WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric dispersion modelling

  1. Stochastic models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2003-01-01

    Simple stochastic differential equation models have been applied by several researchers to describe the dispersion of tracer particles in the planetary atmospheric boundary layer and to form the basis for computer simulations of particle paths. To obtain the drift coefficient, empirical vertical...... velocity distributions that depend on height above the ground both with respect to standard deviation and skewness are substituted into the stationary Fokker/Planck equation. The particle position distribution is taken to be uniform *the well/mixed condition( and also a given dispersion coefficient...

  2. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik

    The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the 'most likely' dispersion scenario....... In MUD, corresponding ensembles of atmospheric dispersion are computed from which uncertainties of predicted radionuclide concentration and deposition patterns are derived....

  3. Uncertainty modelling of atmospheric dispersion by stochastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The parameters associated to a environmental dispersion model may include different kinds of variability, imprecision and uncertainty. More often, it is seen that available information is interpreted in probabilistic sense. Probability theory is a well-established theory to measure such kind of variability. However, not all ...

  4. Atmospheric Dispersion Model Validation in Low Wind Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    Atmospheric plume dispersion models are used for a variety of purposes including emergency planning and response to hazardous material releases, determining force protection actions in the event of a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) attack and for locating sources of pollution. This study provides a review of previous studies that examine the accuracy of atmospheric plume dispersion models for chemical releases. It considers the principles used to derive air dispersion plume models and looks at three specific models currently in use: Aerial Location of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA), Emergency Prediction Information Code (EPIcode) and Second Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF). Results from this study indicate over-prediction bias by the EPIcode and SCIPUFF models and under-prediction bias by the ALOHA model. The experiment parameters were for near field dispersion (less than 100 meters) in low wind speed conditions (less than 2 meters per second).

  5. Atmospheric dispersion modeling near a roadway under calm meteorological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Fallah Shorshani, Masoud; Seigneur, Christian; POLO REHN, Lucie; CHANUT, Hervé; PELLAN, Yann; Jaffrezo, Jean-Luc; CHARRON, Aurélie; Andre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pollutant dispersion near sources is typically simulated by Gaussian models because of their efficient compromise between reasonable accuracy and manageable com- putational time. However, the standard Gaussian dispersion formula applies downwind of a source under advective conditions with a well-defined wind direction and cannot calculate air pollutant concentrations under calm conditions with fluctuating wind direction and/or upwind of the emission source. Attempts have been made...

  6. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik

    uncertainties of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological observations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing e.g. the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observational data, an ensemble......The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as possibilities for optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the ‘most likely...... of meteorological forecasts is produced from which uncertainties in the various meteorological parameters are estimated, e.g. probabilities for rain. Corresponding ensembles of atmospheric dispersion can now be computed from which uncertainties of predicted radionuclide concentration and deposition patterns can...

  7. Atmospheric dispersion modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Gayle [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pobanz, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, Kevin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vogt, Phil [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Aluzzi, Fernando [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homann, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    In this research, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident including: daily Japanese weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions to inform planning for field monitoring operations and to provide U.S. government agencies with ongoing situational awareness of meteorological conditions; estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases to support protective action planning for U.S. citizens; predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations; and source estimation and plume model refinement based on atmospheric dispersion modeling and available monitoring data.

  8. Atmospheric dispersion models help to improve air quality; Los modelos de dispersion atmosferica ayudan a mejorar la calidad del aire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.

    2013-07-01

    One of the main challenges of the atmospheric sciences is to reproduce as well as possible the phenomena and processes of pollutants in the atmosphere. To do it, mathematical models based in this case on fluid dynamics and mass and energy conservation equations, equations that govern the atmospheric chemistry, etc., adapted to the spatial scales to be simulated, are developed. The dispersion models simulate the processes of transport, dispersion, chemical transformation and elimination by deposition that air pollutants undergo once they are emitted. Atmospheric dispersion models with their multiple applications have become essential tools for the air quality management. (Author)

  9. Numerical simulations of atmospheric dispersion of iodine-131 by different models

    OpenAIRE

    Ádám Leelőssy; Róbert Mészáros; Attila Kovács; István Lagzi; Tibor Kovács

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, several dispersion models are available to simulate the transport processes of air pollutants and toxic substances including radionuclides in the atmosphere. Reliability of atmospheric transport models has been demonstrated in several recent cases from local to global scale; however, very few actual emission data are available to evaluate model results in real-life cases. In this study, the atmospheric dispersion of 131I emitted to the atmosphere during an industrial process was sim...

  10. Numerical simulations of atmospheric dispersion of iodine-131 by different models

    OpenAIRE

    Leelőssy, Ádám; Mészáros, Róbert; Kovács, Attila; Lagzi, István; Kovács, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Several dispersion models are available to simulate the transport processes of air pollutants and toxic substances including radionuclides in the atmosphere. Reliability of atmospheric transport models has been demonstrated in several recent cases from local to global scale, however, very few actual emission data are available to evaluate model results in real-life cases. In this study, the atmospheric dispersion of 131I emitted to the atmosphere during an industrial process was simulated wit...

  11. Atmospheric dispersion modelling of particulate and gaseous pollutants affecting the trans-Manche region

    OpenAIRE

    Plainiotis, Stylianos

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of a methodology to determine large-scale and meso-scale atmospheric dispersion patterns. The research is only concerned with outdoor exposure to atmospheric pollutants and aims to identify pollution sources using dispersion modelling with the assistance of ground level measurements from British, French and other monitoring stations and remote sensing technology. \\ud \\ud Lagrangian Particle Dispersion (LPD) models compute trajectories of a large number of...

  12. Modelling of pollution dispersion in atmosphere; Modelowanie procesow propagacji skazen w atmosferze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borysiewicz, M.; Stankiewicz, R.

    1994-12-31

    The paper contains the review of the mathematical foundation of atmospheric dispersion models. The atmospheric phenomena relevant to atmospheric dispersion model are discussed. In particular the parametrization of processes with time and space scales smaller than numerical grid size, limited by available computer power, is presented. The special attention was devoted to similarity theory and parametrization of boundary layer. The numerical methods are analysed and the drawbacks of the method are presented. (author). 99 refs, 15 figs, 3 tabs.

  13. Sensitivity model study of regional mercury dispersion in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencarelli, Christian N.; Bieser, Johannes; Carbone, Francesco; De Simone, Francesco; Hedgecock, Ian M.; Matthias, Volker; Travnikov, Oleg; Yang, Xin; Pirrone, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is the most important pathway by which Hg reaches marine ecosystems, where it can be methylated and enter the base of food chain. The deposition, transport and chemical interactions of atmospheric Hg have been simulated over Europe for the year 2013 in the framework of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project, performing 14 different model sensitivity tests using two high-resolution three-dimensional chemical transport models (CTMs), varying the anthropogenic emission datasets, atmospheric Br input fields, Hg oxidation schemes and modelling domain boundary condition input. Sensitivity simulation results were compared with observations from 28 monitoring sites in Europe to assess model performance and particularly to analyse the influence of anthropogenic emission speciation and the Hg0(g) atmospheric oxidation mechanism. The contribution of anthropogenic Hg emissions, their speciation and vertical distribution are crucial to the simulated concentration and deposition fields, as is also the choice of Hg0(g) oxidation pathway. The areas most sensitive to changes in Hg emission speciation and the emission vertical distribution are those near major sources, but also the Aegean and the Black seas, the English Channel, the Skagerrak Strait and the northern German coast. Considerable influence was found also evident over the Mediterranean, the North Sea and Baltic Sea and some influence is seen over continental Europe, while this difference is least over the north-western part of the modelling domain, which includes the Norwegian Sea and Iceland. The Br oxidation pathway produces more HgII(g) in the lower model levels, but overall wet deposition is lower in comparison to the simulations which employ an O3 / OH oxidation mechanism. The necessity to perform continuous measurements of speciated Hg and to investigate the local impacts of Hg emissions and deposition, as well as interactions dependent on land use and vegetation, forests, peat

  14. A review of numerical models to predict the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelőssy, Ádám; Lagzi, István; Kovács, Attila; Mészáros, Róbert

    2018-02-01

    The field of atmospheric dispersion modeling has evolved together with nuclear risk assessment and emergency response systems. Atmospheric concentration and deposition of radionuclides originating from an unintended release provide the basis of dose estimations and countermeasure strategies. To predict the atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides several numerical models are available coupled with numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems. This work provides a review of the main concepts and different approaches of atmospheric dispersion modeling. Key processes of the atmospheric transport of radionuclides are emission, advection, turbulent diffusion, dry and wet deposition, radioactive decay and other physical and chemical transformations. A wide range of modeling software are available to simulate these processes with different physical assumptions, numerical approaches and implementation. The most appropriate modeling tool for a specific purpose can be selected based on the spatial scale, the complexity of meteorology, land surface and physical and chemical transformations, also considering the available data and computational resource. For most regulatory and operational applications, offline coupled NWP-dispersion systems are used, either with a local scale Gaussian, or a regional to global scale Eulerian or Lagrangian approach. The dispersion model results show large sensitivity on the accuracy of the coupled NWP model, especially through the description of planetary boundary layer turbulence, deep convection and wet deposition. Improvement of dispersion predictions can be achieved by online coupling of mesoscale meteorology and atmospheric transport models. The 2011 Fukushima event was the first large-scale nuclear accident where real-time prognostic dispersion modeling provided decision support. Dozens of dispersion models with different approaches were used for prognostic and retrospective simulations of the Fukushima release. An unknown

  15. Computational dispersion properties of horizontal staggered grids for atmospheric and ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    The computational dispersion properties of horizontally and time-horizontally staggered grids utilizing corresponding centered-difference techniques for approximation of the adjustment, or gravity wave equations, are examined in terms of their group velocity characteristics. Results are acquired for oceanic and atmospheric models, the former being characterized by a much smaller Rossby radius of deformation. For all grids considered additional filtering is required to control and even eliminate waves with poor computational dispersion characteristics. Computational dispersion properties along with other computational characteristics and requirements give some guidance for an optimal selection of an appropriate grid for an ocean or atmospheric model.

  16. Simulation of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides using an Eulerian-Lagrangian modelling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Abdul; Espinosa, Francisco; Avila, Ruben; Raza, S; Irfan, N

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we present an atmospheric dispersion scenario for a proposed nuclear power plant in Pakistan involving the hypothetical accidental release of radionuclides. For this, a concept involving a Lagrangian stochastic particle model (LSPM) coupled with an Eulerian regional atmospheric modelling system (RAMS) is used. The atmospheric turbulent dispersion of radionuclides (represented by non-buoyant particles/neutral traces) in the LSPM is modelled by applying non-homogeneous turbulence conditions. The mean wind velocities governed by the topography of the region and the surface fluxes of momentum and heat are calculated by the RAMS code. A moving least squares (MLS) technique is introduced to calculate the concentration of radionuclides at ground level. The numerically calculated vertical profiles of wind velocity and temperature are compared with observed data. The results obtained demonstrate that in regions of complex terrain it is not sufficient to model the atmospheric dispersion of particles using a straight-line Gaussian plume model, and that by utilising a Lagrangian stochastic particle model and regional atmospheric modelling system a much more realistic estimation of the dispersion in such a hypothetical scenario was ascertained. The particle dispersion results for a 12 h ground release show that a triangular area of about 400 km(2) situated in the north-west quadrant of release is under radiological threat. The particle distribution shows that the use of a Gaussian plume model (GPM) in such situations will yield quite misleading results.

  17. Multi-model study of mercury dispersion in the atmosphere: atmospheric processes and model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travnikov, Oleg; Angot, Hélène; Artaxo, Paulo; Bencardino, Mariantonia; Bieser, Johannes; D'Amore, Francesco; Dastoor, Ashu; De Simone, Francesco; Diéguez, María del Carmen; Dommergue, Aurélien; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Feng, Xin Bin; Gencarelli, Christian N.; Hedgecock, Ian M.; Magand, Olivier; Martin, Lynwill; Matthias, Volker; Mashyanov, Nikolay; Pirrone, Nicola; Ramachandran, Ramesh; Read, Katie Alana; Ryjkov, Andrei; Selin, Noelle E.; Sena, Fabrizio; Song, Shaojie; Sprovieri, Francesca; Wip, Dennis; Wängberg, Ingvar; Yang, Xin

    2017-04-01

    Current understanding of mercury (Hg) behavior in the atmosphere contains significant gaps. Some key characteristics of Hg processes, including anthropogenic and geogenic emissions, atmospheric chemistry, and air-surface exchange, are still poorly known. This study provides a complex analysis of processes governing Hg fate in the atmosphere involving both measured data from ground-based sites and simulation results from chemical transport models. A variety of long-term measurements of gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) and reactive Hg (RM) concentration as well as Hg wet deposition flux have been compiled from different global and regional monitoring networks. Four contemporary global-scale transport models for Hg were used, both in their state-of-the-art configurations and for a number of numerical experiments to evaluate particular processes. Results of the model simulations were evaluated against measurements. As follows from the analysis, the interhemispheric GEM gradient is largely formed by the prevailing spatial distribution of anthropogenic emissions in the Northern Hemisphere. The contributions of natural and secondary emissions enhance the south-to-north gradient, but their effect is less significant. Atmospheric chemistry has a limited effect on the spatial distribution and temporal variation of GEM concentration in surface air. In contrast, RM air concentration and wet deposition are largely defined by oxidation chemistry. The Br oxidation mechanism can reproduce successfully the observed seasonal variation of the RM / GEM ratio in the near-surface layer, but it predicts a wet deposition maximum in spring instead of in summer as observed at monitoring sites in North America and Europe. Model runs with OH chemistry correctly simulate both the periods of maximum and minimum values and the amplitude of observed seasonal variation but shift the maximum RM / GEM ratios from spring to summer. O3 chemistry does not predict significant seasonal variation of Hg

  18. Atmospheric aerosol dispersion models and their applications to environmental risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Mazur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Numerical models of dispersion of atmospheric pollutants are widely used to forecast the spread of contaminants in the air and to analyze the effects of this phenomenon. The aim of the study is to investigate the possibilities and the quality of diagnosis and prediction of atmospheric transport of aerosols in the air using the dispersion model of atmospheric pollutants, developed at the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (IMWM in Warsaw. Material and methods. A model of the dispersion of atmospheric pollutants, linked with meteorological models in a diagnostic mode, was used to simulate the transport of the cloud of aerosols released during the crash near the town of Ożydiw (Ukraine and of volcanic ash – during the volcanic eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland. Results. Possible directions of dispersion of pollutants in the air and its concentration in the atmosphere and deposition to the soil were assessed. The analysis of temporal variability of concentrations of aerosols in the atmosphere confirmed that the model developed at IMWM is an effective tool for diagnosis of air quality in the area of Poland as well as for determination of exposure duration to the aerosol clouds for different weather scenarios. Conclusions. The results are a confirmation of the thesis, that because in the environmental risk assessment, an important element is not only current information on the level of pollution concentrations, but also the time of exposure to pollution and forecast of these elements, and consequently the predicted effects on man or the environment in general; so it is necessary to use forecasting tools, similar to presented application. The dispersion model described in the paper is an operational tool for description, analysis and forecasting of emergency situations in case of emissions of hazardous substances.

  19. Numerical simulations of atmospheric dispersion of iodine-131 by different models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ádám Leelőssy

    Full Text Available Nowadays, several dispersion models are available to simulate the transport processes of air pollutants and toxic substances including radionuclides in the atmosphere. Reliability of atmospheric transport models has been demonstrated in several recent cases from local to global scale; however, very few actual emission data are available to evaluate model results in real-life cases. In this study, the atmospheric dispersion of 131I emitted to the atmosphere during an industrial process was simulated with different models, namely the WRF-Chem Eulerian online coupled model and the HYSPLIT and the RAPTOR Lagrangian models. Although only limited data of 131I detections has been available, the accuracy of modeled plume direction could be evaluated in complex late autumn weather situations. For the studied cases, the general reliability of models has been demonstrated. However, serious uncertainties arise related to low level inversions, above all in case of an emission event on 4 November 2011, when an important wind shear caused a significant difference between simulated and real transport directions. Results underline the importance of prudent interpretation of dispersion model results and the identification of weather conditions with a potential to cause large model errors.

  20. Numerical simulations of atmospheric dispersion of iodine-131 by different models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelőssy, Ádám; Mészáros, Róbert; Kovács, Attila; Lagzi, István; Kovács, Tibor

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, several dispersion models are available to simulate the transport processes of air pollutants and toxic substances including radionuclides in the atmosphere. Reliability of atmospheric transport models has been demonstrated in several recent cases from local to global scale; however, very few actual emission data are available to evaluate model results in real-life cases. In this study, the atmospheric dispersion of 131I emitted to the atmosphere during an industrial process was simulated with different models, namely the WRF-Chem Eulerian online coupled model and the HYSPLIT and the RAPTOR Lagrangian models. Although only limited data of 131I detections has been available, the accuracy of modeled plume direction could be evaluated in complex late autumn weather situations. For the studied cases, the general reliability of models has been demonstrated. However, serious uncertainties arise related to low level inversions, above all in case of an emission event on 4 November 2011, when an important wind shear caused a significant difference between simulated and real transport directions. Results underline the importance of prudent interpretation of dispersion model results and the identification of weather conditions with a potential to cause large model errors.

  1. A new formulation of the probability density function in random walk models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Anne Katrine Vinther; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1997-01-01

    In this model for atmospheric dispersion particles are simulated by the Langevin Equation, which is a stochastic differential equation. It uses the probability density function (PDF) of the vertical velocity fluctuations as input. The PDF is constructed as an expansion after Hermite polynomials. ...

  2. Models for close-in atmospheric dispersion, explosive releases, and particle deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, S.G.

    1993-10-06

    Relatively simple models are presented to simulate close-in atmospheric dispersion, explosive releases, and particle deposition. Close-in generally refers to distances less than 50 m downwind from the source. These models assume simple gas dispersion (no chemical reactions, neutral buoyancy) and that particles behave as a gas expect they can be removed from the plume by a simple, deposition-velocity mechanism. These models have been combined into a QuickBASIC program (INEXPLC.BAS) and its PC executable form (INEXPLC.EXE). These programs, along with sample input and output files, are available from the author.

  3. A random walk model to simulate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jun; Huang, Liuxing; Niu, Shengli; Xie, Honggang; Kuang, Feihong

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide in large-medium scale, a numerical simulation method based on random walk model for radionuclide atmospheric dispersion was established in the paper. The route of radionuclide migration and concentration distribution of radionuclide can be calculated out by using the method with the real-time or historical meteorological fields. In the simulation, a plume of radionuclide is treated as a lot of particles independent of each other. The particles move randomly by the fluctuations of turbulence, and disperse, so as to enlarge the volume of the plume and dilute the concentration of radionuclide. The dispersion of the plume over time is described by the variance of the particles. Through statistical analysis, the relationships between variance of the particles and radionuclide dispersion characteristics can be derived. The main mechanisms considered in the physical model are: (1) advection of radionuclide by mean air motion, (2) mixing of radionuclide by atmospheric turbulence, (3) dry and wet deposition, (4) disintegration. A code named RADES was developed according the method. And then, the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX) in 1994 is simulated by the RADES and FLEXPART codes, the simulation results of the concentration distribution of tracer are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Multilevel Monte Carlo and Improved Timestepping Methods in Atmospheric Dispersion Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Katsiolides, G; Muller, EH; Scheichl, R.; Shardlow, T.; Giles, MB; Thomson, DJ

    2017-01-01

    A common way to simulate the transport and spread of pollutants in the atmosphere is via stochastic Lagrangian dispersion models. Mathematically, these models describe turbulent transport processes with stochastic differential equations (SDEs). The computational bottleneck is the Monte Carlo algorithm, which simulates the motion of a large number of model particles in a turbulent velocity field; for each particle, a trajectory is calculated with a numerical timestepping method. Choosing an ef...

  5. A study on atmospheric relative dispersion using the transport model FLEXPART

    OpenAIRE

    Guttu, Sigmund

    2011-01-01

    Relative dispersion is a widely used measure to characterize mixing properties of atmospheric passive tracers. Numerical models allow for a large number of particles. In this thesis, the Lagrangian transport model FLEXPART has been used to generate particle trajectories. The advection velocity field was provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). 40000 particles were deployed along latitude lines, at 30N and 30S, 60N and 60S, and at two heights, (6km and 12km)....

  6. Description and validation of ERAD: An atmospheric dispersion model for high explosive detonations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boughton, B.A.; DeLaurentis, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    The Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion (ERAD) model is a three-dimensional numerical simulation of turbulent atmospheric transport and diffusion. An integral plume rise technique is used to provide a description of the physical and thermodynamic properties of the cloud of warm gases formed when the explosive detonates. Particle dispersion is treated as a stochastic process which is simulated using a discrete time Lagrangian Monte Carlo method. The stochastic process approach permits a more fundamental treatment of buoyancy effects, calm winds and spatial variations in meteorological conditions. Computational requirements of the three-dimensional simulation are substantially reduced by using a conceptualization in which each Monte Carlo particle represents a small puff that spreads according to a Gaussian law in the horizontal directions. ERAD was evaluated against dosage and deposition measurements obtained during Operation Roller Coaster. The predicted contour areas average within about 50% of the observations. The validation results confirm the model`s representation of the physical processes.

  7. Multilevel Monte Carlo and improved timestepping methods in atmospheric dispersion modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsiolides, Grigoris; Müller, Eike H.; Scheichl, Robert; Shardlow, Tony; Giles, Michael B.; Thomson, David J.

    2018-02-01

    A common way to simulate the transport and spread of pollutants in the atmosphere is via stochastic Lagrangian dispersion models. Mathematically, these models describe turbulent transport processes with stochastic differential equations (SDEs). The computational bottleneck is the Monte Carlo algorithm, which simulates the motion of a large number of model particles in a turbulent velocity field; for each particle, a trajectory is calculated with a numerical timestepping method. Choosing an efficient numerical method is particularly important in operational emergency-response applications, such as tracking radioactive clouds from nuclear accidents or predicting the impact of volcanic ash clouds on international aviation, where accurate and timely predictions are essential. In this paper, we investigate the application of the Multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method to simulate the propagation of particles in a representative one-dimensional dispersion scenario in the atmospheric boundary layer. MLMC can be shown to result in asymptotically superior computational complexity and reduced computational cost when compared to the Standard Monte Carlo (StMC) method, which is currently used in atmospheric dispersion modelling. To reduce the absolute cost of the method also in the non-asymptotic regime, it is equally important to choose the best possible numerical timestepping method on each level. To investigate this, we also compare the standard symplectic Euler method, which is used in many operational models, with two improved timestepping algorithms based on SDE splitting methods.

  8. Statistical Surrogate Modeling of Atmospheric Dispersion Events Using Bayesian Adaptive Splines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francom, D.; Sansó, B.; Bulaevskaya, V.; Lucas, D. D.

    2016-12-01

    Uncertainty in the inputs of complex computer models, including atmospheric dispersion and transport codes, is often assessed via statistical surrogate models. Surrogate models are computationally efficient statistical approximations of expensive computer models that enable uncertainty analysis. We introduce Bayesian adaptive spline methods for producing surrogate models that capture the major spatiotemporal patterns of the parent model, while satisfying all the necessities of flexibility, accuracy and computational feasibility. We present novel methodological and computational approaches motivated by a controlled atmospheric tracer release experiment conducted at the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in California. Traditional methods for building statistical surrogate models often do not scale well to experiments with large amounts of data. Our approach is well suited to experiments involving large numbers of model inputs, large numbers of simulations, and functional output for each simulation. Our approach allows us to perform global sensitivity analysis with ease. We also present an approach to calibration of simulators using field data.

  9. Atmospheric Transport Modeling with 3D Lagrangian Dispersion Codes Compared with SF6 Tracer Experiments at Regional Scale

    OpenAIRE

    François Van Dorpe; Bertrand Iooss; Vladimir Semenov; Olga Sorokovikova; Alexey Fokin; Yves Margerit

    2007-01-01

    The results of four gas tracer experiments of atmospheric dispersion on a regional scale are used for the benchmarking of two atmospheric dispersion modeling codes, MINERVE-SPRAY (CEA), and NOSTRADAMUS (IBRAE). The main topic of this comparison is to estimate the Lagrangian code capability to predict the radionuclide atmospheric transfer on a large field, in the case of risk assessment of nuclear power plant for example. For the four experiments, the results of...

  10. Dispersion analysis of the Pn -Pn-1DG mixed finite element pair for atmospheric modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Mixed finite element methods provide a generalisation of staggered grid finite difference methods with a framework to extend the method to high orders. The ability to generate a high order method is appealing for applications on the kind of quasi-uniform grids that are popular for atmospheric modelling, so that the method retains an acceptable level of accuracy even around special points in the grid. The dispersion properties of such schemes are important to study as they provide insight into the numerical adjustment to imbalance that is an important component in atmospheric modelling. This paper extends the recent analysis of the P2 - P1DG pair, that is a quadratic continuous and linear discontinuous finite element pair, to higher polynomial orders and also spectral element type pairs. In common with the previously studied element pair, and also with other schemes such as the spectral element and discontinuous Galerkin methods, increasing the polynomial order is found to provide a more accurate dispersion relation for the well resolved part of the spectrum but at the cost of a number of unphysical spectral gaps. The effects of these spectral gaps are investigated and shown to have a varying impact depending upon the width of the gap. Finally, the tensor product nature of the finite element spaces is exploited to extend the dispersion analysis into two-dimensions.

  11. Modeling of High-altitude Atmospheric Dispersion Using Climate and Meteorological Forecast Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, L G; Chin, H S

    2005-03-30

    The overall objective of this study is to provide a demonstration of capability for importing both high altitude meteorological forecast and climatological datasets from NRL into the NARAC modeling system to simulate high altitude atmospheric droplet release and dispersion. The altitude of release for the proposed study is between 60 and 100km altitude. As either standard climatological data (over a period of 40 years) or daily meteorological forecasts can drive the particle dispersion model, we did a limited comparison of simulations with meteorological data and simulations with climatological data. The modeling tools used to address this problem are the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) modeling system at LLNL which are operationally employed to assist DOE/DHS/DOD emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants. The interrelation of the various data feeds and codes at NARAC are illustrated in Figure 1. The NARAC scientific models are all verified to both analytic solutions and other codes; the models are validated to field data such as the Prairie Grass study (Barad, 1958). NARAC has multiple real-time meteorological data feeds from the National Weather Service, from the European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting, from the US Navy, and from the US Air Force. NARAC also keeps a historical archive of meteorological data partially for research purposes. The codes used in this effort were the Atmospheric Data Assimilation and Parameterization Techniques (ADAPT) model (Sugiyama and Chan, 1998) and a development version of the Langrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator (LODI) model (Nasstrom et al., 2000). The use of the NASA GEOS-4 dataset required the use of a development version of the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) model (Hodur, 1997; Chin and Glascoe, 2004). The specific goals of this study are the following: (1) Confirm data compatibility of NRL

  12. Simulating industrial emissions using atmospheric dispersion modeling system: model performance and source emission factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fadel, M; Abi-Esber, L

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, the Gaussian Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System (ADMS4) was coupled with field observations of surface meteorology and concentrations of several air quality indicators (nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), fine particulate matter (PM10) and sulfur dioxide (SO2)) to test the applicability of source emission factors set by the European Environment Agency (EEA) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) at an industrial complex. Best emission factors and data groupings based on receptor location, type of terrain and wind speed, were relied upon to examine model performance using statistical analyses of simulated and observed data. The model performance was deemed satisfactory for several scenarios when receptors were located at downwind sites with index of agreement 'd' values reaching 0.58, fractional bias 'FB' and geometric mean bias 'MG' values approaching 0 and 1, respectively, and normalized mean square error 'NMSE' values as low as 2.17. However, median ratios of predicted to observed concentrations 'Cp/Co' at variable downstream distances were 0.01, 0.36, 0.76 and 0.19 for NOx, CO, PM10 and SO2, respectively, and the fraction of predictions within a factor of two of observations 'FAC2' values were lower than 0.5, indicating that the model could not adequately replicate all observed variations in emittant concentrations. Also, the model was found to be significantly sensitive to the input emission factor bringing into light the deficiency in regulatory compliance modeling which often uses internationally reported emission factors without testing their applicability.

  13. EVALUATION OF URBAN ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION MODELS USING DATA FROM THE JOINT URBAN 2003 FIELD EXPERIMENT

    OpenAIRE

    T. Urban, Jeffry; Warner, Steve; Platt, Nathan; F. Heagy, James

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: We have evaluated the performance of several urban atmospheric transport and dispersion models by comparing model predictions to tracer gas concentrations measured during the Joint Urban 2003 field experiment in Oklahoma City, USA. These models include the Urban Canopy, Urban Dispersion Model (UDM), and Micro-SWIFT/SPRAY (MSS) modes within the HPAC modelling suite, QUIC-URB/QUIC-PLUME models, and the MESO/RUSTIC models. We discuss some of the results of these comparisons...

  14. Implicit coupling of turbulent diffusion with chemical reaction mechanisms for prognostic atmospheric dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlowitz, D.R.

    1996-11-01

    In the last few decades the negative impact by humans on the thin atmospheric layer enveloping the earth, the basis for life on this planet, has increased steadily. In order to halt, or at least slow down this development, the knowledge and study of these anthropogenic influence has to be increased and possible remedies have to be suggested. An important tool for these studies are computer models. With their help the atmospheric system can be approximated and the various processes, which have led to the current situation can be quantified. They also serve as an instrument to assess short or medium term strategies to reduce this human impact. However, to assure efficiency as well as accuracy, a careful analysis of the numerous processes involved in the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere is called for. This should help to concentrate on the essentials and also prevent excessive usage of sometimes scarce computing resources. The basis of the presented work is the EUMAC Zooming Model (ETM), and particularly the component calculating the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, the model MARS. The model has two main parts: an explicit solver, where the advection and the horizontal diffusion of pollutants are calculated, and an implicit solution mechanism, allowing the joint computation of the change of concentration due to chemical reactions, coupled with the respective influence of the vertical diffusion of the species. The aim of this thesis is to determine particularly the influence of the horizontal components of the turbulent diffusion on the existing implicit solver of the model. Suggestions for a more comprehensive inclusion of the full three dimensional diffusion operator in the implicit solver are made. This is achieved by an appropriate operator splitting. A selection of numerical approaches to tighten the coupling of the diffusion processes with the calculation of the applied chemical reaction mechanisms are examined. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  15. Atmospheric dispersion of argon-41 from anuclear research reactor: measurement and modeling of plume geometry and gamma radiation field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Bent; Astrup, Poul; Drews, Martin

    2003-01-01

    An atmospheric dispersion experiment was conducted using a visible tracer along with the routine release of argon-41 from the BR1 research reactor in Mol, Belgium. Simultaneous measurements of plume geometry and radiation fields for argon-41 decay were performed as well as measurements of the argon......-41 source term and the meteorological parametres. Good overall agreement is found between measurement data and model results using the mesoscale atmospheric dispersion and dose rate model RIMPUFF....

  16. Development of NEXRAD Wind Retrievals as Input to Atmospheric Dispersion Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Newsom, Rob K.; Allwine, K Jerry; Xu, Qin; Zhang, Pengfei; Copeland, Jeffrey H.; Sun, Jenny

    2007-03-06

    The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility that routinely collected data from the Doppler radars can appropriately be used in Atmospheric Dispersion Models (ADMs) for emergency response. We have evaluated the computational efficiency and accuracy of two variational mathematical techniques that derive the u- and v-components of the wind from radial velocities obtained from Doppler radars. A review of the scientific literature indicated that the techniques employ significantly different approaches in applying the variational techniques: 2-D Variational (2DVar), developed by NOAA¹s (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's) National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) and Variational Doppler Radar Analysis System (VDRAS), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). We designed a series of numerical experiments in which both models employed the same horizontal domain and resolution encompassing Oklahoma City for a two-week period during the summer of 2003 so that the computed wind retrievals could be fairly compared. Both models ran faster than real-time on a typical single dual-processor computer, indicating that they could be used to generate wind retrievals in near real-time. 2DVar executed ~2.5 times faster than VDRAS because of its simpler approach.

  17. Atmospheric dispersion modelling of bioaerosols that are pathogenic to humans and livestock - A review to inform risk assessment studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leuken, J. P G; Swart, A. N.; Havelaar, A. H.; Van Pul, A.; Van der Hoek, W.; Heederik, D.

    In this review we discuss studies that applied atmospheric dispersion models (ADM) to bioaerosols that are pathogenic to humans and livestock in the context of risk assessment studies. Traditionally, ADMs have been developed to describe the atmospheric transport of chemical pollutants, radioactive

  18. A source term estimation method for a nuclear accident using atmospheric dispersion models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Minsik; Ohba, Ryohji; Oura, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an operational source term estimation (STE) method applicable for a nuclear accident like the incident that occurred at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in 2011. The new STE method presented here is based on data from atmospheric dispersion...... models and short-range observational data around the nuclear power plants.The accuracy of this method is validated with data from a wind tunnel study that involved a tracer gas release from a scaled model experiment at Tokai Daini nuclear power station in Japan. We then use the methodology developed...... and validated through the effort described in this manuscript to estimate the release rate of radioactive material from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station....

  19. A source term estimation method for a nuclear accident using atmospheric dispersion models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Minsik; Ohba, Ryohji; Oura, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    models and short-range observational data around the nuclear power plants.The accuracy of this method is validated with data from a wind tunnel study that involved a tracer gas release from a scaled model experiment at Tokai Daini nuclear power station in Japan. We then use the methodology developed......The objective of this study is to develop an operational source term estimation (STE) method applicable for a nuclear accident like the incident that occurred at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in 2011. The new STE method presented here is based on data from atmospheric dispersion...... and validated through the effort described in this manuscript to estimate the release rate of radioactive material from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station....

  20. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling of the February 2014 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Piggott, Tom [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lobaugh, Megan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tai, Lydia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pobanz, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yu, Kristen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-22

    This report presents the results of a simulation of the atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radioactivity released from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in New Mexico in February 2014. These simulations were made by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and supersede NARAC simulation results published in a previous WIPP report (WIPP, 2014). The results presented in this report use additional, more detailed data from WIPP on the specific radionuclides released, radioactivity release amounts and release times. Compared to the previous NARAC simulations, the new simulation results in this report are based on more detailed modeling of the winds, turbulence, and particle dry deposition. In addition, the initial plume rise from the exhaust vent was considered in the new simulations, but not in the previous NARAC simulations. The new model results show some small differences compared to previous results, but do not change the conclusions in the WIPP (2014) report. Presented are the data and assumptions used in these model simulations, as well as the model-predicted dose and deposition on and near the WIPP site. A comparison of predicted and measured radionuclide-specific air concentrations is also presented.

  1. Atmospheric Dispersion Modelling and Spatial Analysis to Evaluate Population Exposure to Pesticides from Farming Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Costanzini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work originates from an epidemiological study aimed to assess the correlation between population exposure to pesticides used in agriculture and adverse health effects. In support of the population exposure evaluation two models implemented by the authors were applied: a GIS-based proximity model and the CAREA atmospheric dispersion model. In this work, the results of the two models are presented and compared. Despite the proximity analysis is widely used for these kinds of studies, it was investigated how meteorology could affect the exposure assessment. Both models were applied to pesticides emitted by 1519 agricultural fields and considering 2584 receptors distributed over an area of 8430 km2. CAREA output shows a considerable enhancement in the percentage of exposed receptors, from the 4% of the proximity model to the 54% of the CAREA model. Moreover, the spatial analysis of the results on a specific test site showed that the effects of meteorology considered by CAREA led to an anisotropic exposure distribution that differs considerably from the symmetric distribution resulting by the proximity model. In addition, the results of a field campaign for the definition and planning of ground measurement of concentration for the validation of CAREA are presented. The preliminary results showed how, during treatments, pesticide concentrations distant from the fields are significantly higher than background values.

  2. Accidental benzene release risk assessment in an urban area using an atmospheric dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Son C. H.; Lee, Myong-In; Kim, Ganghan; Kim, Dongmin; Park, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Cho, Gi-Hyoug

    2016-11-01

    This study applied the American Meteorological Society and Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) to assess the risk caused by an accidental release and dispersion of the toxic chemical benzene in the vicinity of a highly populated urban area. The modeling domain encompasses the Korean megacity of Ulsan, which includes two national industrial complexes and is characterized by a complex coastal terrain. Multiple AERMOD simulations were conducted for an assumed emission scenario using background wind data from August between 2009 and 2013. The series of experiments produced the spatial accident probability patterns for different concentration levels during daytime and nighttime scenarios based on the corresponding dominant wind patterns. This study further quantifies the potential accident risk based on the number of affected individuals by combining the accident probability with the indoor and outdoor population estimates. The chemical gas dispersion characteristics depend on various local meteorological conditions, such as the land-sea breeze direction, which alternates between daytime and nighttime, and the atmospheric stability. The results reveal that benzene dispersion affects a much larger area during the nighttime owing to the presence of a nocturnal stable boundary layer with significant temperature stratification. The affected area is smaller during the daytime owing to decreased stability and enhanced vertical mixing in the boundary layer. The results include a high degree of uncertainty during the nighttime owing to weak wind speeds and the lack of a prevailing wind direction, which impact the vulnerable area. However, vulnerable areas are more effectively identified during the daytime, when more consistent meteorological conditions exist. However, the potential risk becomes much lower during the nighttime owing to a substantial reduction of the outdoor population.

  3. Revisiting the radionuclide atmospheric dispersion event of the Chernobyl disaster - modelling sensitivity and data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roustan, Yelva; Duhanyan, Nora; Bocquet, Marc; Winiarek, Victor

    2013-04-01

    A sensitivity study of the numerical model, as well as, an inverse modelling approach applied to the atmospheric dispersion issues after the Chernobyl disaster are both presented in this paper. On the one hand, the robustness of the source term reconstruction through advanced data assimilation techniques was tested. On the other hand, the classical approaches for sensitivity analysis were enhanced by the use of an optimised forcing field which otherwise is known to be strongly uncertain. The POLYPHEMUS air quality system was used to perform the simulations of radionuclide dispersion. Activity concentrations in air and deposited to the ground of iodine-131, caesium-137 and caesium-134 were considered. The impact of the implemented parameterizations of the physical processes (dry and wet depositions, vertical turbulent diffusion), of the forcing fields (meteorology and source terms) and of the numerical configuration (horizontal resolution) were investigated for the sensitivity study of the model. A four dimensional variational scheme (4D-Var) based on the approximate adjoint of the chemistry transport model was used to invert the source term. The data assimilation is performed with measurements of activity concentrations in air extracted from the Radioactivity Environmental Monitoring (REM) database. For most of the investigated configurations (sensitivity study), the statistics to compare the model results to the field measurements as regards the concentrations in air are clearly improved while using a reconstructed source term. As regards the ground deposited concentrations, an improvement can only be seen in case of satisfactorily modelled episode. Through these studies, the source term and the meteorological fields are proved to have a major impact on the activity concentrations in air. These studies also reinforce the use of reconstructed source term instead of the usual estimated one. A more detailed parameterization of the deposition process seems also to be

  4. Evaluation of radioxenon releases in Australia using atmospheric dispersion modelling tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Rick; Orr, Blake; Grzechnik, Marcus; Hoffmann, Emmy; Saey, Paul; Solomon, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    The origin of a series of atmospheric radioxenon events detected at the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) International Monitoring System site in Melbourne, Australia, between November 2008 and February 2009 was investigated. Backward tracking analyses indicated that the events were consistent with releases associated with hot commission testing of the Australian Nuclear Science Technology Organisation (ANSTO) radiopharmaceutical production facility in Sydney, Australia. Forward dispersion analyses were used to estimate release magnitudes and transport times. The estimated (133)Xe release magnitude of the largest event (between 0.2 and 34 TBq over a 2 d window), was in close agreement with the stack emission releases estimated by the facility for this time period (between 0.5 and 2 TBq). Modelling of irradiation conditions and theoretical radioxenon emission rates were undertaken and provided further evidence that the Melbourne detections originated from this radiopharmaceutical production facility. These findings do not have public health implications. This is the first comprehensive study of atmospheric radioxenon measurements and releases in Australia. Crown Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Source apportionment based on an atmospheric dispersion model and multiple linear regression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushimi, Akihiro; Kawashima, Hiroto; Kajihara, Hideo

    Understanding the contribution of each emission source of air pollutants to ambient concentrations is important to establish effective measures for risk reduction. We have developed a source apportionment method based on an atmospheric dispersion model and multiple linear regression analysis (MLR) in conjunction with ambient concentrations simultaneously measured at points in a grid network. We used a Gaussian plume dispersion model developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency called the Industrial Source Complex model (ISC) in the method. Our method does not require emission amounts or source profiles. The method was applied to the case of benzene in the vicinity of the Keiyo Central Coastal Industrial Complex (KCCIC), one of the biggest industrial complexes in Japan. Benzene concentrations were simultaneously measured from December 2001 to July 2002 at sites in a grid network established in the KCCIC and the surrounding residential area. The method was used to estimate benzene emissions from the factories in the KCCIC and from automobiles along a section of a road, and then the annual average contribution of the KCCIC to the ambient concentrations was estimated based on the estimated emissions. The estimated contributions of the KCCIC were 65% inside the complex, 49% at 0.5-km sites, 35% at 1.5-km sites, 20% at 3.3-km sites, and 9% at a 5.6-km site. The estimated concentrations agreed well with the measured values. The estimated emissions from the factories and the road were slightly larger than those reported in the first Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (PRTR). These results support the reliability of our method. This method can be applied to other chemicals or regions to achieve reasonable source apportionments.

  6. High resolution meteorological modelling of the Inntal valley atmosphere, Part II: applications to dispersion modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, D.; Schicker, I.; Seibert, P.

    2009-09-01

    Orography and local meteorology play a major role in Alpine valleys, as they are linked with valley and slope wind systems, stagnation and recirculation, temperature inversions and turbulence. Thus, they have a strong influence of transport and dilution of pollutants in the valley, affecting human health, and sound propagation. Shallow stable layers at the valley floor and low wind speed conditions, especially in autumn and winter, trap pollutants and thus cause unfavourable dispersion conditions , possibly leading to exceedances of air pollution limits. Moreover, under certain synoptic conditions such as persistent high-pressure systems inversion conditions prevail for days. Emissions may accumulate in the valley from day to day and thus critical levels of pollutants may be reached. With the current computer capabilities, numerical meteorological models and particle dispersion models are powerful tools to investigate such situations and their impact on emission-side measures. Output from the limited area meteorological model MM5 for selected synoptic periods of special interest regarding air quality conditions (see contribution by Schicker et al., this session) will be used as input to the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPARTv6.2. Currently two specific versions of FLEXPART exist to work in the meso and local scale, WRF-FLEXPARTv6.2 and MM5v3-7.FLEXPARTv6.2, which use WRF and MM5 fields as meteorological input, respectively. Extensive tests will be performed with the MM5-driven version and additional preliminary ones with the WRF version. Dispersion calculations for CO and NOx will be performed in a receptor-oriented approach for three stations and with different meteorological input resolutions. The target stations will be Innsbruck, located at the bottom of the Inn valley, and Nordkette, located on the northern slopes of the valley. Source-receptor sensitivities (SRS) will be obtained to see the major sources which contribute to the measurements for

  7. Integration of an atmospheric dispersion model with a dynamic multimedia fate model: development and illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Melissa; Ghirardello, Davide; Semplice, Matteo; Raspa, Giuseppe; Di Guardo, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    Growing attention is devoted to understand the influence of the short-term variations in air concentrations on the environmental fate of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These variations are ascribable to factors such as temperature-mediated air-surface exchange and variability of planetary boundary layer (PBL) height and structure. But when investigating the fate of SVOCs at a local scale, further variability can derive from specific point source contributions. In this context, a new modeling approach (AirPlus) which integrates a previously developed model (AirFug) with an air dispersion model (AERMOD) is presented. The integrated model is illustrated for two PAHs in a Northern Italy scenario. Results show how chemical contributions deriving from background advective inflows, local emissions and a point source interact in an hourly-varying meteorological scenario to determine air concentration rapid changes and the consequent response of the soil compartment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Estimation Of 137Cs Using Atmospheric Dispersion Models After A Nuclear Reactor Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, V.; Kindap, T.; Unal, A.; Pozzoli, L.; Karaca, M.

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear energy will continue to have an important role in the production of electricity in the world as the need of energy grows up. But the safety of power plants will always be a question mark for people because of the accidents happened in the past. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident which happened in 26 April 1986 was the biggest nuclear accident ever. Because of explosion and fire large quantities of radioactive material was released to the atmosphere. The release of the radioactive particles because of accident affected not only its region but the entire Northern hemisphere. But much of the radioactive material was spread over west USSR and Europe. There are many studies about distribution of radioactive particles and the deposition of radionuclides all over Europe. But this was not true for Turkey especially for the deposition of radionuclides released after Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident and the radiation doses received by people. The aim of this study is to determine the radiation doses received by people living in Turkish territory after Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident and use this method in case of an emergency. For this purpose The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model was used to simulate meteorological conditions after the accident. The results of WRF which were for the 12 days after accident were used as input data for the HYSPLIT model. NOAA-ARL's (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory) dispersion model HYSPLIT was used to simulate the 137Cs distrubition. The deposition values of 137Cs in our domain after Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor Accident were between 1.2E-37 Bq/m2 and 3.5E+08 Bq/m2. The results showed that Turkey was affected because of the accident especially the Black Sea Region. And the doses were calculated by using GENII-LIN which is multipurpose health physics code.

  9. CFD and Gaussian atmospheric dispersion models: A comparison for leak from carbon dioxide transportation and storage facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoldi, Alberto; Hill, Tim; Colls, Jeremy J.

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is of interest to the scientific community as a way of achieving significant global reduction of atmospheric CO 2 emission in the medium term. CO 2 would be transported from large emission points (e.g. coal fired power plants) to storage sites by surface/shallow high pressure pipelines. Modelling of CO 2 atmospheric dispersion after leakages from transportation facilities will be required before starting large scale CCS projects. This paper deals with the evaluation of the atmospheric dispersion CFD tool Fluidyn-PANACHE against Prairie Grass and Kit Fox field experiments. A description of the models for turbulence generation and dissipation used ( k- ɛ and k- l) and a comparison with the Gaussian model ALOHA for both field experiments are also outlined. The main outcome of this work puts PANACHE among the "fit-for-purpose" models, respecting all the prerequisites stated by Hanna et al. [Hanna, S.R., Chang, J.C. and Strimaitis, D.G., 1993. Hazardous gas model evaluation with field observations. Atmospheric Environment, 27, 2265-2285] for the evaluation of atmospheric dispersion model performance. The average under-prediction has been ascribed to the usage of mean wind speed and direction, which is characteristic of all CFD models. The authors suggest a modification of performance ranges for model acceptability measures, within the field of high pressure CO 2 transportation risk assessment, with the aim of accounting for the overall simplification induced by the usage of constant wind speed and direction within CFD atmospheric dispersion models.

  10. Dutch distribution zones of stable iodine tablets based on atmospheric dispersion modelling of accidental releases from nuclear power plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok-Palma, Y.S.; Leenders, M.; Meulenbelt, J.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid administration of stable iodine is essential for the saturation and subsequent protection of the thyroid gland against the potential harm caused by radioiodines. This paper proposes the Dutch risk analysis that uses an atmospheric dispersion model to calculate the size of the zones around

  11. Detailed source term estimation of the atmospheric release for the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident by coupling simulations of an atmospheric dispersion model with an improved deposition scheme and oceanic dispersion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katata, G.; Chino, M.; Kobayashi, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki (Japan); and others

    2015-07-01

    Temporal variations in the amount of radionuclides released into the atmosphere during the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FNPS1) accident and their atmospheric and marine dispersion are essential to evaluate the environmental impacts and resultant radiological doses to the public. In this paper, we estimate the detailed atmospheric releases during the accident using a reverse estimation method which calculates the release rates of radionuclides by comparing measurements of air concentration of a radionuclide or its dose rate in the environment with the ones calculated by atmospheric and oceanic transport, dispersion and deposition models. The atmospheric and oceanic models used are WSPEEDI-II (Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information) and SEA-GEARN-FDM (Finite difference oceanic dispersion model), both developed by the authors. A sophisticated deposition scheme, which deals with dry and fog-water depositions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation, and subsequent wet scavenging due to mixed-phase cloud microphysics (in-cloud scavenging) for radioactive iodine gas (I{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}I) and other particles (CsI, Cs, and Te), was incorporated into WSPEEDI-II to improve the surface deposition calculations. The results revealed that the major releases of radionuclides due to the FNPS1 accident occurred in the following periods during March 2011: the afternoon of 12 March due to the wet venting and hydrogen explosion at Unit 1, midnight of 14 March when the SRV (safety relief valve) was opened three times at Unit 2, the morning and night of 15 March, and the morning of 16 March. According to the simulation results, the highest radioactive contamination areas around FNPS1 were created from 15 to 16 March by complicated interactions among rainfall, plume movements, and the temporal variation of release rates. The simulation by WSPEEDI-II using the new source term reproduced the local and regional patterns of

  12. Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear accidents: what has changed in the use of atmospheric dispersion modeling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benamrane, Y; Wybo, J-L; Armand, P

    2013-12-01

    The threat of a major accidental or deliberate event that would lead to hazardous materials emission in the atmosphere is a great cause of concern to societies. This is due to the potential large scale of casualties and damages that could result from the release of explosive, flammable or toxic gases from industrial plants or transport accidents, radioactive material from nuclear power plants (NPPs), and chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear (CBRN) terrorist attacks. In order to respond efficiently to such events, emergency services and authorities resort to appropriate planning and organizational patterns. This paper focuses on the use of atmospheric dispersion modeling (ADM) as a support tool for emergency planning and response, to assess the propagation of the hazardous cloud and thereby, take adequate counter measures. This paper intends to illustrate the noticeable evolution in the operational use of ADM tools over 25 y and especially in emergency situations. This study is based on data available in scientific publications and exemplified using the two most severe nuclear accidents: Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). It appears that during the Chernobyl accident, ADM were used few days after the beginning of the accident mainly in a diagnosis approach trying to reconstruct what happened, whereas 25 y later, ADM was also used during the first days and weeks of the Fukushima accident to anticipate the potentially threatened areas. We argue that the recent developments in ADM tools play an increasing role in emergencies and crises management, by supporting stakeholders in anticipating, monitoring and assessing post-event damages. However, despite technological evolutions, its prognostic and diagnostic use in emergency situations still arise many issues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimation of aggregate population cancer risk from dichloromethane for Japanese using atmospheric dispersion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kazuya; Higashino, Haruyuki; Yoshikado, Hiroshi; Nakanishi, Junko

    2006-01-01

    The aggregate population cancer risk from dichloromethane exposure for each prefecture and for all of Japan was estimated using an atmospheric dispersion model and by considering the population within each calculation mesh (about 5 x 5 km). Indoor dichloromethane exposure was also taken into consideration. The number of lifetime dichloromethane-exposure-induced cancer cases for all of Japan was estimated to be only 1.3 (of 125 million people) using a most recently reported unit risk value. It was also found that the average ratio of the contribution to the aggregate population cancer risk attributable to outdoor emission sources (industrial factories) to the total emission sources was no more than 40% for all of Japan. From these results, it is believed that further reductions in dichloromethane emissions from industrial factories on a prefectural or a nationwide scale would not be effective in reducing cancer risk. It was also revealed that the average ambient concentration of dichloromethane measured at monitoring stations for hazardous air pollutants in each prefecture is a good measure of the average ambient dichloromethane concentration to which people in that prefecture are exposed. Therefore, it was suggested that the aggregate population cancer risk from dichloromethane exposure can be effectively estimated for entire Japan by simply using the average ambient concentration measured at monitoring stations in all of Japan taking into consideration indoor dichloromethane exposure.

  14. Atmospheric dispersion models and pre-processing of meteorological data for real-time application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Desiato, F.

    1993-01-01

    considerations, model performance and evaluation records, computational needs, user expertise, and type of sources to be modelled. Models suitable for a given accident scenario are chosen from this hierarchy in order to provide the dose assessments via the dispersion module. A forecasting feasibility...

  15. Atmospheric Dispersion Capability for T2VOC

    OpenAIRE

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric transport by variable-K theory dispersion has been added to T2VOC. The new code, T2VOCA, models flow and transport in the subsurface identically to T2VOC, but includes also the capability for modeling passive multicomponent variable-K theory dispersion in an atmospheric region assumed to be flat, horizontal, and with a logarithmic wind profile. The specification of the logarithmic wind profile in the T2VOC input file is automated through the use of a build code called ATMDISP...

  16. DUSTRAN 1.0 User’s Guide: A GIS-Based Atmospheric Dust Dispersion Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Rutz, Frederick C.; Shaw, William J.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Fritz, Brad G.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2006-09-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory just completed a multi-year project to develop a fully tested and documented atmospheric dispersion modeling system (DUST TRANsport or DUSTRAN) to assist the U.S. Department of Defense in addressing particulate air quality issues at military training and testing ranges. This manual documents the DUSTRAN modeling system and includes installation instructions, a user’s guide, and detailed example tutorials.

  17. Stochastic fields method for sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion models

    OpenAIRE

    M. Cassiani; Vinuesa, J.F.; Galmarini, S.; Denby, B

    2010-01-01

    The stochastic fields method for turbulent reacting flows has been applied to the issue of sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in a mesoscale model. This method is a solution technique for the probability density function (PDF) transport equation and can be seen as a straightforward extension of currently used mesoscale dispersion models. It has been implemented in an existing mesoscale model and the results are compared with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) data devised to test specifically the...

  18. SPRAYTRAN USER'S GUIDE: A GIS-BASED ATMOSPHERIC SPRAY DROPLET DISPERSION MODELING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The offsite drift of pesticide from spray operations is an ongoing source of concern. The SPRAY TRANsport (SPRAYTRAN) system, documented in this report, incorporates the near-field spray application model, AGDISP, into a meso-scale atmospheric transport model. The AGDISP model ...

  19. Atmospheric and dispersion modeling in areas of highly complex terrain employing a four-dimensional data assimilation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, J.D.; O`Steen, B.L.

    1994-12-31

    The results of this study indicate that the current data assimilation technique can have a positive impact on the mesoscale flow fields; however, care must be taken in its application to grids of relatively fine horizontal resolution. Continuous FDDA is a useful tool in producing high-resolution mesoscale analysis fields that can be used to (1) create a better initial conditions for mesoscale atmospheric models and (2) drive transport models for dispersion studies. While RAMS is capable of predicting the qualitative flow during this evening, additional experiments need to be performed to improve the prognostic forecasts made by RAMS and refine the FDDA procedure so that the overall errors are reduced even further. Despite the fact that a great deal of computational time is necessary in executing RAMS and LPDM in the configuration employed in this study, recent advances in workstations is making applications such as this more practical. As the speed of these machines increase in the next few years, it will become feasible to employ prognostic, three-dimensional mesoscale/transport models to routinely predict atmospheric dispersion of pollutants, even to highly complex terrain. For example, the version of RAMS in this study could be run in a ``nowcasting`` model that would continually assimilate local and regional observations as soon as they become available. The atmospheric physics in the model would be used to determine the wind field where no observations are available. The three-dimensional flow fields could be used as dynamic initial conditions for a model forecast. The output from this type of modeling system will have to be compared to existing diagnostic, mass-consistent models to determine whether the wind field and dispersion forecasts are significantly improved.

  20. Stochastic fields method for sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cassiani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The stochastic fields method for turbulent reacting flows has been applied to the issue of sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in a mesoscale model. This method is a solution technique for the probability density function (PDF transport equation and can be seen as a straightforward extension of currently used mesoscale dispersion models. It has been implemented in an existing mesoscale model and the results are compared with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES data devised to test specifically the effect of sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity on boundary layer concentration fluctuations. The sub-grid scale emission variability is assimilated in the model as a PDF of the emissions. The stochastic fields method shows excellent agreement with the LES data without adjustment of the constants used in the mesoscale model. The stochastic fields method is a stochastic solution of the transport equations for the concentration PDF of dispersing scalars, therefore it possesses the ability to handle chemistry of any complexity without the need to introduce additional closures for the high order statistics of chemical species. This study shows for the first time the feasibility of applying this method to mesoscale chemical transport models.

  1. CFD modelling of small particle dispersion: The influence of the turbulence kinetic energy in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlé, C.; van Beeck, J.; Rambaud, P.; Van Tendeloo, G.

    When considering the modelling of small particle dispersion in the lower part of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) using Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes simulations, the particle paths depend on the velocity profile and on the turbulence kinetic energy, from which the fluctuating velocity components are derived to predict turbulent dispersion. It is therefore important to correctly reproduce the ABL, both for the velocity profile and the turbulence kinetic energy profile. For RANS simulations with the standard k- ɛ model, Richards and Hoxey (1993. Appropriate boundary conditions for computational wind engineering models using the k-ɛ turbulence model. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 46-47, 145-153.) proposed a set of boundary conditions which result in horizontally homogeneous profiles. The drawback of this method is that it assumes a constant profile of turbulence kinetic energy, which is not always consistent with field or wind tunnel measurements. Therefore, a method was developed which allows the modelling of a horizontally homogeneous turbulence kinetic energy profile that is varying with height. By comparing simulations performed with the proposed method to simulations performed with the boundary conditions described by Richards and Hoxey (1993. Appropriate boundary conditions for computational wind engineering models using the k-ɛ turbulence model. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 46-47, 145-153.), the influence of the turbulence kinetic energy on the dispersion of small particles over flat terrain is quantified.

  2. Some Observational and Modeling Studies of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer at Mississippi Gulf Coast for Air Pollution Dispersion Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjaneyulu Yerramilli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal atmospheric conditions widely vary from those over inland due to the land-sea interface, temperature contrast and the consequent development of local circulations. In this study a field meteorological experiment was conducted to measure vertical structure of boundary layer during the period 25-29 June, 2007 at three locations Seabee base, Harrison and Wiggins sites in the Mississippi coast. A GPS Sonde along with slow ascent helium balloon and automated weather stations equipped with slow and fast response sensors were used in the experiment. GPS sonde were launched at three specific times (0700 LT, 1300 LT and 1800 LT during the experiment days. The observations indicate shallow boundary layer near the coast which gradually develops inland. The weather research and forecasting (WRF meso-scale atmospheric model and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (HYSPLIT are used to simulate the lower atmospheric flow and dispersion in a range of 100 km from the coast for 28-30 June, 2007. The simulated meteorological parameters were compared with the experimental observations. The meso-scale model results show significant temporal and spatial variations in the meteorological fields as a result of development of sea breeze flow, its coupling with the large scale flow field and the ensuing alteration in the mixing depth across the coast. Simulated ground-level concentrations of SO2 from four elevated point sources located along the coast indicate diurnal variation and impact of the local sea-land breeze on the direction of the plume. Model concentration levels were highest during the stable morning condition and during the sea-breeze time in the afternoon. The highest concentrations were found up to 40 km inland during sea breeze time. The study illustrates the application of field meteorological observations for the validation of WRF which is coupled to HYSPLIT for dispersion assessment in the coastal region.

