyze the determinants and spatial extent of the second-hand market in France. This study is based on panel data from the French Atlantic Ocean between 1992 and 2009. The trade flows between trading partners is found to increase with their sizes and to be spatially concentrated. Despite the low trade flows between regions, a net impact analysis shows that fishing capacity is redistributed by the second-hand market to regions on the Channel and Aquitaine from central regions. National capacity management policies (constructions/destructions) have induced a net decrease in regional fleet capacity with varying magnitude across regions. Unless there is a change of policy instruments or their scale of implementation, the operation of the second-hand market decreases the effectiveness of regional capacity management policies in regions on the Channel and Aquitaine. PMID:23288614

  12. Managing fleet capacity effectively under second-hand market redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillérou, Emmanuelle; Roudaut, Nolwenn; Guyader, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    Fishing capacity management policies have been traditionally implemented at national level with national targets for capacity reduction. More recently, capacity management policies have increasingly targeted specific fisheries. French fisheries spatially vary along the French coastline and are associated to specific regions. Capacity management policies, however, ignore the capital mobility associated with second-hand vessel trade between regions. This is not an issue for national policies but could limit the effectiveness of regional capacity management policies. A gravity model and a random-effect Poisson regression model are used to analyze the determinants and spatial extent of the second-hand market in France. This study is based on panel data from the French Atlantic Ocean between 1992 and 2009. The trade flows between trading partners is found to increase with their sizes and to be spatially concentrated. Despite the low trade flows between regions, a net impact analysis shows that fishing capacity is redistributed by the second-hand market to regions on the Channel and Aquitaine from central regions. National capacity management policies (constructions/destructions) have induced a net decrease in regional fleet capacity with varying magnitude across regions. Unless there is a change of policy instruments or their scale of implementation, the operation of the second-hand market decreases the effectiveness of regional capacity management policies in regions on the Channel and Aquitaine.

  13. Emission redistribution from a quantum dot-bowtie nanoantenna

    CERN Document Server

    Regler, A; Lyamkina, A; Spiegl, M; Müller, K; Vuckovic, J; Finley, J J; Kaniber, M

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and simulation study of a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot coupled to a nearby ($\\sim 25nm$) plasmonic antenna. Micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy shows a $\\sim 2.4\\times$ increase of intensity, which is attributed to spatial far-field redistribution of the emission from the quantum dot-antenna system. Power-dependent studies show similar saturation powers of $2.5\\mu W$ for both coupled and uncoupled quantum dot emission in polarization-resolved measurements. Moreover, time-resolved spectroscopy reveals the absence of Purcell-enhancement of the quantum dot coupled to the antenna as compared to an uncoupled dot, yielding comparable exciton lifetimes of $\\tau\\sim0.5ns$. This observation is supported by numerical simulations, suggesting only minor Purcell-effects of $25nm$. The observed increased emission from a coupled quantum dot-plasmonic antenna system is found to be in good qualitative agreement with numerical simulations and will lead to a better understanding o...

  14. Interactive graphical tools for three-dimensional mesh redistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, L.A.

    1996-03-01

    Three-dimensional meshes modeling nonlinear problems such as sheet metal forming, metal forging, heat transfer during welding, the propagation of microwaves through gases, and automobile crashes require highly refined meshes in local areas to accurately represent areas of high curvature, stress, and strain. These locally refined areas develop late in the simulation and/or move during the course of the simulation, thus making it difficult to predict their exact location. This thesis is a systematic study of new tools scientists can use with redistribution algorithms to enhance the solution results and reduce the time to build, solve, and analyze nonlinear finite element problems. Participatory design techniques including Contextual Inquiry and Design were used to study and analyze the process of solving such problems. This study and analysis led to the in-depth understanding of the types of interactions performed by FEM scientists. Based on this understanding, a prototype tool was designed to support these interactions. Scientists participated in evaluating the design as well as the implementation of the prototype tool. The study, analysis, prototype tool design, and the results of the evaluation of the prototype tool are described in this thesis.

  15. Climate velocity and the future global redistribution of marine biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Molinos, Jorge; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Schoeman, David S.; Brown, Christopher J.; Kiessling, Wolfgang; Moore, Pippa J.; Pandolfi, John M.; Poloczanska, Elvira S.; Richardson, Anthony J.; Burrows, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Anticipating the effect of climate change on biodiversity, in particular on changes in community composition, is crucial for adaptive ecosystem management but remains a critical knowledge gap. Here, we use climate velocity trajectories, together with information on thermal tolerances and habitat preferences, to project changes in global patterns of marine species richness and community composition under IPCC Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5. Our simple, intuitive approach emphasizes climate connectivity, and enables us to model over 12 times as many species as previous studies. We find that range expansions prevail over contractions for both RCPs up to 2100, producing a net local increase in richness globally, and temporal changes in composition, driven by the redistribution rather than the loss of diversity. Conversely, widespread invasions homogenize present-day communities across multiple regions. High extirpation rates are expected regionally (for example, Indo-Pacific), particularly under RCP8.5, leading to strong decreases in richness and the anticipated formation of no-analogue communities where invasions are common. The spatial congruence of these patterns with contemporary human impacts highlights potential areas of future conservation concern. These results strongly suggest that the millennial stability of current global marine diversity patterns, against which conservation plans are assessed, will change rapidly over the course of the century in response to ocean warming.

  16. Ionization of galactic cosmic rays and high-energy particles in the ionosphere and atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellinov, P. I.; Mateev, L. N.

    This paper presents a new model for the ionization of cosmic rays in the atmosphere of Mars, based on an engineering model for the Martian atmosphere developed by Moroz et al. (1988). Based on the theoretical model, a computer program was developed in TURBO-PASCAL. The q(h) profiles (where q is the rate of electron production at a height h) at the minimum and the maximum of solar activity calculated for summer in the northern Martian atmosphere, and for winter in the southern hemisphere are presented.

  17. Redistribution of mobile surface charges of an oil droplet in water in applied electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengqi; Li, Dongqing

    2016-10-01

    Most researches on oil droplets immersed in aqueous solutions assume that the surface charges of oil droplets are, similar to that of solid particles, immobile and distributed uniformly under external electric field. However, the surface charges at the liquid-liquid interface are mobile and will redistribute under external electric field. This paper studies the redistribution of surface charges on an oil droplet under the influence of the external electrical field. Analytical expressions of the local zeta potential on the surface of an oil droplet after the charge redistribution in a uniform electrical field were derived. The effects of the initial zeta potential, droplet radius and strength of applied electric field on the surface charge redistribution were studied. In analogy to the mobile surface charges, the redistribution of Al2O3-passivated aluminum nanoparticles on the oil droplet surface was observed under applied electrical field. Experimental results showed that these nanoparticles moved and accumulated towards one side of the oil droplet under electric field. The redistribution of the nanoparticles is in qualitative agreement with the redistribution model of the mobile surface charges developed in this work.

  18. Measurement of the atmospheric νμ energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 200 TeV with the ANTARES telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced during cascades initiated by the interaction of primary cosmic rays with air nuclei. In this paper, a measurement of the atmospheric νμ + anti νμ energy spectrum in the energy range 0.1-200 TeV is presented, using data collected by the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope from 2008 to 2011. Overall, the measured flux is ∝25 % higher than predicted by the conventional neutrino flux, and compatible with the measurements reported in ice. The flux is compatible with a single power-law dependence with spectral index γmeas=3.58±0.12. With the present statistics the contribution of prompt neutrinos cannot be established. (orig.)

  19. Measurement of the atmospheric {nu}{sub {mu}} energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 200 TeV with the ANTARES telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ardid, M.; Larosa, G.; Martinez-Mora, J.A. [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Institut d' Investigacio per a la Gestio Integrada de les Zones Costaneres (IGIC), Gandia (Spain); Albert, A.; Drouhin, D.; Racca, C. [GRPHE - Institut universitaire de technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit, BP 50568, Colmar (France); Al Samarai, I.; Aubert, J.J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Carr, J.; Charif, Z.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Dornic, D.; Ernenwein, J.P.; Escoffier, S.; Lambard, E.; Riviere, C.; Vallee, C.; Yatkin, K. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Andre, M. [Technical University of Catalonia, Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics, Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Anghinolfi, M.; Sanguineti, M. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Anton, G.; Classen, F.; Eberl, T.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Fehn, K.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Geisselsoeder, S.; Geyer, K.; Gleixner, A.; Graf, K.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; James, C.W.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Sieger, C.; Spies, A.; Wagner, S. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Anvar, S.; Louis, F. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere - Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers - Service d' Electronique des Detecteurs et d' Informatique, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Astraatmadja, T.; Bogazzi, C.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Heijboer, A.J.; Jong, M. de; Michael, T.; Palioselitis, D.; Schulte, S.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Visser, E. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baret, B.; Bouhou, B.; Creusot, A.; Galata, S.; Kouchner, A.; Elewyck, V. van [Universite Paris Diderot, APC, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Paris (France); Barrios-Marti, J.; Bigongiari, C.; Emanuele, U.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.P.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Lambard, G.; Mangano, S.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Yepes, H.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zuniga, J. [CSIC - Universitat de Valencia, IFIC - Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Basa, S.; Marcelin, M.; Nezri, E. [Pole de l' Etoile Site de Chateau-Gombert, LAM - Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Biagi, S.; Fusco, L.A.; Giacomelli, G.; Margiotta, A.; Spurio, M. [INFN - Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy); Bruijn, R.; Decowski, M.P.; Wolf, E. de [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Capone, A.; De Bonis, G.; Fermani, P.; Perrina, C.; Simeone, F. [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Caramete, L.; Pavalas, G.E.; Popa, V. [Institute for Space Sciences, Bucharest (Romania); Carloganu, C.; Dumas, A.; Gay, P.; Guillard, G. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Cecchini, S.; Chiarusi, T. [INFN - Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Charvis, P.; Deschamps, A.; Hello, Y. [Universite Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Geoazur, CNRS/INSU, IRD, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Sophia Antipolis (France); Circella, M. [INFN - Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Dekeyser, I.; Lefevre, D.; Martini, S.; Robert, A.; Tamburini, C. [Aix-Marseille University, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO), Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Universite du Sud Toulon-Var, CNRS-INSU/IRD UM 110, La Garde Cedex (France); Distefano, C.; Lattuada, D.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Trovato, A. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS), Catania (Italy); Donzaud, C. [Universite Paris Diderot, APC, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Paris (France); Univ Paris-Sud, Orsay Cedex (France); Dorosti, Q.; Loehner, H. [University of Groningen, Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI), Groningen (Netherlands); Flaminio, V. [INFN - Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Pisa (Italy); Giordano, V. [INFN - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Haren, H. van [Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), ' t Horntje (Texel) (Netherlands); Kadler, M. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kooijman, P. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit Utrecht, Faculteit Betawetenschappen, Utrecht (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kreykenbohm, I.; Mueller, C.; Wilms, J. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Bamberg (Germany); Kulikovskiy, V. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D. [INFN - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Universita, Catania (IT); Loucatos, S.; Schuessler, F.; Stolarczyk, T.; Vallage, B.; Vernin, P. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (FR); Montaruli, T. [INFN - Sezione di Bari, Bari (IT); Universite de Geneve, Departement de Physique Nucleaire et Corpusculaire, Geneva (CH); Morganti, M. [INFN - Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (IT); Pradier, T. [Universite de Strasbourg et CNRS/IN2P3, IPHC-Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, Strasbourg Cedex 2 (FR); Rostovtsev, A. [ITEP - Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (RU); Samtleben, D.F.E. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (NL); Universiteit Leiden, Leids Instituut voor Onderzoek in Natuurkunde, Leiden (NL); Taiuti, M. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Genova (IT); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Genova (IT); Tayalati, Y. [University Mohammed I, Laboratory of Physics of Matter and Radiations, B.P. 717, Oujda (MA)

    2013-10-15

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced during cascades initiated by the interaction of primary cosmic rays with air nuclei. In this paper, a measurement of the atmospheric {nu}{sub {mu}} + anti {nu}{sub {mu}} energy spectrum in the energy range 0.1-200 TeV is presented, using data collected by the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope from 2008 to 2011. Overall, the measured flux is {proportional_to}25 % higher than predicted by the conventional neutrino flux, and compatible with the measurements reported in ice. The flux is compatible with a single power-law dependence with spectral index {gamma}{sub meas}=3.58{+-}0.12. With the present statistics the contribution of prompt neutrinos cannot be established. (orig.)

  20. A test of hypothetical hill-slope-gully-streambed soil redistribution model using fallout cs-137 a first use of the technique in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil degradation by water erosion, which is further responsible for sedimentation in the conveyance systems and reservoirs, is a matter of growing concern in Pakistan. Caesium-137, a fallout radioisotope produced from atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, has become a well-established radiotracer of soil movement. To assess the potential for application of caesium-137 as an indicator of soil erosion and sedimentation, a hypothetical hill slope-gully-streambed redistribution model was tested in Mangla Watershed, Pakistan, as a first use of the technique in the country. The results indicate that the soil redistribution along the different components follows the hypothetical model, with severe net soil loss (sheet erosion) at the hill-slope, no labeling of gully head, and high sedimentation on the streambed. The reference inventory of 137CS obtained by scraper plate (4380 Bq m-2 was in agreement with the mean value of bulk cores (i.e. 3945 +- 457 Bq m-2). The net soil loss along the hill slope estimated by the profile distribution model was 17.2 t ha-1 yr-l. The sedimentation rate in the main stream was more before the year 1974 (8 cm yr-l) than afterwards reducing to 5.9 cm yr-1 due to re-vegetation. The 137CS technique proved to be less time consuming in the provision of information on soil redistribution rates than direct measurement would have been and can be used to assess watershed management practices in Pakistan. (author)

  1. Atmospheric muons: experimental aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Cecchini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    We present a review of atmospheric muon flux and energy spectrum measurements over almost six decades of muon momentum. Sea-level and underground/water/ice experiments are considered. Possible sources of systematic errors in the measurements are examinated. The characteristics of underground/water muons (muons in bundle, lateral distribution, energy spectrum) are discussed. The connection between the atmospheric muon and neutrino measurements are also reported.

