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Sample records for atmospheric corrosivity maps

  1. Corrosion mapping in pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zscherpel, U.; Alekseychuk, O.; Bellon, C.; Ewert, U.; Rost, P.; Schmid, M.

    2002-01-01

    In a joint research project, BASF AG and BAM analyzed the state of the art of tangential radiography of pipes and developed more efficient methods of evaluation. Various PC applications were developed and tested: 1. A program for routine evaluation of digital radiographic images. 2. 3D simulation of the tangential projection of pipes for common radiation sources and various different detectors. 3. Preliminary work on combined evaluation of digital projections and wall thickness changes in radiation direction resulted in a new manner of image display, i.e. the so-called 'corrosion mapping', in which the wall thickness is displayed as a 2D picture above the pipe surface [de

  2. Corrosion Cost and Corrosion Map of Korea - Based on the Data from 2005 to 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Lim, H. K.; Kim, J. J.; Hwang, W. S.; Park, Y. S.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion of metallic materials occurs by the reaction with corrosive environment such as atmosphere, marine, soil, urban, high temperature etc. In general, reduction of thickness and cracking and degradation are resulted from corrosion. Corrosion in all industrial facilities and infrastructure causes large economic losses as well as a large number of accidents. Economic loss by corrosion has been reported to be nearly 1-6% of GNP or GDP. In order to reduce corrosion damage of industrial facilities, corrosion map as well as a systematic investigation of the loss of corrosion in each industrial sector is needed. The Corrosion Science Society of Korea in collaboration with 15 universities and institutes has started to survey on the cost of corrosion and corrosion map of Korea since 2005. This work presents the results of the survey on cost of corrosion by Uhlig, Hoar, and input-output methods, and the evaluation of atmospheric corrosion rate of carbon steel, weathering steel, galvanized steel, copper, and aluminum in Korea. The total corrosion cost was estimated in terms of the percentage of the GDP of industry sectors and the total GDP of Korea. According to the result of Input/output method, corrosion cost of Korea was calculated as 2.9% to GDP (2005). Time of wetness was shown to be categories 3 to 4 in all exposure areas. A definite seasonal difference was observed in Korea. In summer and fall, time of wetness was higher than in other seasons. Because of short exposure period (12 months), significant corrosion trends depending upon materials and exposure corrosion environments were not revealed even though increased mass loss and decreased corrosion rate by exposure time

  3. Marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcillo, M.; Alcantara, J.; Diaz, I.; Chico, B.; Simancas, J.; Fuente, D. de la

    2015-07-01

    Basic research on marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels is a relatively young scientific field and there continue to be great gaps in this area of knowledge. The presence of akaganeite in the corrosion products that form on steel when it is exposed to marine atmospheres leads to a notable increase in the corrosion rate. This work addresses the following issues: (a) environmental conditions necessary for akaganeite formation; (b) characterisation of akaganeite in the corrosion products formed; (c) corrosion mechanisms of carbon steel in marine atmospheres; (d) exfoliation of rust layers formed in highly aggressive marine atmospheres; (e) long-term corrosion rate prediction; and (f) behaviour of weathering steels. Field research has been carried out at Cabo Vilano wind farm (Camarinas, Galicia) in a wide range of atmospheric salinities and laboratory work involving the use of conventional atmospheric corrosion techniques and near-surface and bulk sensitive analytical techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mossbauer spectroscopy and SEM/μRaman spectroscopy. (Author)

  4. Atmospheric corrosion of uranium-carbon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, P.; Accary, A.

    1965-01-01

    The authors study the corrosion of uranium-carbon alloys having compositions close to that of the mono-carbide; they show that the extent of the observed corrosion effects increases with the water vapour content of the surrounding gas and they conclude that the atmospheric corrosion of these alloys is due essentially to the humidity of the air, the effect of the oxygen being very slight at room temperature. They show that the optimum conditions for preserving U-C alloys are either a vacuum or a perfectly dry argon atmosphere. The authors have also established that the type of corrosion involved is a corrosion which 'cracks under stress' and is transgranular (it can also be intergranular in the case of sub-stoichiometric alloys). They propose, finally, two hypotheses for explaining this mechanism, one of which is illustrated by the existence, at the fissure interface, of corrosion products which can play the role of 'corners' in the mono-carbide grains. (authors) [fr

  5. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel in Oman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gismelseed, Abbasher, E-mail: abbasher@squ.edu.om; Al-Harthi, S. H.; Elzain, M.; Al-Rawas, A. D.; Yousif, A.; Al-Saadi, S.; Al-Omari, I.; Widatallah, H.; Bouziane, K. [College of Science, Department of Physics (Oman)

    2006-01-15

    A systematic study has been made of the initial corrosion products which form on mild steel capons exposed near the coastal region of Oman and at some industrial areas. The phases and compositions of the products formed at different periods of exposure were examined by using Moessbauer spectroscopy (295 and 78 K) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The results show that lepidocorcite and maghemite are early corrosion products and goethite starts to form after 2 months of metal exposure to the atmosphere. Akaganeite is an early corrosion product but it forms in marine environments only, which reflects the role of chlorine effect in the atmosphere. The 12 months coupons showed the presence of goethite, lepidocorcite and maghemite, but no akaganeite being seen in the products of one of the studied areas.

  6. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel in Oman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gismelseed, Abbasher; Al-Harthi, S. H.; Elzain, M.; Al-Rawas, A. D.; Yousif, A.; Al-Saadi, S.; Al-Omari, I.; Widatallah, H.; Bouziane, K.

    2006-01-01

    A systematic study has been made of the initial corrosion products which form on mild steel capons exposed near the coastal region of Oman and at some industrial areas. The phases and compositions of the products formed at different periods of exposure were examined by using Moessbauer spectroscopy (295 and 78 K) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The results show that lepidocorcite and maghemite are early corrosion products and goethite starts to form after 2 months of metal exposure to the atmosphere. Akaganeite is an early corrosion product but it forms in marine environments only, which reflects the role of chlorine effect in the atmosphere. The 12 months coupons showed the presence of goethite, lepidocorcite and maghemite, but no akaganeite being seen in the products of one of the studied areas.

  7. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in industrial city environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kusmierek, Elzbieta; Chrzescijanska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric corrosion is a significant problem given destruction of various materials, especially metals. The corrosion investigation in the industrial city environment was carried out during one year exposure. Corrosion potential was determined using the potentiometric method. The highest effect of corrosion processes was observed during the winter season due to increased air pollution. Corrosion of samples pre-treated in tannic acid before the exposure was more difficult compared with the s...

  8. Marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcillo, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Basic research on marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels is a relatively young scientific field and there continue to be great gaps in this area of knowledge. The presence of akaganeite in the corrosion products that form on steel when it is exposed to marine atmospheres leads to a notable increase in the corrosion rate. This work addresses the following issues: (a environmental conditions necessary for akaganeite formation; (b characterisation of akaganeite in the corrosion products formed; (c corrosion mechanisms of carbon steel in marine atmospheres; (d exfoliation of rust layers formed in highly aggressive marine atmospheres; (e long-term corrosion rate prediction; and (f behaviour of weathering steels. Field research has been carried out at Cabo Vilano wind farm (Camariñas, Galicia in a wide range of atmospheric salinities and laboratory work involving the use of conventional atmospheric corrosion techniques and near-surface and bulk sensitive analytical techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM/energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy and SEM/μRaman spectroscopy.La investigación fundamental en corrosión atmosférica marina de aceros al carbono es un campo científico relativamente joven que presenta grandes lagunas de conocimiento. La formación de akaganeíta en los productos de corrosión que se forman sobre el acero cuando se expone a atmósferas marinas conduce a un incremento notable de la velocidad de corrosión. En el trabajo se abordan las siguientes cuestiones: (a condiciones ambientales necesarias para la formación de akaganeíta, (b caracterización de la akaganeíta en los productos de corrosión formados, (c mecanismos de corrosión del acero al carbono en atmósferas marinas, (d exfoliación de las capas de herrumbre formadas en atmósferas marinas muy agresivas, (e predicción de la velocidad de corrosión a largo plazo, y (f comportamiento de aceros patinables. La

  9. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in industrial city environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Kusmierek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion is a significant problem given destruction of various materials, especially metals. The corrosion investigation in the industrial city environment was carried out during one year exposure. Corrosion potential was determined using the potentiometric method. The highest effect of corrosion processes was observed during the winter season due to increased air pollution. Corrosion of samples pre-treated in tannic acid before the exposure was more difficult compared with the samples without pretreatment. The corrosion products determined with the SEM/EDS method prove that the most corrosive pollutants present in the industrial city air are SO2, CO2, chlorides and dust.

  10. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in industrial city environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierek, Elzbieta; Chrzescijanska, Ewa

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric corrosion is a significant problem given destruction of various materials, especially metals. The corrosion investigation in the industrial city environment was carried out during one year exposure. Corrosion potential was determined using the potentiometric method. The highest effect of corrosion processes was observed during the winter season due to increased air pollution. Corrosion of samples pre-treated in tannic acid before the exposure was more difficult compared with the samples without pretreatment. The corrosion products determined with the SEM/EDS method prove that the most corrosive pollutants present in the industrial city air are SO2, CO2, chlorides and dust.

  11. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerone C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of metal-based structures has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites to determine corrosion resistance in marine environments. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions of the corrosive environment. Their success for correlation to atmospheric exposure is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated laboratory testing, which often focuses on the electrochemical reactions that occur during corrosion conditions, has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long term service life of a metal despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard and their use is imperative, a method that correlates timescales from atmospheric exposure to accelerated testing would be very valuable. This work uses surface chemistry to interpret the chemical changes occurring on low carbon steel during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions with the objective of finding a correlation between its accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The current results of correlating data from marine atmospheric exposure conditions at the Kennedy Space Center beachside corrosion test site, alternating seawater spray, and immersion in typical electrochemical laboratory conditions, will be presented. Key words: atmospheric exposure, accelerated corrosion testing, alternating seawater spray, marine, correlation, seawater, carbon steel, long-term corrosion performance prediction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  12. Study on influence of native oxide and corrosion products on atmospheric corrosion of pure Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanjie; Wang, Zhenyao; Ke, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Corrosion products layer is only formed in coastal atmosphere. •In coastal atmosphere, rate controlling step is diffusion process. •In rural atmosphere, rate controlling step is charge transfer process. •Pitting area increases greatly in coastal site, but slightly in rural site. -- Abstract: Effects of native oxide and corrosion products on atmospheric corrosion of aluminium in rural and coastal sites were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), open-circuit potential (OCP) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques after outdoor exposure. In the rural atmosphere, only the compact, adhesive native oxide layer exists, and the rate controlling step is diffusion process, while in the coastal atmosphere, another loose, inadhesive corrosion products layer exists, and a charge transfer process controls the corrosion process. The pitting area in the coastal atmosphere increases over time more obviously than that in the rural atmosphere

  13. Atmospheric corrosion: statistical validation of models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, V.; Martinez-Luaces, V.; Guineo-Cobs, G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we discuss two different methods for validation of regression models, applied to corrosion data. One of them is based on the correlation coefficient and the other one is the statistical test of lack of fit. Both methods are used here to analyse fitting of bi logarithmic model in order to predict corrosion for very low carbon steel substrates in rural and urban-industrial atmospheres in Uruguay. Results for parameters A and n of the bi logarithmic model are reported here. For this purpose, all repeated values were used instead of using average values as usual. Modelling is carried out using experimental data corresponding to steel substrates under the same initial meteorological conditions ( in fact, they are put in the rack at the same time). Results of correlation coefficient are compared with the lack of it tested at two different signification levels (α=0.01 and α=0.05). Unexpected differences between them are explained and finally, it is possible to conclude, at least in the studied atmospheres, that the bi logarithmic model does not fit properly the experimental data. (Author) 18 refs

  14. Atmospheric corrosion in Gran Canaria specifically meteorological and pollution conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.E.G.; Valles, M.L.; Mirza R, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon steel, copper, zinc and aluminium samples were exposed in different sizes with known ambient parameters in Gran Canaria Island and atmospheric corrosion was investigated. Weight-loss measurements used to determine corrosion damage were complemented with metallographic and XP S determination in order to characterize the structure and morphology of surface corrosion products. The ambient aggressiveness could be well evaluated from meteorological and pollution data. All atmospheric corrosion and environmental data were statistically processed for establishing general corrosion damage functions for carbon steel, copper, aluminium and zinc in terms of Gran Canaria extreme meteorological and pollution parameters. (Author)

  15. Lamb Wave Tomography for Corrosion Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinders, Mark K.; McKeon, James C. P.

    1999-01-01

    As the world-wide civil aviation fleet continues to age, methods for accurately predicting the presence of structural flaws-such as hidden corrosion-that compromise airworthiness become increasingly necessary. Ultrasonic guided waves, Lamb waves, allow large sections of aircraft structures to be rapidly inspected. However, extracting quantitative information from Lamb wave data has always involved highly trained personnel with a detailed knowledge of mechanical-waveguide physics. Our work focuses on using a variety of different tomographic reconstruction techniques to graphically represent the Lamb wave data in images that can be easily interpreted by technicians. Because the velocity of Lamb waves depends on thickness, we can convert the travel times of the fundamental Lamb modes into a thickness map of the inspection region. In this paper we show results for the identification of single or multiple back-surface corrosion areas in typical aluminum aircraft skin structures.

  16. Evolutionary Computation Techniques for Predicting Atmospheric Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Marref

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion occurs in many engineering structures such as bridges, pipelines, and refineries and leads to the destruction of materials in a gradual manner and thus shortening their lifespan. It is therefore crucial to assess the structural integrity of engineering structures which are approaching or exceeding their designed lifespan in order to ensure their correct functioning, for example, carrying ability and safety. An understanding of corrosion and an ability to predict corrosion rate of a material in a particular environment plays a vital role in evaluating the residual life of the material. In this paper we investigate the use of genetic programming and genetic algorithms in the derivation of corrosion-rate expressions for steel and zinc. Genetic programming is used to automatically evolve corrosion-rate expressions while a genetic algorithm is used to evolve the parameters of an already engineered corrosion-rate expression. We show that both evolutionary techniques yield corrosion-rate expressions that have good accuracy.

  17. Long-term atmospheric corrosion of mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuente, D. de la; Diaz, I.; Simancas, J.; Chico, B.; Morcillo, M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Atmospheric corrosion rate stabilises after the first 4-6 years of exposure. → Great compaction of the rust layers in rural and urban atmospheres. → Corrosion (in rural and urban) deviates from common behaviour of bilogarithmic law. → Typical structures of lepidocrocite, goethite and akaganeite are identified. → Formation of hematite (industrial atmosphere) and ferrihydrite (marine atmosphere). - Abstract: A great deal of information is available on the atmospheric corrosion of mild steel in the short, mid and even long term, but studies of the structure and morphology of corrosion layers are less abundant and generally deal with those formed in just a few years. The present study assesses the structure and morphology of corrosion product layers formed on mild steel after 13 years of exposure in five Spanish atmospheres of different types: rural, urban, industrial and marine (mild and severe). The corrosion layers have been characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Long-term corrosion is seen to be more severe in the industrial and marine atmospheres, and less so in the rural and urban atmospheres. In all cases the corrosion rate is seen to decrease with exposure time, stabilising after the first 4-6 years of exposure. The most relevant aspects to be noted are (a) the great compaction of the rust layers formed in the rural and urban atmospheres, (b) the formation of hematite and ferrihydrite phases (not commonly found) in the industrial and marine atmospheres, respectively and (c) identification of the typical morphological structures of lepidocrocite (sandy crystals and flowery plates), goethite (cotton balls structures) and akaganeite (cotton balls structures and cigar-shaped crystals).

  18. Corrosion in marine atmospheres. Effect of distance from the coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chico, B.; Otero, E.; Morcillos, M.; Mariaca, L.

    1998-01-01

    In marine atmospheres the deposition of saline particles on the surface of metals intensifies the metallic corrosion process. However, quantitative information about the effect of atmospheric salinity on metallic corrosion is very scarce. This paper reports the relationship between salinity and metallic corrosion, where a clear linear relation (r=0.97) has been found for a broad interval of salinities (4-500 mg Cl''-/m''2.d), as well as the relationship between salinity (or metallic corrosion) and distance from the coast. A hyperbolic function seems to be established both variables; there is an exponential drop in salinity (or corrosion) as shoreline distance increases tending towards and asymptotic value. The study has been based on information obtained from field research conducted at a marine atmosphere in Tarragona (Spain) and data compiled from the literature. (Author) 14 refs

  19. Review: Results of studying atmospheric corrosion in Vietnam 1995–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Thi Hong Lien, Pham Thy San and Hoang Lam Hong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Vietnam is situated in the wet tropical zone; thus, atmospheric conditions are characterized by high temperatures and a long time of wetness (TOW. In addition, the salt air coming in from the sea causes a high chloride concentration in coastal areas. Furthermore, Vietnam is a developing country, which means that air pollution is increasing with the development of industry. These factors result in significant damage to materials by atmospheric corrosion. In this report, the results of a recent study on the corrosion of carbon steel and zinc-galvanized steel at 6–8 testing sites in Vietnam over 10 recent years (1995–2005 are focused on as well as the effects of environmental factors on atmospheric corrosion. The results showed that the corrosion of carbon steel is dominated by TOW, whereas zinc-galvanized-steel corrosion strongly depends on the chloride ion concentration in the air. The corrosion losses of both carbon- and zinc-galvanized steel fit the power model well with high correlation coefficients. In addition, the characteristics of the Vietnamese climate are introduced in the form of distribution maps of temperature (T, relative humidity (RH, total rainfall and TOW. A relationship between TOW, T and RH was found that enabled the calculation of TOW from T and RH data, which are available at meteorological stations. Finally, atmospheric corrosivity is determined on the basis of data on TOW, Cl− and SO2 concentrations, and the carbon steel corrosion rate. It is shown that in Vietnam, TOW is so long that the corrosion rate of carbon steel is in the C3 category; nevertheless, Cl− and SO2 concentrations in the atmosphere are not high.

  20. Marine Atmospheric Corrosion of Carbon Steel: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Jenifer; Fuente, Daniel de la; Chico, Belén; Simancas, Joaquín; Díaz, Iván; Morcillo, Manuel

    2017-04-13

    The atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel is an extensive topic that has been studied over the years by many researchers. However, until relatively recently, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the action of marine chlorides. Corrosion in coastal regions is a particularly relevant issue due the latter's great importance to human society. About half of the world's population lives in coastal regions and the industrialisation of developing countries tends to concentrate production plants close to the sea. Until the start of the 21st century, research on the basic mechanisms of rust formation in Cl - -rich atmospheres was limited to just a small number of studies. However, in recent years, scientific understanding of marine atmospheric corrosion has advanced greatly, and in the authors' opinion a sufficient body of knowledge has been built up in published scientific papers to warrant an up-to-date review of the current state-of-the-art and to assess what issues still need to be addressed. That is the purpose of the present review. After a preliminary section devoted to basic concepts on atmospheric corrosion, the marine atmosphere, and experimentation on marine atmospheric corrosion, the paper addresses key aspects such as the most significant corrosion products, the characteristics of the rust layers formed, and the mechanisms of steel corrosion in marine atmospheres. Special attention is then paid to important matters such as coastal-industrial atmospheres and long-term behaviour of carbon steel exposed to marine atmospheres. The work ends with a section dedicated to issues pending, noting a series of questions in relation with which greater research efforts would seem to be necessary.