  3. Final Technical Report: Development of the DUSTRAN GIS-Based Complex Terrain Model for Atmospheric Dust Dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Rutz, Frederick C.; Shaw, William J.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Fritz, Brad G.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2007-05-01

    Activities at U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) training and testing ranges can be sources of dust in local and regional airsheds governed by air-quality regulations. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory just completed a multi-year project to develop a fully tested and documented atmospheric dispersion modeling system (DUST TRANsport or DUSTRAN) to assist the DoD in addressing particulate air-quality issues at military training and testing ranges.

  4. VALDRIFT 1.0: A valley atmospheric dispersion model with deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwine, K.J.; Bian, X.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1995-05-01

    VALDRIFT version 1.0 is an atmospheric transport and diffusion model for use in well-defined mountain valleys. It is designed to determine the extent of ddft from aedal pesticide spraying activities, but can also be applied to estimate the transport and diffusion of various air pollutants in valleys. The model is phenomenological -- that is, the dominant meteorological processes goveming the behavior of the valley atmosphere are formulated explicitly in the model, albeit in a highly parameterized fashion. The key meteorological processes treated are: (1) nonsteady and nonhomogeneous along-valley winds and turbulent diffusivities, (2) convective boundary layer growth, (3) inversion descent, (4) noctumal temperature inversion breakup, and (5) subsidence. The model is applicable under relatively cloud-free, undisturbed synoptic conditions and is configured to operate through one diumal cycle for a single valley. The inputs required are the valley topographical characteristics, pesticide release rate as a function of time and space, along-valley wind speed as a function of time and space, temperature inversion characteristics at sunrise, and sensible heat flux as a function of time following sunrise. Default values are provided for certain inputs in the absence of detailed observations. The outputs are three-dimensional air concentration and ground-level deposition fields as a function of time.

  5. Atmospheric Transport Modeling with 3D Lagrangian Dispersion Codes Compared with SF6 Tracer Experiments at Regional Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Van Dorpe

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of four gas tracer experiments of atmospheric dispersion on a regional scale are used for the benchmarking of two atmospheric dispersion modeling codes, MINERVE-SPRAY (CEA, and NOSTRADAMUS (IBRAE. The main topic of this comparison is to estimate the Lagrangian code capability to predict the radionuclide atmospheric transfer on a large field, in the case of risk assessment of nuclear power plant for example. For the four experiments, the results of calculations show a rather good agreement between the two codes, and the order of magnitude of the concentrations measured on the soil is predicted. Simulation is best for sampling points located ten kilometers from the source, while we note a divergence for more distant points results (difference in concentrations by a factor 2 to 5. This divergence may be explained by the fact that, for these four experiments, only one weather station (near the point source was used on a field of 10 000 km2, generating the simulation of a uniform wind field throughout the calculation domain.

  6. A GIS-based atmospheric dispersion model for pollutants emitted by complex source areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teggi, Sergio; Costanzini, Sofia; Ghermandi, Grazia; Malagoli, Carlotta; Vinceti, Marco

    2018-01-01

    Gaussian dispersion models are widely used to simulate the concentrations and deposition fluxes of pollutants emitted by source areas. Very often, the calculation time limits the number of sources and receptors and the geometry of the sources must be simple and without holes. This paper presents CAREA, a new GIS-based Gaussian model for complex source areas. CAREA was coded in the Python language, and is largely based on a simplified formulation of the very popular and recognized AERMOD model. The model allows users to define in a GIS environment thousands of gridded or scattered receptors and thousands of complex sources with hundreds of vertices and holes. CAREA computes ground level, or near ground level, concentrations and dry deposition fluxes of pollutants. The input/output and the runs of the model can be completely managed in GIS environment (e.g. inside a GIS project). The paper presents the CAREA formulation and its applications to very complex test cases. The tests shows that the processing time are satisfactory and that the definition of sources and receptors and the output retrieval are quite easy in a GIS environment. CAREA and AERMOD are compared using simple and reproducible test cases. The comparison shows that CAREA satisfactorily reproduces AERMOD simulations and is considerably faster than AERMOD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of wind characteristics and atmospheric dispersion modeling of {sup 137}Cs on the Barakah NPP area in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Kuk; Lee, Kun Jai; Yun, Jong IL [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Chul; Belorid, Miloslav [Institute of Environmental Research, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Beeley, Philip A. [Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Dubai (Antigua and Barbuda)

    2014-08-15

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of wind characteristics and atmosphere dispersion modeling that are based on computational simulation and part of a preliminary study evaluating environmental radiation monitoring system (ERMS) positions within the Barakah nuclear power plant (BNPP). The return period of extreme wind speed was estimated using the Weibull distribution over the life time of the BNPP. In the annual meteorological modeling, the winds from the north and west accounted for more than 90 % of the wind directions. Seasonal effects were not represented. However, a discrepancy in the tendency between daytime and nighttime was observed. Six variations of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) dispersion test were simulated under severe accident condition. The {sup 137}Cs dispersion was strongly influenced by the direction and speed of the main wind. A virtual receptor was set and calculated for observation of the {sup 137}Cs movement and accumulation. The results of the surface roughness effect demonstrated that the deposition of {sup 137}Cs was affected by surface condition. The results of these studies offer useful information for developing environmental radiation monitoring systems (ERMSs) for the BNPP and can be used to assess the environmental effects of new nuclear power plant.

  8. Dispersion of effluents in the atmosphere; Dispersion des effluents dans l`atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This conference day was organized by the `convection` section of the French association of thermal engineers with the support of the environment and energy mastery agency (ADEME). This book of proceedings contains 10 papers entitled: `physical modeling of atmospheric dispersion in wind tunnels. Some industrial examples`; `modeling of the noxious effects of a fire on the environment of an industrial site: importance of thermal engineering related hypotheses`; `atmospheric diffusion of a noxious cloud: fast evaluation method of safety areas around refrigerating installations that use ammonia`; `modeling of atmospheric flows in urban areas in order to study the dispersion of pollutants`; `use of a dispersion parameter to characterize the evolution of a diffusion process downstream of a linear source of passive contaminant placed inside a turbulent boundary layer`; `elements of reflexion around the development of an analytical methodology applied to the elaboration of measurement strategies of air quality in ambient and outdoor atmospheres around industrial sites`; `state-of-the-art about treatment techniques for VOC-rich gaseous effluents`; `characteristics of the time variation of the atmospheric pollution in the Paris region and visualization of its space distribution`; `mass-spectrometry for the measurement of atmospheric pollutants`; `volume variations in natural convection turbulence`. (J.S.)

  9. Impact of Land Surface Heterogeneity on Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuling; Nair, Udaysankar S.; Pielke, Roger A., Sr.; McNider, Richard T.; Christopher, Sundar A.; Anantharaj, Valentine G.

    2009-01-01

    Prior numerical modelling studies show that atmospheric dispersion is sensitive to surface heterogeneities, but past studies do not consider the impact of a realistic distribution of surface heterogeneities on mesoscale atmospheric dispersion. While these focussed on dispersion in the convective boundary layer, the present work also considers dispersion in the nocturnal boundary layer and above. Using a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) coupled to the Eulerian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), the impact of topographic, vegetation, and soil moisture heterogeneities on daytime and nighttime atmospheric dispersion is examined. In addition, the sensitivity to the use of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived spatial distributions of vegetation characteristics on atmospheric dispersion is also studied. The impact of vegetation and terrain heterogeneities on atmospheric dispersion is strongly modulated by soil moisture, with the nature of dispersion switching from non-Gaussian to near- Gaussian behaviour for wetter soils (fraction of saturation soil moisture content exceeding 40%). For drier soil moisture conditions, vegetation heterogeneity produces differential heating and the formation of mesoscale circulation patterns that are primarily responsible for non-Gaussian dispersion patterns. Nighttime dispersion is very sensitive to topographic, vegetation, soil moisture, and soil type heterogeneity and is distinctly non-Gaussian for heterogeneous land-surface conditions. Sensitivity studies show that soil type and vegetation heterogeneities have the most dramatic impact on atmospheric dispersion. To provide more skillful dispersion calculations, we recommend the utilisation of satellite-derived vegetation characteristics coupled with data assimilation techniques that constrain soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) models to generate realistic spatial distributions of surface energy fluxes.

  10. Atmospheric Transport Modeling Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzola, Carl A. [Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation, Aiken, SC (United States); Addis, Robert P. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide DOE and other federal agency emergency managers with an in-depth compilation and description of atmospheric dispersion models available to DOE and other Federal sites.

  11. Dutch distribution zones of stable iodine tablets based on atmospheric dispersion modelling of accidental releases from nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok-Palma, Yvo; Leenders, Marianne; Meulenbelt, Jan

    2010-08-01

    Rapid administration of stable iodine is essential for the saturation and subsequent protection of the thyroid gland against the potential harm caused by radioiodines. This paper proposes the Dutch risk analysis that uses an atmospheric dispersion model to calculate the size of the zones around nuclear power plants where radiological thyroid doses for children might be sufficiently high to warrant iodine administration. Dose calculations for possible releases from the nuclear power plants of Borssele (The Netherlands), Doel (Belgium) and Emsland (Germany) are based on two scenarios in combination with a 1-y set of authentic, high-resolution meteorological data. The dimensions of the circular zones were defined for each nuclear power plant. In these zones, with a radius up to 50 km, distribution of stable iodine tablets is advised.

  12. Dispersion of atmospheric fine particulate matters in simulated lung fluid and their effects on model cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiuhua; Wang, Lixin; Cao, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Xuehua; Yang, Fan; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zhenhua; Hu, Jingtian; Ding, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-15

    Atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) was collected to investigate its dispersion in simulated lung fluid (SLF) and its interaction with model cell membranes. Organic acids, NH4(+), SO4(2-) and NO3(-) were detected in PM2.5 soluble fraction, and heavy metals were detected from the total mass. The insoluble fraction contained kaolinite, CaCO3, aliphatic carbons, aromatic rings, carboxyl and hydroxyl groups reflected by the infrared spectra. Proteins dispersed PM2.5 in SLF, resulted in smaller hydrodynamic diameter (dH) and slower sedimentation rate. Conversely, phospholipids increased dH value and accelerated sedimentation rate. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) were used as model cell membranes. PM2.5 adhered on and disrupted the membrane containing positively-charged lipids but not the membrane containing neutrally- and negatively-charged lipids, which was monitored by microscopy and a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The cationic sites on membrane were necessary for PM2.5 adhesion, but membrane should be disrupted by the combined action of electrostatic forces and hydrogen bonds between PM2.5 oxygen containing groups and the lipid phosphate groups. Our results specified the roles of proteins and phospholipids in PM2.5 dispersion and transport, highly suggested that the health hazard of PM2.5 was related to the biomolecules in the lung fluid and the particle surface groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling of 137Cs generated from Nuclear Spent Fuel under Hypothetic Accidental Condition in the BNPP Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongkuk; Lee, Kwan-Hee; Yook, Daesik; Kim, Sung Il; Lee, Byung Soo

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the results of atmosphere dispersion modeling using CALPUFF code that are based on computational simulation to evaluate the environmental characteristics of the Barakah nuclear power plant (BNPP) in west area of UAE. According to meteorological data analysis (2012~2013), the winds from the north(7.68%) and west(9.05%) including NNW(41.63%), NW(28.55%), and WNW(6.31%) winds accounted for more than 90% of the wind directions. East(0.2%) and south(0.6%) direction wind, including ESE(0.31%), SE(0.38%), and SSE(0.38%) were rarely distributed during the simulation period. Seasonal effects were not showed. However, a discrepancy in the tendency between daytime and night-time was observed. Approximately 87% of the wind speed was distributed below 5.4m/s (17%, 47% and 23% between the speeds of 0.5-1.8m/s 1.8-3.3m/s and 3.3-5.4m/s, respectively) during the annual period. Seasonal wind speed distribution results presented very similar pattern of annual distribution. Wind speed distribution of day and night, on the other hand, had a discrepancy with annual modeling results than seasonal distribution in some sections. The results for high wind speed (more than 10.8m/s) showed that this wind blew from the west. This high wind speed is known locally as the 'Shamal', which occurs rarely, lasting one or two days with the strongest winds experienced in association with gust fronts and thunderstorms. Six variations of cesium-137 (137Cs) dispersion test were simulated under hypothetic severe accidental condition. The 137Cs dispersion was strongly influenced by the direction and speed of the main wind. From the test cases, east-south area of the BNPP site was mainly influenced by 137Cs dispersion. A virtual receptor was set and calculated for observation of the 137Cs movement and accumulation. Surface roughness tests were performed for the analysis of topographic conditions. According to the surface condition, there are various surface roughness length. Four types

  14. Overview of the NAME model and its role as a VAAC atmospheric dispersion model during the Eyjafjallajökull Eruption April 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbetter, Susan; Agnew, Paul; Burgin, Laura; Davis, Lucy; Hort, Matthew; Huggett, Lois; Jones, Andrew; Manning, Alistair; Redington, Alsion; Thomson, David; Webster, Helen

    2010-05-01

    The UK Met Office, in its role as one of nine Volcanic Ash Advisory Centres (VAACs) around the world, is responsible for advising international aviation authorities in all impacted countries of the location and movement of clouds of volcanic ash which originate from the London VAAC domain. VAACs only provide advice on extent of ash to the aviation regulators and it is the regulator's decision on whether to restrict air space. The Met Office delivers this capability through a world-leading atmospheric dispersion model, NAME. In addition to its role as an emergency response guidance tool the model is used for routine air quality forecasting and meteorological research activities. NAME is a Lagrangian particle model which calculates the dispersion of pollutants by tracking ‘particles' through a modelled atmosphere. Each model particle has its own characteristics, for example, particles can represent different chemical species and can represent real particulate sizes. NAME has the flexibility to specify sources at any location in the atmosphere. Once emitted, particles move in a manner determined by the meteorology obtained from the Met Office operational numerical weather prediction model, the Unified Model. Particles are advected according to three-dimensional winds with a random component used to represent the effects of atmospheric turbulence and can be removed from the model atmosphere by various processes. For modelling the dispersion of volcanic ash during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption, NAME is configured in the following manner. Material is released between the volcano summit and the plume rise height as estimated from observations taken by the Icelandic Met Office and measurements from radar and satellites. The particles are emitted following a prescribed size distribution with a density of 2300 kg/m3. The material is subjected to gravitational settling, and is deposited due to dry and wet deposition processes. There is no attempt in NAME to model volcano

  15. Contaminant dispersion prediction and source estimation with integrated Gaussian-machine learning network model for point source emission in atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Denglong [Fuli School of Food Equipment Engineering and Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No.28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); Zhang, Zaoxiao, E-mail: zhangzx@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No.28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No.28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2016-07-05

    Highlights: • The intelligent network models were built to predict contaminant gas concentrations. • The improved network models coupled with Gaussian dispersion model were presented. • New model has high efficiency and accuracy for concentration prediction. • New model were applied to indentify the leakage source with satisfied results. - Abstract: Gas dispersion model is important for predicting the gas concentrations when contaminant gas leakage occurs. Intelligent network models such as radial basis function (RBF), back propagation (BP) neural network and support vector machine (SVM) model can be used for gas dispersion prediction. However, the prediction results from these network models with too many inputs based on original monitoring parameters are not in good agreement with the experimental data. Then, a new series of machine learning algorithms (MLA) models combined classic Gaussian model with MLA algorithm has been presented. The prediction results from new models are improved greatly. Among these models, Gaussian-SVM model performs best and its computation time is close to that of classic Gaussian dispersion model. Finally, Gaussian-MLA models were applied to identifying the emission source parameters with the particle swarm optimization (PSO) method. The estimation performance of PSO with Gaussian-MLA is better than that with Gaussian, Lagrangian stochastic (LS) dispersion model and network models based on original monitoring parameters. Hence, the new prediction model based on Gaussian-MLA is potentially a good method to predict contaminant gas dispersion as well as a good forward model in emission source parameters identification problem.

  16. Data assimilation on atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drews, Martin

    , radiological observations, e.g. dose rate measurements, can be used to improve these model predictions and to obtain real-time estimates of the atmospheric dispersion parameters. This thesis examines data assimilation in the context of atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials. In particular, it presents...... assimilation methods in a realistic setting. New experimental studies of atmospheric dispersion of radioactive material was carried out in October 2001 at the SCK"CEN in Mol, Belgium. In the Mol experiment, the radiation field from routine releases of 41 Ar is recorded by an array of gamma detectors along...... for evaluation of gamma dose rate models and for development and testing of data assimilation methods for atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials. The Mol dataset has been used for experimental evaluation of the Gaussian plume model and the RIMPUFF model; the results of these studies are presented...

  17. Modelling the atmospheric dispersion of foot-and-mouth disease virus for emergency preparedness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, J.H.; Jensen, C.O.; Mikkelsen, T.

    2001-01-01

    using as input data from the numerical weather prediction model DMI-HIRLAM. The model system is a part of a real-time decision-support system intended for use by veterinary authorities in case of outbreaks of FMD. Results are presented corresponding to historical outbreaks of the disease. (C) 2000...

  18. Assessing the Accuracy of the Tracer Dilution Method with Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D.; Delkash, M.; Chow, F. K.; Imhoff, P. T.

    2015-12-01

    Landfill methane emissions are difficult to estimate due to limited observations and data uncertainty. The mobile tracer dilution method is a widely used and cost-effective approach for predicting landfill methane emissions. The method uses a tracer gas released on the surface of the landfill and measures the concentrations of both methane and the tracer gas downwind. Mobile measurements are conducted with a gas analyzer mounted on a vehicle to capture transects of both gas plumes. The idea behind the method is that if the measurements are performed far enough downwind, the methane plume from the large area source of the landfill and the tracer plume from a small number of point sources will be sufficiently well-mixed to behave similarly, and the ratio between the concentrations will be a good estimate of the ratio between the two emissions rates. The mobile tracer dilution method is sensitive to different factors of the setup such as placement of the tracer release locations and distance from the landfill to the downwind measurements, which have not been thoroughly examined. In this study, numerical modeling is used as an alternative to field measurements to study the sensitivity of the tracer dilution method and provide estimates of measurement accuracy. Using topography and wind conditions for an actual landfill, a landfill emissions rate is prescribed in the model and compared against the emissions rate predicted by application of the tracer dilution method. Two different methane emissions scenarios are simulated: homogeneous emissions over the entire surface of the landfill, and heterogeneous emissions with a hot spot containing 80% of the total emissions where the daily cover area is located. Numerical modeling of the tracer dilution method is a useful tool for evaluating the method without having the expense and labor commitment of multiple field campaigns. Factors tested include number of tracers, distance between tracers, distance from landfill to transect

  19. Comparison of chlorine and ammonia concentration field trial data with calculated results from a Gaussian atmospheric transport and dispersion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Timothy J

    2013-06-15

    The Jack Rabbit Test Program was sponsored in April and May 2010 by the Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration to generate source data for large releases of chlorine and ammonia from transport tanks. In addition to a variety of data types measured at the release location, concentration versus time data was measured using sensors at distances up to 500 m from the tank. Release data were used to create accurate representations of the vapor flux versus time for the ten releases. This study was conducted to determine the importance of source terms and meteorological conditions in predicting downwind concentrations and the accuracy that can be obtained in those predictions. Each source representation was entered into an atmospheric transport and dispersion model using simplifying assumptions regarding the source characterization and meteorological conditions, and statistics for cloud duration and concentration at the sensor locations were calculated. A detailed characterization for one of the chlorine releases predicted 37% of concentration values within a factor of two, but cannot be considered representative of all the trials. Predictions of toxic effects at 200 m are relevant to incidents involving 1-ton chlorine tanks commonly used in parts of the United States and internationally. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Short-Range Atmospheric Dispersion of Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Cortis, Andrea; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a numerical study aimed at quantifying the effects of concentration-dependent density on the spread of a seeping plume of CO2 into the atmosphere such as could arise from a leaking geologic carbon sequestration site. Results of numerical models can be used to supplement field monitoring estimates of CO2 seepage flux by modelling transport and dispersion between the source emission and concentration-measurement points. We focus on modelling CO2 seepage dispersion over relatively sho...

  1. Evaluation of regional and local atmospheric dispersion models for the analysis of traffic-related air pollution in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah-Shorshani, Masoud; Shekarrizfard, Maryam; Hatzopoulou, Marianne

    2017-10-01

    Dispersion of road transport emissions in urban metropolitan areas is typically simulated using Gaussian models that ignore the turbulence and drag induced by buildings, which are especially relevant for areas with dense downtown cores. To consider the effect of buildings, street canyon models are used but often at the level of single urban corridors and small road networks. In this paper, we compare and validate two dispersion models with widely varying algorithms, across a modelling domain consisting of the City of Montreal, Canada accounting for emissions of more 40,000 roads. The first dispersion model is based on flow decomposition into the urban canopy sub-flow as well as overlying airflow. It takes into account the specific height and geometry of buildings along each road. The second model is a Gaussian puff dispersion model, which handles complex terrain and incorporates three-dimensional meteorology, but accounts for buildings only through variations in the initial vertical mixing coefficient. Validation against surface observations indicated that both models under-predicted measured concentrations. Average weekly exposure surfaces derived from both models were found to be reasonably correlated (r = 0.8) although the Gaussian dispersion model tended to underestimate concentrations around the roadways compared to the street canyon model. In addition, both models were used to estimate exposures of a representative sample of the Montreal population composed of 1319 individuals. Large differences were noted whereby exposures derived from the Gaussian puff model were significantly lower than exposures derived from the street canyon model, an expected result considering the concentration of population around roadways. These differences have large implications for the analyses of health effects associated with NO2 exposure.

  2. Operational mesoscale atmospheric dispersion prediction using a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This numerical system constitutes a parallel version of a nested grid meso-scale meteorological model MM5 coupled to a random walk particle dispersion model FLEXPART.The system provides 48-hour forecast of the local weather and radioactive plume dispersion due to hypothetical airborne releases in a range of 100 ...

  3. Data assimilation on atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drews, Martin

    2006-01-01

    a new method for on-line estimation of the radionuclide source term, i.e. the amount and composition of the released radionuclides, and the main dispersion parameters, based on radiation monitoring data obtained in the vicinity of the release. The method is based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF......) and a stochastic nonlinear state space model formulation, where the state variables are the significant model parameters. The atmospheric dispersion and the ensuing radiation field are modeled by a static Gaussian plume model, which is applicable up to a few kilometers from the release. The embedded parameters...... of the state space model are determined by maximum likelihood estimation, making the approach essentially free of external parameters. The proposed Kalman filter method is tested against both simulated data as well as real radiation monitoring data from a new atmospheric dispersion experiment. For a circular...

  4. Multi-model study of mercury dispersion in the atmosphere: vertical and interhemispheric distribution of mercury species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieser, Johannes; Slemr, Franz; Ambrose, Jesse; Brenninkmeijer, Carl; Brooks, Steve; Dastoor, Ashu; DeSimone, Francesco; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Gencarelli, Christian N.; Geyer, Beate; Gratz, Lynne E.; Hedgecock, Ian M.; Jaffe, Daniel; Kelley, Paul; Lin, Che-Jen; Jaegle, Lyatt; Matthias, Volker; Ryjkov, Andrei; Selin, Noelle E.; Song, Shaojie; Travnikov, Oleg; Weigelt, Andreas; Luke, Winston; Ren, Xinrong; Zahn, Andreas; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Yun; Pirrone, Nicola

    2017-06-01

    Atmospheric chemistry and transport of mercury play a key role in the global mercury cycle. However, there are still considerable knowledge gaps concerning the fate of mercury in the atmosphere. This is the second part of a model intercomparison study investigating the impact of atmospheric chemistry and emissions on mercury in the atmosphere. While the first study focused on ground-based observations of mercury concentration and deposition, here we investigate the vertical and interhemispheric distribution and speciation of mercury from the planetary boundary layer to the lower stratosphere. So far, there have been few model studies investigating the vertical distribution of mercury, mostly focusing on single aircraft campaigns. Here, we present a first comprehensive analysis based on various aircraft observations in Europe, North America, and on intercontinental flights. The investigated models proved to be able to reproduce the distribution of total and elemental mercury concentrations in the troposphere including interhemispheric trends. One key aspect of the study is the investigation of mercury oxidation in the troposphere. We found that different chemistry schemes were better at reproducing observed oxidized mercury patterns depending on altitude. High concentrations of oxidized mercury in the upper troposphere could be reproduced with oxidation by bromine while elevated concentrations in the lower troposphere were better reproduced by OH and ozone chemistry. However, the results were not always conclusive as the physical and chemical parameterizations in the chemistry transport models also proved to have a substantial impact on model results.

  5. Multi-model study of mercury dispersion in the atmosphere: vertical and interhemispheric distribution of mercury species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bieser

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric chemistry and transport of mercury play a key role in the global mercury cycle. However, there are still considerable knowledge gaps concerning the fate of mercury in the atmosphere. This is the second part of a model intercomparison study investigating the impact of atmospheric chemistry and emissions on mercury in the atmosphere. While the first study focused on ground-based observations of mercury concentration and deposition, here we investigate the vertical and interhemispheric distribution and speciation of mercury from the planetary boundary layer to the lower stratosphere. So far, there have been few model studies investigating the vertical distribution of mercury, mostly focusing on single aircraft campaigns. Here, we present a first comprehensive analysis based on various aircraft observations in Europe, North America, and on intercontinental flights. The investigated models proved to be able to reproduce the distribution of total and elemental mercury concentrations in the troposphere including interhemispheric trends. One key aspect of the study is the investigation of mercury oxidation in the troposphere. We found that different chemistry schemes were better at reproducing observed oxidized mercury patterns depending on altitude. High concentrations of oxidized mercury in the upper troposphere could be reproduced with oxidation by bromine while elevated concentrations in the lower troposphere were better reproduced by OH and ozone chemistry. However, the results were not always conclusive as the physical and chemical parameterizations in the chemistry transport models also proved to have a substantial impact on model results.

  6. Use of MODIS Satellite Images and an Atmospheric Dust Transport Model to Evaluate Juniperus spp. Pollen Phenology and Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, J. C.; Sprigg, W. A.; Levetin, E.; Huete, A.; Nickovic, S.; Pejanovic, G. A.; Vukovic, A.; VandeWater, P. K.; Myers, O. B.; Budge, A. M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Pollen can be transported great distances. Van de Water et. al. reported Juniperus spp. pollen was transported 200-600 km. Hence local observations of plant phenology may not be consistent with the timing and source of pollen collected by pollen sampling instruments. The DREAM (Dust REgional Atmospheric Model) is a verified model for atmospheric dust transport modeling using MODIS data products to identify source regions and quantities of dust. We are modifying the DREAM model to incorporate pollen transport. Pollen release will be estimated based on MODIS derived phenology of Juniperus spp. communities. Ground based observational records of pollen release timing and quantities will be used as verification. This information will be used to support the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and the State of New Mexico environmental public health decision support for asthma and allergies alerts.

  7. How displaced migratory birds could use volatile atmospheric compounds to find their migratory corridor? A test using a particle dispersion model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Safi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Olfaction represents an important sensory modality for navigation of both homing pigeons and wild birds. Experimental evidence in homing pigeons showed that airborne volatile compounds carried by the winds at the home area are learned in association with wind directions. When displaced, pigeons obtain information on the direction of their displacement using local odours at the release site. Recently, the role of olfactory cues in navigation has been reported also for wild birds during migration. However, the question whether wild birds develop an olfactory navigational map similar to that described in homing pigeons or, alternatively, exploit the distribution of volatile compounds in different manners for reaching the goal is still an open question. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we evaluate the possibilities of reconstructing spatio-temporally explicit aerosol dispersion at large spatial scales using the particle dispersion model FLEXPART. By combining atmospheric information with particle dispersion models, atmospheric scientists predict the dispersion of pollutants for example, after nuclear fallouts or volcanic eruptions or wildfires, or in retrospect reconstruct the origin of emissions such as aerosols. Using simple assumptions, we reconstructed the putative origin of aerosols traveling to the location of migrating birds. We use the model to test whether the putative odour plume could have originated from an important stopover site. If the migrating birds knew this site and the associated plume from previous journeys, the odour could contribut to the reorientation towards the migratory corridor, as suggested for the model scenario in displaced Lesser black-backed gulls migrating from Northern Europe into Africa.

  8. Some aspects of atmospheric dispersion in the stratified atmospheric boundary layer over homogeneous terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1999-01-01

    The ability to simulate atmospheric dispersion with models developed for applied use under stable atmospheric stability conditions is discussed. The paper is based on model simulations of three experimental data sets reported in the literature. The Hanford data set covered weakly stable conditions......, the Prairie Grass experiments covered both weakly stable and very stable atmospheric conditions, and the Lillestrom experiment was carried out during very stable conditions. Simulations of these experiments reported in the literature for eight different models are discussed. Applied models based...

  9. Short-range atmospheric dispersion of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortis, A.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2009-11-01

    We present a numerical study aimed at quantifying the effects of concentration-dependent density on the spread of a seeping plume of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere such as could arise from a leaking geologic carbon sequestration site. Results of numerical models can be used to supplement field monitoring estimates of CO{sub 2} seepage flux by modelling transport and dispersion between the source emission and concentration-measurement points. We focus on modelling CO{sub 2} seepage dispersion over relatively short distances where density effects are likely to be important. We model dense gas dispersion using the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with density dependence in the gravity term. Results for a two-dimensional system show that a density dependence emerges at higher fluxes than prior estimates. A universal scaling relation is derived that allows estimation of the flux from concentrations measured downwind and vice versa.

  10. The model SIRANE for atmospheric urban pollutant dispersion. PART III: Validation against NO2 yearly concentration measurements in a large urban agglomeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulhac, L.; Nguyen, C. V.; Volta, P.; Salizzoni, P.

    2017-10-01

    We present a validation study of an updated version of the SIRANE model, whose results have been systematically compared to concentrations of nitrogen dioxide collected over the whole urban agglomeration of Lyon. We model atmospheric dispersion of nitrogen oxides emitted by road traffic, industries and domestic heating. The meteorological wind field is computed by a pre-processor using data collected at a ground level monitoring station. Model results are compared with hourly concentrations measured at 15 monitoring stations over the whole year (2008). Further 75 passive diffusion samplers were used during 3 periods of 2 weeks to get a detailed spatial distribution over the west part of the city. An analysis of the model results depending on the variability of the meteorological input allows us to identify the causes for peculiar bad performances of the model and to identify possible improvements of the parameterisations implemented in it.

  11. Assessment of the announced North Korean nuclear test using long-range atmospheric transport and dispersion modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meutter, Pieter; Camps, Johan; Delcloo, Andy; Termonia, Piet

    2017-08-18

    On 6 January 2016, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea announced to have conducted its fourth nuclear test. Analysis of the corresponding seismic waves from the Punggye-ri nuclear test site showed indeed that an underground man-made explosion took place, although the nuclear origin of the explosion needs confirmation. Seven weeks after the announced nuclear test, radioactive xenon was observed in Japan by a noble gas measurement station of the International Monitoring System. In this paper, atmospheric transport modelling is used to show that the measured radioactive xenon is compatible with a delayed release from the Punggye-ri nuclear test site. An uncertainty quantification on the modelling results is given by using the ensemble method. The latter is important for policy makers and helps advance data fusion, where different nuclear Test-Ban-Treaty monitoring techniques are combined.

  12. Public member dose assessment of Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant under normal operation by modeling the fallout from stack using the HYSPLIT atmospheric dispersion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zali, A; Shamsaei Zafarghandi, M; Feghhi, S A; Taherian, A M

    2017-05-01

    In this work, public dose resulting from fission products released from Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) under normal operation is assessed. Due to the long range transport of radionuclides in this work (80 km) and considering terrain and meteorological data, HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYsplit) model, which uses three dimensional long-range numerical models, has been employed to calculate atmospheric dispersion. Annual effective dose calculation is carried out for inhalation, ingestion, and external exposure pathways in 16directions and within 80 km around the site for representative person. The results showed the maximum dose of inhalation and external exposure for adults is 3.8 × 10-8Sv/y in the SE direction and distance of 600 m from the BNPP site which is less than ICRP 103 recommended dose limit (1 mSv). Children and infants' doses are higher in comparison with adults, although they are less than 1 mSv. Ingestion dose percentage in the total dose is less than 0.1%. The results of this study underestimate the Final Safety Analysis Report ofBNPP-1 (FSAR)data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 2.3. Global-scale atmospheric dispersion of microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Gonzalez-Martin, Cristina; Hoose, C.; Smith, D.J.; Delort, Anne-Marie; Amato, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    This chapter addresses long-range dispersion and the survival of microorganisms across a wide range of altitudes in Earth's atmosphere. Topics include mechanisms of dispersion, survivability of microorganisms known to be associated with long-range transport, natural and artificial sources of bioaerosols, residence time estimation through the use of proxy aerosols, transport and emission models, and monitoring assays (both culture and molecular based). We conclude with a discussion of the known limits for Earth's biosphere boundary, relating aerobiology studies to planetary exploration given the large degree of overlapping requirements for in situ studies (including low biomass life detection and contamination control).

  14. Using soil records with atmospheric dispersion modeling to investigate the effects of clean air regulations on 60 years of manganese deposition in Marietta, Ohio (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Megan R; Gaudet, Brian J; Stauffer, David R; White, Timothy S; Brantley, Susan L

    2015-05-15

    Atmospheric emissions of metals from anthropogenic activities have led to deposition and contamination of soils worldwide. We quantified addition of manganese (Mn) to soils around the largest emitter of Mn in the United States (U.S.) using chemical analyses and atmospheric dispersion modeling (Second-Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF)). Concentrations of soil-surface Mn were enriched by 9-fold relative to that of the parent material within 1 km of the facility. Elevated concentrations of Mn and chromium (Cr), another potentially toxic element that was emitted, document contamination only within 1 m of the soil surface. Total mass of Mn added per unit land area integrated over 1 m, mMn, equals ~80 mg Mn cm(-2) near the facility. Values of mMn remained above background up to tens of kilometers from the source. Air concentrations of Mn particles of 7.5-micron diameter simulated with SCIPUFF using available data for the emission rate and local meteorological conditions for 2006 were consistent with measured air concentrations. However, the Mn deposition calculated for 2006 with SCIPUFF yielded a cumulative value over the lifetime of the refinery (60 years) that is a factor of 15 lower than the Mn observed to have been added to the soils. This discrepancy can be easily explained if Mn deposition rates before 1988 were more than an order of magnitude greater than today. Such higher emissions are probable, given the changes in metal production with time and the installation of emission controls after the Clean Air Act (1970). This work shows that atmospheric dispersion models can be used with soil profiles to understand the changes in metal emissions over decadal timescales. In addition, the calculations are consistent with the Clean Air Act accounting for a 15-fold decrease in the Mn deposition to soils around the refinery per metric ton of Mn alloy produced. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. ASSESSMENT OF WIND CHARACTERISTICS AND ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION MODELING OF 137Cs ON THE BARAKAH NPP AREA IN THE UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JONG KUK LEE

    2014-08-01

    Six variations of cesium-137 (137Cs dispersion test were simulated under severe accident condition. The 137Cs dispersion was strongly influenced by the direction and speed of the main wind. A virtual receptor was set and calculated for observation of the 137Cs movement and accumulation. The results of the surface roughness effect demonstrated that the deposition of 137Cs was affected by surface condition. The results of these studies offer useful information for developing environmental radiation monitoring systems (ERMSs for the BNPP and can be used to assess the environmental effects of new nuclear power plant.

  16. Nuclear risk from atmospheric dispersion in Northern Europe - Summary Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Bent

    The objective of the NordRisk II project has been to derive practical means for assessing the risks from long-range atmospheric dispersion of radioac-tive materials. An atlas over different atmospheric dispersion and deposi-tion scenarios has been developed using historical numerical weather pre...

  17. Worldwide dispersion and deposition of radionuclides produced in atmospheric tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Burton G

    2002-05-01

    Radionuclides produced in atmospheric nuclear tests were widely dispersed in the global environment. From the many measurements of the concentrations in air and the deposition amounts, much was learned of atmospheric circulation and environmental processes. Based on these results and the reported fission and total yields of individual tests, it has been possible to devise an empirical model of the movement and residence times of particles in the various atmospheric regions. This model, applied to all atmospheric weapons tests, allows extensive calculations of air concentrations and deposition amounts for the entire range of radionuclides produced throughout the testing period. Especially for the shorter-lived fission radionuclides, for which measurement results at the time of the tests are less extensive, a more complete picture of levels and isotope ratios can be obtained, forming a basis for improved dose estimations. The contributions to worldwide fallout can be inferred from individual tests, from tests at specific sites, or by specific countries. Progress was also made in understanding the global hydrological and carbon cycles from the tritium and 14C measurements. A review of the global measurements and modeling results is presented in this paper. In the future, if injections of materials into the atmosphere occur, their anticipated motions and fates can be predicted from the knowledge gained from the fallout experience.

  18. Dense gas dispersion in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Morten

    1998-09-01

    Dense gas dispersion is characterized by buoyancy induced gravity currents and reduction of the vertical mixing. Liquefied gas releases from industrial accidents are cold because of the heat of evaporation which determines the density for a given concentration and physical properties. The temperature deficit is moderated by the heat flux from the ground, and this convection is an additional source of turbulence which affects the mixing. A simple model as the soil heat flux is used to estimate the ability of the ground to sustain the heat flux during release. The initial enthalpy, release rate, initial entrainment and momentum are discussed for generic source types and the interaction with obstacles is considered. In the MTH project BA experiments source with and without momentum were applied. The continuously released propane gas passed a two-dimensional removable obstacle perpendicular to the wind direction. Ground-level gas concentrations and vertical profiles of concentration, temperature, wind speed and turbulence were measured in front of and behind the obstacle. Ultrasonic anemometers providing fast velocity and concentration signals were mounted at three levels on the masts. The observed turbulence was influenced by the stability and the initial momentum of the jet releases. Additional information were taken from the `Dessert tortoise` ammonia jet releases, from the `Fladis` experiment with transition from dense to passive dispersion, and from the `Thorney Island` continuous releases of isothermal freon mixtures. The heat flux was found to moderate the negative buoyancy in both the propane and ammonia experiments. The heat flux measurements are compared to an estimate by analogy with surface layer theory. (au) 41 tabs., 146 ills., 189 refs.

  19. MET-RODOS: A comprehensive atmospheric dispersion module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Astrup, P.

    1997-01-01

    for operational use in 1999, the: MET-RODOS meteorological module is intended to service the PODOS system with actual and forecast (+36 h) nuclei-specific air concentrations, deposition values, and gamma radiation estimates on the local, national, and European scale. Provisions are furthermore being made......A comprehensive meteorological dispersion module called MET-RODOS is being developed to serve the real-time RODOS(1-3) decision support system with an integrated prediction capability for airborne radioactive spread, deposition and gamma radiation exposure on all scales. Deposition, ground level...... air concentrations, and ground level gamma dose rates from up to 15 simultaneous released nuclides are calculated using a nested system of local and long range atmospheric dispersion models, driven by real-time available on-line meteorological information. The MET-PODOS module uses concurrently...

  20. Filtering effect of wind flow turbulence on atmospheric pollutant dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Mohamed F

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a model for coupling the statistics of wind velocity distribution and atmospheric pollutant dispersion. The effect of wind velocity distribution is modeled as a three-dimensional finite-impulse response (3D-FIR) filter. A phase space representation of the 3D-FIR filter window is discussed. The resulting pollutant dispersion is the multiplication in the phase space of the 3-D Fourier transform of the pollutant concentration and the volume described by the filter window coefficients. The shape of the filter window in the phase space enables representing such effects as vortex shedding thermal currents, etc. The impact of spatial distribution of the sensors on the resulting pollutant spatial distribution and the 3-D FIR filter model employed also discuss. The case of a neutrally buoyant plume emitted from an elevated point source in a turbulent boundary layer considers. The results show that wind turbulence is an important factor in the pollutant dispersion and introduces expected random fluctuations in pollutant distribution and leads to spreading the distribution due to wind mixing.

  1. Evaluation of ensemble atmospheric simulations in oil dispersion models at Itaguai Port region; Avaliacao do uso de resultados numericos de previsao atmosferica por conjunto na modelagem da dispersao de oleo na regiao do Porto de Itaguai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Renato Goncalves dos; Silva, Mariana P.R.; Silva, Ricardo Marcelo da; Torres Junior, Audalio R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Modelagem de Processos Marinhos e Atmosfericos (LAMMA); Landau, Luiz [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Metodos Computacinais em Engenharia (LAMCE); Sa, Reginaldo Ventura de; Hochleitner, Fabio; Correa, Eduardo Barbosa [AQUAMET Meteorologia e Projeto de Sistemas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work discusses the use of numerical prediction using ensemble as boundary condition in pollutants dispersion models, applied in a hypothetical case of an oil spill occurrence in Itaguai Port. The Princeton Ocean Model (POM) has been used to simulate hydrodynamics and NICOIL Eulerian model to forecast oil spill dispersion, and ensemble wind forecast from Global Forecast System (GFS), aiming to assess the importance of this parameter variability in oil dispersion at sea. The wind scenarios using ensemble members has showed significant dispersion when compared to control simulation, demonstrating that the uncertainty in the atmospheric modeling can generate considerable variations in the placement of the final spot of oil. The region of interest was the Sepetiba Bay, located on the southern coast of the Rio de Janeiro state; because of port operations carried out around the Port of Itaguai where they can, eventually, oil leaks occur. (author)

  2. Extension and validation of ARTM (atmospheric radionuclide transportation model) for the application as dispersion calculation model in AVV (general administrative provision) and SBG (incident calculation bases); Erweiterung und Validierung von ARTM fuer den Einsatz als Ausbreitungsmodell in AVV und SBG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Reinhard; Bruecher, Wenzel; Richter, Cornelia; Sentuc, Florence; Sogalla, Martin; Thielen, Harald

    2012-02-15

    In the medium-term time scale the Gaussian plume model used so far for atmospheric dispersion calculations in the General Administrative Provision (AVV) relating to Section 47 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrISchV) as well as in the Incident Calculation Bases (SGB) relating to Section 49 StrISchV is to be replaced by a Lagrangian particle model. Meanwhile the Atmospheric Radionuclide Transportation Model (ARTM) is available, which allows the simulation of the atmospheric dispersion of operational releases from nuclear installations. ARTM is based on the program package AUSTAL2000 which is designed for the simulation of atmospheric dispersion of nonradioactive operational releases from industrial plants and was adapted to the application of airborne radioactive releases. In the context of the research project 3608S05005 possibilities for an upgrade of ARTM were investigated and implemented as far as possible to the program system. The work program comprises the validation and evaluation of ARTM, the implementation of technical-scientific extensions of the model system and the continuation of experience exchange between developers and users. In particular, the suitability of the model approach for simulations of radiological consequences according to the German SBG and the representation of the influence of buildings typical for nuclear power stations have been validated and further evaluated. Moreover, post-processing modules for calculation of dose-relevant decay products and for dose calculations have been developed and implemented. In order to continue the experience feedback and exchange, a web page has been established and maintained. Questions by users and other feedback have been dealt with and a common workshop has been held. The continued development and validation of ARTM has strengthened the basis for applications of this model system in line with the German regulations AVV and SBG. Further activity in this field can contribute to maintain and

  3. Estimation of NH3 emissions from a naturally ventilated livestock farm using local-scale atmospheric dispersion modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cellier

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural livestock represents the main source of ammonia (NH3 in Europe. In recent years, reduction policies have been applied to reduce NH3 emissions. In order to estimate the impacts of these policies, robust estimates of the emissions from the main sources, i.e. livestock farms are needed. In this paper, the NH3 emissions were estimated from a naturally ventilated livestock farm in Braunschweig, Germany during a joint field experiment of the GRAMINAE European project. An inference method was used with a Gaussian-3D plume model and with the Huang 3-D model. NH3 concentrations downwind of the source were used together with micrometeorological data to estimate the source strength over time. Mobile NH3 concentration measurements provided information on the spatial distribution of source strength. The estimated emission strength ranged between 6.4±0.18 kg NH3 d−1 (Huang 3-D model and 9.2±0.7 kg NH3 d−1 (Gaussian-3D model. These estimates were 94% and 63% of what was obtained using emission factors from the German national inventory (9.6 kg d−1 NH3. The effect of deposition was evaluated with the FIDES-2D model. This increased the emission estimate to 11.7 kg NH3 d−1, showing that deposition can explain the observed difference. The daily pattern of the source was correlated with net radiation and with the temperature inside the animal houses. The daily pattern resulted from a combination of a temperature effect on the source concentration together with an effect of variations in free and forced convection of the building ventilation rate. Further development of the plume technique is especially relevant for naturally ventilated farms, since the variable ventilation rate makes other emission measurements difficult.

  4. "Dispersion modeling approaches for near road | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roadway design and roadside barriers can have significant effects on the dispersion of traffic-generated pollutants, especially in the near-road environment. Dispersion models that can accurately simulate these effects are needed to fully assess these impacts for a variety of applications. For example, such models can be useful for evaluating the mitigation potential of roadside barriers in reducing near-road exposures and their associated adverse health effects. Two databases, a tracer field study and a wind tunnel study, provide measurements used in the development and/or validation of algorithms to simulate dispersion in the presence of noise barriers. The tracer field study was performed in Idaho Falls, ID, USA with a 6-m noise barrier and a finite line source in a variety of atmospheric conditions. The second study was performed in the meteorological wind tunnel at the US EPA and simulated line sources at different distances from a model noise barrier to capture the effect on emissions from individual lanes of traffic. In both cases, velocity and concentration measurements characterized the effect of the barrier on dispersion.This paper presents comparisons with the two datasets of the barrier algorithms implemented in two different dispersion models: US EPA’s R-LINE (a research dispersion modelling tool under development by the US EPA’s Office of Research and Development) and CERC’s ADMS model (ADMS-Urban). In R-LINE the physical features reveal

  5. Large-eddy simulation and Lagrangian stochastic modelling of solid particle and droplet dispersion and mixing. Application to atmospheric pollution; Dispersion et melange turbulents de particules solides et de gouttelettes par une simulation des grandes echelles et une modelisation stochastique lagrangienne. Application a la pollution de l'atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinkovic, I.

    2005-07-15

    In order to study atmospheric pollution and the dispersion of industrial stack emissions, a large eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky-Germano sub-grid-scale model is coupled with Lagrangian tracking of fluid particles containing scalar, solid particles and droplets. The movement of fluid particles at a sub-grid level is given by a three-dimensional Langevin model. The stochastic model is written in terms of sub-grid-scale statistics at a mesh level. By introducing a diffusion model, the coupling between the large-eddy simulation and the modified three-dimensional Langevin model is applied to passive scalar dispersion. The results are validated by comparison with the wind-tunnel experiments of Fackrell and Robins (1982). The equation of motion of a small rigid sphere in a turbulent flow is introduced. Solid particles and droplets are tracked in a Lagrangian way. The velocity of solid particles and droplets is considered to have a large scale component (directly computed by the large-eddy simulation) and a sub-grid scale part. Because of inertia and gravity effects, solid particles and droplets, deviate from the trajectories of the surrounding fluid particles. Therefore, a modified Lagrangian correlation timescale is introduced into the Langevin model previously developed for the sub-grid velocity of fluid particles. Two-way coupling and collisions are taken into account. The results of the large-eddy simulation with solid particles are compared with the wind-tunnel experiments of Nalpanis et al. (1993) and of Taniere et al. (1997) on sand particles in saltation and in modified saltation, respectively. A model for droplet coalescence and breakup is implemented which allows to predict droplet interactions under turbulent flow conditions in the frame of the Euler/Lagrange approach. Coalescence and breakup are considered as a stochastic process with simple scaling symmetry assumption for the droplet radius, initially proposed by Kolmogorov (1941). At high

  6. Pollen Forecast and Dispersion Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Monica; Di Giuseppe, Fabio; Medaglia, Carlo Maria; Travaglini, Alessandro; Tocci, Raffaella; Brighetti, M. Antonia; Petitta, Marcello

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is monitoring, mapping and forecast of pollen distribution for the city of Rome using in-situ measurements of 10 species of common allergenic pollens and measurements of PM10. The production of daily concentration maps, associated to a mobile phone app, are innovative compared to existing dedicated services to people who suffer from respiratory allergies. The dispersal pollen is one of the most well-known causes of allergic disease that is manifested by disorders of the respiratory functions. Allergies are the third leading cause of chronic disease and it is estimated that tens millions of people in Italy suffer from it. Recent works reveal that during the last few years there was a progressive increase of affected subjects, especially in urban areas. This situation may depend: on the ability to transport of pollutants, on the ability to react between pollutants and pollen and from a combination of other irritants, existing in densely populated and polluted urban areas. The methodology used to produce maps is based on in-situ measurements time series relative to 2012, obtained from networks of air quality and pollen stations in the metropolitan area of Rome. The monitoring station aerobiological of University of Rome "Tor Vergata" is located at the Department of Biology. The instrument used to pollen monitoring is a volumetric sampler type Hirst (Hirst 1952), Model 2000 VPPS Lanzoni; the data acquisition is carried out as reported in Standard UNI 11008:2004 - "Qualità dell'aria - Metodo di campionamento e conteggio dei granuli pollinici e delle spore fungine aerodisperse" - the protocol that describes the procedure for measuring of the concentration of pollen grains and fungal spores dispersed into the atmosphere, and reported in the "Manuale di gestione e qualità della R.I.M.A" (Travaglini et. al. 2009). All 10 allergenic pollen are monitored since 1996. At Tor Vergata university is also operating a meteorological station (SP2000, CAE

  7. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard...

  8. Coupling constant in dispersive model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    perturbative theory using the dispersive model. By fitting the experimental data, the values of ( M Z ° ) = 0.1171 ± 0.00229 and 0 ( I = 2 GeV ) = 0.5068 ± 0.0440 are found. Our results are consistent with the above model. Our results are also ...

  9. Parallelisation and application of a multi-layer atmospheric transport model to quantify dispersion and deposition of ammonia over the British Isles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, N; Pais, V A; Sutton, M A; Weston, K J; Dragosits, U; Tang, S Y; Aherne, J

    2002-01-01

    An atmospheric transport model, FRAME (Fine Resolution AMmonia Exchange), has been used to model the spatial pattern of ammonia concentrations and deposition over the British Isles for the first time. The model uses a multi-layer approach with diffusion through 33 layers to describe vertical concentration profiles in the atmosphere explicitly. Together with the necessary description of atmospheric reactions with sulphur and oxidised nitrogen, this imposes a major computational requirement, with the model having a run-time of 8.5 days on a mid-range workstation. Improvement in the model run-time was sought by developing a parallel implementation coded in a data-parallel approach using High Performance Fortran. Running the code on a Cray T3E with 128 processors provided a speedup by a factor of 69. The code's portability, its validation with measurements and new maps of its application to the British Isles, are presented. Good agreement is found with measured NH3 concentrations, while wet de-position is underestimated. In addition to model uncertainties, this may be due to an underestimation of the NH3 emissions input data.

  10. Dispersion of Fukushima radionuclides in the global atmosphere and the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinec, P P; Gera, M; Holý, K; Hirose, K; Lujaniené, G; Nakano, M; Plastino, W; Sýkora, I; Bartok, J; Gažák, M

    2013-11-01

    Large quantities of radionuclides were released in March-April 2011 during the accident of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant to the atmosphere and the ocean. Atmospheric and marine modeling has been carried out to predict the dispersion of radionuclides worldwide, to compare the predicted and measured radionuclide concentrations, and to assess the impact of the accident on the environment. Atmospheric Lagrangian dispersion modeling was used to simulate the dispersion of (137)Cs over America and Europe. Global ocean circulation model was applied to predict the dispersion of (137)Cs in the Pacific Ocean. The measured and simulated (137)Cs concentrations in atmospheric aerosols and in seawater are compared with global fallout and the Chernobyl accident, which represent the main sources of the pre-Fukushima radionuclide background in the environment. The radionuclide concentrations in the atmosphere have been negligible when compared with the Chernobyl levels. The maximum (137)Cs concentration in surface waters of the open Pacific Ocean will be around 20 Bq/m(3). The plume will reach the US coast 4-5 y after the accident, however, the levels will be below 3 Bq/m(3). All the North Pacific Ocean will be labeled with Fukushima (137)Cs 10 y after the accident with concentration bellow 1 Bq/m(3). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An atmospheric dispersion model for linear sources in calm wind, stable conditions; Un modello di dispersione atmosferica per sorgenti lineari in condizioni di vento debole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirillo, M. C. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; Buratti, D. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). Facolta' di Scienze Statistiche; Metallo, M. C.; Poli, A.A. [ESA s.a.s., Bracciano, RM (Italy)

    1999-07-01

    In this report a dispersion model is proposed that provides an estimate of concentration of gaseous pollutants emitted by an highway, or in general by a line source, in presence of low wind speed. This aim was pursued because available models have not a satisfactory behaviour in such conditions, which is critical for dispersion of gaseous pollutants. This lack is due to difficulty of simulating dispersion turbulent component which is determined by fluctuation of wind speed and wind direction, and in presence of calm conditions it assumes values comparable with transport component. The proposed model overcomes this difficulty, as it is shown by sensitivity analysis and comparison with experimental data. The capability of simulating dispersion eve in critical conditions, like the presence of low level inversion, and the absence of source geometrical approximations make the model a tool that, properly used, may contribute to the efficient planning and management of environmental resources. [Italian] In questo rapporto viene proposto un modello per la stima delle concentrazioni di inquinanti aeriformi emessi da un'arteria stradale, o in generale da una sorgente lineare, in presenza di vento debole. Questo scopo e' stato perseguito in quanto in questa condizione, nonostante la dispersione degli inquinanti risulti fortemente problematica, i modelli disponibili in letteratura non hanno un comportamento soddisfacente. Questa mancanca e' attribuibile alla difficolta' di simulare la componente turbolenta della dispersione, dovuta alla fluttuazione della direzione e della velocita' del vento che, in presenza di vento debole, assume valori confrontabili alla componente di trasporto. Il modello qui di seguito proposto supera questa difficolta', come dimostrano l'analisi di sensibilita' e il confronto con un caso reale; la capacita' di simulare la dispersione anche in condizioni fisicamente critiche quali la presenza di inversione a

  12. Analysis on the structure of the TMT's Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhuan; Liu, Yan; Tao, Jin

    2015-10-01

    The concepts of atmospheric refraction and atmospheric dispersion are introduced and the method of how to eliminate atmospheric dispersion. This article introduces the structure of Atmospheric Dispersion Correction , the installation position of ADC in TMT telescope and the introduction to the principle of ADC in detail. Using the finite element analysis software Ansys Workbench to analyze the rationality of the ADC structure. Static analysis The ADC structure is loaded with two tape lens, which is more 400kg in weight, as well as itself weight, will deform in x, y, z directions. Dynamic analysis The dynamic performances of ADC structure are very important for the construction of the instrument, for the environmental vibration need to be tested. That is the effect of ADC dynamic deformation on optical accuracy is crucial for imaging quality. Here three order modes of dynamic performance are presented for the references of ADC design. They are 1st order mode , 2nd order mode and 3rd order mode. Thermal deformation according to the ADC working environment temperature change, the instrument temperature would be from -5 to 9 degree. So the thermal deformation of ADC is performed in this temperature fluctuation. ADC structure FEA conclusions: The ADC tapered lens are assumed as a rigid body and the mechanical analysis results are: Static analysis, Kinetics analysis and Thermodynamic analysis. Based on the FEA results, we get the image motion information in the telescope plane. Then, we draw a conclusion that: image motions induced by current structure design are very small and meet the requirements of ADC.

  13. A suggested method for dispersion model evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, John S

    2014-03-01

    Too often operational atmospheric dispersion models are evaluated in their ability to replicate short-term concentration maxima, when in fact a valid model evaluation procedure would evaluate a model's ability to replicate ensemble-average patterns in hourly concentration values. A valid model evaluation includes two basic tasks: In Step 1 we should analyze the observations to provide average patterns for comparison with modeled patterns, and in Step 2 we should account for the uncertainties inherent in Step 1 so we can tell whether differences seen in a comparison of performance of several models are statistically significant. Using comparisons of model simulation results from AERMOD and ISCST3 with tracer concentration values collected during the EPRI Kincaid experiment, a candidate model evaluation procedure is demonstrated that assesses whether a model has the correct total mass at the receptor level (crosswind integrated concentration values) and whether a model is correctly spreading the mass laterally (lateral dispersion), and assesses the uncertainty in characterizing the transport. The use of the BOOT software (preferably using the ASTMD 6589 resampling procedure) is suggested to provide an objective assessment of whether differences in model performance between models are significant. Regulatory agencies can choose to treat modeling results as "pseudo-monitors," but air quality models actually only predict what they are constructed to predict, which certainly does not include the stochastic variations that result in observed short-term maxima (e.g., arc-maxima). Models predict the average concentration pattern of a collection of hours having very similar dispersive conditions. An easy-to-implement evaluation procedure is presented that challenges a model to properly estimate ensemble average concentration values, reveals where to look in a model to remove bias, and provides statistical tests to assess the significance of skill differences seen between

  14. Fast Running Urban Dispersion Model for Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) Releases: Model Description and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gowardhan, Akshay [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Neuscamman, Stephanie [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Donetti, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Walker, Hoyt [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Belles, Rich [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Eme, Bill [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Homann, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC)

    2017-05-24

    Aeolus is an efficient three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code based on finite volume method developed for predicting transport and dispersion of contaminants in a complex urban area. It solves the time dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equation on a regular Cartesian staggered grid using a fractional step method. It also solves a scalar transport equation for temperature and using the Boussinesq approximation. The model also includes a Lagrangian dispersion model for predicting the transport and dispersion of atmospheric contaminants. The model can be run in an efficient Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes (RANS) mode with a run time of several minutes, or a more detailed Large Eddy Simulation (LES) mode with run time of hours for a typical simulation. This report describes the model components, including details on the physics models used in the code, as well as several model validation efforts. Aeolus wind and dispersion predictions are compared to field data from the Joint Urban Field Trials 2003 conducted in Oklahoma City (Allwine et al 2004) including both continuous and instantaneous releases. Newly implemented Aeolus capabilities include a decay chain model and an explosive Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) source term; these capabilities are described. Aeolus predictions using the buoyant explosive RDD source are validated against two experimental data sets: the Green Field explosive cloud rise experiments conducted in Israel (Sharon et al 2012) and the Full-Scale RDD Field Trials conducted in Canada (Green et al 2016).

  15. Coupling constant in dispersive model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The average of the moments for event shapes in e+e− → hadrons within the con- text of next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD prediction in dispersive model is studied. Moments used in this article are 〈1 − T〉, 〈ρ〉, 〈BT〉 and 〈BW〉. We extract αs, the coupling con- stant in perturbative theory and α0 in the ...

  16. Study on atmospheric stability to determine dispersion factor in Yonggwang Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Chan; Yoon, Duk Joo; Song, Dong Soo; Kim, In Hwan; Ha, Sang Jun [Korea Hydro Nuclear Power Co. Ltd, KHNP Central Research Institute, Nuclear Safety Laboratory, Gueongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Air pollution models have been studied by IAEA, NRC and EPA. The aim of this study is to get more efficient methodology of explaining the behavior of atmosphere using the stability. Specially, air pollution model can be Lagrangian, Eulerian or Gaussian. The Gaussian dispersion models are usually used in estimating the stability of atmosphere. The first study and the improved method for stability have been carried out by Cramer in 1957 and Pasquil in 1961, respectively. The methodology consists of wind speed, radiation from Sun, night and cloud's clusters. In conception, the convection and the radiation affect the behavior of atmosphere. In present, this conception is generally used to calculation of stability of atmosphere. This study is focused on the relation between stability and atmosphere dispersion factor. In this study, various methods to determine the stability of atmosphere are reviewed. Especially, IAEA methodology(△T·U) is discussed and compared with other methods. △T·U methodology is very reasonable in both dynamic and static stability. Some conclusions from this study are: 1. For wind speed higher than 1.5 m/sec, △T·U is similar to δ{sub θ}. 2. For wind speed less than 1.5 m/sec, △T·U is in good agreement with △T/△Z. 3. Stability of atmosphere is generally impacted by wind speed. 4. Stability frequency has the similar trends in comparison between △T·U and δ{sub θ}.