  2. Applying quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methodology for modeling postmortem redistribution of benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2014-06-01

    Postmortem redistribution (PMR) constitutes a multifaceted process, which complicates the interpretation of drug concentrations by forensic toxicologists. The present study aimed to apply quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis for modeling PMR data of structurally related drugs, 10 benzodiazepines and 10 tricyclic antidepressants. For benzodiazepines, an adequate QSAR model was obtained (R(2) = 0.98, Q(2) = 0.88, RMSEE = 0.12), in which energy, ionization and molecular size exerted significant impact. For tricyclic antidepressants, an adequate QSAR model with slightly inferior statistics (R(2) = 0.95, Q(2) = 0.87, RMSEE = 0.29) was established after exclusion of maprotiline, in which energy parameters, basicity character and lipophilicity exerted significant contribution. Thus, QSAR analysis could be used as a complementary tool to provide an informative illustration of the contributing molecular, physicochemical and structural properties in PMR process. However, the complexity, non-static and time-dependent nature of PMR endpoints raises serious concerns whether QSAR methodology could predict the degree of redistribution, highlighting the need for animal-derived PMR data.

  3. Lightning-driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: implications for ionisation-levels and neutral chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Rodger, C. J.; Enell, C.-F.; Turunen, E; M. A. Clilverd; Thomson, N. R.; Verronen, P. T.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Lightning-generated whistlers lead to coupling between the troposphere, the Van Allen radiation belts and the lower-ionosphere through Whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP). Lightning produced whistlers interact with cyclotron resonant radiation belt electrons, leading to pitch-angle scattering into the bounce loss cone and precipitation into the atmosphere. Here we consider the relative significance of WEP to the lower ionosphere and atmosphere by contrasting ...

  4. Analysis of climate change impacts on surface energy balance of Lake Huron (estimation of surface energy balance components: Remote sensing approach for water -- atmosphere parameterization)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petchprayoon, Pakorn

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the physical processes of energy exchange between the water surface and atmosphere of Lake Huron in order to explain the processes behind such changes in long-term water levels and to monitor their spatial and temporal fluctuations. The lake surface water temperature and the four components of surface energy balance, including net radiation, latent heat, sensible heat, and heat storage, as well as evaporation rate, were estimated using the daily remotely sensed data from eleven years (2002--2012) with a multi-spatial resolution of 1 km to 5 km using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board Terra satellite, together with in-situ measurements. The regression analysis of the entire lake daily mean water surface temperature revealed a positive trend of 0.1 °C per year, indicating that the lake surface temperature increased by 1.1°C during the period 2002-2012. The warming rate was found to be greatest in the deepest areas of the lake, with a statistically-significant correlation between warming rate and depth. The four components of surface energy balance showed temporal and spatial heterogeneities. There were strong seasonal patterns for all of the components, which were very high in summer and low in winter for net radiation and heat storage. In contrast, the latent heat and sensible heat were very high in the winter and very low in the summer. Approximately 70% of the annual mean 30 min evaporation occurred during the fall and winter seasons, whereas the lowest evaporation rate occurred in March, which was only 3% of the annual mean of 30 min evaporation. There was an increase in the evaporation rate of approximately 1.4 mm m-2 over the 2005--2012 observation period, the water level decreased by 0.04 m during the period 2002--2012, and there was a decrease in total water storage by 1.18 cm during the entire study period (2004--2012). There was obviously a negative correlation between lake

  5. Approximate formulation of redistribution in the Ly-alpha, Ly-beta, H-alpha system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J.; Ballagh, R. J.; Hubeny, I.

    1989-01-01

    Simple approximate formulas are given for the coupled redistribution of Ly-alpha, Ly-beta, and H-alpha, by using well-defined approximations to an essentially exact formulation. These formulas incorporate all the essential physics including Raman scattering, lower state radiative decay, and correlated terms representing emission during a collision which must be retained in order that the emission coefficients are properly behaved in the line wings. Approximate expressions for the appropriate line broadening parameters are collected. Finally, practical expressions for the source functions are given. These are formulated through newly introduced nonimpact redistribution functions, which are shown to be reasonably approximated by existing (ordinary and generalized) redistribution functions.

  6. A Case Study of the Impacts of Dust Aerosols on Surface Atmospheric Variables and Energy Budgets in a Semi-Arid Region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Xiao-Lu; GUO Wei-Dong; ZHANG Le; ZHANG Ren-Jian

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a case study investigatingthe impacts of dust aerosols on surface atmospheric variables and energy budgets in a semi-arid region of China.Enhanced observational meteorological data, radiative fluxes, near-surface heat fluxes, and concentrations of dust aerosols were collected from Tongyu station, one of the reference sites of the International Coordinated Energy and Water Cycle Observations Project (CEOP), during a typical dust storm event in June 2006. A comprehensive analysis of these data show that in this semi-arid area, higher wind velocities and a continuously reduced air pressure were identified during the dust storm period.Dust storm events are usually associated with low relative humidity weather conditions, which result in low latent heat flux values. Dust aerosols suspended in the air decrease the net radiation, mainly by reducing the direct solar radiation reaching the land surface. This reduction in net radiation results in a decrease in soil temperatures at a depth of 2 cm. The combination of increased air temperature and decreased soil temperature strengthens the energy exchange of the atmosphere-earth system, increasing the surface sensible heat flux. After the dust storm event,the atmosphere was dominated by higher pressures and was relatively wet and cold. Net radiation and latent heat flux show an evident increase, while the surface sensible heat flux shows a clear decrease.

  7. Forest fires as possible mechanism of redistribution of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systematic observations of radionuclide composition and concentration in the atmosphere have been carried out at the Institute of Physics in Vilnius since 1963. An increase in activity concentration of radionuclides in the atmosphere was observed after nuclear weapon tests and the Chernobyl NPP accident. At present the radiation situation in Lithuania is determined by two main sources of radionuclides, forest fire and resuspension products transferred from highly polluted region of the Ukraine and Belarus. This year the increase in activity concentration of 137Cs in the atmosphere was registered in many countries and in Lithuania as well. In this paper the analyses of the events of the increase activity concentration, metrological situation, speciation of radionuclides and mechanisms of formation and transformation of aerosol carriers of radionuclides are presented. (author)

  8. Towards Direct Numerical Simulation of mass and energy fluxes at the soil-atmospheric interface with advanced Lattice Boltzmann methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Krafczyk, Manfred; Geier, Martin; Schönherr, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of soil evaporation and of soil water content dynamics near the soil surface are critical in the physics of land-surface processes on many scales and are dominated by multi-component and multi-phase mass and energy fluxes between the ground and the atmosphere. Although it is widely recognized that both liquid and gaseous water movement are fundamental factors in the quantification of soil heat flux and surface evaporation, their computation has only started to be taken into account using simplified macroscopic models. As the flow field over the soil can be safely considered as turbulent, it would be natural to study the detailed transient flow dynamics by means of Large Eddy Simulation (LES [1]) where the three-dimensional flow field is resolved down to the laminar sub-layer. Yet this requires very fine resolved meshes allowing a grid resolution of at least one order of magnitude below the typical grain diameter of the soil under consideration. In order to gain reliable turbulence statistics, up to several hundred eddy turnover times have to be simulated which adds up to several seconds of real time. Yet, the time scale of the receding saturated water front dynamics in the soil is on the order of hours. Thus we are faced with the task of solving a transient turbulent flow problem including the advection-diffusion of water vapour over the soil-atmospheric interface represented by a realistic tomographic reconstruction of a real porous medium taken from laboratory probes. Our flow solver is based on the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) [2] which has been extended by a Cumulant approach similar to the one described in [3,4] to minimize the spurious coupling between the degrees of freedom in previous LBM approaches and can be used as an implicit LES turbulence model due to its low numerical dissipation and increased stability at high Reynolds numbers. The kernel has been integrated into the research code Virtualfluids [5] and delivers up to 30% of the

  9. Suprathermal electron energy spectrum and nonlocally affected plasma-wall interaction in helium/air micro-plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, V. I.; Adams, S. F.; Miles, J. A.; Koepke, M. E.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.

    2016-10-01

    Details of ground-state and excited-state neutral atoms and molecules in an atmospheric-pressure micro-discharge plasma may be obtained by plasma electron spectroscopy (PLES), based on a wall probe. The presence and transport of energetic (suprathermal) electrons, having a nonlocal origin, are responsible for electrostatic charging of the plasma boundary surfaces to potentials many times that associated with the ambient electron kinetic energy. The energy-flux distribution function is shown to be controllable for applications involving analysis of composition and processes taking place in a multiphase (plasma-gas-solid), chemically reactive, interaction region.

  10. Studies of velocity fluctuations in the lower atmosphere using the MU radar. I - Azimuthal anisotropy. II - Momentum fluxes and energy densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzandt, T. E.; Smith, S. A.; Tsuda, T.; Sato, T.; Fritts, D. C.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from a six-day campaign to observe velocity fluctuations in the lower atmosphere using the MU radar (Fukao et al., 1985) in Shigaraki, Japan in March, 1986. Consideration is given to the azimuthal anisotropy, the frequency spectra, the vertical profiles of energy density, and the momentum flux of the motion field. It is found that all of the observed azimuthal variations are probably caused by a gravity wave field whose parameters vary with time. The results show significant differences between the mean zonal and meridional frequency spectra and different profiles of mean energy density with height for different frequency bands and for zonal and meridional components.

  11. Novel approaches to understanding carbon redistribution at multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungait, Jennifer; Beniston, Joshua; Lal, Rattan; Horrocks, Claire; Collins, Adrian; Mariappen, Sankar; Quine, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    Established biogeochemical techniques are used to trace organic inputs typically derived directly or indirectly from plants into soils, sediments and water using lipid biomarkers. Recently, advances in bulk and compound specific stable 13C isotope analyses have provided novel ways of exploring the source and residence times of organic matter in soils using the natural abundance stable 13C isotope signature of C3 and C4 plant end member values. However, the application of biogeochemical source tracing technologies at the molecular level at field to catchment scales has been slow to develop because of perceived problems with dilution of molecular-scale signals. This paper describes the results of recent experiments in natural and agricultural environments in the UK (Collins et al., 2013; Dungait et al., 2013) and United States (Beniston et al., submitted) that have successfully applied new tracing techniques using stable 13C isotope and complementary approaches to explore the transport of sediment-bound organic carbon at a range of scales from the small plot (m2) to field (ha) and small catchment (10's ha). References Beniston et al (submitted) The effects of crop residue removal on soil erosion and macronutrient dynamics on soils under no till for 42 years. Biogeosciences Collins et al (2013) Catchment source contributions to the sediment-bound organic matter degrading salmonid spawning gravels in a lowland river, southern England. Science of the Total Environment 456-457, 181-195. Dungait et al (2013) Microbial responses to the erosional redistribution of soil organic carbon in arable fields. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 60, 195-201. Puttock et al (2012) Stable carbon isotope analysis of fluvial sediment fluxes over two contrasting C4-C3 semi-arid vegetation transitions. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 26, 2386-2392.

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1994 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2: Atmospheric and climate research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) occurs in conjunction with the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) and with the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) Program. Solicitations for proposals and peer review were used to select research projects for funding in FY 1995. Nearly all ongoing projects were brought to a close in FY 1994. Therefore, the articles in this volume include a summary of the long-term accomplishments as well as the FY 1994 progress made on these projects. The following articles present summaries of the progress in FY 1994 under these research tasks: continental and oceanic fate of pollutants; research aircraft operations; ASCOT program management; coupling/decoupling of synoptic and valley circulations; interactions between surface exchange processes and atmospheric circulations; and direct simulations of atmospheric turbulence. Climate change research at PNL is aimed at reducing uncertainties in the fundamental processes that control climate systems that currently prevent accurate predictions of climate change and its effects. PNL is responsible for coordinating and integrating the field and laboratory measurement programs, modeling studies, and data analysis activities of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program. In FY 1994, PNL scientists conducted 3 research projects under the ARM program. In the first project, the sensitivity of GCM grid-ad meteorological properties to subgrid-scale variations in surface fluxes and subgrid-scale circulation patterns is being tested in a single column model. In the second project, a new and computationally efficient scheme has been developed for parameterizing stratus cloud microphysics in general circulation models. In the last project, a balloon-borne instrument package is being developed for making research-quality measurements of radiative flux divergence profiles in the lowest 1,500 meters of the Earth`s atmosphere.

  13. Support for redistribution in Western Europe: Assessing the role of religion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegmüller, D.; Scheepers, P.L.H.; Rossteutscher, S.; Jong, E. de

    2012-01-01

    Previous sociological studies have paid little attention to religion as a central determinant of individual preferences for redistribution. In this article we argue that religious individuals, living in increasingly secular societies, differ in political preferences from their secular counterparts.