  1. Marine Atmospheric Corrosion of Carbon Steel: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Jenifer; de la Fuente, Daniel; Chico, Belén; Simancas, Joaquín; Díaz, Iván; Morcillo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel is an extensive topic that has been studied over the years by many researchers. However, until relatively recently, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the action of marine chlorides. Corrosion in coastal regions is a particularly relevant issue due the latter’s great importance to human society. About half of the world’s population lives in coastal regions and the industrialisation of developing countries tends to concentrate production plants close to the sea. Until the start of the 21st century, research on the basic mechanisms of rust formation in Cl−-rich atmospheres was limited to just a small number of studies. However, in recent years, scientific understanding of marine atmospheric corrosion has advanced greatly, and in the authors’ opinion a sufficient body of knowledge has been built up in published scientific papers to warrant an up-to-date review of the current state-of-the-art and to assess what issues still need to be addressed. That is the purpose of the present review. After a preliminary section devoted to basic concepts on atmospheric corrosion, the marine atmosphere, and experimentation on marine atmospheric corrosion, the paper addresses key aspects such as the most significant corrosion products, the characteristics of the rust layers formed, and the mechanisms of steel corrosion in marine atmospheres. Special attention is then paid to important matters such as coastal-industrial atmospheres and long-term behaviour of carbon steel exposed to marine atmospheres. The work ends with a section dedicated to issues pending, noting a series of questions in relation with which greater research efforts would seem to be necessary. PMID:28772766

  2. Real time corrosion monitoring in atmosphere using automated battery driven corrosion loggers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosek, T.; Kouril, M.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2008-01-01

    diminishes due to corrosion. Zinc, iron, copper and nickel sensors at several thicknesses are available. Sensitivity of the corrosion measurement varies from 1 to 10 nm depending on the type and thickness of the sensor. Changes in the air corrosivity can be thus detected within hours or even tens of minutes......A logger enabling continuous measurement of corrosion rate of selected metals in indoor and outdoor atmospheres has been developed. Principle of the measurement method is based on the increasing electrical resistance of a measuring element made of the material concerned as its cross-sectional area....... The logger lifetime in medium corrosive environments is designed to be 2 years with full autonomy. Data on the sensor corrosion rate are available any time through GPRS connection or by a non-contact inductive reading without the need of retracting the logger from the exposure site....

  3. Marine Atmospheric Corrosion of Carbon Steel: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Alc?ntara, Jenifer; de la Fuente, Daniel; Chico, Bel?n; Simancas, Joaqu?n; D?az, Iv?n; Morcillo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel is an extensive topic that has been studied over the years by many researchers. However, until relatively recently, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the action of marine chlorides. Corrosion in coastal regions is a particularly relevant issue due the latter’s great importance to human society. About half of the world’s population lives in coastal regions and the industrialisation of developing countries tends to concentrate production pl...

  4. Metallic corrosion in the polluted urban atmosphere of Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Da-Wei; Guo, Hai; Ling, Zhen-Hao; Cheung, Kalam

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationship between air pollutants, particularly acidic particles, and metallic material corrosion. An atmospheric corrosion test was carried out in spring-summer 2012 at a polluted urban site, i.e., Tung Chung in western Hong Kong. Nine types of metallic materials, namely iron, Q235 steel, 20# steel, 16Mn steel, copper, bronze, brass, aluminum, and aluminum alloy, were selected as specimens for corrosion tests. Ten sets of the nine materials were all exposed to ambient air, and then each set was collected individually after exposure to ambient air for consecutive 6, 13, 20, 27, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, and 70 days, respectively. After the removal of the corrosion products on the surface of the exposed specimens, the corrosion rate of each material was determined. The surface structure of materials was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after the corrosion tests. Environmental factors including temperature, relative humidity, concentrations of gaseous pollutants, i.e., sulfur dioxide (SO₂), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O₃), and particulate-phase pollutants, i.e., PM₂.₅ (FSP) and PM₁₀ (RSP), were monitored. Correlation analysis between environmental factors and corrosion rate of materials indicated that iron and carbon steel were damaged by both gaseous pollutants (SO₂ and NO₂) and particles. Copper and copper alloys were mainly corroded by gaseous pollutants (SO₂ and O₃), while corrosion of aluminum and aluminum alloy was mainly attributed to NO₂ and particles.

  5. Corrosion Map for Metal Pipes in Coastal Louisiana : Tech Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this project was to create a guidance document with maps that delineates zones where metal pipe is prone to increased corrosion due to environmental conditions. Results from this project will provide a logical rationale to support DO...

  6. Corrosion behaviors of SMART materials in the ammonia atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, J. H.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. S.; Kim, J. P.; Jung, Y. H.; Lee, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion characteristics of the zirconium-based alloy(Low-Sn Zircaloy-4) and titanium-based alloys(PT-7M and ASTM Gr.2), which would be used for fuel cladding tube and steam generator tube in the SMART, were investigated at 360 deg C, 400 deg C, 500 deg C, and 520 deg C in the ammonia atmosphere. In all test conditions, the resistance to uniform and nodular corrosion of zirconium-based alloy was inferior to that of titanium-based alloys. In the case of 360 deg C test, the corrosion rate of zirconium-based alloy decreased slightly with increasing the ammonia concentration, while that of titanium-based alloys increased. The test results above 400 deg C showed that the corrosion resistance of PT-7M alloys was superior to that of ASTM Gr.2 alloy and was not influenced from the variation of ammonia concentration

  7. Atmospheric corrosion of uranium-carbon alloys; Corrosion atmospherique des alliages uranium-carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousset, P; Accary, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The authors study the corrosion of uranium-carbon alloys having compositions close to that of the mono-carbide; they show that the extent of the observed corrosion effects increases with the water vapour content of the surrounding gas and they conclude that the atmospheric corrosion of these alloys is due essentially to the humidity of the air, the effect of the oxygen being very slight at room temperature. They show that the optimum conditions for preserving U-C alloys are either a vacuum or a perfectly dry argon atmosphere. The authors have also established that the type of corrosion involved is a corrosion which 'cracks under stress' and is transgranular (it can also be intergranular in the case of sub-stoichiometric alloys). They propose, finally, two hypotheses for explaining this mechanism, one of which is illustrated by the existence, at the fissure interface, of corrosion products which can play the role of 'corners' in the mono-carbide grains. (authors) [French] Les auteurs etudient la corrosion des alliages uranium-carbone de composition voisine du monocarbure; ils montrent que l'importance des effets de la corrosion observee augmente avec la teneur en vapeur d'eau du milieu gazeux ambiant et concluent que la corrosion atmospherique de ces alliages est due essentiellement a l'humidite de l'air, l'action de l'oxygene de l'air etant tres faible a la temperature ambiante. Ils indiquent que les conditions optimales de conservation des alliages U-C sont le vide ou une atmosphere d'argon parfaitement desseches. D'autre part, les auteurs etablissent que le type de corrosion mis en jeu est une corrosion 'fissurante sous contrainte', transgranulaire (pouvant egalement etre intergranulaire dans le cas d'alliages sous-stoechiometriques). Ils proposent enfin deux hypotheses pour rendre compte de ce mecanisme, dont l'une est illustree par la mise en evidence, a l'interface des fissures, de produits de corrosion pouvant jouer le role de 'coins' dans les grains de

  8. Digital mapping of corrosion risk in coastal urban areas using remote sensing and structural condition assessment: case study in cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neocleous Kyriacos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion is one of the main factors leading to performance deterioration of reinforced concrete buildings; and, hence, periodic structural condition monitoring is required to assess and repair the adverse effects of corrosion. However, this can become a cumbersome and expensive task to undertake for large populations of buildings, scattered in large urban areas. To optimize the use of available resources, appropriate tools are required for the assessment of corrosion risk of reinforced concrete construction. This paper proposes a framework for the production of digital corrosion risk maps for urban areas; Cyprus was used as a case study. This framework explored multi-temporal satellite remote sensing data from the Landsat sensors as well as corrosion risk factors derived from the results of a recently completed research project, entitled “STEELCOR”. This framework was used to develop two corrosion risk scenarios within Geographical Information Systems, and to produce corrosion risk maps for three coastal cities of Cyprus. The thematic maps indicated that, for slight corrosion damage, the distance of reinforced concrete buildings from the coast was more influential than the building age. While, for significant corrosion damage, the maps indicated that the age of RC buildings was more influential than the distance from the coast.

  9. Localized Corrosion Behavior of Type 304SS with a Silica Layer Under Atmospheric Corrosion Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. Tada; G.S. Frankel

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed a potential repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. [I] The temperature could be high on the waste packages, and it is possible that dripping water or humidity could interact with rock dust particulate to form a thin electrolyte layer with concentrated ionic species. Under these conditions, it is possible that highly corrosion-resistant alloys (CRAs) used as packages to dispose the nuclear waste could suffer localized corrosion. Therefore, to better understand long-term corrosion performance of CRAs in the repository, it is important to investigate localized corrosion under a simulated repository environment. We measured open circuit potential (OCP) and galvanic current (i g ) for silica-coated Type 304SS during drying of salt solutions under controlled RH environments to clarify the effect of silica layer as a dust layer simulant on localized corrosion under atmospheric environments. Type 304SS was used as a relatively susceptible model CRA instead of the much more corrosion resistant alloys, such as Alloy 22, that are being considered as, waste package materials

  10. Some Clarifications Regarding Literature on Atmospheric Corrosion of Weathering Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Díaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research work has thrown light on the requisites for a protective rust layer to form on weathering steels (WSs in the atmosphere, one of the most important is the existence of wet/dry cycling. However, the abundant literature on WS behaviour in different atmospheres can sometimes be confusing and lacks clear criteria regarding certain aspects that are addressed in the present paper. What corrosion models best fit the obtained data? How long does it take for the rust layer to stabilize? What is the morphology and structure of the protective rust layer? What is an acceptable corrosion rate for unpainted WS? What are the guideline environmental conditions, time of wetness (TOW, SO2, and Cl−, for unpainted WS? The paper makes a review of the bibliography on this issue.

  11. New fundamental and environmental aspects of atmospheric corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leygraf, C.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion involves chemical, electrochemical, and physical processes in three phases (solid, liquid, and gas and two interfaces (solid/liquid and liquid/gas. Because of inherent experimental and conceptual difficulties, scientific efforts to characterize this highly complex interfacial regime came relatively late into the field. With the access and development of surface and interface sensitive analytical techniques, it has lately become possible to perform molecular in situ analyses of the interfaces involved in atmospheric corrosion. This lecture presents some highlights from our fundamental research in atmospheric corrosion, performed at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. It includes results from the most recent efforts in our research group to provide a molecular understanding of the interfacial regime that governs atmospheric corrosion. Using copper or zinc as substrate and carboxylic acid as corrosion stimulator in the humidity-containing atmosphere, results have been obtained with particular emphasis on probing the metal oxide/water interface (by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS combined with the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM and sum frequency generation (SFG and the water/gas interface (by SFG, respectively. While research in atmospheric corrosion traditionally has aimed at understanding how the environment influences the metal, the opposite question- how the metal influences the environment during atmospheric corrosion- may be of equally technical importance. Some examples of on-going research on new environmental aspects of atmospheric corrosion of zinc will also be presented.

    La corrosión atmosférica implica procesos químicos, electroquímicos y físicos en tres fases (sólido, liquido y gas y dos interfases (sólido/líquido y líquido/gas. A causa de dificultades experimentales y conceptuales los esfuerzos científicos para caracterizar el proceso, interfacial

  12. Atmospheric Corrosivity at Australian and Overseas Airbases and Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    climatic conditions, the correlation between the GCIA and weight loss data from aluminium alloy coupons exposed in the open at 38 sites in the US...corrosivity. The test consists of an aluminium wire wrapped around a copper bolt exposed in the atmosphere for three months; the weight loss of the wire...Abbreviations/Acronyms AAC Army Aviation Centre AB Air Base ADF Australian Defence Force AFB Air Force Base Al aluminium ANGB Air National Guard Base

  13. Chloride-catalyzed corrosion of plutonium in glovebox atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, M.; Haschke, J.M.; Allen, T.H.; Morales, L.A.; Jarboe, D.M.; Puglisi, C.V.

    1998-04-01

    Characterization of glovebox atmospheres and the black reaction product formed on plutonium surfaces shows that the abnormally rapid corrosion of components in the fabrication line is consistent with a complex salt-catalyzed reaction involving gaseous hydrogen chloride (HCl) and water. Analytical data verify that chlorocarbon and HCl vapors are presented in stagnant glovebox atmospheres. Hydrogen chloride concentrations approach 7 ppm at some locations in the glovebox line. The black corrosion product is identified as plutonium monoxide monohydride (PuOH), a product formed by hydrolysis of plutonium in liquid water and salt solutions at room temperature. Plutonium trichloride (PuCl 3 ) produced by reaction of HCl at the metal surface is deliquescent and apparently forms a highly concentrated salt solution by absorbing moisture from the glovebox atmosphere. Rapid corrosion is attributed to the ensuing salt-catalyzed reaction between plutonium and water. Experimental results are discussed, possible involvement of hydrogen fluoride (HF) is examined, and methods of corrective action are presented in this report

  14. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in tropics and subtropic. 2. Corrosion resistance of different metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strekalov, P.V.

    1993-01-01

    Data from 169 sources concerning corrosion of different metals, alloys and means of protection, obtained for a 30-year period (up to 1987) in different continent including Europe (Bulgaria, Spain, Italy, France, USSR); America (USA, Panama, Cuba, Venezuela, Brasil, Argentine); Africa (Nigeria, SAR); Australia, New Zeland, Papua-Newguinea, Philippines, are systemized. Actual results of full-scal atmospheric testings of iron, zinc, copper, cadmium, aluminium, tin, lead, carbon, low-alloys. Stainless steels, cast irons, halvanic coatings, copper, aluminium, nickel, titanium, magnesium alloys are presented. Data on the fracture rate can be used for creating the data base in banks on atmospheric resistance of metal materials

  15. Characterization of corrosion products formed on steels in the first months of atmospheric exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes Renato Altobelli; Costa Isolda; Faria Dalva Lúcia Araújo de

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion products of carbon steel and weathering steel exposed to three different types of atmospheres, at times ranging from one to three months, have been identified. The steels were exposed in an industrial site, an urban site (São Paulo City, Brazil), and a humid site. The effect of the steel type on the corrosion products formed in the early stages of atmospheric corrosion has been evaluated. The corrosion products formed at the various exposure locations were characterized by Raman...

  16. Mapping corrosion of metallic slab by thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bison, P; Ceseri, M; Inglese, G

    2010-01-01

    Thermography is used to detect corrosion on a aluminum specimen. Two identical aluminum plates are extracted from the same base material. One of them is machined on one side, in such a way to simulate a material loss. Both the sound and damaged plate are heated on the undamaged side by a sine modulated heating source. A thermographic camera records a sequence of images of the temperature surface of both the sound and damaged sample on the heated (undamaged) sides. Several sequences are recorded with different modulation periods. By a suitable data reduction procedure, the thermographic sequence is reduced to a couple of images representing amplitude and phase of the oscillating temperature field. A perturbative method is used to solve iteratively the direct problem in the corroded domain that is confronted with the experimental data until an optimum matching is reached.

  17. Zn-10.2% Fe coating over carbon steel atmospheric corrosion resistance. Comparison with zinc coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnau, G.; Gimenez, E.; Rubio, M.V.; Saura, J.J.; Suay, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Zn-10.2% Fe galvanized coating versus hot galvanized coating over carbon steel corrosion performance has been studied. Different periods of atmospheric exposures in various Valencia Community sites, and salt spray accelerated test have been done. Carbon steel test samples have been used simultaneously in order to classify exposure atmosphere corrosivity, and environmental exposure atmosphere characteristics have been analyzed. Corrosion Velocity versus environmental parameters has been obtained. (Author) 17 refs

  18. A contribution to the modelling of atmospheric corrosion of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoerle, S.; Mazaudier, F.

    2003-01-01

    With the aim of predicting the long term atmospheric corrosion behaviour of iron, the characteristics of the rust layer formed during this process and the mechanisms occurring inside the rust layer during a wet-dry cycle are considered. A first step in modelling the behaviour is proposed, based on the description of the cathodic reactions associated with iron oxidation: reduction of a part of the rust layer (lepidocrocite) and reduction of dissolved oxygen on the rust layer. The modelling, by including some composition and morphological data of the rust layer as parameters, is able to account for the metal damage after one Wet-Dry cycle. (authors)

  19. Standard practice for conducting atmospheric corrosion tests on metals

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers and defines conditions for exposure of metals and alloys to the weather. It sets forth the general procedures that should be followed in any atmospheric test. It is presented as an aid in conducting atmospheric corrosion tests so that some of the pitfalls of such testing may be avoided. As such, it is concerned mainly with panel exposures to obtain data for comparison purposes. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of whoever uses this standard to consult and establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  20. Development and evaluation of an instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeld, F.; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Kendig, M. W.; Roe, D. K.

    1985-06-01

    A research program was carried out in which a new instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor (ACRM) was developed and evaluated, and equipment was constructed which will allow the use of many sensors in an economical way in outdoor exposures. In the first task, the ACRM was developed and tested in flow chambers in which relative humidity and gaseous and particulate pollutant levels can be controlled. Diurnal cycles and periods of rain were simulated. The effects of aerosols were studied. A computerized system was used for collection, storage, and analysis of the electrochemical data. In the second task, a relatively inexpensive electronics system for control of the ACRM and measurement of atmospheric corrosion rates was designed and built. In the third task, calibration of deterioration rates of various metallic and nonmetallic materials with the response of the ACRMs attached to these materials was carried out under controlled environmental conditions using the system developed in the second task. A Quality Assurance project plan was prepared with inputs from the Rockwell International Environmental Monitoring and Service Center and Quality Assurance System audits were performed.

  1. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing - Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of metals to predict service life of metal-based structures in corrosive environments has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions similar to those of the corrosive environment. Their reliability to correlate to atmospheric exposure test results is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated corrosion testing has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long-term service life of a metal, despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard, and their use is crucial, a method that correlates timescales from accelerated testing to atmospheric exposure would be very valuable. This paper presents work that began with the characterization of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Beachside Corrosion Test Site. The chemical changes that occur on low carbon steel, during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions, were investigated using surface chemistry analytical methods. The corrosion rates and behaviors of panels subjected to long-term and accelerated corrosion conditions, involving neutral salt fog and alternating seawater spray, were compared to identify possible timescale correlations between accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The results, as well as preliminary findings on the correlation investigation, are presented.

  2. Bearing assembly and the like for use in corrosive and non-corrosive atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashburn, D.N.; Woodall, H.C.; Wright, R.R.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a novel machine element characterized by mutually rubbing surfaces which are composed of dissimilar materials having high hardness, a low coefficient of friction, and resistance to corrosion by halogen-containing atmospheres. As exemplified by the preferred embodiment for use in gaseous UF 6 , the rubbing surfaces are chemically deposited nickel and anodized aluminum. These surfaces permit jam-free operation despite long-term exposure to UF 6 . Preferably, both surfaces have a hardness of at least about 500 HV 100 on the Vickers hardness scale, and preferably the anodized-aluminum surface is of type having comparatively little tendency to sorb uranium hexafluoride

  3. Atmospheric Corrosion Behavior of 2A12 Aluminum Alloy in a Tropical Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyu Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion behavior of 2A12 aluminum alloy exposed to a tropical marine environment for 4 years was investigated. Weight loss of 2A12 alloy in the log-log coordinates can be well fitted with two linear segments, attributing to the evolution of the corrosion products. EIS results indicate that the corrosion product layer formed on the specimens exposed for 12 months or longer presents a good barrier effect. Corrosion morphology changes from pitting corrosion to severe intergranular corrosion with the extension of exposure time, resulting in the reduction of the mechanical properties.

  4. Kinetics of atmospheric corrosion of mild steel, zinc, galvanized iron and aluminium at 10 exposure stations in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, M.; Venkatachari, G.; Palaniswamy, N.