  17. Dispersion modeling by kinematic simulation: Cloud dispersion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, J C H [Department of Mathematics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong); Perkins, R J [Laboratoire de Mecanique des Fluides et d' Acoustique, Ecole Centrale de Lyon (France)], E-mail: majfung@ust.hk

    2008-04-30

    A new technique has been developed to compute mean and fluctuating concentrations in complex turbulent flows (tidal current near a coast and deep ocean). An initial distribution of material is discretized into any small clouds which are advected by a combination of the mean flow and large scale turbulence. The turbulence can be simulated either by kinematic simulation (KS) or direct numerical simulation. The clouds also diffuse relative to their centroids; the statistics for this are obtained from a separate calculation of the growth of individual clouds in small scale turbulence, generated by KS. The ensemble of discrete clouds is periodically re-discretized, to limit the size of the small clouds and prevent overlapping. The model is illustrated with simulations of dispersion in uniform flow, and the results are compared with analytic, steady state solutions. The aim of this study is to understand how pollutants disperses in a turbulent flow through a numerical simulation of fluid particle motion in a random flow field generated by Fourier modes. Although this homogeneous turbulent is rather a 'simple' flow, it represents a building block toward understanding pollutant dispersion in more complex flow. The results presented here are preliminary in nature, but we expect that similar qualitative results should be observed in a genuine turbulent flow.

  18. Effects on ambient air caused by emissions from the Clean Harbors incinerator and underground water treatment facility in Mercier : evaluation by atmospheric dispersion modeling; Effets sur l'air ambiant des emissions de l'incinerateur Clean Harbors et de l'Unite de traitement des eaux souterraines (UTES) a Mercier : evaluation par modelisation de la dispersion atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulet, G.; Walsh, P.; Brault, M.P.; Couture, Y.; Briere, J.F. [Quebec Ministere du Developpement durable, de l' Environnement et des Parcs, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Direction du suivi de l' etat de l' environnement; Guay, F.; Longpre, L. [Quebec Ministere du Developpement durable, de l' Environnement et des Parcs, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Direction regionale de l' analyse et de l' expertise de l' Estrie de la Monteregie; Lemire, R.; Busque, D. [Quebec Ministere du Developpement durable, de l' Environnement et des Parcs, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Service de l' information sur le milieu atmospherique

    2010-09-15

    Clean Harbors is a leading provider of high-tech, high-temperature destruction of hazardous and industrial waste. The Quebec Ministry of Sustainable Development, Environment and Parks created an atmospheric dispersion model to determine the impact of the Clean Harbors incinerator and underground water treatment facility on air quality in Mercier, Quebec. This document described the dispersion model and its inputs, including emissions of polychlorinated dibenzodioxin, dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fine particulates, mercury, lead and arsenic. The effects of these emissions on air quality were evaluated by considering meteorological data, source characteristics, topography and land use zoning. The modeling study showed that emissions from the incinerator were well below criteria levels and do not cause significant deterioration in air quality. However, higher than allowable limits of polyvinyl chloride and benzene emissions were found 700 m from the underground water treatment facility. Nearby residential areas were not affected. 21 refs., 9 tabs., 10 figs., 1 appendix.

  19. Model review and evaluation for application in DOE safety basis documentation of chemical accidents - modeling guidance for atmospheric dispersion and consequence assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, M. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Woodarad, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hanna, S. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hesse, D. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Huang, J. -C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lewis, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mazzola, C. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through its Defense Programs (DP), Office of Engineering and Operations Suppon, established the Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (AP AC) Methodology Evaluation Program to identify and evaluate methodologies and computer codes to support accident phenomenological and consequence calculations for both radiological and nonradiological materials at DOE facilities and to identify development needs. The program is also intended to define and recommend "best or good engineering/safety analysis practices" to be followed in preparing ''design or beyond design basis" assessments to be included in DOE nuclear and nonnuclear facility safety documents. The AP AC effort is intended to provide scientifically sound and more consistent analytical approaches, by identifying model selection procedures and application methodologies, in order to enhance safety analysis activities throughout the DOE complex.

  20. Atmospheric dispersion of radon around uranium mill tailings of the former Pridneprovsky Chemical Plant in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalets, Ivan V; Asker, Christian; Khalchenkov, Alexander V; Persson, Christer; Lavrova, Tatyana V

    2017-06-01

    Simulations of atmospheric dispersion of radon around the uranium mill tailings of the former Pridneprovsky Chemical Plant (PChP) in Ukraine were carried out with the aid of two atmospheric dispersion models: the Airviro Grid Model and the CALMET/CALPUFF model chain. The available measurement data of radon emission rates taken in the territories and the close vicinity of tailings were used in simulations. The results of simulations were compared to the yearly averaged measurements of concentration data. Both models were able to reasonably reproduce average radon concentration at the Sukhachivske site using averaged measured emission rates as input together with the measured meteorological data. At the same time, both models significantly underestimated concentrations as compared to measurements collected at the PChP industrial site. According to the results of both dispersion models, it was shown that only addition of significant radon emission rate from the whole territory of PChP in addition to emission rates from the tailings could explain the observed concentration measurements. With the aid of the uncertainty analysis, the radon emission rate from the whole territory of PChP was estimated to be between 1.5 and 3.5 Bq·m -2 s -1 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS & RADIOLOGICAL & TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SANDGREN, K.R.

    2005-03-03

    This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farm safety analyses. The current revision also includes atmospheric dispersion coefficients used for analyses of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System. The basic equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included.

  2. Numerical modelling of microorganisms dispersion in urban area : application to legionella

    OpenAIRE

    Tognet, Frédéric; Turmeau, Cyrille; HA, Thi Lan; Tarnaud, Eric; Rouil, Laurence; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Robine, Enric; Morel, Yannick

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Dispersion modelling is often used to estimate potentially contaminated areas in case of accidental release of microorganisms in the atmosphere. In the specific case of Legionella, accidental spread in the atmosphere due to contaminated cooling towers system may occur over distance larger than 10km. In addition, most cooling towers are located in urban areas where dispersion due to obstacles is complex. In this case, dispersion models have to take into account complex ...

  3. Can the confidence in long range atmospheric transport models be increased? The Pan-European experience of ENSEMBLE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galmarini, S.; Bianconi, R.; Klug, W.

    2004-01-01

    Is atmospheric dispersion forecasting an important asset of the early-phase nuclear emergency response management? Is there a 'perfect atmospheric dispersion model'? Is there a way to make the results of dispersion models more reliable and trustworthy? While seeking to answer these questions...... the multi-model ensemble dispersion forecast system ENSEMBLE will be presented....

  4. Can the confidence in long range atmospheric transport models be increased? The pan-european experience of ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmarini, S; Bianconi, R; Klug, W; Mikkelsen, T; Addis, R; Andronopoulos, S; Astrup, P; Baklanov, A; Bartniki, J; Bartzis, J C; Bellasio, R; Bompay, F; Buckley, R; Bouzom, M; Champion, H; D'Amours, R; Davakis, E; Eleveld, H; Geertsema, G T; Glaab, H; Kollax, M; Ilvonen, M; Manning, A; Pechinger, U; Persson, C; Polreich, E; Potemski, S; Prodanova, M; Saltbones, J; Slaper, H; Sofiev, M A; Syrakov, D; Sørensen, J H; Van der Auwera, L; Valkama, I; Zelazny, R

    2004-01-01

    Is atmospheric dispersion forecasting an important asset of the early-phase nuclear emergency response management? Is there a 'perfect atmospheric dispersion model'? Is there a way to make the results of dispersion models more reliable and trustworthy? While seeking to answer these questions the multi-model ensemble dispersion forecast system ENSEMBLE will be presented. Copyright 2004 Oxford University Press

  5. Atmospheric Dispersal and Dispostion of Tephra From a Potential Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Keating; W.Statham

    2004-02-12

    The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (ASHPLUME) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. The ASHPLUME conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The ASHPLUME mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report will improve and clarify the previous documentation of the ASHPLUME mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model.

  6. Predictability of the dispersion of Fukushima-derived radionuclides and their homogenization in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Róbert; Leelőssy, Ádám; Kovács, Tibor; Lagzi, István

    2016-01-01

    Long-range simulation of the dispersion of air pollutants in the atmosphere is one of the most challenging tasks in geosciences. Application of precise and fast numerical models in risk management and decision support can save human lives and can diminish consequences of an accidental release. Disaster at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has been the most serious event in the nuclear technology and industry in the recent years. We present and discuss the results of the numerical simulations on dispersion of Fukushima-derived particulate 131I and 137Cs using a global scale Lagrangian particle model. We compare concentrations and arrival times, using two emission scenarios, with the measured data obtained from 182 monitoring stations located all over the Northern Hemisphere. We also investigate the homogenization of isotopes in the atmosphere. Peak concentrations were predicted with typical accuracy of one order of magnitude showing a general underestimation in the case of 131I but not for 137Cs. Tropical and Arctic plumes, as well as the early detections in American and European midlatitudes were generally well predicted, however, the later regional-scale mixing could not be captured by the model. Our investigation highlights the importance of the parameterization of free atmospheric turbulence.

  7. Predictability of the dispersion of Fukushima-derived radionuclides and their homogenization in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Róbert; Leelőssy, Ádám; Kovács, Tibor; Lagzi, István

    2016-01-28

    Long-range simulation of the dispersion of air pollutants in the atmosphere is one of the most challenging tasks in geosciences. Application of precise and fast numerical models in risk management and decision support can save human lives and can diminish consequences of an accidental release. Disaster at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has been the most serious event in the nuclear technology and industry in the recent years. We present and discuss the results of the numerical simulations on dispersion of Fukushima-derived particulate (131)I and (137)Cs using a global scale Lagrangian particle model. We compare concentrations and arrival times, using two emission scenarios, with the measured data obtained from 182 monitoring stations located all over the Northern Hemisphere. We also investigate the homogenization of isotopes in the atmosphere. Peak concentrations were predicted with typical accuracy of one order of magnitude showing a general underestimation in the case of (131)I but not for (137)Cs. Tropical and Arctic plumes, as well as the early detections in American and European midlatitudes were generally well predicted, however, the later regional-scale mixing could not be captured by the model. Our investigation highlights the importance of the parameterization of free atmospheric turbulence.

  8. Uncertainty in spatially explicit animal dispersal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Wolf M.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    Uncertainty in estimates of survival of dispersing animals is a vexing difficulty in conservation biology. The current notion is that this uncertainty decreases the usefulness of spatially explicit population models in particular. We examined this problem by comparing dispersal models of three levels of complexity: (1) an event-based binomial model that considers only the occurrence of mortality or arrival, (2) a temporally explicit exponential model that employs mortality and arrival rates, and (3) a spatially explicit grid-walk model that simulates the movement of animals through an artificial landscape. Each model was fitted to the same set of field data. A first objective of the paper is to illustrate how the maximum-likelihood method can be used in all three cases to estimate the means and confidence limits for the relevant model parameters, given a particular set of data on dispersal survival. Using this framework we show that the structure of the uncertainty for all three models is strikingly similar. In fact, the results of our unified approach imply that spatially explicit dispersal models, which take advantage of information on landscape details, suffer less from uncertainly than do simpler models. Moreover, we show that the proposed strategy of model development safeguards one from error propagation in these more complex models. Finally, our approach shows that all models related to animal dispersal, ranging from simple to complex, can be related in a hierarchical fashion, so that the various approaches to modeling such dispersal can be viewed from a unified perspective.

  9. Modeling atmospheric effects - an assessment of the problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas G. Fox

    1976-01-01

    Our ability to simulate atmospheric processes that affect the life cycle of pollution is reviewed. The transport process is considered on three scales (a) the near-source or single-plume dispersion problem, (b) the multiple-source dispersion problem, and (c) the long-range transport. Modeling the first of these is shown to be well within the capability of generally...

  10. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSAL AND DEPOSITION OF TEPHRA FROM A POTENTIAL VOLCANIC ERUPTION AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Harrington

    2004-10-25

    The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (Ashplume) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. These aspects of volcanism-related dose calculation are described in the context of the entire igneous disruptive events conceptual model in ''Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169989], Section 6.1.1). The Ashplume conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The Ashplume mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report update the previous documentation of the Ashplume mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model. In this report, ''Ashplume'' is used when referring to the atmospheric dispersal model and ''ASHPLUME'' is used when referencing the code of that model. Two analysis and model reports provide direct inputs to this model report, namely ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and Number of Waste Packages Hit

  11. DIMO, a plant dispersal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wamelink, G.W.W.; Jochem, R.; Greft, van der J.G.M.; Franke, J.; Malinowska, A.H.; Geertsema, W.; Prins, A.H.; Ozinga, W.A.; Hoek, van der D.C.J.; Grashof-Bokdam, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Due to human activities many natural habitats have become isolated. As a result the dispersal of many plant species is hampered. Isolated populations may become extinct and have a lower probability to become reestablished in a natural way. Moreover, plant species may be forced to migrate to new

  12. Kalman filtration of radiation monitoring data from atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drews, M.; Lauritzen, B.; Madsen, H.

    2004-01-01

    A Kalman filter method using off-site radiation monitoring data is proposed as a tool for on-line estimation of the source term for short-range atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials. The method is based on the Gaussian plume model, in which the plume parameters including the source term...... exhibit a ‘random walk’ process. The embedded parameters of the Kalman filter are determined through maximum-likelihood estimation making the filter essentially free of external parameters. The method is tested using both real and simulated radiation monitoring data. For simulated data, the method...

  13. NKS-B NordRisk II: Nuclear risk from atmospheric dispersion in Northern Europe - Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, B. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy. Radiation Research Div., Roskilde (Denmark))

    2011-05-15

    The objective of the NordRisk II project has been to derive practical means for assessing the risks from long-range atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials. An atlas over different atmospheric dispersion and deposition scenarios has been developed using historical numerical weather prediction (NWP) model data. The NWP model data covers three years spanning the climate variability associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, and the atlas considers radioactive releases from 16 release sites in and near the Nordic countries. A statistical analysis of the long-range dispersion and deposition patterns is undertaken to quantify the mean dispersion and deposition as well as the variability. Preliminary analyses show that the large-scale atmospheric dispersion and deposition is near-isotropic, irrespective of the release site and detailed climatology, and allows for a simple parameterization of the global dispersion and deposition patterns. The atlas and the underlying data are made available in a format compatible with the ARGOS decision support system, and have been implemented in ARGOS. (Author)

  14. Discrete dispersion models and their Tweedie asymptotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bent; Kokonendji, Célestin C.

    2016-01-01

    in this approach, whereas several overdispersed discrete distributions, such as the Neyman Type A, Pólya-Aeppli, negative binomial and Poisson-inverse Gaussian, turn out to be Poisson-Tweedie factorial dispersion models with power dispersion functions, analogous to ordinary Tweedie exponential dispersion models......-Tweedie asymptotic framework where Poisson-Tweedie models appear as dilation limits. This unifies many discrete convergence results and leads to Poisson and Hermite convergence results, similar to the law of large numbers and the central limit theorem, respectively. The dilation operator also leads to a duality...

  15. Improving temporal profiles of anthropogenic emissions influenced by human activities and meteorological drivers for atmospheric dispersion modelling - a case study for the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieno, M.; Reis, S.; Ambelas Skjøth, C.; Lang, M.; Geels, C.

    2010-12-01

    Emissions of trace gases originating from anthropogenic activities are vital input data for chemical transport models (CTMs). Other key input datasets such as meteorological drivers, and biogeochemical and physical processes have been subject to detailed investigation and research in the recent past, while the representation of emission data in CTMs has been somewhat neglected. Arguably, this has less impact on the regional to hemispheric or global scale, where the grid sizes of currently applied CTMs represent well mixed average concentrations or deposition values. Evaluating model output against ground-based observations or remote sensing results on these spatial levels appears not to be overly sensitive to the temporal (and spatial) profiles of emission input data. With increasing level of detail and spatiotemporal resolution, CTMs applied to determine national or local scale air quality are likely prone to be more sensitive to the spatial and temporal patterns of anthropogenic emissions. This paper discusses results of the application of the EMEP4UK CTM on a 5 km x 5 km resolution for the whole of the United Kingdom. In a first instance, detailed temporal profiles for emissions from road transport, power generation and other stationary sources have been developed. Depending on typical sectoral activities, hourly to seasonal variations have been quantified and (sub-)sectoral time curves generated. Here, we will discuss how these improved time curves influence modelled concentrations of NO2, Ozone and PM10 for selected episodes in the year 2007. In a second application, both anthropogenic activities (e.g. manure spreading and fertilizer application) and meteorological factors (e.g. temperature and seasonality) have been investigated regarding their influence on the spatiotemporal distribution of NH3 emissions (Skjøth et al., 2004; see as well Pinder et al., 2004; Gilliland et al., 2006). The discussion of results in this case will focus on the impact on the

  16. Modeling electrical dispersion phenomena in Earth materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Patella

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available It is illustrated that IP phenomena in rocks can be described using conductivity dispersion models deduced as solutions to a 2nd-order linear differential equation describing the motion of a charged particle immersed in an external electrical field. Five dispersion laws are discussed, namely: the non-resonant positive IP model, which leads to the classical Debye-type dispersion law and by extension to the Cole-Cole model, largely used in current practice; the non-resonant negative IP model, which allows negative chargeability values, known in metals at high frequencies, to be explained as an intrinsic physical property of earth materials in specific field cases; the resonant flat, positive or negative IP models, which can explain the presence of peak effects at specific frequencies superimposed on flat, positive or negative dispersion spectra.

  17. Sensitivity Analysis of Onsite Atmospheric Dispersion Factor in Westinghouse type NPP in KOREA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Chan; Yoon, Duk Joo; Song, Dong Soo [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    ARCON96 is a NRC licensed air dispersion model to evaluate onsite atmospheric relative concentration X/Q. The purpose of this paper is to provide some results for checking and testing the functionalities of ARCON96. Specially, this code is optimized to estimate a habitability of control room. Since NUREG 0737 issue, the control room habitability has been studied for a FSAR (Final Safety Analysis Report). Some assumptions and methodology is used in this paper. Some methodology is introduced in this paper. The reason of the selection of 2-loop Westinghouse NPP is because of carrying out the study project for the 2-loop Westinghouse NPP in the condition of the defueled NPP condition. Onsite atmospheric dispersion factor sensitivity is performed. Key impact factor is reviewed. Some results are below: a. Time averaged effect of X/Q is timely increased. b. ARCON96 code is more conservative at the low wind speed conditions. c. Building wake impact is significant in the condition of unstable atmospheric class with more than 7m/sec of wind speed. d. Plume meander effect is strong when the distance from the release point is small. e. The other plume meander effect is strong when the meander duration time is accumulated Finally, these results show that the appropriate conservation of ARCON96 is appeared in some conditions. Also these results seem to be in good agreement with NRC Regulatory Guide and positions.

  18. Analysis of a Kalman filter based method for on-line estimation of atmospheric dispersion parameters using radiation monitoring data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drews, Martin; Lauritzen, Bent; Madsen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    A Kalman filter method is discussed for on-line estimation of radioactive release and atmospheric dispersion from a time series of off-site radiation monitoring data. The method is based on a state space approach, where a stochastic system equation describes the dynamics of the plume model parame...

  19. Physical models of polarization mode dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menyuk, C.R.; Wai, P.K.A. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The effect of randomly varying birefringence on light propagation in optical fibers is studied theoretically in the parameter regime that will be used for long-distance communications. In this regime, the birefringence is large and varies very rapidly in comparison to the nonlinear and dispersive scale lengths. We determine the polarization mode dispersion, and we show that physically realistic models yield the same result for polarization mode dispersion as earlier heuristic models that were introduced by Poole. We also prove an ergodic theorem.

  20. Implementation of a model of atmospheric dispersion and dose calculation in the release of radioactive effluents in the Nuclear Centre; Implementacion de un modelo de dispersion atmosferica y calculo de dosis en la liberacion de efluentes radiactivos en el Centro Nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz L, C. A.

    2015-07-01

    In the present thesis, the software DERA (Dispersion of Radioactive Effluents into the Atmosphere) was developed in order to calculate the equivalent dose, external and internal, associated with the release of radioactive effluents into the atmosphere from a nuclear facility. The software describes such emissions in normal operation, and not considering the exceptional situations such as accidents. Several tools were integrated for describing the dispersion of radioactive effluents using site meteorological information (average speed and wind direction and the stability profile). Starting with the calculation of the concentration of the effluent as a function of position, DERA estimates equivalent doses using a set of EPA s and ICRP s coefficients. The software contains a module that integrates a database with these coefficients for a set of 825 different radioisotopes and uses the Gaussian method to calculate the effluents dispersion. This work analyzes how adequate is the Gaussian model to describe emissions type -puff-. Chapter 4 concludes, on the basis of a comparison of the recommended correlations of emissions type -puff-, that under certain conditions (in particular with intermittent emissions) it is possible to perform an adequate description using the Gaussian model. The dispersion coefficients (σ{sub y} and σ{sub z}), that using the Gaussian model, were obtained from different correlations given in the literature. Also in Chapter 5 is presented the construction of a particular correlation using Lagrange polynomials, which takes information from the Pasquill-Gifford-Turner curves (PGT). This work also contains a state of the art about the coefficients that relate the concentration with the equivalent dose. This topic is discussed in Chapter 6, including a brief description of the biological-compartmental models developed by the ICRP. The software s development was performed using the programming language Python 2.7, for the Windows operating system (the

  1. Uncertainty modelling of atmospheric dispersion by stochastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Uncertainties can be represented in many ways. The literature describes many types of uncer- tainty representation. Among the most encountered uncertainty representations are probability distributions, interval, probability bounds and fuzzy numbers. Aleatory uncertainties are rep- resented by probability distributions and ...

  2. Estimation of air tritium concenration around Wolsung NPP site using a Lagrangian atmopsheric dispersion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M. C.; Lee, K. B.; Song, Y. I. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K. N. [KEPCO, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    A Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model(K-LADM) combining a three dimensional sea-land breeze model has been developed and applied to the estimation of the quaterly and the annual averaged air tritium concentration around Wolsung NPP site. The estimated concentrations were compared with the observed concentration data. The results showed that the present Lagrangian Atmospheric dispersion model(K-LADM) provided very good agreement with the observations.

  3. Implementation of meso-scale radioactive dispersion model for GPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunarko [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Jakarta (Indonesia). Nuclear Energy Assessment Center; Suud, Zaki [Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), Bandung (Indonesia). Physics Dept.

    2017-05-15

    Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Method (LPDM) is applied to model atmospheric dispersion of radioactive material in a meso-scale of a few tens of kilometers for site study purpose. Empirical relationships are used to determine the dispersion coefficient for various atmospheric stabilities. Diagnostic 3-D wind-field is solved based on data from one meteorological station using mass-conservation principle. Particles representing radioactive pollutant are dispersed in the wind-field as a point source. Time-integrated air concentration is calculated using kernel density estimator (KDE) in the lowest layer of the atmosphere. Parallel code is developed for GTX-660Ti GPU with a total of 1 344 scalar processors using CUDA. A test of 1-hour release discovers that linear speedup is achieved starting at 28 800 particles-per-hour (pph) up to about 20 x at 14 4000 pph. Another test simulating 6-hour release with 36 000 pph resulted in a speedup of about 60 x. Statistical analysis reveals that resulting grid doses are nearly identical in both CPU and GPU versions of the code.

  4. Modelling and Simulation of Crude Oil Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulfatai JIMOH

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This research work was carried out to develop a model equation for the dispersion of crude oil in water. Seven different crude oils (Bonny Light, Antan Terminal, Bonny Medium, Qua Iboe Light, Brass Light Mbede, Forcados Blend and Heavy H were used as the subject crude oils. The developed model equation in this project which is given as...It was developed starting from the equation for the oil dispersion rate in water which is given as...The developed equation was then simulated with the aid of MathCAD 2000 Professional software. The experimental and model results obtained from the simulation of the model equation were plotted on the same axis against time of dispersion. The model results revealed close fittings between the experimental and the model results because the correlation coefficients and the r-square values calculated using Spreadsheet Program were both found to be unity (1.00.

  5. Using Dispersed Modes During Model Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Eric; Hathcock, Megan

    2017-01-01

    Using model dispersions as a starting point allows us to quickly adjust a model to reflect new test data: a) The analyst does a lot of work before the test to save time post-test. b) Creating 1000s of model dispersions to provide "coarse tuning," then use Attune to provide the "fine tuning." ?Successful model tuning on three structures: a) TAURUS. b) Ares I-X C) Cart (in backup charts). ?Mode weighting factors, matrix norm method, and XOR vs. MAC all play key roles in determining the BME. The BME process will be used on future tests: a) ISPE modal test (ongoing work). b) SLS modal test (mid 2018).

  6. Lagrangian Modeling of the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-08-01

    Like watching a balloon borne by the breeze, a Lagrangian model tracks a parcel of air as it flows through the atmosphere. Whether running forward or backward in time, Lagrangian models offer a powerful tool for tracking and understanding the fates, or origins, of atmospheric flows. In the AGU monograph Lagrangian Modeling of the Atmosphere, editors John Lin, Dominik Brunner, Christoph Gerbig, Andreas Stohl, Ashok Luhar, and Peter Webley explore the nuances of the modeling technique. In this interview Eos talks to Lin about the growing importance of Lagrangian modeling as the world settles on climate change mitigation strategies, the societal value of operational modeling, and how recent advances are making it possible to run these complex calculations at home.

  7. A METHODOLOGY TO CHARACTERISE THE SOURCES OF UNCERTAINTIES IN ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT MODELLING

    OpenAIRE

    Brocheton, Fabien; Armand, Patrick; Soulhac, Lionel; Buisson, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: The atmospheric dispersion modelling of pollutants is based on models, but also on data and users, who lead to uncertainties, i.e. to differences between the results of the models and the physical reality to describe. The question of the uncertainty of dispersion models is a subject of increasing interest for primarily two reasons: • In spite of the significant number of research works on atmospheric dispersion in the last 30 years, results of simulations preserve an imp...

  8. Hanford atmospheric dispersion data: 1960 through June 1967

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickola, P.W.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Glantz, C.S.; Kerns, R.E.

    1983-11-01

    This volume presents dispersion and supporting meteorological data from experiments conducted over relatively flat terrain at Hanford, Washington from January 1960 through June 1967. The nature of the experiments, the sampling grids, and the tracer techniques used are described in the narrative portion of the document. Appendices contain the time-integrated concentrations for samplers within the plumes, summaries of the concentration distributions across the plumes, and wind and temperature profile data for each release period. 18 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Technical note: The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART version 6.2

    OpenAIRE

    Stohl, A.; Forster, C.; Frank, A.; P. Seibert; G. Wotawa

    2005-01-01

    International audience; The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was originally (about 8 years ago) designed for calculating the long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollutants from point sources, such as after an accident in a nuclear power plant. In the meantime FLEXPART has evolved into a comprehensive tool for atmospheric transport modeling and analysis. Its application fields were extended from air pollution studies to other topics where atmospheric transport plays a role ...

  10. Atmospheric Deposition Modeling Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset provides data on model results for dry and total deposition of sulfur, nitrogen and base cation species. Components include deposition velocities, dry...

  11. A High-precision Technique to Correct for Residual Atmospheric Dispersion in High-contrast Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, P.; Guyon, O.; Jovanovic, N.; Lozi, J.; Martinache, F.; Minowa, Y.; Kudo, T.; Takami, H.; Hayano, Y.; Narita, N.

    2016-12-01

    Direct detection and spectroscopy of exoplanets requires high-contrast imaging. For habitable exoplanets in particular, located at a small angular separation from the host star, it is crucial to employ small inner working angle (IWA) coronagraphs that efficiently suppress starlight. These coronagraphs, in turn, require careful control of the wavefront that directly impacts their performance. For ground-based telescopes, atmospheric refraction is also an important factor, since it results in a smearing of the point-spread function (PSF), that can no longer be efficiently suppressed by the coronagraph. Traditionally, atmospheric refraction is compensated for by an atmospheric dispersion compensator (ADC). ADC control relies on an a priori model of the atmosphere whose parameters are solely based on the pointing of the telescope, which can result in imperfect compensation. For a high-contrast instrument like the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system, which employs very small IWA coronagraphs, refraction-induced smearing of the PSF has to be less than 1 mas in the science band for optimum performance. In this paper, we present the first on-sky measurement and correction of residual atmospheric dispersion. Atmospheric dispersion is measured from the science image directly, using an adaptive grid of artificially introduced speckles as a diagnostic to feedback to the telescope’s ADC. With our current setup, we were able to reduce the initial residual atmospheric dispersion from 18.8 mas to 4.2 in broadband light (y- to H-band) and to 1.4 mas in the H-band only. This work is particularly relevant to the upcoming extremely large telescopes (ELTs) that will require fine control of their ADC to reach their full high-contrast imaging potential.

  12. Atmospheric dispersion characteristics of radioactive materials according to the local weather and emission conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Hye Yeon; Kang, Yoon Hee; Kim, Yoo Keun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Sang Keun [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study evaluated the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive material according to local weather conditions and emission conditions. Local weather conditions were defined as 8 patterns that frequently occur around the Kori Nuclear Power Plant and emission conditions were defined as 6 patterns from a combination of emission rates and the total number of particles of the {sup 137}Cs, using the WRF/HYSPLIT modeling system. The highest mean concentration of {sup 137}Cs occurred at 0900 LST under the ME4{sub 1} (main wind direction: SSW, daily average wind speed: 2.8 ms{sup -1}), with a wide region of its high concentration due to the continuous wind changes between 0000 and 0900 LST; under the ME3 (NE, 4.1 ms{sup -1}), the highest mean concentration of {sup 137}Cs occurred at 1500 and 2100 LST with a narrow dispersion along a strong northeasterly wind. In the case of ME4{sub 4} (S, 2.7 ms{sup -1}), the highest mean concentration of {sup 137}Cs occurred at 0300 LST because {sup 137}Cs stayed around the KNPP under low wind speed and low boundary layer height. As for the emission conditions, EM1{sub 3} and EM2{sub 3} that had the maximum total number of particles showed the widest dispersion of {sup 137}Cs, while its highest mean concentration was estimated under the EM1{sub 1} considering the relatively narrow dispersion and high emission rate. This study showed that even though an area may be located within the same radius around the Kori Nuclear Power Plant, the distribution and levels of {sup 137}Cs concentration vary according to the change in time and space of weather conditions (the altitude of the atmospheric boundary layer, the horizontal and vertical distribution of the local winds, and the precipitation levels), the topography of the regions where {sup 137}Cs is dispersed, the emission rate of {sup 137}Cs, and the number of emitted particles.

  13. Summary of the March 25--26, 1991 atmospheric model working meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1992-07-01

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations for the initial phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project were made using the MESOILT2 computer code (Ramsdell and Burk 1991). This code implemented a Lagrangian trajectory, puff dispersion model using components from other models designed primarily for regulatory applications. Uncertainty in the dispersion calculations was estimated following model calculations. The results of the atmospheric dispersion calculations were summarized in frequency distributions by location for use in preliminary dose calculations.

  14. NKS NordRisk II: Atlas of long-range atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides from selected risk sites in the Northern Hemisphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith Korsholm, U.; Havskov Soerensen, J. (Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), Copenhagen (Denmark)); Astrup, P.; Lauritzen, B. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy. Radiation Research Div., Roskilde (Denmark))

    2011-04-15

    The present atlas has been developed within the NKS/NordRisk-II project 'Nuclear risk from atmospheric dispersion in Northern Europe'. The atlas describes risks from hypothetical long-range dispersion and deposition of radionuclides from 16 nuclear risk sites on the Northern Hemisphere. The atmospheric dispersion model calculations cover a period of 30 days following each release to ensure almost complete deposition of the dispersed material. The atlas contains maps showing the total deposition and time-integrated air concentration of Cs-137 and I-131 based on three years of meteorological data spanning the climate variability associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, and corresponding time evolution of the ensemble mean atmospheric dispersion. (Author)

  15. Modelling land surface - atmosphere interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Højmark

    related to inaccurate land surface modelling, e.g. enhanced warm bias in warm dry summer months. Coupling the regional climate model to a hydrological model shows the potential of improving the surface flux simulations in dry periods and the 2 m air temperature in general. In the dry periods......The study is investigates modelling of land surface – atmosphere interactions in context of fully coupled climatehydrological model. With a special focus of under what condition a fully coupled model system is needed. Regional climate model inter-comparison projects as ENSEMBLES have shown bias...

  16. Development and test of an evaluation protocol for heavy gas dispersion models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijm, N.J.; Carissimo, B.; Mercer, A.; Bartholome, C.; Giesbrecht, H.

    1997-01-01

    In order to improve the quality (i.e. fitness-for-purpose) of models used to describe the atmospheric dispersion of heavy gas, an evaluation methodology has been developed and tested through a small evaluation exercise. This activity was carried out by the Heavy Gas Dispersion Expert Group, which

  17. Evaluación del desempeño de modelos de dispersión de contaminantes aplicados a cañones urbanos Evaluation of the performance of atmospheric dispersion models applied to urban street canyons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Venegas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available En los cañones urbanos, frecuentemente, se presentan concentraciones de contaminantes en aire varias veces superiores a la contaminación de fondo urbana. En este trabajo, se comparan valores de concentraciones de monóxido de carbono (CO en aire medidas dentro de un cañón urbano con las estimadas mediante algunos modelos de dispersión atmosférica aplicables a procesos que se verifican en los cañones: STREET, STREET-BOX, OSPM y AEOLIUS. Se presenta la evaluación para condiciones de sotavento, barlovento y para direcciones intermedias del viento. En la comparación, se utilizaron los valores horarios de concentraciones de CO en aire medidas durante un año en el interior de un cañón urbano de Göttinger Strässe (Hannover, Alemania y en el techo de un edificio lindero, de velocidad y dirección del viento observadas en el techo del mismo edificio y de flujo de tránsito vehicular en la calle del cañón. Los resultados generados por el modelo STREET con una constante empírica k=7, subestimaron las concentraciones observadas, obteniéndose un mejor desempeño con k= 12,1. El modelo STREET-BOX es adecuado para condiciones de sotavento y direcciones intermedias, pero presenta diferencias importantes con las concentraciones observadas a barlovento. En general, los resultados aportados por los modelos OSPM y AEOLIUS fueron los que menos se apartaron de los valores observados.Air pollutant concentrations inside street canyons are usually several times background concentrations in urban areas. In this paper, carbon monoxide (CO concentrations observed in a street canyon are compared with estimated values obtained using four atmospheric dispersion models: STREET, STREET-BOX, OSPM and AEOLIUS. Results for leeward, windward and intermediate wind directions are analyzed. Data used in the model evaluation include one year of hourly CO concentrations measured inside a street canyon of Göttinger Strässe (Hannover, Germany and at the roof of a

  18. Debris Dispersion Model Using Java 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar; Bardina, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes web based simulation of Shuttle launch operations and debris dispersion. Java 3D graphics provides geometric and visual content with suitable mathematical model and behaviors of Shuttle launch. Because the model is so heterogeneous and interrelated with various factors, 3D graphics combined with physical models provides mechanisms to understand the complexity of launch and range operations. The main focus in the modeling and simulation covers orbital dynamics and range safety. Range safety areas include destruct limit lines, telemetry and tracking and population risk near range. If there is an explosion of Shuttle during launch, debris dispersion is explained. The shuttle launch and range operations in this paper are discussed based on the operations from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA.

  19. Dispersion of atmospheric air pollution in summer and winter season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichowicz, Robert; Wielgosiński, Grzegorz; Fetter, Wojciech

    2017-11-04

    Seasonal variation of air pollution is associated with variety of seasons and specificity of particular months which form the so-called summer and winter season also known as the "heating" season. The occurrence of higher values of air pollution in different months of a year is associated with the type of climate, and accordingly with different atmospheric conditions in particular months, changing state of weather on a given day, and anthropogenic activity. The appearance of these conditions results in different levels of air pollution characteristic for a given period. The study uses data collected during a seven-year period (2009-2015) in the automatic measuring station of immissions located in Eastern Wielkopolska. The analysis concerns the average and maximum values of air pollution (i.e., particulate matter PM10, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and ozone) from the perspective of their occurrence in particular seasons and months or in relation to meteorological actors such as temperature, humidity, and wind speed.

  20. Iterative ensemble Kalman filter for atmospheric dispersion in nuclear accidents: An application to Kincaid tracer experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.L.; Su, G.F.; Chen, J.G. [Institute of Public Safety Research, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Raskob, W. [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, D-76021 (Germany); Yuan, H.Y., E-mail: hy-yuan@outlook.com [Institute of Public Safety Research, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, Q.Y. [Institute of Public Safety Research, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • We integrate the iterative EnKF method into the POLYPHEMUS platform. • We thoroughly evaluate the data assimilation system against the Kincaid dataset. • The data assimilation system substantially improves the model predictions. • More than 60% of the retrieved emissions are within a factor two of actual values. • The results reveal that the boundary layer height is the key influential factor. - Abstract: Information about atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides is vitally important for planning effective countermeasures during nuclear accidents. Results of dispersion models have high spatial and temporal resolutions, but they are not accurate enough due to the uncertain source term and the errors in meteorological data. Environmental measurements are more reliable, but they are scarce and unable to give forecasts. In this study, our newly proposed iterative ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation scheme is used to combine model results and environmental measurements. The system is thoroughly validated against the observations in the Kincaid tracer experiment. The initial first-guess emissions are assumed to be six magnitudes underestimated. The iterative EnKF system rapidly corrects the errors in the emission rate and wind data, thereby significantly improving the model results (>80% reduction of the normalized mean square error, r = 0.71). Sensitivity tests are conducted to investigate the influence of meteorological parameters. The results indicate that the system is sensitive to boundary layer height. When the heights from the numerical weather prediction model are used, only 62.5% of reconstructed emission rates are within a factor two of the actual emissions. This increases to 87.5% when the heights derived from the on-site observations are used.

  1. Atmospheric Dispersion of Radioactivity from Nuclear Power Plant Accidents: Global Assessment and Case Study for the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East

    OpenAIRE

    Theodoros Christoudias; Yiannis Proestos; Jos Lelieveld

    2014-01-01

    We estimate the contamination risks from the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides released by severe nuclear power plant accidents using the ECHAM/Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) atmospheric chemistry (EMAC) atmospheric chemistry-general circulation model at high resolution (50 km). We present an overview of global risks and also a case study of nuclear power plants that are currently under construction, planned and proposed in the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, a region pron...

  2. Model for Simulation Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1976-01-01

    A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance......, a correct spectral shape, and non-Gaussian statistics, is selected in order to evaluate the model turbulence. An actual turbulence record is analyzed in detail providing both a standard for comparison and input statistics for the generalized spectral analysis, which in turn produces a set of orthonormal....... The method is unique in modeling the three velocity components simultaneously, and it is found that important cross-statistical features are reasonably well-behaved. It is concluded that the model provides a practical, operational simulator of atmospheric turbulence....

  3. Updating source term and atmospheric dispersion simulations for the dose reconstruction in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai Haruyasu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the radiological dose to the public resulting from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS accident in Japan, especially for the early phase of the accident when no measured data are available for that purpose, the spatial and temporal distribution of radioactive materials in the environment are reconstructed by computer simulations. In this study, by refining the source term of radioactive materials discharged into the atmosphere and modifying the atmospheric transport, dispersion and deposition model (ATDM, the atmospheric dispersion simulation of radioactive materials is improved. Then, a database of spatiotemporal distribution of radioactive materials in the air and on the ground surface is developed from the output of the simulation. This database is used in other studies for the dose assessment by coupling with the behavioral pattern of evacuees from the FDNPS accident. By the improvement of the ATDM simulation to use a new meteorological model and sophisticated deposition scheme, the ATDM simulations reproduced well the 137Cs and 131I deposition patterns. For the better reproducibility of dispersion processes, further refinement of the source term was carried out by optimizing it to the improved ATDM simulation by using new monitoring data.

  4. Updating source term and atmospheric dispersion simulations for the dose reconstruction in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Haruyasu; Terada, Hiroaki; Tsuduki, Katsunori; Katata, Genki; Ota, Masakazu; Furuno, Akiko; Akari, Shusaku

    2017-09-01

    In order to assess the radiological dose to the public resulting from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) accident in Japan, especially for the early phase of the accident when no measured data are available for that purpose, the spatial and temporal distribution of radioactive materials in the environment are reconstructed by computer simulations. In this study, by refining the source term of radioactive materials discharged into the atmosphere and modifying the atmospheric transport, dispersion and deposition model (ATDM), the atmospheric dispersion simulation of radioactive materials is improved. Then, a database of spatiotemporal distribution of radioactive materials in the air and on the ground surface is developed from the output of the simulation. This database is used in other studies for the dose assessment by coupling with the behavioral pattern of evacuees from the FDNPS accident. By the improvement of the ATDM simulation to use a new meteorological model and sophisticated deposition scheme, the ATDM simulations reproduced well the 137Cs and 131I deposition patterns. For the better reproducibility of dispersion processes, further refinement of the source term was carried out by optimizing it to the improved ATDM simulation by using new monitoring data.

  5. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS AND RADIOLOGICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIGSBY KM

    2011-04-07

    This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farms safety analysis. The basis equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included. In this revision, the time averaging for toxicological consequence evaluations is clarified based on a review of DOE complex guidance and a review of tank farm chemicals.

  6. Field studies of transport and dispersion of atmospheric tracers in nocturnal drainage flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul H. Gudiksen; Gilbert J. Ferber; Malcolm M. Fowler; Wynn L. Eberhard; Michael A. Fosberg; William R. Knuth

    1984-01-01

    A series of tracer experiments were carried out as part of the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program to evaluate pollutant transport and dispersion characteristics of nocturnal drainage flows within a valley in northern California. The results indicate that the degree of interaction of the drainage flows with the larger scale regional flows are...

  7. Atmospheric discharge and dispersion of radionuclides during the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Part II: verification of the source term and analysis of regional-scale atmospheric dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Hiroaki; Katata, Genki; Chino, Masamichi; Nagai, Haruyasu

    2012-10-01

    Regional-scale atmospheric dispersion simulations were carried out to verify the source term of (131)I and (137)Cs estimated in our previous studies, and to analyze the atmospheric dispersion and surface deposition during the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The accuracy of the source term was evaluated by comparing the simulation results with measurements of daily and monthly surface depositions (fallout) over land in eastern Japan from March 12 to April 30, 2011. The source term was refined using observed air concentrations of radionuclides for periods when there were significant discrepancies between the calculated and measured daily surface deposition, and when environmental monitoring data, which had not been used in our previous studies, were now available. The daily surface deposition using the refined source term was predicted mostly to within a factor of 10, and without any apparent bias. Considering the errors in the model prediction, the estimated source term is reasonably accurate during the period when the plume flowed over land in Japan. The analysis of regional-scale atmospheric dispersion and deposition suggests that the present distribution of a large amount of (137)Cs deposition in eastern Japan was produced primarily by four events that occurred on March 12, 15-16, 20, and 21-23. The ratio of wet deposition to the total varied widely depending on the influence by the particular event. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling of Rayleigh wave dispersion in Iberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Badal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase and group velocities of 15–70 s Rayleigh waves propagating across the Iberian Peninsula have been transformed into local dispersion curves by linear inversion of travel times. The procedure permits that the waveform dispersion to be obtained as a continuous period-dependent velocity function at grid points belonging to the area probed by the waves, thus providing phase- and group-velocity contour maps for several periods within the interval of interest. The regionalization process rests on a homogeneous initial data set in which the number of observations remains almost constant for all periods of reference. Damped least-squares inversion of the local dispersion curves for shear-wave velocity structure is performed to obtain depth-dependent S-wave velocity profiles at the grid points covering the model region. The reliability of the results should improve significantly owing to the use of phase and group velocities simultaneously. On this basis, we have built horizontal depth sections that give an updated view of the seismic velocity structure of the peninsula at lithospheric and upper mantle depths (20–200 km. After averaging all the pure-path S-wave velocities previously determined at each grid point, the velocity-depth models so obtained for major tectonic units allow the comparison between the Hercynian basement and other areas of Mesozoic folding and Tertiary basins.

  9. Short and long term dispersion patterns of radionuclides in the atmosphere around the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leelossy, Adam; Meszaros, Robert [Department of Meteorology, Eoetvoes Lorand University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Lagzi, Istvan, E-mail: lagzi@vuk.chem.elte.hu [Department of Meteorology, Eoetvoes Lorand University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-12-15

    The Chernobyl accident and unfortunately the recent accident at the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant are the most serious accidents in the history of the nuclear technology and industry. Both of them have a huge and prolonged impact on environment as well as human health. Therefore, any technological developments and strategies that could diminish the consequences of such unfortunate events are undisputedly the most important issues of research. Numerical simulations of dispersion of radionuclides in the atmosphere after an accidental release can provide with a reliable prediction of the path of the plume. In this study we present a short (one month) and a long (11 years) term statistical study for the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant to estimate the most probable dispersion directions and plume structures of radionuclides on local scale using a Gaussian dispersion model. We analyzed the differences in plume directions and structures in case of typical weather/circulation pattern and provided a statistical-climatological method for a 'first-guess' approximation of the dispersion of toxic substances. The results and the described method can support and used by decision makers in such important cases like the Fukushima accident. - Highlights: > Plume direction and structure in the atmosphere were calculated near the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant. > There are significant differences among plume directions and structures in each month and season of the year. > Developed statistical approach could be an additional extension for decision makers.

  10. Air Quality Dispersion Modeling - Alternative Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Models, not listed in Appendix W, that can be used in regulatory applications with case-by-case justification to the Reviewing Authority as noted in Section 3.2, Use of Alternative Models, in Appendix W.

  11. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART version 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisso, Ignacio; Sollum, Espen; Grythe, Henrik; Kristiansen, Nina; Cassiani, Massimo; Eckhardt, Sabine; Thompson, Rona; Groot Zwaaftnik, Christine; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Hamburger, Thomas; Sodemann, Harald; Haimberger, Leopold; Henne, Stephan; Brunner, Dominik; Burkhart, John; Fouilloux, Anne; Fang, Xuekun; Phillip, Anne; Seibert, Petra; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was in its first original release in 1998 designed for calculating the long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollutants from point sources, such as after an accident in a nuclear power plant. The model has now evolved into a comprehensive tool for atmospheric transport modelling and analysis. Its application fields are extended to a range of atmospheric transport processes for both atmospheric gases and aerosols, e.g. greenhouse gases, short-lived climate forces like black carbon, volcanic ash and gases as well as studies of the water cycle. We present the newest release, FLEXPART version 10. Since the last publication fully describing FLEXPART (version 6.2), the model code has been parallelised in order to allow for the possibility to speed up computation. A new, more detailed gravitational settling parametrisation for aerosols was implemented, and the wet deposition scheme for aerosols has been heavily modified and updated to provide a more accurate representation of this physical process. In addition, an optional new turbulence scheme for the convective boundary layer is available, that considers the skewness in the vertical velocity distribution. Also, temporal variation and temperature dependence of the OH-reaction are included. Finally, user input files are updated to a more convenient and user-friendly namelist format, and the option to produce the output-files in netCDF-format instead of binary format is implemented. We present these new developments and show recent model applications. Moreover, we also introduce some tools for the preparation of the meteorological input data, as well as for the processing of FLEXPART output data.

  12. Mixing height derived from the DMI-HIRLAM NWP model, and used for ETEX dispersion modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, J.H.; Rasmussen, A. [Danish Meteorological Inst., Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    For atmospheric dispersion modelling it is of great significance to estimate the mixing height well. Mesoscale and long-range diffusion models using output from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models may well use NWP model profiles of wind, temperature and humidity in computation of the mixing height. This is dynamically consistent, and enables calculation of the mixing height for predicted states of the atmosphere. In autumn 1994, the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX) was carried out with the objective to validate atmospheric dispersion models. The Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) participates in the model evaluations with the Danish Emergency Response Model of the Atmosphere (DERMA) using NWP model data from the DMI version of the High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM) as well as from the global model of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). In DERMA, calculation of mixing heights are performed based on a bulk Richardson number approach. Comparing with tracer gas measurements for the first ETEX experiment, a sensitivity study is performed for DERMA. Using DMI-HIRLAM data, the study shows that optimum values of the critical bulk Richardson number in the range 0.15-0.35 are adequate. These results are in agreement with recent mixing height verification studies against radiosonde data. The fairly large range of adequate critical values is a signature of the robustness of the method. Direct verification results against observed missing heights from operational radio-sondes released under the ETEX plume are presented. (au) 10 refs.

  13. Plutonium explosive dispersal modeling using the MACCS2 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, C.M.; Wald, T.L.; Chanin, D.I.

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive the necessary parameters to be used to establish a defensible methodology to perform explosive dispersal modeling of respirable plutonium using Gaussian methods. A particular code, MACCS2, has been chosen for this modeling effort due to its application of sophisticated meteorological statistical sampling in accordance with the philosophy of Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.145, ``Atmospheric Dispersion Models for Potential Accident Consequence Assessments at Nuclear Power Plants``. A second advantage supporting the selection of the MACCS2 code for modeling purposes is that meteorological data sets are readily available at most Department of Energy (DOE) and NRC sites. This particular MACCS2 modeling effort focuses on the calculation of respirable doses and not ground deposition. Once the necessary parameters for the MACCS2 modeling are developed and presented, the model is benchmarked against empirical test data from the Double Tracks shot of project Roller Coaster (Shreve 1965) and applied to a hypothetical plutonium explosive dispersal scenario. Further modeling with the MACCS2 code is performed to determine a defensible method of treating the effects of building structure interaction on the respirable fraction distribution as a function of height. These results are related to the Clean Slate 2 and Clean Slate 3 bunkered shots of Project Roller Coaster. Lastly a method is presented to determine the peak 99.5% sector doses on an irregular site boundary in the manner specified in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.145 (1983). Parametric analyses are performed on the major analytic assumptions in the MACCS2 model to define the potential errors that are possible in using this methodology.

  14. Frontiers in Atmospheric Chemistry Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colette, Augustin; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Meleux, Frederik; Rouïl, Laurence

    2013-04-01

    The first pan-European kilometre-scale atmospheric chemistry simulation is introduced. The continental-scale air pollution episode of January 2009 is modelled with the CHIMERE offline chemistry-transport model with a massive grid of 2 million horizontal points, performed on 2000 CPU of a high performance computing system hosted by the Research and Technology Computing Center at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CCRT/CEA). Besides the technical challenge, which demonstrated the robustness of the selected air quality model, we discuss the added value in terms of air pollution modelling and decision support. The comparison with in-situ observations shows that model biases are significantly improved despite some spurious added spatial variability attributed to shortcomings in the emission downscaling process and coarse resolution of the meteorological fields. The increased spatial resolution is clearly beneficial for the detection of exceedances and exposure modelling. We reveal small scale air pollution patterns that highlight the contribution of city plumes to background air pollution levels. Up to a factor 5 underestimation of the fraction of population exposed to detrimental levels of pollution can be obtained with a coarse simulation if subgrid scale correction such as urban increments are ignored. This experiment opens new perspectives for environmental decision making. After two decades of efforts to reduce air pollutant emissions across Europe, the challenge is now to find the optimal trade-off between national and local air quality management strategies. While the first approach is based on sectoral strategies and energy policies, the later builds upon new alternatives such as urban development. The strategies, the decision pathways and the involvement of individual citizen differ, and a compromise based on cost and efficiency must be found. We illustrated how high performance computing in atmospheric science can contribute to this

  15. Advanced Atmospheric Ensemble Modeling Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Chiswell, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kurzeja, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Maze, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Viner, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Werth, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-29

    Ensemble modeling (EM), the creation of multiple atmospheric simulations for a given time period, has become an essential tool for characterizing uncertainties in model predictions. We explore two novel ensemble modeling techniques: (1) perturbation of model parameters (Adaptive Programming, AP), and (2) data assimilation (Ensemble Kalman Filter, EnKF). The current research is an extension to work from last year and examines transport on a small spatial scale (<100 km) in complex terrain, for more rigorous testing of the ensemble technique. Two different release cases were studied, a coastal release (SF6) and an inland release (Freon) which consisted of two release times. Observations of tracer concentration and meteorology are used to judge the ensemble results. In addition, adaptive grid techniques have been developed to reduce required computing resources for transport calculations. Using a 20- member ensemble, the standard approach generated downwind transport that was quantitatively good for both releases; however, the EnKF method produced additional improvement for the coastal release where the spatial and temporal differences due to interior valley heating lead to the inland movement of the plume. The AP technique showed improvements for both release cases, with more improvement shown in the inland release. This research demonstrated that transport accuracy can be improved when models are adapted to a particular location/time or when important local data is assimilated into the simulation and enhances SRNL’s capability in atmospheric transport modeling in support of its current customer base and local site missions, as well as our ability to attract new customers within the intelligence community.

  16. Prime focus wide-field corrector designs with lossless atmospheric dispersion correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, Will [Australian Astron. Observ.; Gillingham, Peter [Australian Astron. Observ.; Smith, Greg [Australian Astron. Observ.; Kent, Steve [Fermilab; Doel, Peter [University Coll. London

    2014-07-18

    Wide-Field Corrector designs are presented for the Blanco and Mayall telescopes, the CFHT and the AAT. The designs are Terezibh-style, with 5 or 6 lenses, and modest negative optical power. They have 2.2-3 degree fields of view, with curved and telecentric focal surfaces suitable for fiber spectroscopy. Some variants also allow wide-field imaging, by changing the last WFC element. Apart from the adaptation of the Terebizh design for spectroscopy, the key feature is a new concept for a 'Compensating Lateral Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector', with two of the lenses being movable laterally by small amounts. This provides excellent atmospheric dispersion correction, without any additional surfaces or absorption. A novel and simple mechanism for providing the required lens motions is proposed, which requires just 3 linear actuators for each of the two moving lenses.

  17. Lagrangian modeling of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides and geographical information systems as tools to support emergency planning in area of influence of nuclear complex of Angra dos Reis, RJ, Brazil; Modelagem Lagrangeana da dispersao atmoferica de radionuclideos e sistemas de informacao geografica como ferramentas de suporte ao planejamento de emergencia na area de influencia do complexo nuclear de Angra dos Reis, RJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Corbiniano

    2013-07-01

    Industrial accidents generally endanger structures and the set of environmental influence area where the enterprises are located, especially when affected by atmospheric dispersion of their pollutants, whose concern with the evacuation of the population is the main goal in emergency situations. Considering the nuclear complex Angra dos Reis - RJ, based on computer modeling analysis of the mechanisms of pollutant dispersion in conjunction with geographic information systems were developed. Thus, information about the dispersion of radionuclides - from simulations performed on the HYSPLIT; meteorological data (direction, intensity and calm on the wind regime and analysis of the wind field in the region using WRF), occurrence of landslides and data on the environmental study area were integrated into a GIS database using ArcGIS platform. Aiming at the identification and definition of escape routes in case of evacuation from accidental events in CNAAA, the results point solutions for long-term planning, based on weather and landslides, and short-term, supported by simulations of the dispersion radionuclides, in order to support actions that assist local emergency planning. (author)

  18. Longitudinal dispersion modeling in small streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekarova, Pavla; Pekar, Jan; Miklanek, Pavol

    2014-05-01

    The environmental problems caused by the increasing of pollutant loads discharged into natural water bodies are very complex. For that reason the cognition of transport mechanism and mixing characteristics in natural streams is very important. The mathematical and numerical models have become very useful tools for solving the water management problems. The mathematical simulations based on numerical models of pollution mixing in streams can be used (for example) for prediction of spreading of accidental contaminant waves in rivers. The paper deals with the estimation of the longitudinal dispersion coefficients and with the numerical simulation of transport and transformation of accidental pollution in the small natural streams. There are different ways of solving problems of pollution spreading in open channels, in natural rivers. One of them is the hydrodynamic approach, which endeavours to understand and quantify the spreading phenomenon in a stream. The hydrodynamic models are based on advection-diffusion equation and the majority of them are one-dimensional models. Their disadvantage is inability to simulate the spread of pollution until complete dispersion of pollutant across the stream section is finished. Two-dimensional mixing models do not suffer from these limitations. On the other hand, the one-dimensional models are simpler than two-dimensional ones, they need not so much input data and they are often swifter. Three-dimensional models under conditions of natural streams are applicable with difficulties (or inapplicable) for their complexity and demands on accuracy and amount of input data. As there was mentioned above the two-dimensional models can be used also until complete dispersion of pollutant across the stream section is not finished, so we decided to apply the two-dimensional model SIRENIE. Experimental microbasin Rybarik is the part of the experimental Mostenik brook basin of IH SAS Bratislava. It was established as a Field Hydrological

  19. Wave model for longitudinal dispersion: Development of the model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Dil`man, V.V.; Kronberg, A.E. [Twente Univ. of Technology, Enschede (Netherlands)

    1995-09-01

    A new 1-D model for longitudinal dispersion is proposed as an alternative to the Fickian-type dispersed plug-flow model. Accounting for significant features of longitudinal mixing gives rise to a quasilinear hyperbolic system of two first-order equations for the average concentration and the dispersion flux instead of one second-order parabolic equation for the average concentration. The model equations are obtained based on minor extensions of the heuristic equilibrium analysis of Taylor. A qualitative, more general derivation of the equations is given on the basis of a simple generalization of Fick`s law, taking into account the finite velocity of fluid elements. For linear problems the mean concentration and the dispersion flux obey a hyperbolic equation of the second order. The proposed hyperbolic model contains three parameters that depend only on the flow conditions, the physical properties of the fluid, and the geometry of the system. It effectively resolves the well-known problem of boundary conditions that, for unidirectional flow, are formulated now only at the reactor inlet. The new model eliminates the conceptual shortcoming inherent to the Fickian dispersed plug-flow model: it predicts a finite velocity of signal propagation and does not involve backmixing in the case of unidirectional flow.

  20. On-sky Closed-loop Correction of Atmospheric Dispersion for High-contrast Coronagraphy and Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, P.; Guyon, O.; Jovanovic, N.; Lozi, J.; Martinache, F.; Minowa, Y.; Kudo, T.; Kotani, T.; Takami, H.