  14. Betwixt and between?: the European Union’s redistributive management of globalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Burgoon

    2010-01-01

    The European Union's (EU) management of globalization includes redistributing or compensating for distributional consequences of globalization, using policies at different levels of governance (national, regional-European and supra-European). This contribution analyzes the extent and politics of suc

  15. The chimera of redistribution: 'Black Economic Empowerment' (BEE) in the South African fishing industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ponte, Stefano; van Sittert, Lance

    2006-01-01

    Redistributive processes do not belong to the pantheon of Neo-liberalism. In this framework, inequality of resources can only be addressed by equality of opportunity. Even in ‘softer’ impersonations of Neo-liberalism, corporate (mis)behaviour is tamed by corporate social responsibility, not by state disciplinary action. Yet, in the context of post-apartheid South Africa, the state can not ignore political pressure for redistribution, even if only rhetorically. The process of Black Economic Em...

  16. Measurements and simulations of non-linear noise re-distribution in an SOA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Tromborg, Bjarne; Mørk, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    Measurements and statistical simulations demonstrate that a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) induces non-linear noise re-distribution with a strong power and bandwidth dependence. © 2004 Optical Society of America......Measurements and statistical simulations demonstrate that a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) induces non-linear noise re-distribution with a strong power and bandwidth dependence. © 2004 Optical Society of America...

  17. Comparison of noise redistribution in an SOA in pass-through and wavelength conversion mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Tromborg, Bjarne; Mørk, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    We use numerical simulations to investigate the redistribution of noise in a saturated SOA. A comparison of cross-gain modulation and self-modulation pass-through mode shows fundamental differences relevant to all-optical wavelength converters and regenerators.......We use numerical simulations to investigate the redistribution of noise in a saturated SOA. A comparison of cross-gain modulation and self-modulation pass-through mode shows fundamental differences relevant to all-optical wavelength converters and regenerators....

  18. Household perceptions towards a redistributive policy across health insurance funds in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chomi, Eunice; Mujinja, Phares; Hansen, Kristian Schultz;

    2015-01-01

    Background The Tanzanian health insurance system comprises multiple health insurance funds targeting different population groups but which operate in parallel, with no mechanisms for redistribution across the funds. Establishing such redistributive mechanisms requires public support, which...... data collected from a survey of 695 households relating to perceptions of household heads towards cross-subsidisation of the poor to enable them to access health services. Kruskal-Wallis test is used to compare perceptions by membership status. Generalized ordinal logistic regression models are used...

  19. Blood flow redistribution and ventilation-perfusion mismatch during embolic pulmonary arterial occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Burrowes, K. S.; Clark, A. R.; Tawhai, M.H

    2011-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism causes redistribution of blood in the lung, which impairs ventilation/perfusion matching and gas exchange and can elevate pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) by increasing pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). An anatomically-based multi-scale model of the human pulmonary circulation was used to simulate pre- and post-occlusion flow, to study blood flow redistribution in the presence of an embolus, and to evaluate whether reduction in perfused vascular bed is sufficient ...

  20. Rainfall redistribution and change of water quality in tropical forest canopies : patterns and persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Motivations and research objectives: During the passage of rain water through a forest canopy two main processes take place. First, water is redistributed; and second, its chemical properties change substantially. The rain water redistribution and the brief contact with plant surfaces results in a large variability of both throughfall and its chemical composition. Since throughfall and its chemistry influence a range of physical, chemical and biological processes at or below the forest floor ...

  1. Redistribution of heart failure as the cause of death: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, Michelle L.; Love, Shelly-Ann; Sorlie, Paul D.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Antini, Carmen; Metcalf, Patricia A.; Hardy, Shakia; Suchindran, Chirayath M; Shahar, Eyal; Heiss, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure is sometimes incorrectly listed as the underlying cause of death (UCD) on death certificates, thus compromising the accuracy and comparability of mortality statistics. Statistical redistribution of the UCD has been used to examine the effect of misclassification of the UCD attributed to heart failure, but sex- and race-specific redistribution of deaths on coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in the United States has not been examined. Methods We used coarsened exact...

  2. Spatial variation in hydraulic redistribution by the desert shrub, Sarcobatus vermiculatus, at multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, J. H.; Donovan, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    Passive water movement through roots from moist to dry soils, i.e. hydraulic redistribution, can be important for plant water status, vegetation water use, nutrient acquisition and cycling, and competition/facilitation among plant species. Although hydraulic redistribution is known from many species and habitats, little is known about how it varies at multiple spatial scales across species ranges. In the Mono Basin, California ecosystem we documented variation in hydraulic redistribution by the desert halophytic shrub, Sarcobatus vermiculatus, at three spatial scales: landscape, shrub-island versus interspace, and depth. Hydraulic redistribution varied among sites across the landscape. It was most prevalent at a low salinity site with deep groundwater (9.4 m), but of lower magnitude at more saline sites with shallower groundwater. At the low salinity site, infiltration from snowmelt, the predominant precipitation input, was confined to interspaces between shrub islands. Shrub-island soils remained very dry after snowmelt, even in a year with high total snow accumulation. Shrub-island soils, however, had substantial net increases in Ψsoil during week- to month-long periods in the early part of the growing season, concomitant with self-irrigated root growth into these dry soils, as documented with mini-rhizotrons. The source of this root-system-transported water was both moist interspace soils and moist deep soil layers. Wetting up of otherwise dry shrub-island soils is likely essential for nutrient mineralization and acquisition from trapped litter, making hydraulic redistribution an important driver of landscape-scale biogeochemical cycles in these saline basins. In addition, hydraulic redistribution buffered spatial variation in water availability among sites, depths, depth to groundwater, and for plants with different root distributions, such that plant Ψpredawn and Ψmidday differed little across the landscape. Multi-scale variation in hydraulic redistribution

  3. Redistribution of soil water by a saprotrophic fungus enhances carbon mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhr, Alexander; Borken, Werner; Spohn, Marie; Matzner, Egbert

    2015-11-24

    The desiccation of upper soil horizons is a common phenomenon, leading to a decrease in soil microbial activity and mineralization. Recent studies have shown that fungal communities and fungal-based food webs are less sensitive and better adapted to soil desiccation than bacterial-based food webs. One reason for a better fungal adaptation to soil desiccation may be hydraulic redistribution of water by mycelia networks. Here we show that a saprotrophic fungus (Agaricus bisporus) redistributes water from moist (-0.03 MPa) into dry (-9.5 MPa) soil at about 0.3 cm ⋅ min(-1) in single hyphae, resulting in an increase in soil water potential after 72 h. The increase in soil moisture by hydraulic redistribution significantly enhanced carbon mineralization by 2,800% and enzymatic activity by 250-350% in the previously dry soil compartment within 168 h. Our results demonstrate that hydraulic redistribution can partly compensate water deficiency if water is available in other zones of the mycelia network. Hydraulic redistribution is likely one of the mechanisms behind higher drought resistance of soil fungi compared with bacteria. Moreover, hydraulic redistribution by saprotrophic fungi is an underrated pathway of water transport in soils and may lead to a transfer of water to zones of high fungal activity. PMID:26554004

  4. Charge-state and element-resolved ion energies in the cathodic arc plasma from composite AlCr cathodes in argon, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Robert; Anders, André

    2014-01-01

    The energy distribution functions of ions in the cathodic arc plasma using composite AlCr cathodes were measured as a function of the background gas pressure in the range 0.5 to 3.5 Pa for different cathode compositions and gas atmospheres. The most abundant aluminium ions were Al$^{+}$ regardless of the background gas species, whereas Cr$^{2+}$ ions were dominating in Ar and N$_2$ and Cr$^{+}$ in O$_2$ atmospheres. The energy distributions of the aluminium and chromium ions typically consisted of a high energy fraction due to acceleration in the expanding plasma plume from the cathode spot and thermalised ions that were subjected to collisions in the plasma cloud. The fraction of the latter increased with increasing background gas pressure. Atomic nitrogen and oxygen ions showed similar energy distributions as the aluminium and chromium ions, whereas the argon and molecular nitrogen and oxygen ions were mainly thermalised. In addition to the positively charged metal and gas ions, negatively charged oxygen an...

  5. Energy Loss of Solar $p$ Modes due to the excitation of Magnetic Sausage Tube Waves: Importance of Coupling the Upper Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Gascoyne, Andrew; Hindman, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    We consider damping and absorption of solar $p$ modes due to their energy loss to magnetic tube waves that can freely carry energy out of the acoustic cavity. The coupling of $p$ modes and sausage tube waves is studied in a model atmosphere composed of a polytropic interior above which lies an isothermal upper atmosphere. The sausage tube waves, excited by $p$ modes, propagate along a magnetic fibril which is assumed to be a vertically aligned, stratified, thin magnetic flux-tube. The deficit of $p$-mode energy is quantified through the damping rate, $\\Gamma$ and absorption coefficient, $\\alpha$. The variation of $\\Gamma$ and $\\alpha$ as a function of frequency and the tube's plasma properties is studied in detail. Previous similar studies have considered only a subphotospheric layer, modelled as a polytrope that has been truncated at the photosphere (Bogdan et al. (1996), Hindman & Jain 2008, Gascoyne et al. (2011)). Such studies have found that the resulting energy loss by the $p$ modes is very sensitiv...

  6. Solute redistribution during phase separation of ternary Fe-Cu-Si alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, S. B.; Wang, W. L.; Xia, Z. C.; Wu, Y. H.; Wei, B.

    2015-06-01

    Ternary Fe48Cu48Si4 immiscible alloy was rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside a drop tube. Liquid phase separation took place in the alloy melt and led to the formation of various segregated structures. The core-shell structure consisting of Fe-rich and Cu-rich zones and the homogenously dispersed structure were the major structural morphologies. Phase field simulation results revealed that the two-layer core-shell was the final structure of liquid phase separation. The solute redistribution of liquid Fe48Cu48Si4 alloy experienced the macroscopic solute distribution induced by liquid phase separation, the secondary phase separation within the separated liquid phases and the solute trapping during rapid solidification. Energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis showed that the solute Si was enriched in the Fe-rich zone whereas depleted in the Cu-rich zone. In addition, both αFe and (Cu) phases in the Fe-rich zone exhibited a conspicuous solute trapping effect. As compared with (Cu) phase, αFe phase had a stronger affinity with solute Si.

  7. Demographic intermediation between development and population redistribution in Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, A A

    1983-12-01

    degrees and will depend on the pace of decline of each vital rate and the trend of migration. In conclusion, the regional patterns of population growth and redistribution are likely to be uneven in the foreseeable future, unless a genuine policy of regionalizing is effectively implemented. PMID:12312893

  8. Observations of Recent Arctic Sea Ice Volume Loss and Its Impact on Ocean-Atmosphere Energy Exchange and Ice Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, N. T.; Markus, T.; Farrell, S. L.; Worthen, D. L.; Boisvert, L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Using recently developed techniques we estimate snow and sea ice thickness distributions for the Arctic basin through the combination of freeboard data from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) and a snow depth model. These data are used with meteorological data and a thermodynamic sea ice model to calculate ocean-atmosphere heat exchange and ice volume production during the 2003-2008 fall and winter seasons. The calculated heat fluxes and ice growth rates are in agreement with previous observations over multiyear ice. In this study, we calculate heat fluxes and ice growth rates for the full distribution of ice thicknesses covering the Arctic basin and determine the impact of ice thickness change on the calculated values. Thinning of the sea ice is observed which greatly increases the 2005-2007 fall period ocean-atmosphere heat fluxes compared to those observed in 2003. Although there was also a decline in sea ice thickness for the winter periods, the winter time heat flux was found to be less impacted by the observed changes in ice thickness. A large increase in the net Arctic ocean-atmosphere heat output is also observed in the fall periods due to changes in the areal coverage of sea ice. The anomalously low sea ice coverage in 2007 led to a net ocean-atmosphere heat output approximately 3 times greater than was observed in previous years and suggests that sea ice losses are now playing a role in increasing surface air temperatures in the Arctic.

  9. Laser cooling of dense atomic gases by collisional redistribution of radiation and spectroscopy of molecular dimers in a dense buffer gas environment

    CERN Document Server

    Saß, Anne; Christopoulos, Stavros; Knicker, Katharina; Moroshkin, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We study laser cooling of atomic gases by collisional redistribution of fluorescence. In a high pressure buffer gas regime, frequent collisions perturb the energy levels of alkali atoms, which allows for the absorption of a far red detuned irradiated laser beam. Subsequent spontaneous decay occurs close to the unperturbed resonance frequency, leading to a cooling of the dense gas mixture by redistribution of fluorescence. Thermal deflection spectroscopy indicates large relative temperature changes down to and even below room temperature starting from an initial cell temperature near 700 K. We are currently performing a detailed analysis of the temperature distribution in the cell. As we expect this cooling technique to work also for molecular-noble gas mixtures, we also present initial spectroscopic experiments on alkali-dimers in a dense buffer gas surrounding.

  10. Energetic particle precipitation in ECHAM5/MESSy1 – Part 1: Downward transport of upper atmospheric NOx produced by low energy electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Brühl

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1 has been extended by processes that parameterize particle precipitation. Several types of particle precipitation that directly affect NOy and HOx concentrations in the middle atmosphere are accounted for and discussed in a series of papers. In the companion paper, the ECHAM5/MESSy1 solar proton event parameterization is discussed, while in the current paper we focus on low energy electrons (LEE that produce NOx in the upper atmosphere. For the flux of LEE NOx into the top of the model domain a novel technique which can be applied to most atmospheric chemistry general circulation models has been developed and is presented here. The technique is particularly useful for models with an upper boundary between the stratopause and mesopause and therefore cannot directly incorporate upper atmospheric NOx production. The additional NOx source parametrization is based on a measure of geomagnetic activity, the Ap index, which has been shown to be a good proxy for LEE NOx interannual variations. HALOE measurements of LEE NOx that has been transported into the stratosphere are used to develop a scaling function which yields a flux of NOx that is applied to the model top. We describe the implementation of the parameterization as the submodel SPACENOX in ECHAM5/MESSy1 and discuss the results from test simulations. The NOx enhancements and associated effects on ozone are shown to be in good agreement with independent measurements. Ap index data is available for almost one century, thus the parameterization is suitable for simulations of the recent climate.