    2006-01-01

    As a part of updating Corrosion Map of India project, atmospheric corrosion behaviour of commercially available engineering materials such as mild steel, galvanized iron, zinc and aluminium metals was studied in marine, industrial, urban, and rural environments by weight loss method at 10 exposure stations in India over a period of 5 years. The results of these studies demonstrated that galvanized iron, zinc and aluminium metals were several times more durable than mild steel. Compared to galvanized iron and zinc, aluminium provided superior protection in industrial and marine environment except at Mormugao Port Trust (MPT). It also offered much better resistance to corrosion in rural environments. At certain places, galvanized iron proved to be more durable than aluminium. The results obeyed well with the empirical kinetics equation of the form C = Kt n , where K and C are the corrosion losses in μm after 1 and 't' years of the exposure, respectively, and 'n' is a constant. Based on 'n' values, the corrosion mechanisms of these metals are predicted. The corrosion products formed on the metal samples in Chennai marine atmosphere were identified by X-ray diffraction analysis

  5. A comparative study of accelerated tests to simulate atmospheric corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis, Sergio Luiz de

    2000-01-01

    In this study, specimens coated with five organic coating systems were exposed to accelerated tests for periods up to 2000 hours, and also to weathering for two years and six months. The accelerated tests consisted of the salt spray test, according to ASTM B-117; Prohesion (ASTM G 85-98 annex 5A); Prohesion combined with cyclic exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation; 'Prohchuva' a test described by ASTM G 85-98 using a salt spray with composition that simulated the acid rain of Sao Paulo, but one thousand times more concentrated, and 'Prohchuva' combined with cyclic exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation. The coated specimens were exposed with and without incision to expose the substrate. The onset and progress of corrosion at and of the exposed metallic surface, besides coating degradation, were followed by visual observation, and photographs were taken. The coating systems were classified according to the extent of corrosion protection given to the substrate, using a method based on ASTM standards D-610, D-714, D-1654 and D-3359. The rankings of the coatings obtained from accelerated tests and weathering were compared and contrasted with classification of the same systems obtained from literature, for specimens exposed to an industrial atmosphere. Coating degradation was strongly dependent on the test, and could be attributed to differences in test conditions. The best correlation between accelerated test and weathering was found for the test Prohesion alternated with cycles of exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation. (author)

  6. Emissions of the corrosion radionuclides in an atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vardanyan, M.

    2010-01-01

    In area of Armenian nuclear power plant location, in atmospheric air in majority of cases log two technogenic radionuclides: l 37 C s and 9 0 S r. Presence of these radionuclides basically is caused by global fall out (consequences of tests of the nuclear weapon and Chernobyl NPP accident), whose contribution to the contents of these radionuclides in atmosphere is incomparably greater, than emissions from the NPP. However there are some cases when in an atmosphere are registered the technogenic radionuclides, caused by emissions from NPP. In the present work such case is considered. Gas-aerosol releases of NPP in the atmosphere are carefully purified by means of various high-efficiency filters and gas-cleaning systems. Nevertheless, one should forecast and measure, the possible impact of these releases on the environment in the regions surrounding the NPP. Radioactive releases of the Armenian NPP (ANPP) contain the set of radionuclides characteristic for NPPs of this type. They may be divided into three groups: 1 31 I , 1 37 C s, 1 34 C s, 9 0 S r and 8 9 S r fission fragments, isotopes of noble gases krypton and xenon and other radionuclides; corrosion originated radionuclides: 6 0 C o, 1 10m A g, 5 4 M n, 5 l C r and others; activation products of the heat-transfer agent itself. It should be noted that the amount of radioactive materials released in the environment by the ANPP during the whole period of its operation was much lower than the admissible quantities specified in the corresponding legal documents (RSN, NPPSP) acting in Armenia, which are practically identical to the internationally accepted norms. The amounts of releases and their radionuclides composition for the ANPP are given

  7. Corrosion of mineral insulated (MI) cables at MAPS-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bora, J.S.; Babar, A.K.

    1989-01-01

    It has been experimentally verified that the cause of undesirable behaviour of mineral insulated (MI) cables at Madras Atomic Power Station Unit 2 (MAPS-2) is due to corrosion of termination. It is always possible to restore them to their normal condition by heating if degradation is due to absorption of moisture and by cutting and removing the affected portion in case of short or open failures. During extended shutdown, it is advisable to check other MI terminations and take appropriate corrective action in order to prevent failures in future. During installation MI Cables are to be heated before sealing and should never be heated after sealing. (author)

  8. Mechanism and degree of chemical elements effect on atmosphere corrosion resistance of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu Din' Vuj

    1991-01-01

    It follows from the proposed regression equations that falourable effect of chemical elements on steel resistance to atmospheric corrosion is determined by their ability to increase interatom bond stability in iron crystal lattice and form corrosion products with high protection properties. Element positive influence on steel corrosion resistance decreases in the following order: S, P, Si, Mn, Cu, Cr, Ni, C in semiurban tropical atmosphere and S, Mn, Sr, Cu, Ni, Cr in coastal atmosphere. In the latter case C increases corrosion in a greater degree as compared to P. Small ammounts of Mo decrease steel resistance in semiurban atmosphere and almost do not influence it in the coastal one. Possible mechanisms of individual element influence on steel corrosion resistance are considered

  9. 49 CFR 195.583 - What must I do to monitor atmospheric corrosion control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.583 What must I do to... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What must I do to monitor atmospheric corrosion control? 195.583 Section 195.583 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued...

  10. A brief review on the atmospheric corrosion of mild steel in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shafiei

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review on the atmospheric corrosion of steel, at three sites, in Iran. Corrosion rate values, time of wetness, and the level of pollutants, namely of SO2 and chlorides were determined for the first year of exposure in order to establish the aggressiveness of the atmospheres. The results obeyed well with the empirical kinetics equation of the form C = Ktn.

  11. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... atmosphere, except pipelines under paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Coating material must be suitable for...

  12. VVER vessel steel corrosion at interaction with molten corium in oxidizing atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechta, S.V. [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation)], E-mail: bechta@sbor.spb.su; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Sulatsky, A.A. [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Gusarov, V.V.; Almiashev, V.I. [Institute of Silicate Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences (ISCh RAS), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lopukh, D.B. [SPb State Electrotechnical University (SPbGETU), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bottomley, D. [EUROPAISCHE KOMMISSION, Joint Research Centre Institut fuer Transurane (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, M. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Piluso, P. [CEA/DEN/DSNI, Saclay (France); Miassoedov, A.; Tromm, W. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Altstadt, E. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR), Dresden (Germany); Fichot, F. [IRSN/DPAM/SEMCA, St. Paul lez Durance (France); Kymalainen, O. [FORTUM Nuclear Services Ltd., Espoo (Finland)

    2009-06-15

    The long-term in-vessel corium retention (IVR) in the lower head bears a risk of the vessel wall deterioration caused by steel corrosion. The ISTC METCOR Project has studied physicochemical impact of prototypic coria having different compositions in air and steam and has generated valuable experimental data on vessel steel corrosion. It is found that the corrosion rate is sensitive to corium composition, but the composition of oxidizing above-melt atmosphere (air, steam) has practically no influence on it. A model of the corrosion process that integrates the experimental data, is proposed and used for development of correlations.

  13. VVER vessel steel corrosion at interaction with molten corium in oxidizing atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Sulatsky, A.A.; Gusarov, V.V.; Almiashev, V.I.; Lopukh, D.B.; Bottomley, D.; Fischer, M.; Piluso, P.; Miassoedov, A.; Tromm, W.; Altstadt, E.; Fichot, F.; Kymalainen, O.

    2009-01-01

    The long-term in-vessel corium retention (IVR) in the lower head bears a risk of the vessel wall deterioration caused by steel corrosion. The ISTC METCOR Project has studied physicochemical impact of prototypic coria having different compositions in air and steam and has generated valuable experimental data on vessel steel corrosion. It is found that the corrosion rate is sensitive to corium composition, but the composition of oxidizing above-melt atmosphere (air, steam) has practically no influence on it. A model of the corrosion process that integrates the experimental data, is proposed and used for development of correlations.

  14. Atmospheric corrosion tests along the Norwegian-Russian border. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, J.F.; Mikhailov, A.A.

    1997-12-31

    A bilateral exposure programme was carried out along the Norwegian-Russian border in 1990-1991, 1992-1993 and 1993-1994 to evaluate quantitatively the effect of sulphur pollutants on the atmospheric corrosion of important materials in sub-arctic climate. The first part of the programme demonstrated that also in subarctic climate do metals corrode depending on the atmospheric corrosivity, and dose-response functions were derived which combined the effects of SO{sub 2} and time of wetness. The second part of the programme, which is described in this report, involved exposures of carbon steel, zinc and copper at two sites in Norway and three sites in Russia. It is concluded that the accelerated atmospheric corrosion of metals in regions along the border is mainly due to dry deposition of sulphur. At some sites, dry deposition of Cl contributes because of sea-salt aerosols. The corrosivity of acid precipitation is certain but could not be represented as a function because of the small differences observed in the pH values at the different sites. At all test sites the kinetics of corrosion of steel, zinc and copper are characterized by a reduced corrosion rate after one year of exposure. Time of wetness is an important parameter in predicting atmospheric corrosion of metals even on a regional scale. Hence, for monitoring and for trend-effect analysis, it is very important to determine the corrosivity of SO{sub 2} with time of wetness. In accordance with dose-response functions obtained, the yearly corrosion rate for steel and zinc are higher for the areas with higher amounts of dry deposition of Cl than for areas with analogous but only SO{sub 2}-containing atmosphere. 6 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  15. Atmospheric corrosion monitoring at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, M.

    1995-01-01

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) at the US Department of Energy's K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, TN has been stored in large steel cylinders which have undergone significant atmospheric corrosion damage over the last 35 years. A detailed experimental program to characterize and monitor the corrosion damage was initiated in 1992. Large amounts of corrosion scale and deep pits are found to cover cylinder surfaces. Ultrasonic wall thickness measurements have shown uniform corrosion losses up to 20 mils (0.5 mm) and pits up to 100 mils (2.5 mm) deep. Electrical resistance corrosion probes, time-of-wetness sensors and thermocouples have been attached to cylinder bodies. Atmospheric conditions are monitored using rain gauges, relative humidity sensors and thermocouples. Long-term (16 years) data are being obtained from mild steel corrosion coupons on test racks as well as attached directly to cylinder surfaces. Corrosion rates have been found to intimately related to the times-of-wetness, both tending to be higher on cylinder tops due to apparent sheltering effects. Data from the various tests are compared, discrepancies are discussed and a pattern of cylinder corrosion as a function of cylinder position and location is described

  16. Annual and long-term prediction of the atmospheric corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcillo, M.

    1998-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of metals is known to be a discontinuous electrochemical process which takes place only when the metallic surface is wet or moistened by different meteorological phenomena (rain, humidity condensation, fog, etc.) The magnitude of atmospheric corrosion would be relatively low if it were not for the presence of certain pollutants in the atmosphere, mainly sulphur dioxide (anthropogenic pollutant) and marine chlorides (natural pollutant). The literature contains different models for predicting the atmospheric metals over short periods (generally one year) and long periods (15, 20 or more years) of atmospheric exposure. In addition to the different meteorological factors (volume of precipitation, days of rain, relative humidity (RH), T, etc.), atmospheric SO 2 deposition rate and atmospheric salinity (Cl - ) appear as independent variables in all of these models. (Author)

  17. Corrosion of bismuth-based superconductor wires by some atmospheric agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Azzouz, F.; M'chirgui, A.; Ben Salem, M.; Yangui, B.; Lamine, C.; Nitsche, S.; Boulesteix, C.

    2000-01-01

    Superconducting wires (SWs) were previously prepared in our group by heat treatment of bismuth-based superconductor coatings on a metal core. This paper presents an analysis of the corrosion process by some atmospheric agents on the SWs. SWs with different concentrations of a (Bi, Pb)-2223 phase have been exposed to water vapour saturated air, to pure water vapour or to dry carbon dioxide. Each of these atmospheric agents was found to act differently on the SWs. However, all the studied corrosion processes present a high sensitivity to the concentration of the (Bi, Pb)-2223 phase. For a higher concentration of this phase, the SWs are less sensitive to atmospheric agents. (author)

  18. The Moessbauer spectroscopy in the characterization of atmospheric corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Torres, D.; Leiva Ronda, P.; Gomez, J.; Ronda, M.

    1996-01-01

    A study of corrosion products on mild steel formed after 1 and 5 years exposure in two industrial coastal weathering stations in the Bay from Matanzas City, Cuba, has been carried out. Structural analysis was conducted using mainly transmission Moessbauer Spectroscopy and the X-ray diffraction as complementary technique. The main phases found in the specimen exposed to high chloride containing environment were: lepidocrocite (γ- FeOOH), goethite (α- FeOOH) and magnetite concentration was the lowest, the phases found were γ- FeOOH and α- FeOOH, and the phase transformation proposed was γ- FeOOh -> α- Fe-OOH. In this station were found also amorphous corrosion products. There amorphous phases could be responsible for the lowest levels of corrosion on steel in this station

  19. Corrosion map for metal pipes in coastal Louisiana : research project capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this project is to create a guidance document with maps : that delineate zones where metal pipe is prone to increased corrosion due : to environmental conditions. Results from this project will provide a logical : rationale to suppor...

  20. The effect of surface treatment and gaseous rust protection paper on the atmospheric corrosion stability of aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Guizhong

    1992-03-01

    The experimental results of atmospheric corrosion of 166 aluminium alloy of Al-Mg-Si-Cu system and 167 aluminium alloy of Al-Mg-Si-Cu-Fe-Ni system for different surface treatment and different wrapping papers used are introduced. The results show: 1. The composition of aluminium alloy has some effect on the performance of atmospheric corrosion stability and the local corrosion depth for 167 aluminium alloy specimen is considerable. 2. After 8 years storage, the 167 aluminium alloy tubular specimen, which was treated with surface treatment in deionized water at 100 ∼ 230 C degree, has no spot of atmospheric corrosion found. 3. Within the test period, the performance of atmospheric corrosion stability by sulphuric-acid anodization film is remarkable. 4. The No. 19 gaseous rust protection paper has no effect of atmospheric corrosion stability on the 166 and 167 aluminium alloys which were treated with quenching and natural ageing method

  1. Trials carried out on corrosive (fluorinated) atmosphere vacuum gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant, M.; Houyvet, A.; Noe, P.

    1966-01-01

    Study of the stability of readings given by a modified Pirani type measurement probe with a view to long term operation in the presence of corrosive gases. Results of measurements carried out before and after use under these conditions. (author) [fr

  2. Durability of bare and anodised aluminium in atmosphere of very different corrosivities I. Bare aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Escudero, E.; Lopez, V.; Simancas, J.; Morcillo, M.

    2004-01-01

    The behaviour of bare aluminium is studied in atmospheric exposure at 11 natural testing stations with salinity levels ranging between 2.1 and 684 mg Cl''- m''-2 d''-1. In atmospheres of low or moderate aggressivity aluminium behaves as a passive material, though the insignificant corrosion that is produced is sufficient to spoil its appearance. In contrast, at salinity levels of 50 mg Cl''- m''-2 ''-1 or above, aluminium is susceptible to pitting corrosion even in the first year of atmospheric exposure, or in the second year at salinities of ≤ 10 mg Cl''- m''-2 d''-1. For comparative purposes, results are included for aluminium protected with an anodic film of 28 μm thickness exposed at the same testing stations. A 28 μm anodic film, correctly sealed, prevents the risk of localised corrosion even in the most unfavourable situations. (Author) 23 refs

  3. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  4. Application Of Fractal Dimension On Atmospheric Corrosion Of Galvanized Iron Roofing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa A.K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Corrosion rates of galvanized iron roofing sheet In yola north eastern part of Nigeria were assessed and determined by weight loss method and scanner fractal analysis method. Scanning electronic machine SEM was used to transform corrosion coupons to electronic form for image j processing and analysing software The result of corrosion rates for these two methods after six months of the samples exposure in industrial. Coastal market and urban areas in the region are 1.51 1.079 1.051 0.779 and 1.9941 1.9585 1.9565 1.9059 for weight loss and scanner fractal dimension methods respectively. and the results from the two methods were in agreement This establish the reliability of fractal dimension in measuring atmospheric corrosion this research also provides alternative method of measuring atmospheric corrosion and overcome the limitation of conventional weight loss technique in its inability to measure corrosion rate which is not significantly change over a long period of time moreover weight loss cannot demonstrate the area of concentration of corrosion on the surface of the coupon it rather gives the weight loss value and this will aid in determining the real level or extent of corrosion damage in the material and this can be obtained when measuring the material through fractal analysis these results clearly indicate that corrosion is heavier on locations close to the industrial areas. This also shows the negative impact of industrial activities on the corrodible materials and consequently on the plants and environment.

  5. A discussion for stabilization time of carbon steel in atmospheric corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zong-kai; Ma, Xiao-bing; Cai, Yi-kun

    2017-09-01

    Stabilization time is an important parameter in long-term prediction of carbon steel corrosion in atmosphere. The range of the stabilization time of carbon steel in atmospheric corrosion has been published in many scientific literatures. However, the results may not precise because engineering experiences is dominant. This paper deals with the recalculation of stabilization time based on ISO CORRAG program, and analyzes the results and makes a comparison to the data mentioned above. In addition, a new thinking to obtain stabilization time will be proposed.

  6. Indoor atmospheric corrosion of historical ferrous alloys. System characterisation, mechanisms and modelling discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, J.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of indoor atmospheric corrosion in iron alloys is of primary importance in several fields, including for the conservation of Middle Ages monuments or the long term storage of nuclear waste. In this research, a double approach was developed, combining fine characterisation of corrosion systems and design of experiments to answers specific questions related to mechanisms understanding. Iron indoor atmospheric corrosion was investigated on samples coming from the reinforcing chain of the Amiens cathedral (15. century). In the first stage, the corrosion system has been extensively characterised from the macroscopic to the nano-metric scale. In particular, structural micro-analysis (μ-Raman, μ-XRD, μ-XAS) has been used to locate, identify and quantify the oxidised phases. Rust layers are composed of a matrix of nano-metric goethite, with low quantities of lepidocrocite and akaganeite mostly located in the extern part of the corrosion system. In addition, clear marblings are dispersed in the matrix, which are sometimes connected with the metal core. Although these may contain maghemite, these marblings are generally made of ferri-hydrite/feroxyhite phases. In the second stage, specific experiments have been carried out in an unsaturated marked medium to locate oxygen reduction sites in the rust layers. Several cases were evidenced, depending on the rust layer morphology. In addition, reduction processes of model phases have been studied in situ, using an electrochemical cell coupled with structural characterisation techniques. This combination highlighted the influence of reduction mode and pH on the type of reduced phase formed. From the obtained results, several mechanisms are proposed to explain the long term indoor atmospheric corrosion of iron, including rust layers morphology and phases properties. The different hypotheses have been integrated in a proposed method to diagnosis ancient ferrous systems stability. These hypotheses also

  7. Long-Term Atmospheric Corrosion Behavior of Epoxy Prime Coated Aluminum Alloy 7075-T6 in Coastal Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Zhang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric corrosion of epoxy prime coated aluminum alloy 7075-T6 exposed for 7, 12 and 20 years was investigated. The remaining thicknesses of epoxy prime coatings for macroscopically intact coating areas followed a normal distribution and decreased linearly. EIS results demonstrated that the corrosion resistance of the coating decreased with exposure time. After 20 years of exposure, the epoxy coating had lost its protection as cracks existed within the coating and exfoliation corrosion had occurred on the substrate. The substrate was sensitive to exfoliation corrosion through metallographic and TEM analysis. The corrosion products were mainly hydroxides of aluminum. The morphology and chemical compositions of the coating bubbling area and propagation characterizations of exfoliation corrosion were analyzed by SEM, EPMA and EDS. Cracks between the lumps of corrosion products provided the channels for the transmission of corrosion mediums. Furthermore, the mechanical model was proposed to analyze the propagation characterization of exfoliation corrosion.

  8. Research on atmospheric corrosion of steel using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, M.; Uchida, H.; Konishi, H.; Mizuki, J.

    2004-01-01

    Correlation between local structure around Cr in the protective rust layer on weathering steel and protective performance of the rust layer is presented as an example of corrosion research using synchrotron radiation which has recently been applied in various research fields as a useful tool. In addition, in situ observation of initial process of rust formation on steel is also mentioned. It was pointed out by considering the X-ray absorption fine structure spectra that the nanostructure of the protective rust layer on weathering steel primarily comprises of small Cr-goethite crystals containing surface adsorbed and/or intergranular CrO x 3-2X complex anions. This CrO x 3-2X explains the protective performance of the rust layer originated by dense aggregation of fine crystals with cation selectivity of the Cr-goethite. It is very advantageous to employ white X-rays for in situ observation of rusting process of a carbon steel covered with electrolyte thin films because rust structure might change very quickly. This in situ observation revealed the effect of ion species on the change in rust phase during wet/dry repeating. It can be said that application of synchrotron radiation on corrosion research is so useful to understand the nanostructure of surface oxides which closely relate to corrosion behavior of metals and alloys. (author)

  9. Investigation of the cut-edge corrosion of organically-coated galvanized steel after accelerated atmospheric corrosion test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reşit Yıldız

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cut edge corrosion of organically coated (epoxy, polyurethane and polyester galvanized steel was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Measurements were performed on specimens that had been tested in an accelerated atmospheric corrosion test. The samples were subjected to 10 s fogging and 1 h awaiting cycles in an exposure cabinet (120 and 180 days with artificial acid rain solution. According to the investigation, the coatings were damaged from the cut edge into the sheet, this distance was about 0.8 cm. These defects were more pronounced at after 180 days in proportion to after 120 days.