    2018-02-01

    Adaptive optic (AO) systems delivering high levels of wavefront correction are now common at observatories. One of the main limitations to image quality after wavefront correction comes from atmospheric refraction. An atmospheric dispersion compensator (ADC) is employed to correct for atmospheric refraction. The correction is applied based on a look-up table consisting of dispersion values as a function of telescope elevation angle. The look-up table-based correction of atmospheric dispersion results in imperfect compensation leading to the presence of residual dispersion in the point spread function (PSF) and is insufficient when sub-milliarcsecond precision is required. The presence of residual dispersion can limit the achievable contrast while employing high-performance coronagraphs or can compromise high-precision astrometric measurements. In this paper, we present the first on-sky closed-loop correction of atmospheric dispersion by directly using science path images. The concept behind the measurement of dispersion utilizes the chromatic scaling of focal plane speckles. An adaptive speckle grid generated with a deformable mirror (DM) that has a sufficiently large number of actuators is used to accurately measure the residual dispersion and subsequently correct it by driving the ADC. We have demonstrated with the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO (SCExAO) system on-sky closed-loop correction of residual dispersion to direct detection of habitable exoplanets with upcoming extremely large telescopes (ELTs) and also provide a diagnostic tool to test the performance of instruments which require sub-milliarcsecond correction.

  1. Electron density measurement of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma using dispersion interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Kasahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2017-10-01

    Medical applications of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasmas have recently been attracting a great deal of attention, where many types of plasma sources have been developed to meet the purposes. For example, plasma-activated medium (PAM), which is now being studied for cancer treatment, has been produced by irradiating non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma with ultrahigh electron density to a culture medium. Meanwhile, in order to measure electron density in magnetic confinement plasmas, a CO2 laser dispersion interferometer has been developed and installed on the Large Helical Device (LHD) at the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. The dispersion interferometer has advantages that the measurement is insensitive to mechanical vibrations and changes in neutral gas density. Taking advantage of these properties, we applied the dispersion interferometer to electron density diagnostics of atmospheric pressure plasmas produced by the NU-Global HUMAP-WSAP-50 device, which is used for producing PAM. This study was supported by the Grant of Joint Research by the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS).

  2. The pioneering works of Professor Duzheng Ye on atmospheric dispersion, Tibetan Plateau meteorology, and air-sea interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ngar-Cheung

    2017-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of the impacts of the original works of Professor Duzheng YE on a selected set of observational and model studies with which the present author has been associated over the past several decades. The main themes of these works include atmospheric energy dispersion, air-land interactions over the Tibetan Plateau, and El Ni˜norelated air-sea coupling over East Asia. The dispersive behavior of observed atmospheric fluctuations accompanying cold surge events in East Asia is demonstrated. Cold air outbreaks over Korea and southern China are coincident with the successive downstream development of troughs and ridges, with the group velocity of such wave packets being notably faster than the phase propagation speed of individual troughs and ridges. In a more general context, dispersive features are also discernible from lagged teleconnection charts and cross-spectra of observed and model-simulated geopotential height variations on 10-30-day time scales. Using the output from a high-resolution general circulation model, the relative contributions of condensational, sensible, and radiative heating to the atmospheric energy budget over the Tibetan Plateau are documented. The rapid changes of the upper tropospheric Tibetan anticyclone and East Asian mei-yu ("plum rain") precipitation band associated with the development of the Asian monsoon system are described. The principal anomalies in sea level pressure, surface wind, precipitation and sea surface temperature over southeastern China and the Philippine Sea region during El Ni˜no events are presented. The contributions of remote El Ni˜no-related forcing and local air-sea interaction to the occurrence of these anomalies are assessed.

  3. Observations and Modeling of Atmospheric Radiance Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wintersteiner, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The overall purpose of the work that we have undertaken is to provide new capabilities for observing and modeling structured radiance in the atmosphere, particularly the non-LTE regions of the atmosphere...

  4. Short and long term dispersion patterns of radionuclides in the atmosphere around the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelossy, Adám; Mészáros, Róbert; Lagzi, István

    2011-12-01

    The Chernobyl accident and unfortunately the recent accident at the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant are the most serious accidents in the history of the nuclear technology and industry. Both of them have a huge and prolonged impact on environment as well as human health. Therefore, any technological developments and strategies that could diminish the consequences of such unfortunate events are undisputedly the most important issues of research. Numerical simulations of dispersion of radionuclides in the atmosphere after an accidental release can provide with a reliable prediction of the path of the plume. In this study we present a short (one month) and a long (11 years) term statistical study for the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant to estimate the most probable dispersion directions and plume structures of radionuclides on local scale using a Gaussian dispersion model. We analyzed the differences in plume directions and structures in case of typical weather/circulation pattern and provided a statistical-climatological method for a "first-guess" approximation of the dispersion of toxic substances. The results and the described method can support and used by decision makers in such important cases like the Fukushima accident. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Summary of the March 25--26, 1991 atmospheric model working meeting. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1992-07-01

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations for the initial phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project were made using the MESOILT2 computer code (Ramsdell and Burk 1991). This code implemented a Lagrangian trajectory, puff dispersion model using components from other models designed primarily for regulatory applications. Uncertainty in the dispersion calculations was estimated following model calculations. The results of the atmospheric dispersion calculations were summarized in frequency distributions by location for use in preliminary dose calculations.

  6. Using Atmospheric Dispersion Theory to Inform the Design of a Short-lived Radioactive Particle Release Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishel, Jeremy P; Keillor, Martin E; Arrigo, Leah M; Baciak, James E; Detwiler, Rebecca S; Kernan, Warnick J; Kirkham, Randy R; Milbrath, Brian D; Seifert, Allen; Seifert, Carolyn E; Smart, John E

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric dispersion theory can be used to predict ground deposition of particulates downwind of a radionuclide release. This paper uses standard formulations found in Gaussian plume models to inform the design of an experimental release of short-lived radioactive particles into the atmosphere. Specifically, a source depletion algorithm is used to determine the optimum particle size and release height that maximizes the near-field deposition while minimizing both the required source activity and the fraction of activity lost to long-distance transport. The purpose of the release is to provide a realistic deposition pattern that might be observed downwind of a small-scale vent from an underground nuclear explosion. The deposition field will be used, in part, to study several techniques of gamma radiation survey and spectrometry that could be used by an On-Site Inspection team investigating such an event.

  7. Biophysical models of larval dispersal in the Benguela Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We synthesise and update results from the suite of biophysical, larval-dispersal models developed in the Benguela Current ecosystem. Biophysical models of larval dispersal use outputs of physical hydrodynamic models as inputs to individual-based models in which biological processes acting during the larval life are ...

  8. Modelling the dispersion of particle numbers in five European cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukkonen, J.; Karl, M.; Keuken, M. P.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; Denby, B. R.; Singh, V.; Douros, J.; Manders, A.; Samaras, Z.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Jonkers, S.; Aarnio, M.; Karppinen, A.; Kangas, L.; Lützenkirchen, S.; Petäjä, T.; Vouitsis, I.; Sokhi, R. S.

    2016-02-01

    We present an overview of the modelling of particle number concentrations (PNCs) in five major European cities, namely Helsinki, Oslo, London, Rotterdam, and Athens, in 2008. Novel emission inventories of particle numbers have been compiled both on urban and European scales. We used atmospheric dispersion modelling for PNCs in the five target cities and on a European scale, and evaluated the predicted results against available measured concentrations. In all the target cities, the concentrations of particle numbers (PNs) were mostly influenced by the emissions originating from local vehicular traffic. The influence of shipping and harbours was also significant for Helsinki, Oslo, Rotterdam, and Athens, but not for London. The influence of the aviation emissions in Athens was also notable. The regional background concentrations were clearly lower than the contributions originating from urban sources in Helsinki, Oslo, and Athens. The regional background was also lower than urban contributions in traffic environments in London, but higher or approximately equal to urban contributions in Rotterdam. It was numerically evaluated that the influence of coagulation and dry deposition on the predicted PNCs was substantial for the urban background in Oslo. The predicted and measured annual average PNCs in four cities agreed within approximately ≤ 26 % (measured as fractional biases), except for one traffic station in London. This study indicates that it is feasible to model PNCs in major cities within a reasonable accuracy, although major challenges remain in the evaluation of both the emissions and atmospheric transformation of PNCs.

  9. Technical Report for Calculations of Atmospheric Dispersion at Onsite Locations for Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Alan [Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR& D), Washington, DC (United States); Chaves, Chris [Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR& D), Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-04-04

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has performed an evaluation of the technical bases for the default value for the atmospheric dispersion parameter χ/Q. This parameter appears in the calculation of radiological dose at the onsite receptor location (co-located worker at 100 meters) in safety analysis of DOE nuclear facilities. The results of the calculation are then used to determine whether safety significant engineered controls should be established to prevent and/or mitigate the event causing the release of hazardous material. An evaluation of methods for calculation of the dispersion of potential chemical releases for the purpose of estimating the chemical exposure at the co-located worker location was also performed. DOE’s evaluation consisted of: (a) a review of the regulatory basis for the default χ/Q dispersion parameter; (b) an analysis of this parameter’s sensitivity to various factors that affect the dispersion of radioactive material; and (c) performance of additional independent calculations to assess the appropriate use of the default χ/Q value.

  10. Multilevel modelling of dispersed multiphase flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Dispersed multiphase flows are frequently encountered in a variety of industrially important processes in the petroleum, chemical, metallurgical and energy industries. Scale-up of equipment involving dispersed multiphase flows is quite difficult which is mainly due to the inherent complexity of the

  11. Simulation of atmospheric dispersion of elevated releases from point sources in Mississippi Gulf Coast with different meteorological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerramilli, Anjaneyulu; Srinivas, Challa Venkata; Dasari, Hari Prasad; Tuluri, Francis; White, Loren D; Baham, Julius M; Young, John H; Hughes, Robert; Patrick, Chuck; Hardy, Mark G; Swanier, Shelton J

    2009-03-01

    Atmospheric dispersion calculations are made using the HYSPLIT Particle Dispersion Model for studying the transport and dispersion of air-borne releases from point elevated sources in the Mississippi Gulf coastal region. Simulations are performed separately with three meteorological data sets having different spatial and temporal resolution for a typical summer period in 1-3 June 2006 representing a weak synoptic condition. The first two data are the NCEP global and regional analyses (FNL, EDAS) while the third is a meso-scale simulation generated using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with nested domains at a fine resolution of 4 km. The meso-scale model results show significant temporal and spatial variations in the meteorological fields as a result of the combined influences of the land-sea breeze circulation, the large scale flow field and diurnal alteration in the mixing depth across the coast. The model predicted SO(2) concentrations showed that the trajectory and the concentration distribution varied in the three cases of input data. While calculations with FNL data show an overall higher correlation, there is a significant positive bias during daytime and negative bias during night time. Calculations with EDAS fields are significantly below the observations during both daytime and night time though plume behavior follows the coastal circulation. The diurnal plume behavior and its distribution are better simulated using the mesoscale WRF meteorological fields in the coastal environment suggesting its suitability for pollution dispersion impact assessment in the local scale. Results of different cases of simulation, comparison with observations, correlation and bias in each case are presented.

  12. Simulation of Atmospheric Dispersion of Elevated Releases from Point Sources in Mississippi Gulf Coast with Different Meteorological Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelton J. Swanier

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric dispersion calculations are made using the HYSPLIT Particle Dispersion Model for studying the transport and dispersion of air-borne releases from point elevated sources in the Mississippi Gulf coastal region. Simulations are performed separately with three meteorological data sets having different spatial and temporal resolution for a typical summer period in 1-3 June 2006 representing a weak synoptic condition. The first two data are the NCEP global and regional analyses (FNL, EDAS while the third is a meso-scale simulation generated using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with nested domains at a fine resolution of 4 km. The meso-scale model results show significant temporal and spatial variations in the meteorological fields as a result of the combined influences of the land-sea breeze circulation, the large scale flow field and diurnal alteration in the mixing depth across the coast. The model predicted SO2 concentrations showed that the trajectory and the concentration distribution varied in the three cases of input data. While calculations with FNL data show an overall higher correlation, there is a significant positive bias during daytime and negative bias during night time. Calculations with EDAS fields are significantly below the observations during both daytime and night time though plume behavior follows the coastal circulation. The diurnal plume behavior and its distribution are better simulated using the mesoscale WRF meteorological fields in the coastal environment suggesting its suitability for pollution dispersion impact assessment in the local scale. Results of different cases of simulation, comparison with observations, correlation and bias in each case are presented.

  13. Modelo matemático de dispersão de poluentes na atmosfera: um instrumento técnico para a gestão ambiental Mathematical model of pollutants dispersion in the atmosphere: an instrument technique to environmental management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson Moreira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Os modelos matemáticos de dispersão de poluentes na atmosfera representam um instrumento técnico importante, seja para o conhecimento do estado do ambiente, unidos à rede de monitoramento, seja para a gestão ambiental. Neste trabalho são evidenciadas as caraterísticas operacionais e teóricas dos modelos. São introduzidos os modelos de nova geração que podem representar diretamente a turbulência atmosférica através do valor do comprimento de Monin-Obukhov e da velocidade de atrito. Além disso, salienta-se que uma correta utilização dos modelos de transporte e difusão na atmosfera dependem de um estudo sobre suas capacidades de representarem corretamente situações reais confrontando os valores calculados dos modelos com observações experimentais. É aprofundado em particular, visto a grande atualidade do fenômeno, a utilização dos modelos matemáticos de dispersão na gestão da qualidade do ar em ambiente urbano.The mathematical models of pollutant dispersion in the atmosphere represent an important technical instrument, as for the knowledge of the state of the atmosphere, united to the monitoring net, as for the environmental administration. In this work the operational and theoretical characteristics of air pollution models are evidenced. Models of new generation that can represent the atmospheric turbulence directly through the value of the Monin-Obukhov length and of the friction velocity are introduced. Besides, it is pointed out that a correct use of the transport and diffusion models in the atmosphere depends of a study about their capacities of representing real situations confronting the calculated values of the models with experimental observations. It is deepened in matter, seen the great present time of the phenomenon, the use of the mathematical models of dispersion in the management of the air quality in urban environment.

  14. Prototyping the Use of Dispersion Models to Predict Ground Concentrations During Burning of Deployed Military Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    and that approximately 40% of the pollutant was deposited in the 10 by 10 grid ( Schaum et al., 2010). In the late 90’s EPA and American...Sawyer, P. (2007). Atmospheric dispersion model validation in low wind conditions. National Security Technologies, LLC. Schaum , J., Cohen, M., Perry, S

  15. Atmospheric Dispersion of Various Types of Iodine in UAE in February and August

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sungyeop; Beeley, Philip A. [Khalifa Univ. of Science, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Kim, Sungyeop; Chang, Soonheung; Lee, Kunjai [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The distribution ratio of these three types of iodine being released to the atmosphere under accident scenario is still not clearly reported because of its complex kinetics of chemical and physical process in the accidental condition. In this research, the dispersion behaviors of three kinds of iodine in the atmosphere have been considered in the UAE environment in winter and summer situations. Higher ground level concentration on the same downwind distance from the source appears in summer because of lower wind speed than that of winter. More lateral spreading of vertical downwind direction in summer has been confirmed because of less stable air than that of winter. Higher ground level concentrations have been appeared in order of particle type, organic gas type and elemental gas type of I-131 with given assumptions.

  16. Air Dispersion Modeling for Building 3026C/D Demolition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Richard C [ORNL; Sjoreen, Andrea L [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL

    2010-06-01

    This report presents estimates of dispersion coefficients and effective dose for potential air dispersion scenarios of uncontrolled releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) buildings 3026C, 3026D, and 3140 prior to or during the demolition of the 3026 Complex. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) AERMOD system1-6 was used to compute these estimates. AERMOD stands for AERMIC Model, where AERMIC is the American Meteorological Society-EPA Regulatory Model Improvement Committee. Five source locations (three in building 3026D and one each in building 3026C and the filter house 3140) and associated source characteristics were determined with the customer. In addition, the area of study was determined and building footprints and intake locations of air-handling systems were obtained. In addition to the air intakes, receptor sites consisting of ground level locations on four polar grids (50 m, 100 m, 200 m, and 500 m) and two intersecting lines of points (50 m separation), corresponding to sidewalks along Central Avenue and Fifth Street. Three years of meteorological data (2006 2008) were used each consisting of three datasets: 1) National Weather Service data; 2) upper air data for the Knoxville-Oak Ridge area; and 3) local weather data from Tower C (10 m, 30 m and 100 m) on the ORNL reservation. Annual average air concentration, highest 1 h average and highest 3 h average air concentrations were computed using AERMOD for the five source locations for the three years of meteorological data. The highest 1 h average air concentrations were converted to dispersion coefficients to characterize the atmospheric dispersion as the customer was interested in the most significant response and the highest 1 h average data reflects the best time-averaged values available from the AERMOD code. Results are presented in tabular and graphical form. The results for dose were obtained using radionuclide activities for each of the buildings provided by the customer.7

  17. ANALYTICAL MODELS OF EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES. I. ATMOSPHERIC DYNAMICS VIA THE SHALLOW WATER SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heng, Kevin [Center for Space and Habitability, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Workman, Jared, E-mail: kevin.heng@csh.unibe.ch, E-mail: jworkman@coloradomesa.edu [Colorado Mesa University, 1260 Kennedy Avenue, Grand Junction, CO 81501 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Within the context of exoplanetary atmospheres, we present a comprehensive linear analysis of forced, damped, magnetized shallow water systems, exploring the effects of dimensionality, geometry (Cartesian, pseudo-spherical, and spherical), rotation, magnetic tension, and hydrodynamic and magnetic sources of friction. Across a broad range of conditions, we find that the key governing equation for atmospheres and quantum harmonic oscillators are identical, even when forcing (stellar irradiation), sources of friction (molecular viscosity, Rayleigh drag, and magnetic drag), and magnetic tension are included. The global atmospheric structure is largely controlled by a single key parameter that involves the Rossby and Prandtl numbers. This near-universality breaks down when either molecular viscosity or magnetic drag acts non-uniformly across latitude or a poloidal magnetic field is present, suggesting that these effects will introduce qualitative changes to the familiar chevron-shaped feature witnessed in simulations of atmospheric circulation. We also find that hydrodynamic and magnetic sources of friction have dissimilar phase signatures and affect the flow in fundamentally different ways, implying that using Rayleigh drag to mimic magnetic drag is inaccurate. We exhaustively lay down the theoretical formalism (dispersion relations, governing equations, and time-dependent wave solutions) for a broad suite of models. In all situations, we derive the steady state of an atmosphere, which is relevant to interpreting infrared phase and eclipse maps of exoplanetary atmospheres. We elucidate a pinching effect that confines the atmospheric structure to be near the equator. Our suite of analytical models may be used to develop decisively physical intuition and as a reference point for three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of atmospheric circulation.

  18. Dispersion of aerosol particles in the free atmosphere using ensemble forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Haszpra

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion of aerosol particle pollutants is studied using 50 members of an ensemble forecast in the example of a hypothetical free atmospheric emission above Fukushima over a period of 2.5 days. Considerable differences are found among the dispersion predictions of the different ensemble members, as well as between the ensemble mean and the deterministic result at the end of the observation period. The variance is found to decrease with the particle size. The geographical area where a threshold concentration is exceeded in at least one ensemble member expands to a 5–10 times larger region than the area from the deterministic forecast, both for air column "concentration" and in the "deposition" field. We demonstrate that the root-mean-square distance of any particle from its own clones in the ensemble members can reach values on the order of one thousand kilometers. Even the centers of mass of the particle cloud of the ensemble members deviate considerably from that obtained by the deterministic forecast. All these indicate that an investigation of the dispersion of aerosol particles in the spirit of ensemble forecast contains useful hints for the improvement of risk assessment.

  19. Determining and modeling the dispersion of non point source ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, pollutants in runoff are characterized and their dispersion after they enter the lake is measured and modeled at different points in the study areas. The objective is to develop a one dimensional mathematical model which can be used to predict the nutrient (ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate) dispersion ...

  20. The Effect of Atmospheric Cooling on Vertical Velocity Dispersion and Density Distribution of Brown Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Russell E., Jr.; Thorman, Paul A.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Cohen, Seth H.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Pirzkal, Nor; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Young, Erick

    2017-09-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation designed to predict the vertical velocity dispersion of brown dwarfs in the Milky Way. We show that since these stars are constantly cooling, the velocity dispersion has a noticeable trend with the spectral type. With realistic assumptions for the initial mass function, star formation history, and the cooling models, we show that the velocity dispersion is roughly consistent with what is observed for M dwarfs, decreases to cooler spectral types, and increases again for the coolest types in our study (˜T9). We predict a minimum in the velocity dispersions for L/T transition objects, however, the detailed properties of the minimum predominately depend on the star formation history. Since this trend is due to brown dwarf cooling, we expect that the velocity dispersion as a function of spectral type should deviate from the constancy around the hydrogen-burning limit. We convert from velocity dispersion to vertical scale height using standard disk models and present similar trends in disk thickness as a function of spectral type. We suggest that future, wide-field photometric and/or spectroscopic missions may collect sizable samples of distant (˜ 1 kpc) dwarfs that span the hydrogen-burning limit. As such, we speculate that such observations may provide a unique way of constraining the average spectral type of hydrogen burning. Support for program #13266 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  1. Ship plume dispersion rates in convective boundary layers for chemistry models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Chosson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Detailed ship plume simulations in various convective boundary layer situations have been performed using a Lagrangian Dispersion Model driven by a Large Eddy Simulation Model. The simulations focus on the early stage (1–2 h of plume dispersion regime and take into account the effects of plume rise on dispersion. Results are presented in an attempt to provide to atmospheric chemistry modellers a realistic description of characteristic dispersion impact on exhaust ship plume chemistry. Plume dispersion simulations are used to derive analytical dilution rate functions. Even though results exhibit striking effects of plume rise parameter on dispersion patterns, it is shown that initial buoyancy fluxes at ship stack have a minor effect on plume dilution rate. After initial high dispersion regimes a simple characteristic dilution time scale can be used to parameterize the subgrid plume dilution effect in large-scale chemistry models. The results show that this parameter is directly related to the typical turn-over time scale of the convective boundary layer.

  2. Atmospheric dispersion of natural gas from a rupture in a pressurized and valved subsea pipeline; Dispersao atmosferica de gas natural por ruptura em duto submarino pressurizado e valvulado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Fabio Coimbra Moreira de Macedo; Medeiros, Jose Luiz de; Araujo, Ofelia de Queiroz Fernandes [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica. Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2008-04-15

    This paper presents a simplified approach to the problem of transient atmospheric dispersion of natural gas released accidentally under the ocean, caused by leaks in pressurized subsea pipelines. The model aims to estimate the transient spatial distribution of gas concentration in the atmosphere for subsequent risk analysis. In this scenario, shut-off valves are used to rapidly isolate the damaged stretch of the gas pipeline (pipeline shutdown). The analysis considers the transient behavior of the remaining inventory inside the pipes through a release-by-leakage model, and the subsequent effect on the atmosphere surrounding the epicenter of release. There are also scenarios formulated with occurrences of numerous ruptures, synchronized or not, with known spatial distribution. The spatial-temporal model of atmospheric dispersion employed is based on the resolution of the tridimensional diffusion equation under turbulence in semi-infinite domains. The model includes appropriate resources to deal with: an ample range of atmospheric conditions; different wind velocities; transient conditions of gas released into the atmosphere (i.e., outflow, pressure, and temperature); many depths of emission; multi-source configuration of release. In this work a simulation tool in MATLAB environment was developed for the analyses of scenarios of transient dispersion of gas into the atmosphere. In the case of ruptures in subsea gas lines, this tool is useful to determine the conditions of maximum risk on production platforms situated close to the occurrence, as well as the impact of the localization of the shut-off valves in the release transient behavior. (author)

  3. A review of toxicity models for realistic atmospheric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunatilaka, Ajith; Skvortsov, Alex; Gailis, Ralph

    2014-02-01

    There are many applications that need to study human health effects caused by exposure to toxic chemicals. Risk analysis for industrial sites, study of population health impacts of atmospheric pollutants, and operations research for assessing the potential impacts of chemical releases in military contexts are some examples. Because of safety risks and the high cost of field trials involving hazardous chemical releases, computer simulations are widely used for such studies. Modelling of atmospheric transport and dispersion of chemicals released into the atmosphere to determine the toxic chemical concentrations to which individuals will be exposed is one main component of these simulations, and there are well established atmospheric dispersion models for this purpose. Estimating the human health effects caused by the exposure to these predicted toxic chemical concentrations is the other main component. A number of different toxicity models for assessing the health effects of toxic chemical exposure are found in the literature. Because these different models have been developed based on different assumptions about the plume characteristics, chemical properties, and physiological response, there is a need to review and compare these models to understand their applicability. This paper reviews several toxicity models described in the literature. The paper also presents results of applying different toxicity models to simulated concentration time series data. These results show that the use of ensemble mean concentrations, which are what atmospheric dispersion models typically provide, to estimate human health effects of exposure to hazardous chemical releases may underestimate their impact when toxic exponent, n, of the chemical is greater than one; the opposite phenomenon appears to hold when n biological recovery processes may predict greater toxicity than the explicitly parameterised models. Despite the wide variety of models of varying degrees of complexity that is

  4. Computational fluid dynamics study on two-phase CO2 dispersion in a neutral atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijssenaar, I.J.M.; Spruijt, M.P.N.; Hulsbosch, C.E.C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: A large release of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is modelled with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), (Fluent v12.1). Special attention is given to the modelling of a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) with gravity. Both the presence of non-vapour CO2 and the high density of CO2 require that

  5. Fused deposition modelling of sodium caseinate dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutyser, M.A.I.; Houlder, S.; Wit, de Martin; Buijsse, C.A.P.; Alting, A.C.

    2018-01-01

    Only recently, researchers have started experimenting with 3D printing of foods. The aim of this study was to investigate 3D printed objects from sodium caseinate dispersions, exhibiting reversible gelation behaviour. Gelation and dispensing behaviour were explored and structures of different

  6. NARAC Dispersion Model Product Integration With RadResponder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aluzzi, Fernando [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Work on enhanced cooperation and interoperability of Nuclear Incident Response Teams (NIRT) is a joint effort between DHS/FEMA, DOE/NNSA and EPA. One such effort was the integration between the RadResponder Network, a resource sponsored by FEMA for the management of radiological data during an emergency, and the National Atmospheric Advisory Center (NARAC), a DOE/NNSA modeling resource whose predictions are used to aid radiological emergency preparedness and response. Working together under a FEMA-sponsored project these two radiological response assets developed a capability to read and display plume model prediction results from the NARAC computer system in the RadResponder software tool. As a result of this effort, RadResponder users have been provided with NARAC modeling predictions of contamination areas, radiological dose levels, and protective action areas (e.g., areas warranting worker protection or sheltering/evacuation) to help guide protective action decisions and field monitoring surveys, and gain key situation awareness following a radiological/nuclear accident or incident (e.g., nuclear power plant accident, radiological dispersal device incident, or improvised nuclear detonation incident). This document describes the details of this integration effort.

  7. A 3D model of Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangvichith, M.; Forget, F.; Wordsworth, R.

    2011-10-01

    For the first time, we have built a GCM of Pluto's atmosphere, adapted from the model of Triton's, recently developed[9] . In fact, Pluto and Triton have a lot of similarities (atmospheric, orbital). This GCM will allow to better understand the complex mechanism of the planet and to study the variation of the thermal profile during time.

  8. Description of the RIVM/KNMI PUFF dispersion model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verver GHL; de Leeuw FAAM; van Rheineck Leyssius HJ

    1990-01-01

    In this report an atmospheric transport model (the RIVM/KNMI PUFF- model) is described. The model is intended for operational use at KNMI and RIVM in case of an accidental release of (toxic or radioactive) gases or particles into the atmosphere. In its operational version the model area will cover

  9. Modelling the variance of dispersion measures of radio pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelemans, G.; Hartman, J.W.; Verbunt, F.; Bhattacharya, D.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1997-01-01

    On the basis of a highly simplified model for small scale structure in the electron density distribution in the Galaxy, we argue that the spread of expectation values for the dispersion measure at given distance is proportional to the square root of the dispersion measure as found from a smooth

  10. Mathematical models for dispersive electromagnetic waves: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Cassier, Maxence; Joly, Patrick; Kachanovska, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    International audience; In this work, we investigate mathematical models for electromagnetic wave propagation in dispersive isotropic media. We emphasize the link between physical requirements and mathematical properties of the models. A particular attention is devoted to the notion of non-dissipativity and passivity. We consider successively the case of so-called local media and general passive media. The models are studied through energy techniques, spectral theory and dispersion analysis o...

  11. Mathematical models for dispersive electromagnetic waves: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Cassier, Maxence; Joly, Patrick; Kachanovska, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we investigate mathematical models for electromagnetic wave propagation in dispersive isotropic media. We emphasize the link between physical requirements and mathematical properties of the models. A particular attention is devoted to the notion of non-dissipativity and passivity. We consider successively the case of so-called local media and general passive media. The models are studied through energy techniques, spectral theory and dispersion analysis of plane waves. For makin...

  12. Soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikonen, J.P.; Sucksdorff, Y. [Finnish Environment Agency, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In this study the soil/vegetation/atmosphere-model based on the formulation of Deardorff was refined to hour basis and applied to a field in Vihti. The effect of model parameters on model results (energy fluxes, temperatures) was also studied as well as the effect of atmospheric conditions. The estimation of atmospheric conditions on the soil-vegetation system as well as an estimation of the effect of vegetation parameters on the atmospheric climate was estimated. Areal surface fluxes, temperatures and moistures were also modelled for some river basins in southern Finland. Land-use and soil parameterisation was developed to include properties and yearly variation of all vegetation and soil types. One classification was selected to describe the hydrothermal properties of the soils. Evapotranspiration was verified against the water balance method

  13. Modelling long-distance seed dispersal in heterogeneous landscapes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levey, Douglas, J.; Tewlsbury, Joshua, J.; Bolker, Benjamin, M.

    2008-01-01

    1. Long-distance seed dispersal is difficult to measure, yet key to understanding plant population dynamics and community composition. 2. We used a spatially explicit model to predict the distribution of seeds dispersed long distances by birds into habitat patches of different shapes. All patches were the same type of habitat and size, but varied in shape. They occurred in eight experimental landscapes, each with five patches of four different shapes, 150 m apart in a matrix of mature forest. The model was parameterized with smallscale movement data collected from field observations of birds. In a previous study we validated the model by testing its predictions against observed patterns of seed dispersal in real landscapes with the same types and spatial configuration of patches as in the model. 3. Here we apply the model more broadly, examining how patch shape influences the probability of seed deposition by birds into patches, how dispersal kernels (distributions of dispersal distances) vary with patch shape and starting location, and how movement of seeds between patches is affected by patch shape. 4. The model predicts that patches with corridors or other narrow extensions receive higher numbers of seeds than patches without corridors or extensions. This pattern is explained by edgefollowing behaviour of birds. Dispersal distances are generally shorter in heterogeneous landscapes (containing patchy habitat) than in homogeneous landscapes, suggesting that patches divert the movement of seed dispersers, ‘holding’ them long enough to increase the probability of seed defecation in the patches. Dispersal kernels for seeds in homogeneous landscapes were smooth, whereas those in heterogenous landscapes were irregular. In both cases, long-distance (> 150 m) dispersal was surprisingly common, usually comprising approximately 50% of all dispersal events. 5. Synthesis . Landscape heterogeneity has a large influence on patterns of long-distance seed dispersal. Our

  14. Modelling the observed vertical transport of {sup 7}Be in specific soils with advection dispersion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Astorga, Romina; Velasco, Hugo; Valladares, Diego L.; Lohaiza, Flavia; Ayub, Jimena Juri; Rizzotto, Marcos [Grupo de Estudios Ambientales. Instituto de Matematica Aplicada San Luis - Universidad Nacional de San Luis - CONICET, San Luis (Argentina)

    2014-07-01

    {sup 7}Be is a short-lived environmental radionuclide, produced in the upper atmosphere by spallation of nitrogen and oxygen by cosmic rays. After of the production by the nuclear reaction, {sup 7}Be diffuses through the atmosphere until it attaches to atmospheric aerosols. Subsequently, it is deposited on the earth surface mainly as wet fallout. The main physical processes which transport {sup 7}Be in soil are diffusion and advection by water. Migration parameters and measurements confirm that sorption is the main physical process, which confines {sup 7}Be concentration to soil surface. The literature data show that in soils, {sup 7}Be is concentrated near the surface (0-2 cm) as it is adsorbed onto clay minerals after its deposition on the soil surface and does not penetrate deeper into soils due to its short half-life. The maximum mass activity density of {sup 7}Be is found at the point of input of the radionuclide, i.e. at the surface of the soil column, showing a exponential distribution profile typical of a purely diffusive transport. Many studies applying the advection dispersion models have been reported in the literature in order to modelling the transport of {sup 137}Cs in soils. On them, the models are used to achieve information of the mechanisms that govern the transport, i. e. the model is used to explain the soil profile of radionuclide. The effective dispersion coefficient and the apparent advection velocity of radionuclide in soil are also obtained by fitting the analytical solution of the model equation to measured depth distributions of the radionuclide. In this work, the advective dispersive transport model with linear sorption is used to analyze the vertical migration process of {sup 7}Be in soils of undisturbed or reference sites. The deposition history is approximated by pulse-like input functions and time dependent analytical solution of equation model is obtained. The values of dispersion coefficient and apparent advection velocity obtained

  15. Development of a tool for calculating early internal doses in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident based on atmospheric dispersion simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kurihara Osamu; Kim Eunjoo; Kunishima Naoaki; Tani Kotaro; Ishikawa Tetsuo; Furuyama Kazuo; Hashimoto Shozo; Akashi Makoto

    2017-01-01

    A tool was developed to facilitate the calculation of the early internal doses to residents involved in the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster based on atmospheric transport and dispersion model (ATDM) simulations performed using Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Information 2nd version (WSPEEDI-II) together with personal behavior data containing the history of the whereabouts of individul’s after the accident. The tool generates hourly-averaged air concentration d...

  16. A Direct Measurement of Atmospheric Dispersion in N-band Spectra: Implications for Mid-IR Systems on ELTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Hoffmann, William F.; Close, Laird M.; Kendrew, Sarah; Mathar, Richard J.; Stuik, Remko; Greene, Thomas P.; Woodward, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael S.

    This paper is modified from [A.J. Skemer, P.M. Hinz, W.F. Hoffmann, L.M. Close, S. Kendrew, R.J. Mathar, R. Stuik, T.P. Greene, C.E. Woodward, M.S. Kelley, PASP 121, 897 (2009)]. Adaptive optics will almost completely remove the effects of atmospheric turbulence at 10µm on the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) generation of telescopes. In this paper, we observationally confirm that the next most important limitation to image quality is atmospheric dispersion, rather than telescope diffraction. By using the 6.5 meter MMT with its unique mid-IR adaptive optics system, we measure atmospheric dispersion in the N-band with the newly commissioned spectroscopic mode on MIRAC4BLINC. Our results indicate that atmospheric dispersion is generally linear in the N-band, although there is some residual curvature. We compare our measurements to theory, and make predictions for ELT Strehls and image FHWM with and without an atmospheric dispersion corrector (ADC). We find that for many mid-IR applications, an ADC will be necessary on ELTs. The observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a facility operated jointly by the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona

  17. A Model of Dispersion in Pollutant Transport; Un modelo de dispersion en el transporte de contaminantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maron Dominguez, David Ernesto [Instituto Superior Politecnico Jose A. Echeverrria (Cuba)

    2002-09-01

    A numeric model is show for the solution of the inverse problem in pollutant transport. Quadratic and cubic elements were used in the discretization by the MEF of the equation of the dispersion. The algorithms of the inverse model are verified and compared with analytic solutions reported in the literature. The application of the model to the calibration of the parameters of a wetland used a s a filter in the treatment of wastewater is shown. The wetland was created in the laboratory and measurements of sodium fluorescein concentrations of a test were used as tracer. The dispersion coefficient, the retardation coefficient, the degradation coefficient, and the parameter of weight of the discretization in time were gauged. The results shown prove the good approximation of the dispersion coefficient obtained with a value estimated by another method. The graphs of the adjustments obtained are also shown. [Spanish] Se muestra un modelo numerico para la resolucion del problema inverso en el transporte de contaminantes. Se emplearon elementos cuadraticos y cubicos en la discretizacion por el metodo de los elementos finitos de la ecuacion de la ecuacion de la dispersion. Se verifican y se comparan los algoritmos del modelo inverso con una solucion analitica reportada en la literatura. Se muestra la aplicacion del modelo a la calibracion de los parametros de un humedal utilizado como filtro en el tratamiento de agua residuales. El humedal se construyo en el laboratorio y se utilizaron mediciones de concentraciones de fluoresceina sodica de una prueba de trazado. Se calibraron el coeficiente de dispersion, el coeficiente de retardo, el coeficiente de degradacion y el parametro de peso de la discretizacion en el tiempo. Se muestran los resultados obtenidos, comprobandose la buena aproximacion del coeficiente de dispersion con un valor estimado por otro metodo. Se muestran las graficas de los ajustes que se lograron.

  18. Dispersive processes in models of regional radionuclide migration. Technical memorandum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evenson, D.E.; Dettinger, M.D.

    1980-05-01

    Three broad areas of concern in the development of aquifer scale transport models will be local scale diffusion and dispersion processes, regional scale dispersion processes, and numerical problems associated with the advection-dispersion equation. Local scale dispersion processes are fairly well understood and accessible to observation. These processes will generally be dominated in large scale systems by regional processes, or macro-dispersion. Macro-dispersion is primarily the result of large scale heterogeneities in aquifer properties. In addition, the effects of many modeling approximations are often included in the process. Because difficulties arise in parameterization of this large scale phenomenon, parameterization should be based on field measurements made at the same scale as the transport process of interest or else partially circumvented through the application of a probabilistic advection model. Other problems associated with numerical transport models include difficulties with conservation of mass, stability, numerical dissipation, overshoot, flexibility, and efficiency. We recommend the random-walk model formulation for Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's purposes as the most flexible, accurate and relatively efficient modeling approach that overcomes these difficulties.

  19. Xenon-133 and caesium-137 releases into the atmosphere from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant: determination of the source term, atmospheric dispersion, and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohl, A.; Seibert, P.; Wotawa, G.; Arnold, D.; Burkhart, J. F.; Eckhardt, S.; Tapia, C.; Vargas, A.; Yasunari, T. J.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation will show the results of a paper currently under review in ACPD and some additional new results, including more data and with an independent box modeling approach to support some of the findings of the ACPD paper. On 11 March 2011, an earthquake occurred about 130 km off the Pacific coast of Japan's main island Honshu, followed by a large tsunami. The resulting loss of electric power at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FD-NPP) developed into a disaster causing massive release of radioactivity into the atmosphere. In this study, we determine the emissions of two isotopes, the noble gas xenon-133 (133Xe) and the aerosol-bound caesium-137 (137Cs), which have very different release characteristics as well as behavior in the atmosphere. To determine radionuclide emissions as a function of height and time until 20 April, we made a first guess of release rates based on fuel inventories and documented accident events at the site. This first guess was subsequently improved by inverse modeling, which combined the first guess with the results of an atmospheric transport model, FLEXPART, and measurement data from several dozen stations in Japan, North America and other regions. We used both atmospheric activity concentration measurements as well as, for 137Cs, measurements of bulk deposition. Regarding 133Xe, we find a total release of 16.7 (uncertainty range 13.4-20.0) EBq, which is the largest radioactive noble gas release in history not associated with nuclear bomb testing. There is strong evidence that the first strong 133Xe release started early, before active venting was performed. The entire noble gas inventory of reactor units 1-3 was set free into the atmosphere between 11 and 15 March 2011. For 137Cs, the inversion results give a total emission of 35.8 (23.3-50.1) PBq, or about 42% of the estimated Chernobyl emission. Our results indicate that 137Cs emissions peaked on 14-15 March but were generally high from 12 until 19 March, when they

  20. Application of inverse dispersion model for estimating volatile organic compounds emitted from the offshore industrial park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, M.; Lee, C.; Yu, H.

    2013-12-01

    In the last 20 years, the Yunlin offshore industrial park has significantly contributed to the economic development of Taiwan. Its annual production value has reached almost 12 % of Taiwan's GDP in 2012. The offshore industrial park also balanced development of urban and rural in areas. However, the offshore industrial park is considered the major source of air pollution to nearby counties, especially, the emission of Volatile Organic Compounds(VOCs). Studies have found that exposures to high level of some VOCs have caused adverse health effects on both human and ecosystem. Since both health and ecological effects of air pollution have been the subject of numerous studies in recent years, it is a critical issue in estimating VOCs emissions. Nowadays emission estimation techniques are usually used emissions factors in calculation. Because the methodology considered totality of equipment activities based on statistical assumptions, it would encounter great uncertainty between these coefficients. This study attempts to estimate VOCs emission of the Yunlin Offshore Industrial Park using an inverse atmospheric dispersion model. The inverse modeling approach will be applied to the combination of dispersion modeling result which input a given one-unit concentration and observations at air quality stations in Yunlin. The American Meteorological Society-Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) is chosen as the tool for dispersion modeling in the study. Observed concentrations of VOCs are collected by the Taiwanese Environmental Protection Administration (TW EPA). In addition, the study also analyzes meteorological data including wind speed, wind direction, pressure and temperature etc. VOCs emission estimations from the inverse atmospheric dispersion model will be compared to the official statistics released by Yunlin Offshore Industrial Park. Comparison of estimated concentration from inverse dispersion modeling and official statistical concentrations will

  1. Modeling interpopulation dispersal by banner-tailed kangaroo rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvarla, J.L.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Waser, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Many metapopulation models assume rules of population connectivity that are implicitly based on what we know about within-population dispersal, but especially for vertebrates, few data exist to assess whether interpopulation dispersal is just within-population dispersal "scaled up." We extended existing multi-stratum mark-release-recapture models to incorporate the robust design, allowing us to compare patterns of within- and between-population movement in the banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis). Movement was rare among eight populations separated by only a few hundred meters: seven years of twice-annual sampling captured >1200 individuals but only 26 interpopulation dispersers. We developed a program that implemented models with parameters for capture, survival, and interpopulation movement probability and that evaluated competing hypotheses in a model selection framework. We evaluated variants of the island, stepping-stone, and isolation-by-distance models of interpopulation movement, incorporating effects of age, season, and habitat (short or tall grass). For both sexes, QAICc values clearly favored isolation-by-distance models, or models combining the effects of isolation by distance and habitat. Models with probability of dispersal expressed as linear-logistic functions of distance and as negative exponentials of distance fit the data equally well. Interpopulation movement probabilities were similar among sexes (perhaps slightly biased toward females), greater for juveniles than adults (especially for females), and greater before than during the breeding season (especially for females). These patterns resemble those previously described for within-population dispersal in this species, which we interpret as indicating that the same processes initiate both within- and between-population dispersal.

  2. Chemical kinetics and modeling of planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    A unified overview is presented for chemical kinetics and chemical modeling in planetary atmospheres. The recent major advances in the understanding of the chemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere make the study of planets more interesting and relevant. A deeper understanding suggests that the important chemical cycles have a universal character that connects the different planets and ultimately link together the origin and evolution of the solar system. The completeness (or incompleteness) of the data base for chemical kinetics in planetary atmospheres will always be judged by comparison with that for the terrestrial atmosphere. In the latter case, the chemistry of H, O, N, and Cl species is well understood. S chemistry is poorly understood. In the atmospheres of Jovian planets and Titan, the C-H chemistry of simple species (containing 2 or less C atoms) is fairly well understood. The chemistry of higher hydrocarbons and the C-N, P-N chemistry is much less understood. In the atmosphere of Venus, the dominant chemistry is that of chlorine and sulfur, and very little is known about C1-S coupled chemistry. A new frontier for chemical kinetics both in the Earth and planetary atmospheres is the study of heterogeneous reactions. The formation of the ozone hole on Earth, the ubiquitous photochemical haze on Venus and in the Jovian planets and Titan all testify to the importance of heterogeneous reactions. It remains a challenge to connect the gas phase chemistry to the production of aerosols.

  3. A Mercury Model of Atmospheric Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Alex B. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chodash, Perry A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Procassini, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-19

    Using the particle transport code Mercury, accurate models were built of the two sources used in Operation BREN, a series of radiation experiments performed by the United States during the 1960s. In the future, these models will be used to validate Mercury’s ability to simulate atmospheric transport.

  4. Modelling the dispersion energy for Van der Waals complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz-Garcia, A

    2002-01-01

    Strictly ab initio calculations of the dispersion energy are unfeasible in practice but for the smallest systems. A sensible alternative is to model the dispersion contribution through a damped multipolar expansion. This thesis proposes to represent the dispersion energy by means of a non-empirical, atom-atom model using damping functions scaled from 'exact' results for one electron-one electron systems. We start by investigating the scalability of ab initio calculated damping functions for closed-shell atom-atom dimers. Ab initio scaling parameters are employed to assess the quality of the damping functions yielded by a predictor scheme based on the charge overlap between the interacting monomers. The investigation of the scaling properties is extended to atom-linear molecule systems, focusing on the dependence on orientation of the short-range dispersion energy and how to account for it using isotropic damping parameters. We study the possibilities of an 'atomic' (multicentre) representation of the dispersi...

  5. A multi-model approach to tephra dispersal forecast: The Mt. Etna’s case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, A.; Barsotti, S.; Coltelli, M.; Costa, A.; Folch, A.; Macedonio, G.; Nannipieri, L.; Prestifilippo, M.; Scollo, S.; Spata, G.

    2009-12-01

    Since 1979, Mt. Etna has produced several explosive events that are of concern to civil aviation, especially since it is located close to the Catania International Airport. During the 2006 crisis, there was persistent explosive activity for several months. This disrupted airport operations several times, causing discomfort to the population and resulting in severe economic losses. These and many other examples worldwide highlight the importance to know in advance the volcanic cloud movements and its dispersion in the atmosphere. However, atmospheric transport dynamics are complex as they depend on: the nature of air-borne particles; the type of explosive activity, and the transient, 3D structure of the atmosphere. Numerical modelling is a powerful tool to quantitatively describe such phenomena and today several numerical codes exist to simulate an explosive eruption and its associated tephra dispersal. The fundamental aim of this work is to analyze, and possibly improve, the tephra dispersal forecasts by using a multi-model approach. In fact the use of different codes, based on different physical and mathematical formulations, allows to gain crucial insight on the strengths and weaknesses of different models as well as produce quantitative comparisons on key model outputs. In detail, each day an automatic web-based procedure produces ash concentration maps of FALL3D, PUFF, and VOL-CALPUFF models and ground deposition maps of TEPHRA, PUFF, FALL3D, VOL-CALPUFF, and HAZMAP models for two eruptive scenarios. These maps are then synthesised to establish the spatial regions that have air and mass loadings that are higher than fixed thresholds. Results of different models are compared allowing to produce a first estimate of the model-dependent uncertainty also as a function of eruptive and atmospheric conditions.

  6. Coupled atmosphere-wildland fire modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Henri Balbi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Simulating the interaction between fire and atmosphere is critical to the estimation of the rate of spread of the fire. Wildfire’s convection (i.e., entire plume can modify the local meteorology throughout the atmospheric boundary layer and consequently affect the fire propagation speed and behaviour. In this study, we use for the first time the Méso-NH meso-scale numerical model coupled to the point functional ForeFire simplified physical front-tracking wildfire model to investigate the differences introduced by the atmospheric feedback in propagation speed and behaviour. Both numerical models have been developed as research tools for operational models and are currently used to forecast localized extreme events. These models have been selected because they can be run coupled and support decisions in wildfire management in France and Europe. The main originalities of this combination reside in the fact that Méso-NH is run in a Large Eddy Simulation (LES configuration and that the rate of spread model used in ForeFire provides a physical formulation to take into account the effect of wind and slope. Simulations of typical experimental configurations show that the numerical atmospheric model is able to reproduce plausible convective effects of the heat produced by the fire. Numerical results are comparable to estimated values for fire-induced winds and present behaviour similar to other existing numerical approaches.

  7. A model for long-distance dispersal of boll weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, John K.; Eyster, Ritchie S.; Allen, Charles T.

    2011-07-01

    The boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis (Boheman), has been a major insect pest of cotton production in the US, accounting for yield losses and control costs on the order of several billion US dollars since the introduction of the pest in 1892. Boll weevil eradication programs have eliminated reproducing populations in nearly 94%, and progressed toward eradication within the remaining 6%, of cotton production areas. However, the ability of weevils to disperse and reinfest eradicated zones threatens to undermine the previous investment toward eradication of this pest. In this study, the HYSPLIT atmospheric dispersion model was used to simulate daily wind-aided dispersal of weevils from the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of southern Texas and northeastern Mexico. Simulated weevil dispersal was compared with weekly capture of weevils in pheromone traps along highway trap lines between the LRGV and the South Texas / Winter Garden zone of the Texas Boll Weevil Eradication Program. A logistic regression model was fit to the probability of capturing at least one weevil in individual pheromone traps relative to specific values of simulated weevil dispersal, which resulted in 60.4% concordance, 21.3% discordance, and 18.3% ties in estimating captures and non-captures. During the first full year of active eradication with widespread insecticide applications in 2006, the dispersal model accurately estimated 71.8%, erroneously estimated 12.5%, and tied 15.7% of capture and non-capture events. Model simulations provide a temporal risk assessment over large areas of weevil reinfestation resulting from dispersal by prevailing winds. Eradication program managers can use the model risk assessment information to effectively schedule and target enhanced trapping, crop scouting, and insecticide applications.

  8. Tagging Water Sources in Atmospheric Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, M.

    2003-01-01

    Tagging of water sources in atmospheric models allows for quantitative diagnostics of how water is transported from its source region to its sink region. In this presentation, we review how this methodology is applied to global atmospheric models. We will present several applications of the methodology. In one example, the regional sources of water for the North American Monsoon system are evaluated by tagging the surface evaporation. In another example, the tagged water is used to quantify the global water cycling rate and residence time. We will also discuss the need for more research and the importance of these diagnostics in water cycle studies.

  9. Numerical model of the circulation and dispersion in the east Adriatic coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg Paklar, Gordana; Dzoic, Tomislav; Koracin, Darko; Matijevic, Slavica; Grbec, Branka; Ivatek-Sahdan, Stjepan

    2017-04-01

    The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) was implemented to reproduce physical properties of the area around submarine outlet Stobrec in the middle Adriatic coastal area. ROMS model run was forced with realistic atmospheric fields obtained from meteorological model Aladin, climatological river discharges, tides and dynamics of the surrounding area imposed at the open boundaries. Atmospheric forcing included momentum, heat and water fluxes calculated interactively from the Aladin surface fields during ROMS model simulations. Simulated fields from the Adriatic and shelf scale models were used to prescribe the initial and open boundary conditions for fine resolution coastal domain. Model results were compared with available CTD measurements and discussed in the light of the climatological circulation and thermohaline properties of the middle Adriatic coastal area. Variability in the circulation is related to the prevailing atmospheric conditions, changes in the hydrological conditions and water mass exchange at the open boundaries. Basic features of the coastal circulation are well reproduced by the ROMS model, as well as temperatures and salinities which are within corresponding seasonal intervals, although with lower stratification than measured ones. In order to reproduce dispersion of the passive tracer the ROMS model was coupled with Lagrangian dispersion model. Multiyear monitoring of the physical, chemical and biological parameters around the sewage outlet was used to assess the quality of the dispersion model results. Among measured parameters, redox potential of the surface sediment layer was selected to be compared with model results as its negative values are direct consequence of increased organic matter input that can be attributed to the sewage system inflow.

  10. Long-distance dispersal of eastern spruce budworm in Minnesota (USA) via the atmospheric pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Sturtevant; Gary Achtemeier; Dean Anderson; Joseph Charney; Barry. Cooke

    2011-01-01

    Long-distance dispersal is thought to play an important role in synchronizing disparate populations of forest insect defoliators, but its importance relative to other factors remains unclear due to the difficulty of quantifying dispersal.

  11. Comparison of CFD and operational dispersion models in an urban-like environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonioni, G.; Burkhart, S.; Burman, J.; Dejoan, A.; Fusco, A.; Gaasbeek, R.; Gjesdal, T.; Jäppinen, A.; Riikonen, K.; Morra, P.; Parmhed, O.; Santiago, J. L.

    2012-02-01

    Chemical plants, refineries, transportation of hazardous materials are some of the most attractive facilities for external attacks aimed at the release of toxic substances. Dispersion of these substances into the atmosphere forms a concentration distribution of airborne pollutants with severe consequences for exposed individuals. For emergency preparedness and management, the availability of assessed/validated dispersion models, which can be able to predict concentration distribution and thus dangerous zones for exposed individuals, is of primary importance. Air quality models, integral models and analytical models predict the transport and the turbulent dispersion of gases or aerosols after their release without taking into account in detail the presence of obstacles. Obstacles can modify the velocity field and in turn the concentration field. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models on the other hand are able to describe such phenomena, but they need to be correctly set up, tested and validated in order to obtain reliable results. Within the project Europa-ERG1 TA 113.034 "NBC Modelling and Simulation" several different approaches in CFD modelling of turbulent dispersion in closed, semi-confined and urban-like environment were adopted and compared with experimental data and with operational models. In this paper the results of a comparison between models describing the dispersion of a neutral gas in an idealized urban-like environment are presented and discussed. Experimental data available in the literature have been used as a benchmark for assessing statistical performance for each model. Selected experimental trials include some water channel tests, that were performed by Coanda at 1:205 scale, and one full-scale case that was tested in the fall of 2001 at the Dugway Proving Grounds in Utah, using an array of shipping containers. The paper also suggests the adoption of improved statistical parameters in order to better address differences between models

  12. Electrical model of cold atmospheric plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsker, Ya. Z.; Semenov, V. E.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Ryzhkov, M. A.; Felsteiner, J.; Binenbaum, Y.; Gil, Z.; Shtrichman, R.; Cohen, J. T.

    2017-10-01

    We present an analytical model of cold atmospheric plasma formed by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), which is based on the lumped and distributed elements of an equivalent electric circuit of this plasma. This model is applicable for a wide range of frequencies and amplitudes of the applied voltage pulses, no matter whether or not the generated plasma plume interacts with a target. The model allows quantitative estimation of the plasma plume length and the energy delivered to the plasma. Also, the results of this model can be used for the design of DBD guns which efficiently generate cold atmospheric plasma. A comparison of the results of the model with those obtained in experiments shows a fairly good agreement.

  13. Determining and modeling the dispersion of non point source ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    Lake Victoria is an important source of livelihood that is threatened by rising pollution. In this study, pollutants in runoff are characterized and their dispersion after they enter the lake is measured and modeled at different points in the study areas. The objective is to develop a one dimensional mathematical model which can ...

  14. Mathematical modeling of disperse two-phase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Morel, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book develops the theoretical foundations of disperse two-phase flows, which are characterized by the existence of bubbles, droplets or solid particles finely dispersed in a carrier fluid, which can be a liquid or a gas. Chapters clarify many difficult subjects, including modeling of the interfacial area concentration. Basic knowledge of the subjects treated in this book is essential to practitioners of Computational Fluid Dynamics for two-phase flows in a variety of industrial and environmental settings. The author provides a complete derivation of the basic equations, followed by more advanced subjects like turbulence equations for the two phases (continuous and disperse) and multi-size particulate flow modeling. As well as theoretical material, readers will discover chapters concerned with closure relations and numerical issues. Many physical models are presented, covering key subjects including heat and mass transfers between phases, interfacial forces and fluid particles coalescence and breakup, a...

  15. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar

  16. PIV Measurements of Atmospheric Turbulence and Pollen Dispersal Above a Corn Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; van Hout, R.; Luznik, L.; Katz, J.

    2003-12-01

    Dispersal of pollen grains by wind and gravity (Anemophilous) is one of the oldest means of plant fertilization available in nature. Recently, the growth of genetically modified foods has raised questions on the range of pollen dispersal in order to limit cross-fertilization between organically grown and transgenic crops. The distance that a pollen grain can travel once released from the anther is determined, among others, by the aerodynamic parameters of the pollen and the characteristics of turbulence in the atmosphere in which it is released. Turbulence characteristics of the flow above a pollinating corn field were measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The measurements were performed on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay, in Maryland, during July 2003. Two PIV systems were used simultaneously, each with an overall sample area of 18x18 cm. The spacing between samples was about equal to the field of view. The PIV instrumentation, including CCD cameras, power supply and laser sheets forming optics were mounted on a measurement platform, consisting of a hydraulic telescopic arm that could be extended up to 10m. The whole system could be rotated in order to align it with the flow. The flow was seeded with smoke generated about 30m upstream of the sample areas. Measurements were carried out at several elevations, from just below canopy height up to 1m above canopy. The local meteorological conditions around the test site were monitored by other sensors including sonic anemometers, Rotorod pollen counters and temperature sensors. Each processed PIV image provides an instantaneous velocity distribution containing 64x64 vectors with a vector spacing of ~3mm. The pollen grains (~100mm) can be clearly distinguished from the smoke particles (~1mm) based on their size difference. The acquired PIV data enables calculation of the mean flow and turbulence characteristics including Reynolds stresses, spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate. Data

  17. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART-WRF VERSION 3.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brioude, J.; Arnold, D.; Stohl, A.; Cassiani, M.; Morton, Don; Seibert, P.; Angevine, W. M.; Evan, S.; Dingwell, A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Pisso, I.; Bukhart, J.; Wotawa, G.

    2013-11-01

    The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was originally designed for cal- culating long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollutants from point sources, such as after an accident in a nuclear power plant. In the meantime FLEXPART has evolved into a comprehensive tool for atmospheric transport modeling and analysis at different scales. This multiscale need from the modeler community has encouraged new developments in FLEXPART. In this document, we present a version that works with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale meteoro- logical model. Simple procedures on how to run FLEXPART-WRF are presented along with special options and features that differ from its predecessor versions. In addition, test case data, the source code and visualization tools are provided to the reader as supplementary material.

  18. Numerical investigation on three-dimensional dispersion and conversion behaviors of silicon tetrachloride release in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianwen, Zhang; Xinxin, Yin; Yanan, Xin; Jian, Zhang; Xiaoping, Zheng; Chunming, Jiang

    2015-05-15

    The world has experienced heavy thirst of energy as it has to face a dwindling supply of fossil fuel and polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic solar energy technology has been assigned great importance. Silicon tetrachloride is the main byproducts of polysilicon industry, and it's volatile and highly toxic. Once silicon tetrachloride releases, it rapidly forms a dense gas cloud and reacts violently with water vapor in the atmosphere to form a gas cloud consisting of the mixture of silicon tetrachloride, hydrochloric acid and silicic acid, which endangers environment and people. In this article, numerical investigation is endeavored to explore the three dimensional dispersion and conversion behaviors of silicon tetrachloride release in the atmosphere. The k-ϵ model with buoyancy correction on k is applied for turbulence closure and modified EBU model is applied to describe the hydrolysis reaction of silicon tetrachloride. It is illustrated that the release of silicon tetrachloride forms a dense cloud, which sinks onto the ground driven by the gravity and wind and spreads both upwind and downwind. Complicated interaction occurs between the silicon tetrachloride cloud and the air mass. The main body of the dense cloud moves downwind and reacts with the water vapor on the interface between the dense cloud and the air mass to generate a toxic mixture of silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen chloride and silicic acid. A large coverage in space is formed by the toxic mixture and imposes chemical hazards to the environment. The exothermic hydrolysis reaction consumes water and releases reaction heat resulting in dehydration and temperature rise, which imposes further hazards to the ecosystem over the affected space. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Computer Models Simulate Fine Particle Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Through a NASA Seed Fund partnership with DEM Solutions Inc., of Lebanon, New Hampshire, scientists at Kennedy Space Center refined existing software to study the electrostatic phenomena of granular and bulk materials as they apply to planetary surfaces. The software, EDEM, allows users to import particles and obtain accurate representations of their shapes for modeling purposes, such as simulating bulk solids behavior, and was enhanced to be able to more accurately model fine, abrasive, cohesive particles. These new EDEM capabilities can be applied in many industries unrelated to space exploration and have been adopted by several prominent U.S. companies, including John Deere, Pfizer, and Procter & Gamble.