  11. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...... localities of tensions between matter and the immaterial, the practical and the ideal, and subject and object. In the colloquial language there can, moreover, often seem to be something authentic or genuine about atmosphere, juxtaposing it to staging, which is implied to be something simulated or artificial....... This introduction seeks to outline how a number of scholars have addressed the relationship between staged atmospheres and experience, and thus highlight both the philosophical, social and political aspects of atmospheres...

  12. Simulation of infiltration and redistribution of intense rainfall using Land Surface Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Anna; Verhoef, Anne; Cloke, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    Flooding from intense rainfall (FFIR) can cause widespread damage and disruption. Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models provide distributed information about atmospheric conditions, such as precipitation, that can lead to a flooding event. Short duration, high intensity rainfall events are generally poorly predicted by NWP models, because of the high spatiotemporal resolution required and because of the way the convective rainfall is described in the model. The resolution of NWP models is ever increasing. Better understanding of complex hydrological processes and the effect of scale is important in order to improve the prediction of magnitude and duration of such events, in the context of disaster management. Working as part of the NERC SINATRA project, we evaluated how the Land Surface Model (LSM) components of NWP models cope with high intensity rainfall input and subsequent infiltration problems. Both in terms of the amount of water infiltrated in the soil store, as well as the timing and the amount of surface and subsurface runoff generated. The models investigated are SWAP (Soil Water Air Plant, Alterra, the Netherlands, van Dam 1997), JULES (Joint UK Land Environment Simulator a component of Unified Model in UK Met Office, Best et al. 2011) and CHTESSEL (Carbon and Hydrology- Tiled ECMWF Scheme for Surface Exchanges over Land, Balsamo et al. 2009) We analysed the numerical aspects arising from discontinuities (or sharp gradients) in forcing and/or the model solution. These types of infiltration configurations were tested in the laboratory (Vachaud 1971), for some there are semi-analytical solutions (Philip 1957, Parlange 1972, Vanderborght 2005) or reference numerical solutions (Haverkamp 1977, van Dam 2000, Vanderborght 2005). The maximum infiltration by the surface, Imax, is in general dependent on atmospheric conditions, surface type, soil type, soil moisture content θ, and surface orographic factor σ. The models used differ in their approach to

  13. Pluto's Atmosphere Does Not Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Olkin, C B; Borncamp, D; Pickles, A; Sicardy, B; Assafin, M; Bianco, F B; Buie, M W; de Oliveira, A Dias; Gillon, M; French, R G; Gomes, A Ramos; Jehin, E; Morales, N; Opitom, C; Ortiz, J L; Maury, A; Norbury, M; Ribas, F B; Smith, R; Wasserman, L H; Young, E F; Zacharias, M; Zacharias, N

    2013-01-01

    Combining stellar occultation observations probing Pluto's atmosphere from 1988 to 2013 and models of energy balance between Pluto's surface and atmosphere, we conclude that Pluto's atmosphere does not collapse at any point in its 248-year orbit. The occultation results show an increasing atmospheric pressure with time in the current epoch, a trend present only in models with a high thermal inertia and a permanent N2 ice cap at Pluto's north rotational pole.

  14. Atmospheric sciences transfer between research advances and energy-policy assessments (ASTRAEA). Final report, 1 April 1996--31 December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slinn, W.G.N.

    1997-12-10

    Consistent with the prime goal of the ASTRAEA project, as given in its peer-reviewed proposal, this final report is an informal report to DOE managers about a perceived DOE management problem, specifically, lack of vision in DOE`s Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). After presenting a review of relevant, current literature, the author suggests a framework for conceiving new visions for ACP, namely, multidisciplinary research for energy policy, tackling tough (e.g., nonlinear) problems as a team, ahead of political curves. Two example visions for ACP are then described, called herein the CITIES Project (the Comprehensive Inventory of Trace Inhalants from Energy Sources Project) and the OCEAN Project (the Ocean-Circulation Energy-Aerosol Nonlinearities Project). Finally, the author suggests methods for DOE to provide ACP with needed vision.

  15. TREATMENT OF METALS, POLYMER FILMS, AND FABRICS WITH A ONE ATMOSPHERE UNIFORM GLOW DISCHARGE PLASMA (OAUGDP) FOR INCREASED SURFACE ENERGY AND DIRECTIONAL ETCHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Reece Roth; Z.Y. Chen; Peter P.- Y. Tsai

    2001-01-01

    Direct exposure of samples to the active species of air generated by a One AtmosphereUniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OA UGDP) has been used to etch and to increasethe surface energy of metallic surfaces, photoresist, polymer films, and nonwoven fab-rics. The OAUGDP is a non-thermal plasma with the classical characteristics of aDC normal glow discharge that operates in air (and other gases) at atmospheric pres-sure. Neither a vacuum system nor batch processing is necessary. A wide range ofapplications to metals, photoresist, films, fabrics, and polymeric webs can be accom-modated by direct exposure of the workpiece to the plasma in parallel-plate reactors.This technology is simple, it produces effects that can be obtained in no other way atone atmosphere; it generates minimal pollutants or unwanted by-products; and it issuitable for individual sample or online treatment of metallic surfaces, wafers, films.and fabrics.``Early exposures of solid materials to the OA UGDP required minutes to produce rela-tively small increases of surface energy. These durations appeared too long for com-mercial application to fast-moving webs. Recent improvements in OA UGDP gas com-position, power density, plasma quality, recirculating gas flow, and impedance match-ing of the power supply to the parallel plate plasma reactor have made it possible toraise the surface energy ofa variety of polymeric webs (PP, PET, PE, etc.) to levels of60 to 70 dynes/crn with one second of exposure. In air plasmas, the high surface ener-gies are not durable, and fall to 50 dynes/em after periods of weeks to months. Here.we report the exposure of metallic surfaces, photoresist, polymeric films, and nonwo-ven fabrics made of PP and PET to an impedance matched parallel plate OA UGDPfor durations ranging from one second to several tens of seconds. Data will be re-ported on the surface energy, wettability, wickability, and aging effect of polymericfilms and fabrics as functions of time of exposure, and time

  16. Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis for single-particle analysis and its application for characterizing atmospheric aerosol particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shila Maskey; Chul-Un Ro

    2011-02-01

    An energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA) technique using an energy-dispersive X-ray detector with an ultra-thin window, designated as low-Z particle EPMA, has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA allows the quantitative determination of concentrations of low-Z elements such as C, N and O, as well as higher-Z elements that can be analysed by conventional ED-EPMA. The quantitative determination of low-Z elements (using full Monte Carlo simulations, from the electron impact to the X-ray detection) in individual particles has improved the applicability of single-particle analysis, especially in atmospheric environmental aerosol research; many environmentally important atmospheric particles, e.g. sulphates, nitrates, ammonium and carbonaceous particles, contain low-Z elements. To demonstrate its practical applicability, the application of the low-Z particle EPMA for the characterization of Asian Dust, urban and subway aerosol particles is shown herein. In addition, it is demonstrated that the Monte Carlo calculation can also be applied in a quantitative single-particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), showing that the technique is useful and reliable for the characterization of submicron aerosol particles

  17. High Energy Laser Beam Propagation in the Atmosphere: The Integral Invariants of the Nonlinear Parabolic Equation and the Method of Moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    The method of moments is used to define and derive expressions for laser beam deflection and beam radius broadening for high-energy propagation through the Earth s atmosphere. These expressions are augmented with the integral invariants of the corresponding nonlinear parabolic equation that describes the electric field of high-energy laser beam to propagation to yield universal equations for the aforementioned quantities; the beam deflection is a linear function of the propagation distance whereas the beam broadening is a quadratic function of distance. The coefficients of these expressions are then derived from a thin screen approximation solution of the nonlinear parabolic equation to give corresponding analytical expressions for a target located outside the Earth s atmospheric layer. These equations, which are graphically presented for a host of propagation scenarios, as well as the thin screen model, are easily amenable to the phase expansions of the wave front for the specification and design of adaptive optics algorithms to correct for the inherent phase aberrations. This work finds application in, for example, the analysis of beamed energy propulsion for space-based vehicles.

  18. Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S

    2010-01-01

    At the dawn of the first discovery of exoplanets orbiting sun-like stars in the mid-1990s, few believed that observations of exoplanet atmospheres would ever be possible. After the 2002 Hubble Space Telescope detection of a transiting exoplanet atmosphere, many skeptics discounted it as a one-object, one-method success. Nevertheless, the field is now firmly established, with over two dozen exoplanet atmospheres observed today. Hot Jupiters are the type of exoplanet currently most amenable to study. Highlights include: detection of molecular spectral features; observation of day-night temperature gradients; and constraints on vertical atmospheric structure. Atmospheres of giant planets far from their host stars are also being studied with direct imaging. The ultimate exoplanet goal is to answer the enigmatic and ancient question, "Are we alone?" via detection of atmospheric biosignatures. Two exciting prospects are the immediate focus on transiting super Earths orbiting in the habitable zone of M-dwarfs, and u...

  19. Sensitivity of the Tropical Atmosphere Energy Balance to ENSO-Related SST Changes: How Well Can We Quantify Hydrologic and Radiative Responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Fitzjarrald, Dan; Sohn, Byung-Ju; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The continuing debate over feedback mechanisms governing tropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and tropical climate in general has highlighted the diversity of potential checks and balances within the climate system. Competing feedbacks due to changes in surface evaporation, water vapor, and cloud long- and shortwave radiative properties each may serve critical roles in stabilizing or destabilizing the climate system. It is also intriguing that even those climate variations having origins internal to the climate system-- changes in ocean heat transport for example, apparently require complementary equilibrating effects by changes in atmospheric energy fluxes. Perhaps the best observational evidence of this is the relatively invariant nature of tropically averaged net radiation exiting the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) as measured by broadband satellite sensors over the past two decades. Thus, analyzing how these feedback mechanisms are operating within the context of current interannual variability may offer considerable insight for anticipating future climate change. In this paper we focus on how fresh water and radiative fluxes over the tropical oceans change during ENSO warm and cold events and how these changes affect the tropical energy balance. At present, ENSO remains the most prominent known mode of natural variability at interannual time scales. Although great advances have been made in understanding this phenomenon and realizing prediction skill over the past decade, our ability to document the coupled water and energy changes observationally and to represent them in climate models seems far from settled (Soden, 2000 J Climate). Our analysis makes use a number of data bases, principally those derived from space-based measurements, to explore systematic changes in rainfall, evaporation, and surface and top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes, A reexamination of the Langley 8-Year Surface Radiation Budget data set reveals errors in the surface longwave

  20. Articulating Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily...... experience in space, presented as middle ground experience. In the field of HCI, middle ground experiences complete the unarticulated spectrum between designing for foreground of attention or background awareness. When “Articulating Atmospheres through Middle Ground Experiences in Interaction Design...

  1. Pluto's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne CCD photometer observations of Pluto's June 9, 1988 stellar occultation have yielded an occultation lightcurve, probing two regions on the sunrise limb 2000 km apart, which reveals an upper atmosphere overlying an extinction layer with an abrupt upper boundary. The extinction layer may surround the entire planet. Attention is given to a model atmosphere whose occultation lightcurve closely duplicates observations; fits of the model to the immersion and emersion lightcurves exhibit no significant derived atmosphere-structure differences. Assuming a pure methane atmosphere, surface pressures of the order of 3 microbars are consistent with the occultation data. 43 references

  2. Atmospheric electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, J Alan

    1957-01-01

    Atmospheric Electricity brings together numerous studies on various aspects of atmospheric electricity. This book is composed of 13 chapters that cover the main problems in the field, including the maintenance of the negative charge on the earth and the origin of the charges in thunderstorms. After a brief overview of the historical developments of atmospheric electricity, this book goes on dealing with the general principles, results, methods, and the MKS system of the field. The succeeding chapters are devoted to some aspects of electricity in the atmosphere, such as the occurrence and d

  3. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Soil Redistribution in a Heterogeneous Shrub Dominated Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pelt, R. S.; Zobeck, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Redistribution of soil by wind results when the erosive force of the wind impacts bare, susceptible soil surfaces. In semi-arid and arid environments, many grasslands with protected surfaces are being replaced by heterogeneous shrub communities with bare, susceptible soil surfaces between the individual shrubs. The development of nutrient islands and the increases of fugitive dust in these areas is indicative of increases of soil redistribution, but few quantitative measurements have been made to date. We fenced three 1 ha areas in an approximately 100 ha coppice dune area of southeast New Mexico dominated by shinnery oak, sand sage, and mesquite and installed a 4 X 4 grid of MWAC sampler masts spaced at 20 m from each other. Weather data were collected at an automated weather station in each of the fenced areas. We found the patterns of soil redistribution to be highly variable in space and time. Differences in vegetation patterns and wind fields were noted among the plots for the same discrete time period that could explain some of the spatial variability. We also noted seasonality of wind fields that accounted for the temporally variable spatial patterns of soil redistribution. We conclude that accurate measurement of soil redistribution patterns in a heterogeneous shrub community requires a very large number of samplers and a long period of study and we believe that net soil loss from an area is limited to fine dust emissions.