  10. The effects of air pollution and climatic factors on atmospheric corrosion of marble under field exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Nishimura, Rokuro; Tsujino, Yoshio; Satoh, Yukihiro; Thi Phuong Thoa, Nguyen; Yokoi, Masayuki; Maeda, Yasuaki

    2005-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of marble was evaluated in terms of SO 2 concentration as air pollution and climatic factors such as rainfall, relative humidity, temperature and so on under the field exposure. Marble of calcite type (CaCO 3 ) was exposed to outdoor atmospheric environment with and without a rain shelter at four test sites in the southern part of Vietnam for 3-month, 1- and 2-year periods from July 2001 to September 2003. The thickness loss of marble was investigated gravimetrically. X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescent methods were applied to study corrosion products on marble. The corrosion product of marble was only gypsum (CaSO 4 . 2H 2 O) and was washed out by rain under the unsheltered exposure condition. It was found that the most substantial factors influencing the corrosion of marble were rainfall, SO 2 concentration in the air and relative humidity. Based on the results obtained, we estimated the dose-response functions for the atmospheric corrosion of marble in the southern part of Vietnam

  11. atmospheric corrosion of mild steel in the niger delta region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    xtz

    ABSTRACT. The atmospheric corrosion of Calabar, Cross River State environment has been investigated for 12 months using weight loss technique. The extent of pollution of the environment was also determined via measurements of the precipitation and air quality parameters. Apart from the suspended particulate.

  12. Dose-response functions and corrosion mapping for a small geographical area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haagenrud, S.E.; Henriksen, J.F.; Gram, F.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed corrosion and environmental measurements have been used to develop dose response (D/R) functions for carbon steel, zinc, copper, and aluminum for a 26 x 31 km urban/rural area with approximately homogeneous climate. The D/R functions, expressed in terms of SO 2 and time of wetness, were of the same type for all four metals. The SO 2 contribution to the total corrosion dominates in the centers of towns and around an industrial plant. Corrosion maps for the whole area were established

  13. High-Temperature, Dual-Atmosphere Corrosion of Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Paul; Amendola, Roberta

    2012-12-01

    High-temperature corrosion of ferritic stainless steel (FSS) surfaces can be accelerated and anomalous when it is simultaneously subjected to different gaseous environments, e.g., when separating fuel (hydrogen) and oxidant (air) streams, in comparison with single-atmosphere exposures, e.g., air only. This so-called "dual-atmosphere" exposure is realized in many energy-conversion systems including turbines, boilers, gasifiers, heat exchangers, and particularly in intermediate temperature (600-800°C) planar solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. It is generally accepted that hydrogen transport through the FSS (plate or tube) and its subsequent integration into the growing air-side surface oxide layer can promote accelerated and anomalous corrosion—relative to single-atmosphere exposure—via defect chemistry changes, such as increased cation vacancy concentrations, decreased oxygen activity, and steam formation within the growing surface oxide layers. Establishment of a continuous and dense surface oxide layer on the fuel side of the FSS can inhibit hydrogen transport and the associated effects on the air side. Minor differences in FSS composition, microstructure, and surface conditions can all have dramatic influences on dual-atmosphere corrosion behaviors. This article reviews high-temperature, dual-atmosphere corrosion phenomena and discusses implications for SOFC stacks, related applications, and future research.

  14. Influence of stripping and cooling atmospheres on surface properties and corrosion of zinc galvanizing coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasakau, K.A., E-mail: kyasakau@ua.pt [Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, CICECO—Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Giner, I. [Universität Paderborn, Fakultät NW—Department Chemie, Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie, Warburger Strasse 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany); Vree, C. [Salzgitter Mannesmann Forschung, GmbH Division Surface Technology, Eisenhüttenstrasse 99, 38239 Salzgitter (Germany); Ozcan, O.; Grothe, R. [Universität Paderborn, Fakultät NW—Department Chemie, Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie, Warburger Strasse 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany); Oliveira, A. [Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, CICECO—Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Grundmeier, G. [Universität Paderborn, Fakultät NW—Department Chemie, Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie, Warburger Strasse 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany); Ferreira, M.G.S. [Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, CICECO—Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Zheludkevich, M.L. [Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, CICECO—Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Department of Corrosion and Surface Technology, Institute of Materials Research Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Stripping/cooling atmosphere affects surfaces chemical composition of Zn and Zn-Al-Mg galvanized coatings. • Higher peel forces of model adhesive films were obtained on zinc alloys samples prepared under nitrogen atmosphere. • Localized corrosion attack originates at grain boundaries on Zn galvanized coating. • Visible dissolution of MgZn{sub 2} phase was observed by in situ AFM only at binary eutectics and not at ternary ones. - Abstract: In this work the influence of stripping/cooling atmospheres used after withdrawal of steel sheet from Zn or Zn-alloy melt on surface properties of Zn (Z) and Zn-Al-Mg (ZM) hot-dip galvanizing coatings has been studied. The aim was to understand how the atmosphere (composed by nitrogen (N{sub 2}) or air) affects adhesion strength to model adhesive and corrosive behaviour of the galvanized substrates. It was shown that the surface chemical composition and Volta potential of the galvanizing coatings prepared under the air or nitrogen atmosphere are strongly influenced by the atmosphere. The surface chemistry Z and ZM surfaces prepared under N{sub 2} contained a higher content of metal atoms and a richer hydroxide density than the specimens prepared under air atmosphere as assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The induced differences on the microstructure of the galvanized coatings played a key role on the local corrosion induced defects as observed by means of in situ Atomic force microscopy (AFM). Peel force tests performed on the substrates coated by model adhesive films indicate a higher adhesive strength to the surfaces prepared under nitrogen atmosphere. The obtained results have been discussed in terms of the microstructure and surface chemical composition of the galvanizing coatings.

  15. Influence of stripping and cooling atmospheres on surface properties and corrosion of zinc galvanizing coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasakau, K.A.; Giner, I.; Vree, C.; Ozcan, O.; Grothe, R.; Oliveira, A.; Grundmeier, G.; Ferreira, M.G.S.; Zheludkevich, M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Stripping/cooling atmosphere affects surfaces chemical composition of Zn and Zn-Al-Mg galvanized coatings. • Higher peel forces of model adhesive films were obtained on zinc alloys samples prepared under nitrogen atmosphere. • Localized corrosion attack originates at grain boundaries on Zn galvanized coating. • Visible dissolution of MgZn_2 phase was observed by in situ AFM only at binary eutectics and not at ternary ones. - Abstract: In this work the influence of stripping/cooling atmospheres used after withdrawal of steel sheet from Zn or Zn-alloy melt on surface properties of Zn (Z) and Zn-Al-Mg (ZM) hot-dip galvanizing coatings has been studied. The aim was to understand how the atmosphere (composed by nitrogen (N_2) or air) affects adhesion strength to model adhesive and corrosive behaviour of the galvanized substrates. It was shown that the surface chemical composition and Volta potential of the galvanizing coatings prepared under the air or nitrogen atmosphere are strongly influenced by the atmosphere. The surface chemistry Z and ZM surfaces prepared under N_2 contained a higher content of metal atoms and a richer hydroxide density than the specimens prepared under air atmosphere as assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The induced differences on the microstructure of the galvanized coatings played a key role on the local corrosion induced defects as observed by means of in situ Atomic force microscopy (AFM). Peel force tests performed on the substrates coated by model adhesive films indicate a higher adhesive strength to the surfaces prepared under nitrogen atmosphere. The obtained results have been discussed in terms of the microstructure and surface chemical composition of the galvanizing coatings.

  16. Corrosion Map for Metal Pipes in Coastal Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Transportation agencies often allow metal pipes as an option for cross drains under/along roads and highways. Metal culverts can corrode over time at various rates based on their environmental conditions (e.g., corrosive nature of coastal soils, high...

  17. Atmospheric Corrosion Behavior and Mechanism of a Ni-Advanced Weathering Steel in Simulated Tropical Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Zeng, Zhongping; Cheng, Xuequn; Li, Xiaogang; Liu, Bo

    2017-12-01

    Corrosion behavior of Ni-advanced weathering steel, as well as carbon steel and conventional weathering steel, in a simulated tropical marine atmosphere was studied by field exposure and indoor simulation tests. Meanwhile, morphology and composition of corrosion products formed on the exposed steels were surveyed through scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Results indicated that the additive Ni in weathering steel played an important role during the corrosion process, which took part in the formation of corrosion products, enriched in the inner rust layer and promoted the transformation from loose γ-FeOOH to dense α-FeOOH. As a result, the main aggressive ion, i.e., Cl-, was effectively separated in the outer rust layer which leads to the lowest corrosion rate among these tested steels. Thus, the resistance of Ni-advanced weathering steel to atmospheric corrosion was significantly improved in a simulated tropical marine environment.

  18. Corrosion of tinplate T54S and T61 in humid atmosphere and saline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X.; Sandenbergh, R.F. [Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Univ. of Pretoria (South Africa)

    2001-09-01

    The initial corrosion mechanism and corrosion behaviors of tinplate T54S and T61 were investigated by chemical stripping layer by layer, humid atmosphere exposure, SEM and potentiodynamic method in saline solutions with the addition of a small amount of components simulating foods and tomato sauce. The results show that T54S initially corroded in the form of pitting at the bottom of grease marks on the surface while T61 displayed the initial corrosion along the steel base on the interface of the tin coating and steel, and both were driven by galvanic corrosion between tin coating as a cathode and base steel as an anode. In the solution of 3.5% NaCl, the free corrosion potential from the outer layer to steel base shifted to negative with an addition of 100 ppm HNO{sub 3} but the potential order reversed as HNO{sub 2} replaced HNO{sub 3} at equivalent content. With an addition of 100 ppm NaHS, a high cathodic peak for either the middle or the inner layers was ascribed to the involvement of the reduction of extra hydrogen, i.e. HS{sup -}. T54S displayed a wider anodic passive zone and lower passive current density than T61, which resulted from the effect of the alloy layer. (orig.)

  19. Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Atmospheric Cr Pollution as a Factor to Accelerated Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dereje Homa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Cr(VI pollution on the corrosion rate of corrugated iron roof samples collected from tanning industry areas was investigated through simulated laboratory exposure and spectrophotometric detection of Cr(III deposit as a product of the reaction. The total level of Cr detected in the samples ranged from 113.892 ± 0.17 ppm to 53.05 ± 0.243 ppm and showed increasing trend as sampling sites get closer to the tannery and in the direction of tannery effluent stream. The laboratory exposure of a newly manufactured material to a simulated condition showed a relatively faster corrosion rate in the presence of Cr(VI with concomitant deposition of Cr(III under pH control. A significant (P = 0.05 increase in the corrosion rate was also recorded when exposing scratched or stress cracked samples. A coupled redox process where Cr(VI is reduced to a stable, immobile, and insoluble Cr(III accompanying corrosion of the iron is proposed as a possible mechanism leading to the elevated deposition of the latter on the materials. In conclusion, the increased deposits of Cr detected in the corrugated iron roof samples collected from tanning industry zones suggested possible atmospheric Cr pollution as a factor to the accelerated corrosion of the materials.

  20. Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Atmospheric Cr Pollution as a Factor to Accelerated Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, Dereje; Haile, Ermias; Washe, Alemayehu P

    2017-01-01

    The effect of Cr(VI) pollution on the corrosion rate of corrugated iron roof samples collected from tanning industry areas was investigated through simulated laboratory exposure and spectrophotometric detection of Cr(III) deposit as a product of the reaction. The total level of Cr detected in the samples ranged from 113.892 ± 0.17 ppm to 53.05 ± 0.243 ppm and showed increasing trend as sampling sites get closer to the tannery and in the direction of tannery effluent stream. The laboratory exposure of a newly manufactured material to a simulated condition showed a relatively faster corrosion rate in the presence of Cr(VI) with concomitant deposition of Cr(III) under pH control. A significant ( P = 0.05) increase in the corrosion rate was also recorded when exposing scratched or stress cracked samples. A coupled redox process where Cr(VI) is reduced to a stable, immobile, and insoluble Cr(III) accompanying corrosion of the iron is proposed as a possible mechanism leading to the elevated deposition of the latter on the materials. In conclusion, the increased deposits of Cr detected in the corrugated iron roof samples collected from tanning industry zones suggested possible atmospheric Cr pollution as a factor to the accelerated corrosion of the materials.

  1. Influence of stripping and cooling atmospheres on surface properties and corrosion of zinc galvanizing coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasakau, K. A.; Giner, I.; Vree, C.; Ozcan, O.; Grothe, R.; Oliveira, A.; Grundmeier, G.; Ferreira, M. G. S.; Zheludkevich, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    In this work the influence of stripping/cooling atmospheres used after withdrawal of steel sheet from Zn or Zn-alloy melt on surface properties of Zn (Z) and Zn-Al-Mg (ZM) hot-dip galvanizing coatings has been studied. The aim was to understand how the atmosphere (composed by nitrogen (N2) or air) affects adhesion strength to model adhesive and corrosive behaviour of the galvanized substrates. It was shown that the surface chemical composition and Volta potential of the galvanizing coatings prepared under the air or nitrogen atmosphere are strongly influenced by the atmosphere. The surface chemistry Z and ZM surfaces prepared under N2 contained a higher content of metal atoms and a richer hydroxide density than the specimens prepared under air atmosphere as assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The induced differences on the microstructure of the galvanized coatings played a key role on the local corrosion induced defects as observed by means of in situ Atomic force microscopy (AFM). Peel force tests performed on the substrates coated by model adhesive films indicate a higher adhesive strength to the surfaces prepared under nitrogen atmosphere. The obtained results have been discussed in terms of the microstructure and surface chemical composition of the galvanizing coatings.

  2. Electrochemical noise evaluation of anodized aluminum. Comparative study against corrosion behaviour in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancourt, N.; Corvo, F.; Mendoza, A.; Simancas, J.; Morcillo, M.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Fragata, F.; Pena, J. J.; Sanchez de Villalaz, M.; Flores, S.; Almeida, E.; Rivero, S.; Rincon, O. T. de.

    2003-01-01

    The present work reports the evaluation of aluminum and anodized aluminum by electrochemical noise, as a part of the PATINE/CYTED project of the working group NS5. A visual examination is also made. The samples were exposed at several Ibero-American atmospheres up to 2 years of exposure. Different thickness of anodized aluminum were evaluated. The electrochemical potential noise of the 5 μm unexposed sample (pattern) showed a different behaviour to that showed by the other anodized specimens. This could be due to a slower sealed of the samples of higher thickness. The same behavior was observed on the samples exposed at the rural station. el Pardo. According to the visual examination, the samples of bare aluminum and those of anodized 5 μm thickness were the most affected by pitting corrosion in the highly polluted atmospheres. A good correlation between corrosion behaviour determined by visual examination and EN was obtained. (Author) 4 refs

  3. On the Effects of Atmospheric Particles Contamination and Humidity on Tin Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D’Angelo, L.; Verdingovas, V.; Ferrero, L.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of hygroscopic atmospheric particles are investigated in relation to the corrosion of tin. Surface insulation resistance test boards were directly contaminated both with ambient particles sampled in the field at Milan, Italy, and with pure saline particles generated in the laboratory....... An innovative particle deposition device was used to uniformly coat circular spots on to the test board surfaces. Deliquescence and crystallization of the water-soluble compounds were detected by observing the impedance response to varying relative humidity (RH) conditions with a gradual and continuous ramps....... The effects of the adsorption/desorption kinetics and of the temperature on the deliquescence and crystallization RH values were also investigated. Leakage current measurements at 5-V dc highlighted the ability of atmospheric particles to promote corrosion and electrochemical migration at RH levels far below...

  4. Corrosion study of steels exposed over five years to the humid tropical atmosphere of Panama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaén, Juan A., E-mail: juan.jaen@up.ac.pa [Departamento de Química Física, Edificio de Laboratorios Científicos-VIP (Panama); Iglesias, Josefina [Laboratorio de Análisis Industriales y Ciencias Ambientales (Panama)

    2017-11-15

    The results of assessing five-year corrosion of low-carbon and conventional weathering steels exposed to the Panamanian tropical atmosphere is presented. Two different test sites, one in Panama City: 5 km from the shoreline of the Pacific Ocean, and another in the marine environment of Fort Sherman, Caribbean coast of Panama; namely, Fort Sherman Coastal site: 100 m from coastline. The corrosion products, formed in the skyward and earthward faces in the studied tropical environment, were mainly identified using room temperature and low temperature (15 K) Mössbauer spectroscopy, and ATR-FTIR. In all samples, lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and goethite (α-FeOOH) were the main constituents. Some maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), was also identified in Tocumen by Mössbauer spectroscopy and traces of feroxyhyte (δ-FeOOH) using ATR-FTIR. The corrosion rate values obtained are discussed in light of the atmospheric exposure conditions and atmospheric pollutants.

  5. Heterogeneous corrosion of mild steel under SRB-biofilm characterised by electrochemical mapping technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Zehua; Shi Wei; Ruan Hongmei; Zhang Guoan

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Highly conductive SRB-biofilm can shield the potential differences of mild steel. → Potential maps fail to indicate the localised corrosion of steel under SRB-biofilm. → Galvanic current maps can detect the location of localised corrosion under biofilm. → SRB-biofilm is super-capacitive due to the conductive sulphide micropores. - Abstract: Heterogeneous corrosion of mild steel under sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB)-biofilm was characterised by wire beam electrode (WBE) technique and electrochemical impedance spectrum. The potential/current distributions of the WBE under SRB-biofilm showed that the potential maps could not indicate the localised corrosion of steels beneath biofilm due to the fact that all wire electrodes were short-circuited by the highly conductive sulphide precipitates embedded in SRB-biofilm. Instead, the galvanic current maps may give a good indication. The characteristic of super-capacitance (0.21 F/cm 2 ) of SRB-biofilm was attributed to the huge specific surface area of conductive pore walls inside biofilm.

  6. STEEL CORROSION AT 600°C IN SINGLE AND DUAL CONDITION IN OXYFUEL ATMOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Massari de Souza Coelho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Coal-fired power plants using the Oxyfuel process are being developed to produce electricity with zero CO2 emission. Steels used in this and other processes are often exposed to different atmospheres in each side of the material, especially in heat exchangers and solid oxide fuel cells. Some studies have shown that steels exposed to different hydrogen partial pressures in each side have a different corrosion behavior from steels exposed to a single atmosphere condition. In this investigation, two experimental steels were studied at 600°C and 1 atm in dual atmospheres containing water vapor in one side and flue gas in the other and they were compared to steels oxidized in single atmospheres. The gas composition used is similar to the ones found in Oxyfuel coal power plants, where there is a great concentration of CO2, and also H2O and SO2. Analyses were made using SEM and TEM.

  7. A Study on the Effect of Electrolyte Thickness on Atmospheric Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Kyeong Woo; Kim, Kwang Bum

    1998-01-01

    Effect of electrolyte layer thickness and increase in concentration of electrolyte during electrolyte thining on the atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel were investigated using EIS and cathodic polarization technique. The electrolyte layer thickness was controlled via two methods : one is mechanical method with microsyringe applying a different amount of electrolyte onto the metal surface to give different electrolyte thickness with the same electrolyte concentration. The other is drying method in which water layer thickness decreases through drying, causing increase in concentration of electrolyte during electrolyte thinning. In the region whose corrosion rate is controlled by cathodic reaction, corrosion rate for mechanical method is larger than that for drying method. However, for the electrolyte layers thinner than 20 ∼ 30 m, increase in concentration of electrolyte cause a higher corrosion rate for the case of the mechanical method compared with that of drying method. For a carbon steel covered with 0.1M Na 2 SO 4 , maximum corrosion rate is found at an electrolyte thickness of 45 ∼ 55 μm for mechanical method. However, maximum corrosion rate is found at an electrolyte thickness of 20 ∼ 35 μm for drying method. The limiting current is inversely proportional to electrolyte thickness for electrolyte thicker than 20 ∼ 30 μm. However, further decrease of the electrolyte thickness leads to an electrolyte thickness-independent limiting current reagion, where the oxygen rate is controlled by the solvation of oxygen at the electrolyte/gas interface. Diffusion limiting current for drying method is smaller compared with that for mechanica control. This can be attributed to decreasing in O 2 solubility caused by increase in concentration of electrolyte during electrolyte thining

  8. A modelling of the mechanisms occurring during the atmospheric corrosion of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marechal, L.; Perrin, S.; Hoerle, S.; Mazaudier, F.; Dillmann, P.