  20. Improved reference models for middle atmosphere ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, G. M.; Pitts, M. C.; Chen, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the improvements introduced into the original version of ozone reference model of Keating and Young (1985, 1987) which is to be incorporated in the next COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA). The ozone reference model will provide information on the global ozone distribution (including the ozone vertical structure as a function of month and latitude from 25 to 90 km) combining data from five recent satellite experiments: the Nimbus 7 LIMS, Nimbus 7 SBUV, AE-2 Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE), Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) UV Spectrometer, and SME 1.27 Micron Airglow. The improved version of the reference model uses reprocessed AE-2 SAGE data (sunset) and extends the use of SAGE data from 1981 to the 1981-1983 time period. Comparisons are presented between the results of this ozone model and various nonsatellite measurements at different levels in the middle atmosphere.

  1. The Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boville, B. A.; Garcia, R. R.; Sassi, F.; Kinnison, D.; Roble, R. G.

    The Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) is an upward exten- sion of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model. WACCM simulates the atmosphere from the surface to the lower thermosphere (140 km) and includes both dynamical and chemical components. The salient points of the model formulation will be summarized and several aspects of its performance will be discussed. Comparison with observations indicates that WACCM produces re- alistic temperature and zonal wind distributions. Both the mean state and interannual variability will be summarized. Temperature inversions in the midlatitude mesosphere have been reported by several authors and are also found in WACCM. These inver- sions are formed primarily by planetary wave forcing, but the background state on which they form also requires gravity wave forcing. The response to sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies will be examined by com- paring simulations with observed SSTs for 1950-1998 to a simulation with clima- tological annual cycle of SSTs. The response to ENSO events is found to extend though the winter stratosphere and mesosphere and a signal is also found at the sum- mer mesopause. The experimental framework allows the ENSO signal to be isolated, because no other forcings are included (e.g. solar variability and volcanic eruptions) which complicate the observational record. The temperature and wind variations asso- ciated with ENSO are large enough to generate significant perturbations in the chem- ical composition of the middle atmosphere, which will also be discussed.

  2. Dispersion Models to Forecast Traffic-related Emissions in Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Scannapieco

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Down the centuries, a direct link had been developed between increase in mobility and increase in wealth. On the other hand, air emission of greenhouse gases (GHG due to vehicles equipped with internal combustion engines can be regarded as a negative pressure over the environment. In the coming decades, road transport is likely to remain a significant contributor to air pollution in cities. Many urban trips cover distances of less than 6 km. Since the effectiveness of catalytic converters in the initial minutes of engine operation is small, the average emission per distance driven is very high in urban areas. Also, poorly maintained vehicles that lack exhaust aftertreatment systems are responsible for a major part of pollutant emissions. Therefore in urban areas, where higher concentrations of vehicles can be easily found, air pollution represents a critical issue, being it related with both environment and human health protection: in truth, research in recent decades consistently indicates the adverse effects of outdoor air pollution on human health, and the evidence points to air pollution stemming from transport as an important contributor to these effects. Several institutions (EEA, USEPA, etc. focused their interest in dispersion models because of their potential effectiveness to forecast atmospheric pollution. Furthermore, air micropollutants such as Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (PAH and Metallic Trace Elements (MTE are traffic-related and although very low concentrations their dispersion is a serious issue. However, dispersion models are usefully implemented to better manage this estimation problem. Nonetheless, policy makers and land managers have to deal with model selection, taking into account that several dispersion models are available, each one of them focused on specific goals (e.g., wind transport of pollutants, land morphology implementation, evaluation of micropollutants transport, etc.; a further aspect to be considered is

  3. Atmospheric inverse modeling via sparse reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Nils; Miller, Scot M.; Maaß, Peter; Notholt, Justus; Palm, Mathias; Warneke, Thorsten

    2017-10-01

    Many applications in atmospheric science involve ill-posed inverse problems. A crucial component of many inverse problems is the proper formulation of a priori knowledge about the unknown parameters. In most cases, this knowledge is expressed as a Gaussian prior. This formulation often performs well at capturing smoothed, large-scale processes but is often ill equipped to capture localized structures like large point sources or localized hot spots. Over the last decade, scientists from a diverse array of applied mathematics and engineering fields have developed sparse reconstruction techniques to identify localized structures. In this study, we present a new regularization approach for ill-posed inverse problems in atmospheric science. It is based on Tikhonov regularization with sparsity constraint and allows bounds on the parameters. We enforce sparsity using a dictionary representation system. We analyze its performance in an atmospheric inverse modeling scenario by estimating anthropogenic US methane (CH4) emissions from simulated atmospheric measurements. Different measures indicate that our sparse reconstruction approach is better able to capture large point sources or localized hot spots than other methods commonly used in atmospheric inversions. It captures the overall signal equally well but adds details on the grid scale. This feature can be of value for any inverse problem with point or spatially discrete sources. We show an example for source estimation of synthetic methane emissions from the Barnett shale formation.

  4. Atmospheric inverse modeling via sparse reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hase

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many applications in atmospheric science involve ill-posed inverse problems. A crucial component of many inverse problems is the proper formulation of a priori knowledge about the unknown parameters. In most cases, this knowledge is expressed as a Gaussian prior. This formulation often performs well at capturing smoothed, large-scale processes but is often ill equipped to capture localized structures like large point sources or localized hot spots. Over the last decade, scientists from a diverse array of applied mathematics and engineering fields have developed sparse reconstruction techniques to identify localized structures. In this study, we present a new regularization approach for ill-posed inverse problems in atmospheric science. It is based on Tikhonov regularization with sparsity constraint and allows bounds on the parameters. We enforce sparsity using a dictionary representation system. We analyze its performance in an atmospheric inverse modeling scenario by estimating anthropogenic US methane (CH4 emissions from simulated atmospheric measurements. Different measures indicate that our sparse reconstruction approach is better able to capture large point sources or localized hot spots than other methods commonly used in atmospheric inversions. It captures the overall signal equally well but adds details on the grid scale. This feature can be of value for any inverse problem with point or spatially discrete sources. We show an example for source estimation of synthetic methane emissions from the Barnett shale formation.

  5. An Empirical Model of Wage Dispersion with Sorting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Jesper; Lentz, Rasmus

    This paper studies wage dispersion in an equilibrium on-the-job-search model with endogenous search intensity. Workers differ in their permanent skill level and firms differ with respect to productivity. Positive (negative) sorting results if the match production function is supermodular (submodu......This paper studies wage dispersion in an equilibrium on-the-job-search model with endogenous search intensity. Workers differ in their permanent skill level and firms differ with respect to productivity. Positive (negative) sorting results if the match production function is supermodular...... dispersion. We decompose wage variation into four sources: Worker heterogeneity, firm heterogeneity, frictions, and sorting. Worker heterogeneity contributes 51% of the variation, firm heterogeneity contributes 11%, frictions 23%, and finally sorting contributes 15%. We measure the output loss due...... to mismatch by asking how much greater output would be if the estimated population of matches were perfectly positively assorted. In this case, output would increase by 7.7%....

  6. Modeling surf zone tracer plumes: 2. Transport and dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David B.; Feddersen, Falk; Guza, R. T.

    2011-11-01

    Five surf zone dye tracer releases from the HB06 experiment are simulated with a tracer advection diffusion model coupled to a Boussinesq surf zone model (funwaveC). Model tracer is transported and stirred by currents and eddies and diffused with a breaking wave eddy diffusivity, set equal to the breaking wave eddy viscosity, and a small (0.01 m2 s-1) background diffusivity. Observed and modeled alongshore parallel tracer plumes, transported by the wave driven alongshore current, have qualitatively similar cross-shore structures. Although the model skill for mean tracer concentration is variable (from negative to 0.73) depending upon release, cross-shore integrated tracer moments (normalized by the cross-shore tracer integral) have consistently high skills (≈0.9). Modeled and observed bulk surf zone cross-shore diffusivity estimates are also similar, with 0.72 squared correlation and skill of 0.4. Similar to the observations, the model bulk (absolute) cross-shore diffusivity is consistent with a mixing length parameterization based on low-frequency (0.001-0.03 Hz) eddies. The model absolute cross-shore dispersion is dominated by stirring from surf zone eddies and does not depend upon the presence of the breaking wave eddy diffusivity. Given only the bathymetry and incident wave field, the coupled Boussinesq-tracer model qualitatively reproduces the observed cross-shore absolute tracer dispersion, suggesting that the model can be used to study surf zone tracer dispersion mechanisms.

  7. Sulfur dioxide estimations in the planetary boundary layer using dispersion models and satellite retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarauz, Jorge V.

    The health and environmental conditions in the Central Andes city La Oroya, Peru, have been seriously damaged by the heavy metal mining activities in the region. The situation has been exacerbated by the complex topography, which prevents proper mixing and dissolution of particles and gases released into the atmosphere. Understanding how pollutants are dispersed in populated regions, especially in complex terrain, would help to create mitigation strategies. The present study uses CALPUFF and HYSPLIT dispersion/deposition models to estimate sulfur dioxide (SO2) dispersion from the main stack of the La Oroya metallurgical plant. Due to the lack of meteorological data in the area, the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is used with observational nudging for temperature, relative humidity, and wind fields of three surface meteorological stations specifically installed for the study. The pollutant dispersion models are sensitive to a precise estimation of the turbulent vertical transport of mass, energy and moisture in the low atmosphere; therefore, two planetary boundary layer (PBL) schemes are tested, the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic and Yonsei University models. The dispersion models are run and results compared with field measurements at La Oroya, and Huancayo. The observation-nudging and YSU scheme considerably improved the prognostic variables. CALPUFF and HYSPLIT models showed similar patterns; however, HYSPLIT overestimated SO2 concentrations for low PBLs. Moreover, recent enhancements on spectral, spatial and temporal resolution of atmospheric scanning sensors of chemical constituents from the space, have led to detecting trace gases of anthropogenic origin in the lower troposphere. This contribution also explores the SO2 level 2 dataset from Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI), in conjunction with atmospheric optical depth and Angstrom coefficient data products, extracted from MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate SO2 loads in the PBL

  8. A STATISTICAL APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING UNCERTAINTY IN DISPERSION MODELING: AN EXAMPLE OF APPLICATION IN THE SOUTHWESTERN U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents a new method based on a statistical approach of estimating the uncertainty in simulating the transport and dispersion of atmospheric pollutants. The application of the method has been demonstrated by using observations and modeling results from a tracer experi...

  9. Climate change and climate systems influence and control the atmospheric dispersion of desert dust: implications for human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Ragaini, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    The global dispersion of desert dust through Earth’s atmosphere is greatly influenced by temperature. Temporal analyses of ice core data have demonstrated that enhanced dust dispersion occurs during glacial events. This is due to an increase in ice cover, which results in an increase in drier terrestrial cover. A shorter temporal analysis of dust dispersion data over the last 40 years has demonstrated an increase in dust transport. Climate systems or events such as the North Atlantic Oscillation, the Indian Ocean subtropical High, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and El Nino-Sothern Oscillation are known to influence global short-term dust dispersion occurrence and transport routes. Anthropogenic influences on dust transport include deforestation, harmful use of topsoil for agriculture as observed during the American Dust Bowl period, and the creation of dry seas (Aral Sea) and lakes (Lake Owens in California and Lake Chad in North Africa) through the diversion of source waters (for irrigation and drinking water supplies). Constituents of desert dust both from source regions (pathogenic microorganisms, organic and inorganic toxins) and those scavenged through atmospheric transport (i.e., industrial and agricultural emissions) are known to directly impact human and ecosystem health. This presentation will present a review of global scale dust storms and how these events can be both a detriment and benefit to various organisms in downwind environments.

  10. Fuel dispersal modeling for aircraft-runway impact scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tieszen, S.R.

    1995-11-01

    A fuel dispersal model for C-141 transport accidents was developed for the Defense Nuclear Agency`s Fuel Fire Technology Base Program to support Weapon System Safety Assessments. The spectrum of accidents resulting from aircraft impact on a runway was divided into three fuel dispersal regimes: low, intermediate, and high-velocity impact. Sufficient data existed in the accident, crash test, and fuel-filled bomb literature to support development of a qualitative framework for dispersal models, but not quantitative models for all regimes. Therefore, a test series at intermediate scale was conducted to generate data on which to base the model for the high-velocity regime. Tests were conducted over an impact velocity range from 12 m/s to 91 m/s and angles of impact from 22.5{degrees} to 67.5{degrees}. Dependent variables were area covered by dispersed fuel, amount of mass in that area, and location of the area relative to the impact line. Test results showed that no liquid pooling occurred for impact velocities greater than 61 m/s, independent of the angle of impact. Some pooling did occur at lower velocities, but in no test was the liquid-layer thickness greater than 5.25 mm.

  11. Variational Boussinesq model for strongly nonlinear dispersive waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawrence, C.; Adytia, D.; van Groesen, E.

    2018-01-01

    For wave tank, coastal and oceanic applications, a fully nonlinear Variational Boussinesq model with optimized dispersion is derived and a simple Finite Element implementation is described. Improving a previous weakly nonlinear version, high waves over flat and varying bottom are shown to be

  12. Equilibrium Price Dispersion in a Matching Model with Divisible Money

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamiya, K.; Sato, T.

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to show that, for any given parameter values, an equilibrium with dispersed prices (two-price equilibrium) exists in a simple matching model with divisible money presented by Green and Zhou (1998).We also show that our two-price equilibrium is unique in certain

  13. PHYSICAL AND NUMERICAL MODELING OF ASD EXHAUST DISPERSION AROUND HOUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses the use of a wind tunnel to physically model the dispersion of exhaust plumes from active soil depressurization (ASD) radon mitigation systems in houses. he testing studied the effects of exhaust location (grade level vs. above the eave), as house height, roo...

  14. Frequency effects of spatial dispersion in semiclassical model of conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovashkin, A I; Ivanenko, O M; Karuzskii, A L; Lykov, A N; Perestoronin, A V; Vishnyakov, Yu V, E-mail: karuz@sci.lebedev.r [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Leninsky prospekt 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2009-03-01

    Effect of significant retardation of an electromagnetic wave in microstrip microwave systems, where the phase velocity becomes less than the Fermi velocity, opens a novel experimental approach to investigations of properties and pairing mechanisms of carriers in superconductors by measurements of spatial dispersion effects at low temperatures. In this study, we present for the first time the semiclassical model of the current carrier dynamics depending on the frequency and phase velocity of electromagnetic wave, which accounts the unlocal spatial dispersion effects. These equations make it possible to perform a comparative analysis of the spatial effects observed in high-temperature superconductors, conventional superconductors, and normal metals.

  15. A linearized dispersion relation for orthorhombic pseudo-acoustic modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Xiaolei

    2012-11-04

    Wavefield extrapolation in acoustic orthorhombic anisotropic media suffers from wave-mode coupling and stability limitations in the parameter range. We introduce a linearized form of the dispersion relation for acoustic orthorhombic media to model acoustic wavefields. We apply the lowrank approximation approach to handle the corresponding space-wavenumber mixed-domain operator. Numerical experiments show that the proposed wavefield extrapolator is accurate and practically free of dispersions. Further, there is no coupling of qSv and qP waves, because we use the analytical dispersion relation. No constraints on Thomsen\\'s parameters are required for stability. The linearized expression may provide useful application for parameter estimation in orthorhombic media.

  16. Dispersion modeling of selected PAHs in urban air: A new approach combining dispersion model with GIS and passive air sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáňka, Ondřej; Melymuk, Lisa; Čupr, Pavel; Dvorská, Alice; Klánová, Jana

    2014-10-01

    This study introduces a new combined air concentration measurement and modeling approach that we propose can be useful in medium and long term air quality assessment. A dispersion study was carried out for four high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an urban area with industrial, traffic and domestic heating sources. A geographic information system (GIS) was used both for processing of input data as well as visualization of the modeling results. The outcomes of the dispersion model were compared to the results of passive air sampling (PAS). Despite discrepancies between measured and modeled concentrations, an approach combining the two techniques is promising for future air quality assessment. Differences between measured and modeled concentrations, in particular when measured values exceed the modeled concentrations, are indicative of undocumented, sporadic pollutant sources. Thus, these differences can also be useful for assessing and refining emission inventories.

  17. Atmospheric pollution. From processes to modelling; Pollution atmospherique. Des processus a la modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sportisse, B. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees (ENPC), Centre d' Enseignement et de Recherche en Environnement Atmospherique, Lab. Commun ENPC, 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    Air quality, greenhouse effect, ozone hole, chemical or nuclear accidents.. All these phenomena are tightly linked to the chemical composition of atmosphere and to the atmospheric dispersion of pollutants. This book aims at supplying the main elements of understanding of 'atmospheric pollutions': stakes, physical processes involved, role of scientific expertise in decision making. Content: 1 - classifications and scales: chemical composition of the atmosphere, vertical structure, time scales (transport, residence); 2 - matter/light interaction: notions of radiative transfer, application to the Earth's atmosphere; 3 - some elements about the atmospheric boundary layer: notion of scales in meteorology, atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), thermal stratification and stability, description of ABL turbulence, elements of atmospheric dynamics, some elements about the urban climate; 4 - notions of atmospheric chemistry: characteristics, ozone stratospheric chemistry, ozone tropospheric chemistry, brief introduction to indoor air quality; 5 - aerosols, clouds and rains: aerosols and particulates, aerosols and clouds, acid rains and leaching; 6 - towards numerical simulation: equation of reactive dispersion, numerical methods for chemistry-transport models, numerical resolution of the general equation of aerosols dynamics (GDE), modern simulation chains, perspectives. (J.S.)

  18. An explicit method for modeling lossy and dispersive transmission lines

    OpenAIRE

    Palà Schönwälder, Pere; Miró Sans, Joan Maria

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, an explicit -non iterative- method for modeling lossy and dispersive transmission lines, allowing the inclusion of skin-effect parameters is described. This method, based on multipoint Padé approximation, allows direct implementation to obtain models for existing simulation program -such as SPICE-without the need of making use of optimization algorithms at any stage. Examples are given to show that the described procedure yields the same accuracy as other existing techniques th...

  19. Organic chemistry in the atmosphere. [laboratory modeling of Titan atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.

    1974-01-01

    The existence of an at least moderately complex organic chemistry on Titan is stipulated based on clear evidence of methane, and at least presumptive evidence of hydrogen in its atmosphere. The ratio of methane to hydrogen is the highest of any atmosphere in the solar system. Irradiation of hydrogen/methane mixtures produces aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. A very reasonable hypothesis assumes that the red cloud cover of Titan is made of organic chemicals. Two-carbon hydrocarbons experimentally produced from irradiated mixtures of methane, ammonia, water, and hydrogen bear out the possible organic chemistry of the Titanian environment.

  20. NKS NordRisk. Atlas of long-range atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides from selected risk sites in the Northern Hemisphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havskov Soerensen, J.; Baklanov, A.; Mahura, A. (Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Lauritzen, Bent; Mikkelsen, Torben (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark))

    2008-07-15

    Within the NKS NordRisk project, 'Nuclear risk from atmospheric dispersion in Northern Europe', the NKS NordRisk Atlas has been developed. The atlas describes risks from hypothetical long-range atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides from selected nuclear risk sites in the Northern Hemisphere. A number of case studies of long-term long-range atmospheric transport and deposition of radionuclides has been developed, based on two years of meteorological data. Radionuclide concentrations in air and radionuclide depositions have been evaluated and examples of long-term averages of the dispersion and deposition and of the variability around these mean values are provided. (au)

  1. Validation of the DIFFAL, HPAC and HotSpot Dispersion Models Using the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device (FSRDD) Field Trials Witness Plate Deposition Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Murray; Parkes, David

    2016-05-01

    Three atmospheric dispersion models--DIFFAL, HPAC, and HotSpot--of differing complexities have been validated against the witness plate deposition dataset taken during the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device (FSRDD) Field Trials. The small-scale nature of these trials in comparison to many other historical radiological dispersion trials provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the near-field performance of the models considered. This paper performs validation of these models using two graphical methods of comparison: deposition contour plots and hotline profile graphs. All of the models tested are assessed to perform well, especially considering that previous model developments and validations have been focused on larger-scale scenarios. Of the models, HPAC generally produced the most accurate results, especially at locations within ∼100 m of GZ. Features present within the observed data, such as hot spots, were not well modeled by any of the codes considered. Additionally, it was found that an increase in the complexity of the meteorological data input to the models did not necessarily lead to an improvement in model accuracy; this is potentially due to the small-scale nature of the trials.

  2. Atmospheric Dispersion at Spatial Resolutions Below Mesoscale for university of Tennessee SimCenter at Chattanooga: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. David Whitfield; Dr. Daniel Hyams

    2009-09-14

    In Year 1 of this project, items 1.1 and 1.2 were addressed, as well as item 2.2. The baseline parallel computational simulation tool has been refined significantly over the timeline of this project for the purpose of atmospheric dispersion and transport problems; some of these refinements are documented in Chapter 3. The addition of a concentration transport capability (item 1.2) was completed, along with validation and usage in a highly complex urban environment. Multigrid capability (item 2.2) was a primary focus of Year 1 as well, regardless of the fact that it was scheduled for Year 2. It was determined by the authors that due to the very large nature of the meshes required for atmospheric simulations at mesoscale, multigrid was a key enabling technology for the rest of the project to be successful. Therefore, it was addressed early according to the schedule laid out in the original proposal. The technology behind the multigrid capability is discussed in detail in Chapter 5. Also in Year 1, the issue of ground topography specification is addressed. For simulations of pollutant transport in a given region, a key prerequisite is the specification of the detailed ground topography. The local topography must be placed into a form suitable for generating an unstructured grid both on the topography itself and the atmospheric volume above it; this effort is documented in Chapter 6. In Year 2 of this project, items 1.3 and 2.1 were addressed. Weather data in the form of wind speeds, relative humidity, and baseline pollution levels may be input into the code in order to improve the real-world fidelity of the solutions. Of course, the computational atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) boundary condition developed in Year 1 may still be used when necessary. Cloud cover may be simulated via the levels of actinic flux allowed in photochemical reactions in the atmospheric chemistry model. The primary focus of Year 2 was the formulation of a multispecies capability with included

  3. A multiscale model for bioimpedance dispersion of liver tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W H; Chui, C K; Teoh, S H; Chang, S K Y

    2012-06-01

    Radio-frequency ablation (RFA) has been used in liver surgery to minimize blood loss during tissue division. However, the current RFA tissue division method lacks an effective way of determining the stoppage of blood flow. There is limitation on the current state-of-the-art laser Doppler flow sensor due to its small sensing area. A new technique was proposed to use bioimpedance for blood flow sensing. This paper discusses a new geometrical multiscale model of the liver bioimpedance incorporating blood flow impedance. This model establishes correlation between the physical tissue structure and bioimpedance measurement. The basic Debye structure within a multilevel framework is used in the model to account for bioimpedance dispersion. This dispersion is often explained by the Cole-Cole model that includes a constant phase element without physical explanation. Our model is able to account for reduced blood flow in its output with changes in permittivity in gamma dispersion that is mainly due to the polarization of water molecules. This study demonstrates the potential of a multiscale model in determining the stoppage of blood flow during surgery.

  4. CFD modeling of reactive pollutant dispersion in simplified urban configurations with different chemical mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Beatriz; Santiago, Jose-Luis; Martilli, Alberto; Palacios, Magdalena; Kirchner, Frank

    2016-09-01

    An accurate understanding of urban air quality requires considering a coupled behavior between the dispersion of reactive pollutants and atmospheric dynamics. Currently, urban air pollution is mostly dominated by traffic emission, where nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the primary emitted pollutants. However, modeling reactive pollutants with a large set of chemical reactions, using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model, requires a large amount of computational (CPU) time. In this sense, the selection of the chemical reactions needed in different atmospheric conditions becomes essential in finding the best compromise between CPU time and accuracy. The purpose of this work is to assess the differences in NO and NO2 concentrations by considering three chemical approaches: (a) passive tracers (non-reactive), (b) the NOx-O3 photostationary state and (c) a reduced complex chemical mechanism based on 23 species and 25 reactions. The appraisal of the effects of chemical reactions focuses on studying the NO and NO2 dispersion in comparison with the tracer behavior within the street. In turn, the effect of including VOC reactions is also analyzed taking into account several VOC / NOx ratios of traffic emission. Given that the NO and NO2 dispersion can also be affected by atmospheric conditions, such as wind flow or the background concentration from season-dependent pollutants, in this work the influence of wind speeds and background O3 concentrations are studied. The results show that the presence of ozone in the street plays an important role in NO and NO2 concentrations. Therefore, greater differences linked to the chemical approach used are found with higher O3 concentrations and faster wind speeds. This bears relation to the vertical flux as a function of ambient wind speed since it increases the pollutant exchange between the street and the overlying air. This detailed study allows one to ascertain under which atmospheric conditions

  5. CFD modeling of reactive pollutant dispersion in simplified urban configurations with different chemical mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sanchez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An accurate understanding of urban air quality requires considering a coupled behavior between the dispersion of reactive pollutants and atmospheric dynamics. Currently, urban air pollution is mostly dominated by traffic emission, where nitrogen oxides (NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOCs are the primary emitted pollutants. However, modeling reactive pollutants with a large set of chemical reactions, using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD model, requires a large amount of computational (CPU time. In this sense, the selection of the chemical reactions needed in different atmospheric conditions becomes essential in finding the best compromise between CPU time and accuracy. The purpose of this work is to assess the differences in NO and NO2 concentrations by considering three chemical approaches: (a passive tracers (non-reactive, (b the NOx–O3 photostationary state and (c a reduced complex chemical mechanism based on 23 species and 25 reactions. The appraisal of the effects of chemical reactions focuses on studying the NO and NO2 dispersion in comparison with the tracer behavior within the street. In turn, the effect of including VOC reactions is also analyzed taking into account several VOC ∕ NOx ratios of traffic emission. Given that the NO and NO2 dispersion can also be affected by atmospheric conditions, such as wind flow or the background concentration from season-dependent pollutants, in this work the influence of wind speeds and background O3 concentrations are studied. The results show that the presence of ozone in the street plays an important role in NO and NO2 concentrations. Therefore, greater differences linked to the chemical approach used are found with higher O3 concentrations and faster wind speeds. This bears relation to the vertical flux as a function of ambient wind speed since it increases the pollutant exchange between the street and the overlying air. This detailed study allows one to ascertain under which

  6. Applicability of an integrated plume rise model for the dispersion from wild-land fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukkonen, J.; Nikmo, J.; Sofiev, M.; Riikonen, K.; Petäjä, T.; Virkkula, A.; Levula, J.; Schobesberger, S.; Webber, D. M.

    2014-11-01

    We have presented an overview of a mathematical model, BUOYANT, that was originally designed for the evaluation of the dispersion of buoyant plumes originated from major warehouse fires. The model addresses the variations of the cross-plume integrated properties of a buoyant plume in the presence of a vertically varying atmosphere. The model also includes a treatment for a rising buoyant plume interacting with an inversion layer. We have compared the model predictions with the data of two prescribed wild-land fire experiments. For the SCAR-C experiment in Quinault (US) in 1994, the predicted vertical extents of the plume at maximum plume rise were between 500 and 800 m and between 200 and 700 m, using two alternative meteorological data sets. The corresponding observed injection heights of the aerosol particles measured using an airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) ranged from 250 to 600 m. For the prescribed burning experiment in Hyytiälä (Finland) in 2009, the model predictions were compared with plume elevations and diameters, determined based on particulate matter number concentration measurements onboard an aeroplane. However, the agreement between modelled and measured results substantially depends on how the properties of the source term are evaluated, especially regarding the convective heat fluxes from the fire. The results demonstrate that in field experiments on wild-land fires, there are substantial uncertainties in estimating both (i) the source terms for the atmospheric dispersion computations and (ii) the relevant vertical meteorological profiles.

  7. Modelling plume dispersion pattern from a point source using spatial auto-correlational analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujoh, F.; Kwabe, D.

    2014-02-01

    The main objective of the study is to estimate the rate and model the pattern of plume rise from Dangote Cement Plc. A handheld Garmin GPS was employed for collection of coordinates at a single kilometre graduation from the centre of the factory to 10 kilometres. Plume rate was estimated using the Gaussian model while Kriging, using ArcGIS, was adopted for modelling the pattern of plume dispersion over a 10 kilometre radius around the factory. ANOVA test was applied for statistical analysis of the plume coefficients. The results indicate that plume dispersion is generally high with highest values recorded for the atmospheric stability classes A and B, while the least values are recorded for the atmospheric stability classes F and E. The variograms derived from the Kriging reveal that the pattern of plume dispersion is outwardly radial and omni-directional. With the exception of 3 stability sub-classes (DH, EH and FH) out of a total of 12, the 24-hour average of particulate matters (PM10 and PM2.5) within the study area is outrageously higher (highest value at 21392.3) than the average safety limit of 150 ug/m3 - 230 ug/m3 prescribed by the 2006 WHO guidelines. This indicates the presence of respirable and non-respirable pollutants that create poor ambient air quality. The study concludes that the use of geospatial technology can be adopted in modelling dispersion of pollutants from a point source. The study recommends ameliorative measures to reduce the rate of plume emission at the factory.

  8. A numerical model for sonic boom propagation through an inhomogeneous, windy atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Leick D.

    1992-01-01

    The ZEPHYRUS computer model calculates sonic boom distortion during propagation through the atmosphere. The model includes the effects of nonlinear distortion, attenuation, dispersion, and wind. Trial runs with the model indicate that, in general, stable shocks have not formed when the sonic boom reaches the ground. Also, the rise time of the lead shock may strongly depend on the overall waveform shape, and may be significantly increased by purely dispersive effects when matching occurs between the rise time and the characteristic oxygen molecular relaxation time.

  9. Generic atmospheric correction models for radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhong; Yu, Chen; Crippa, Paola; Penna, Nigel

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric effects (especially the part due to tropospheric water vapour) represent one of the major error sources of repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), and limit the accuracy of InSAR derived surface displacements. The spatio-temporal variations of atmospheric water vapour make it a challenge to measure small-amplitude surface displacements with InSAR. In previous studies, several InSAR atmospheric correction models have been successfully demonstrated: (1) Ground-based correction models such as those using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and/or surface meteorological observations, (2) Space-based correction models including those involving NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and/or ESA Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS), and (3) Numerical Weather Model (NWM) based corrections including those using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim and/or Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models. Each model has its own inherited limitations. For example, ground-based correction models are limited by the availability (and distribution) of ground observations, whilst MODIS/MERIS correction models are sensitive to the presence of clouds and there is often a time difference between space-based water vapour and radar observations. Similar to space-based correction models, NWM correction models might be impacted by the time difference between NWM and radar observations. Taking into account the inherent advantages and limitations of GNSS, MODIS and ECMWF water vapour products, we aim to develop a global and near-real-time mode InSAR atmospheric correction model. Tropospheric delays can be routinely retrieved from ground-based GNSS arrays in all-weather conditions and also in real-time. We develop an Iterative Tropospheric Decomposition (ITD) interpolation model that decouples the GNSS-estimated total tropospheric delays into (i) a stratified component highly correlated

  10. Quantifying potential aircraft tephra exposure using a volcanic ash dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R. A.; Dean, K.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling the long-range atmospheric transport and sedimentation of volcanic ash is a formidable task due to the large spatial and temporal scales over which atmospheric conditions vary dramatically. Dispersion models are efficient tools for forecasting the trajectories and evolution of ash clouds by avoiding the complex feedbacks to the meteorology of large eruptions (e.g. 1991 Pinatubo), and tracking tracer particles within the atmosphere. In light of this limitation, dispersion models have proven to be very useful in providing forecasts very quickly, which is crucial for aircraft and emergency responders in the event of an eruption. Because dispersion models predict the 3-dimensional structure of an evolving ash cloud in time, we have developed a technique to quantitatively predict the potential exposure to tephra an in-flight aircraft will experience. The numerical technique involves integrating the ash cloud concentration along the aircraft route through space and time. This method is efficient and the thousands of different air routes each day can be easily analyzed in near real-time. We have looked at applications that may be used in the present, past, and future. (1) For in- flight aircraft near an existing ash cloud, a cost-benefit analysis for a range of route deviations can be quickly performed. (2) A post-event analysis can indicate aircraft that may have been exposed to low-levels of volcanic ash and may require additional maintenance. (3) The potential hazard of a future eruption to an existing air- traffic corridor can be quantified and assessed.

  11. Combined dispersive solid-phase extraction-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction-derivatization for gas chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of aliphatic amines on atmospheric fine particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majedi, Seyed Mohammad; Lee, Hian Kee

    2017-02-24

    Short-chain aliphatic amines are ubiquitous in the atmospheric environment. They play an important role in the formation and growth of atmospheric particles. As such, there is a pressing need to monitor these particle-bound compounds present at trace quantities. The present work describes an efficient, one-step microextraction technique for the preconcentration and detection of trace levels of 10 aliphatic amines on fine particles (particulate matter of 2.5μm or less (PM2.5)) in the atmosphere. After extraction of amines from particles in acidified water samples, carbon-based sorbents (in dispersive solid-phase extraction mode), and vortex agitation were utilized for simultaneous derivatization-extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. The approach significantly increased the recoveries and enrichment of the amine derivatives. This one-step, combined technique is proposed for the first time. Several influential factors including type and concentration of derivatization reagent (for gas chromatographic separation), type of buffer, sample pH, types and volumes of extraction and disperser solvents, type and amount of sorbent, vortex time and temperature, desorption solvent type and volume, and salt content were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, high enrichment factors (in the range of between 307 and 382) and good reproducibility (relative standard deviations, below 7.0%, n=5) were achieved. The linearity ranged from 0.1μg/L-100μg/L, and from 0.5μg/L-100μg/L, depending on the analytes. The limits of detection were between 0.02μg/L (corresponding to ∼0.01ng/m(3) in air) and 0.09μg/L (corresponding to ∼0.04ng/m(3) in air). The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of PM2.5 samples collected by air sampling through polytetrafluoroethylene filters. The concentration levels of amines ranged from 1.04 to 4.16ng/m(3) in the air sampled. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Network models of frugivory and seed dispersal: Challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Tomás A.; Yang, Suann

    2011-11-01

    Network analyses have emerged as a new tool to study frugivory and seed dispersal (FSD) mutualisms because networks can model and simplify the complexity of multiple community-wide species interactions. Moreover, network theory suggests that structural properties, such as the presence of highly generalist species, are linked to the stability of mutualistic communities. However, we still lack empirical validation of network model predictions. Here we outline new research avenues to connect network models to FSD processes, and illustrate the challenges and opportunities of this tool with a field study. We hypothesized that generalist frugivores would be important for forest stability by dispersing seeds into deforested areas and initiating reforestation. We then constructed a network of plant-frugivore interactions using published data and identified the most generalist frugivores. To test the importance of generalists we measured: 1) the frequency with which frugivores moved between pasture and forest, 2) the bird-generated seed rain under perches in the pasture, and 3) the perching frequency of birds above seed traps. The generalist frugivores in the forest network were not important for seed dispersal into pastures, and thus for forest recovery, because the forest network excluded habitat heterogeneities, frugivore behavior, and movements. More research is needed to develop ways to incorporate relevant FSD processes into network models in order for these models to be more useful to community ecology and conservation. The network framework can serve to spark and renew interest in FSD and further our understanding of plant-animal communities.

  13. Unstructured Spectral Element Model for Dispersive and Nonlinear Wave Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Eskilsson, Claes; Bigoni, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    ). In the present paper we use a single layer of quadratic (in 2D) and prismatic (in 3D) elements. The model has been stabilized through a combination of over-integration of the Galerkin projections and a mild modal filter. We present numerical tests of nonlinear waves serving as a proof-of-concept validation......We introduce a new stabilized high-order and unstructured numerical model for modeling fully nonlinear and dispersive water waves. The model is based on a nodal spectral element method of arbitrary order in space and a -transformed formulation due to Cai, Langtangen, Nielsen and Tveito (1998...

  14. Validation and optimization of SST k-ω turbulence model for pollutant dispersion within a building array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hesheng; Thé, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    The prediction of the dispersion of air pollutants in urban areas is of great importance to public health, homeland security, and environmental protection. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) emerges as an effective tool for pollutant dispersion modelling. This paper reports and quantitatively validates the shear stress transport (SST) k-ω turbulence closure model and its transitional variant for pollutant dispersion under complex urban environment for the first time. Sensitivity analysis is performed to establish recommendation for the proper use of turbulence models in urban settings. The current SST k-ω simulation is validated rigorously by extensive experimental data using hit rate for velocity components, and the "factor of two" of observations (FAC2) and fractional bias (FB) for concentration field. The simulation results show that current SST k-ω model can predict flow field nicely with an overall hit rate of 0.870, and concentration dispersion with FAC2 = 0.721 and FB = 0.045. The flow simulation of the current SST k-ω model is slightly inferior to that of a detached eddy simulation (DES), but better than that of standard k-ε model. However, the current study is the best among these three model approaches, when validated against measurements of pollutant dispersion in the atmosphere. This work aims to provide recommendation for proper use of CFD to predict pollutant dispersion in urban environment.

  15. Applications of the PUFF model to forecasts of volcanic clouds dispersal from Etna and Vesuvio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, P.; Lirer, L.; Petrosino, P.; Spinelli, N.; Peterson, R.

    2009-05-01

    PUFF is a numerical volcanic ash tracking model developed to simulate the behaviour of ash clouds in the atmosphere. The model uses wind field data provided by meteorological models and adds dispersion and sedimentation physics to predict the evolution of the cloud once it reaches thermodynamic equilibrium with the atmosphere. The software is intended for use in emergency response situations during an eruption to quickly forecast the position and trajectory of the ash cloud in the near (˜1-72 h) future. In this paper, we describe the first application of the PUFF model in forecasting volcanic ash dispersion from the Etna and Vesuvio volcanoes. We simulated the daily occurrence of an eruptive event of Etna utilizing ash cloud parameters describing the paroxysm of 22nd July 1998 and wind field data for the 1st September 2005-31st December 2005 time span from the Global Forecast System (GFS) model at the approximate location of the Etna volcano (38N 15E). The results show that volcanic ash particles are dispersed in a range of directions in response to changing wind field at various altitudes and that the ash clouds are mainly dispersed toward the east and southeast, although the exact trajectory is highly variable, and can change within a few hours. We tested the sensitivity of the model to the mean particle grain size and found that an increased concentration of ash particles in the atmosphere results when the mean grain size is decreased. Similarly, a dramatic variation in dispersion results when the logarithmic standard deviation of the particle-size distribution is changed. Additionally, we simulated the occurrence of an eruptive event at both Etna and Vesuvio, using the same parameters describing the initial volcanic plume, and wind field data recorded for 1st September 2005, at approximately 38N 15E for Etna and 41N 14E for Vesuvio. The comparison of the two simulations indicates that identical eruptions occurring at the same time at the two volcanic centres

  16. CFD Modeling of LNG Spill: Humidity Effect on Vapor Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannissi, S. G.; Venetsanos, A. G.; Markatos, N.

    2015-09-01

    The risks entailed by an accidental spill of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) should be indentified and evaluated, in order to design measures for prevention and mitigation in LNG terminals. For this purpose, simulations are considered a useful tool to study LNG spills and to understand the mechanisms that influence the vapor dispersion. In the present study, the ADREA-HF CFD code is employed to simulate the TEEX1 experiment. The experiment was carried out at the Brayton Fire Training Field, which is affiliated with the Texas A&M University system and involves LNG release and dispersion over water surface in open- obstructed environment. In the simulation the source was modeled as a two-phase jet enabling the prediction of both the vapor dispersion and the liquid pool spreading. The conservation equations for the mixture are solved along with the mass fraction for natural gas. Due to the low prevailing temperatures during the spill ambient humidity condenses and this might affect the vapor dispersion. This effect was examined in this work by solving an additional conservation equation for the water mass fraction. Two different models were tested: the hydrodynamic equilibrium model which assumes kinetic equilibrium between the phases and the non hydrodynamic equilibrium model, in order to assess the effect of slip velocity on the prediction. The slip velocity is defined as the difference between the liquid phase and the vapor phase and is calculated using the algebraic slip model. Constant droplet diameter of three different sizes and a lognormal distribution of the droplet diameter were applied and the results are discussed and compared with the measurements.

  17. Extension of the D3 dispersion coefficient model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeweyher, Eike; Bannwarth, Christoph; Grimme, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    A new model, termed D4, for the efficient computation of molecular dipole-dipole dispersion coefficients is presented. As in the related, well established D3 scheme, these are obtained as a sum of atom-in-molecule dispersion coefficients over atom pairs. Both models make use of dynamic polarizabilities obtained from first-principles time-dependent density functional theory calculations for atoms in different chemical environments employing fractional atomic coordination numbers for interpolation. Different from the D3 model, the coefficients are obtained on-the-fly by numerical Casimir-Polder integration of the dynamic, atomic polarizabilities α (iω ). Most importantly, electronic density information is now incorporated via atomic partial charges computed at a semi-empirical quantum mechanical tight-binding level, which is used to scale the polarizabilities. Extended statistical measures show that errors for dispersion coefficients with the proposed D4 method are significantly lower than with D3 and other, computationally more involved schemes. Alongside, accurate isotropic charge and hybridization dependent, atom-in-molecule static polarizabilities are obtained with an unprecedented efficiency. Damping function parameters are provided for three standard density functionals, i.e., TPSS, PBE0, and B3LYP, allowing evaluation of the new DFT-D4 model for common non-covalent interaction energy benchmark sets.

  18. An atmospheric-terrestrial heavy metal transport model: model theory and process equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagenet, R.J.; Grenney, W.J.; Wooldridge, G.L.; Jurinak, J.J.

    1979-03-01

    A general modelTOHMwas developed to predict the terrestrial fate of zinc, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury emitted during operation of a coal-fired electric generating facility. The model comprises interfacing submodels describing atmospheric dispersion, precipitation, soil chemistry, and soil erosion. TOHM predicted no substantial increase in indigenous levels of zinc, chromium, and lead in the impact area. However, the model predicted that both mercury and cadmium would be emitted and eroded to the environmental sink in concentrations exceeding that naturally present in the system. The process equations used to describe the atmospheric-terrestrial transport of heavy metals are presented. Accounting procedures allowing calculation of amount of sediment eroded, heavy metal distribution, soil chemical reactions, and precipitation are explained. (9 diagrams, 5 graphs, 2 maps, 13 references)

  19. Dispersion Relations for Electroweak Observables in Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Contino, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We derive dispersion relations for the electroweak oblique observables measured at LEP in the context of $SO(5)/SO(4)$ composite Higgs models. It is shown how these relations can be used and must be modified when modeling the spectral functions through a low-energy effective description of the strong dynamics. The dispersion relation for the parameter $\\epsilon_3$ is then used to estimate the contribution from spin-1 resonances at the 1-loop level. Finally, it is shown that the sign of the contribution to the $\\hat S$ parameter from the lowest-lying spin-1 states is not necessarily positive definite, but depends on the energy scale at which the asymptotic behavior of current correlators is attained.

  20. Uncertainty propagation analysis applied to volcanic ash dispersal at Mt. Etna by using a Lagrangian model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Pardini, Federica; Spanu, Antonio; Neri, Augusto; Vittoria Salvetti, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic ash clouds represent a major hazard for populations living nearby volcanic centers producing a risk for humans and a potential threat to crops, ground infrastructures, and aviation traffic. Lagrangian particle dispersal models are commonly used for tracking ash particles emitted from volcanic plumes and transported under the action of atmospheric wind fields. In this work, we present the results of an uncertainty propagation analysis applied to volcanic ash dispersal from weak plumes with specific focus on the uncertainties related to the grain-size distribution of the mixture. To this aim, the Eulerian fully compressible mesoscale non-hydrostatic model WRF was used to generate the driving wind, representative of the atmospheric conditions occurring during the event of November 24, 2006 at Mt. Etna. Then, the Lagrangian particle model LPAC (de' Michieli Vitturi et al., JGR 2010) was used to simulate the transport of mass particles under the action of atmospheric conditions. The particle motion equations were derived by expressing the Lagrangian particle acceleration as the sum of the forces acting along its trajectory, with drag forces calculated as a function of particle diameter, density, shape and Reynolds number. The simulations were representative of weak plume events of Mt. Etna and aimed to quantify the effect on the dispersal process of the uncertainty in the particle sphericity and in the mean and variance of a log-normal distribution function describing the grain-size of ash particles released from the eruptive column. In order to analyze the sensitivity of particle dispersal to these uncertain parameters with a reasonable number of simulations, and therefore with affordable computational costs, response surfaces in the parameter space were built by using the generalized polynomial chaos technique. The uncertainty analysis allowed to quantify the most probable values, as well as their pdf, of the number of particles as well as of the mean and

  1. Report of the Nordic dispersion-/trajectory model comparison with the ETEX-1 fullscale experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U. [IFE, Kjeller (Norway); Mikkelsen, T. [Forskningscenter Risoe, Roskilde (Denmark)] [eds.

    1995-12-01

    On the 6th and 7th June 1995 a meeting was held at Risoe, where calculations of the atmospheric transportation and dispersion of the ETEX-1 release carried out by a number of institutions in the Nordic countries were presented. Also presented were the results of the measurements carried out by the National Environmental Research Institute of Denmark, information previously not known to the participants in the meeting. This provided not only an opportunity of intercomparing the models, but also of carrying out a validation exercise. The main points form the concluding discussions are also included in this report. (au) 7 tabs., 75 ills.

  2. Conditions for the formation and atmospheric dispersion of a toxic, heavy gas layer during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits by sill intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Michael; Hankin, Robin K. S.

    2010-05-01

    There is compelling evidence for massive discharge of volatiles, including toxic species, into the atmosphere at the end of the Permian. It has been argued that most of the gases were produced during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits in the East Siberia Tunguska basin following sill intrusion (Retallack and Jahren, 2008; Svensen et al., 2009). The release of the volatiles has been proposed as a major cause of environmental and extinction events at the end of the Permian, with venting of carbon gases and halocarbons to the atmosphere leading to global warming and atmospheric ozone depletion (Svensen et al., 2009) Here we consider the conditions required for the formation and dispersion of toxic, heavier than air, gas plumes, made up of a mixture of CO2, CH4, H2S and SO2 and formed during the thermal metamorphism of C- and S- rich sediments. Dispersion models and density considerations within a range of CO2/CH4 ratios and volatile fluxes and temperatures, for gas discharge by both seepage and from vents, allow the possibility that following sill emplacement much of the vast East Siberia Tunguska basin was - at least intermittently - covered by a heavy, toxic gas layer that was unfavorable for life. Dispersion scenarios for a heavy gas layer beyond the Siberian region during end-Permian times will be presented. REFERENCES G. J. Retallack and A. H. Jahren, Methane release from igneous intrusion of coal during Late Permian extinction events, Journal of Geology, volume 116, 1-20, 2008 H. Svensen et al., Siberian gas venting and the end-Permian environmental crisis, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, volume 277, 490-500, 2009

  3. Dispersion of sulphur in the northern hemisphere. A study with a 3-dimensional time-resolved model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrason, L.

    1995-12-31

    This thesis on atmospheric dispersion of sulphur presents a calculation of intercontinental transport of oxidized sulphur and allocates different contributions to sulphur background levels over Europe. It is found that a significant fraction of anthropogenic sulphur (AS) is transported out of continental boundaries thus affecting the background levels over major parts of the northern hemisphere. Over Europe, the contribution of AS from North America is similar in amount to that of Asian AS and natural sources from the North Atlantic Ocean. Although the yearly contribution of intercontinental transport to deposition of sulphur over Europe is quite small, it can be much more important over certain areas and seasons and is comparable to the contributions from individual European countries. The calculations are based on a three-dimensional Eulerian time-resolved model that describes sulphur dispersion in the atmosphere in connection with large-scale synoptic flows and agree well with observations. The thesis emphasizes the role of synoptic scale atmospheric motions in determining intercontinental transport of sulphur. It indicates the need to resolve individual cyclones and anticyclones in order to describe the dispersion and distribution of atmospheric sulphur in the northern hemisphere and stresses the value of comparing model calculations with observations, both in atmospheric chemistry studies and in climate applications. 260 refs., 50 figs., 17 tabs.

  4. Modelling the dispersion of particle numbers in five European cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kukkonen, J.; Karl, M.; Keuken, M.P.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Denby, B.R.; Singh, V.; Douros, J.; Manders, A.M.M.; Samaras, Z.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Jonkers, S.; Aarnio, M.; Karppinen, A.; Kangas, L.; Lutzenkirchen, S.; Petaja, T.; Vouitsis, I.; Sokhi, R.S.

    2016-01-01

    We present an overview of the modelling of particle number concentrations (PNCs) in five major European cities, namely Helsinki, Oslo, London, Rotterdam and Athens in 2008. Novel emission inventories of particle numbers have been compiled both on urban and European scales. We used atmospheric

  5. Xenon-133 and caesium-137 releases into the atmosphere from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant: determination of the source term, atmospheric dispersion, and deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available On 11 March 2011, an earthquake occurred about 130 km off the Pacific coast of Japan's main island Honshu, followed by a large tsunami. The resulting loss of electric power at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant developed into a disaster causing massive release of radioactivity into the atmosphere. In this study, we determine the emissions into the atmosphere of two isotopes, the noble gas xenon-133 (133Xe and the aerosol-bound caesium-137 (137Cs, which have very different release characteristics as well as behavior in the atmosphere. To determine radionuclide emissions as a function of height and time until 20 April, we made a first guess of release rates based on fuel inventories and documented accident events at the site. This first guess was subsequently improved by inverse modeling, which combined it with the results of an atmospheric transport model, FLEXPART, and measurement data from several dozen stations in Japan, North America and other regions. We used both atmospheric activity concentration measurements as well as, for 137Cs, measurements of bulk deposition. Regarding 133Xe, we find a total release of 15.3 (uncertainty range 12.2–18.3 EBq, which is more than twice as high as the total release from Chernobyl and likely the largest radioactive noble gas release in history. The entire noble gas inventory of reactor units 1–3 was set free into the atmosphere between 11 and 15 March 2011. In fact, our release estimate is higher than the entire estimated 133Xe inventory of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, which we explain with the decay of iodine-133 (half-life of 20.8 h into 133Xe. There is strong evidence that the 133Xe release started before the first active venting was made, possibly indicating structural damage to reactor components and/or leaks due to overpressure which would have allowed early release of noble gases. For 137

  6. Xenon-133 and caesium-137 releases into the atmosphere from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Determination of the source term, atmospheric dispersion, and deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stohl, A.; Burkhart, J.F.; Eckhardt, S. [NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Seibert, P. [Univ. of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria). Inst. of Meteorology; Wotawa, G. [Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics, Vienna (Austria); Arnold, D. [Univ. of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria). Inst. of Meteorology; Technical Univ. of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain). Inst. of Energy Technologies; Tapia, C. [Technical Univ. of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Physics and Nucelar Engineering; Vargas, A. [Technical Univ. of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain). Inst. of Energy Technologies; Yasunari, T.J. [Univs. Space Research Association, Columbia, MD (United States). Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology and Research

    2012-07-01

    On 11 March 2011, an earthquake occurred about 130 km off the Pacific coast of Japan's main island Honshu, followed by a large tsunami. The resulting loss of electric power at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant developed into a disaster causing massive release of radioactivity into the atmosphere. In this study, we determine the emissions into the atmosphere of two isotopes, the noble gas xenon-133 ({sup 133}Xe) and the aerosol-bound caesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), which have very different release characteristics as well as behavior in the atmosphere. To determine radionuclide emissions as a function of height and time until 20 April, we made a first guess of release rates based on fuel inventories and documented accident events at the site. This first guess was subsequently improved by inverse modeling, which combined it with the results of an atmospheric transport model, FLEXPART, and measurement data from several dozen stations in Japan, North America and other regions. We used both atmospheric activity concentration measurements as well as, for {sup 137}Cs, measurements of bulk deposition. Regarding {sup 133}Xe, we find a total release of 15.3 (uncertainty range 12.2-18.3) EBq, which is more than twice as high as the total release from Chernobyl and likely the largest radioactive noble gas release in history. The entire noble gas inventory of reactor units 1-3 was set free into the atmosphere between 11 and 15 March 2011. In fact, our release estimate is higher than the entire estimated {sup 133}Xe inventory of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, which we explain with the decay of iodine-133 (half-life of 20.8 h) into {sup 133}Xe. There is strong evidence that the {sup 133}Xe release started before the first active venting was made, possibly indicating structural damage to reactor components and/or leaks due to overpressure which would have allowed early release of noble gases. For {sup 137}Cs, the inversion results give a total emission of 36

  7. Simulating mesoscale transport and diffusion of radioactive noble gases using the Lagrangian particle dispersion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Hee; Song, Chang-Keun; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Song, Sang-Keun

    2008-10-01

    In order to simulate the impact of mesoscale wind fields and to assess potential capability of atmospheric Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) as an emergency response model for the decision supports, two different simulations of LPDM with the mesoscale prognostic model MM5 (Mesoscale Model ver. 5) were driven. The first simulation of radioactive noble gas (85Kr exponent) emitted during JCO accident occurred from 30 September to 3 October 1999 at Tokai, Japan showed that the first arriving short pulse was found in Tsukuba located at 60 km away from the accidental area. However, the released radioactive noble gas was transported back to the origin site about 2 days later due to the mesoscale meteorological wind circulation, enhancing the levels of 85Kr with the secondary peak in Tsukuba. The second simulation of atmospheric dilution factors (the ratio of concentration to the emission rate, chi/Q), during the underground nuclear test (UNT) performed by North Korea showed that high chi/Q moved to the eastward and extended toward southward in accordance with the mesoscale atmospheric circulations generated by mesoscale prognostic model MM5. In comparison with the measurements, the simulated horizontal distribution patterns of 85Kr during the JCO are well accord with that of observation in Tsukuba such as the existence of secondary peak which is associated with the mesoscale circulations. However, the simulated level of 85Kr anomaly was found to be significantly lower than the observations, and some interpretations on these discrepancies were described. Applications of LPDM to two mesoscale emergency response dispersion cases suggest the potential capability of LPDM to be used as a decision support model provided accurate emission rate of accident in case of a large accident.

  8. Modeling Gravitational Waves to Test GR Dispersion and Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Rhondale; Chen, Yanbei; Isi, Maximilliano

    2017-01-01

    Given continued observation runs from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory Scientific Collaboration, further gravitational wave (GW) events will provide added constraints on beyond-general relativity (b-GR) theories. One approach, independent of the GW generation mechanism at the source, is to look at modification to the GW dispersion and propagation, which can accumulate over vast distances. Generic modification of GW propagation can also, in certain b-GR theories, impact the polarization content of GWs. To this end, a comprehensive approach to testing the dispersion and polarization content is developed by modeling anisotropic deformations to the waveforms' phase, along with birefringence effects and corollary consequences for b-GR polarizations, i.e., breathing, vector, and longitudinal modes. Such an approach can be mapped to specific theories like Lorentz violation, amplitude birefringence in Chern-Simons, and provide hints at additional theories to be included. An overview of data analysis routines to be implemented will also be discussed.

  9. Viscoelasticity and diffusional properties of colloidal model dispersions

    CERN Document Server

    Naegele, G

    2003-01-01

    We examine linear viscoelastic, and translational and rotational diffusion properties of colloidal model dispersions. Theoretical results are discussed, in comparison with experiments, for monodisperse suspensions of charged and neutral colloidal spheres, and for binary dispersions of differently sized tracer and host particles. The theoretical methods employed comprise a mode-coupling scheme for Brownian particles, and a rooted cluster expansion scheme of tracer diffusion with two- and three-body hydrodynamic interactions included. We analyse in particular the validity of various empirical generalized Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relations between the (dynamic) shear viscosity and translational/rotational diffusion coefficients. Some of these generalized SED relations are basic to microrheological measurements aimed at characterizing the viscoelasticity of complex fluids on the basis of the diffusional properties of immersed tracer particles.

  10. On the coalescence-dispersion modeling of turbulent molecular mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givi, Peyman; Kosaly, George

    1987-01-01

    The general coalescence-dispersion (C/D) closure provides phenomenological modeling of turbulent molecular mixing. The models of Curl and Dopazo and O'Brien appear as two limiting C/D models that bracket the range of results one can obtain by various models. This finding is used to investigate the sensitivtiy of the results to the choice of the model. Inert scalar mixing is found to be less model-sensitive than mixing accompanied by chemical reaction. Infinitely fast chemistry approximation is used to relate the C/D approach to Toor's earlier results. Pure mixing and infinite rate chemistry calculations are compared to study further a recent result of Hsieh and O'Brien who found that higher concentration moments are not sensitive to chemistry.

  11. Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) Dispersant Data for BP Spil/Deepwater Horizon - August 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) buses are self-contained mobile laboratories that conduct instant-result monitoring of air quality at particular locations....

  12. MODELING OF GENERIC AIR POLLUTION DISPERSION ANALYSIS FROM CEMENT FACTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses E EMETERE

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution from cement factory is classified as one of the sources of air pollution. The control of the air pollution by addressing the wind field dynamics was the main objective of the paper. The dynamics of dispersion showed a three way flow which was calculated and explained accordingly. The 3D model showed good level of accuracy by determining field values of air deposited pollutants. Mean concentration of diffusing pollutants was shown to be directly proportional to the plume angular displacement. The 2D model explained the details of the wind field dynamics and proffers a solution which may be relevant in controlling air pollution from anthropogenic sources.

  13. Atmospheric Dispersion of Radioactivity from Nuclear Power Plant Accidents: Global Assessment and Case Study for the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodoros Christoudias

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We estimate the contamination risks from the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides released by severe nuclear power plant accidents using the ECHAM/Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy atmospheric chemistry (EMAC atmospheric chemistry-general circulation model at high resolution (50 km. We present an overview of global risks and also a case study of nuclear power plants that are currently under construction, planned and proposed in the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, a region prone to earthquakes. We implemented continuous emissions from each location, making the simplifying assumption that all potential accidents release the same amount of radioactivity. We simulated atmospheric transport and decay, focusing on 137Cs and 131I as proxies for particulate and gaseous radionuclides, respectively. We present risk maps for potential surface layer concentrations, deposition and doses to humans from the inhalation exposure of 131I. The estimated risks exhibit seasonal variability, with the highest surface level concentrations of gaseous radionuclides in the Northern Hemisphere during winter.

  14. LANDSCAPE MODELING OF CHARACTERISTIC HABITAT SCALES, DISPERSAL, AND CONNECTIVITY FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE ORGANISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    A modeling framework was developed to investigate the interactive effects of life history characteristics and landscape heterogeneity on dispersal success. An individual-based model was used to examine how dispersal between resource patches is affected by four landscape characte...