  4. Phenomenology of atmospheric neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedynitch Anatoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of astrophysical neutrinos, certainly a break-through result, introduced new experimental challenges and fundamental questions about acceleration mechanisms of cosmic rays. On one hand IceCube succeeded in finding an unambiguous proof for the existence of a diffuse astrophysical neutrino flux, on the other hand the precise determination of its spectral index and normalization requires a better knowledge about the atmospheric background at hundreds of TeV and PeV energies. Atmospheric neutrinos in this energy range originate mostly from decays of heavy-flavor mesons, which production in the phase space relevant for prompt leptons is uncertain. Current accelerator-based experiments are limited by detector acceptance and not so much by the collision energy. This paper recaps phenomenological aspects of atmospheric leptons and calculation methods, linking recent progress in flux predictions with particle physics at colliders, in particular the Large Hadron Collider.

  5. A modelling approach to carbon, water and energy feedbacks and interactions across the land-atmosphere interface.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Timothy. C.

    2007-01-01

    The climate is changing and the rate of this change is expected to increase. In the 20th century global surface temperatures rose by 0.6 (±0.2) K. Based on current model predictions, and economic forecasts, global temperature increases of 1.4 to 5.8 K are expected over the period 1990 – 2100. One of the main drivers for this temperature increase is the build up of CO2 in the atmosphere which has been increasing since pre-industrial times. Pre-industrial concentrations of CO2 were bounded betw...

  6. Dynamic Operation of HT-PEFC: in-operando imaging of phosphoric acid profiles and (re)distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Eberhardt, S H; Toulec, M; Marone, F.; Stampanoni, M.; Buchi, F N; Schmidt, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron based X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) is used for imaging and quantifying the redistribution of phosphoric acid (PA) in high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells (HT-PEFC) in-operando. The main focus of this work is the redistribution of phosphoric acid under dynamic load conditions. Therefore, two different load cycling protocols were applied and the transient redistribution within the fuel cell components was imaged. XTM, for the first time, revealed that the examined P...

  7. Experimental Study of the Redistribution of Welding Distortion According to the Partial Removal of Welded Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Rae; Wang, Chao; Kim, Jae Woong [Yeungnam University, Kyungsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    During the welding process, welding distortion is caused by the non-uniformity of the temperature distribution in the weldment. Welding distortion is redistributed because the residual stress and rigidity change according to the removal of the welded structure. In shipbuilding in particular, this phenomenon may be observed during the cutting process of lugs that are attached to blocks for transfer. The redistribution of welding distortion also causes problems, such as damage to the cutting tool. The aim of this study is to experimentally analyze the redistribution of welding distortion because of the partial removal of the welded structure. In the experiments conducted in this study, fillet welding and cutting were performed, and longitudinal bending and angular distortion in the welded structures were then investigated and analyzed.

  8. In-situ neutron diffraction measurement of stress redistribution in a dissimilar joint during heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodge, M.F., E-mail: michael.dodge@twi.co.uk [TWI Ltd., Great Abington, Cambridge CB21 6AL (United Kingdom); Gittos, M.F. [TWI Ltd., Great Abington, Cambridge CB21 6AL (United Kingdom); Dong, H. [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Zhang, S.Y.; Kabra, S.; Kelleher, J.F. [ISIS, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-11

    Neutron diffraction is routinely used to monitor stress redistribution before and after heat treatment in dissimilar joints. However there remains a paucity of information concerning the evolution of strain throughout the process of heat treatment itself. Due to different mechanical properties between opposing sides, a competitive strain redistribution process occurs. Consequently, a novel in-situ measurement approach has been developed: strains at multiple points in a dissimilar joint have been measured during heat treatment. Thus, the described work elucidates areas within the thermal cycle in which competitive strain redistribution occurs, and where high residual stresses remain, following PWHT. The method may be used to characterise comparable material combinations, with a view to optimising the thermal cycles, and ultimately, the structural integrity of dissimilar joints.

  9. In-situ neutron diffraction measurement of stress redistribution in a dissimilar joint during heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron diffraction is routinely used to monitor stress redistribution before and after heat treatment in dissimilar joints. However there remains a paucity of information concerning the evolution of strain throughout the process of heat treatment itself. Due to different mechanical properties between opposing sides, a competitive strain redistribution process occurs. Consequently, a novel in-situ measurement approach has been developed: strains at multiple points in a dissimilar joint have been measured during heat treatment. Thus, the described work elucidates areas within the thermal cycle in which competitive strain redistribution occurs, and where high residual stresses remain, following PWHT. The method may be used to characterise comparable material combinations, with a view to optimising the thermal cycles, and ultimately, the structural integrity of dissimilar joints

  10. Experimental Study of the Redistribution of Welding Distortion According to the Partial Removal of Welded Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the welding process, welding distortion is caused by the non-uniformity of the temperature distribution in the weldment. Welding distortion is redistributed because the residual stress and rigidity change according to the removal of the welded structure. In shipbuilding in particular, this phenomenon may be observed during the cutting process of lugs that are attached to blocks for transfer. The redistribution of welding distortion also causes problems, such as damage to the cutting tool. The aim of this study is to experimentally analyze the redistribution of welding distortion because of the partial removal of the welded structure. In the experiments conducted in this study, fillet welding and cutting were performed, and longitudinal bending and angular distortion in the welded structures were then investigated and analyzed

  11. Redistribution of carbon atoms in Pt substrate for high quality monolayer graphene synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-dimensional material graphene shows its extraordinary potential in many application fields. As the most effective method to synthesize large-area monolayer graphene, chemical vapor deposition has been well developed; however, it still faces the challenge of a high occurrence of multilayer graphene, which causes the small effective area of monolayer graphene. This phenomenon limits its applications in which only a big size of monolayer graphene is needed. In this paper, by introducing a redistribution stage after the decomposition of carbon source gas to redistribute the carbon atoms dissolved in Pt foils, the number of multilayer flakes on the monolayer graphene decreases. The mean area of monolayer graphene can be extended to about 16 000 μm2, which is eight times larger than that of the graphene grown without the redistribution stage. A Raman spectrograph is used to demonstrate the high quality of the monolayer graphene grown by the improved process. (semiconductor materials)

  12. Algorithm for Resource Redistribution Required for Recovery of Society after Large Scale Disasters

    CERN Document Server

    Lubashevskiy, Vasily; Furuta, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The recovery of society after a large scale disaster generally consists of two phases, short- and long-term recoveries. The problem of short-term recovery is rather close to the problem of resilience in their goal, namely, bouncing the damaged system back to the operating standards. The present paper proposes an algorithm for the vital resource redistribution required for implementation of the short-term recovery. The developed model is based on the cooperative interaction of cities during the resource redistribution, ordering the cities according to their priority in resource delivery, and a generating a semi-optimal plan for the desired redistribution. Nonlinear effects caused by the city limit capacities are taken into account. Two types of systems, "uniform" and "centralized", are studied numerically. In particular it is demonstrated that the cooperation effects are able to shorten substantially the duration of the process required for its implementation.

  13. A Generalized Kawasaki-Type Dynamics with Spin-Pair Redistribution Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱建阳; 朱涵

    2002-01-01

    We generalize Kawasaki's dynamics, spin-pair exchange mechanism, to a spin-pair redistribution mechanism,and we present a normalized redistribution probability. As an application, we treat the one-dimensional kinetic Gaussian model and obtain the exact diffusion equation and the temperature-dependent diffusion coefficient. We find that the diffusion process can slow down infinitely near the critical point and obtain the critical dynamic exponent z = 2 that is independent of the assumed mechanism, either Glauber-type or Kawasaki-type.

  14. INFLUENCE OF CARBON CONTENT OF MARTENSITE STEELS ON HARDNESS RE-DISTRIBUTION NEAR WORN SURFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.P. Ma

    2002-01-01

    After three-body abrasion, the hardness re-distribution near the worn surface has aclose relationship with the carbon content of martensite steel. It is considered thatthere is a competition between the work-hardening and the temper softening, whichresults from deformation and friction heat of material. When the carbon content ofmartensite steel is below about 0.6%, the subsurface hardness distribution of materialis a softened layer sandwiched between two hardened layers, but above 0.6%C, nosoftened region appears on the hardness re-distribution curve.

  15. Extensions to decomposition of the redistributive effect of health care finance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hai

    2009-10-01

    The total redistributive effect (RE) of health-care finance has been decomposed into vertical, horizontal and reranking effects. The vertical effect has been further decomposed into tax rate and tax structure effects. We extend this latter decomposition to the horizontal and reranking components of the RE. We also show how to measure the vertical, horizontal and reranking effects of each component of the redistributive system, allowing analysis of the RE of health-care finance in the context of that system. The methods are illustrated with application to the RE of health-care financing in Canada.

  16. A new generalization of the proportional conflict redistribution rule stable in terms of decision

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, we present and discuss a new generalized proportional conflict redistribution rule. The Dezert-Smarandache extension of the Demster-Shafer theory has relaunched the studies on the combination rules especially for the management of the conflict. Many combination rules have been proposed in the last few years. We study here different combination rules and compare them in terms of decision on didactic example and on generated data. Indeed, in real applications, we need a reliable decision and it is the final results that matter. This chapter shows that a fine proportional conflict redistribution rule must be preferred for the combination in the belief function theory.

  17. Effect of muon-nuclear inelastic scattering on high-energy atmospheric muon spectrum at large depth underwater

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Lokhtin, K S; Takahashi, N

    2007-01-01

    The energy spectra of hadron cascade showers produced by the cosmic ray muons travelling through water as well as the muon energy spectra underwater at the depth up to 4 km are calculated with two models of muon inelastic scattering on nuclei, the recent hybrid model (two-component, 2C) and the well-known generalized ector-meson-dominance model for the comparison. The 2C model involves photonuclear interactions at low and moderate virtualities as well as the hard scattering including the weak neutral current processes. For the muon scattering off nuclei substantial uclear effects, shadowing, nuclear binding and Fermi motion of nucleons are taken into account. It is shown that deep nderwater muon energy spectrum calculated with the 2C model are noticeably distorted at energies above 100 TeV as compared to that obtained with the GVMD model.

  18. Jerks as Guiding Influences on the Global Environment: Effects on the Solid Earth, Its Angular Momentum and Lithospheric Plate Motions, the Atmosphere, Weather, and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J. M.; Leybourne, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    Jerks are thought to be the result of torques applied at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) caused by either of two possible processes, working together or separately: 1) Electromagnetic Induction and 2) Mechanical Slippage. In the first case, it is thought that electromagnetic energy slowly builds-up at the CMB, reaches some critical level, and is then suddenly released, causing a geomagneticly induced torque at the CMB due to the differential electrical conductivity between the lower mantle and the surface of the outer core. The second case is driven by stress and strain increases that buildup mechanical potential energy, which is released when a critical level is reached, thereby generating a torque at the CMB. Generally, a trigger is required to start the Jerk process in motion. In the electromagnetic case, it is suggested that energy from the Sun may supply the requisite energy buildup that is subsequently released by a magnetic storm trigger, for instance. In the case of mechanical slippage, bari-center motion among the Earth, Moon, and Sun, as well as tidal forces and mass redistributions through Earth's wobbles combine to provide the accumulated stress/strain buildup and subsequent trigger. The resulting fluid flow changes at the CMB result in geomagnetic field changes and Joule heating throughout the solid Earth, its oceans, and atmosphere. It is shown that the Global Temperature Anomaly (GTA), which is measured at Earth's surface, correlates with changes in the geomagnetic non-dipole moment, and thus with core fluid motions. This links Global Warming and weather with core processes, important examples being the 1930's Dust Bowl Era and the 1947 Impulse. The CMB torque also affects Earth's angular momentum. But it appears that magnetic storms can as well. As a consequence, the Jet Stream, atmospheric circulation patterns, and the Global Oscillation System (i.e., El-Nino/Southern-Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, the Pacific Decade Oscillation, etc.) are

  19. The calculation of vibrational populations of O2 Herzberg states in the atmospheres of terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, Andrey S.

    The calculated quenching rate constants of the c1, A'3, A3 states of O2 by molecules in [Kirillov, 2014, Chem. Phys. Lett., v.592, p.103] are applied in the simulation of vibrational populations of the Herzberg states in the nightglow of upper atmosphere of Venus and Mars where carbon dioxide is the main gas and in the mixture of molecular oxygen with CO2, CO, N2 gases for laboratory conditions. The results of the simulation show very important role of electronic-vibrational (EV) energy transfer processes in the redistribution of electronic excitation energy on vibrational levels of the states. The main aim of the simulation is an attempt to explain the high intensities of the Herzberg II band system observed in laboratory experiments with high CO2 concentrations [Lawrence et al., 1977, Science, v.195, p.573; Slanger, 1978, J. Chem. Phys., v.69, p.4779] and registered with spacecraft spectrometers in the nightglow of the Venus atmosphere [Krasnopolsky et al., 1977, Cosmic Res., v.14, p.687; Gerard et al., 2013, Icarus, v.223, p.602].

  20. Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Fortney, Jonathan; Barman, Travis

    2014-01-01

    The study of exoplanetary atmospheres is one of the most exciting and dynamic frontiers in astronomy. Over the past two decades ongoing surveys have revealed an astonishing diversity in the planetary masses, radii, temperatures, orbital parameters, and host stellar properties of exoplanetary systems. We are now moving into an era where we can begin to address fundamental questions concerning the diversity of exoplanetary compositions, atmospheric and interior processes, and formation histories, just as have been pursued for solar system planets over the past century. Exoplanetary atmospheres provide a direct means to address these questions via their observable spectral signatures. In the last decade, and particularly in the last five years, tremendous progress has been made in detecting atmospheric signatures of exoplanets through photometric and spectroscopic methods using a variety of space-borne and/or ground-based observational facilities. These observations are beginning to provide important constraints...