    2004-01-01

    In order to predict the long-term corrosion of metallic containers in storage conditions, a modelling of atmospheric corrosion of iron is proposed. This modelling takes into account the mechanisms which occur during the three stages of a wet-dry cycle. During the wetting stage, the reduction of lepidocrocite (g-FeOOH), a constituent of the rust layer, is considered to be the rate-limiting step of the corrosion. During the second stage of the cycle, the wet period, the reduction of dissolved oxygen on the lepidocrocite, previously reduced, is controlling the mechanism. The amount of oxidized metal depends on the quantity of reduced lepidocrocite and also on the oxygen diffusion in the electrolyte and the rust layer. At the end of the cycle, the blocking of the anodic sites is considered to describe the extinction of electrochemical corrosion during the drying. It appears that each stage of the cycle depends mainly on the chemical and morphological properties of the rust layer. (authors)

  9. Atmospheric corrosion in subtropical areas: XRD and electrochemical study of zinc atmospheric corrosion products in the province of Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)]. E-mail: jmorales@ull.es; Diaz, F. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Hernandez-Borges, J. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Universidad de La Laguna, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Gonzalez, S. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2006-02-15

    In the present paper, zinc sheets have been exposed for 4 years to the action of different atmospheres in 35 test sites located in the province of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. Corrosion products formed on the surface of the samples have been identified by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) for the first and second year of exposure. Zincite, hydrozincite, simonkolleite, zinc chlorohydroxysulphate, zinc oxysulphate and zinc hydroxysulphate have been identified in the test sheets. Preliminary results of an electrochemical study of the breakdown potential of zinc samples are also presented in order to test the protective effect of the film formed on the surface of the samples. It was found that the protective effect of this film increases linearly with exposure time.

  10. High temperature corrosion in chloridizing atmospheres: development of material quasi-stability diagrams and coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doublet, S.; Schuetze, M. [Karl-Winnacker-Institut der DECHEMA e.V., Theodor-Heuss-Allee 25, D-60486 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Chlorine gas is widely encountered in chemical industries, e. g. in waste incinerators and plastic/polymer decomposition mills. The presence of chlorine may significantly reduce the life-time of the components. Although metallic materials have been widely used under such conditions there is still a need for data on the role of the different alloying elements in commercial alloys. The purpose of this work is to produce a clear picture of which alloying elements play a detrimental role and which elements are beneficial. These results can be used as a tool for general assessment of metallic alloys with regard to their performance in chloridizing high temperature environments. A previous study has already been performed in oxidizing-chloridizing atmospheres and led to the elaboration of material quasi-stability diagrams. As a follow-up the present work has been performed in reducing-chloridizing atmospheres in order to validate these diagrams at low partial pressures of oxygen. The behaviour of 9 commercial materials where the content of the major alloying elements was varied in a systematic manner was investigated in reducing-chloridizing atmospheres (in Ar containing up to 2 vol.% Cl{sub 2} and down to 1 ppm O{sub 2}) at 800 deg. C. As the thermodynamical approach to corrosion in such atmospheres could not explain all the phenomena which occur, kinetics calculations i.e. diffusion calculations were carried out. Pack cementation and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) coatings were also developed from the best alloying elements previously found by the calculations and the corrosion experiments. Corrosion tests on the coated materials were then performed in the same conditions as the commercial alloys. (authors)

  11. Standard guide for estimating the atmospheric corrosion resistance of low-alloy steels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This guide presents two methods for estimating the atmospheric corrosion resistance of low-alloy weathering steels, such as those described in Specifications A242/A242M, A588/A588M, A606 Type 4, A709/A709M grades 50W, HPS 70W, and 100W, A852/A852M, and A871/A871M. One method gives an estimate of the long-term thickness loss of a steel at a specific site based on results of short-term tests. The other gives an estimate of relative corrosion resistance based on chemical composition. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

  12. Effect of corrosive marine atmosphere on construction materials in Tanzania: Exposure sites and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mmari, A.G.; Uiso, C.B.S.; Makundi, I.N.; Potgieter-Vermaak, S.S.; Potgieter, J.H.; Van Grieken, R.

    2007-01-01

    Air pollution studies in Africa are limited and the influence of ambient air quality on buildings and constructions have not been investigated in the larger part of Sub-Saharan Africa. The increasing burden of emission from industry, traffic and coal power plants on ambient air pollution in Sub-Saharan Africa necessitated reviewing previous and current studies. In South Africa a 20-year exposure program, focusing on the effect of ambient exposure on various metals and alloys, showed that the amount of rainfall, relative humidity, atmospheric pollution, wind speed, solar radiation and structural design are some of the factors controlling atmospheric corrosion. Tanzania, being among the Sub-Saharan African countries and partly bordered by Indian ocean, the main source of marine atmosphere, experiences corrosive degradation on metal roofing and cementitious materials. This paper describes the exposure site set-up and will report on some preliminary results of air quality and its relation with the meteorological conditions, as well as surface changes observed, for the year one of exposure. These will thereafter be compared to the completed European and Asian studies, as reported by CLRTAP and RAPIDC respectively. (author)

  13. Standard Practice for Recording Data from Atmospheric Corrosion Tests of Metallic-Coated Steel Specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for recording data of atmospheric corrosion tests of metallic-coated steel specimens. Its objective is the assurance of (1) complete identification of materials before testing, (2) objective reporting of material appearance during visual inspections, and (3) adequate photographic, micrographic, and chemical laboratory examinations at specific stages of deterioration, and at the end of the tests. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. Evaluation of atmospheric corrosion on electroplated zinc and zinc nickel coatings by Electrical Resistance (ER) Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per

    2013-01-01

    ER (Electrical Resistance) probes provide a measurement of metal loss, measured at any time when a metal is exposed to the real environment. The precise electrical resistance monitoring system can evaluate the corrosion to the level of nanometers, if the conductivity is compensated for temperature...... and magnetic fields. With this technique very important information about the durability of a new conversion coatings for aluminum, zinc and zinc alloys exposed to unknown atmospheric conditions can be gathered. This is expected to have a major impact on a number of industrial segments, such as test cars...

  15. Atmospheric corrosion Monitoring with Time-of-Wetness (TOW) sensor and Thin Film Electric Resistance (TFER) sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Sung Won; Kim, Young Geun; Song, Hong Seok; Lee, Seung Min; Kho, Young Tai

    2002-01-01

    In this study, TOW sensor was fabricated with the same P. J. Serada's in NRC and was evaluated according to pollutant amount and wet/dry cycle. Laboratorily fabricated thin film electric resistance (TFER) probes were applied in same environment for the measurement of corrosion rate for feasibility. TOW sensor could not differentiate the wet and dry time especially at polluted environment like 3.5% NaCl solution. This implies that wet/dry time monitoring by means of TOW sensor need careful application on various environment. TFER sensor could produce instant atmospheric corrosion rate regardless of environment condition. And corrosion rate obtained by TFER sensor could be differentiated according to wet/dry cycle, wet/dry cycle time variation and solution chemistry. Corrosion behaviors of TFER sensor showed that corrosion could proceed even after wet cycle because of remained electrolyte at the surface

  16. Atmospheric corrosion performance of different steels in early exposure in the coastal area region West Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuraini, Lutviasari; Prifiharni, Siska; Priyotomo, Gadang; Sundjono, Gunawan, Hadi; Purawiardi, Ibrahim

    2018-05-01

    The performance of carbon steel, galvanized steel and aluminium after one month exposed in the atmospheric coastal area, which is in Limbangan and Karangsong Beach, West Java, Indonesia was evaluated. The corrosion rate was determined by weight loss method and the morphology of the steel after exposed was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy(SEM)/Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis(EDX). The site was monitored to determine the chloride content in the marine atmosphere. Then, the corrosion products formed at carbon steel were characterized by X-Ray diffraction (XRD). The result showed the aggressively corrosion in Karangsong beach, indicated from the corrosion rate of carbon steel, galvanized steel and aluminium were 38.514 mpy; 4.7860 mpy and 0.5181 mpy, respectively. While in Limbangan Beach the corrosion rate of specimen carbon steel, galvanized steel and aluminium were 3.339; 0.219 and 0.166 mpy, respectively. The chloride content was found to be the main factor that influences in the atmospheric corrosion process in this area. Chloride content accumulated in Karangsong and Limbangan was 497 mg/m2.day and 117 mg/m2.day, respectively. The XRD Analysis on each carbon steel led to the characterization of a complex mixture of iron oxides phases.

  17. Recent Research and Development in Solving Atmospheric Corrosion Problems of Steel Industries in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, M.; Uchida, H.

    2002-01-01

    A rust layer, so called 'protective' rust layer, on a weathering low-alloy steel has strong protective ability for atmospheric corrosion of the steel. We have recently found through a large number of spectroscopic studies including Moessbauer spectroscopy that the protective rust layer forms after long-term phase transformation. The phase and structure of the rust definitely control the protective ability of the rust layer. From this recent knowledge, some new technologies have been developed. One is the surface-treatment technique that provides a possibility for obtaining the protective rust layer in a relatively short period even in the severe environments such as in marine and chloride (de-icing salts) containing environments. Others are based on selection of effective alloying elements for steel materials. These are particularly important for application in areas where protective rust layer formation may be hindered or prevented. In this paper, we mention recent progress in research and development on rusting protection by rust for atmospheric corrosion of steels in Japan.

  18. Influence of climatic factors and pollution on the atmospheric corrosion of steels. Laboratory measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muylder, Jean van; Pourbaix, Marcel

    1977-01-01

    The influence of climatic and polluting factors on the atmospheric corrosion of four steels has been examined in the laboratory by an original accelerated electrochemical testing method. This research has led notably to the following conclusions: the corrosion behavior of the steels very much depends on the chloride- and SO 2 -contents of the rain water, as well as on the temperature of the metal during the drying periods. The best patinas have been obtained by submitting the steel successively to the corroding action of a solution of bisulphite and to the alternate actions of non-polluted rains and of drying, preferably at about 60 0 C. As a result of this, the formation of a protective patina may be accelerated by different methods. The relative merits of different steels under different conditions of atmospheric exposure may be predetermined by laboratory tests lasting several weeks. It is useful, when exposing steels in natural exposure sites, to measure as often as feasible the electrode potentials and the temperature of the steel specimens

  19. Effect of Ni on the corrosion resistance of bridge steel in a simulated hot and humid coastal-industrial atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-liang; Fu, Gui-qin; Zhu, Miao-yong; Li, Qing; Yin, Cheng-xiang

    2018-03-01

    The corrosion resistance of weathering bridge steels containing conventional contents of Ni (0.20wt%, 0.42wt%, 1.50wt%) and a higher content of Ni (3.55wt%) in a simulated hot and humid coastal-industrial atmosphere was investigated by corrosion depth loss, scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrochemical methods. The results showed that, with increasing Ni content, the mechanical properties of the bridge steel were markedly improved, the welding parameters were satisfactory at room temperature, and the corrosion resistance was enhanced. When the Ni content was low (≤0.42wt%), the crystallization process of the corrosion products was substantially promoted, enhancing the stability of the rust layer. When the Ni content was higher ( 3.55wt%), the corrosion reaction of the steel quickly reached a balance, because the initial rapid corrosion induced the formation of a protective rust layer in the early stage. Simultaneously, NiO and NiFe2O2 were generated in large quantities; they not only formed a stable, compact, and continuous oxide protective layer, but also strongly inhibited the transformation process of the corrosion products. This inhibition reduced the structural changes in the rust layer, thereby enhancing the protection. However, when the Ni content ranged from 0.42wt% to 1.50wt%, the corrosion resistance of the bridge steel increased only slightly.

  20. Mechanisms of the multi-secular atmospheric corrosion of ferrous alloys: The case of the Metz cathedral reinforcements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchar, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The study of the mechanisms of the multi-secular atmospheric corrosion of ferrous alloys has various applications, from the preservation and restoration of cultural heritage metals, to the evaluation of their long term behaviour, specifically when they are used for the storage containers surrounding nuclear wastes. The study of the corrosion product layers (CPL) developed during 5 centuries on the Metz cathedral reinforcements brings new results for a better understanding of the complex processes involved in the formation of the atmospheric CPL. The phases and chemical elements constituting the CPL of these reinforcements were characterized at the micrometric scale (μDRX, Raman μ-spectroscopy (μRS), SEM-EDS). Results specifically showed that these CPL differ from other multi-secular systems previously studied by their very high content in ferri-hydrite (5Fe 2 O 3 , 9H 2 O). This very reactive phase is distributed in the whole CPL and mixed at the microscopic scale with goethite (a-FeOOH) and lepidocrocite (g-FeOOH). Diffusion experiments of bromide ions followed by in situ X-ray μ-fluorescence allowed a better understanding of the transport of dissolved species in the porous network of the CPL. Furthermore, a test of the corrosion system behavior in conditions simulating the wetting stage of the RH cycle of atmospheric corrosion, also followed in situ by μRS, highlighted the reduction of ferri-hydrite at the metal/CPL interface. These results allowed to verify for the first time a fundamental hypothesis about the mechanisms of very long term atmospheric corrosion. Finally, re-corrosion experiments of the corrosion system were monitored in a climatic chamber simulating accelerated atmospheric cycles in an 18 O-labelled environment. Then the detection of the 18 O isotope linked to the precipitated phases, by nuclear reaction analysis using a nuclear microprobe, allowed to localise the formation sites of the new corrosion products. All these results improve the

  1. Study of the corrosion products formed on carbon steels in the tropical atmosphere of Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaén, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction (in selected samples have been used to characterize corrosion products on carbon steels after atmospheric exposure to the tropical Panamanian locations of Panama and Colon, classified according to ISO 9223 as C3 and C5, respectively. Goethite (α-FeOOH of intermediate particle size (20-100 nm, lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH, a spinel phase consisting of non-stoichiometric magnetite (Fe3-xO4 and/or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3 and nano-sized particles were identified in the corrosion products. The spinel phase is related to short term atmospheric exposure transforms in time to other corrosion products. The corrosion resistance increased with fraction of goethite following a saturation-type behavior.

    Se caracterizaron los productos de corrosión de aceros al carbono expuestos a las atmósferas tropicales panameñas localizadas en Panamá y Colón, mediante el uso de la espectroscopia Mössbauer y difracción de rayos-X (en muestras seleccionadas. Las atmósferas se clasifican como C3 y C5, respectivamente, de acuerdo a la norma ISO 9223. Se lograron identificar los compuestos goethita (α-FeOOH de tamaño de partícula intermedio (20-100 nm, lepidocrocita (γ-FeOOH, una fase de espinela consistente en magnetita no estequiométrica (Fe3-xO4 y/o maghemita (γ-Fe2O3, y nanopartículas. La fase de espinela se puede correlacionar con exposiciones cortas a la atmósfera, transformándose en el tiempo en otros productos de corrosión. La resistencia a la corrosión se incrementa con la cantidad de goethita siguiendo una conducta de saturación.

  2. Multispectral atmospheric mapping sensor of mesoscale water vapor features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, P.; Jedlovec, G.; Wilson, G.; Atkinson, R.; Smith, W.

    1985-01-01

    The Multispectral atmospheric mapping sensor was checked out for specified spectral response and detector noise performance in the eight visible and three infrared (6.7, 11.2, 12.7 micron) spectral bands. A calibration algorithm was implemented for the infrared detectors. Engineering checkout flights on board the ER-2 produced imagery at 50 m resolution in which water vapor features in the 6.7 micron spectral band are most striking. These images were analyzed on the Man computer Interactive Data Access System (McIDAS). Ground truth and ancillary data was accessed to verify the calibration.

  3. Inhibition treatment of the corrosion of lead artefacts in atmospheric conditions and by acetic acid vapour: use of sodium decanoate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocca, E.; Rapin, C.; Mirambet, F.

    2004-01-01

    The efficiency of linear sodium decanoate, CH 3 (CH 2 ) 8 COONa (noted NaC 10 ), as corrosion inhibitor of lead was determined by electrochemical techniques in two corrosive mediums: ASTM D1384 standard water and acetic acid-enriched solutions. Best results were obtained with 0.05 mol l -1 of NaC 10 solution. In these conditions, the inhibition efficiency can be estimated of 99.9%. The corrosion inhibition effect was confirmed by cyclic atmospheric tests in a climatic chamber in two different conditions: water saturated vapour, and acid acetic enriched vapour simulating the atmosphere in the wooden displays in museums. Surface analyses by SEM and X-ray diffraction indicate that the metal protection is due to the formation of a protective layer mainly composed of lead decanoate Pb(C 10 ) 2 (metallic soap). This inhibition treatment was applied on objects of metallic cultural heritage: gallo-roman sarcophagus in lead. Electrochemical methods confirm the efficiency of treatment on archaeological materials. In conclusion, this inhibitor treatment seems to be very promising against the atmospheric corrosion and the corrosion by organic acid vapour in museums

  4. Effect of hydrogen chloride on the corrosion of an FeCrAlY alloy in simulated coal gasifier atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coley, K.S.; Rhoades-Brown, J.E.; Blick, K.

    1989-03-01

    An iron chromium aluminium yttrium steel was exposed to a simulated coal gasifier atmosphere containing 1000 ppm and 2200 ppm hydrogen chloride at 450/sup 0/C. Increasing hydrogen chloride content was found to accelerate reaction rates, and significantly alter the microstructure and composition of the corrosion product. Tentative explanations for these results, involving vapour phase transport of metal chlorides are proposed.

  5. Corrosion and protection of metals in the rural atmosphere of "El Pardo" Spain (PATINA / CYTED project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simancas, J.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion tests of metallic and organic coatings on steel, zinc and aluminium have been conducted in "El Pardo" (Spain as part of the PATINA/CYTED project "Anticorrosive Protection of Metals in the Atmosphere". This is a rural atmosphere with the following ISO corrosivity categories: C2 (Fe, C2 (Zn, C3 (Cu and Cl (Al. Its average temperature and relative humidity is 13 °C and 62.8 %, respectively, and it has low SO2 and Cl- contents. Results of 42 months exposure are discussed. Atmospheric exposure tests were carried out for the following types of coatings: conventional paint coatings for steel and hot-dip galvanized steel (group 1, new painting technologies for steel and galvanized steel (group 2, zinc-base metallic coatings (group 3, aluminium-base metallic coatings (group 4, coatings on aluminium (group 5 and coil-coatings on steel, hot-dip galvanized steel and 55 % Al-Zn coated steel (group 6.

    Como parte del proyecto PATINA/CYTED "Protección anticorrosiva de metales en la atmósfera" se han llevado a cabo en la estación de ensayo de "El Pardo" (España, ensayos de corrosión atmosférica de recubrimientos metálicos y orgánicos sobre acero, zinc y aluminio. Se trata de una atmósfera rural según la clasificación ISO de grado de corrosividad: C2 (Fe, C2 (Zn, C3 (Cu y Cl (Al. La temperatura y humedad relativa media es de 13 °C y 62,8 %, respectivamente, y tiene bajos contenidos de SO2 y Cl-. Se discuten los resultados obtenidos después de 42 meses de exposición. Los ensayos de corrosión atmosférica se llevaron a cabo para tres tipos de recubrimientos: recubrimientos de pintura convencional sobre acero y acero zincado (grupo 1, nuevas tecnologías en pinturas para acero y acero galvanizado (grupo 2, recubrimientos metálicos base zinc (grupo 3, recubrimientos metálicos base aluminio (grupo 4, recubrimientos sobre aluminio (grupo 5 y recubrimientos de banda en continuo

  6. Long term corrosion of iron in concrete and in atmospheric conditions: a contribution of archaeological analogues to mechanism comprehension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, E.; Demoulin, A.; Dillman, Ph.; Neff, D.; Berge, P.; Burger, E.; Perrin, St.; L'hostis, V.; Dillman, Ph.; Millard, A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The prediction of iron (or low alloy steel) corrosion on very long term period is necessary in two different purposes: (i) the preservation and conservation of cultural heritage and (ii) the French storage and repository concept for the radioactive wastes. In order to determine the evolution of corrosion processes for very long period, mechanistic models have been developed. In these models that are based on a phenomenological approach to evaluate the average corrosion rates, two different environments are considered: concrete (steel reinforcements) and atmospheric. The study of archaeological analogues is a very pertinent tool for the validation of these models. First, physico-chemical analysis on old corrosion layers lead to a precise localisation and identification of the phases present in the corrosion system. Moreover, experimental reinduced corrosions of ancient samples under controlled parameters (temperature, relative humidity) bring new insight on the mechanisms involved. In particular, one crucial question related to the wet-dry cycle is the localisation of oxygen reduction sites in the rust layer. For this purpose, specific experiments have been set up to re-corrode the ancient samples in marked medium (using 18 O 2 ). Samples were exposed to cycling between high and low relative humidity, produced by saline saturated solutions. Then cross-sections of samples obtained were investigated by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) 18 O(p,α) 15 N on the Pierre Sue Laboratory nuclear microprobe. In this presentation the 18 O distribution profiles are discussed and interpreted in order to bring new insight on corrosion mechanisms. A comparative interpretation is made for each medium (concrete and atmosphere)

  7. Mössbauer investigation of the influence of the sea atmosphere on the corrosion of steel constructions in Sochi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, V. P.; Lauer, D. E.; Lauer, Yu. A.; Kargin, N. I.; Goloborodko, P. G.; Goloborodko, I. V.; Poliakov, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    A study of the sea atmosphere influence on the corrosion products of steel constructions near Sochi at difference distances from the sea has been made. The phases and compositions of the corrosion products formed on different sides of steel construction elements were examined by using Mössbauer spectroscopy (at 298 and 78 K). The results show that phases and composition distributions in oxide films are different on different parts of the constructions. The differences depend not only on the distance from the sea, but from their relative orientation to the sea also. The phase structure of the oxide films on different positions is identified.