  15. Modelling of deposited black carbon with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART in backward mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Sabine; Cassiani, Massimo; Sollum, Espen; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Lagrangian particle dispersion models are popular tools to simulate the dispersion of trace gases, aerosols or radionuclides in the atmosphere. If they consider only linear processes, they are self-adjoint, i.e., they can be run forward and backward in time without changes to the source code. Backward simulations are very efficient if the number of receptors is smaller than the number of sources, and they are well suited to establish source-receptor (s-r) relationships for measurements of various trace substances in air. However, not only the air concentrations are of interest, but also the s-r relationships for deposition are important for interpreting measurement data. E.g., deposition of dust is measured regularly in ice cores, partly also as a proxy to understand changes in aridity in dust source regions. Contamination of snow by black carbon (BC) aerosols has recently become a hot topic because of the potential impact of BC on the snow albedo. To interpret such deposition measurements and study the sources of the deposited substance, it would be convenient to have a model that is capable of efficient s-r relationship calculations for such types of measurements. We present here the implementation of such an algorithm into the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, and test the new scheme by comparisons with results from forward simulations as well as comparisons with measurements. As an application, we analyse source regions for elemental carbon (EC) measured in snow over the years 2014-2016 in the Russian Arctic. Simulations using an annual constant black carbon inventory based on ECLIPSE V5 and GFED (Global Fire Emission Database), have been performed. The meteorological data used in the simulation are 3 hourly operational data from the European Centre of Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) on a 1 degree grid resolution and 138 vertical levels. The model is able to capture very well the measured concentrations. Gas flaring and residential

  16. Comparing the Degree of Land-Atmosphere Interaction in Four Atmospheric General Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D.; Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Ijpelaar, Ruben; Tyahla, Lori; Cox, Peter; Suarez, Max J.; Houser, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Land-atmosphere feedback, by which (for example) precipitation-induced moisture anomalies at the land surface affect the overlying atmosphere and thereby the subsequent generation of precipitation, has been examined and quantified with many atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs). Generally missing from such studies, however, is an indication of the extent to which the simulated feedback strength is model dependent. Four modeling groups have recently performed a highly controlled numerical experiment that allows an objective inter-model comparison of land-atmosphere feedback strength. The experiment essentially consists of an ensemble of simulations in which each member simulation artificially maintains the same time series of surface prognostic variables. Differences in atmospheric behavior between the ensemble members then indicates the degree to which the state of the land surface controls atmospheric processes in that model. A comparison of the four sets of experimental results shows that feedback strength does indeed vary significantly between the AGCMs.

  17. Nonlinear dispersion effects in elastic plates: numerical modelling and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijanka, Piotr; Radecki, Rafal; Packo, Pawel; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Leamy, Michael J.

    2017-04-01

    Nonlinear features of elastic wave propagation have attracted significant attention recently. The particular interest herein relates to complex wave-structure interactions, which provide potential new opportunities for feature discovery and identification in a variety of applications. Due to significant complexity associated with wave propagation in nonlinear media, numerical modeling and simulations are employed to facilitate design and development of new measurement, monitoring and characterization systems. However, since very high spatio- temporal accuracy of numerical models is required, it is critical to evaluate their spectral properties and tune discretization parameters for compromise between accuracy and calculation time. Moreover, nonlinearities in structures give rise to various effects that are not present in linear systems, e.g. wave-wave interactions, higher harmonics generation, synchronism and | recently reported | shifts to dispersion characteristics. This paper discusses local computational model based on a new HYBRID approach for wave propagation in nonlinear media. The proposed approach combines advantages of the Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA) and Cellular Automata for Elastodynamics (CAFE). The methods are investigated in the context of their accuracy for predicting nonlinear wavefields, in particular shifts to dispersion characteristics for finite amplitude waves and secondary wavefields. The results are validated against Finite Element (FE) calculations for guided waves in copper plate. Critical modes i.e., modes determining accuracy of a model at given excitation frequency - are identified and guidelines for numerical model parameters are proposed.

  18. Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics: Modeling Atmospheric Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    The first year of work on this project has been completed. This report provides a summary of the progress made and the plan for the coming year. Also included with this report is a preprint of an article that was accepted for publication in Journal of Geophysical Research and describes in detail most of the results from the first year of effort. The goal for the first year was to develop a radiation belt electron model for fitting to data from the SAMPEX and Polar satellites that would provide an empirical description of the electron losses into the upper atmosphere. This was largely accomplished according to the original plan (with one exception being that, for reasons described below, the inclusion of the loss cone electrons in the model was deferred). The main concerns at the start were to accurately represent the balance between pitch angle diffusion and eastward drift that determines the dominant features of the low altitude data, and then to accurately convert the model into simulated data based on the characteristics of the particular electron detectors. Considerable effort was devoted to achieving these ends. Once the model was providing accurate results it was applied to data sets selected from appropriate periods in 1997, 1998, and 1999. For each interval of -30 to 60 days, the model parameters were calculated daily, thus providing good short and long term temporal resolution, and for a range of radial locations from L = 2.7 to 3.9. .

  19. Wave model for longitudinal dispersion: application to the laminar-flow tubular reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kronberg, Alexandre E.; Benneker, A.H.; Benneker, A.H.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1996-01-01

    The wave model for longitudinal dispersion, published elsewhere as an alternative to the commonly used dispersed plug-flow model, is applied to the classic case of the laminar-flow tubular reactor. The results are compared in a wide range of situations to predictions by the dispersed plug-flow model

  20. 78 FR 20148 - Reporting Procedure for Mathematical Models Selected To Predict Heated Effluent Dispersion in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... mathematical modeling methods used in predicting the dispersion of heated effluent in natural water bodies. The... COMMISSION Reporting Procedure for Mathematical Models Selected To Predict Heated Effluent Dispersion in... Mathematical Models Selected to Predict Heated Effluent Dispersion in Natural Water Bodies.'' The guide is...

  1. The NET effect of dispersants : A critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marieke Zeinstra-Helfrich; Wierd Koops; Albertinka J. Murk

    2015-01-01

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and

  2. The NET effect of dispersants - a critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra-Helfrich, Marieke; Koops, Wierd; Murk, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and

  3. Temperature-dependent dispersion model of float zone crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franta, Daniel; Dubroka, Adam; Wang, Chennan; Giglia, Angelo; Vohánka, Jirí; Franta, Pavel; Ohlídal, Ivan

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we present the temperature dependent dispersion model of float zone crystalline silicon. The theoretical background for valence electronic excitations is introduced in the theoretical part of this paper. This model is based on application of sum rules and parametrization of transition strength functions corresponding to the individual elementary phonon and electronic excitations. The parameters of the model are determined by fitting ellipsometric and spectrophotometric experimental data in the spectral range from far infrared (70 cm-1) to extreme ultraviolet (40 eV). The ellipsometric data were measured in the temperature range 5-700 K. The excitations of the valence electrons to the conduction band are divided into the indirect and direct electronic transitions. The indirect transitions are modeled by truncated Lorentzian terms, whereas the direct transitions are modeled using Gaussian broadened piecewise smooth functions representing 3D and 2D van Hove singularities modified by excitonic effects. Since the experimental data up to high energies (40 eV) are available, we are able to determine the value of the effective number of valence electrons. The Tauc-Lorentz dispersion model is used for modeling high energy electron excitations. Two slightly different values of the effective number of valence electrons are obtained for the Jellison-Modine (4.51) and Campi-Coriasso (4.37) parametrization. Our goal is to obtain the model of dielectric response of crystalline silicon which depends only on photon energy, temperature and small number of material parameters, e.g. the concentration of substituted carbon and interstitial oxygen. The model presented in this paper is accurate enough to replace tabulated values of c-Si optical constants used in the optical characterization of thin films diposited on silicon substrates. The spectral dependencies of the optical constants obtained in our work are compared to results obtained by other authors.

  4. Effective pollutant emission heights for atmospheric transport modelling based on real-world information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregger, Thomas; Friedrich, Rainer

    2009-02-01

    Emission data needed as input for the operation of atmospheric models should not only be spatially and temporally resolved. Another important feature is the effective emission height which significantly influences modelled concentration values. Unfortunately this information, which is especially relevant for large point sources, is usually not available and simple assumptions are often used in atmospheric models. As a contribution to improve knowledge on emission heights this paper provides typical default values for the driving parameters stack height and flue gas temperature, velocity and flow rate for different industrial sources. The results were derived from an analysis of the probably most comprehensive database of real-world stack information existing in Europe based on German industrial data. A bottom-up calculation of effective emission heights applying equations used for Gaussian dispersion models shows significant differences depending on source and air pollutant and compared to approaches currently used for atmospheric transport modelling.

  5. Modeling skull's acoustic attenuation and dispersion on photoacoustic signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, L.; Behnam, H.; Nasiriavanaki, M. R.

    2017-03-01

    Despite the great promising results of a recent new transcranial photoacoustic brain imaging technology, it has been shown that the presence of the skull severely affects the performance of this imaging modality. In this paper, we investigate the effect of skull on generated photoacoustic signals with a mathematical model. The developed model takes into account the frequency dependence attenuation and acoustic dispersion effects occur with the wave reflection and refraction at the skull surface. Numerical simulations based on the developed model are performed for calculating the propagation of photoacoustic waves through the skull. From the simulation results, it was found that the skull-induced distortion becomes very important and the reconstructed image would be strongly distorted without correcting these effects. In this regard, it is anticipated that an accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in transcranial photoacoustic brain imaging.

  6. Predictions of plume dispersion in complex terrain: Eulerian versus Lagrangian models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, K. C.; Noonan, J. A.; Galbally, I. E.; Physick, W. L.

    Simulations of dispersion from an elevated point source in complex terrain and non-stationary flow are presented using the Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model (LADM, Physick et al., 1992, Air Pollution Modeling and its Applications, Vol. IX, pp. 725-729, Plenum Press, New York; 1994 CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research Technical Paper No. 24) and the Eulerian grid-based model (CALGRID, Yamartino et al., 1989, CALGRID: a mesoscale photochemical grid model, Vol. I; model formation document, Report, Sacarmento, California). Both models use the same predicted windfields. We find that • the different algorithms used for release of pollutants into the model domains lead to initial concentrations at the release height in LADM one-third higher than in CALGRID. • The CALGRID plume spreads laterally over a larger region than does the LADM plume due to the finite-difference approach of CALGRID. The pollutant mass in the extra volume occupied by the CALGRID plume is less than 10% of that released. • The essentials of morning fumigation are simulated more realistically under the Lagrangian approach. In LADM the elevated plume is mixed down to the ground rapidly, causing a sharp increase in ground-level concentrations (glc), whereas, in CALGRID glc increase more gradually over a few hours. • The use of hourly averaged windfields in CALGRID compared to 10 min windfields in LADM leads to a relative separation of the two modelled plumes of 5 km at a distance of roughly 6 km downwind from the sources at 1500 LST. Consequently in complex terrain and non-stationary conditions, the plumes are subjected to different three-dimensional wind regimes. For the particular terrain studied, roughly 3% of the pollutant mass emitted into CALGRID during the day is transported above 3000 m after 1700 LST whereas only 0.8% is transported above this height in LADM. • During the daytime the CALGRID simulation produces maximum glc which are about 40% smaller than those predicted by LADM.

  7. Ship plume dispersion rates in convective boundary layers for chemistry models

    OpenAIRE

    Chosson, F.; Paoli, R.; B. Cuenot

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Detailed ship plume simulations in various convective boundary layer situations have been performed using a Lagrangian Dispersion Model driven by a Large Eddy Simulation Model. The simulations focus on early stage (1–2 h) of plume dispersion regime and take into account the effects of plume rise on dispersion. Results are presented in an attempt to provide to chemical modellers community a realistic description of the impact of characteristic dispersion on exhaust ship...

  8. Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian Model, a Two-Dimensional Model and a Three-Dimensional Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, J A; Molenkamp, C R; Bixler, N E; Morrow, C W; Ramsdell, Jr., J V

    2004-05-10

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses MACCS2 (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2) for regulatory purposes such as planning for emergencies and cost-benefit analyses. MACCS2 uses a straight-line Gaussian model for atmospheric transport and dispersion. This model has been criticized as being overly simplistic, although only expected values of metrics of interest are used in the regulatory arena. To test the assumption that averaging numerous weather results adequately compensates for the loss of structure in the meteorology that occurs away from the point of release, average MACCS2 results have been compared with average results from a state-of-the-art, 3-dimensional LODI (Lagrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator)/ADAPT (Atmospheric Data Assimilation and Parameterization Technique) and a Lagrangian trajectory, Gaussian puff transport and dispersion model from RASCAL (Radiological Assessment System for consequence Analysis). The weather sample included 610 weather trials representing conditions for a hypothetical release at the Central Facility of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site. The values compared were average ground concentrations and average surface-level air concentrations at several distances out to 100 miles (160.9 km) from the assumed release site.

  9. Modelling spread with context-based dispersal strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriamihaja Ramanantoanina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dispersal is a context-dependent adaptive trait. Different dispersal strategies arise as species need to optimize their fitness in the ever changing quality of habitats further imposed by abiotic and biotic factors. This work reviews the spread of populations under different dispersal strategies. Namely, we address the spread of a population when dispersal is driven by habitat fragmentations, density-dependent predation and mixed propagules. The context-based dispersal can explain a variety of range dynamics. It is of common accord however that the cause and effect of dispersal could have a wider effect on population dynamics that goes beyond purely ecological nature.

  10. Essays on pricing dynamics, price dispersion, and nested logit modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinda, Jeremy Alan

    The body of this dissertation comprises three standalone essays, presented in three respective chapters. Chapter One explores the possibility that local market power contributes to the asymmetric relationship observed between wholesale costs and retail prices in gasoline markets. I exploit an original data set of weekly gas station prices in Southern California from September 2002 to May 2003, and take advantage of highly detailed station and local market-level characteristics to determine the extent to which spatial differentiation influences price-response asymmetry. I find that brand identity, proximity to rival stations, bundling and advertising, operation type, and local market features and demographics each influence a station's predicted asymmetric relationship between prices and wholesale costs. Chapter Two extends the existing literature on the effect of market structure on price dispersion in airline fares by modeling the effect at the disaggregate ticket level. Whereas past studies rely on aggregate measures of price dispersion such as the Gini coefficient or the standard deviation of fares, this paper estimates the entire empirical distribution of airline fares and documents how the shape of the distribution is determined by market structure. Specifically, I find that monopoly markets favor a wider distribution of fares with more mass in the tails while duopoly and competitive markets exhibit a tighter fare distribution. These findings indicate that the dispersion of airline fares may result from the efforts of airlines to practice second-degree price discrimination. Chapter Three adopts a Bayesian approach to the problem of tree structure specification in nested logit modelling, which requires a heavy computational burden in calculating marginal likelihoods. I compare two different techniques for estimating marginal likelihoods: (1) the Laplace approximation, and (2) reversible jump MCMC. I apply the techniques to both a simulated and a travel mode

  11. Representing uncertainty in a spatial invasion model that incorporates human-mediated dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank H. Koch; Denys Yemshanov; Robert A. Haack

    2013-01-01

    Most modes of human-mediated dispersal of invasive species are directional and vector-based. Classical spatial spread models usually depend on probabilistic dispersal kernels that emphasize distance over direction and have limited ability to depict rare but influential long-distance dispersal events. These aspects are problematic if such models are used to estimate...

  12. Uncertainty, ensembles and air quality dispersion modeling: applications and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabberdt, Walter F.; Miller, Erik

    The past two decades have seen significant advances in mesoscale meteorological modeling research and applications, such as the development of sophisticated and now widely used advanced mesoscale prognostic models, large eddy simulation models, four-dimensional data assimilation, adjoint models, adaptive and targeted observational strategies, and ensemble and probabilistic forecasts. Some of these advances are now being applied to urban air quality modeling and applications. Looking forward, it is anticipated that the high-priority air quality issues for the near-to-intermediate future will likely include: (1) routine operational forecasting of adverse air quality episodes; (2) real-time high-level support to emergency response activities; and (3) quantification of model uncertainty. Special attention is focused here on the quantification of model uncertainty through the use of ensemble simulations. Application to emergency-response dispersion modeling is illustrated using an actual event that involved the accidental release of the toxic chemical oleum. Both surface footprints of mass concentration and the associated probability distributions at individual receptors are seen to provide valuable quantitative indicators of the range of expected concentrations and their associated uncertainty.

  13. 2-D model for pollutant dispersion at the coastal outfall off Paradip

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suryanarayana, A.; Babu, M.T.; Vethamony, P.; Gouveia, A.D.

    Simulation of dispersion of the effluent discharge has been carried out using 2-D Model to verify the advection and diffusion of the pollutant patch of the proposed effluent disposal off Paradip, Orissa, India. The simulation of dispersion...

  14. Modeling distribution of dispersal distances in male white-tailed deer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, D.R.; Long, E.S.; Rosenberry, C.S.; Wallingford, B.D.; Smith, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Dispersal distances and their distribution pattern are important to understanding such phenomena as disease spread and gene flow, but oftentimes dispersal characteristics are modeled as a fixed trait for a given species. We found that dispersal distributions differ for spring and autumn dispersals of yearling male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) but that combined data can be adequately modeled based on a log-normal distribution. We modeled distribution of dispersal distances from 3 distinct populations in Pennsylvania and Maryland, USA, based on the relationship between percent forest cover and mean dispersal distance and the relationship between mean and variance of dispersal distances. Our results suggest distributions of distances for dispersing yearling male white-tailed deer can be modeled by simply measuring a readily obtained landscape metric, percent forest cover, which could be used to create generalized spatially explicit disease or gene.

  15. Improving the low temperature dyeability of polyethylene terephthalate fabric with dispersive dyes by atmospheric pressure plasma discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elabid, Amel E.A., E-mail: amelkanzi2014@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Zhang, Jie; Shi, Jianjun; Guo, Ying; Ding, Ke [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Science, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Zhang, Jing, E-mail: jingzh@dhu.cdu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Science, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atmospheric pressure glow-like plasma with fine and uniform filament discharge has been successfully applied to the low temperature dyeing (95 °C) of PET fabric. • Simultaneously the dye uptake was increased as twice as much and the color strength rate was increased by about 20% for less than 3 min plasma treated PET. • Dyeing mechanism research showed the significance of surface roughing and functional group introduction by this kind of discharge. • Results highlight a novel environmentally friendly dyeing process for one of the largest commodity in polymer fabric. - Abstract: Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fiber and textile is one of the largest synthetic polymer commodity in the world. The great energy consumption and pollution caused by the high temperature and pressure dyeing of PET fibers and fabrics with disperse dyes has been caused concern these years. In this study, an atmospheric pressure plasma with fine and uniform filament discharge operated at 20 kHz has been used to improve the low temperature dyeability of PET fabric at 95 °C with three cation disperse dyes: Red 73, Blue 183 and Yellow 211. The dyes uptake percentage of the treated PET fabrics was observed to increase as twice as much of untreated fabric. The color strength rate was increased more than 20%. The reducing of the water contact angle and the raising of the capillary height of treated PET fabric strip indicate its hydrophilicity improvement. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) results display nano to micro size of etching pits appeared uniformly on the fiber surface of the treated PET. Simultaneously, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicates an increase of the oxygen content in the surface caused by the introduction of polar groups such as C=O and COOH. The rough surface with improved polar oxygen groups showed hydrophilicity and affinity to C.I. dispersive dyes and is believed to be caused by the strong and very fine

  16. Simulating Flow and Dispersion by Using WRF-CFD Coupled Model in a Built-Up Area of Shenyang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijia Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented from a series of numerical studies designed to investigate the atmospheric boundary layer structure, ambient wind, and pollutant source location and their impacts on the wind field and pollutant distribution within the built-up areas of Shenyang, China. Two models, namely, Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation (OpenFOAM software package and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model, are used in the present study. Then the high resolution computational fluid dynamics (CFD numerical experiments were performed under the typical simulated atmospheric boundary conditions. It was found that the atmospheric boundary structure played a crucial role in the pollution within the building cluster, which determined the potential turbulent diffusion ability of the atmospheric surface layer; the change of the ambient wind direction can significantly affect the dispersion pattern of pollutants, which was a more sensitive factor than the ambient wind speed; under a given atmospheric state, the location of the pollution sources would dramatically determine the pollution patterns within built-up areas. The WRF-CFD numerical evaluation is a reliable method to understand the complicated flow and dispersion within built-up areas.

  17. Operational Generation of Urban Wind Fields to Support Transport and Dispersion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, J. H.; Sheu, R.; Brown, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    A realistic wind field is a key component to any transport and dispersion model simulation. In the urban environment observing the wind field accurately is complicated by the presence of the building structures themselves. In situ measurements are only representative over a limited area near the point of observation due to the influence of nearby buildings. Winds observed remotely, via radar or lidar, have good spatial resolution, but are limited to making measurements above rooftop. The Urban Shield project is an emergency response system for hazardous atmospheric releases in Arlington County Virginia. To provide building aware wind fields over a 100 square kilometer area for transport and dispersion modeling we use a combined approach of remotely sensed wind observations and very high resolution, ~10 meters, diagnostic wind modeling. In brief, the system uses 3-D wind analyses from Doppler radar and lidar as input to Los Alamos National Laboratory's QUIC-Urb empirical wind model. An overview of the system and results will be presented.

  18. Circulation and microplastic dispersion in the Chiemsee (Germany) investigated with numerical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcello Falcieri, Francesco; Laforsch, Christian; Piehl, Sarah; Ricchi, Antonio; Atwood, Elizabeth C.; Carniel, Sandro; Sclavo, Mauro

    2017-04-01

    The Chiemsee (measuring about 80 km2 and a maximum depth of 73 m) is a NATURA 2000 site and one of the major German lakes and plays a significant environmental role for the region. Moreover it is an important touristic destination, making its beaches and water quality highly valuable from a socio-economical viewpoint. As for most inland European aquatic environments, the Chiemsee was recently found to be contaminated by microplastic (i.e. plastic fragments smaller than 0.5 mm). Two main microplastics sources were identified in the Chiemsee: riverine inputs, and degradation of litter from touristic beaches. Hence, it is of interest to study lake circulation and the resulting microplastic dispersion from these sources in order to support activities to achieve a good environmental status. Here we present the first attempt to characterize the hydrodynamic processes of the Chiemsee with a high resolution 3D implementation of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). The simulations were forced with observed riverine inputs and modeled atmospherical fields computed with a local implementation of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Modeling results provide a first insight into the Chiemsee circulation system and contribute to understanding the dispersion pathways of microplastic particles from different sources. Furthermore, results can be used to highlight coastlines with higher risk of microplastic accumulation, identified using a set of Lagrangian simulations. The work was partially supported by the CNR Short Term Mobility grant.

  19. Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    ARL-TR-8155 ● SEP 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model... Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model) by Clayton Walker and Gail Vaucher Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL...2017 June 28 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ROTC Internship

  20. Placing Local Aggregations in a Larger-Scale Context: Hierarchical Modeling of Black-Footed Albatross Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, P E; Jahncke, J; Hyrenbach, K D

    2016-01-01

    At-sea surveys facilitate the study of the distribution and abundance of marine birds along standardized transects, in relation to changes in the local environmental conditions and large-scale oceanographic forcing. We analyzed the form and the intensity of black-footed albatross (Phoebastria nigripes: BFAL) spatial dispersion off central California, using five years (2004-2008) of vessel-based surveys of seven replicated survey lines. We related BFAL patchiness to local, regional and basin-wide oceanographic variability using two complementary approaches: a hypothesis-based model and an exploratory analysis. The former tested the strength and sign of hypothesized BFAL responses to environmental variability, within a hierarchical atmosphere-ocean context. The latter explored BFAL cross-correlations with atmospheric / oceanographic variables. While albatross dispersion was not significantly explained by the hierarchical model, the exploratory analysis revealed that aggregations were influenced by static (latitude, depth) and dynamic (wind speed, upwelling) environmental variables. Moreover, the largest BFAL patches occurred along the survey lines with the highest densities, and in association with shallow banks. In turn, the highest BFAL densities occurred during periods of negative Pacific Decadal Oscillation index values and low atmospheric pressure. The exploratory analyses suggest that BFAL dispersion is influenced by basin-wide, regional-scale and local environmental variability. Furthermore, the hypothesis-based model highlights that BFAL do not respond to oceanographic variability in a hierarchical fashion. Instead, their distributions shift more strongly in response to large-scale ocean-atmosphere forcing. Thus, interpreting local changes in BFAL abundance and dispersion requires considering diverse environmental forcing operating at multiple scales.

  1. Placing Local Aggregations in a Larger-Scale Context: Hierarchical Modeling of Black-Footed Albatross Dispersion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P E Michael

    Full Text Available At-sea surveys facilitate the study of the distribution and abundance of marine birds along standardized transects, in relation to changes in the local environmental conditions and large-scale oceanographic forcing. We analyzed the form and the intensity of black-footed albatross (Phoebastria nigripes: BFAL spatial dispersion off central California, using five years (2004-2008 of vessel-based surveys of seven replicated survey lines. We related BFAL patchiness to local, regional and basin-wide oceanographic variability using two complementary approaches: a hypothesis-based model and an exploratory analysis. The former tested the strength and sign of hypothesized BFAL responses to environmental variability, within a hierarchical atmosphere-ocean context. The latter explored BFAL cross-correlations with atmospheric / oceanographic variables. While albatross dispersion was not significantly explained by the hierarchical model, the exploratory analysis revealed that aggregations were influenced by static (latitude, depth and dynamic (wind speed, upwelling environmental variables. Moreover, the largest BFAL patches occurred along the survey lines with the highest densities, and in association with shallow banks. In turn, the highest BFAL densities occurred during periods of negative Pacific Decadal Oscillation index values and low atmospheric pressure. The exploratory analyses suggest that BFAL dispersion is influenced by basin-wide, regional-scale and local environmental variability. Furthermore, the hypothesis-based model highlights that BFAL do not respond to oceanographic variability in a hierarchical fashion. Instead, their distributions shift more strongly in response to large-scale ocean-atmosphere forcing. Thus, interpreting local changes in BFAL abundance and dispersion requires considering diverse environmental forcing operating at multiple scales.

  2. Atmospheric discharge and dispersion of radionuclides during the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Part I: Source term estimation and local-scale atmospheric dispersion in early phase of the accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katata, Genki; Ota, Masakazu; Terada, Hiroaki; Chino, Masamichi; Nagai, Haruyasu

    2012-07-01

    The atmospheric release of (131)I and (137)Cs in the early phase of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP1) accident from March 12 to 14, 2011 was estimated by combining environmental data with atmospheric dispersion simulations under the assumption of a unit release rate (1 Bq h(-1)). For the simulation, WSPEEDI-II computer-based nuclear emergency response system was used. Major releases of (131)I (>10(15) Bq h(-1)) were estimated when air dose rates increased in FNPP1 during the afternoon on March 12 after the hydrogen explosion of Unit 1 and late at night on March 14. The high-concentration plumes discharged during these periods flowed to the northwest and south-southwest directions of FNPP1, respectively. These plumes caused a large amount of dry deposition on the ground surface along their routes. Overall, the spatial pattern of (137)Cs and the increases in the air dose rates observed at the monitoring posts around FNPP1 were reproduced by WSPEEDI-II using estimated release rates. The simulation indicated that air dose rates significantly increased in the south-southwest region of FNPP1 by dry deposition of the high-concentration plume discharged from the night of March 14 to the morning of March 15. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mercury Dispersion Modeling And Purge Ventilation Stack Height Determination For Tank 40H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Giboyeaux, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-05-19

    The SRNL Atmospheric Technologies Group performed an analysis for mercury emissions from H-Tank Farm - Tank 40 ventilation system exhaust in order to assess whether the Short Term Exposure Limit (STEL), or Threshold Limit Value (TLV) levels for mercury will be exceeded during bulk sludge slurry mixing and sludge removal operations. The American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) was used as the main dispersion modelling tool for this analysis. The results indicated that a 45-foot stack is sufficient to raise the plume centerline from the Tank 40 release to prevent mercury exposure problems for any of the stack discharge scenarios provided. However, a 42-foot stack at Tank 40 is sufficient to prevent mercury exposure concerns in all emission scenarios except the 50 mg/m3 release. At a 42-foot stack height, values exceeding the exposure standards are only measured on receptors located above 34 feet.

  4. Development of a tool for calculating early internal doses in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident based on atmospheric dispersion simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Kunishima, Naoaki; Tani, Kotaro; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Furuyama, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Shozo; Akashi, Makoto

    2017-09-01

    A tool was developed to facilitate the calculation of the early internal doses to residents involved in the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster based on atmospheric transport and dispersion model (ATDM) simulations performed using Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Information 2nd version (WSPEEDI-II) together with personal behavior data containing the history of the whereabouts of individul's after the accident. The tool generates hourly-averaged air concentration data for the simulation grids nearest to an individual's whereabouts using WSPEEDI-II datasets for the subsequent calculation of internal doses due to inhalation. This paper presents an overview of the developed tool and provides tentative comparisons between direct measurement-based and ATDM-based results regarding the internal doses received by 421 persons from whom personal behavior data available.

  5. Development of a tool for calculating early internal doses in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident based on atmospheric dispersion simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurihara Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A tool was developed to facilitate the calculation of the early internal doses to residents involved in the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster based on atmospheric transport and dispersion model (ATDM simulations performed using Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Information 2nd version (WSPEEDI-II together with personal behavior data containing the history of the whereabouts of individul’s after the accident. The tool generates hourly-averaged air concentration data for the simulation grids nearest to an individual’s whereabouts using WSPEEDI-II datasets for the subsequent calculation of internal doses due to inhalation. This paper presents an overview of the developed tool and provides tentative comparisons between direct measurement-based and ATDM-based results regarding the internal doses received by 421 persons from whom personal behavior data available.

  6. Use of dispersion modelling for Environmental Impact Assessment of biological air pollution from composting: Progress, problems and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P; Hayes, E T; Williams, W B; Tyrrel, S F; Kinnersley, R P; Walsh, K; O'Driscoll, M; Longhurst, P J; Pollard, S J T; Drew, G H

    2017-12-01

    With the increase in composting asa sustainable waste management option, biological air pollution (bioaerosols) from composting facilities have become a cause of increasing concern due to their potential health impacts. Estimating community exposure to bioaerosols is problematic due to limitations in current monitoring methods. Atmospheric dispersion modelling can be used to estimate exposure concentrations, however several issues arise from the lack of appropriate bioaerosol data to use as inputs into models, and the complexity of the emission sources at composting facilities. This paper analyses current progress in using dispersion models for bioaerosols, examines the remaining problems and provides recommendations for future prospects in this area. A key finding is the urgent need for guidance for model users to ensure consistent bioaerosol modelling practices. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling of dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, Harald

    1998-08-01

    A general two-fluid model is derived and applied in CFD computations to various test cases of important industrial multiphase flows. It is general in the sense of its applicability to dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flows. The model is limited to isothermal flow without mass transfer and only one particle phase is described. The instantaneous fluid phase equations, including the phase interaction terms, are derived from a volume averaging technique, and the instantaneous particle phase equations are derived from the kinetic theory of granular material. Whereas the averaging procedure, the treatment of the interaction terms, and the kinetic theory approach have been reported in literature prior to this work the combination of the approaches is new. The resulting equations are derived without ambiguity in the interpretation of the particle phase pressure (equation-of-state of particle phase). The basic modeling for the particle phase is improved in two steps. Because in the basic modeling only stresses due to kinetic and collisional interactions are included, a simple model for an effective viscosity is developed in order to allow also frictional stresses within the particle phase. Moreover, turbulent stresses and turbulent dispersion of particles play often an important role for the transport processes. Therefore in a second step, a two-equation turbulence model for both fluid and particle phase turbulence is derived by applying the phasic average to the instantaneous equations. The resulting k-{epsilon}-k{sup d}-{epsilon}{sup d} model is new. Mathematical closure is attempted such that the resulting set of equations is valid for both dilute arid dense flows. During the development of the closure relations a clear distinction is made between granular or ''viscous'' microscale fluctuations and turbulent macro scale fluctuations (true particle turbulence) within the particle phase. The set of governing equations is discretized by using a

  8. A model for radiological consequences of nuclear power plant operational atmospheric releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocar, Cemil; Sökmen, Cemal Niyazi

    2009-01-01

    A dynamic dose and risk assessment model is developed to estimate radiological consequences of atmospheric emissions from nuclear power plants. Internal exposure via inhalation and ingestion, external exposure from clouds and radioactivity deposited on the ground are included in the model. The model allows to simulate interregional moves of people and multi-location food supply in the computational domain. Any long-range atmospheric dispersion model which yields radionuclide concentrations in air and on the ground at predetermined time intervals can easily be integrated into the model. The software developed is validated against radionuclide concentrations measured in different environmental media and dose values estimated after the Chernobyl accident. Results obtained using the model compare well with dose estimates and activities measured in foodstuffs and feedstuffs.

  9. Effect of Additional Structure on Effective Stack Height of Gas Dispersion in Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenobu Michioka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wind-tunnel experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of additional structure (building, sea wall and banking on the effective stack height, which is usually used in safety analyses of nuclear power facilities in Japan. The effective stack heights were estimated with and without the additional structure in addition to the reactor building while varying several conditions such as the source height, the height of additional structure and the distance between the source position and the additional structure. When the source height is equivalent to the reactor building height, the additional structure enhances both the vertical and horizontal gas dispersion widths and decreases the ground gas concentration, and it means that the additional structure does not decrease the effective stack height. When the source height is larger than the reactor height, the additional structures might affect the effective stack height. As the distance between the source and the additional structure decreases, or as the height of the additional structure increases, the structure has a larger effect on the effective stack height.

  10. Enhanced air dispersion modelling at a typical Chinese nuclear power plant site: Coupling RIMPUFF with two advanced diagnostic wind models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Li, Hong; Sun, Sida; Fang, Sheng

    2017-09-01

    An enhanced air dispersion modelling scheme is proposed to cope with the building layout and complex terrain of a typical Chinese nuclear power plant (NPP) site. In this modelling, the California Meteorological Model (CALMET) and the Stationary Wind Fit and Turbulence (SWIFT) are coupled with the Risø Mesoscale PUFF model (RIMPUFF) for refined wind field calculation. The near-field diffusion coefficient correction scheme of the Atmospheric Relative Concentrations in the Building Wakes Computer Code (ARCON96) is adopted to characterize dispersion in building arrays. The proposed method is evaluated by a wind tunnel experiment that replicates the typical Chinese NPP site. For both wind speed/direction and air concentration, the enhanced modelling predictions agree well with the observations. The fraction of the predictions within a factor of 2 and 5 of observations exceeds 55% and 82% respectively in the building area and the complex terrain area. This demonstrates the feasibility of the new enhanced modelling for typical Chinese NPP sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Atomic hydrogen distribution. [in Titan atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarie, N.

    1974-01-01

    Several possible H2 vertical distributions in Titan's atmosphere are considered with the constraint of 5 km-A a total quantity. Approximative calculations show that hydrogen distribution is quite sensitive to two other parameters of Titan's atmosphere: the temperature and the presence of other constituents. The escape fluxes of H and H2 are also estimated as well as the consequent distributions trapped in the Saturnian system.

  12. Atmospheric Modeling Using Accelerometer Data During Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Robert H.; Lugo, Rafael A.; Baird, Darren T.; Cianciolo, Alicia D.; Bougher, Stephen W.; Zurek, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft is a NASA orbiter designed to explore the Mars upper atmosphere, typically from 140 to 160 km altitude. In addition to the nominal science mission, MAVEN has performed several Deep Dip campaigns in which the orbit's closest point of approach, also called periapsis, was lowered to an altitude range of 115 to 135 km. MAVEN accelerometer data were used during mission operations to estimate atmospheric parameters such as density, scale height, along-track gradients, and wave structures. Density and scale height estimates were compared against those obtained from the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model and used to aid the MAVEN navigation team in planning maneuvers to raise and lower periapsis during Deep Dip operations. This paper describes the processes used to reconstruct atmosphere parameters from accelerometers data and presents the results of their comparison to model and navigation-derived values.

  13. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasyanos, M E

    2008-05-15

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  14. A CFD model for pollutant dispersion in rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modenesi K.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that humankind will experience a water shortage in the coming decades. It is therefore paramount to develop new techniques and models with a view to minimizing the impact of pollution. It is important to predict the environmental impact of new emissions in rivers, especially during periods of drought. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD has proved to be an invaluable tool to develop models able to analyze in detail particle dispersion in rivers. However, since these models generate grids with thousands (even millions of points to evaluate velocities and concentrations, they still require powerful machines. In this context, this work contributes by presenting a new three-dimensional model based on CFD techniques specifically developed to be fast, providing a significant improvement in performance. It is able to generate predictions in a couple of hours for a one-thousand-meter long section of river using Pentium IV computers. Commercial CFD packages would require weeks to solve the same problem. Another innovation inb this work is that a half channel with a constant elliptical cross section represents the river, so the Navier Stokes equations were derived for the elliptical system. Experimental data were obtained from REPLAN (PETROBRAS refining unit on the Atibaia River in São Paulo, Brazil. The results show good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Mesoscale, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, O.

    1994-01-01

    Projektet Mesoscales, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere er opdelt i 3 delprojekter: Sources - farmland, Sources - sea og Sources - biogenic nitrogen.......Projektet Mesoscales, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere er opdelt i 3 delprojekter: Sources - farmland, Sources - sea og Sources - biogenic nitrogen....

  16. Improving volcanic ash predictions with the HYSPLIT dispersion model by assimilating MODIS satellite retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Tianfeng; Crawford, Alice; Stunder, Barbara; Pavolonis, Michael J.; Draxler, Roland; Stein, Ariel

    2017-02-01

    Currently, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) runs the HYSPLIT dispersion model with a unit mass release rate to predict the transport and dispersion of volcanic ash. The model predictions provide information for the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) to issue advisories to meteorological watch offices, area control centers, flight information centers, and others. This research aims to provide quantitative forecasts of ash distributions generated by objectively and optimally estimating the volcanic ash source strengths, vertical distribution, and temporal variations using an observation-modeling inversion technique. In this top-down approach, a cost functional is defined to quantify the differences between the model predictions and the satellite measurements of column-integrated ash concentrations weighted by the model and observation uncertainties. Minimizing this cost functional by adjusting the sources provides the volcanic ash emission estimates. As an example, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite retrievals of the 2008 Kasatochi volcanic ash clouds are used to test the HYSPLIT volcanic ash inverse system. Because the satellite retrievals include the ash cloud top height but not the bottom height, there are different model diagnostic choices for comparing the model results with the observed mass loadings. Three options are presented and tested. Although the emission estimates vary significantly with different options, the subsequent model predictions with the different release estimates all show decent skill when evaluated against the unassimilated satellite observations at later times. Among the three options, integrating over three model layers yields slightly better results than integrating from the surface up to the observed volcanic ash cloud top or using a single model layer. Inverse tests also show that including the ash-free region to constrain the model is not

  17. Prestack Parallel Modeling of Dispersive and Attenuative Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    How-Wei Chen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an efficient parallelized staggered grid pseudospectral method for 2-D viscoacoustic seismic waveform modeling that runs in a highperformance multi-processor computer and an in-house developed PC cluster. Parallel simulation permits several processors to be used for solving a single large problem with a high computation to communication ratio. Thus, parallelizing the serial scheme effectively reduces the computation time. Computational results indicate a reasonably consistent parallel performance when using different FFTs in pseudospectral computations. Meanwhile, a virtually perfect linear speedup can be achieved in a distributed- memory multi-processor environment. Effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated using synthetic examples by simulating multiple shot gathers consistent with field coordinates. For dispersive and attenuating media, the propagating wavefield possesses the observable differences in waveform, amplitude and travel-times. The resulting effects on seismic signals, such as the decreased amplitude because of intrinsic Q and temporal shift because of physical dispersion phenomena, can be analyzed quantitatively. Anelastic effects become more visible owing to cumulative propagation effects. Field data application is presented in simulating OBS wide-angle seismic marine data for deep crustal structure study. The fine details of deep crustal velocity and attenuation structures in the survey area can be resolved by comparing simulated waveforms with observed seismograms recorded at various distances. Parallel performance is analyzed through speedup and efficiency for a variety of computing platforms. Effective parallel implementation requires numerous independent CPU intensive sub-jobs with low latency and high bandwidth inter-processor communication.

  18. Identification and elucidation of anthropogenic source contribution in PM10 pollutant: Insight gain from dispersion and receptor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debananda; Singh, Gurdeep; Yadav, Pankaj

    2016-10-01

    Source apportionment study of PM10 (Particulate Matter) in a critically polluted area of Jharia coalfield, India has been carried out using Dispersion model, Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) techniques. Dispersion model Atmospheric Dispersion Model (AERMOD) was introduced to simplify the complexity of sources in Jharia coalfield. PCA and CMB analysis indicates that monitoring stations near the mining area were mainly affected by the emission from open coal mining and its associated activities such as coal transportation, loading and unloading of coal. Mine fire emission also contributed a considerable amount of particulate matters in monitoring stations. Locations in the city area were mostly affected by vehicular, Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG) & Diesel Generator (DG) set emissions, residential, and commercial activities. The experimental data sampling and their analysis could aid understanding how dispersion based model technique along with receptor model based concept can be strategically used for quantitative analysis of Natural and Anthropogenic sources of PM10. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Proposed reference models for atomic oxygen in the terrestrial atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, E. J.; Mcdade, I. C.; Lockerbie, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    A provisional Atomic Oxygen Reference model was derived from average monthly ozone profiles and the MSIS-86 reference model atmosphere. The concentrations are presented in tabular form for the altitude range 40 to 130 km.

  20. Source identification of total mercury (TM) wet deposition using a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yong-Seok; Han, Young-Ji; Holsen, Thomas M.; Choi, Eunhwa; Zoh, Kyung-Duk; Yi, Seung-Muk

    2015-03-01

    Event-based precipitation samples for total mercury (TM) were collected with a modified MIC-B sampler concurrent with atmospheric gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and particulate bound mercury (PBM) concentrations in Seoul, Korea from January 2006 to December 2009 to: 1) determine the seasonal variations in TM wet deposition, 2) investigate contributions of GOM and PBM scavenging to mercury wet deposition, and 3) identify source areas contributing to the high TM wet deposition using a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM). The volume-weighted mean (VWM) TM concentration was highest in winter, while the wet deposition flux was highest in summer. Multiple linear regression showed that the scavenging coefficient (SC) for GOM was much higher than the SC for PBM indicating that GOM was more effectively scavenged by wet deposition than PBM. Joint-probability LPDM (JP-LPDM) indicated that the main sources of TM wet deposition were the industrial and coastal areas in China and Japan.

  1. Plume dispersion in four pine thinning scenarios: development of a simple pheromone dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly Peterson; Harold Thistle; Brian Lamb; Gene Allwine; Steve Edburg; Brian Strom

    2010-01-01

    A unique field campaign was conducted in 2004 to examine how changes in stand density may affect dispersion of insect pheromones in forest canopies. Over a l4-day period, 126 tracer tests were performed, and conditions ranged from an unthinned loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) canopy through a series of thinning scenarios with basal areas of32.l, 23.0, and 16.1 m2ha-l.ln...

  2. Advances and Problems in Mathematical Modelling of Dispersion of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most expressions for dispersion of pollutants have failed to give accurate predictions in both channel and natural stream flows. This paper outlines the basic concepts on which the fundamental dispersion equations have been derived. Some of the advances on these equations are examined and their deficiencies pointed ...

  3. Evaluation of a coupled dispersion and aerosol process model against measurements near a major road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjola, M. A.; Pirjola, L.; Karppinen, A.; Härkönen, J.; Ketzel, M.; Kukkonen, J.

    2007-02-01

    A field measurement campaign was conducted near a major road "Itäväylä" in an urban area in Helsinki in 17-20 February 2003. Aerosol measurements were conducted using a mobile laboratory "Sniffer" at various distances from the road, and at an urban background location. Measurements included particle size distribution in the size range of 7 nm-10 μm (aerodynamic diameter) by the Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) and in the size range of 3-50 nm (mobility diameter) by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), total number concentration of particles larger than 3 nm detected by an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC), temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, driving route of the mobile laboratory, and traffic density on the studied road. In this study, we have compared measured concentration data with the predictions of the road network dispersion model CAR-FMI used in combination with an aerosol process model MONO32. The vehicular exhaust emissions, and atmospheric dispersion and transformation of fine and ultrafine particles was evaluated within the distance scale of 200 m (corresponding to a time scale of a couple of minutes). We computed the temporal evolution of the number concentrations, size distributions and chemical compositions of various particle size classes. The atmospheric dilution rate of particles is obtained from the roadside dispersion model CAR-FMI. Considering the evolution of total number concentration, dilution was shown to be the most important process. The influence of coagulation and condensation on the number concentrations of particle size modes was found to be negligible at this distance scale. Condensation was found to affect the evolution of particle diameter in the two smallest particle modes. The assumed value of the concentration of condensable organic vapour of 1012 molecules cm-3 was shown to be in a disagreement with the measured particle size evolution, while the modelling runs with the

  4. Modeling the effects of atmospheric emissions on groundwater composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Theresa Jean [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A composite model of atmospheric, unsaturated and groundwater transport is developed to evaluate the processes determining the distribution of atmospherically derived contaminants in groundwater systems and to test the sensitivity of simulated contaminant concentrations to input parameters and model linkages. One application is to screen specific atmospheric emissions for their potential in determining groundwater age. Temporal changes in atmospheric emissions could provide a recognizable pattern in the groundwater system. The model also provides a way for quantifying the significance of uncertainties in the tracer source term and transport parameters on the contaminant distribution in the groundwater system, an essential step in using the distribution of contaminants from local, point source atmospheric emissions to examine conceptual models of groundwater flow and transport.

  5. Modelling substorm chorus events in terms of dispersive azimuthal drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Collier

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Substorm Chorus Event (SCE is a radio phenomenon observed on the ground after the onset of the substorm expansion phase. It consists of a band of VLF chorus with rising upper and lower cutoff frequencies. These emissions are thought to result from Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between whistler mode waves and energetic electrons which drift into a ground station's field of view from an injection site around midnight. The increasing frequency of the emission envelope has been attributed to the combined effects of energy dispersion due to gradient and curvature drifts, and the modification of resonance conditions and variation of the half-gyrofrequency cutoff resulting from the radial component of the ExB drift. A model is presented which accounts for the observed features of the SCE in terms of the growth rate of whistler mode waves due to anisotropy in the electron distribution. This model provides an explanation for the increasing frequency of the SCE lower cutoff, as well as reproducing the general frequency-time signature of the event. In addition, the results place some restrictions on the injected particle source distribution which might lead to a SCE. Key words. Space plasma physics (Wave-particle interaction – Magnetospheric physics (Plasma waves and instabilities; Storms and substorms

  6. Modelling substorm chorus events in terms of dispersive azimuthal drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Collier

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Substorm Chorus Event (SCE is a radio phenomenon observed on the ground after the onset of the substorm expansion phase. It consists of a band of VLF chorus with rising upper and lower cutoff frequencies. These emissions are thought to result from Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between whistler mode waves and energetic electrons which drift into a ground station's field of view from an injection site around midnight. The increasing frequency of the emission envelope has been attributed to the combined effects of energy dispersion due to gradient and curvature drifts, and the modification of resonance conditions and variation of the half-gyrofrequency cutoff resulting from the radial component of the ExB drift.

    A model is presented which accounts for the observed features of the SCE in terms of the growth rate of whistler mode waves due to anisotropy in the electron distribution. This model provides an explanation for the increasing frequency of the SCE lower cutoff, as well as reproducing the general frequency-time signature of the event. In addition, the results place some restrictions on the injected particle source distribution which might lead to a SCE.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (Wave-particle interaction – Magnetospheric physics (Plasma waves and instabilities; Storms and substorms

  7. Radioactive Dispersive Device (RDD) Bomb Modeling in Cities for Emergency Response Using the QUIC Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, N. M.; Elson, J. S.; Brown, M. J.; Williams, M. D.; Mitchell, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    The Quick Urban and Industrial Complex (QUIC) dispersion modeling system was developed as a rapid dispersion analysis tool to examine concentration and deposition patterns from a variety of chemical, biological, and radiological release sources. One of the model's modules produces an approximated three-dimensional wind field around buildings using an empirical diagnostic approach. A second module calculates the contaminant transport and dispersion using an urbanized Lagrangian random-walk dispersion model, incorporating gradient diffusion and non-local mixing to produce building-induced turbulence. QUIC's GUI includes a city builder for creating building domains, a meteorology builder to specify wind profiles, and a source GUI for location(s), geometry, type, and amount of release. Recent code improvements include the ability to release, track, and deposit particles of multiple size distribution, an explosive release accompanied by a buoyant plume, and a post-processing Depositional calculator, which sums deposition on horizontal and vertical surfaces, as a function of particle size bins. Los Alamos National Laboratory and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have worked to formulate hypothetical RDD urban releases with the objective of a pre-emptive prediction of contaminant air concentrations, their dispersion, and subsequent surface contaminant deposition, and relate these concentrations to the Protective Action Guides for emergency response and clean-up concentration metrics, with provided examples. We will discuss model development, applications, and direction for further research.

  8. Modeling atmospheric deposition using a stochastic transport model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R.L.

    1999-12-17

    An advanced stochastic transport model has been modified to include the removal mechanisms of dry and wet deposition. Time-dependent wind and turbulence fields are generated with a prognostic mesoscale numerical model and are used to advect and disperse individually released particles that are each assigned a mass. These particles are subjected to mass reduction in two ways depending on their physical location. Particles near the surface experience a decrease in mass using the concept of a dry deposition velocity, while the mass of particles located within areas of precipitation are depleted using a scavenging coefficient. Two levels of complexity are incorporated into the particle model. The simple case assumes constant values of dry deposition velocity and scavenging coefficient, while the more complex case varies the values according to meteorology, surface conditions, release material, and precipitation intensity. Instantaneous and cumulative dry and wet deposition are determined from the mass loss due to these physical mechanisms. A useful means of validating the model results is with data available from a recent accidental release of Cesium-137 from a steel-processing furnace in Algeciras, Spain in May, 1998. This paper describes the deposition modeling technique, as well as a comparison of simulated concentration and deposition with measurements taken for the Algeciras release.

  9. Dispersed plug flow model for upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors with focus on granular sludge dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalyuzhnyi, S.V.; Fedorovich, V.V.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A new approach to model upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB)-reactors, referred to as a one-dimensional dispersed plug flow model, was developed. This model focusses on the granular sludge dynamics along the reactor height, based on the balance between dispersion, sedimentation and convection using

  10. Evaluating Force-Field London Dispersion Coefficients Using the Exchange-Hole Dipole Moment Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebifar, Mohamad; Johnson, Erin R; Rowley, Christopher N

    2017-12-12

    London dispersion interactions play an integral role in materials science and biophysics. Force fields for atomistic molecular simulations typically represent dispersion interactions by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential using empirically determined parameters. These parameters are generally underdetermined, and there is no straightforward way to test if they are physically realistic. Alternatively, the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) model from density-functional theory predicts atomic and molecular London dispersion coefficients from first principles, providing an innovative strategy to validate the dispersion terms of molecular-mechanical force fields. In this work, the XDM model was used to obtain the London dispersion coefficients of 88 organic molecules relevant to biochemistry and pharmaceutical chemistry and the values compared with those derived from the Lennard-Jones parameters of the CGenFF, GAFF, OPLS, and Drude polarizable force fields. The molecular dispersion coefficients for the CGenFF, GAFF, and OPLS models are systematically higher than the XDM-calculated values by a factor of roughly 1.5, likely due to neglect of higher order dispersion terms and premature truncation of the dispersion-energy summation. The XDM dispersion coefficients span a large range for some molecular-mechanical atom types, suggesting an unrecognized source of error in force-field models, which assume that atoms of the same type have the same dispersion interactions. Agreement with the XDM dispersion coefficients is even poorer for the Drude polarizable force field. Popular water models were also examined, and TIP3P was found to have dispersion coefficients similar to the experimental and XDM references, although other models employ anomalously high values. Finally, XDM-derived dispersion coefficients were used to parametrize molecular-mechanical force fields for five liquids-benzene, toluene, cyclohexane, n-pentane, and n-hexane-which resulted in improved accuracy in the

  11. Atmospheric muon simulation using the FLUKA MC Model

    CERN Document Server

    Battistoni, G; Muraro, S; Sala, P R

    2007-01-01

    The FLUKA code has been used to reproduce experimental data concerning muon fluxes in atmosphere in a wide energy range with the aim of testing the performance of this Monte Carlo model in predicting secondary cosmic ray spectra in atmosphere. Here new results are presented, concerning in particular the cases of BESS and L3+C experiments.

  12. Atmospheric muon simulation using the FLUKA MC Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battistoni, G. [INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy)], E-mail: battistoni@mi.infn.it; Ferrari, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Muraro, S.; Sala, P.R. [INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2007-06-15

    The FLUKA code has been used to reproduce experimental data concerning muon fluxes in atmosphere in a wide energy range with the aim of testing the performance of this Monte Carlo model in predicting secondary cosmic ray spectra in atmosphere. Here new results are presented, concerning in particular the cases of BESS and L3+C experiments.

  13. Ozone transmittance in a model atmosphere at Ikeja, Lagos state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variation of ozone transmittance with height in the atmosphere for radiation in the 9.6m absorption band was studied using Goody's model atmosphere, with cubic spline interpolation technique to improve the quality of the curve. The data comprising of pressure and temperature at different altitudes (0-22 km) for the month of ...

  14. UV- Radiation Absorption by Ozone in a Model Atmosphere using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UV- radiation absorption is studied through variation of ozone transmittance with altitude in the atmosphere for radiation in the 9.6μm absorption band using Goody's model atmosphere with cubic spline interpolation technique to improve the quality of the curve. The data comprising of pressure and temperature at different ...

  15. An overview of experimental results and dispersion modelling of nanoparticles in the wake of moving vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Carpentieri, M.; Kumar, P.; Robins, A.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the transformation of nanoparticles emitted from vehicles is essential for developing appropriate methods for treating fine scale particle dynamics in dispersion models. This article provides an overview of significant research work relevant to modelling the dispersion of pollutants, especially nanoparticles, in the wake of vehicles. Literature on vehicle wakes and nanoparticle dispersion is reviewed, taking into account field measurements, wind tunnel experiments and mathematic...

  16. Evaluation of two pollutant dispersion models over continental scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, D.; Walker, H.; Klepikova, N.; Kostrikov, A.; Zhuk, Y.

    Two long-range, emergency response models—one based on the particle-in-cell method of pollutant representation (ADPIC/U.S.) the other based on the superposition of Gaussian puffs released periodically in time (EXPRESS/Russia)—are evaluated using perfluorocarbon tracer data from the Across North America Tracer Experiment (ANATEX). The purpose of the study is to assess our current capabilities for simulating continental-scale dispersion processes and to use these assessments as a means to improve our modeling tools. The criteria for judging model performance are based on protocols devised by the Environmental Protection Agency and on other complementary tests. Most of these measures require the formation and analysis of surface concentration footprints (the surface manifestations of tracer clouds, which are sampled over 24-h intervals), whose dimensions, center-of-mass coordinates and integral characteristics provide a basis for comparing observed and calculated concentration distributions. Generally speaking, the plumes associated with the 20 releases of perfluorocarbon (10 each from sources at Glasgow, MT and St. Cloud, MN) in January 1987, are poorly resolved by the sampling network when the source-to-receptor distances are less than about 1000 km. Within this undersampled region, both models chronically overpredict the sampler concentrations. Given this tendency, the computed areas of the surface footprints and their integral concentrations are likewise excessive. When the actual plumes spread out sufficiently for reasonable resolution, the observed ( O) and calculated ( C) footprint areas are usually within a factor of two of one another, thereby suggesting that the models possess some skill in the prediction of long-range diffusion. Deviations in the O and C plume trajectories, as measured by the distances of separation between the plume centroids, are on the other of 125 km d -1 for both models. It appears that the inability of the models to simulate large

  17. MODELING DISPERSION FROM CHEMICALS RELEASED AFTER A TRAIN COLLISION IN GRANITEVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Addis, R; Matt Parker, M

    2006-08-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Weather INformation and Display (WIND) System was used to provide meteorological and atmospheric modeling/consequence assessment support to state and local agencies following the collision of two Norfolk Southern freight trains on the morning of January 6, 2005. This collision resulted in the release of several toxic chemicals to the environment, including chlorine. The dense and highly toxic cloud of chlorine gas that formed in the vicinity of the accident was responsible for nine fatalities, and caused injuries to more than five hundred others. Transport model results depicting the forecast path of the ongoing release were made available to emergency managers in the county's Unified Command Center shortly after SRNL received a request for assistance. Support continued over the ensuing two days of the active response. The SRNL also provided weather briefings and transport/consequence assessment model results to responders from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Emergency Operations Center (EOC), Department of Energy Headquarters, and hazmat teams dispatched from the SRS. Although model-generated forecast winds used in consequence assessments conducted during the incident were provided at 2-km horizontal grid spacing during the accident response, a high-resolution Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 4.3.0) simulation was later performed to examine potential influences of local topography on plume migration. The detailed RAMS simulation was used to determine meteorology using multiple grids with an innermost grid spacing of 125 meters. Results from the two simulations are shown to generally agree with meteorological observations at the time; consequently, local topography did not significantly affect wind in the area. Use of a dense gas dispersion model to simulate localized plume behavior using the higher resolution

  18. Future developments in modelling and monitoring of volcanic ash clouds: outcomes from the first IAVCEI-WMO workshop on Ash Dispersal Forecast and Civil Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadonna, Costanza; Folch, Arnau; Loughlin, Susan; Puempel, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the serious consequences of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption (Iceland) on civil aviation, 52 volcanologists, meteorologists, atmospheric dispersion modellers and space and ground-based monitoring specialists from 12 different countries (including representatives from 6 Volcanic Ash Advisory Centres and related institutions) gathered to discuss the needs of the ash dispersal modelling community, investigate new data-acquisition strategies (i.e. quantitative measurements and observations) and discuss how to improve communication between the research community and institutions with an operational mandate. Based on a dedicated benchmark exercise and on 3 days of in-depth discussion, recommendations have been made for future model improvements, new strategies of ash cloud forecasting, multidisciplinary data acquisition and more efficient communication between different communities. Issues addressed in the workshop include ash dispersal modelling, uncertainty, ensemble forecasting, combining dispersal models and observations, sensitivity analysis, model variability, data acquisition, pre-eruption forecasting, first simulation and data assimilation, research priorities and new communication strategies to improve information flow and operational routines. As a main conclusion, model developers, meteorologists, volcanologists and stakeholders need to work closely together to develop new and improved strategies for ash dispersal forecasting and, in particular, to: (1) improve the definition of the source term, (2) design models and forecasting strategies that can better characterize uncertainties, (3) explore and identify the best ensemble strategies that can be adapted to ash dispersal forecasting, (4) identify optimized strategies for the combination of models and observations and (5) implement new critical operational strategies.

  19. Dispersion Modeling and Characterization of Particulates from Land Application of Class B Biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Abhishek S.