  1. Atmospheric composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The earth's atmosphere is made up of a number of gases in different relative amounts. Near sea level and up to about 90 km, the amount of these atmospheric gases in clean, relatively dry air is practically constant. Four of these gases, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide, make up 99.99 percent by volume of the atmosphere. Two gases, ozone and water vapor, change in relative amounts, but the total amount of these two is very small compared to the amount of the other gases. The atmospheric composition shown in a table can be considered valid up to 90 km geometric altitude. Above 90 km, mainly because of molecular dissociation and diffusive separation, the composition changes.

  2. Organic carbon redistribution due to erosion at various spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Gergely; Szabó, Judit; Szalai, Zoltán; Mészáros, Erzsébet; Szabó, Boglárka; Centeri, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) has a crucial role both in terms of crop production and climate change mitigation. Soil could be an effective sink of atmospheric carbon since in agricultural areas the carbon content of the soil is much lower than its capacity. The main obstacle against carbon charge of the soils is cultivation and erosion. Soil detachment, delivery and deposition are rather scale dependent processes that is why it is difficult to compare or extrapolate results among scales. Present case study aims to compare the SOC content and soil organic matter (SOM) compound of the detached soil particles on the ridge to those that are deposited at the bottom of the catena in order to clarify the role of delivery in soil erosion. Initial soil erosion was modelled using a laboratory rainfall simulator at the point scale. Deposition was surveyed and analysed by 3D sampling from drillings on the sedimentary parts at the field scale. At the detachment phase carbon enrichment (50-100%) and C/N ratio increase were found in each aggregate size class of the detached soil particles. Variations in SOM compounds suggested that a very intensive SOM exchange took place during initial erosion processes and delivery. In addition to the selective erosion selective SOC deposition were also found at the field scale. Two topographical hotspots were identified as the place of SOC surplus deposition. In these patches SOM compounds were deposited separately due to different geomorphologic positions. The lower patch next to the end of an ephemeral gully was dominated by less polymerized more aromatic SOM, while the upper one was ruled by high molecular weighted aliphatic SOM. Difference in SOM compound was manifested also in different sediment morphology. The topographically higher deposition patch were covered by aggregates while the lower one was found to be sealed by individual soil particles. Present study was supported by the National Hungarian Research Found K100180, G. Jakab was

  3. Effects of atmospheric variability on energy utilization and conservation. Final report, 1 January 1979-31 December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, E.R.; Burns, C.C.; Cochrane, H.; Johnson, G.R.; Leong, H.; McKean, J.; Sheaffer, J.D.; Starr, A.M.; Webber, J.

    1980-04-01

    An interdisciplinary approach towards a detailed assessment of energy consumption in urban space-heating and cooling is presented in terms of measurement and modeling results. Modeling efforts concentrated on the city of Minneapolis, MN, using data from the winter seasons 1977/78 and 1978/79. Further developments of a reference model also fall back on data from Cheyenne, WY, and Greeley, CO. Mean absolute daily errors of gas consumption estimated by the physical model applied to Minneapolis are 6.26% when compared to actual energy usage for the period 12/1/77 to 2/28/78. The mean daily absolute errors for the statistical reference model for the same time period were 5.54%. Modeling of the energy consumption required detailed input of meteorological parameters from a special network of stations. As a spin-off an assessment was obtained of the effects of anthropogenic heat on urban heat-island generation under various synoptic conditions. A detailed building census, comprised of 105.722 heated structures, was obtained. A field survey in Greeley indicated that investment returns from insulating houses might not be as high as hoped for; possibly a considerable amount of insulating material is applied wastefully. Misinformation seems to be the primary cause of misguided energy conservation. Progress in conservation could be achieved if utility costs were considered in mortgage-loan applications, together with principal, interests, taxes, and insurance. Detailed energy-consumption modeling would be a premise for such fiscal-management approaches. Another extensive field survey yielded data for a local input-output model applied to the city of Greeley. Economic multipliers for dollars of output, space heating, energy use, and employment were developed and used for growth projections to the year 2003 under varying scenarios.

  4. Vibrational spectra and intramolecular vibrational redistribution in highly excited deuterobromochlorofluoromethane CDBrClF: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, Andreas; Hollenstein, Hans; Monti, Oliver L. A.; Quack, Martin; Stohner, Jürgen

    2000-08-01

    The rovibrational spectra of deuterobromochlorofluoromethane (CDBrClF) were measured at intermediate (0.1 cm-1) and high resolution (0.0024 cm-1 full bandwidth, half-maximum) by interferometric Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the range from the far infrared at 200 cm-1 to the near infrared (12 000 cm-1) covering all the fundamentals and CD stretching overtones up to polyad N=5. The spectra are completely analyzed in terms of their vibrational assignments to fundamentals, combinations and overtones. At high excitation the analysis reveals the dominant anharmonic coupling between four high frequency vibrational modes; the CD stretching (ν1), two CD bending (ν2,ν3), and the CF stretching mode (ν4). The analysis is carried out using effective model Hamiltonians including three and four vibrational degrees of freedom. We also present vibrational variational calculations on a grid in a four-dimensional normal coordinate subspace. The potential energy and the dipole moment function are calculated ab initio on this grid using self-consistent field second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). Experimental and theoretical results for band positions and integrated intensities as well as effective spectroscopic parameters are found to be in good agreement. The important anharmonic coupling between the CD chromophore and the CF stretching vibration can be described by an effective cubic Fermi resonance coupling constant ksff'≈(50±10) cm-1, which leads to intramolecular vibrational redistribution between the CD and CF chromophores on the femtosecond time scale. Time dependent intramolecular vibrational redistribution processes in CDBrClF are derived in various representations, including time dependent probability densities ("wave packets") in coordinate space and finally time dependent entropy.

  5. Atmospheric impacts of black carbon emission reductions through the strategic use of biodiesel in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Magara-Gomez, Kento T; Olson, Michael R; Okuda, Tomoaki; Walz, Kenneth A; Schauer, James J; Kleeman, Michael J

    2015-12-15

    The use of biodiesel as a replacement for petroleum-based diesel fuel has gained interest as a strategy for greenhouse gas emission reductions, energy security, and economic advantage. Biodiesel adoption may also reduce particulate elemental carbon (EC) emissions from conventional diesel engines that are not equipped with after-treatment devices. This study examines the impact of biodiesel blends on EC emissions from a commercial off-road diesel engine and simulates the potential public health benefits and climate benefits. EC emissions from the commercial off-road engine decreased by 76% when ultra-low sulfur commercial diesel (ULSD) fuel was replaced by biodiesel. Model calculations predict that reduced EC emissions translate directly into reduced EC concentrations in the atmosphere, but the concentration of secondary particulate matter was not directly affected by this fuel change. Redistribution of secondary particulate matter components to particles emitted from other sources did change the size distribution and therefore deposition rates of those components. Modification of meteorological variables such as water content and temperature influenced secondary particulate matter formation. Simulations with a source-oriented WRF/Chem model (SOWC) for a severe air pollution episode in California that adopted 75% biodiesel blended with ULSD in all non-road diesel engines reduced surface EC concentrations by up to 50% but changed nitrate and total PM2.5 mass concentrations by less than ±5%. These changes in concentrations will have public health benefits but did not significantly affect radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere. The removal of EC due to the adoption of biodiesel produced larger coatings of secondary particulate matter on other atmospheric particles containing residual EC leading to enhanced absorption associated with those particles. The net effect was a minor change in atmospheric optical properties despite a large change in atmospheric EC

  6. Atmospheric impacts of black carbon emission reductions through the strategic use of biodiesel in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Magara-Gomez, Kento T; Olson, Michael R; Okuda, Tomoaki; Walz, Kenneth A; Schauer, James J; Kleeman, Michael J

    2015-12-15

    The use of biodiesel as a replacement for petroleum-based diesel fuel has gained interest as a strategy for greenhouse gas emission reductions, energy security, and economic advantage. Biodiesel adoption may also reduce particulate elemental carbon (EC) emissions from conventional diesel engines that are not equipped with after-treatment devices. This study examines the impact of biodiesel blends on EC emissions from a commercial off-road diesel engine and simulates the potential public health benefits and climate benefits. EC emissions from the commercial off-road engine decreased by 76% when ultra-low sulfur commercial diesel (ULSD) fuel was replaced by biodiesel. Model calculations predict that reduced EC emissions translate directly into reduced EC concentrations in the atmosphere, but the concentration of secondary particulate matter was not directly affected by this fuel change. Redistribution of secondary particulate matter components to particles emitted from other sources did change the size distribution and therefore deposition rates of those components. Modification of meteorological variables such as water content and temperature influenced secondary particulate matter formation. Simulations with a source-oriented WRF/Chem model (SOWC) for a severe air pollution episode in California that adopted 75% biodiesel blended with ULSD in all non-road diesel engines reduced surface EC concentrations by up to 50% but changed nitrate and total PM2.5 mass concentrations by less than ±5%. These changes in concentrations will have public health benefits but did not significantly affect radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere. The removal of EC due to the adoption of biodiesel produced larger coatings of secondary particulate matter on other atmospheric particles containing residual EC leading to enhanced absorption associated with those particles. The net effect was a minor change in atmospheric optical properties despite a large change in atmospheric EC

  7. The effects of blue energy on future emissions of greenhouse gases and other atmospheric pollutants in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, X.; Kroeze, C.

    2012-01-01

    Blue energy is the electricity generated from salinity gradients in rivers. About half of the global electricity demand could be satisfied if the technical potential was implemented. However, the technique is not yet implemented in full-scale operational plants. We estimate the potential effects of

  8. Simulation of Surface Energy Fluxes and Snow Interception Using a Higher Order Closure Multi-Layer Soil-Vegetation-Atmospheric Model: The Effect of Canopy Shape and Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, L. E.; Dahlke, H. E.; Paw U, K. T.

    2015-12-01

    Snow cover is a critical driver of the Earth's surface energy budget, climate change, and water resources. Variations in snow cover not only affect the energy budget of the land surface but also represent a major water supply source. In California, US estimates of snow depth, extent, and melt in the Sierra Nevada are critical to estimating the amount of water available for both California agriculture and urban users. However, accurate estimates of snow cover and snow melt processes in forested area still remain a challenge. Canopy structure influences the vertical and spatiotemporal distribution of snow, and therefore ultimately determines the degree and extent by which snow alters both the surface energy balance and water availability in forested regions. In this study we use the Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil algorithm (ACASA), a multi-layer soil-vegetation-atmosphere numerical model, to simulate the effect of different snow-covered canopy structures on the energy budget, and temperature and other scalar profiles within different forest types in the Sierra Nevada, California. ACASA incorporates a higher order turbulence closure scheme which allows the detailed simulation of turbulent fluxes of heat and water vapor as well as the CO2 exchange of several layers within the canopy. As such ACASA can capture the counter gradient fluxes within canopies that may occur frequently, but are typically unaccounted for, in most snow hydrology models. Six different canopy types were modeled ranging from coniferous forests (e.g. most biomass near the ground) to top-heavy (e.g. most biomass near the top of the crown) deciduous forests to multi-layered forest canopies (e.g. mixture of young and mature trees). Preliminary results indicate that the canopy shape and structure associated with different canopy types fundamentally influence the vertical scalar profiles (including those of temperature, moisture, and wind speed) in the canopy and thus alter the interception and snow

  9. Constituent Redistribution in U-Zr Metallic Fuel Using the Advanced Fuel Performance Code BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Matthews, Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Previous work done by Galloway, et. al. [1] on EBR-II ternary (U-Pu-Zr) fuel constituent redistribution yielded accurate simulation data for the limited data sets of Zr redistribution. The data sets included EPMA scans of two different irradiated rods. First, T179 which was irradiated to 1.9 at% burnup was analyzed. Second, DP16 which was irradiated to 11 at% burnup was analyzed. One set of parameters that most accurately represented the zirconium profiles for both experiments was determined. Since the binary fuel (U-Zr) has previously been used as the driver fuel for sodium fast reactors (SFR) as well as being the likely driver fuel if a new SFR is constructed, this same process has been initiated on the binary fuel form. From limited binary EPMA scans as well as other fuel characterization techniques, it has been observed that zirconium redistribution also occurs in the binary fuel, albeit at a reduced rate compared to observation in the ternary fuel, as noted by Kim et. al. in [2]. While the rate of redistribution has been observed to be slower, numerous metallographs of U-Zr fuel, such as the one shown in Figure 1, show distinct zone formations.

  10. Preferences on Redistribution in Fragmented Labor Markets in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Berens

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the extent to which labor market dualization polarizes preferences on redistribution between formal and informal sector workers in Latin America and the Caribbean. Differences in welfare state costs and benefits for these labor market groups are likely to fuel diverging incentives regarding welfare consumption. The article tests whether or not informal workers are driven mainly by economic self-interest to increase gains from public welfare goods. The study employed a hierarchical model on pooled survey data from the Latin American Public Opinion Project (LAPOP 2008 and 2010 to analyze the risk exposure of formal and informal workers and, subsequently, their preferences on redistribution. The analysis reveals that while economic self-interest is an influential factor for formal workers, it is (unexpectedly much less so for informal workers. Also, an increased economically insecure environment, reflected by high unemployment rates, does not motivate informal workers to an exceptional degree to turn towards the state for redistribution, despite greater exposure to economic risk. Labor market dualization does not translate into polarization at the individual level regarding redistributive preferences in Latin America and the Caribbean.