  8. Corrosion-electrochemical behavior of nickel in an alkali metal carbonate melt under a chlorine-containing atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, E. V.; Kudyakov, V. Ya.; Malkov, V. B.; Plaksin, S. V.

    2013-08-01

    The corrosion-electrochemical behavior of a nickel electrode is studied in the melt of lithium, sodium, and potassium (40: 30: 30 mol %) carbonates in the temperature range 500-600°C under an oxidizing atmosphere CO2 + 0.5O2 (2: 1), which is partly replaced by gaseous chlorine (30, 50, 70%) in some experiments. In other experiments, up to 5 wt % chloride of sodium peroxide is introduced in a salt melt. A change in the gas-phase composition is shown to affect the mechanism of nickel corrosion.

  9. Deposition of SiOx on Metal Surface with a DBD Plasma Gun at Atmospheric Pressure for Corrosion Prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Erli; Chen Qiang; Zhang Yuefei; Chen Fei; Ge Yuanjing

    2007-01-01

    In this study, SiO x films were deposited by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma gun at an atmospheric pressure. The relationship of the film structures with plasma powers was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). It was shown that an uniform and cross-linking structure film was formed by the DBD gun. As an application, the SiO x films were deposited on a carbon steel surface for the anti-corrosion purpose. The experiment was carried out in a 0.1 M NaCl solution. It was found that a very good anti-corrosive property was obtained, i.e., the corrosion rate was decreased c.a. 15 times in 5% NaCl solution compared to the non-SiO x coated steel, as detected by the potentiodynamic polarization measurement

  10. Electrochemical noise evaluation of anodized aluminum. Comparative study against corrosion behaviour in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betancourt, N.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports the evaluation of aluminum and anodized aluminum by electrochemical noise, as a part of the PATINA/CYTED project of the working group Nº 5. A visual examination is also made. The samples were exposed at several Ibero-American atmospheres up to 2 years of exposure. Different thickness of anodized aluminum were evaluated. The electrochemical potential noise of the 5 μm unexposed sample (pattern showed a different behaviour to that showed by the other anodized specimens. This could be due to a slower sealed of the samples of higher thickness. The same behaviour was observed on the samples exposed at the rural station El Pardo. According to the visual examination, the samples of bare aluminum and those of anodized 5 μm thickness were the most affected by pitting corrosion in the highly polluted atmospheres. A good correlation between corrosion behaviour determined by visual examination and EN was obtained.

    Como parte de las investigaciones de la Red PATINA el grupo de trabajo Nº 5 dedicó su atención al comportamiento del aluminio desnudo y anodizado con diferentes espesores en diferentes atmósferas de Iberoamérica. En el presente trabajo se presenta una evaluación de patrones de aluminio 99,5 % de pureza desnudo y anodizado con espesores de 15 y 25 μm, mediante ruido electroquímico. Los resultados obtenidos se comparan con el comportamiento determinado en diferentes atmósferas durante un período de 2 años. El ruido de voltaje del patrón de 5 μm de espesor presenta un comportamiento diferente al de los restantes espesores, lo que coincide con una mayor susceptibilidad a la corrosión picadura de este primer anodizado. Se reportan también algunas diferencias en el ruido de corriente. Se concluye que mediante la utilización del ruido electroquímico es posible caracterizar el aluminio con respecto a su sensibilidad a la corrosión picadura en condiciones atmosféricas.

  11. Reduction of air pollutants - a tool for control of atmospheric corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucera, V.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In most urban areas in Europe and Northern America serious corrosion impacts on buildings and cultural monuments have been caused by emissions of pollutants. The rapidly increasing pollution levels in many of the developing countries also exert a serious threat to materials. Beside the very important role of SO2 also the direct or synergistic effect of NOx and O3, the particulates and rain acidity may contribute in an important way to materials degradation. Results from extensive international field exposure programs i.e. within the UN/ECE have enabled development of dose-response relations which describe the effect of dry and wet deposition of pollutants on corrosion of different material groups. In most of the industrialized countries decreasing trends of sulphur and nitrogen pollutants and of acidity of precipitation have resulted in decreased corrosion rates. The concept of acceptable levels of pollutants is a useful tool in planning of abatement strategies and for defining of conditions for a suitable development in the field of corrosion of constructions in the atmosphere.

    La contaminación de la atmósfera ha sido la principal razón del grave deterioro de las edificaciones y de los monumentos en numerosas ciudades de Europa y Norteamérica. De otro lado, el acelerado incremento de los niveles de contaminación en los países menos desarrollados está poniendo en peligro la estabilidad de los materiales utilizados. Además del importante papel que en este sentido juega el SO2, la acción directa o el efecto sinérgico de los NOx y el O3, al igual que el material particulado y las lluvias acidas contribuyen a agravar el problema. Resultados de vastos programas internacionales de investigación como, por ejemplo, el UN/ECE, han permitido desarrollar relaciones dosis-respuesta que describen el efecto de la deposición de los contaminantes sobre la corrosión de

  12. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  13. Behavior of Fatigue Crack Tip Opening in Air and Corrosive Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Morihito; Toeda, Kazunori

    In the study, a formula for predicting fatigue crack tip opening displacement is deduced firstly. And then, due to comparing actual crack growth rate with the deduced formula, the crack tip configuration factor is defined to figure out the crack tip opening configuration that is useful to clarify the behavior of fatigue crack tip formation apparently. Applying the concept, the crack growth of 7/3 brass and 6/4 brass is predicted from the formula, by replacing material properties such as plastic flow resistance, Young modulus, the Poisson ratio, and fatigue toughness, and fatigue test conditions such as the stress intensity factor range, the load ratio, and cycle frequency. Furthermore, the theoretically expected results are verified with the fatigue tests which were carried out on CT specimens under different load conditions of load ratio, cycle frequency, and cyclic peak load, in different environments of air or corrosive ammonia atmosphere, for various brasses. And by comparing and discussing the calculated crack growth rate with attained experimental results, the apparent configuration factor at the crack tip is determined. And through the attained factor which changes along with crack growth, the behaviors of fatigue crack tip formation under different test conditions have been found out.

  14. Effectiveness of using pure copper and silver coupon corrosivity monitoring (CCM) metal strips to measure the severity levels of air pollutants in indoor and outdoor atmospheres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Foax, LJ

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Severity levels of air pollutants rich in oxides, chlorides and sulphides were successfully measured in indoor and outdoor atmospheres using pure copper and silver coupon corrosivity monitoring (CCM) metal strips when the maximum exposure periods...

  15. Structure and Corrosion Resistance of Welded Joints of Alloy 1151 in Marine Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakulo, A. V.; Yakushin, B. F.; Puchkov, Yu. A.

    2017-07-01

    The corrosion behavior of joints formed by TIG and IMIG welding from clad sheets of heat-hardenable aluminum alloy 1151 of the Al - Cu - Mg system is studied. The corrosion tests are performed in an aqueous solution of NaCl in a salt-spray chamber. The welded joints are subjected to a metallographic analysis.

  16. Corrosion and protection of metals in the rural atmosphere of El Pardo Spain (PATINA/CYTED project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simancas, J.; Castano, J. G.; Morcillo, M.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric corrosion tests of metallic and organic coatings on steel, zinc and aluminium have been conducted in el Pardo (Spain) as part of the PATINA/CYTED project Anticorrosive Protection of Metals in the Atmosphere. This is a rural atmosphere with the following ISO corrosivity categories: C2 (Fe), C'' (Zn), Cu (Cu) and C1 (Al). Its average temperature and relative humidity is 13 degree centigrade and 62.8, respectively, and it has low SO 2 and C1''- contents. Results of 42 months exposure are discussed. Atmospheric exposure tests were carried out for the following types of coatings: conventional paint coatings for steel and hot-dip galvanized steel (group 1), new painting technologies for steel and galvanized steel (group 2), zinc-base metallic coatings (group 3), aluminium-base metallic coatings (group 4), coatings on aluminium (group 5) and coil-coatings on steel, hot-dip galvanized steel and 55% Al-Zn coated steel (group 6). (Author) 9 refs

  17. Correlation between the surface chemistry and the atmospheric corrosion of AZ31, AZ80 and AZ91D magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feliu, S.; Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Coy, A.E.; Viejo, F.; Arrabal, R.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used in order to investigate the correlation between the surface chemistry and the atmospheric corrosion of AZ31, AZ80 and AZ91D magnesium alloys exposed to 98% relative humidity at 50 deg. C. Commercially pure magnesium, used as the reference material, revealed MgO, Mg(OH) 2 and tracers of magnesium carbonate in the air-formed film. For the AZ80 and AZ91D alloys, the amount of magnesium carbonate formed on the surface reached similar values to those of MgO and Mg(OH) 2 . A linear relation between the amount of magnesium carbonate formed on the surface and the subsequent corrosion behaviour in the humid environment was found. The AZ80 alloy revealed the highest amount of magnesium carbonate in the air-formed film and the highest atmospheric corrosion resistance, even higher than the AZ91D alloy, indicating that aluminium distribution in the alloy microstructure influenced the amount of magnesium carbonate formed.

  18. Application Of Fractal Dimension On Atmospheric Corrosion Of Galvanized Iron Roofing Material

    OpenAIRE

    Issa A.K; Abba. M. Aji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Corrosion rates of galvanized iron roofing sheet In yola north eastern part of Nigeria were assessed and determined by weight loss method and scanner fractal analysis method. Scanning electronic machine SEM was used to transform corrosion coupons to electronic form for image j processing and analysing software The result of corrosion rates for these two methods after six months of the samples exposure in industrial. Coastal market and urban areas in the region are 1.51 1.079 1.051 0....

  19. New Insights in the Long-Term Atmospheric Corrosion Mechanisms of Low Alloy Steel Reinforcements of Cultural Heritage Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Bouchar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcing clamps made of low alloy steel from the Metz cathedral and corroded outdoors during 500 years were studied by OM, FESEM/EDS, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The corrosion product layer is constituted of a dual structure. The outer layer is mainly constituted of goethite and lepidocrocite embedding exogenous elements such as Ca and P. The inner layer is mainly constituted of ferrihydrite. The behaviour of the inner layer under conditions simulating the wetting stage of the RH wet/dry atmospheric corrosion cycle was observed by in situ micro-Raman spectroscopy. The disappearance of ferrihydrite near the metal/oxide interface strongly suggests a mechanism of reductive dissolution caused by the oxidation of the metallic substrate and was observed for the first time in situ on an archaeological system.

  20. Influence of Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of 2A02 Al Alloy in Marine Atmospheric Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Cao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of 2A02 Al alloy under 4 mg/cm2 NaCl deposition at different temperatures (from 30 to 80 °C has been studied. This corrosion behavior was researched using mass-gain, scanning electron microscopy-SEM, laser scanning confocal microscopy-LSCM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-XPS and other techniques. The results showed and revealed that the corrosion was maximal at 60 °C after 200 h of exposure. The increase of temperature not only affected the solubility of oxygen gas in the thin film, but also promoted the transport of ions (such as Cl−, and the formation of protective AlO(OH, which further affects the corrosion speed.

  1. Corrosion behaviour of Mg/Al alloys in high humidity atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrabal, R.; Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Mohedano, M.; Casajus, P. [Facultad de Quimicas, Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Merino, S. [Departamento de Tecnologia Industrial, Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    The influence of relative humidity (80-90-98% RH) and temperature (25 and 50 C) on the corrosion behaviour of AZ31, AZ80 and AZ91D magnesium alloys was evaluated using gravimetric measurements. The results were compared with the data obtained for the same alloys immersed in Madrid tap water. The corrosion rates of AZ alloys increased with the RH and temperature and were influenced by the aluminium content and alloy microstructure for RH values above 90%. The initiation of corrosion was localised around the Al-Mn inclusions in the AZ31 alloy and at the centre of the {alpha}-Mg phase in the AZ80 and AZ91D alloys. The {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase acted as a barrier against corrosion. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Influence of Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of 2A02 Al Alloy in Marine Atmospheric Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Min; Liu, Li; Fan, Lei; Yu, Zhongfen; Li, Ying; Oguzie, Emeka E.; Wang, Fuhui

    2018-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2A02 Al alloy under 4 mg/cm2 NaCl deposition at different temperatures (from 30 to 80 °C) has been studied. This corrosion behavior was researched using mass-gain, scanning electron microscopy-SEM, laser scanning confocal microscopy-LSCM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-XPS and other techniques. The results showed and revealed that the corrosion was maximal at 60 °C after 200 h of exposure. The increase of temperature not only affected the solubility of oxygen gas in the thin film, but also promoted the transport of ions (such as Cl−), and the formation of protective AlO(OH), which further affects the corrosion speed. PMID:29401690

  3. MAPSS: Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System Model, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: MAPSS (Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System) is a landscape to global vegetation distribution model that was developed to simulate the potential biosphere...

  4. MAPSS: Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System Model, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MAPSS (Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System) is a landscape to global vegetation distribution model that was developed to simulate the potential biosphere impacts and...

  5. A thermogravimetric analyzer for corrosive atmospheres, and its application to the chlorination of ZrO2-C mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquevich, Daniel; Caneiro, Alberto

    1990-01-01

    A thermogravimetric analyzer built on the basis of a Cahn 2000 electrobalance, suitable for using with corrosive atmospheres, is reported. The corrections for buoyancy and gas-flow effects, which strongly modify the thermogravimetric curves are discussed. As an application, the kinetics of a reaction between chlorine and a mixture of zirconia and carbon has been studied. It has been able to measure the uptake of chlorine by carbon and the reaction rate within the first 50 seconds. Evidence of a transition to quite a different reaction rate at longer times is presented. (Author)

  6. Modeling of atmospheric corrosion environments and its application to constant dew-point corrosion test; Yagai taiki fushoku kankyo no modeling to sore ni motozuku teirotengata saikuru fushoku shikenho no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, I. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)] Sugimoto, K. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1998-08-15

    Recently, stainless steel is increasing its demand for corrosion resistant building materials. Then, as it is necessary to develop and accelerating testing method capable of accurately estimating weatherability at sea side area, such testing method has no been developed yet because of difficulty to quantify corrosive environment relating to atmospheric corrosion phenomenon. As air temperature and relative humidity in outdoor change in complex, specific temperature and relative humidity cannot be used for their representative values. And, construction of corrosive factors such as sea salt particles, and so on are also much different at each area. However, at coastal area, a dew water dissolving the sea salt particles, so called droplets of chlorides aqueous solution is formed onto material surface. Then, in this study, on a base of drying and humidity absorption behavior and daily change behavior of temperature and humidity in outdoor, modeling of atmospheric corrosion environment was tried. An accelerating testing method according to this modeling was developed, long-term weathering test was compared with the corrosion behavior of the same steel, and validity of a new accelerating testing method was evaluated. 22 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Effect of Aluminum and Silicon on Atmospheric Corrosion of Low-alloying Steel under Containing NaHSO3 Wet/dry Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xinhua, Chen; Junhua, Dong; Enhou, Han; Wei, Ke

    2008-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion performance of Al-alloying Si-alloying and Al-Si-alloying steel were studied by wet/dry cyclic corrosion tests (CCT) at 30 .deg. C and 60% relative humidity (RH). The corrosion electrolyte used for CCT was 0.052 wt% NaHSO 3 (pH∼4) solution. The result of gravimetry demonstrated that Al-Si-bearing steels showed lower corrosion resistance than other rusted steels. But the rusted 0.7%Si-alloying steel showed a better corrosion resistance than rusted mild steel. Polarization curves demonstrated that Al-/Si-alloying and Al-Si-alloying improved the rest potential of steel at the initial stage: and accelerated the cathodic reduction and anodic dissolution after a rust layer formed on the surfaces of steels. XRD results showed that Al-Si-alloying decreased the volume fraction of Fe 3 O 4 and α-FeOOH. The recycle of acid accelerated the corrosion of steel at the initial stage. After the rust layer formed on the steel, the leak of rust destabilized the rust layer due to the dissolution of compound containing Al (such as FeAl 2 O 4 , (Fe, Si) 2 (Fe, Al)O 4 ). Al-Si-alloying is hence not suitable for improving the anti-corrosion resistance of steel in industrial atmosphere

  8. Accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing using a cyclic wet/dry exposure test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, S.B.; Thompson, G.E.; Johnson, J.E.; Wood, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    Aluminum corrosion is important in overhead electrical conductors constructed from aluminum wire centrally reinforced by galvanized steel strands. Inspection of conductor after long service has implicated rubber bushing material, on the outside, and the galvanized strands, on the inside, as providing potential galvanic sites for the initiation of rapid aluminum corrosion. Therefore, the galvanic corrosion of aluminum in contact with graphite-loaded neoprene rubber, hot-dip galvanized steel and steel was assessed in a cyclic wet/dry exposure test using mixed-salts spray solutions containing appropriate ratios of sulfate and chloride ion. Aluminum was found to corrode at between 3 to 6 times its uncoupled rate when associated with the rubber material. While the eta-phase, relatively pure Zn, galvanized layer remained intact, galvanic corrosion of aluminum was slow. However, on exposure of the zeta-phase, Zn/Fe intermetallic layer, aluminum corroded about 35 times faster than expected in a solution with a high level of Cl - ion. The importance of these data to conductor lifetime is discussed

  9. Corrosion mechanism of model zinc-magnesium alloys in atmospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosek, T.; Nazarov, A.; Bexell, U.; Thierry, D.; Serak, J.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, superior corrosion properties of zinc coatings alloyed with magnesium have been reported. Corrosion behaviour of model zinc-magnesium alloys was studied to understand better the protective mechanism of magnesium in zinc. Alloys containing from 1 to 32 wt.% magnesium, pure zinc, and pure magnesium were contaminated with sodium chloride and exposed to humid air for 28 days. Composition of corrosion products was analyzed using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ion chromatography (IC), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The exposure tests were completed with scanning Kelvin probe (SKP) and electrochemical measurements. Weight loss of ZnMg alloys with 1-16 wt.% magnesium was lower than that of pure zinc. Up to 10-fold drop in weight loss was found for materials with 4-8 wt.% Mg in the structure. The improved corrosion stability of ZnMg alloys was connected to the presence of an Mg-based film adjacent to the metal surface. It ensured stable passivity in chloride environment and limited the efficiency of oxygen reduction

  10. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  11. Middle Atmosphere Program. Handbook for MAP. Volume 30: International School on Atmospheric Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukao, Shoichiro (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Broad, tutorial coverage is given to the technical and scientific aspects of mesosphere stratosphere troposphere (MST) meteorological radar systems. Control issues, signal processing, atmospheric waves, the historical aspects of radar atmospheric dynamics, incoherent scatter radars, radar echoes, radar targets, and gravity waves are among the topics covered.

  12. Mapping the concentration changes during the dynamic processes of crevice corrosion by digital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HENGLEI JIA

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic process of crevice corrosion during anodic dissolution of a crevice electrode in a 5.0 mmol dm-3 NaCl solution has been studied by digital holographic reconstruction. Digital holographic reconstruction has been proved to be an effective and in situ technique to detect the changes in the solution concentration because useful and direct information can be obtained from the three-dimensional images. It provides a valuable method for a better understanding of the mechanism of crevice corrosion by studying the dynamic processes of changes in the solution concentration at the interface of crevice corrosion.

  13. Atmospheric corrosion and runoff processes on copper and zinc as roofing materials

    OpenAIRE

    He, Wenle

    2002-01-01

    An extensive investigation with parallel field andlaboratory exposures has been conducted to elucidateatmospheric corrosion and metal runoff processes on copper andzinc used for roofing applications. Detailed studies have beenperformed to disclose the effect of various parameters on therunoff rate including: surface inclination and orientation,natural patination (age), patina composition, rain duration andvolume, rain pH, and length of dry periods inbetween rainevents. Annual and average corr...