    This study presents a comprehensive approach to understand the particle characteristics, identify the source profile, develop new equations for emission rates, analyze the source-receptor relationship, and develop and evaluate a numerical model for the dispersion and transport of particles released during the injection of biosolids. Two field studies were conducted in the summer of 2008 and 2009 to collect airborne particulate matter emitted during the injection application of class B biosolids. The sampling was carried out before (pre-application), during (application), and after (post-application) the application. The research work characterized the particulate emissions deposited on the aerosols spectrometer. The mass concentrations of fine (PM2.5) and ultrafine (PM 1.0) particles were highest during the pre-application. The mass concentration of thoracic fraction (PM2.5-10) increased significantly during the application. A bimodal size distribution was observed throughout the sampling. Nuclei mode formation was predominant during the pre-application and the post-application, whereas the accumulation mode was distinctive during the application. Airborne particles were collected on filter papers during the biosolids application process using an aerosol spectrometer. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) tool was used to analyze particles collected before, during, and after injection of biosolids. The major emphasis of the analysis was on providing in depth information on particle count, size, shape, morphology, and chemical composition. The particle count was significantly sensitive towards the different activities surrounding the application. The combination of SEM, particle analysis software, and EDS technique was capable of revealing detailed information on the size, shape, morphology, and chemical composition of individual particles. These techniques proved to be an effective non-destructive method for the

  20. Recent advances in non-LTE stellar atmosphere models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Andreas A. C.

    2017-11-01

    In the last decades, stellar atmosphere models have become a key tool in understanding massive stars. Applied for spectroscopic analysis, these models provide quantitative information on stellar wind properties as well as fundamental stellar parameters. The intricate non-LTE conditions in stellar winds dictate the development of adequate sophisticated model atmosphere codes. The increase in both, the computational power and our understanding of physical processes in stellar atmospheres, led to an increasing complexity in the models. As a result, codes emerged that can tackle a wide range of stellar and wind parameters. After a brief address of the fundamentals of stellar atmosphere modeling, the current stage of clumped and line-blanketed model atmospheres will be discussed. Finally, the path for the next generation of stellar atmosphere models will be outlined. Apart from discussing multi-dimensional approaches, I will emphasize on the coupling of hydrodynamics with a sophisticated treatment of the radiative transfer. This next generation of models will be able to predict wind parameters from first principles, which could open new doors for our understanding of the various facets of massive star physics, evolution, and death.

  1. Ensemble data assimilation in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedatella, N. M.; Raeder, K.; Anderson, J. L.; Liu, H.-L.

    2014-08-01

    We present results pertaining to the assimilation of real lower, middle, and upper atmosphere observations in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) using the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) ensemble adjustment Kalman filter. The ability to assimilate lower atmosphere observations of aircraft and radiosonde temperature and winds, satellite drift winds, and Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate refractivity along with middle/upper atmosphere temperature observations from SABER and Aura MLS is demonstrated. The WACCM+DART data assimilation system is shown to be able to reproduce the salient features, and variability, of the troposphere present in the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Re-Analysis. In the mesosphere, the fit of WACCM+DART to observations is found to be slightly worse when only lower atmosphere observations are assimilated compared to a control experiment that is reflective of the model climatological variability. This differs from previous results which found that assimilation of lower atmosphere observations improves the fit to mesospheric observations. This discrepancy is attributed to the fact that due to the gravity wave drag parameterizations, the model climatology differs significantly from the observations in the mesosphere, and this is not corrected by the assimilation of lower atmosphere observations. The fit of WACCM+DART to mesospheric observations is, however, significantly improved compared to the control experiment when middle/upper atmosphere observations are assimilated. We find that assimilating SABER observations reduces the root-mean-square error and bias of WACCM+DART relative to the independent Aura MLS observations by ˜50%, demonstrating that assimilation of middle/upper atmosphere observations is essential for accurate specification of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region in WACCM+DART. Last, we demonstrate that

  2. Modeling Smoke Plume-Rise and Dispersion from Southern United States Prescribed Burns with Daysmoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Talat Odman

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present Daysmoke, an empirical-statistical plume rise and dispersion model for simulating smoke from prescribed burns. Prescribed fires are characterized by complex plume structure including multiple-core updrafts which makes modeling with simple plume models difficult. Daysmoke accounts for plume structure in a three-dimensional veering/sheering atmospheric environment, multiple-core updrafts, and detrainment of particulate matter. The number of empirical coefficients appearing in the model theory is reduced through a sensitivity analysis with the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST. Daysmoke simulations for “bent-over” plumes compare closely with Briggs theory although the two-thirds law is not explicit in Daysmoke. However, the solutions for the “highly-tilted” plume characterized by weak buoyancy, low initial vertical velocity, and large initial plume diameter depart considerably from Briggs theory. Results from a study of weak plumes from prescribed burns at Fort Benning GA showed simulated ground-level PM2.5 comparing favorably with observations taken within the first eight kilometers of eleven prescribed burns. Daysmoke placed plume tops near the lower end of the range of observed plume tops for six prescribed burns. Daysmoke provides the levels and amounts of smoke injected into regional scale air quality models. Results from CMAQ with and without an adaptive grid are presented.

  3. On the construction of a regional atmospheric climate model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J. H.; Van Meijgaard, E.

    1992-01-01

    A Regional Atmospheric Climate Model which combines the physical parameterization package of the General Circulation or Climate Model (ECHAM) used at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, and the dynamics package of the Nordic - Dutch - Irish Limited Area Model (HIRLAM), has been...... developed. The necessary changes applied to both model packages in order to obtain a working code are described. -from Authors...

  4. Dispersal distances for airborne spores based on deposition rates and stochastic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockmarr, Anders; Andreasen, Viggo; Østergård, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    A new modeling framework for particle dispersal is explored in the context of the particles being fungal spores dispersed within a field. The model gives rise to both exponentially decreasing and polynomially decreasing two-dimensional densities of deposited fungal spores. We reformulate the mode...

  5. AN ANALYTIC RADIATIVE-CONVECTIVE MODEL FOR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Tyler D. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Catling, David C., E-mail: robinson@astro.washington.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195-1310 (United States)

    2012-09-20

    We present an analytic one-dimensional radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power-law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric-pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries; (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunlight throughout the atmosphere, which we show can produce either shallow or deep radiative-convective boundaries, depending on the strength of sunlight attenuation; and (3) strongly irradiated giant planets (including hot Jupiters), where we explore the conditions under which these worlds acquire detached convective regions in their mid-tropospheres. Finally, we validate our model and demonstrate its utility through comparisons to the average observed thermal structure of Venus, Jupiter, and Titan, and by comparing computed flux profiles to more complex models.

  6. GrayStarServer: Stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, C. Ian

    2017-01-01

    GrayStarServer is a stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis code of pedagogical accuracy that is accessible in any web browser on commonplace computational devices and that runs on a timescale of a few seconds.

  7. Venus Global Reference Atmospheric Model Status and Planned Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justh, H. L.; Dwyer Cianciolo, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    Details the current status of Venus Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Venus-GRAM). Provides new sources of data and upgrades that need to be incorporated to maintain credibility and identifies options and features that could increase capability.

  8. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 7-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the island of Guam at...

  9. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 7-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the islands of Samoa at...

  10. Atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module. Model description version 2.8.0; ARTM. Atmosphaerisches Radionuklid-Transport-Modell mit Radon Postprozessor und SBG-Modul. Modellbeschreibung zu Version 2.8.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Cornelia; Sogalla, Martin; Thielen, Harald; Martens, Reinhard

    2015-04-20

    The study on the atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module (model description version 2.8.0) covers the following issues: determination of emissions, radioactive decay, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive gases, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive dusts, determination of the gamma cloud radiation (gamma submersion), terrain roughness, effective source height, calculation area and model points, geographic reference systems and coordinate transformations, meteorological data, use of invalid meteorological data sets, consideration of statistical uncertainties, consideration of housings, consideration of bumpiness, consideration of terrain roughness, use of frequency distributions of the hourly dispersion situation, consideration of the vegetation period (summer), the radon post processor radon.exe, the SBG module, modeling of wind fields, shading settings.

  11. Meteorological Modeling Using the WRF-ARW Model for Grand Bay Intensive Studies of Atmospheric Mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Ngan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Measurements at the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve support a range of research activities aimed at improving the understanding of the atmospheric fate and transport of mercury. Routine monitoring was enhanced by two intensive measurement periods conducted at the site in summer 2010 and spring 2011. Detailed meteorological data are required to properly represent the weather conditions, to determine the transport and dispersion of plumes and to understand the wet and dry deposition of mercury. To describe the mesoscale features that might influence future plume calculations for mercury episodes during the Grand Bay Intensive campaigns, fine-resolution meteorological simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model were conducted with various initialization and nudging configurations. The WRF simulations with nudging generated reasonable results in comparison with conventional observations in the region and measurements obtained at the Grand Bay site, including surface and sounding data. The grid nudging, together with observational nudging, had a positive effect on wind prediction. However, the nudging of mass fields (temperature and moisture led to overestimates of precipitation, which may introduce significant inaccuracies if the data were to be used for subsequent atmospheric mercury modeling. The regional flow prediction was also influenced by the reanalysis data used to initialize the WRF simulations. Even with observational nudging, the summer case simulation results in the fine resolution domain inherited features of the reanalysis data, resulting in different regional wind patterns. By contrast, the spring intensive period showed less influence from the reanalysis data.

  12. Atmospheric correction for superconducting gravimeters based on operational weather models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbon, M.; Boehm, J.; Meurers, B.; Schuh, H.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure fluctuations are a major source of noise in precise gravimetric measurements and must be corrected carefully. This is usually done by using the local air pressure, which reduces up to 90-95 % of the atmospheric signal. However, modern superconducting gravimeters require an even better atmospheric correction if small signals are to be identified. For this task the use of 3-dimensional modeling of atmospheric mass attraction based on operational numerical weather models has shown promising results. Similar strategies are realized and applied successfully for de -aliasing measurements of satellite gravity missions, such as GRACE and GOCE. For example, within the project GGOS Atmosphere at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics of TU Vienna a service was established providing atmospheric gravity corrections in form of global spherical harmonic coefficients (AGC). In this study we show that these products, originally dedicated to correct the gravity mission data, can also be used to correct the atmospheric effects on superconducting gravimeters (SG), i.e., the global contribution of the effect is obtained directly from the AGC. Furthermore, it will be examined if the additional effort of implementing high resolution regional models as well as analytical models in the near field is justified. The Conrad Observatory near Vienna is taken as example station for the SG corrections.

  13. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2010 Version: Users Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justh, H. L.

    2014-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) presents the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2010 (Mars-GRAM 2010) and its new features. Mars-GRAM is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Applications include systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry, descent and landing, and aerocapture. Additionally, this TM includes instructions on obtaining the Mars-GRAM source code and data files as well as running Mars-GRAM. It also contains sample Mars-GRAM input and output files and an example of how to incorporate Mars-GRAM as an atmospheric subroutine in a trajectory code.

  14. Assessment of a CFD model for short-range plume dispersion: Applications to the Fusion Field Trial 2007 (FFT-07) diffusion experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pramod; Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Ngae, Pierre; Feiz, Amir-Ali; Turbelin, Grégory

    2017-11-01

    Simulations of the short-range plume dispersion under different atmospheric conditions can provide essential information for the development of source reconstruction methodologies that allows to retrieve the location and intensity of an unknown hazardous pollutant source. This process required a comprehensive assessment of the atmospheric dispersion models with tracer diffusion experiments in various stability conditions. In this study, a comprehensive evaluation of a CFD model fluidyn-PANACHE is performed with the observations from available seven trials of single releases conducted in the Fusion Field Trail 2007 (FFT-07) tracer experiment. The CFD simulations are performed for each trial and it was observed that the CFD model fluidyn-PANACHE provides good agreement of the predicted concentrations with the observations in both stable and convective atmospheric conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the simulated results is performed by computing the statistical performance measures for the dispersion model evaluation. The CFD model predicts 65.4% of the overall concentration points within a factor of two to the observations. It was observed that the CFD model is predicting better in convective stability conditions in comparison to the trials conducted in stable stability. In convective conditions, 74.6% points were predicted within a factor of two to the observations which are higher than 59.3% concentration points predicted within a factor of two in the trials in stable atmospheric conditions.

  15. Developing Tighter Constraints on Exoplanet Biosignatures by Modeling Atmospheric Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Ryan; Neveu, Marc; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn David; Desch, Steven; Arney, Giada

    2018-01-01

    As we increase our capacity to resolve the atmospheric composition of exoplanets, we must continue to refine our ability to distinguish true biosignatures from false positives in order to ultimately distinguish a life-bearing from a lifeless planet. Of the possible true and false biosignatures, methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are of interest, because on Earth geological and biological processes can produce them on large scales. To identify a biotic, Earth-like exoplanet, we must understand how these biosignatures shape their atmospheres. High atmospheric abundances of CH4 produce photochemical organic haze, which dramatically alters the photochemistry, climate, and spectrum of a planet. Arney et al. (2017) have suggested that haze-bearing atmospheres rich in CO2 may be a type of biosignature because the CH4 flux required to produce the haze is similar to the amount of biogenic CH4 on modern Earth. Atmospheric CH4 and CO2 both affect haze-formation photochemistry, and the potential for hazes to form in Earth-like atmospheres at abiotic concentrations of these gases has not been well studied. We will explore a wide range of parameter space of abiotic concentration levels of these gases to determine what spectral signatures are possible from abiotic environments and look for measurable differences between abiotic and biotic atmospheres. We use a 1D photochemical model with an upgraded haze production mechanism to compare Archean and modern Earth atmospheres to abiotic versions while varying atmospheric CH4 and CO2 levels and atmospheric pressure. We will vary CO2 from a trace gas to an amount such that it dominates atmospheric chemistry. For CH4, there is uncertainty regarding the amount of abiotic CH4 that comes from serpentinizing systems. To address this uncertainty, we will model three cases: 1) assume all CH4 comes from photochemistry; 2) use estimates of modern-day serpentinizing fluxes, assuming they are purely abiotic; and 3) assume serpentinizing

  16. Teaching and communicating dispersion in hydrogeology, with emphasis on the applicability of the Fickian model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanidis, P. K.

    2017-08-01

    The process of dispersion in porous media is the effect of combined variability in fluid velocity and concentration at scales smaller than the ones resolved that contributes to spreading and mixing. It is usually introduced in textbooks and taught in classes through the Fick-Scheidegger parameterization, which is introduced as a scientific law of universal validity. This parameterization is based on observations in bench-scale laboratory experiments using homogeneous media. Fickian means that dispersive flux is proportional to the gradient of the resolved concentration while the Scheidegger parameterization is a particular way to compute the dispersion coefficients. The unresolved scales are thus associated with the pore-grain geometry that is ignored when the composite pore-grain medium is replaced by a homogeneous continuum. However, the challenge faced in practice is how to account for dispersion in numerical models that discretize the domain into blocks, often cubic meters in size, that contain multiple geologic facies. Although the Fick-Scheidegger parameterization is by far the one most commonly used, its validity has been questioned. This work presents a method of teaching dispersion that emphasizes the physical basis of dispersion and highlights the conditions under which a Fickian dispersion model is justified. In particular, we show that Fickian dispersion has a solid physical basis provided that an equilibrium condition is met. The issue of the Scheidegger parameterization is more complex but it is shown that the approximation that the dispersion coefficients should scale linearly with the mean velocity is often reasonable, at least as a practical approximation, but may not necessarily be always appropriate. Generally in Hydrogeology, the Scheidegger feature of constant dispersivity is considered as a physical law and inseparable from the Fickian model, but both perceptions are wrong. We also explain why Fickian dispersion fails under certain conditions

  17. Mercury emission and dispersion models from soils contaminated by cinnabar mining and metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanos, Willians; Kocman, David; Higueras, Pablo; Horvat, Milena

    2011-12-01

    The laboratory flux measurement system (LFMS) and dispersion models were used to investigate the kinetics of mercury emission flux (MEF) from contaminated soils. Representative soil samples with respect to total Hg concentration (26-9770 μg g(-1)) surrounding a decommissioned mercury-mining area (Las Cuevas Mine), and a former mercury smelter (Cerco Metalúrgico de Almadenejos), in the Almadén mercury mining district (South Central Spain), were collected. Altogether, 14 samples were analyzed to determine the variation in mercury emission flux (MEF) versus distance from the sources, regulating two major environmental parameters comprising soil temperature and solar radiation. In addition, the fraction of the water-soluble mercury in these samples was determined in order to assess how MEF from soil is related to the mercury in the aqueous soil phase. Measured MEFs ranged from less than 140 to over 10,000 ng m(-2) h(-1), with the highest emissions from contaminated soils adjacent to point sources. A significant decrease of MEF was then observed with increasing distance from these sites. Strong positive effects of both temperature and solar radiation on MEF was observed. Moreover, MEF was found to occur more easily in soils with higher proportions of soluble mercury compared to soils where cinnabar prevails. Based on the calculated Hg emission rates and with the support of geographical information system (GIS) tools and ISC AERMOD software, dispersion models for atmospheric mercury were implemented. In this way, the gaseous mercury plume generated by the soil-originated emissions at different seasons was modeled. Modeling efforts revealed that much higher emissions and larger mercury plumes are generated in dry and warm periods (summer), while the plume is smaller and associated with lower concentrations of atmospheric mercury during colder periods with higher wind activity (fall). Based on the calculated emissions and the model implementation, yearly emissions from

  18. Large-Scale Atmospheric Dispersal Simulations Identify Likely Airborne Incursion Routes of Wheat Stem Rust Into Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M; Burgin, L; Hort, M C; Hodson, D P; Gilligan, C A

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, severe wheat stem rust epidemics hit Ethiopia, sub-Saharan Africa's largest wheat-producing country. These were caused by race TKTTF (Digalu race) of the pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, which, in Ethiopia, was first detected at the beginning of August 2012. We use the incursion of this new pathogen race as a case study to determine likely airborne origins of fungal spores on regional and continental scales by means of a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM). Two different techniques, LPDM simulations forward and backward in time, are compared. The effects of release altitudes in time-backward simulations and P. graminis f. sp. tritici urediniospore viability functions in time-forward simulations are analyzed. Results suggest Yemen as the most likely origin but, also, point to other possible sources in the Middle East and the East African Rift Valley. This is plausible in light of available field surveys and phylogenetic data on TKTTF isolates from Ethiopia and other countries. Independent of the case involving TKTTF, we assess long-term dispersal trends (>10 years) to obtain quantitative estimates of the risk of exotic P. graminis f. sp. tritici spore transport (of any race) into Ethiopia for different 'what-if' scenarios of disease outbreaks in potential source countries in different months of the wheat season.

  19. Simulation of variability in atmospheric carbon dioxide using a global coupled Eulerian – Lagrangian transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Koyama

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the advantages of using a coupled atmospheric-tracer transport model, comprising a global Eulerian model and a global Lagrangian particle dispersion model, to improve the reproducibility of tracer-gas variations affected by the near-field surface emissions and transport around observation sites. The ability to resolve variability in atmospheric composition on an hourly time-scale and a spatial scale of several kilometers would be beneficial for analyzing data from continuous ground-based monitoring and from upcoming space-based observations. The coupled model yields an increase in the horizontal resolution of transport and fluxes, and has been tested in regional-scale studies of atmospheric chemistry. By applying the Lagrangian component to the global domain, we extend this approach to the global scale, thereby enabling computationally efficient global inverse modeling and data assimilation. To validate the coupled model, we compare model-simulated CO2 concentrations with continuous observations at three sites: two operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA, and one operated by the National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan. As the goal of this study is limited to introducing the new modeling approach, we selected a transport simulation at these three sites to demonstrate how the model may perform at various geographical areas. The coupled model provides improved agreement between modeled and observed CO2 concentrations in comparison to the Eulerian model. In an area where variability in CO2 concentration is dominated by a fossil fuel signal, the correlation coefficient between modeled and observed concentrations increases by between 0.05 to 0.1 from the original values of 0.5–0.6 achieved with the Eulerian model.

  20. Evaluation protocol for the WIND system atmospheric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion models have been developed for real-time calculations of the location and concentration of toxic or radioactive materials during a accidental release at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These models are have been incorporated into an automated menu-driven computer based system called the WIND (Weather INformation and Display) system. In an effort to establish more formal quality assurance procedures for the WIND system atmospheric codes, a software evaluation protocol is being developed. An evaluation protocol is necessary to determine how well they may perform in emergency response (real-time) situations. The evaluation of high-impact software must be conducted in accordance with WSRC QA Manual, 1Q, QAP 20-1. This report will describe the method that will be used to evaluate the atmospheric models. The evaluation will determine the effectiveness of the atmospheric models in emergency response situations, which is not necessarily the same procedure used for research purposes. The format of the evaluation plan will provide guidance for the evaluation of atmospheric models that may be added to the WIND system in the future. The evaluation plan is designed to provide the user with information about the WIND system atmospheric models that is necessary for emergency response situations.

  1. Evaluation protocol for the WIND system atmospheric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion models have been developed for real-time calculations of the location and concentration of toxic or radioactive materials during a accidental release at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These models are have been incorporated into an automated menu-driven computer based system called the WIND (Weather INformation and Display) system. In an effort to establish more formal quality assurance procedures for the WIND system atmospheric codes, a software evaluation protocol is being developed. An evaluation protocol is necessary to determine how well they may perform in emergency response (real-time) situations. The evaluation of high-impact software must be conducted in accordance with WSRC QA Manual, 1Q, QAP 20-1. This report will describe the method that will be used to evaluate the atmospheric models. The evaluation will determine the effectiveness of the atmospheric models in emergency response situations, which is not necessarily the same procedure used for research purposes. The format of the evaluation plan will provide guidance for the evaluation of atmospheric models that may be added to the WIND system in the future. The evaluation plan is designed to provide the user with information about the WIND system atmospheric models that is necessary for emergency response situations.

  2. Kin competition and the evolution of dispersal in an individual-based model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, LA; Thomsen, R; Pertoldi, C

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of dispersal was investigated in an adaptive individual-based metapopulation model, which allowed for demographic and environmental stochasticity. The individual dispersal behaviour was determined by a one-locus genotype subjected to simple inheritance and mutation. Dispersal behavi...... how the evolution of dispersal alleviates kin competition when it originates from the population renewal process as an emergent property. Moreover, predictions are suggested that may be addressed by selection experiments. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......The evolution of dispersal was investigated in an adaptive individual-based metapopulation model, which allowed for demographic and environmental stochasticity. The individual dispersal behaviour was determined by a one-locus genotype subjected to simple inheritance and mutation. Dispersal...... reproduction and competition in the discrete life cycle dispersal was allowed to occur either before or after local competition. Hence, the degree to which dispersal relaxed competition among siblings was investigated directly with respect to the effect on the evolved dispersal rate. We found a pronounced...

  3. Studying urban land-atmospheric interactions by coupling an urban canopy model with a single column atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J.; Wang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Studying urban land-atmospheric interactions by coupling an urban canopy model with a single column atmospheric models Jiyun Song and Zhi-Hua Wang School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, PO Box 875306, Tempe, AZ 85287-5306 Landuse landcover changes in urban area will modify surface energy budgets, turbulent fluxes as well as dynamic and thermodynamic structures of the overlying atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In order to study urban land-atmospheric interactions, we coupled a single column atmospheric model (SCM) to a cutting-edge single layer urban canopy model (SLUCM). Modification of surface parameters such as the fraction of vegetation and engineered pavements, thermal properties of building and pavement materials, and geometrical features of street canyon, etc. in SLUCM dictates the evolution of surface balance of energy, water and momentum. The land surface states then provide lower boundary conditions to the overlying atmosphere, which in turn modulates the modification of ABL structure as well as vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and tracer gases. The coupled SLUCM-SCM model is tested against field measurements of surface layer fluxes as well as profiles of temperature and humidity in the mixed layer under convective conditions. After model test, SLUCM-SCM is used to simulate the effect of changing urban land surface conditions on the evolution of ABL structure and dynamics. Simulation results show that despite the prescribed atmospheric forcing, land surface states impose significant impact on the physics of the overlying vertical atmospheric layer. Overall, this numerical framework provides a useful standalone modeling tool to assess the impacts of urban land surface conditions on the local hydrometeorology through land-atmospheric interactions. It also has potentially far-reaching implications to urban ecohydrological services for cities under future expansion and climate challenges.

  4. PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere: determining important driving forces using a global atmospheric transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Friedman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a spatially and temporally resolved global atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB model, driven by meteorological data, that is skilled at simulating mean atmospheric PCB concentrations and seasonal cycles in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes and mean Arctic concentrations. However, the model does not capture the observed Arctic summer maximum in atmospheric PCBs. We use the model to estimate global budgets for seven PCB congeners, and we demonstrate that congeners that deposit more readily show lower potential for long-range transport, consistent with a recently described "differential removal hypothesis" regarding the hemispheric transport of PCBs. Using sensitivity simulations to assess processes within, outside, or transport to the Arctic, we examine the influence of climate- and emissions-driven processes on Arctic concentrations and their effect on improving the simulated Arctic seasonal cycle. We find evidence that processes occurring outside the Arctic have a greater influence on Arctic atmospheric PCB levels than processes that occur within the Arctic. Our simulations suggest that re-emissions from sea ice melting or from the Arctic Ocean during summer would have to be unrealistically high in order to capture observed temporal trends of PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere. We conclude that midlatitude processes are likely to have a greater effect on the Arctic under global change scenarios than re-emissions within the Arctic.

  5. A simulation of pollutants dispersion from Dorud cement plant using SCREEN3 Software Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Omidi-Khaniabadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: With regard to application of the oil fuel at winter in Dorud cement plant, the aim of this study was to investigaten NOX, SO2 and particulate matter (PM dispersion from cement plant stack at downwind direction and atmospheric different conditions and thermal inversion in winter season up to distance 5000 m from emission source and its comparison with clean air and NAAQS standard. Materials and Methods: In this study, the sampling gases exited from cement plant stack were carried out using Testo XL350 and particulates measurement done by Westech device. SCREEN3 software model was used to evaluate air quality and dispersion NOX, SO2 and PM. Data interred into the model includin emission rate, physical factor related with stack, height, length and width building, mixing height, meteorological stability and wind speed. This model incorporates sources related factors, meteorological factors and emission rates to estimate pollutant concentration from continuous sources. The class stability and wind speed were at a  hight of 10 meter. Results: The results showed that the maximum concentration predicted NOX, SO2 and PM by SCREEN3 in neutral condition (D and wind speed 6 m/s was at 1084 m away from stack with concentration of 265.48µg/m3, 168.39µg/m3 and, 56.56µg/m3 for NOX, SO2 and PM respectively. Also, at stability condition (F with wind speed 4 m/s the maximum concentration predicted in 2647 m away of stack with amount of 195.71µg/m3, 308.54µg/m3 and 65.37µg/m3 respectively.  Conclusion: In order to reach the clean air  standard, continuous monitoring and development methods are necessary for control gases and particulates exited from stack.

  6. A global atmospheric model of meteoric iron

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feng, Wuhu; Marsh, Daniel R; Chipperfield, Martyn P; Janches, Diego; Höffner, Josef; Yi, Fan; Plane, John M. C

    2013-01-01

    .... The meteoric input function (MIF), which describes the injection of Fe as a function of height, latitude, and day, is precalculated from an astronomical model coupled to a chemical meteoric ablation model (CABMOD...

  7. New aging properties of the Clayton-Oakes model based on multivariate dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    Arias-Nicolás, José Pablo

    2010-01-01

    In this work we present a recent definition of Multivariate Increasing Failure Rate (MIFR) based on the concept of multivariate dispersion. This new definition is an extension of the univariate characterization of IFR distributions under dispersive ordering of the residual lifetimes. We apply this definition to the Clayton-Oakes model. In particular, we provide several conditions to order in the multivariate dispersion sense the residual lifetimes of random vectors with a dependence structure...

  8. AIR DISPERSION MODELING AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucker, D.F.

    2000-08-01

    One concern at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the amount of alpha-emitting radionuclides or hazardous chemicals that can become airborne at the facility and reach the Exclusive Use Area boundary as the result of a release from the Waste Handling Building (WHB) or from the underground during waste emplacement operations. The WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR), WIPP RCRA Permit, and WIPP Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessments include air dispersion calculations to address this issue. Meteorological conditions at the WIPP facility will dictate direction, speed, and dilution of a contaminant plume of respirable material due to chronic releases or during an accident. Due to the paucity of meteorological information at the WIPP site prior to September 1996, the Department of Energy (DOE) reports had to rely largely on unqualified climatic data from the site and neighboring Carlsbad, which is situated approximately 40 km (26 miles) to the west of the site. This report examines the validity of the DOE air dispersion calculations using new meteorological data measured and collected at the WIPP site since September 1996. The air dispersion calculations in this report include both chronic and acute releases. Chronic release calculations were conducted with the EPA-approved code, CAP88PC and the calculations showed that in order for a violation of 40 CFR61 (NESHAPS) to occur, approximately 15 mCi/yr of 239Pu would have to be released from the exhaust stack or from the WHB. This is an extremely high value. Hence, it is unlikely that NESHAPS would be violated. A site-specific air dispersion coefficient was evaluated for comparison with that used in acute dose calculations. The calculations presented in Section 3.2 and 3.3 show that one could expect a slightly less dispersive plume (larger air dispersion coefficient) given greater confidence in the meteorological data, i.e. 95% worst case meteorological conditions. Calculations show that dispersion will decrease

  9. Southeast Atmosphere Studies: learning from model-observation syntheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of atmospheric trace species in the United States have changed dramatically over the past several decades in response to pollution control strategies, shifts in domestic energy policy and economics, and economic development (and resulting emission changes elsewhere in the world. Reliable projections of the future atmosphere require models to not only accurately describe current atmospheric concentrations, but to do so by representing chemical, physical and biological processes with conceptual and quantitative fidelity. Only through incorporation of the processes controlling emissions and chemical mechanisms that represent the key transformations among reactive molecules can models reliably project the impacts of future policy, energy and climate scenarios. Efforts to properly identify and implement the fundamental and controlling mechanisms in atmospheric models benefit from intensive observation periods, during which collocated measurements of diverse, speciated chemicals in both the gas and condensed phases are obtained. The Southeast Atmosphere Studies (SAS, including SENEX, SOAS, NOMADSS and SEAC4RS conducted during the summer of 2013 provided an unprecedented opportunity for the atmospheric modeling community to come together to evaluate, diagnose and improve the representation of fundamental climate and air quality processes in models of varying temporal and spatial scales.This paper is aimed at discussing progress in evaluating, diagnosing and improving air quality and climate modeling using comparisons to SAS observations as a guide to thinking about improvements to mechanisms and parameterizations in models. The effort focused primarily on model representation of fundamental atmospheric processes that are essential to the formation of ozone, secondary organic aerosol (SOA and other trace species in the troposphere, with the ultimate goal of understanding the radiative impacts of these species in the southeast and

  10. Measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars using model atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suleimanov, V.F. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Kazan Federal University, Kazan (Russian Federation); Poutanen, J. [University of Turku, Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Piikkioe (Finland); KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Nordita, Stockholm (Sweden); Klochkov, D.; Werner, K. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Model spectra of neutron star atmospheres are nowadays widely used to fit the observed thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars. This fitting is the key element in the method of the neutron star radius determination. Here, we present the basic assumptions used for the neutron star atmosphere modeling as well as the main qualitative features of the stellar atmospheres leading to the deviations of the emergent model spectrum from blackbody. We describe the properties of two of our model atmosphere grids: i) pure carbon atmospheres for relatively cool neutron stars (1-4MK) and ii) hot atmospheres with Compton scattering taken into account. The results obtained by applying these grids to model the X-ray spectra of the central compact object in supernova remnant HESS 1731-347, and two X-ray bursting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1724-307 and 4U 1608-52, are presented. Possible systematic uncertainties associated with the obtained neutron star radii are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Modeling SF{sub 6} plume dispersion in complex terrain and meteorology with a limited data set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalk, W.W. III

    1996-10-01

    Early actions of emergency responders during hazardous material releases are intended to assess contamination and potential public exposure. As measurements are collected, an integration of model calculations and measurements can assist to better understand the situation. This study applied a high resolution version of the operational 3-D numerical models used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to a limited meteorological and tracer data set to assist in the interpretation of the dispersion pattern on a 140 km scale. The data set was collected from a tracer release during the morning surface inversion and transition period in the complex terrain of the Snake River Plain near Idaho Falls, Idaho in November 1993 by the United States Air Force. Sensitivity studies were conducted to determine model input parameters that best represented the study environment. These studies showed that mixing and boundary layer heights, atmospheric stability, and rawinsonde data are the most important model input parameters affecting wind field generation and tracer dispersion. Numerical models and limited measurement data were used to interpret dispersion patterns through the use of data analysis, model input determination, and sensitivity studies. Comparison of the best-estimate calculation to measurement data showed that model results compared well with the aircraft data, but had moderate success with the few surface measurements taken. The moderate success of the surface measurement comparison, may be due to limited downward mixing of the tracer as a result of the model resolution determined by the domain size selected to study the overall plume dispersion. 8 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Mathematical modeling of radionuclide dispersion in the Pripyat-Dnieper aquatic system after the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheleznyak, M.J.; Demchenko, R.I.; Khursin, S.L.; Kuzmenko, Y.I.; Tkalich, P.V.; Vitiuk, N.Y. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. Kibernetiki)

    1992-02-01

    The Chernobyl accident heavily contaminated the largest aquatic system in the Ukraine, requiring the development of a model-based detection support system in the field of aquatic radioecology. The main objectives of the system were to simulate and predict radionuclide dispersion in the Pripyat-Dnieper River-reservoir system, assess the effectiveness of special hydraulic countermeasures designed to decrease the rate of radionuclide dispersion in the water bodies, and support the Dnieper reservoirs' management operations. A hierarchy of mathematical models was developed. A two-dimensional (2D) vertical-longitudinal model, a 2D lateral-longitudinal model, a 1D channel model and a box-type model are briefly presented. These models describe the main features of radionuclide dispersion, including the processes governing radionuclide-sediment interactions. Examples of the models' applications are presented to show the peculiarities of radionuclide dispersion in this aquatic system. (author). 34 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs.

  13. Information Flow in an Atmospheric Model and Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young-noh

    2011-01-01

    Weather forecasting consists of two processes, model integration and analysis (data assimilation). During the model integration, the state estimate produced by the analysis evolves to the next cycle time according to the atmospheric model to become the background estimate. The analysis then produces a new state estimate by combining the background…

  14. Applying a mesoscale atmospheric model to Svalbard glaciers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claremar, B.; Obleitner, F.; Reijmer, C.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229345956; Pohjola, V.; Waxegard, A.; Karner, F.; Rutgersson, A.

    2012-01-01

    The mesoscale atmospheric model WRF is used over three Svalbard glaciers. The simulations are done with a setup of the model corresponding to the state-of-the-art model for polar conditions, Polar WRF, and it was validated using surface observations. The ERA-Interim reanalysis was used for boundary

  15. Some results regarding the comparison of the Earth's atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šegan S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine air densities derived from our realization of aeronomic atmosphere models based on accelerometer measurements from satellites in a low Earth's orbit (LEO. Using the adapted algorithms we derive comparison parameters. The first results concerning the adjustment of the aeronomic models to the total-density model are given.

  16. [Hyperspectral Detection Model for Soil Dispersion in Zhouqu Debris Flow Source Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin-jun; Wei, Yong-ming; Chen, Yu; Chen, Jia-ge; Lin, Qi-zhong

    2016-02-01

    Sensitive band positions, models and the principles of soil dispersion detected by hyperspectral remote sensing were firstly discussed according to the results of soil dispersive hyperspectral remote sensing experiment. Results showed that, (1) signals and noises could be separated by Fourier transformation. A finely mineral identification system was developed to remove spectral noises and provide highly accurate data for establishing soil dispersive model; (2) Soil dispersive hyperspectral remote sensing model established by the multiple linear regression method was good at soil dispersion forecasting for the high correlation between sensitive bands and the soil dispersions. (3) According to mineral spectra, soil minerals and their absorbed irons were reflected by sensitive bands which revealed reasons causing soils to be dispersive. Sodium was the closest iron correlated with soil dispersion. The secondary was calcite, montmorillonite and illite. However, the correlation between soil dispersion and chlorite, kaolinite, PH value, quartz, potassium feldspar, plagioclase was weak. The main reason was probably that sodium was low in ionic valence, small ionic radius and strong hydration forces; calcite was high water soluble and illite was weak binding forces between two layers under high pH value.

  17. Urban morphological analysis for mesoscale meteorological and dispersion modeling applications : current issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burian, S. J. (Steven J.); Brown, M. J. (Michael J.); Ching, J. (Jason); Cheuk, M. L. (Mang Lung); Yuan, M. (May); McKinnon, A. T. (Andrew T.); Han, W. S. (Woo Suk)

    2004-01-01

    Accurate predictions of air quality and atmospheric dispersion at high spatial resolution rely on high fidelity predictions of mesoscale meteorological fields that govern transport and turbulence in urban areas. However, mesoscale meteorological models do not have the spatial resolution to directly simulate the fluid dynamics and thermodynamics in and around buildings and other urban structures that have been shown to modify micro- and mesoscale flow fields (e.g., see review by Bornstein 1987). Mesoscale models therefore have been adapted using numerous approaches to incorporate urban effects into the simulations (e.g., see reviews by Brown 2000 and Bornstein and Craig 2002). One approach is to introduce urban canopy parameterizations to approximate the drag, turbulence production, heating, and radiation attenuation induced by sub-grid scale buildings and urban surface covers (Brown 2000). Preliminary results of mesoscale meteorological and air quality simulations for Houston (Dupont et al. 2004) demonstrated the importance of introducing urban canopy parameterizations to produce results with high spatial resolution that accentuates variability, highlights important differences, and identifies critical areas. Although urban canopy parameterizations may not be applicable to all meteorological and dispersion models, they have been successfully introduced and demonstrated in many of the current operational and research mode mesoscale models, e.g., COAMPS (Holt et al. 2002), HOTMAC (Brown and Williams 1998), MM5 (e.g., Otte and Lacser 2001; Lacser and Otte 2002; Dupont et al. 2004), and RAMS (Rozoff et al. 2003). The primary consequence of implementing an urban parameterization in a mesoscale meteorological model is the need to characterize the urban terrain in greater detail. In general, urban terrain characterization for mesoscale modeling may be described as the process of collecting datasets of urban surface cover physical properties (e.g., albedo, emissivity) and

  18. Integration of AMS and ERDS Measurement Data into NARAC Dispersion Models FY05 Technology Integration Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, K; Arnold, E; Bonner, D; Eme, B; Fischer, K; Gash, J; Nasstrom, J; Walker, H; Guber, A; Logan, C; Wasiolek, P; Fulton, J

    2005-09-20

    Staff from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Bechtel Nevada Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL), and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) completed the proposed work for the Technology Integration Project titled Integration of AMS and ERDS Measurement Data into NARAC Dispersion Models. The objectives of this project were to develop software to convert Aerial Measurement Survey (AMS) and Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) field measurement data into a standard electronic format for transmission to the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), and to streamline aspects of the NARAC operational atmospheric dispersion modeling system to quickly process these data for use in generating consequence calculations based on refined, field measurement-based estimates of the source strength. Although NARAC continues to develop and maintain a state-of-the-art atmospheric dispersion modeling system, model predictions are constrained by the availability of information to properly characterize the source term. During an actual atmospheric release, very little may be known initially about the source material properties, amount, or release time and location. Downwind measurements often provide the best information about the scope and nature of the release. The timely integration of field measurement data with model calculations is an obvious approach toward improving the model consequence predictions. By optimizing these predictions a more accurate representation of the consequences may be provided to (a) predict contamination levels which may be below the detectable limit of sensors, but which may still pose a significant hazard, (b) determine contamination is areas where measurements have not yet been made, and (c) prioritize the locations of future measurement surveys. By automating and streamlining much of the related field measurement data processing, these optimized predictions may be provided within a significantly reduced period, and with a reduction in

  19. South African seasonal rainfall prediction performance by a coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, WA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is presented that coupled ocean-atmosphere models can already outscore computationally less expensive atmospheric models. However, if the atmospheric models are forced with highly skillful SST predictions, they may still be a very strong...

  20. Atmospheric Athena: 3D Atmospheric escape model with ionizing radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Anjali; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric Athena simulates hydrodynamic escape from close-in giant planets in 3D. It uses the Athena hydrodynamics code (ascl:1010.014) with a new ionizing radiative transfer implementation to self-consistently model photoionization driven winds from the planet. The code is fully compatible with static mesh refinement and MPI parallelization and can handle arbitrary planet potentials and stellar initial conditions.

  1. AMORE: Atmospheric Modeling Of Radiation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slusser, J.; Harrison, L.; Gao, W.

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this talk is to present a comparison of modeled and measured clear-sky erythemal UV irradiances. Are the various models in reasonable agreement with the various measurements? Measurements were made with the USDA Reference Spectroradiometer, New Zealand's NIWA Spectroradiometer, a USEPA Brewer, and a Yankee UV-RSS. Modeling groups were given a list of clear days between June 5 and August 5, 2001. The average measured morning and afternoon aerosol optical depths at 368 nm and 332 nm were measured with a UV-MFRSR. The estimated wavelength independent aerosol asymmetry parameter and single scattering albedo, surface pressure and albedo, total column ozone, extraterrestrial solar spectrum, erythemal weighting function were supplied. Modeling groups submitted erythemally weight irradiances for every half hour. Comparisons of measurements to models showed good ageement to within 10% for SZAs out to 60 degrees. Reasons for discrepancies will be discussed.

  2. Assessment of exposure to mercury from industrial emissions: comparing "distance as a proxy" and dispersion modelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Susan; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Colvile, Roy; Jarup, Lars

    2007-06-01

    The Runcorn area, north-west England, contains many pollution sources, the health effects of which have been under discussion for over 100 years. Preliminary investigations revealed an excess risk of mortality from kidney disease in people living nearest to several point sources of pollution, using distance as a proxy for exposure. Ongoing epidemiological investigations into the effect of ambient mercury exposure on dose and renal effect required a more refined assessment of exposure. Atmospheric dispersion modelling was used to assess mercury dispersion from three mercury-emitting sources (including a large chlor alkali plant), based on knowledge of emissions, local meteorology and topography. The model was sensitive to various input parameters, with different dispersion patterns and ground-level concentrations, and therefore different exposed populations identified when different input parameters were defined. The different approaches to exposure assessment also had an impact on the epidemiological findings. The model output correlated well with weekly monitoring data collected in the local area, although the model underestimated concentrations in close proximity to the chlor alkali plant. The model identified that one point source did not contribute significantly to ground-level mercury concentrations, so that inclusion of this source when using the "distance as a proxy" approach led to significant exposure misclassification. The model output indicates that assessment of ambient exposure should give consideration to the magnitude of emissions, point source characteristics, local meteorology and topography to ensure that the most appropriate exposure classification is reached. Even if dispersion modelling cannot be undertaken, these data can be used to inform and improve the distance as a proxy approach, and improve the interpretability of the epidemiological findings.

  3. The physical theory and propagation model of THz atmospheric propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Yao, J. Q.; Xu, D. G.; Wang, J. L.; Wang, P.

    2011-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is extensively applied in diverse fields, such as space communication, Earth environment observation, atmosphere science, remote sensing and so on. And the research on propagation features of THz wave in the atmosphere becomes more and more important. This paper firstly illuminates the advantages and outlook of THz in space technology. Then it introduces the theoretical framework of THz atmospheric propagation, including some fundamental physical concepts and processes. The attenuation effect (especially the absorption of water vapor), the scattering of aerosol particles and the effect of turbulent flow mainly influence THz atmosphere propagation. Fundamental physical laws are illuminated as well, such as Lamber-beer law, Mie scattering theory and radiative transfer equation. The last part comprises the demonstration and comparison of THz atmosphere propagation models like Moliere(V5), SARTre and AMATERASU. The essential problems are the deep analysis of physical mechanism of this process, the construction of atmospheric propagation model and databases of every kind of material in the atmosphere, and the standardization of measurement procedures.

  4. Diffusion Model Applied to Postfeeding Larval Dispersal in Blowflies (Diptera: Calliphoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassanezi RC

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a diffusion model of larval dispersal especifically designed to account for particular aspects of postfeeding larval dispersal from the food source in organisms such as blowflies. In these organisms the dispersal of immatures includes two groups of individuals, those that are actively migrating and those that have initiated the pupation process. The classical diffusion equation in one dimension was modified to incorporate a function which describes the burying of larvae to become pupae. The analytical solution of this equation predicts oscillatory and monotonic dispersal behaviors, which are observed in experimental populations of blowfly species

  5. An Analytic Radiative-Convective Model for Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, T. D.; Catling, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    A fundamental aspect of planetary atmospheres is the vertical thermal structure. Simple one-dimensional (vertical) models can provide reasonable estimates of a planet's global-mean temperature profile while providing insights into the physics behind the thermal profile of an atmosphere. The best basic models are those that incorporate the minimum amount of complexity while still remaining general enough to provide intuitive understanding. Here, we present an analytic 1-D radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres [1]. We assume that thermal radiative transfer is gray, and we include two shortwave channels for absorbed solar (or stellar) light so that the model can compute realistic stratospheric temperature inversions. A convective profile is placed at the base of the portion of the atmosphere that is in radiative equilibrium, and the model ensures that both the temperature profile and the upwelling flux profile are continuous across the radiation-convection boundary. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. The utility, validity, and generality of our model are demonstrated by applying it to a disparate range of worlds, including Jupiter, Venus, and Titan. Our model can be used to explain general observed phenomena in the Solar System [2], and we explore the behaviors of variants of our model, showing its ability to provide clear insights. Given the wealth of new problems posed by exoplanets, development of an analytic model with few parameters is likely to be useful for future application to such worlds, for which only limited data will be known. Our model can be used to help interpret

  6. Dispersal leads to spatial autocorrelation in species distributions: A simulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, V.; Krohn, W.B.; O'Connor, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Compared to population growth regulated by local conditions, dispersal has been underappreciated as a central process shaping the spatial distribution of populations. This paper asks: (a) which conditions increase the importance of dispersers relative to local recruits in determining population sizes? and (b) how does dispersal influence the spatial distribution patterns of abundances among connected populations? We approached these questions with a simulation model of populations on a coupled lattice with cells of continuously varying habitat quality expressed as carrying capacities. Each cell contained a population with the basic dynamics of density-regulated growth, and was connected to other populations by immigration and emigration. The degree to which dispersal influenced the distribution of population sizes depended most strongly on the absolute amount of dispersal, and then on the potential population growth rate. Dispersal decaying in intensity with distance left close neighbours more alike in population size than distant populations, leading to an increase in spatial autocorrelation. The spatial distribution of species with low potential growth rates is more dependent on dispersal than that of species with high growth rates; therefore, distribution modelling for species with low growth rates requires particular attention to autocorrelation, and conservation management of these species requires attention to factors curtailing dispersal, such as fragmentation and dispersal barriers. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  8. Solitary excitations in discrete two-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger models with dispersive dipole-dipole interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Johansson, M.

    1998-01-01

    The dynamics of discrete two-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger models with long-range dispersive interactions is investigated. In particular, we focus on the cases where the dispersion arises from a dipole-dipole interaction, assuming the dipole moments at each lattice site to be aligned either...

  9. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aerospace Vehicles: Fractional Order Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An improved model for simulating atmospheric disturbances is disclosed. A scale Kolmogorov spectral may be scaled to convert the Kolmogorov spectral into a finite energy von Karman spectral and a fractional order pole-zero transfer function (TF) may be derived from the von Karman spectral. Fractional order atmospheric turbulence may be approximated with an integer order pole-zero TF fit, and the approximation may be stored in memory.

  10. Sulfur processing in the marine atmospheric boundary layer: A review and critical assessment of modeling uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faloona, Ian

    Sulfur is an extremely motile and vital element in the Earth's biogeochemical environment, one whose active redox chemistry maintains small reservoirs in the atmosphere and biosphere yet large fluxes through both. Essential for life, intimately linked to the climate state, and an important component of air quality, sulfur and its transport and processing in the atmosphere have been the subject of active research for several decades. This review article describes the current state of our understanding of the atmospheric sulfur cycle, focusing on the marine atmospheric boundary layer, with the aim of identifying the largest roots of uncertainty that most inhibit accurate simulation of sulfur cycling in the atmosphere. An overview of the emissions by phytoplankton and shipping, dispersion and entrainment in the marine boundary layer, and chemical processing by aerosols, clouds, and dry deposition is presented. Analysis of 20 contemporary modeling studies suggests that the greatest ambiguity in global sulfur cycling derives from (in descending order) wet deposition of aerosol sulfate, dry deposition of sulfur dioxide to the Earth's surface, and the heterogeneous oxidation of SO 2 in aerosols and clouds.

  11. Atmospheric CO2 observations and models suggest strong carbon uptake by forests in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkamp, Kay; Mikaloff Fletcher, Sara E.; Brailsford, Gordon; Smale, Dan; Moore, Stuart; Keller, Elizabeth D.; Baisden, W. Troy; Mukai, Hitoshi; Stephens, Britton B.

    2017-01-01

    A regional atmospheric inversion method has been developed to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of CO2 sinks and sources across New Zealand for 2011-2013. This approach infers net air-sea and air-land CO2 fluxes from measurement records, using back-trajectory simulations from the Numerical Atmospheric dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME) Lagrangian dispersion model, driven by meteorology from the New Zealand Limited Area Model (NZLAM) weather prediction model. The inversion uses in situ measurements from two fixed sites, Baring Head on the southern tip of New Zealand's North Island (41.408° S, 174.871° E) and Lauder from the central South Island (45.038° S, 169.684° E), and ship board data from monthly cruises between Japan, New Zealand, and Australia. A range of scenarios is used to assess the sensitivity of the inversion method to underlying assumptions and to ensure robustness of the results. The results indicate a strong seasonal cycle in terrestrial land fluxes from the South Island of New Zealand, especially in western regions covered by indigenous forest, suggesting higher photosynthetic and respiratory activity than is evident in the current a priori land process model. On the annual scale, the terrestrial biosphere in New Zealand is estimated to be a net CO2 sink, removing 98 (±37) Tg CO2 yr-1 from the atmosphere on average during 2011-2013. This sink is much larger than the reported 27 Tg CO2 yr-1 from the national inventory for the same time period. The difference can be partially reconciled when factors related to forest and agricultural management and exports, fossil fuel emission estimates, hydrologic fluxes, and soil carbon change are considered, but some differences are likely to remain. Baseline uncertainty, model transport uncertainty, and limited sensitivity to the northern half of the North Island are the main contributors to flux uncertainty.

  12. Method to characterize directional changes in Arctic sea ice drift and associated deformation due to synoptic atmospheric variations using Lagrangian dispersion statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Lukovich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A framework is developed to assess the directional changes in sea ice drift paths and associated deformation processes in response to atmospheric forcing. The framework is based on Lagrangian statistical analyses leveraging particle dispersion theory which tells us whether ice drift is in a subdiffusive, diffusive, ballistic, or superdiffusive dynamical regime using single-particle (absolute dispersion statistics. In terms of sea ice deformation, the framework uses two- and three-particle dispersion to characterize along- and across-shear transport as well as differential kinematic parameters. The approach is tested with GPS beacons deployed in triplets on sea ice in the southern Beaufort Sea at varying distances from the coastline in fall of 2009 with eight individual events characterized. One transition in particular follows the sea level pressure (SLP high on 8 October in 2009 while the sea ice drift was in a superdiffusive dynamic regime. In this case, the dispersion scaling exponent (which is a slope between single-particle absolute dispersion of sea ice drift and elapsed time changed from superdiffusive (α ∼ 3 to ballistic (α ∼ 2 as the SLP was rounding its maximum pressure value. Following this shift between regimes, there was a loss in synchronicity between sea ice drift and atmospheric motion patterns. While this is only one case study, the outcomes suggest similar studies be conducted on more buoy arrays to test momentum transfer linkages between storms and sea ice responses as a function of dispersion regime states using scaling exponents. The tools and framework developed in this study provide a unique characterization technique to evaluate these states with respect to sea ice processes in general. Application of these techniques can aid ice hazard assessments and weather forecasting in support of marine transportation and indigenous use of near-shore Arctic areas.

  13. Method to characterize directional changes in Arctic sea ice drift and associated deformation due to synoptic atmospheric variations using Lagrangian dispersion statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukovich, Jennifer V.; Geiger, Cathleen A.; Barber, David G.

    2017-07-01

    A framework is developed to assess the directional changes in sea ice drift paths and associated deformation processes in response to atmospheric forcing. The framework is based on Lagrangian statistical analyses leveraging particle dispersion theory which tells us whether ice drift is in a subdiffusive, diffusive, ballistic, or superdiffusive dynamical regime using single-particle (absolute) dispersion statistics. In terms of sea ice deformation, the framework uses two- and three-particle dispersion to characterize along- and across-shear transport as well as differential kinematic parameters. The approach is tested with GPS beacons deployed in triplets on sea ice in the southern Beaufort Sea at varying distances from the coastline in fall of 2009 with eight individual events characterized. One transition in particular follows the sea level pressure (SLP) high on 8 October in 2009 while the sea ice drift was in a superdiffusive dynamic regime. In this case, the dispersion scaling exponent (which is a slope between single-particle absolute dispersion of sea ice drift and elapsed time) changed from superdiffusive (α ˜ 3) to ballistic (α ˜ 2) as the SLP was rounding its maximum pressure value. Following this shift between regimes, there was a loss in synchronicity between sea ice drift and atmospheric motion patterns. While this is only one case study, the outcomes suggest similar studies be conducted on more buoy arrays to test momentum transfer linkages between storms and sea ice responses as a function of dispersion regime states using scaling exponents. The tools and framework developed in this study provide a unique characterization technique to evaluate these states with respect to sea ice processes in general. Application of these techniques can aid ice hazard assessments and weather forecasting in support of marine transportation and indigenous use of near-shore Arctic areas.

  14. ARAC dispersion modeling support for January-March 1995 Vandenberg AFB launches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskett, R. L.; Pace, J. C.

    1995-05-01

    The Glory Trip (GT) 17-PA Peacekeeper launch originally scheduled at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) between 15 and 20 November 1994 was cancelled based on modeled toxic exhaust cloud calculations. The Missile Flight Control Branch, 30th Space Wing Safety Office (30 SW/SEY), made several successive 'No Go' decisions using Version 7.05 Rocket Exhaust Effluent Dispersion Model (REEDM) with forecasted meteorological conditions. REEDM runs made from T-14 hours to T-30 minutes predicted that ground-level concentrations of hydrogen chloride (HCl) gas from the catastrophic abort case would exceed 5 ppM, the 'instantaneous' ambient air concentration 'Tier 2' limit at that time, modeled as a peak 1-minute cloud centerline concentration. Depending on the forecasted wind direction and speed at launch time, this limit was predicted to be exceeded sometimes at Base Housing, approximately 10 km southeast of the launch, and during other launch windows at the town of Casmalia, about 5 km east- southeast. In late December 1994, the LLNL Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) program modeled the aborted November 1994 Peacekeeper launch and compared its results with REEDM. This initial comparison showed that the ARAC model predicted values about 1/3 as large as REEDM for the limiting case at Base Housing. Subsequently ARAC was asked to provide real-time modeling support to 30 SW/SEY during the rescheduled Peacekeeper GT 17-PA launch in January 1995 and two Minuteman launches in February and March. This report first briefly discusses the model differences and then summarizes the results of the three supported launches.

  15. Internal atmospheric noise characteristics in twentieth century coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colfescu, Ioana; Schneider, Edwin K.

    2017-09-01

    The statistical characteristics of the atmospheric internal variability (hereafter internal atmospheric noise) for surface pressure (PS) in twentieth century simulations of a coupled general circulation model are documented. The atmospheric noise is determined from daily post-industrial (1871-1998) Community Climate System Model 3 simulations by removing the SST and externally forced responses from the total fields. The forced responses are found from atmosphere-only simulations forced by the SST and external forcing of the coupled runs. However, we do not address the influence of the SST variability on the synoptic scale high frequency weather noise.The spatial patterns of the main seasonal modes of atmospheric noise variability are found for boreal winter and summer from empirical orthogonal function analyses performed globally and for various regions, including the North Atlantic, the North Pacific, and the equatorial Pacific. The temporal characteristics of the modes are illustrated by power spectra and probability density functions (PDF) of the principal components (PC). Our findings show that, for two different realizations of noise, the variability is dominated by large scale spatial structures of the atmospheric noise that resemble observed patterns, and that their relative amplitudes in the CGCM and AGCM simulations are very similar. The regional expression of the dominant global mode, a seasonally dependent AO-like or AAO-like pattern is also found in the regional analyses, with similar time dependence. The PCs in the CGCM and the corresponding SST forced AGCM simulations are uncorrelated, but the spectra and PDFs of the CGCM and AGCM PCs are similar.The temporal structures of the noise PCs are white at timescales larger than few months, so that these modes can be thought of as stochastic forcings (in time) for the climate system. The PDFs of the noise PCs are not statistically distinguishable from Gaussian distributions with the same standard deviation

  16. Proposed ozone reference models for the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, G. M.; Young, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    Since the publication of the last COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA 72), large amounts of ozone data acquired from satellites have become available in addition to increasing quantities of rocketsonde, balloonsonde, Dobson, M83, and Umkehr measurements. From the available archived satellite data, models are developed for the new CIRA using 5 satellite experiments (Nimbus 7 SBUV and LIMS, AEM-2 SAGE, and SME IR and UVS) of the monthly latitudinal and altitudinal variations in the ozone mixing ratio in the middle atmosphere. Standard deviations and interannual variations are also quantified. The satellite models are shown to agree well with a previous reference model based on rocket and balloon measurements.

  17. Coupled Atmospheric Chemistry Schemes for Modeling Regional and Global Atmospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, E.; Stockwell, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric chemistry models require chemical reaction mechanisms to simulate the production of air pollution. GACM (Global Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism) is intended for use in global scale atmospheric chemistry models to provide chemical boundary conditions for regional scale simulations by models such as CMAQ. GACM includes additional chemistry for marine environments while reducing its treatment of the chemistry needed for highly polluted urban regions. This keeps GACM's size small enough to allow it to be used efficiently in global models. GACM's chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOC) is highly compatible with the VOC chemistry in RACM2 allowing a global model with GACM to provide VOC boundary conditions to a regional scale model with RACM2 with reduced error. The GACM-RACM2 system of mechanisms should yield more accurate forecasts by regional air quality models such as CMAQ. Chemical box models coupled with the regional and global atmospheric chemistry mechanisms (RACM2 & GACM) will be used to make simulations of tropospheric ozone, nitric oxides, and volatile organic compounds that are produced in regional and global domains. The simulations will focus on the Los Angeles' South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) where the Pacific Ocean meets a highly polluted urban area. These two mechanisms will be compared on the basis of simulated ozone concentrations over this marine-urban region. Simulations made with the more established RACM2 will be compared with simulations made with the newer GACM. In addition WRF-Chem will be used to simulate how RACM2 will produce regional simulations of tropospheric ozone and NOx, which can be further, analyzed for air quality impacts. Both the regional and global model in WRF-Chem will be used to predict how the concentrations of ozone and nitrogen oxides change over land and ocean. The air quality model simulation results will be applied to EPA's BenMAP-CE (Environmental Benefits Mapping & Analysis Program-Community Edition

  18. A dynamic approach for the impact of a toxic gas dispersion hazard considering human behaviour and dispersion modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovreglio, Ruggiero; Ronchi, Enrico; Maragkos, Georgios; Beji, Tarek; Merci, Bart

    2016-11-15

    The release of toxic gases due to natural/industrial accidents or terrorist attacks in populated areas can have tragic consequences. To prevent and evaluate the effects of these disasters different approaches and modelling tools have been introduced in the literature. These instruments are valuable tools for risk managers doing risk assessment of threatened areas. Despite the significant improvements in hazard assessment in case of toxic gas dispersion, these analyses do not generally include the impact of human behaviour and people movement during emergencies. This work aims at providing an approach which considers both modelling of gas dispersion and evacuation movement in order to improve the accuracy of risk assessment for disasters involving toxic gases. The approach is applied to a hypothetical scenario including a ship releasing Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on a crowd attending a music festival. The difference between the results obtained with existing static methods (people do not move) and a dynamic approach (people move away from the danger) which considers people movement with different degrees of sophistication (either a simple linear path or more complex behavioural modelling) is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermosphere Extension of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-04

    for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. [40] Robert Lysak thanks the reviewers for their assistance in evaluating...F. Muller, L. K. Emmons , and M. A. Carroll (1998), MOZART: A global chemical transport model for ozone and related chemical tracers: 2. Model results

  20. Atmospheric modelling for seasonal prediction at the CSIR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, WA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available by observed monthly sea-surface temperature (SST) and sea-ice fields. The AGCM is the conformal-cubic atmospheric model (CCAM) administered by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. Since the model is forced with observed rather than predicted...