  11. Strain redistribution around holes and notches in fiber-reinforced cross-woven brittle matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben Krogsdal; Brøndsted, Povl

    1997-01-01

    Mechanics, and an identification procedure based on a uni-axial tensile test and a shear test the strain redistribution around a hole or a notch due to matrix cracking can be predicted. Damage due to fiber breakage is not included in the model. Initial matrix damage in the C-f/SiCm material has...

  12. Rainfall intensity switches ecohydrological runoff/runon redistribution patterns in dryland vegetation patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliano, Patricio N; Breshears, David D; Fernández, Roberto J; Jobbágy, Esteban G

    2015-12-01

    Effectively managing net primary productivity in drylands for grazing and other uses depends on understanding how limited rainfall input is redistributed by runoff and runon among vegetation patches, particularly for patches that contrast between lesser and greater amounts of vegetation cover. Due in part to data limitations, ecohydrologists generally have focused on rainfall event size to characterize water redistribution processes. Here we use soil moisture data from a semiarid woodland to highlight how, when event size is controlled and runoff and interception are negligible at the stand scale, rainfall intensity drives the relationship between water redistribution and canopy and soil patch attributes. Horizontal water redistribution variability increased with rainfall intensity and differed between patches with contrasting vegetation cover. Sparsely vegetated patches gained relatively more water during lower intensity events, whereas densely vegetated ones gained relatively more water during higher intensity events. Consequently, range managers need to account for the distribution of rainfall event intensity, as well as event size, to assess the consequences of climate variability and change on net primary productivity. More generally, our results suggest that rainfall intensity needs to be considered in addition to event size to understand vegetation patch dynamics in drylands.

  13. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER DURING SUMMER DROUGHT IN TWO CONTRASTING PACIFIC NORTHWEST CONIFEROUS FORESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The magnitude of hydraulic redistribution of soil water by roots and its impact on soil water balance were estimated by monitoring time courses of soil water status at multiple depths and root sap flow during droughted conditions in a dry ponderosa pine ecosystem and a moist Doug...

  14. Elemental redistribution in a nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy induced by high-pressure torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: · Elemental distribution of a nc Ni-Fe alloy before and after high-pressure torsion. · The supersaturated Ni-Fe solid solution was stable under HPT. · C and S atoms further segregated to the remaining GBs during grain growth. · GB diffusion and the motion of defects facilitate the elemental redistribution. - Abstract: An electrochemically deposited nanocrystalline supersaturated face-centred-cubic Ni-21 at.% Fe alloy with an initial average grain size of ∼21 nm was processed using high-pressure torsion (HPT) that resulted in grain growth via grain rotation and coalescence to an average grain size of ∼53 nm. Atom probe tomography investigations revealed that the supersaturated Ni-Fe solid solution was stable under HPT and that C and S atoms, which are the major impurities in the material and segregated to the grain boundaries (GBs) of the as-deposited material, migrated from disappearing GBs to the remaining GBs during HPT. We propose that the elemental redistribution was facilitated by GB diffusion and the motion of a large volume of HPT-induced defects at the GB regions during the grain growth process. This elemental redistribution process is different from other HPT-induced elemental redistribution processes reported in the literature.

  15. Redistributive Taxation vs. Education Subsidies: Fostering Equality and Social Mobility in an Intergenerational Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Redistributive taxation and education subsidies are common policies intended to foster education attendance of poor children. However, this paper shows that in an intergenerational framework, these policies can raise social mobility only for some investment situations but not in general. I also study the impact of both policies on the aggregate…

  16. Water uptake and hydraulic redistribution across large woody root systems to 20 m depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the occurrence of hydraulic redistribution (HR) in a semi-arid woodland in central Texas to improve our understanding of the ecohydrological consequences of HR for the dominant evergreen and deciduous tree species in this water-limited ecosystem. We measured sap flow in numerous stem...

  17. Redistribution of contaminants from pig slurry after direct injection into soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Mostofa; Bech, T B; Forslund, A;

    2010-01-01

    The redistribution of pig manure-borne contaminants after direct injection to soil was investigated in a field study. The spatial distribution of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium Bacteriophage 28B and other slurry components in and around the injection slit was measured on day 0.15, 1, 6...

  18. A glimpse through the veil of ignorance: Equality of opportunity and support for redistribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Krawczyk

    2010-01-01

    This study is an experimental investigation into preference for redistribution of income. It had been hypothesized that (belief in) equality of opportunity in a society diminishes support for the welfare state. This could potentially explain the low taxes and social benefits in the United States vis

  19. A glimpse through the veil of ignorance: equality of opportunity and support for redistribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Krawczyk

    2007-01-01

    This study is an experimental investigation into preference for redistribution of income. It had been hypothesized that (belief in) equality of opportunity in a society diminishes support for the welfare state. This could potentially explain the low taxes and social benefits in the United States vis

  20. CONTAMINANT REDISTRIBUTION CAN CONFOUND INTERPRETATION OF OIL-SPILL BIOREMEDIATION STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The physical redistribution of oil between the inside and outside of experimental plots can affect the results of bioremediation field studies that are conducted on shorelines contaminated by real oil spills. Because untreated oil from the surrounding beach will enter the plot, ...

  1. Barker's Ecology of Disadvantage and Educational Equity: Issues of Redistribution and Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffo, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    As Barker notes, the link between disadvantage and poor educational attainments is an enduring one. Educational policy over the last 40 years or so has tended to respond to educational inequality in predominately one of two ways--attempts to raise standards across the system as a whole and attempts to redistribute resources to families, schools…

  2. Residual stress redistribution in shot peened samples subject to mechanical loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, Dennis J., E-mail: dennis.buchanan@udri.udayton.edu [University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0020 (United States); John, Reji [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RXCM), Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7817 (United States)

    2014-10-06

    Shot peening is a well-established surface treatment process that imparts large compressive residual stresses onto the surface and at shallow depths to retard initiation and growth of fatigue cracks. The plastic deformation developed during the surface treatment sets up a constraint that retains compressive stresses on the surface balanced by tensile residual stresses in the interior. However, component service histories that produce subsequent plastic deformation may redistribute these residual stresses. In most engineering components, this additional plastic deformation is localized to stress concentration sites such as holes, notches, and fillets. In the case of gross plastic deformation where the entire cross section experiences material yielding the residual stress profile may redistribute, resulting in tensile stresses on the outside surface balanced by compression in the interior. This paper describes a series of experiments combined with models to explain the redistribution in residual stress depth profiles subject to applied stresses producing gross plastic strains in shot peened laboratory specimens. The initial room temperature residual stress and plastic strain profiles provide initial conditions for predictions. Model predictions correlate well with experimental results on shot peened dogbone specimens subject to single cycle and fatigue loading conditions at elevated temperature. Experiments on shot peened notched specimens do not exhibit the same stress redistribution even for larger applied stresses.

  3. Rainfall intensity switches ecohydrological runoff/runon redistribution patterns in dryland vegetation patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliano, Patricio N; Breshears, David D; Fernández, Roberto J; Jobbágy, Esteban G

    2015-12-01

    Effectively managing net primary productivity in drylands for grazing and other uses depends on understanding how limited rainfall input is redistributed by runoff and runon among vegetation patches, particularly for patches that contrast between lesser and greater amounts of vegetation cover. Due in part to data limitations, ecohydrologists generally have focused on rainfall event size to characterize water redistribution processes. Here we use soil moisture data from a semiarid woodland to highlight how, when event size is controlled and runoff and interception are negligible at the stand scale, rainfall intensity drives the relationship between water redistribution and canopy and soil patch attributes. Horizontal water redistribution variability increased with rainfall intensity and differed between patches with contrasting vegetation cover. Sparsely vegetated patches gained relatively more water during lower intensity events, whereas densely vegetated ones gained relatively more water during higher intensity events. Consequently, range managers need to account for the distribution of rainfall event intensity, as well as event size, to assess the consequences of climate variability and change on net primary productivity. More generally, our results suggest that rainfall intensity needs to be considered in addition to event size to understand vegetation patch dynamics in drylands. PMID:26910941

  4. Elemental redistribution in a nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy induced by high-pressure torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, S. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Sha, G., E-mail: gang.sha@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Wang, Y.B. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Liao, X.Z., E-mail: xiaozhou.liao@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Alhajeri, S.N. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, College of Technological Studies, PAAET, Shuwaikh 70654 (Kuwait); Li, H.Q. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zhu, Y.T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27659-7919 (United States); Langdon, T.G. [Materials Research Group, School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Departments of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453 (United States); Ringer, S.P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-09-25

    Highlights: {center_dot} Elemental distribution of a nc Ni-Fe alloy before and after high-pressure torsion. {center_dot} The supersaturated Ni-Fe solid solution was stable under HPT. {center_dot} C and S atoms further segregated to the remaining GBs during grain growth. {center_dot} GB diffusion and the motion of defects facilitate the elemental redistribution. - Abstract: An electrochemically deposited nanocrystalline supersaturated face-centred-cubic Ni-21 at.% Fe alloy with an initial average grain size of {approx}21 nm was processed using high-pressure torsion (HPT) that resulted in grain growth via grain rotation and coalescence to an average grain size of {approx}53 nm. Atom probe tomography investigations revealed that the supersaturated Ni-Fe solid solution was stable under HPT and that C and S atoms, which are the major impurities in the material and segregated to the grain boundaries (GBs) of the as-deposited material, migrated from disappearing GBs to the remaining GBs during HPT. We propose that the elemental redistribution was facilitated by GB diffusion and the motion of a large volume of HPT-induced defects at the GB regions during the grain growth process. This elemental redistribution process is different from other HPT-induced elemental redistribution processes reported in the literature.

  5. Local temperature redistribution and structural transition during joule-heating-driven conductance switching in VO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suhas; Pickett, Matthew D; Strachan, John Paul; Gibson, Gary; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R Stanley

    2013-11-13

    Joule-heating induced conductance-switching is studied in VO2 , a Mott insulator. Complementary in situ techniques including optical characterization, blackbody microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and numerical simulations are used. Abrupt redistribution in local temperature is shown to occur upon conductance-switching along with a structural phase transition, at the same current.

  6. Rock Outcrops Redistribute Organic Carbon and Nutrients to Nearby Soil Patches in Three Karst Ecosystems in SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dianjie; Shen, Youxin; Li, Yuhui; Huang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Emergent rock outcrops are common in terrestrial ecosystems. However, little research has been conducted regarding their surface function in redistributing organic carbon and nutrient fluxes to soils nearby. Water that fell on and ran off 10 individual rock outcrops was collected in three 100 × 100 m plots within a rock desertification ecosystem, an anthropogenic forest ecosystem, and a secondary forest ecosystem between June 2013 and June 2014 in Shilin, SW China. The concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (N), total phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) in the water samples were determined during three seasons, and the total amounts received by and flowing out from the outcrops were calculated. In all three ecosystems, TOC and N, P, and K were found throughout the year in both the water received by and delivered to nearby soil patches. Their concentrations and amounts were generally greater in forested ecosystems than in the rock desertification ecosystem. When rock outcrops constituted a high percentage (≥ 30%) of the ground surface, the annual export of rock outcrop runoff contributed a large amount of organic carbon and N, P, and K nutrients to soil patches nearby by comparison to the amount soil patches received via atmospheric deposition. These contributions may increase the spatial heterogeneity of soil fertility within patches, as rock outcrops of different sizes, morphologies, and emergence ratios may surround each soil patch. PMID:27509199

  7. Rock Outcrops Redistribute Organic Carbon and Nutrients to Nearby Soil Patches in Three Karst Ecosystems in SW China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dianjie; Shen, Youxin; Li, Yuhui; Huang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Emergent rock outcrops are common in terrestrial ecosystems. However, little research has been conducted regarding their surface function in redistributing organic carbon and nutrient fluxes to soils nearby. Water that fell on and ran off 10 individual rock outcrops was collected in three 100 × 100 m plots within a rock desertification ecosystem, an anthropogenic forest ecosystem, and a secondary forest ecosystem between June 2013 and June 2014 in Shilin, SW China. The concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (N), total phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) in the water samples were determined during three seasons, and the total amounts received by and flowing out from the outcrops were calculated. In all three ecosystems, TOC and N, P, and K were found throughout the year in both the water received by and delivered to nearby soil patches. Their concentrations and amounts were generally greater in forested ecosystems than in the rock desertification ecosystem. When rock outcrops constituted a high percentage (≥ 30%) of the ground surface, the annual export of rock outcrop runoff contributed a large amount of organic carbon and N, P, and K nutrients to soil patches nearby by comparison to the amount soil patches received via atmospheric deposition. These contributions may increase the spatial heterogeneity of soil fertility within patches, as rock outcrops of different sizes, morphologies, and emergence ratios may surround each soil patch. PMID:27509199

  8. Potential Alternatives for Advanced Energy Material Processing in High Performance Li-ion Batteries (LIBs) via Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duh, Jenq-Gong; Chuang, Shang-I.; Lan, Chun-Kai; Yang, Hao; Chen, Hsien-Wei

    2015-09-01

    A new processing technique by atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) jet treatment of LIBs was introduced. Ar/N2 plasma enhanced the high-rate anode performance of Li4Ti5O12. Oxygen vacancies were discovered and nitrogen doping were achieved by the surface reaction between pristine Li4Ti5O12 and plasma reactive species (N* and N2+). Electrochemical impedance spectra confirm that plasma modification increases Li ions diffusivity and reduces internal charge-transfer resistance, leading to a superior capacity (132 mAh/g) and excellent stability with negligible capacity decay over 100 cycles under 10C rate. Besides 2D material surface treatment, a specially designed APP generator that are feasible to modify 3D TiO2 powders is proposed. The rate capacity of 20 min plasma treated TiO2 exhibited 20% increment. Plasma diagnosis revealed that excited Ar and N2 was contributed to TiO2 surface reduction as companied by formation of oxygen vacancy. A higher amount of oxygen vacancy increased the chance for excited nitrogen doped onto surface of TiO2 particle. These findings promote the understanding of APP on processing anode materials in high performance LIBs.