  14. A study of the evolution of rust on Mo–Cu-bearing fire-resistant steel submitted to simulated atmospheric corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Long; Zhang Sixun; Dong Junhua; Ke Wei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The rusting evolution of a Mo–Cu-bearing fire-resistant steel in a simulated industrial atmosphere was investigated. ► The rusting evolution of the steel is related to the rust composition, structure, and electrochemical characteristics. ► Increased content of α-FeOOH and decreased γ-FeOOH and Fe 3 O 4 indicate the enhanced resistance of the rust. ► Mo and Cu are involved in the formation of molybdate and Cu(I)-bearing compounds in the rust. - Abstract: The corrosion evolution of a Mo–Cu-bearing fire-resistant steel in a simulated industrial atmosphere was investigated by corrosion weight gain, XRD, EPMA, XPS, and polarization curves. The results indicate that the corrosion kinetics is closely related to the rust composition and electrochemical properties. As the corrosion proceeds, the relative content of γ-FeOOH and Fe 3 O 4 decreases and α-FeOOH increases, and the rust layer becomes compact and adherent to steel substrate. Molybdenum and copper enrich in the inner rust layer, especially at the bottom of the corrosion nest, forming non-soluble molybdate and Cu(I)-bearing compounds responsible for enhanced corrosion resistance of the rust layer.

  15. Chemical vapour deposition at atmospheric pressure of graphene on molybdenum foil: Effect of annealing time on characteristics and corrosion stability of graphene coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naghdi, Samira; Jevremović, Ivana; Mišković-Stanković, Vesna; Rhee, Kyong Yop

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of graphene on molybdenum foils. • Quality and domain size of graphene layers increased with longer annealing times. • The number of graphene layers decreased with longer annealing times. • Graphene coatings on molybdenum foils exhibited corrosion inhibitive properties. - Abstract: In this work, the effect of pre-annealing of Mo substrate on the quality of graphene layers grown by chemical vapour deposition was investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, different electrochemical techniques were employed to investigate the corrosion stability of the graphene coated Mo in 0.1 M NaCl. Longer annealing time resulted in less defective graphene coatings with fewer layers. Graphene coating on the annealed Mo provided better protection against corrosion during the initial exposure times, while after prolonged exposure times, both graphene coatings on annealed and non-annealed Mo exhibited nearly the same corrosion inhibitive properties.

  16. The atmospheric corrosion, important technical and economic factor in the construction of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.; Diaz, J.; Gomez, J.; Rodriguez, J.

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine the atmospheric effects of the construction of the Juragua NPP some experiments were performed in the reactor site. Samples of carbon steel were placed in experimental stations and the consequent oxidation was measured. The results show that the region's atmosphere aggressiveness may be classified from low to median. 11 refs

  17. Methodology for the accelerated simulation of the deterioration that by atmospheric corrosion appears in electronic equipment; Metodologia para la simulacion acelerada del deterioro que por corrosion atmosferica se presenta en equipo electronico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz Prado, A.; Schouwenaars, R.; Cerrud Sanchez, S.M. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-12-01

    The corrosion resistance of systems and electronic parts which are designed to work in atmospheric conditions have been tested for decades; some of these methods were the Cyclic Humidity Test, Field Tests and Salt Spray (Fog) Testing, the latter was one of the most popular methods. However, the salt spray test and most of the other existing methods do not show strong relationships with the real conditions of service. For this reason, it is necessary to develop appropriated methods and equipment for the accelerated simulation of real atmospheric corrosion phenomena. This article seeks to demonstrate the need to develop a test and the necessary equipment to reproduce the damage in electronic systems and equipment by atmospheric corrosion. [Spanish] Para la evaluacion de la resistencia a la corrosion de sistemas y equipo electronico que trabajaran bajo condiciones de deterioro generadas por el medio ambiente, se han aplicado una serie de ensayos, donde el mas popular es el de camara de niebla salina. Sin embargo, este y otros que se han elaborado para tal efecto no tienen ninguna relacion con las condiciones reales de servicio, por lo que es necesario un metodo de evaluacion que permita simular de forma acelerada los fenomenos de deterioro por efectos ambientales. Este articulo pretende demostrar la necesidad de desarrollar una prueba, que en forma acelerada, reproduzca el dano que sufre el material por efecto de la atmosfera; el cual se orienta a la evaluacion de equipo electrico y electronico.

  18. Mechanism of Early Stage Corrosion for Boric-sulfuric Acid Anodized 2A97 Al-Cu-Li Alloy Under Tropical Marine Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUO Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Optical microscopy(OM, scanning electron microscopy(SEM, EDX and EIS combined with ultramicrotomy were employed to investigate the micro morphology, chemical composition and electrochemical properties of anodized 2A97 Al-Cu-Li alloy before and after atmospheric corrosion. The results show that when electrolytes containing combinations of tartaric-sulfuric or boric-sulfuric acid are used to grow the films at different temperatures, boric acid addition and higher temperature allow for higher current density that speeds up the film growth. The pore geometry and structure is similar for different electrolytes. Dispersive dark rusty spots composed of O, Al, Cl, Cu are present on the boric-sulfuric acid anodized specimen after exposure in tropical marine atmosphere for 1 month. Deposition of white corrosion product is found on the specimen surface as well. Severe pitting occurs and develops deeply into the alloy substrate after elongated outdoor exposure. Corrosion propagation is associated with θ-phase particles.

  19. Corrosion Susceptibility of AA5083-H116 in Biologically Active Atmospheric Marine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Ahn, D. J. Quesnel, S. B. Jung, "Behavior of beta phase (A13Mg2) in AA 5083 during friction stir welding ," Intermetallics 35 (2013) p. 120-127. 4. R... Metallurgy and Materials Science 43A, 13 (2012) p. 4933-4939. 7. D. Mizuno, R. G. Kelly, "Galvanically Induced Intergranular Corrosion of AA5083-H131 Under...Behavior of Al-5083," Metallurgical and Materials Transactions a-Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science 42A, 2 (2011) p. 348-355. 13. R. L. Holtz, P

  20. The atmospheric corrosion: an important technical-economic and nuclear safety factor during storage in the construction of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.; Rodriguez, J.; Diaz, J.; Gomez, J.; Galeano, N.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to show the results of the research performed to determine the atmospheric corrosion in the region of Juragua nuclear power plant and to offer some practical recommendations to increase the efficiency during the storage of materials, considering technical-economic and nuclear safety aspects

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of U-0.1% Cr in humid helium atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalkind, S.; Eshkenazy, R.; Harush, S.; Halperin, D.; Moreno, D.; Abramov, E.; Venkert, A.

    1994-01-01

    Rivets were matched into adapted drilled holes in plates, both made of U-0.1% Cr alloy and were placed in different environments containing dry air and helium and humid air and helium for a variety of exposure times. After opening, the most significant amounts of corrosion products were detected in the specimens that stayed for three years in humid helium (5% RH) environment. Radial cracks, developed in the bore edge, were detected in the specimens. X-ray diffraction patterns of the corrosion products gave the composition of UH 3 and UO 2 . The microstructure was examined using light and electron microscopy techniques. The hydride phase that was observed, formed mainly beneath the oxide layer and penetrated into the metal matrix as needle-like forms. The formation of a lower density hydride phase, yielded in a large volume change causing the development of high stresses at the rivet-bore interface. The combination of the high stress and the weakening of the bore edge due to the presence of the brittle hydride phase led to radial crack formation around the bore edge. (orig.)

  2. Evolution of corrosion of MnCuP weathering steel submitted to wet/dry cyclic tests in a simulated coastal atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Long; Zhang Sixun; Dong Junhua; Ke Wei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The evolution of rust on MnCuP weathering steel submitted to a simulated coastal atmosphere has been investigated. ► The corrosion evolution of MnCuP weathering steel can be divided into two stages with distinct rust properties. ► A protective rust layer with higher amounts of α-FeOOH and lower Fe 3 O 4 forms as the corrosion proceeds. ► The rust initially enhances and then stabilizes the cathodic process, but the anodic process tends to be inhibited. - Abstract: The evolution of rust on MnCuP weathering steel submitted to a simulated coastal atmosphere was investigated by corrosion weight gain, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical methods. The results indicate that the higher corrosion rate during the first stage than that during the second stage is related closely to the rust composition and electrochemical properties. The corrosion rate evolution is caused by the formation of a protective rust layer with a higher relative amount of α-FeOOH. The rust initially enhances and then stabilizes the cathodic process, but the anodic process tends to be inhibited by the protective rust layer.

  3. Corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing atmosphere by using molten salt for spent nuclear oxide fuel. Corrosion research under chlorine gas condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Masayuki; Hanada, Keiji; Koizumi, Tsutomu; Aose, Shinichi; Kato, Toshihiro

    2002-12-01

    Pyrochemical reprocessing using molten salts (RIAR process) has been recently developed for spent nuclear oxide fuel and discussed in feasibility study. It is required to improve the corrosion resistance of equipments such as electrolyzer because the process is operated in severe corrosion environment. In this study, the corrosion resistance of ceramic materials was discussed through the thermodynamic calculation and corrosion test. The corrosion test was basically carried out in alkali molten salt under chlorine gas condition. And further consideration about the effects of oxygen, carbon and main fission product's chlorides were evaluated in molten salt. The result of thermodynamic calculation shows most of ceramic oxides have good chemical stability on chlorine, oxygen and uranyl chloride, however the standard Gibb's free energies with carbon have negative value. On the other hand, eleven kinds of ceramic materials were examined by corrosion test, then silicon nitride, mullite and cordierite have a good corrosion resistance less than 0.1 mm/y. Cracks were not observed on the materials and flexural strength did not reduce remarkably after 480 hours test in molten salt with Cl 2 -O 2 bubbling. In conclusion, these three ceramic materials are most applicable materials for the pyrochemical reprocessing process with chlorine gas condition. (author)

  4. Control of Fe(O,OH)6 nano-network structures of rust for high atmospheric-corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Masao; Kihira, Hiroshi; Ohta, Noriaki; Hashimoto, Misao; Senuma, Takehide

    2005-01-01

    A new-type of weathering steel containing 3.0 mass% Ni and 0.4 mass% Cu ('advanced weathering steel') exhibits good atmospheric-corrosion resistance in an atmosphere containing relatively high air-born salinity. Here, we show that the high performance was successfully achieved by controlling Fe(O,OH) 6 nano-network structures of rust formed on their surfaces. A novel technique using synchrotron radiation has been developed for the in situ observation of rust-formation during wet-dry cycles. It has been revealed that the evolution of Fe(O,OH) 6 nano-network structures of rust formed on the advanced weathering steel was more unique than those of conventional weathering steel and mild steel. At an early stage of reaction, Fe 2 NiO 4 and CuO phases precipitate, which provide sites for the nucleation of the Fe(O,OH) 6 nano-network resulting in the formation of rust composed of fine and dense-packed grains. The existence of Fe 2 NiO 4 in the nano-network changes the ion-exchanging properties of rust from anion to cation selective. Then, the rust on the advanced weathering steel 'breathes out' chloride ions from the rust/steel interface, and protects steel for more than a century by reducing the life cycle maintenance cost in an environment-friendly manner

  5. Effect of flue gas composition on deposit induced high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions mimicking biomass firing. Part I: Exposures in oxidizing and chlorinating atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kiamehr, Saeed; Montgomery, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    on hightemperature corrosion of an austenitic superheater material under laboratoryconditions mimicking biomass firing is investigated in this work. Exposuresinvolving deposit (KCl)-coated and deposit-free austenitic stainless steel (TP347H FG) samples were conducted isothermally at 560 8C for 72 h, under...... only in an oxidizing-chlorinating atmosphere, otherwise corrosionresults in formation of a duplex oxide. Corrosion attack on deposit-coatedsamples was higher than on deposit-free samples irrespective of the gaseousatmosphere. Specifically, severe volatilization of alloying elements occurred ondeposit-coated...

  6. Moessbauer study of corrosion products formed on Fe80B20 and Fe40Ni40 (MoB)20 amorphous alloys in an SO2-polluted atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davalos, J.; Marco, J.F.; Gracia, M.; Gancedo, J.R.; Greneche, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    ICEMS, XPS, XRD, and AES have been used to study the corrosion layers formed on two metallic glasses, Fe 80 B 20 and Fe 40 Ni 40 (MoB) 20 (2605 and 2826 MB, Allied Company), exposed to an SO 2 -polluted humid atmosphere. The iron-containing corrosion products are the same found for pure iron in the same environment, but different relative concentrations were clearly evidenced by ICEMS results. Elemental sulphur, Ni(OH) 2 , and B(OH) 3 , the latter enriched at the surface, were found by XPS, XRD and AES. (orig.)

  7. Corrosion performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed alumina coatings on AZ31B magnesium alloy under immersion environment

    OpenAIRE

    D. Thirumalaikumarasamy; K. Shanmugam; V. Balasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are successfully used in many industrial applications, where high wear and corrosion resistance with thermal insulation are required. The alumina powders were plasma sprayed on AZ31B magnesium alloy with three different plasma spraying parameters. In the present work, the influence of plasma spray parameters on the corrosion behavior of the coatings was investigated. The corrosion behavior of the coated samples was evaluated by immersion corrosion test in 3.5 w...

  8. Trajectory mapping of middle atmospheric water vapor by a mini network of NDACC instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lainer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The important task to observe the global coverage of middle atmospheric trace gases like water vapor or ozone usually is accomplished by satellites. Climate and atmospheric studies rely upon the knowledge of trace gas distributions throughout the stratosphere and mesosphere. Many of these gases are currently measured from satellites, but it is not clear whether this capability will be maintained in the future. This could lead to a significant knowledge gap of the state of the atmosphere. We explore the possibilities of mapping middle atmospheric water vapor in the Northern Hemisphere by using Lagrangian trajectory calculations and water vapor profile data from a small network of five ground-based microwave radiometers. Four of them are operated within the frame of NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. Keeping in mind that the instruments are based on different hardware and calibration setups, a height-dependent bias of the retrieved water vapor profiles has to be expected among the microwave radiometers. In order to correct and harmonize the different data sets, the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on the Aura satellite is used to serve as a kind of traveling standard. A domain-averaging TM (trajectory mapping method is applied which simplifies the subsequent validation of the quality of the trajectory-mapped water vapor distribution towards direct satellite observations. Trajectories are calculated forwards and backwards in time for up to 10 days using 6 hourly meteorological wind analysis fields. Overall, a total of four case studies of trajectory mapping in different meteorological regimes are discussed. One of the case studies takes place during a major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW accompanied by the polar vortex breakdown; a second takes place after the reformation of stable circulation system. TM cases close to the fall equinox and June solstice event from the year 2012 complete the study, showing the high

  9. Atmospheric corrosion resistance of epoxy duplex coated electrogalvanized steel exposed in marine, industrial and urban sites at pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bano, H.; Kazmi, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    An epoxy based duplex coating system (Electrogalvanized Mild Steel/Etch Primer/Epoxy-Polyamide Primer/ Epoxy-Amine Topcoat System) embedded with iron oxide, zinc chromate and titanium dioxide pigments was studied to ascertain its corrosion resistant synergistic performance at various anthropogenic sites of Karachi coastal city while salt spray test was also executed for reference. Coating performance was ascertained by visual morphological inspection, gloss measurements, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy. SEM and EDX results corroborated high degradation of epoxy coating at marine site experiment as substantial increment in oxygen/carbon ratio and high concentration of Ti at coating surface due to ex-corporation of pigments were noticed. Worst performance of epoxy coating at marine test site as compared to salt spray testing may be due to the salt-laden winds of Karachi coastal city and corrosive constituents incorporated in atmospheres from industrial and automobiles exhaust. General diminution trend in gloss value, depletion of morphological features witnessed through SEM micrographs, curtailment of aryl ether and aromatic nuclei signals in FTIR spectrum, and emergence of new peaks in the 1620-1800 cm-1 region correspond to formation of new oxidation products; concluded that an insignificant protection offered by the epoxy coating due to its outdoor aging which led to ex-capsulation of pigments under moist conditions. Appraisal of these results have furnished an average coating performance correlation of 547.5 hpy (hours of salt spray test equivalence per year exposure test) at marine test site and 528 hpy at industrial test site in terms of blistering while equivalence mean in terms of rusting were found 680 hpy and 567 hpy at marine and industrial test sites respectively. (author)

  10. Atmospheric corrosion of low carbon steel in a polar marine environment. Study of the effect of wind regime; Corrosion atmosferica del acero bajo en carbono en un ambiente marino polar. Estudio del efecto del regimen de vientos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivero, S.; Chico, B.; Fuente, D. de la; Morcillo, M.

    2007-07-01

    The present work studies the atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel (UNE-EN 10130) in a sub-polar marine environment (Artigas Antarctic Scientific Base (BCAA), Uruguay) as a function of site atmospheric salinity and exposure time. A linear relationship is established between corrosion rate and airborne salinity deposition rate, valid in the deposition range encountered (125-225 mg Cl-l/m{sup 2}.d) and a bi logarithmic relationship established between corrosion and exposure time (1-4 years). Atmospheric salinity is related with the monthly wind speed average, based on the concept of the wind run. chloride ion deposition rates of less than 300 mg Cl-l/m{sup 2}.d are related with remote (oceanic) winds and coastal winds basically of speeds between 1-40 km/h, while higher deposition rates (300-700 mg Cl-/m{sup 2}.d) correspond to coastal marine winds of a certain persistence with speeds of between 41-80 km/h. (Author) 39 refs.

  11. Validation of a chromatographic method and its use in the determination of sulphates in the products of atmospheric corrosion of zinc exposed to SO2 and NO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, Paula; Castano, Juan G

    2005-01-01

    The role of SO 2 and NO 2 in the atmospheric corrosion of zinc was studied by determining sulphates as the main products of corrosion when this metal is exposed to atmospheres containing SO 2 and NO 2 , scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDX) and Ion Exchange Chromatography (IC) were used as instrumental techniques, the former was used to establish the morphology and the elementary qualitative determination of corrosion products, and the latter to quantify sulphates, before conducting the chromatographic analyses a series of parameters such as selectivity, linearity, precision, accuracy, limit of quantification, and detection limit, were evaluated to validate the method and to have the statistical certainty of its utility in the sulphate quantification, the results showed that when the metal is exposed to an atmosphere containing SO 2 and NO 2 , the sulphate formation increases with exposure time, a synergetic effect of both polluting agents on sulphate formation was found with respect to the sulphate formation in atmospheres containing only SO 2

  12. Corrosion resistance of Ni-50Cr HVOF coatings on 310S alloy substrates in a metal dusting atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saaedi, J. [Centre for Advanced Coating Technologies, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arabi, H.; Mirdamadi, S.; Ghorbani, H. [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Coyle, T.W. [Centre for Advanced Coating Technologies, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Metal dusting attack has been examined after three 168 h cycles on two Ni-50Cr coatings with different microstructures deposited on 310S alloy substrates by the high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal-spray process. Metal dusting in uncoated 310S alloy specimens was found to be still in the initiation stage after 504 h of exposure in the 50H{sub 2}:50CO gas environment at 620 C. Dense Ni-50Cr coatings offered suitable resistance to metal dusting. Metal dusting was observed in the 310S substrates adjacent to pores at the interface between the substrate and a porous Ni-50Cr coating. The porosity present in the as-deposited coatings was shown to introduce a large variability into coating performance. Carbon formed by decomposition of the gaseous species accumulated in the surface pores and resulted in the dislodgement of surface splats due to stresses generated by the volume changes. When the corrosive gas atmosphere was able to penetrate through the interconnected pores and reach the coating-substrate interface, the 310S substrate was carburized, metal dusting attack occurred, and the resulting formation of coke in the pores led to local failure of the coating. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. The Moessbauer spectroscopy in the characterization of atmospheric corrosion products; La espectroscopia Moessbauer en la caracterizacion de productos de corrosion atmosferica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Torres, D; Leiva Ronda, P [Centro de Estudios Aplicados al Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), La Habana (Cuba); Gomez, J; Ronda, M [Centro de Investigaciones del Petroleo, La Habana (Cuba)

    1996-07-01

    A study of corrosion products on mild steel formed after 1 and 5 years exposure in two industrial coastal weathering stations in the Bay from Matanzas City, Cuba, has been carried out. Structural analysis was conducted using mainly transmission Moessbauer Spectroscopy and the X-ray diffraction as complementary technique. The main phases found in the specimen exposed to high chloride containing environment were: lepidocrocite ({gamma}- FeOOH), goethite ({alpha}- FeOOH) and magnetite concentration was the lowest, the phases found were {gamma}- FeOOH and {alpha}- FeOOH, and the phase transformation proposed was {gamma}- FeOOh -> {alpha}- Fe-OOH. In this station were found also amorphous corrosion products. There amorphous phases could be responsible for the lowest levels of corrosion on steel in this station.