  1. Challenges in Modeling of the Global Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjic, Zavisa; Djurdjevic, Vladimir; Vasic, Ratko; Black, Tom

    2015-04-01

    The massively parallel computer architectures require that some widely adopted modeling paradigms be reconsidered in order to utilize more productively the power of parallel processing. For high computational efficiency with distributed memory, each core should work on a small subdomain of the full integration domain, and exchange only few rows of halo data with the neighbouring cores. However, the described scenario implies that the discretization used in the model is horizontally local. The spherical geometry further complicates the problem. Various grid topologies will be discussed and examples will be shown. The latitude-longitude grid with local in space and explicit in time differencing has been an early choice and remained in use ever since. The problem with this method is that the grid size in the longitudinal direction tends to zero as the poles are approached. So, in addition to having unnecessarily high resolution near the poles, polar filtering has to be applied in order to use a time step of decent size. However, the polar filtering requires transpositions involving extra communications. The spectral transform method and the semi-implicit semi-Lagrangian schemes opened the way for a wide application of the spectral representation. With some variations, these techniques are used in most major centers. However, the horizontal non-locality is inherent to the spectral representation and implicit time differencing, which inhibits scaling on a large number of cores. In this respect the lat-lon grid with a fast Fourier transform represents a significant step in the right direction, particularly at high resolutions where the Legendre transforms become increasingly expensive. Other grids with reduced variability of grid distances such as various versions of the cubed sphere and the hexagonal/pentagonal ("soccer ball") grids were proposed almost fifty years ago. However, on these grids, large-scale (wavenumber 4 and 5) fictitious solutions ("grid imprinting

  2. Upper Atmosphere Neutral and Plasma Density Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-31

    Semidiurnal density amplitude vs. height and latitude at 429N. 15 Figure 2. Percent density variation vs. height and local time over the equator during...March. 16 Figure 3. Semidiurnal (top) and diurnal (bottom) density variations as a function of height near the equator , for the 1979 Kwajalein...M.W., Klobuchar , J.A. and Doherty, P.H. Evaluation of six iono- spheric models as predictors of total electron content, Radio Science, 26, p. 1007, 1991

  3. Analysis of attenuation and dispersion of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media by finite-difference modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shichuan; Song, Xianhai; Cai, Wei; Hu, Ying

    2018-01-01

    Viscoelasticity of Earth media has an important influence on Rayleigh-wave propagation. Therefore, it is necessary to study the attenuation and dispersion of Rayleigh-wave by numerical modeling to better understand Rayleigh-wave behaviors in Earth media. Modeling adopts a staggered finite-difference (FD) scheme, which calculates the spatial derivatives by a 12th-order operator and the time derivatives by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. In time-space domain, the accuracy of FD method is demonstrated through comparing the modeling results with the analytical solution in an elastic half-space. In frequency-velocity domain, the correctness of modeling results is verified via comparing the dispersive images with the theoretical dispersion curves of Rayleigh-wave. The attenuation and dispersion of Rayleigh-wave are analyzed by comparisons between elastic and viscoelastic modeling results in the homogeneous half-space models in terms of the wave field snapshots, the synthetic seismograms, and the dispersive images, respectively. The two-layer models are also simulated to further investigate the attenuation and dispersion of Rayleigh-wave in viscoelastic layered media. Results show that the viscoelastic Rayleigh-wave presents substantial differences in amplitude and phase velocity compared with the elastic case. Viscoelasticity of media arouses amplitude attenuation of Rayleigh-wave. The high-frequency waves are attenuated more severely than the lower-frequency waves, and the attenuation degree is severe increasingly with offset increasing. Viscoelasticity of media also causes the phase velocity dispersion of Rayleigh-wave. The phase velocity ratio of viscoelastic Rayleigh-wave respecting to the corresponding elastic one increases with frequency, and the resolution of dispersion energy is lower than the elastic one. The attenuation and dispersion of Rayleigh-wave are prominent increasingly with Q decreasing.

  4. Box models for the evolution of atmospheric oxygen: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    A simple 3-box model of the atmosphere/ocean system is used to describe the various stages in the evolution of atmospheric oxygen. In Stage I, which probably lasted until redbeds began to form about 2.0 Ga ago, the Earth's surface environment was generally devoid of free O2, except possibly in localized regions of high productivity in the surface ocean. In Stage II, which may have lasted for less than 150 Ma, the atmosphere and surface ocean were oxidizing, while the deep ocean remained anoxic. In Stage III, which commenced with the disappearance of banded iron formations around 1.85 Ga ago and has lasted until the present, all three surface reservoirs contained appreciable amounts of free O2. Recent and not-so-recent controversies regarding the abundance of oxygen in the Archean atmosphere are identified and discussed. The rate of O2 increase during the Middle and Late Proterozoic is identified as another outstanding question.

  5. GEOS Atmospheric Model: Challenges at Exascale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, William M.; Suarez, Max J.

    2017-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) model at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) is used to simulate the multi-scale variability of the Earth's weather and climate, and is used primarily to assimilate conventional and satellite-based observations for weather forecasting and reanalysis. In addition, assimilations coupled to an ocean model are used for longer-term forecasting (e.g., El Nino) on seasonal to interannual times-scales. The GMAO's research activities, including system development, focus on numerous time and space scales, as detailed on the GMAO website, where they are tabbed under five major themes: Weather Analysis and Prediction; Seasonal-Decadal Analysis and Prediction; Reanalysis; Global Mesoscale Modeling, and Observing System Science. A brief description of the GEOS systems can also be found at the GMAO website. GEOS executes as a collection of earth system components connected through the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). The ESMF layer is supplemented with the MAPL (Modeling, Analysis, and Prediction Layer) software toolkit developed at the GMAO, which facilitates the organization of the computational components into a hierarchical architecture. GEOS systems run in parallel using a horizontal decomposition of the Earth's sphere into processing elements (PEs). Communication between PEs is primarily through a message passing framework, using the message passing interface (MPI), and through explicit use of node-level shared memory access via the SHMEM (Symmetric Hierarchical Memory access) protocol. Production GEOS weather prediction systems currently run at 12.5-kilometer horizontal resolution with 72 vertical levels decomposed into PEs associated with 5,400 MPI processes. Research GEOS systems run at resolutions as fine as 1.5 kilometers globally using as many as 30,000 MPI processes. Looking forward, these systems can be expected to see a 2 times increase in horizontal resolution every two to three years, as well as

  6. Modelling drivers of mangrove propagule dispersal and restoration of abandoned shrimp farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Di Nitto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Propagule dispersal of four mangrove species Rhizophora mucronata, R. apiculata, Ceriops tagal and Avicennia officinalis in the Pambala–Chilaw Lagoon Complex (Sri Lanka was studied by combining a hydrodynamic model with species-specific knowledge on propagule dispersal behaviour. Propagule transport was simulated using a finite-volume advection-diffusion model to investigate the effect of dispersal vectors (tidal flow, freshwater discharge and wind, trapping agents (retention by vegetation and seed characteristics (buoyancy on propagule dispersal patterns. Sensitivity analysis showed that smaller propagules, like the oval-shaped propagules of Avicennia officinalis, dispersed over larger distances and were most sensitive to changing values of retention by mangrove vegetation compared to larger, torpedo-shaped propagules of Rhizophora spp. and C. tagal. Directional propagule dispersal in this semi-enclosed lagoon with a small tidal range was strongly concentrated towards the edges of the lagoon and channels. Short distance dispersal appeared to be the main dispersal strategy for all four studied species, with most of the propagules being retained within the vegetation. Only a small proportion (max. 5% of propagules left the lagoon through a channel connecting the lagoon with the open sea. Wind significantly influenced dispersal distance and direction once propagules entered the lagoon or adjacent channels. Implications of these findings for mangrove restoration were tested by simulating partial removal in the model of dikes around abandoned shrimp ponds to restore tidal hydrology and facilitate natural recolonisation by mangroves. The specific location of dike removal, (with respect to the vicinity of mangroves and independently suitable hydrodynamic flows, was found to significantly affect the resultant quantities and species of inflowing propagules and hence the potential effectiveness of natural regeneration. These results demonstrate the

  7. Modelling drivers of mangrove propagule dispersal and restoration of abandoned shrimp farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nitto, D.; Erftemeijer, P. L. A.; van Beek, J. K. L.; Dahdouh-Guebas, F.; Higazi, L.; Quisthoudt, K.; Jayatissa, L. P.; Koedam, N.

    2013-07-01

    Propagule dispersal of four mangrove species Rhizophora mucronata, R. apiculata, Ceriops tagal and Avicennia officinalis in the Pambala-Chilaw Lagoon Complex (Sri Lanka) was studied by combining a hydrodynamic model with species-specific knowledge on propagule dispersal behaviour. Propagule transport was simulated using a finite-volume advection-diffusion model to investigate the effect of dispersal vectors (tidal flow, freshwater discharge and wind), trapping agents (retention by vegetation) and seed characteristics (buoyancy) on propagule dispersal patterns. Sensitivity analysis showed that smaller propagules, like the oval-shaped propagules of Avicennia officinalis, dispersed over larger distances and were most sensitive to changing values of retention by mangrove vegetation compared to larger, torpedo-shaped propagules of Rhizophora spp. and C. tagal. Directional propagule dispersal in this semi-enclosed lagoon with a small tidal range was strongly concentrated towards the edges of the lagoon and channels. Short distance dispersal appeared to be the main dispersal strategy for all four studied species, with most of the propagules being retained within the vegetation. Only a small proportion (max. 5%) of propagules left the lagoon through a channel connecting the lagoon with the open sea. Wind significantly influenced dispersal distance and direction once propagules entered the lagoon or adjacent channels. Implications of these findings for mangrove restoration were tested by simulating partial removal in the model of dikes around abandoned shrimp ponds to restore tidal hydrology and facilitate natural recolonisation by mangroves. The specific location of dike removal, (with respect to the vicinity of mangroves and independently suitable hydrodynamic flows), was found to significantly affect the resultant quantities and species of inflowing propagules and hence the potential effectiveness of natural regeneration. These results demonstrate the value of propagule

  8. Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System Modeling, Calibration, and Error Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.; VanNorman, John; Siemers, Paul M.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Munk, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI)/Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System (MEADS) project installed seven pressure ports through the MSL Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heatshield to measure heatshield surface pressures during entry. These measured surface pressures are used to generate estimates of atmospheric quantities based on modeled surface pressure distributions. In particular, the quantities to be estimated from the MEADS pressure measurements include the dynamic pressure, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip. This report describes the calibration of the pressure transducers utilized to reconstruct the atmospheric data and associated uncertainty models, pressure modeling and uncertainty analysis, and system performance results. The results indicate that the MEADS pressure measurement system hardware meets the project requirements.

  9. The Role of Dispersion in Radionuclide Transport - Data and Modeling Requirements: Revision No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2004-02-01

    This document is the collaborative effort of the members of an ad hoc subcommittee of the Underground Test Area Project Technical Working Group. This subcommittee was to answer questions and concerns raised by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, regarding Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units (CAUs) 101 and 102. The document attempts to synthesize the combined comments made by each member of this subcommittee into insights made in the role of dispersion in radionuclide transport data and modeling. Dispersion is one of many processes that control the concentration of radionuclides in groundwater beneath the Nevada Test Site where CAUs 101 and 102 are located. In order to understand the role of dispersion in radionuclide transport, there is a critical need for CAU- or site-specific data related to transport parameters which is currently lacking, particularly in the case of Western a nd Central Pahute Mesa. The purpose of this technical basis document is to: (1) define dispersion and its role in contaminant transport, (2) present a synopsis of field-scale dispersion measurements, (3) provide a literature review of theories to explain field-scale dispersion, (4) suggest approaches to account for dispersion in CAU-scale radionuclide modeling, and (5) to determine if additional dispersion measurements should be made at this time.

  10. Towards a Global Unified Model of Europa's Tenuous Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plainaki, Christina; Cassidy, Tim A.; Shematovich, Valery I.; Milillo, Anna; Wurz, Peter; Vorburger, Audrey; Roth, Lorenz; Galli, André; Rubin, Martin; Blöcker, Aljona; Brandt, Pontus C.; Crary, Frank; Dandouras, Iannis; Jia, Xianzhe; Grassi, Davide; Hartogh, Paul; Lucchetti, Alice; McGrath, Melissa; Mangano, Valeria; Mura, Alessandro; Orsini, Stefano; Paranicas, Chris; Radioti, Aikaterini; Retherford, Kurt D.; Saur, Joachim; Teolis, Ben

    2018-02-01

    Despite the numerous modeling efforts of the past, our knowledge on the radiation-induced physical and chemical processes in Europa's tenuous atmosphere and on the exchange of material between the moon's surface and Jupiter's magnetosphere remains limited. In lack of an adequate number of in situ observations, the existence of a wide variety of models based on different scenarios and considerations has resulted in a fragmentary understanding of the interactions of the magnetospheric ion population with both the moon's icy surface and neutral gas envelope. Models show large discrepancy in the source and loss rates of the different constituents as well as in the determination of the spatial distribution of the atmosphere and its variation with time. The existence of several models based on very different approaches highlights the need of a detailed comparison among them with the final goal of developing a unified model of Europa's tenuous atmosphere. The availability to the science community of such a model could be of particular interest in view of the planning of the future mission observations (e.g., ESA's JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) mission, and NASA's Europa Clipper mission). We review the existing models of Europa's tenuous atmosphere and discuss each of their derived characteristics of the neutral environment. We also discuss discrepancies among different models and the assumptions of the plasma environment in the vicinity of Europa. A summary of the existing observations of both the neutral and the plasma environments at Europa is also presented. The characteristics of a global unified model of the tenuous atmosphere are, then, discussed. Finally, we identify needed future experimental work in laboratories and propose some suitable observation strategies for upcoming missions.

  11. Evaluation of Current Computer Models Applied in the DOE Complex for SAR Analysis of Radiological Dispersion & Consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Kula, K. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); East, J. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Weber, A. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Savino, A. V. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Mazzola, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The evaluation of atmospheric dispersion/ radiological dose analysis codes included fifteen models identified in authorization basis safety analysis at DOE facilities, or from regulatory and research agencies where past or current work warranted inclusion of a computer model. All computer codes examined were reviewed using general and specific evaluation criteria developed by the Working Group. The criteria were based on DOE Orders and other regulatory standards and guidance for performing bounding and conservative dose calculations. Included were three categories of criteria: (1) Software Quality/User Interface; (2) Technical Model Adequacy; and (3) Application/Source Term Environment. A consensus-based limited quantitative ranking process was used to base an order of model preference as both an overall conclusion, and under specific conditions.

  12. Forecasting Models for Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don Pollen Count Showing an Alternate Dispersal Rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Ito

    2008-01-01

    Conclusions: An alternate pollen dispersal rhythm represented by a dummy variable in the multiple regression analysis plays a key role in improving forecasting models for the total annual sugi pollen count.

  13. Dispersion processes in coastal waters - Some outstanding practical issues for monitoring and modelling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Swamy, G.N.

    This paper highlights on the issues of dispersion processes in coastal waters like space-time description of field parameters, limitation of physical models, limitations of numerical formulations, Eulerian-Lagrangian transformations, shear...

  14. Analysis of air pollution from swine production by using air dispersion model and GIS in Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarr, Joachim H; Goïta, Kalifa; Desmarais, Camille

    2010-01-01

    Swine production, the second most important contributor to Quebec's agricultural revenue, faces many problems. Intensive piggeries, with up to 599 animal units, are used to raise finishing pigs for slaughter. Among the great number of gaseous species emitted to the atmospheric environment from livestock buildings and manure storage units is NH3, which is one of the most important and most offensive with respect to human health. Under appropriate meteorological and topographical conditions, gaseous contaminants can spread and cause a public nuisance--up to a 1-km radius around the farm. To mitigate these effects, the Quebec Government adopted regulations that set minimum buffer distances to be observed by any expansion of an existing or new pig farm. The objectives of this study were (i) to assess the efficiency of the current buffer distance prescriptions in Quebec in mitigating effects of air pollution from swine units and (ii) to identify potential areas for establishing pig farm operations that will not be offensive to people. The air dispersion American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) with receptors distributed at 1.6 km around each source was used first, followed by a spatial geographic information system (GIS) model. Results from the dispersion model showed that the highest hourly concentration with a 99.5% compliance frequency for a single farm was 3078.1 microg/m3 and exceeded the NH3 odor criterion hourly standard set by the Quebec Government at 183.4 microg/m3. Thus, for public safety, densely populated areas like housing developments must be located >1300 m from a pig farm. This distance is in the range of setback distances (723 to 1447 m) obtained by using abacuses defined in the L'Erable Regional County Municipality. That is why we can say the current rules established by the Quebec Government, if rigorously applied, can prevent odor nuisance, due to NH3 emission, from swine farms. In the spatial model

  15. Single species victory in a two-site, two-species model of population dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Jack; Sander, Len; Kessler, David

    2008-03-01

    We study the behavior of two species, differentiated only by their dispersal rates in an environment providing heterogeneous growth rates. Previous deterministic studies have shown that the slower-dispersal species always drives the faster species to extinction, while stochastic studies show that the opposite case can occur given small enough population and spatial heterogeneity. Other models of similar systems demonstrate the existence of an optimum dispersal rate, suggesting that distinguishing the species as faster or slower is insufficient. We here study the interface of these models for a small spatial system and determine the conditions of stability for a single species outcome.

  16. Modeling Atmospheric Emission for CMB Ground-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errard, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Baccigalupi, C.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Cukierman, A.; Delabrouille, J.; Dobbs, M.; Ducout, A.; Elleflot, T.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Feeney, S.; Gilbert, A.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Hill, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jeong, O.; Katayama, N.; Kaufman, J.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Leon, D.; Linder, E.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Miller, N. J.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Okamura, T.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Puglisi, G.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Rotermund, K. M.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B. D.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Tajima, O.; Takakura, S.; Tikhomirov, A.; Tomaru, T.; Whitehorn, N.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.

    2015-08-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3D-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive a new analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using an original numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the polarbear-i project first season data set. We derive a new 1.0% upper limit on the linear polarization fraction of atmospheric emission. We also compare our results to previous studies and weather station measurements. The proposed model can be used for realistic simulations of future ground-based CMB observations.

  17. Applying Atmospheric Measurements to Constrain Parameters of Terrestrial Source Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, E. J.; Kasischke, E. S.; Allen, D. J.

    2004-12-01

    Quantitative inversions of atmospheric measurements have been widely applied to constrain atmospheric budgets of a range of trace gases. Experiments of this type have revealed persistent discrepancies between 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' estimates of source magnitudes. The most common atmospheric inversion uses the absolute magnitude as the sole parameter for each source, and returns the optimal value of that parameter. In order for atmospheric measurements to be useful for improving 'bottom-up' models of terrestrial sources, information about other properties of the sources must be extracted. As the density and quality of atmospheric trace gas measurements improve, examination of higher-order properties of trace gas sources should become possible. Our model of boreal forest fire emissions is parameterized to permit flexible examination of the key uncertainties in this source. Using output from this model together with the UM CTM, we examined the sensitivity of CO concentration measurements made by the MOPITT instrument to various uncertainties in the boreal source: geographic distribution of burned area, fire type (crown fires vs. surface fires), and fuel consumption in above-ground and ground-layer fuels. Our results indicate that carefully designed inversion experiments have the potential to help constrain not only the absolute magnitudes of terrestrial sources, but also the key uncertainties associated with 'bottom-up' estimates of those sources.

  18. Validation of coupled atmosphere-fire behavior models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossert, J.E.; Reisner, J.M.; Linn, R.R.; Winterkamp, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Schaub, R. [Dynamac Corp., Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States); Riggan, P.J. [Forest Service, Riverside, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Recent advances in numerical modeling and computer power have made it feasible to simulate the dynamical interaction and feedback between the heat and turbulence induced by wildfires and the local atmospheric wind and temperature fields. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, the authors have developed a modeling system that includes this interaction by coupling a high resolution atmospheric dynamics model, HIGRAD, with a fire behavior model, BEHAVE, to predict the spread of wildfires. The HIGRAD/BEHAVE model is run at very high resolution to properly resolve the fire/atmosphere interaction. At present, these coupled wildfire model simulations are computationally intensive. The additional complexity of these models require sophisticated methods for assuring their reliability in real world applications. With this in mind, a substantial part of the research effort is directed at model validation. Several instrumented prescribed fires have been conducted with multi-agency support and participation from chaparral, marsh, and scrub environments in coastal areas of Florida and inland California. In this paper, the authors first describe the data required to initialize the components of the wildfire modeling system. Then they present results from one of the Florida fires, and discuss a strategy for further testing and improvement of coupled weather/wildfire models.

  19. Model Atmospheres and Transit Spectra for Hot Rocky Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupu, Roxana

    We propose to build a versatile set of self-consistent atmospheric models for hot rocky exoplanets and use them to predict their transit and eclipse spectra. Hot rocky exoplanets will form the majority of small planets in close-in orbits to be discovered by the TESS and Kepler K2 missions, and offer the best opportunity for characterization with current and future instruments. We will use fully non-grey radiative-convective atmospheric structure codes with cloud formation and vertical mixing, combined with a self-consistent treatment of gas chemistry above the magma ocean. Being in equilibrium with the surface, the vaporized rock material can be a good tracer of the bulk composition of the planet. We will derive the atmospheric structure and escape rates considering both volatile-free and volatile bearing compositions, which reflect the diversity of hot rocky planet atmospheres. Our models will inform follow- up observations with JWST and ground-based instruments, aid the interpretation of transit and eclipse spectra, and provide a better understanding of volatile loss in these atmospheres. Such results will help refine our picture of rocky planet formation and evolution. Planets in ultra-short period (USP) orbits are a special class of hot rocky exoplanets. As shown by Kepler, these planets are generally smaller than 2 Earth radii, suggesting that they are likely to be rocky and could have lost their volatiles through photo-evaporation. Being close to their host stars, these planets are ultra-hot, with estimated temperatures of 1000-3000 K. A number of USP planets have been already discovered (e.g. Kepler-78 b, CoRoT-7 b, Kepler-10 b), and this number is expected to grow by confirming additional planet candidates. The characterization of planets on ultra-short orbits is advantageous due to the larger number of observable transits, and the larger transit signal in the case of an evaporating atmosphere. Much advance has been made in understanding and characterizing

  20. Comparison of a Riverine Waterborne Transport and Dispersion Model and Yellowstone River Dye Releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    and Dispersion Model and Yellowstone River Dye Releases N. Platt, Project Leader J. L. Palguta January 2015...F E N S E A N A L Y S E S IDA Document D-5330 Comparison of a Riverine Waterborne Transport and Dispersion Model and Yellowstone ...conducted in the Yellowstone River. We selected this study because it provided all the necessary information for setting up ICWater simulations and

  1. Fractional Order Modeling of Atmospheric Turbulence - A More Accurate Modeling Methodology for Aero Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George

    2014-01-01

    The presentation covers a recently developed methodology to model atmospheric turbulence as disturbances for aero vehicle gust loads and for controls development like flutter and inlet shock position. The approach models atmospheric turbulence in their natural fractional order form, which provides for more accuracy compared to traditional methods like the Dryden model, especially for high speed vehicle. The presentation provides a historical background on atmospheric turbulence modeling and the approaches utilized for air vehicles. This is followed by the motivation and the methodology utilized to develop the atmospheric turbulence fractional order modeling approach. Some examples covering the application of this method are also provided, followed by concluding remarks.

  2. Modelling Nitrogen Oxides in Los Angeles Using a Hybrid Dispersion/Land Use Regression Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, Darren C.

    The goal of this dissertation is to develop models capable of predicting long term annual average NOx concentrations in urban areas. Predictions from simple meteorological dispersion models and seasonal proxies for NO2 oxidation were included as covariates in a land use regression (LUR) model for NOx in Los Angeles, CA. The NO x measurements were obtained from a comprehensive measurement campaign that is part of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Air Pollution Study (MESA Air). Simple land use regression models were initially developed using a suite of GIS-derived land use variables developed from various buffer sizes (R²=0.15). Caline3, a simple steady-state Gaussian line source model, was initially incorporated into the land-use regression framework. The addition of this spatio-temporally varying Caline3 covariate improved the simple LUR model predictions. The extent of improvement was much more pronounced for models based solely on the summer measurements (simple LUR: R²=0.45; Caline3/LUR: R²=0.70), than it was for models based on all seasons (R²=0.20). We then used a Lagrangian dispersion model to convert static land use covariates for population density, commercial/industrial area into spatially and temporally varying covariates. The inclusion of these covariates resulted in significant improvement in model prediction (R²=0.57). In addition to the dispersion model covariates described above, a two-week average value of daily peak-hour ozone was included as a surrogate of the oxidation of NO2 during the different sampling periods. This additional covariate further improved overall model performance for all models. The best model by 10-fold cross validation (R²=0.73) contained the Caline3 prediction, a static covariate for length of A3 roads within 50 meters, the Calpuff-adjusted covariates derived from both population density and industrial/commercial land area, and the ozone covariate. This model was tested against annual average NOx

  3. A simulation of pollutants dispersion from Dorud cement plant using SCREEN3 Software Model

    OpenAIRE

    Yosef Omidi-Khaniabadi; GHolam reza Goudarzi; Rajab Rashidi; Sodabe Zare; Hoshang Armin; Mehdi Jourvand

    2016-01-01

    Background: With regard to application of the oil fuel at winter in Dorud cement plant, the aim of this study was to investigaten NOX, SO2 and particulate matter (PM) dispersion from cement plant stack at downwind direction and atmospheric different conditions and thermal inversion in winter season up to distance 5000 m from emission source and its comparison with clean air and NAAQS standard. Materials and Methods: In this study, the sampling gases exited from cement plant stack were car...

  4. Gyrotactic swimmer dispersion in pipe flow: experimental challenge of competing models

    CERN Document Server

    Croze, O A; Bees, M A

    2016-01-01

    Suspensions of microswimmers are a rich source of fascinating new fluid mechanics. Recently we predicted the nonclassical pipe flow dispersion of gyrotactic microalgae, whose orientation is biased by gravity and flow shear. Analytical theory predicts that these active swimmers disperse in a markedly distinct manner from passive tracers (Taylor dispersion). Dispersing swimmers display nonzero drift and effective diffusivity that is non-monotonic with Peclet number. Such predictions agree with numerical simulations, but hitherto have not been tested experimentally. Here, we extend the theory to realistically describe suspensions of negatively buoyant bi-flagellate algae and obtain new predictions for the model species Dunaliella salina, parametrised using tracking video microscopy. We then present a new experimental method to measure gyrotactic dispersion using fluorescently stained D. salina and provide a preliminary comparison with predictions of a nonzero drift above the mean flow. Finally, we propose furthe...

  5. A Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean-Wave Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, R. A.; Smith, T.; Rogers, W. E.; Jensen, T. G.; Chu, P.; Campbell, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    A growing interest in the impacts that large and small scale ocean and atmospheric events (El Niño, hurricanes, etc.) have on weather forecasting has led to the coupling of atmospheric, ocean circulation and ocean wave models. The Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS™ ) consists of the Navy's atmospheric model coupled to the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) and the wave models SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) and WAVEWATCH III (WW3™). In a fully coupled mode, COAMPS, NCOM, and SWAN (or WW3) may be integrated concurrently so that currents and water levels, wave-induced stress, bottom drag, Stokes drift current, precipitation, and surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and momentum are exchanged across the air-wave-sea interface. This coupling is facilitated through the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). The ESMF version of COAMPS is being transitioned to operational production centers at the Naval Oceanographic Office and the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center. Highlights from validation studies for the Florida Straits, Hurricane Ivan and the Adriatic Sea will be presented. COAMPS® is a registered trademark of the Naval Research Laboratory.

  6. Systematic evaluation of atmospheric chemistry-transport model CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Siour, Guillaume; Couvidat, Florian; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Turquety, Solene

    2017-04-01

    Regional-scale atmospheric chemistry-transport models (CTM) are used to develop air quality regulatory measures, to support environmentally sensitive decisions in the industry, and to address variety of scientific questions involving the atmospheric composition. Model performance evaluation with measurement data is critical to understand their limits and the degree of confidence in model results. CHIMERE CTM (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/) is a French national tool for operational forecast and decision support and is widely used in the international research community in various areas of atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, and environment (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/CW-articles.php). This work presents the model evaluation framework applied systematically to the new CHIMERE CTM versions in the course of the continuous model development. The framework uses three of the four CTM evaluation types identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS): operational, diagnostic, and dynamic. It allows to compare the overall model performance in subsequent model versions (operational evaluation), identify specific processes and/or model inputs that could be improved (diagnostic evaluation), and test the model sensitivity to the changes in air quality, such as emission reductions and meteorological events (dynamic evaluation). The observation datasets currently used for the evaluation are: EMEP (surface concentrations), AERONET (optical depths), and WOUDC (ozone sounding profiles). The framework is implemented as an automated processing chain and allows interactive exploration of the results via a web interface.

  7. Dispersion modeling of accidental releases of toxic gases - Comparison of the models and their utility for the fire brigades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, S.; Baumann-Stanzer, K.

    2009-04-01

    Dispersion modeling of accidental releases of toxic gases - Comparison of the models and their utility for the fire brigades. Sirma Stenzel, Kathrin Baumann-Stanzer In the case of accidental release of hazardous gases in the atmosphere, the emergency responders need a reliable and fast tool to assess the possible consequences and apply the optimal countermeasures. For hazard prediction and simulation of the hazard zones a number of air dispersion models are available. The most model packages (commercial or free of charge) include a chemical database, an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI) and automated graphical output for display the results, they are easy to use and can operate fast and effective during stress situations. The models are designed especially for analyzing different accidental toxic release scenarios ("worst-case scenarios"), preparing emergency response plans and optimal countermeasures as well as for real-time risk assessment and management. There are also possibilities for model direct coupling to automatic meteorological stations, in order to avoid uncertainties in the model output due to insufficient or incorrect meteorological data. Another key problem in coping with accidental toxic release is the relative width spectrum of regulations and values, like IDLH, ERPG, AEGL, MAK etc. and the different criteria for their application. Since the particulate emergency responders and organizations require for their purposes unequal regulations and values, it is quite difficult to predict the individual hazard areas. There are a quite number of research studies and investigations coping with the problem, anyway the end decision is up to the authorities. The research project RETOMOD (reference scenarios calculations for toxic gas releases - model systems and their utility for the fire brigade) was conducted by the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in cooperation with the Vienna fire brigade, OMV Refining & Marketing GmbH and

  8. Source-receptor matrix calculation with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model in backward mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Seibert

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to calculate linear-source receptor relationships for the transport of atmospheric trace substances with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM running in backward mode is shown and presented with many tests and examples. This mode requires only minor modifications of the forward LPDM. The derivation includes the action of sources and of any first-order processes (transformation with prescribed rates, dry and wet deposition, radioactive decay, etc.. The backward mode is computationally advantageous if the number of receptors is less than the number of sources considered. The combination of an LPDM with the backward (adjoint methodology is especially attractive for the application to point measurements, which can be handled without artificial numerical diffusion. Practical hints are provided for source-receptor calculations with different settings, both in forward and backward mode. The equivalence of forward and backward calculations is shown in simple tests for release and sampling of particles, pure wet deposition, pure convective redistribution and realistic transport over a short distance. Furthermore, an application example explaining measurements of Cs-137 in Stockholm as transport from areas contaminated heavily in the Chernobyl disaster is included.

  9. Models of the Solar Atmospheric Response to Flare Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I will present models of the solar atmospheric response to flare heating. The models solve the equations of non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics with an electron beam added as a flare energy source term. Radiative transfer is solved in detail for many important optically thick hydrogen and helium transitions and numerous optically thin EUV lines making the models ideally suited to study the emission that is produced during flares. I will pay special attention to understanding key EUV lines as well the mechanism for white light production. I will also present preliminary results of how the model solar atmosphere responds to Fletcher & Hudson type flare heating. I will compare this with the results from flare simulations using the standard thick target model.

  10. An Overview of Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Quality Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew S.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will include my personal research experience and an overview of atmospheric chemistry and air quality modeling to the participants of the NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP 2017). The presentation will also provide examples on ways to apply airborne observations for chemical transport (CTM) and air quality (AQ) model evaluation. CTM and AQ models are important tools in understanding tropospheric-stratospheric composition, atmospheric chemistry processes, meteorology, and air quality. This presentation will focus on how NASA scientist currently apply CTM and AQ models to better understand these topics. Finally, the importance of airborne observation in evaluating these topics and how in situ and remote sensing observations can be used to evaluate and improve CTM and AQ model predictions will be highlighted.

  11. Capturing Scale-Dependent Dispersion in Saturated Soils using both Local and Nonlocal Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrard, R. M.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, H.; Xia, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Conservative tracer transport in saturated soils can exhibit scale-dependent dispersion before reaching a Gaussian asymptote. This is most likely due to increasing flow field heterogeneity or the expansion of local velocity distribution experienced by the tracer particles with travel distance. A time nonlocal transport model, previously developed to capture this non-Fickian transport has exhibited an upscaling, sometimes constant, effective dispersion coefficient D from numerical simulations. However, the efficiency of this model has not been systematically checked against real-world data. This study applies and compares both the traditional advection-dispersion equation (ADE) and the time fractional ADE models to quantify solute dynamics moving through 10-meter-long soil columns, where the spatial trend of D can shed light on the scale-dependency of pre-asymptotic dispersion.

  12. Using observations to evaluate biosphere-atmosphere interactions in models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julia; Konings, Alexandra G.; Alemohammad, Seyed H.; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere interactions influence the hydrologic cycle by altering climate and weather patterns (Charney, 1975; Koster et al., 2006; Seneviratne et al., 2006), contributing up to 30% of precipitation and radiation variability in certain regions (Green et al., 2017). They have been shown to contribute to the persistence of drought in Europe (Seneviratne et al., 2006), as well as to increase rainfall in the Amazon (Spracklen et al., 2012). Thus, a true representation of these feedbacks in Earth System Models (ESMs) is crucial for accurate forecasting and planning. However, it has been difficult to validate the performance of ESMs since often-times surface and atmospheric flux data are scarce and/or difficult to observe. In this study, we use the results of a new global observational study (using remotely sensed solar-induced fluorescence to represent the biosphere flux) (Green et al., 2017) to determine how well a suite of 13 ESMs capture biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks. We perform a Conditional Multivariate Granger Causality analysis in the frequency domain with radiation, precipitation and temperature as atmospheric inputs and GPP as the biospheric input. Performing the analysis in the frequency domain allows for separation of feedbacks at different time-scales (subseasonal, seasonal or interannual). Our findings can be used to determine whether there is agreement between models, as well as, to pinpoint regions or time-scales of model bias or inaccuracy, which will provide insight on potential improvement. We demonstrate that in addition to the well-known problem of convective parameterization over land in models, the main issue in representing feedbacks between the land and the atmosphere is due to the misrepresentation of water stress. These results provide a direct quantitative assessment of feedbacks in models and how to improve them. References: Charney, J.G. Dynamics of deserts and drought in the Sahel. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological

  13. The NASA MSFC Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model-2007 Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, F.W.; Justus, C.G.

    2008-01-01

    Reference or standard atmospheric models have long been used for design and mission planning of various aerospace systems. The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM) was developed in response to the need for a design reference atmosphere that provides complete global geographical variability, and complete altitude coverage (surface to orbital altitudes) as well as complete seasonal and monthly variability of the thermodynamic variables and wind components. A unique feature of GRAM is that, addition to providing the geographical, height, and monthly variation of the mean atmospheric state, it includes the ability to simulate spatial and temporal perturbations in these atmospheric parameters (e.g. fluctuations due to turbulence and other atmospheric perturbation phenomena). A summary comparing GRAM features to characteristics and features of other reference or standard atmospheric models, can be found Guide to Reference and Standard Atmosphere Models. The original GRAM has undergone a series of improvements over the years with recent additions and changes. The software program is called Earth-GRAM2007 to distinguish it from similar programs for other bodies (e.g. Mars, Venus, Neptune, and Titan). However, in order to make this Technical Memorandum (TM) more readable, the software will be referred to simply as GRAM07 or GRAM unless additional clarity is needed. Section 1 provides an overview of the basic features of GRAM07 including the newly added features. Section 2 provides a more detailed description of GRAM07 and how the model output generated. Section 3 presents sample results. Appendices A and B describe the Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) data and the Global Gridded Air Statistics (GGUAS) database. Appendix C provides instructions for compiling and running GRAM07. Appendix D gives a description of the required NAMELIST format input. Appendix E gives sample output. Appendix F provides a list of available

  14. Comparison between conventional biofilters and biotrickling filters applied to waste bio-drying in terms of atmospheric dispersion and air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Marco; Ragazzi, Marco; Torretta, Vincenzo; Rada, Elena Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Biofiltration has been widely applied to remove odours and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial off-gas and mechanical-biological waste treatments. However, conventional open biofilters cannot guarantee an efficient dispersion of air pollutants emitted into the atmosphere. The aim of this paper is to compare conventional open biofilters with biotrickling filters (BTFs) in terms of VOC dispersion in the atmosphere and air quality in the vicinity of a hypothetical municipal solid waste bio-drying plant. Simulations of dispersion were carried out regarding two VOCs of interest due to their impact in terms of odours and cancer risk: dimethyl disulphide and benzene, respectively. The use of BTFs, instead of conventional biofilters, led to significant improvements in the odour impact and the cancer risk: when adopting BTFs instead of an open biofilter, the area with an odour concentration > 1 OU m(-3) and a cancer risk > 10(-6) was reduced by 91.6% and 95.2%, respectively. When replacing the biofilter with BTFs, the annual mean concentrations of odorants and benzene decreased by more than 90% in the vicinity of the plant. These improvements are achieved above all because of the higher release height of BTFs and the higher velocity of the outgoing air flow.

  15. School on MathematicallNumerical Modelling in Earth, Atmospheric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As a part of the interactive course, each candidate is expected to make a 30 min presentation on his/her perceptions and expectations. The application, together with ... mathematical physics will be assumed. The topics of lectures include: Atmosphere and Ocean General. Circulation Models as applied to the study of climate ...

  16. Modelling atmospheric OH-reactivity in a boreal forest ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, D.; Smolander, S.; Sogachev, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    We have modelled the total atmospheric OH-reactivity in a boreal forest and investigated the individual contributions from gas phase inorganic species, isoprene, monoterpenes, and methane along with other important VOCs. Daily and seasonal variation in OH-reactivity for the year 2008 was examined...

  17. Laboratory and modelling studies on the atmospheric stability of levoglucosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilgner, Andreas; Hoffmann, Dirk; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol particles are known to influence important atmospheric processes such as cloud formation and the solar radiation budget. Therefore, much effort is spend to characterise and locate the sources of atmospheric particles. Source apportionment studies using molecular tracer compounds are a common approach to distinguish between different sources. The anhydromonosaccharide levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-D-glucopyranose) is an widely used and very specific tracer compound for particle emissions from natural and anthropogenic biomass combustion processes. Levoglucosan is formed in large quantities during the pyrolysis of cellulose at temperatures above 300° C. Even if levoglucosan is widely used in source apportionment studies only few studies investigated the atmospheric stability of this tracer compound so far. Furthermore, oxidation processes by free radicals in aqueous particles are not yet considered as a potential sink reaction for this highly water soluble compound. Therefore, detailed kinetic studies on the reactivity of levoglucosan towards three important atmospheric free radicals (OH, NO3 and SO4-) in aqueous solutions were performed for the first time using the laser flash photolysis technique. Laboratory studies on the stability of levoglucosan were done both in the presence and absence of other water soluble reaction partners. The results obtained in the different experiments will be presented, compared and discussed. Furthermore, the experimental data were implemented into the parcel model SPACCIM (Spectral Aerosol Cloud Chemistry Interaction Model; Wolke et al., 2005) in order to study the degradation fluxes of levoglucosan in cloud droplets and aqueous particles considering a detailed microphysics and multiphase chemistry. The model calculations, performed under different conditions (summer, winter, with cloud passages, without cloud passages, different relative humidity and iron contents), show that levoglucosan can be oxidised readily by OH

  18. CFD modeling of particle dispersion and deposition coupled with particle dynamical models in a ventilated room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guangping; Wang, Jiasong

    2017-10-01

    Two dynamical models, the traditional method of moments coupled model (MCM) and Taylor-series expansion method of moments coupled model (TECM) for particle dispersion distribution and gravitation deposition are developed in three-dimensional ventilated environments. The turbulent airflow field is modeled with the renormalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulence model. The particle number concentration distribution in a ventilated room is obtained by solving the population balance equation coupled with the airflow field. The coupled dynamical models are validated using experimental data. A good agreement between the numerical and experimental results can be achieved. Both models have a similar characteristic for the spatial distribution of particle concentration. Relative to the MCM model, the TECM model presents a more close result to the experimental data. The vortex structure existed in the air flow makes a relative large concentration difference at the center region and results in a spatial non-uniformity of concentration field. With larger inlet velocity, the mixing level of particles in the room is more uniform. In general, the new dynamical models coupled with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the current study provide a reasonable and accurate method for the temporal and spatial evolution of particles effected by the deposition and dispersion behaviors. In addition, two ventilation modes with different inlet velocities are proceeded to study the effect on the particle evolution. The results show that with the ceiling ventilation mode (CVM), the particles can be better mixed and the concentration level is also higher. On the contrast, with the side ceiling ventilation mode (SVM), the particle concentration has an obvious stratified distribution with a relative lower level and it makes a much better environment condition to the human exposure.

  19. Source-receptor matrix calculation for deposited mass with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model in backward mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Sabine; Cassiani, Massimo; Sollum, Espen; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Lagrangian particle dispersion models (LPDM) are popular tools to simulate the dispersion of trace gases, aerosols or radionuclides in the atmosphere LPDMs typically consider only linear processes, i.e., processes that do not depend on the concentration of the simulated tracer such as non-linear chemical reactions. This linearity means that they are self-adjoint, i.e., they can be run forward and backward in time without changes to the source code. The only difference between such simulations is the sign of the wind components used for transporting the particles. In the case where the number of (potential) source elements is larger than the number of receptors, running the model backward from the receptors is computationally more efficient than running it forward from the sources (if the number of receptors is smaller than the number of sources). To interpret the wet deposition of acidifying compounds or the contamination of snow by the albedo reducing BC, the s-r relationship of the deposited material would be very important to understand. To date, backward calculations for deposition quantities have not been possible. We present an extension of the LPDM FLEXPART that allows such calculations and test its performance for both dry and wet deposition. We show a comparison between model results in forward and backward mode as well as modeled vs. measured concentration of black carbon at high latitudes. Both analysis prove that the model approach is working well in backward mode and also gives a very good agreement with deposition measurements.

  20. Assessment of atmosphere-ocean general circulation model simulations of winter northern hemisphere atmospheric blocking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vial, Jessica; Osborn, Tim J. [University of East Anglia, Climatic Research Unit, School of Environmental Sciences, Norwich (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    An assessment of six coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs) is undertaken in order to evaluate their ability in simulating winter atmospheric blocking highs in the northern hemisphere. The poor representation of atmospheric blocking in climate models is a long-standing problem (e.g. D'Andrea et al. in Clim Dyn 4:385-407, 1998), and despite considerable effort in model development, there is only a moderate improvement in blocking simulation. A modified version of the Tibaldi and Molteni (in Tellus A 42:343-365, 1990) blocking index is applied to daily averaged 500 hPa geopotential fields, from the ERA-40 reanalysis and as simulated by the climate models, during the winter periods from 1957 to 1999. The two preferred regions of blocking development, in the Euro-Atlantic and North Pacific, are relatively well captured by most of the models. However, the prominent error in blocking simulations consists of an underestimation of the total frequency of blocking episodes over both regions. A more detailed analysis revealed that this error was due to an insufficient number of medium spells and long-lasting episodes, and a shift in blocking lifetime distributions towards shorter blocks in the Euro-Atlantic sector. In the Pacific, results are more diverse; the models are equally likely to overestimate or underestimate the frequency at different spell lengths. Blocking spatial signatures are relatively well simulated in the Euro-Atlantic sector, while errors in the intensity and geographical location of the blocks emerge in the Pacific. The impact of models' systematic errors on blocking simulation has also been analysed. The time-mean atmospheric circulation biases affect the frequency of blocking episodes, and the maximum event duration in the Euro-Atlantic region, while they sometimes cause geographical mislocations in the Pacific sector. The analysis of the systematic error in time-variability has revealed a negative relationship between the

  1. Modelling atmospheric OH-reactivity in a boreal forest ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, D.; Smolander, S.; Sogachev, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    OH sink, and in our opinion, the reason for missing OH-reactivity is due to unmeasured unknown BVOCs, and limitations in our knowledge of atmospheric chemistry including uncertainties in rate constants. Furthermore, we found that the OH-reactivity correlates with both organic and inorganic compounds......We have modelled the total atmospheric OH-reactivity in a boreal forest and investigated the individual contributions from gas phase inorganic species, isoprene, monoterpenes, and methane along with other important VOCs. Daily and seasonal variation in OH-reactivity for the year 2008 was examined...

  2. Dispersion modeling of accidental releases of toxic gases - Sensitivity study and optimization of the meteorological input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann-Stanzer, K.; Stenzel, S.

    2009-04-01

    Several air dispersion models are available for prediction and simulation of the hazard areas associated with accidental releases of toxic gases. The most model packages (commercial or free of charge) include a chemical database, an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI) and automated graphical output for effective presentation of results. The models are designed especially for analyzing different accidental toxic release scenarios ("worst-case scenarios"), preparing emergency response plans and optimal countermeasures as well as for real-time risk assessment and management. Uncertainties in the meteorological input together with incorrect estimates of the source play a critical role for the model results. The research project RETOMOD (reference scenarios calculations for toxic gas releases - model systems and their utility for the fire brigade) was conducted by the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in cooperation with the Vienna fire brigade, OMV Refining & Marketing GmbH and Synex Ries & Greßlehner GmbH. RETOMOD was funded by the KIRAS safety research program at the Austrian Ministry of Transport, Innovation and Technology (www.kiras.at). The main tasks of this project were 1. Sensitivity study and optimization of the meteorological input for modeling of the hazard areas (human exposure) during the accidental toxic releases. 2. Comparison of several model packages (based on reference scenarios) in order to estimate the utility for the fire brigades. This presentation gives a short introduction to the project and presents the results of task 1 (meteorological input). The results of task 2 are presented by Stenzel and Baumann-Stanzer in this session. For the aim of this project, the observation-based analysis and forecasting system INCA, developed in the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) was used. INCA (Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis) data were calculated with 1 km horizontal resolution and

  3. Temperature, humidity and air flow in the emplacement drifts using convection and dispersion transport models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danko, G.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Bahrami, D.; Halecky, N.

    2009-10-01

    A coupled thermal-hydrologic-airflow model is developed, solving for the transport processes within a waste emplacement drift and the surrounding rockmass together at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Natural, convective air flow as well as heat and mass transport in a representative emplacement drift during post-closure are explicitly simulated, using the MULTIFLUX model. The conjugate, thermal-hydrologic transport processes in the rockmass are solved with the TOUGH2 porous-media simulator in a coupled way to the in-drift processes. The new simulation results show that large-eddy turbulent flow, as opposed to small-eddy flow, dominate the drift air space for at least 5000 years following waste emplacement. The size of the largest, longitudinal eddy is equal to half of the drift length, providing a strong axial heat and moisture transport mechanism from the hot to the cold drift sections. The in-drift results are compared to those from simplified models using a surrogate, dispersive model with an equivalent dispersion coefficient for heat and moisture transport. Results from the explicit, convective velocity simulation model provide higher axial heat and moisture fluxes than those estimated from the previously published, simpler, equivalent-dispersion models, in addition to showing differences in temperature, humidity and condensation rate distributions along the drift length. A new dispersive model is also formulated, giving a time- and location-variable function that runs generally about ten times higher in value than the highest dispersion coefficient currently used in the Yucca Mountain Project as an estimate for the equivalent dispersion coefficient in the emplacement drift. The new dispersion coefficient variation, back-calculated from the convective model, can adequately describe the heat and mass transport processes in the emplacement drift example.

  4. EXTRACTING URBAN MORPHOLOGY FOR ATMOSPHERIC MODELING FROM MULTISPECTRAL AND SAR SATELLITE IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wittke

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach designed to derive an urban morphology map from satellite data while aiming to minimize the cost of data and user interference. The approach will help to provide updates to the current morphological databases around the world. The proposed urban morphology maps consist of two layers: 1 Digital Elevation Model (DEM and 2 land cover map. Sentinel-2 data was used to create a land cover map, which was realized through image classification using optical range indices calculated from image data. For the purpose of atmospheric modeling, the most important classes are water and vegetation areas. The rest of the area includes bare soil and built-up areas among others, and they were merged into one class in the end. The classification result was validated with ground truth data collected both from field measurements and aerial imagery. The overall classification accuracy for the three classes is 91 %. TanDEM-X data was processed into two DEMs with different grid sizes using interferometric SAR processing. The resulting DEM has a RMSE of 3.2 meters compared to a high resolution DEM, which was estimated through 20 control points in flat areas. Comparing the derived DEM with the ground truth DEM from airborne LIDAR data, it can be seen that the street canyons, that are of high importance for urban atmospheric modeling are not detectable in the TanDEM-X DEM. However, the derived DEM is suitable for a class of urban atmospheric models. Based on the numerical modeling needs for regional atmospheric pollutant dispersion studies, the generated files enable the extraction of relevant parametrizations, such as Urban Canopy Parameters (UCP.

  5. Extracting Urban Morphology for Atmospheric Modeling from Multispectral and SAR Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittke, S.; Karila, K.; Puttonen, E.; Hellsten, A.; Auvinen, M.; Karjalainen, M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents an approach designed to derive an urban morphology map from satellite data while aiming to minimize the cost of data and user interference. The approach will help to provide updates to the current morphological databases around the world. The proposed urban morphology maps consist of two layers: 1) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and 2) land cover map. Sentinel-2 data was used to create a land cover map, which was realized through image classification using optical range indices calculated from image data. For the purpose of atmospheric modeling, the most important classes are water and vegetation areas. The rest of the area includes bare soil and built-up areas among others, and they were merged into one class in the end. The classification result was validated with ground truth data collected both from field measurements and aerial imagery. The overall classification accuracy for the three classes is 91 %. TanDEM-X data was processed into two DEMs with different grid sizes using interferometric SAR processing. The resulting DEM has a RMSE of 3.2 meters compared to a high resolution DEM, which was estimated through 20 control points in flat areas. Comparing the derived DEM with the ground truth DEM from airborne LIDAR data, it can be seen that the street canyons, that are of high importance for urban atmospheric modeling are not detectable in the TanDEM-X DEM. However, the derived DEM is suitable for a class of urban atmospheric models. Based on the numerical modeling needs for regional atmospheric pollutant dispersion studies, the generated files enable the extraction of relevant parametrizations, such as Urban Canopy Parameters (UCP).

  6. Modeling atmospheric effects of the September 1859 Solar Flare

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Brian; Jackman, Charles,; Melott, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    We have modeled atmospheric effects, especially ozone depletion, due to a solar proton event which probably accompanied the extreme magnetic storm of 1-2 September 1859. We use an inferred proton fluence for this event as estimated from nitrate levels in Greenland ice cores. We present results showing production of odd nitrogen compounds and their impact on ozone. We also compute rainout of nitrate in our model and compare to values from ice core data.

  7. Idealized Tropical Cyclones in Atmospheric General Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, K. A.; Jablonowski, C.

    2008-12-01

    The paper discusses the design of idealized tropical cyclone experiments in Atmospheric General Circulation Models (GCMs). Our first goal is to suggest the evolution of an idealized tropical cyclone as a standard test case for atmospheric model developments that adds complexity to a dynamical-core and GCM test suite. In addition, we plan on using idealized cyclones as a test bed for hurricane-dust interactions in the Atlantic Ocean Basin and climate-hurricane sensitivity studies. A group of sensitivity tests will be presented using the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) 3.1. The tests are run in a so-called aqua-planet configuration that consists of an ocean-covered Earth with prescribed sea surface temperatures and radiative forcing. We utilize the CAM 3.1 Finite Volume dynamical core on a latitude-longitude grid at a half-degree horizontal resolution. The development of an idealized, initially weak warm-core vortex is investigated with varying initial parameters including vorticity, radius of maximum wind, latitude, and sea surface temperature. The evolution of the initial vortex is especially sensitive to the initial vorticity, and therefore the initial wind speed, and radius of maximum wind. This sensitivity is also related to the model resolution. Although model resolution has improved greatly over the last decade, improved resolution will still be needed to model tropical cyclones in global climate models. These sensitivity tests provide us with suitable initial parameter configurations to model tropical cyclogenesis in CAM 3.1 and other GCMs.

  8. Improving 1D Stellar Models with 3D Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rørsted Mosumgaard, Jakob; Silva Aguirre, Víctor; Weiss, Achim; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Trampedach, Regner

    2017-10-01

    Stellar evolution codes play a major role in present-day astrophysics, yet they share common issues. In this work we seek to remedy some of those by the use of results from realistic and highly detailed 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar atmospheres. We have implemented a new temperature stratification extracted directly from the 3D simulations into the Garching Stellar Evolution Code to replace the simplified atmosphere normally used. Secondly, we have implemented the use of a variable mixing-length parameter, which changes as a function of the stellar surface gravity and temperature - also derived from the 3D simulations. Furthermore, to make our models consistent, we have calculated new opacity tables to match the atmospheric simulations. Here, we present the modified code and initial results on stellar evolution using it.

  9. Quantum dimer model on the triangular lattice: Semiclassical and variational approaches to vison dispersion and condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misguich, Grégoire; Mila, Frédéric

    2008-04-01

    After reviewing the concept of vison excitations in Z2 dimer liquids, we study the liquid-crystal transition of the quantum dimer model on the triangular lattice by means of a semiclassical spin-wave approximation to the dispersion of visons in the context of a “soft-dimer” version of the model. This approach captures some important qualitative features of the transition: continuous nature of the transition, linear dispersion at the critical point, and 12×12 symmetry-breaking pattern. In a second part, we present a variational calculation of the vison dispersion relation at the Rokhsar-Kivelson (RK) point, which reproduces the qualitative shape of the dispersion relation and the order of magnitude of the gap. This approach provides a simple but reliable approximation of the vison wave functions at the RK point.

  10. GPU-based parallel computing in real-time modeling of atmospheric transport and diffusion of radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcelo C. dos; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Schirru, Roberto; Pinheiro, André, E-mail: jovitamarcelo@gmail.com, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.br, E-mail: schirru@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: apinheiro99@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Atmospheric radionuclide dispersion systems (ARDS) are essential mechanisms to predict the consequences of unexpected radioactive releases from nuclear power plants. Considering, that during an eventuality of an accident with a radioactive material release, an accurate forecast is vital to guide the evacuation plan of the possible affected areas. However, in order to predict the dispersion of the radioactive material and its impact on the environment, the model must process information about source term (radioactive materials released, activities and location), weather condition (wind, humidity and precipitation) and geographical characteristics (topography). Furthermore, ARDS is basically composed of 4 main modules: Source Term, Wind Field, Plume Dispersion and Doses Calculations. The Wind Field and Plume Dispersion modules are the ones that require a high computational performance to achieve accurate results within an acceptable time. Taking this into account, this work focuses on the development of a GPU-based parallel Plume Dispersion module, focusing on the radionuclide transport and diffusion calculations, which use a given wind field and a released source term as parameters. The program is being developed using the C ++ programming language, allied with CUDA libraries. In comparative case study between a parallel and sequential version of the slower function of the Plume Dispersion module, a speedup of 11.63 times could be observed. (author)

  11. Ozone reference models for CIRA. [COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, G. M.; Young, D. F.; Pitts, M. C.

    1987-01-01

    The data bases and computational techniques used in recent models of the O3 distribution in the earth atmosphere are described, summarizing the results of ongoing efforts to define an O3 reference model for incorporation into CIRA. Consideration is given to the analysis of data from satellite instruments (Nimbus 7 LIMS, TOMS, and SBUV; SME UVS and IR; and AE-2 SAGE) to construct models of total column O3 and vertical O3 structure. The satellite-based model predictions are then compared with balloon, rocket, and umkehr measurements in extensive graphs: good agreement is demonstrated both among the satellite data sets and between satellite and nonsatellite data sets.

  12. Dispersion modeling of accidental releases of toxic gases - utility for the fire brigades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, S.; Baumann-Stanzer, K.

    2009-09-01

    Several air dispersion models are available for prediction and simulation of the hazard areas associated with accidental releases of toxic gases. The most model packages (commercial or free of charge) include a chemical database, an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI) and automated graphical output for effective presentation of results. The models are designed especially for analyzing different accidental toxic release scenarios ("worst-case scenarios”), preparing emergency response plans and optimal countermeasures as well as for real-time risk assessment and management. The research project RETOMOD (reference scenarios calculations for toxic gas releases - model systems and their utility for the fire brigade) was conducted by the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in cooperation with the Viennese fire brigade, OMV Refining & Marketing GmbH and Synex Ries & Greßlehner GmbH. RETOMOD was funded by the KIRAS safety research program of the Austrian Ministry of Transport, Innovation and Technology (www.kiras.at). The main tasks of this project were 1. Sensitivity study and optimization of the meteorological input for modeling of the hazard areas (human exposure) during the accidental toxic releases. 2. Comparison of several model packages (based on reference scenarios) in order to estimate the utility for the fire brigades. For the purpose of our study the following models were tested and compared: ALOHA (Areal Location of Hazardous atmosphere, EPA), MEMPLEX (Keudel av-Technik GmbH), Trace (Safer System), Breeze (Trinity Consulting), SAM (Engineering office Lohmeyer). A set of reference scenarios for Chlorine, Ammoniac, Butane and Petrol were proceed, with the models above, in order to predict and estimate the human exposure during the event. Furthermore, the application of the observation-based analysis and forecasting system INCA, developed in the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in case of toxic release was

  13. Benchmarking of numerical models describing the