  9. Thermally re-distributed IRSL (RD-IRSL): A new possibility of dating sediments near B/M boundary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthekai, P.; Chauhan, P.R.; Jain, Mayank;

    2015-01-01

    most distant pairs and hence should be more stable. A thermal stimulation after pIR-IRSL leads to redistribution of charges including distant pairs and this can be probed by further IRSL and pIRSL (post IR IRSL) measurements. This post IRSL following a thermal treatment is termed as redistributed IRSLs...

  10. THE SCATTERING POLARIZATION OF THE Ly{alpha} LINES OF H I AND He II TAKING INTO ACCOUNT PARTIAL FREQUENCY REDISTRIBUTION AND J-STATE INTERFERENCE EFFECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belluzzi, Luca; Trujillo Bueno, Javier [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Stepan, Jiri [Astronomical Institute ASCR, Ondrejov (Czech Republic)

    2012-08-10

    Recent theoretical investigations have pointed out that the cores of the Ly{alpha} lines of H I and He II should show measurable scattering polarization signals when observing the solar disk, and that the magnetic sensitivity, through the Hanle effect, of such linear polarization signals is suitable for exploring the magnetism of the solar transition region. Such investigations were carried out in the limit of complete frequency redistribution (CRD) and neglecting quantum interference between the two upper J-levels of each line. Here we relax both approximations and show that the joint action of partial frequency redistribution and J-state interference produces much more complex fractional linear polarization (Q/I) profiles, with large amplitudes in their wings. Such wing polarization signals turn out to be very sensitive to the temperature structure of the atmospheric model, so that they can be exploited for constraining the thermal properties of the solar chromosphere. Finally, we show that the approximation of CRD without J-state interference is however suitable for estimating the amplitude of the linear polarization signals in the core of the lines, where the Hanle effect operates.

  11. Mitigation of atmospheric carbon emissions through increased energy efficiency versus increased non-carbon energy sources: A trade study using a simplified {open_quotes}market-free{close_quotes} exogenously driven model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1997-08-24

    A simplified model of global, long-term energy use is described and used to make a `top-level` comparison of two generic approaches for mitigating atmospheric carbon emissions: (a) those based on increased energy efficiency; and (b) those based on increased use of reduced- or non-carbon fuels. As approximate as is the model, first-order estimates of and trade offs between increasing non-carbon generation capacities (e.g., supply-side solutions) versus energy-use efficiency (e.g., demand-side solutions) to stem atmospheric carbon accumulations can be useful in guiding more elaborate models. At the level of this analysis, both the costs of abatement and the costs of damage can be large, with the formation of benefit-to-cost ratios as a means of assessment being limited by uncertainties associated with relating given climatic responses to greenhouse warming to aggregate damage cost, as well as uncertainties associated with procedures used for multi-generation discounting of both abatement and damage costs. In view of uncertainties associated with both supply-side and demand-side approaches, as well as the estimation of greenhouse-warming responses per se, a combination of solutions seems prudent. Key findings are: (a) the relative insensitivity of the benefit-to-cost ratio adopted in this study to supply-side versus demand-side approaches to abating atmospheric carbon-dioxide emissions; (b) the extreme sensitivity of damage costs, abatement costs, and the related benefit-to-cost ratios to the combination of discounting procedure and the (time) concavity of the function used to relate global temperature rise to damage costs; and (c) no matter the discounting procedure and/or functional relationship between average temperature rise and a damage cost, a goal of increased per-capita gross world product at minimum damage suggests action now rather than delay.

  12. Atmospheric Circulation of Hot Jupiters: Dayside-Nightside Temperature Differences

    CERN Document Server

    Komacek, Thaddeus D

    2016-01-01

    The full-phase infrared light curves of low-eccentricity hot Jupiters show a trend of increasing dayside-to-nightside brightness temperature difference with increasing equilibrium temperature. Here we present a three-dimensional model that explains this relationship, in order to shed insight on the processes that control heat redistribution in tidally-locked planetary atmospheres. This three-dimensional model combines predictive analytic theory for the atmospheric circulation and dayside-nightside temperature differences over a range of equilibrium temperature, atmospheric composition, and potential frictional drag strengths with numerical solutions of the circulation that verify this analytic theory. This analytic theory shows that the longitudinal propagation of waves mediates dayside-nightside temperature differences in hot Jupiter atmospheres, analogous to the wave adjustment mechanism that regulates the thermal structure in Earth's tropics. These waves can be damped in hot Jupiter atmospheres by either r...

  13. Effect of eating on thallium-201 myocardial redistribution after myocardial ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether eating a high-carbohydrate meal between initial and delayed postexercise thallium-201 (Tl-201) imaging affects detection of Tl-201 redistribution during exercise stress testing, 16 patients with stable angina performed 2 Tl-201 treadmill exercise stress tests within a 14-day interval. Immediately after initial postexercise imaging, patients either drank a commercially available instant breakfast preparation for the intervention test or drank an equivalent volume of water for the control test. Comparable exercise workloads were achieved by exercising patients to the same heart rate for both tests. The order of the 2 (intervention and control) tests were randomized. All patients had at least 1 region of Tl-201 myocardial redistribution on either their eating or control test scans, although only 7 of the 16 had positive treadmill exercise test responses. Forty-six regions showing Tl-201 myocardial redistribution were identified in all 144 regions examined. Significantly more of these regions were identified on control test scans than on eating test scans: 11 of 46 on both test scans, 6 of 46 only on eating test scans and 29 of 46 only on control scans (p less than 0.001). Consistent with results of the quantitative regional analysis, the percentage of Tl-201 clearance over 4 hours in the 46 Tl-201 myocardial redistribution regions was 39 +/- 8% for the eating tests and 29 +/- 8% for control tests (mean +/- standard deviation, p less than 0.003). In 4 patients diagnosis of transient ischemia would have been missed because their 14 Tl-201 myocardial redistribution regions were detected only on the control test scans

  14. Drug-driven AMPA receptor redistribution mimicked by selective dopamine neuron stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T C Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Addictive drugs have in common that they cause surges in dopamine (DA concentration in the mesolimbic reward system and elicit synaptic plasticity in DA neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA. Cocaine for example drives insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors (AMPARs at glutamatergic synapes in DA neurons. However it remains elusive which molecular target of cocaine drives such AMPAR redistribution and whether other addictive drugs (morphine and nicotine cause similar changes through their effects on the mesolimbic DA system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used in vitro electrophysiological techniques in wild-type and transgenic mice to observe the modulation of excitatory inputs onto DA neurons by addictive drugs. To observe AMPAR redistribution, post-embedding immunohistochemistry for GluA2 AMPAR subunit was combined with electron microscopy. We also used a double-floxed AAV virus expressing channelrhodopsin together with a DAT Cre mouse line to selectively express ChR2 in VTA DA neurons. We find that in mice where the effect of cocaine on the dopamine transporter (DAT is specifically blocked, AMPAR redistribution was absent following administration of the drug. Furthermore, addictive drugs known to increase dopamine levels cause a similar AMPAR redistribution. Finally, activating DA VTA neurons optogenetically is sufficient to drive insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPARs, mimicking the changes observed after a single injection of morphine, nicotine or cocaine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose the mesolimbic dopamine system as a point of convergence at which addictive drugs can alter neural circuits. We also show that direct activation of DA neurons is sufficient to drive AMPAR redistribution, which may be a mechanism associated with early steps of non-substance related addictions.

  15. Effect of axial heat transfer and atmospheric conditions on the energy performance of GSHP systems: A simulation-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A range of analytical and numerical models is available to investigate the thermal behaviour of vertical ground heat exchangers, both in the short- and long-term. However, most of them ignore the thermal effects of weather at ground level that affect the upper part of boreholes. Furthermore, few models look at the integrated simulation of a ground source heat pump system for both the borehole field and heat pump. Consequently, a limited number of applications to real cases are available for designers. This paper shows a study to assess the effects of both axial heat transfer in boreholes and the weather at ground level on the fluid temperature in the boreholes, as well as on the energy efficiency of the heat pump. To this purpose, long-term analysis of two ground source heat pump systems was conducted over ten years by means of a detailed numerical simulation tool. The systems were for two office buildings with unbalanced load profiles in Canada and Italy. These case studies were analyzed as they were being designed, then the influence of the borehole arrangement and borehole length was also investigated. The simulation results show that axial heat transfer affects fluid temperature in the boreholes and the seasonal energy efficiency of the whole system more than the weather. Moreover, when the load profile is unbalanced, neglecting the effect of weather does not always ensure a conservative design of the borehole field. - Highlights: • Multi-year integrated simulations of two real GSHP systems are carried out. • The work focuses on the long-term energy efficiency of GSHP systems. • The simulation tool considers both the borehole field and the heat pump. • The axial heat transfer in the ground affects the energy efficiency of the system. • The weather at the ground level affects the fluid temperature in the boreholes

  16. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  17. Modeling the early-phase redistribution of radiocesium fallouts in an evergreen coniferous forest after Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmon, P.; Gonze, M.-A.; Mourlon, Ch.

    2015-10-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, the scientific community gained numerous data on the transfer of radiocesium in European forest ecosystems, including information regarding the short-term redistribution of atmospheric fallout onto forest canopies. In the course of international programs, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) developed a forest model, named TREE4 (Transfer of Radionuclides and External Exposure in FORest systems), 15 years ago. Recently published papers on a Japanese evergreen coniferous forest contaminated by Fukushima radiocesium fallout provide interesting and quantitative data on radioactive mass fluxes measured within the forest in the months following the accident. The present study determined whether the approach adopted in the TREE4 model provides satisfactory results for Japanese forests or whether it requires adjustments. This study focused on the interception of airborne radiocesium by forest canopy, and the subsequent transfer to the forest floor through processes such as litterfall, throughfall, and stemflow, in the months following the accident. We demonstrated that TREE4 quite satisfactorily predicted the interception fraction (20%) and the canopy-to-soil transfer (70% of the total deposit in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest. This dynamics was similar to that observed in the Höglwald spruce forest. However, the unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall (31% in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest could not be reproduced in our simulations (2.5%). Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed; and sensitivity of the results to uncertainty in deposition conditions was analyzed. - Highlights: • Transfer of radiocesium atmospheric fallout in evergreen forests was modeled. • The model was tested using observations from Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents. • Model predictions of canopy interception and depuration agree with measurements. • Unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall for the

  18. Sensitivity of the Tropical Atmospheric Energy Balance to ENSO-Related SST Changes: Comparison of Climate Model Simulations to Observed Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Fitzjarrald, Dan; Marshall, Susan; Oglesby, Robert; Roads, John; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper focuses on how fresh water and radiative fluxes over the tropical oceans change during ENSO warm and cold events and how these changes affect the tropical energy balance. At present, ENSO remains the most prominent known mode of natural variability at interannual time scales. While this natural perturbation to climate is quite distinct from possible anthropogenic changes in climate, adjustments in the tropical water and energy budgets during ENSO may give insight into feedback processes involving water vapor and cloud feedbacks. Although great advances have been made in understanding this phenomenon and realizing prediction skill over the past decade, our ability to document the coupled water and energy changes observationally and to represent them in climate models seems far from settled (Soden, 2000 J Climate). In a companion paper we have presented observational analyses, based principally on space-based measurements which document systematic changes in rainfall, evaporation, and surface and top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes. Here we analyze several contemporary climate models run with observed SSTs over recent decades and compare SST-induced changes in radiation, precipitation, evaporation, and energy transport to observational results. Among these are the NASA / NCAR Finite Volume Model, the NCAR Community Climate Model, the NCEP Global Spectral Model, and the NASA NSIPP Model. Key disagreements between model and observational results noted in the recent literature are shown to be due predominantly to observational shortcomings. A reexamination of the Langley 8-Year Surface Radiation Budget data reveals errors in the SST surface longwave emission due to biased SSTs. Subsequent correction allows use of this data set along with ERBE TOA fluxes to infer net atmospheric radiative heating. Further analysis of recent rainfall algorithms provides new estimates for precipitation variability in line with interannual evaporation changes inferred from

  19. Atmospheric thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarne, J V

    1973-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the atmosphere is the subject of several chapters in most textbooks on dynamic meteorology, but there is no work in English to give the subject a specific and more extensive treatment. In writing the present textbook, we have tried to fill this rather remarkable gap in the literature related to atmospheric sciences. Our aim has been to provide students of meteorology with a book that can playa role similar to the textbooks on chemical thermodynamics for the chemists. This implies a previous knowledge of general thermodynamics, such as students acquire in general physics courses; therefore, although the basic principles are reviewed (in the first four chapters), they are only briefly discussed, and emphasis is laid on those topics that will be useful in later chapters, through their application to atmospheric problems. No attempt has been made to introduce the thermodynamics of irreversible processes; on the other hand, consideration of heterogeneous and open homogeneous systems permits a...

  20. Atmospheric transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chairman and contributors are members of the Working Group on Atmospheric Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension. This group examined the mathematical approaches for determining the direct and indirect pathways to man of releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. The dose-to-man limitations promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Energy Research and Development Administration were presented. The present status of research was discussed, and recommendations for future work were made. Particular emphasis was placed on the need for additional experimental work to develop confidence limits leading to acceptable probability statements of critical pathways for determining the dose-to-man