  14. Development of advanced metallic coatings resistant to corrosion in high temperature industrial atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, T.; Bender, R.; Rosado, C.; Schuetze, M. [DECHEMA e.V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Following the experimental results that {gamma}-TiAl is highly resistant in reducing sulfidizing atmospheres the development of Ti-Al-co-diffusion coatings produced in a single step pack cementation process was started. The appropriate diffusion powder compositions were selected using thermodynamical calculations. Different Al-Ti-, Al-Si- and Al-Ti-Si-diffusion coatings were successfully applied on austenitic steels as well as Ni-base materials and showed excellent behaviour in reducing sulfidizing atmospheres with high carbon contents (CH{sub 4} - 1% CO - 1% CO{sub 2} - 10% H{sub 2} - 7% H{sub 2}S) up to 700 deg. C, under metal dusting conditions (H{sub 2} - 25 CO - 2% H{sub 2}O and CO - 2.4% CO{sub 2} - 1% CH{sub 4} - 9.4% N{sub 2} - 23.4% H{sub 2} - 0.2% H{sub 2}O - 1 ppm H{sub 2}S-0.3 ppm HCl) at temperatures of 620 deg. C and 700 deg. C. The application of diffusion coatings on ferritic materials has to be modified due to the specific requirements on the mechanical properties which are affected by the heat treatment during the diffusion process. TiAl was also applied by the HVOF thermal spray method on ferritic steels. Due to similarity of the thermal expansion coefficients this substrate-coating system proved to be mechanically very stable also under thermal cycling conditions. (authors)

  15. Evaluation of protective effect of deposits formed by naphthenic corrosion and sulfidation on carbon steel and steel 5Cr-0.5Mo exposed in atmospheric distillation fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Duarte

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Refining of so-called opportunity crude oils with a high level of naphthenic acids and sulfur compounds has been increasing interest due to limited availability of light crude oils, however, considerable corrosive effects in the processing to high temperature on pipes and distillation towers mainly by the attack of naphthenic acids and sulfur compounds; sulfur compounds could be corrosive or can reduce the attack of naphthenic acids due to the formation of sulfides layers on the metal surface. In this work was evaluated the performance of deposits formed on the surface of carbon steel AISI SAE 1020 and 5% Cr-0.5% Mo steel exposed in crude oil fractions obtained from atmospheric distillation tower. For this, gravimetric tests were performed in dynamic autoclave using metal samples pre-treated in a crude oil fraction obtained from the atmospheric distillation tower of the Crude Distillation Unit (CDU # 1 in order to form layers of sulfides on the surface of the two materials and subsequently to expose pre-treated and non-pretreated samples in two different crude oil fractions obtained from atmospheric distillation tower of Crude Distillation Unit (CDU # 2. The evaluation showed that the samples pretreated decreased tendency to corrosion by naphthenic acids and sulfidation compared to untreated samples.

  16. Characterization of corrosion products of Zn and Zn–Mg–Al coated steel in a marine atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diler, E.; Rouvellou, B.; Rioual, S.; Lescop, B.; Nguyen Vien, G.; Thierry, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The corrosion behaviour of Zn–Mg–Al alloy in marine environment is characterized. • Zn–Mg–Al alloy shows a better corrosion resistance than Zn. • Strong enhancement of NaZn 4 Cl(OH) 6 SO 4 ·6H 2 O in the corrosion products is observed. • Al 3+ and Mg 2+ induced quenching effects in corrosion activity are described. - Abstract: The corrosion behaviour of pure zinc and zinc–magnesium–aluminium alloy (ZMA) has been studied during 6 months of exposure in marine environment (Brest, France). The composition of corrosion products is analysed using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). An improved corrosion resistance of ZMA is observed. This improvement is found to be connected to Mg 2+ and Al 3+ induced quenching of corrosion activity and to the enhancement of NaZn 4 Cl(OH) 6 SO 4 ·6H 2 O in the formed corrosion product

  17. An overall view on corrosion and bio-fouling problems in sea water cooling systems at MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satyanarayanan, V.; Umapathy, P.; Bhaskaran, R.; Nagarajan, J.; Pradeep, Jeena; Krishna Rao, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    MAPS is a twin unit-220 MWe Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) nuclear power station using seawater as cooling medium in main steam condensers and in the Process Sea Water Heat Exchangers (PSWHXs). The seawater system consists of intake structure, submarine tunnel, fore-bay and pump house, travelling water screens, associated pumps and piping, heat-exchangers and out-fall structure. The horseshoe type submarine tunnel of length 468 metres and diameter 3.85 metres carrying ∼ 1.3 lakh m 3 /hr seawater from the intake structure to the pump house is lined with special concrete of 225 mm thickness. The major portion of piping carrying seawater is made of concrete and coal-tar based epoxy coated mild steel. Some portions of the mild steel pipes were gunnited and coated with araldite to minimise corrosion and fouling. The tubes of the condensers and the PSWHXs are of aluminium brass and the tube sheets are of aluminium bronze. The water boxes are rubber-lined with 3 mm thick neoprene and 2% magnesium iron sacrificial anodes are also provided in the water boxes to minimise corrosion. Plastic inserts are installed at the inlets of the tubes to prevent damage due to impingement attack and erosion. Ferrous sulphate dosing is being carried out to minimize the corrosion of aluminium brass tubes. Biofouling control (both Micro/Macro) is effected by gaseous chlorination at the rate of 30 - 40 Kg/hr for ∼ 20 hrs daily with residuals of 0.20 ppm. Further, booster dose (Liquid chlorine injection through evaporator) is given twice a week with a residual of ∼ 0.50 ppm and the dose required for this treatment is met by using evaporators. The major marine species identified in the intake and forebay were large barnacles and green mussels whereas the species identified in the PSWHXs were small size Barnacles (B. Reticulatus, 3 - 4 mm in size) and Mussels ( M.Striatulus, 5 - 8 mm in size). The main condensers are being cleaned during planned outages whereas it is not possible to

  18. Study of the effect of the NO{sub 2} in the atmospheric corrosion of copper; Estudio del efecto del NO{sub 2} en la corrosion atmosferica del cobre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariaca Rodriguez, Liboria

    1997-12-31

    Factors as the increase of the power consumption and the development of new combustion technologies, together with the increasing campaigns for the diminution of the SO{sub 2} emissions, have given rise to an increase of the relative importance of other atmospheric polluting agents, among which the nitrogen oxides occupy preponderant place. This new situation has motivated that during the last years greater attention is appearing to the effect these oxides can have on the stability of the materials. However, the results still are scarce and sometimes contradictory. With the purpose of contributing to the understanding of the effect of the NO{sub x} in the atmospheric corrosion, the investigation that is shown here was made. The effect that the NO{sub 2} has in the atmospheric corrosion of copper was studied, considering cases with and without the simultaneous presence of SO{sub 2}, with different relative humidities (RH) and temperatures of the atmospheric air. For this purpose one resorted to the simulation of atmospheres of interest by means of laboratory chambers that allowed the control of the temperature, RH and the contamination level. In each atmosphere completely clean copper coupons were exposed, and withdrawn at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Gravimetric analyses of gain and loss of mass and one complete characterization the corrosion products formed was made, mainly by means of X ray diffraction techniques by grazing angle (DRS), and photo electronic X ray spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA). Also, the applicability in these conditions of the electrochemical techniques of DC (RP, CP and RE) and of alternating current (EIE). From the results obtained it is worth mentioning as the more important the following ones: The corrosion of copper in atmospheres contaminated solely with NO{sub 2} depends fundamentally on the RH, not existing, as in the case of other metals, a critical RH (CRH), from which the kinetics of the corrosion process increases; all the opposite, the copper

  19. Durability of bare and anodised aluminium in atmosphere of very different corrosivities. II Anodised aluminium; Durabilidad del aluminio desnudo y anodizado en atmosfera de muy diferentes corrosividades. II. Aluminio anodizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, V.; Escudero, E.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Otero, E.; Morcillo, M.

    2004-07-01

    The behaviour of three anodic films with thicknesses of approximately 7, 17 and 28 {mu}m is studied in atmospheric exposure at 11 natural testing stations with salinity levels ranging between 2.1 and 684 mg Cl''- m''-2 d''-1. To evaluate the results, use was made of gravimetric techniques, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), EDX microanalysis, standard quality control tests, optical microscopy and, occasionally, electron microscopy. It is shown that anodising with correct sealing is an appropriate solution for preventing localised corrosion of aluminium and conserving its appearance, even in atmospheres of high corrosivity, provided that an ill-defined minimum thickness threshold is passed. The 7 {mu}m anodic films suffer corrosion after the second annual cycle in the most aggressive environments. Corrosion, when it occurs, is localised in the form of pitting or filiform corrosion. (Author) 23 refs.

  20. Detection and mapping of organic molecules in Titan's atmosphere using ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Titan's atmospheric photochemistry results in the production of a wide range of organic molecules, including hydrocarbons, nitriles, aromatics and other complex species of possible pre-biotic relevance. Studies of Titan's atmospheric chemistry thus provide a unique opportunity to explore the origin and evolution of organic matter in primitive (terrestrial) planetary atmospheres. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a powerful new facility, well suited to the study of molecular emission from Titan's upper and middle-atmosphere. Results will be presented from our ongoing studies of Titan using ALMA data obtained during the period 2012-2014 [1,2], including detection and mapping of emission from C2H5CN, HNC, HC3N, CH3CN and CH3CCH. In addition, combining data from multiple ALMA Band 6 observations, we obtained high-resolution spectra with unprecedented sensitivity, enabling the first detection of C2H3CN (vinyl cyanide) on Titan, and derived a mean C2H3CN C2H5CN abundance ratio above 300 km of 0.3. Vinyl cyanide has recently been investigated as a possible constituent of (pre-biotic) vesicle membranes in Titan's liquid CH4 oceans [3]. Radiative transfer models and possible chemical formation pathways for the detected molecules will be discussed. ALMA observations provide instantaneous snapshot mapping of Titan's entire Earth-facing hemisphere for gases inaccessible to previous studies, and therefore provide new insights into photochemical production and transport, particularly at higher altitudes. Our maps show spatially resolved peaks in Titan's northern and southern hemispheres, consistent with the molecular distributions found in previous studies at infrared wavelengths by Voyager and Cassini, but high-altitude longitudinal asymmetries in our nitrile data indicate that the mesosphere may be more spatially variable than previously thought.

  1. Atmospheric-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Grade 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel—Effects of 475 °C Embrittlement and Process Orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Örnek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 475 °C embrittlement and microstructure process orientation on atmospheric-induced stress corrosion cracking (AISCC of grade 2205 duplex stainless steel has been investigated. AISCC tests were carried out under salt-laden, chloride-containing deposits, on U-bend samples manufactured in rolling (RD and transverse directions (TD. The occurrence of selective corrosion and stress corrosion cracking was observed, with samples in TD displaying higher propensity towards AISCC. Strains and tensile stresses were observed in both ferrite and austenite, with similar magnitudes in TD, whereas, larger strains and stresses in austenite in RD. The occurrence of 475 °C embrittlement was related to microstructural changes in the ferrite. Exposure to 475 °C heat treatment for 5 to 10 h resulted in better AISCC resistance, with spinodal decomposition believed to enhance the corrosion properties of the ferrite. The austenite was more susceptible to ageing treatments up to 50 h, with the ferrite becoming more susceptible with ageing in excess of 50 h. Increased susceptibility of the ferrite may be related to the formation of additional precipitates, such as R-phase. The implications of heat treatment at 475 °C and the effect of process orientation are discussed in light of microstructure development and propensity to AISCC.

  2. The detailed analysis of the spray time effects of the aluminium coating using self-generated atmospheric plasma spray system on the microstructure and corrosion behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Khandanjou

    Full Text Available In the present paper our aim is to investigate the effect of the spray time of the aluminium coated layers on the microstructure and corrosion behaviour. For this purpose we use the self-generated atmospheric plasma spray system for coating of aluminium on the carbon steel substrate. The different thicknesses of coating are created. To evaluate this effect we use the several analyses such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, Micro hardness analysis by Vickers method, Adhesion strength analysis and electrochemical polarization test. The results are very interesting and show that due to low porosity, thicker layers are more homogeneous. The nanoparticles are observed in the thicker layers. The micro hardness tests show that the thicker layers have the better micro hardness value. Next, the adhesion strength tests illustrate that the highest adhesion strength are for longer spray times. On the other hand, the corrosion resistance behaviour of the coating is investigated by electrochemical polarization test. It is shown that the corrosion resistance increases by increasing the thickness due to low percentage of porosity. Keywords: Plasma spray, Thickness, Aluminium, Micro hardness, Corrosion resistance

  3. Establishing empirical relationships to predict porosity level and corrosion rate of atmospheric plasma-sprayed alumina coatings on AZ31B magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Thirumalaikumarasamy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are successfully used in many industrial applications, where high wear and corrosion resistance with thermal insulation are required. In this work, empirical relationships were developed to predict the porosity and corrosion rate of alumina coatings by incorporating independently controllable atmospheric plasma spray operational parameters (input power, stand-off distance and powder feed rate using response surface methodology (RSM. A central composite rotatable design with three factors and five levels was chosen to minimize the number of experimental conditions. Within the scope of the design space, the input power and the stand-off distance appeared to be the most significant two parameters affecting the responses among the three investigated process parameters. A linear regression relationship was also established between porosity and corrosion rate of the alumina coatings. Further, sensitivity analysis was carried out and compared with the relative impact of three process parameters on porosity level and corrosion rate to verify the measurement errors on the values of the uncertainty in estimated parameters.

  4. Corrosion performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed alumina coatings on AZ31B magnesium alloy under immersion environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Thirumalaikumarasamy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are successfully used in many industrial applications, where high wear and corrosion resistance with thermal insulation are required. The alumina powders were plasma sprayed on AZ31B magnesium alloy with three different plasma spraying parameters. In the present work, the influence of plasma spray parameters on the corrosion behavior of the coatings was investigated. The corrosion behavior of the coated samples was evaluated by immersion corrosion test in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. Empirical relationship was established to predict the corrosion rate of plasma sprayed alumina coatings by incorporating process parameters. The experiments were conducted based on a three factor, five-level, central composite rotatable design matrix. The developed relationship can be effectively used to predict the corrosion rate of alumina coatings at 95% confidence level. The results indicate that the input power has the greatest influence on corrosion rate, followed by stand-off distance and powder feed rate.

  5. Corrosion control for low-cost reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This conference was held September 19-24, 1993 in Houston, Texas to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on corrosion. Topics of interest focus on the following: atmospheric corrosion; chemical process industry corrosion; high temperature corrosion; and corrosion of plant materials. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  6. Enhanced corrosion resistance and hemocompatibility of biomedical NiTi alloy by atmospheric-pressure plasma polymerized fluorine-rich coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Penghui; Li, Limin [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Wenhao [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Division of Spine Surgery, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Jin, Weihong [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Liu, Xiangmei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan, Hubei 430062 (China); Yeung, Kelvin W.K. [Division of Spine Surgery, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Paul K., E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Fluoropolymer is deposited on NiTi alloy via atmospheric-pressure plasma polymerization. • The corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy in SBF and DMEM is evidently improved. • The adsorption ratio of albumin to fibrinogen is increased on the coated surface. • The reduced platelet adhesion number indicates better in vitro hemocompatibility. - Abstract: To improve the corrosion resistance and hemocompatibility of biomedical NiTi alloy, hydrophobic polymer coatings are deposited by plasma polymerization in the presence of a fluorine-containing precursor using an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. This process takes place at a low temperature in air and can be used to deposit fluoropolymer films using organic compounds that cannot be achieved by conventional polymerization techniques. The composition and chemical states of the polymer coatings are characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The corrosion behavior of the coated and bare NiTi samples is assessed and compared by polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in physiological solutions including simulated body fluids (SBF) and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's medium (DMEM). The corrosion resistance of the coated NiTi alloy is evidently improved. Protein adsorption and platelet adhesion tests reveal that the adsorption ratio of albumin to fibrinogen is increased and the number of adherent platelets on the coating is greatly reduced. The plasma polymerized coating renders NiTi better in vitro hemocompatibility and is promising as a protective and hemocompatible coating on cardiovascular implants.

  7. Study of the corrosion of metallic coatings and alloys containing aluminum in a mixed atmosphere - sulphur, oxygen - at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellmann, Daniel

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is the development of materials for a sulphur experimental loop allowing the thermodynamic properties of such an energy cycle to be checked. As solutions must comply with industrial methods, rare materials are excluded as they are too expensive or difficult to implement. Iron-based materials have been tested but could not have at the same time a good corrosion resistance and high temperature forming and mechanical toughness properties. Therefore, metallic coatings have been chosen, specifically alumina. After having reported a bibliographical study on corrosion by sulphur vapour and by oxygen and by sulphur-oxygen, the author presents the experimental materials and methods. Then, the author reports the study of mixed corrosion (by sulphur and oxygen together) of metallic alloys (ferritic and austeno-ferritic alloys, aluminium and titanium alloys), and of the corrosion of FeAlx coatings, of AlTix alloys [fr

  8. Erosion and erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomoto, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    It is very difficult to interpret the technical term of erosion-corrosion' which is sometimes encountered in piping systems of power plants, because of complicated mechanisms and several confusing definitions of erosion-corrosion phenomena. 'FAC (flow accelerated corrosion)' is recently introduced as wall thinning of materials in power plant systems, as a representative of 'erosion-corrosion'. FAC is, however, not necessarily well understood and compared with erosion-corrosion. This paper describes firstly the origin, definition and fundamental understandings of erosion and erosion-corrosion, in order to reconsider and reconfirm the phenomena of erosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC. Next, typical mapping of erosion, corrosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC are introduced in flow velocity and environmental corrosiveness axes. The concept of damage rate in erosion-corrosion is finally discussed, connecting dissolution rate, mass transfer of metal ions in a metal oxide film and film growth. (author)

  9. Mapping atmospheric aerosols with a citizen science network of smartphone spectropolarimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snik, Frans; Rietjens, Jeroen H. H.; Apituley, Arnoud; Volten, Hester; Mijling, Bas; Di Noia, Antonio; Heikamp, Stephanie; Heinsbroek, Ritse C.; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Smit, J. Martijn; Vonk, Jan; Stam, Daphne M.; Harten, Gerard; Boer, Jozua; Keller, Christoph U.

    2014-10-01

    To assess the impact of atmospheric aerosols on health, climate, and air traffic, aerosol properties must be measured with fine spatial and temporal sampling. This can be achieved by actively involving citizens and the technology they own to form an atmospheric measurement network. We establish this new measurement strategy by developing and deploying iSPEX, a low-cost, mass-producible optical add-on for smartphones with a corresponding app. The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) maps derived from iSPEX spectropolarimetric measurements of the daytime cloud-free sky by thousands of citizen scientists throughout the Netherlands are in good agreement with the spatial AOT structure derived from satellite imagery and temporal AOT variations derived from ground-based precision photometry. These maps show structures at scales of kilometers that are typical for urban air pollution, indicating the potential of iSPEX to provide information about aerosol properties at locations and at times that are not covered by current monitoring efforts.

  10. Benthic Habitat Mapping Using Multispectral High-Resolution Imagery: Evaluation of Shallow Water Atmospheric Correction Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Eugenio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Remote multispectral data can provide valuable information for monitoring coastal water ecosystems. Specifically, high-resolution satellite-based imaging systems, as WorldView-2 (WV-2, can generate information at spatial scales needed to implement conservation actions for protected littoral zones. However, coastal water-leaving radiance arriving at the space-based sensor is often small as compared to reflected radiance. In this work, complex approaches, which usually use an accurate radiative transfer code to correct the atmospheric effects, such as FLAASH, ATCOR and 6S, have been implemented for high-resolution imagery. They have been assessed in real scenarios using field spectroradiometer data. In this context, the three approaches have achieved excellent results and a slightly superior performance of 6S model-based algorithm has been observed. Finally, for the mapping of benthic habitats in shallow-waters marine protected environments, a relevant application of the proposed atmospheric correction combined with an automatic deglinting procedure is presented. This approach is based on the integration of a linear mixing model of benthic classes within the radiative transfer model of the water. The complete methodology has been applied to selected ecosystems in the Canary Islands (Spain but the obtained results allow the robust mapping of the spatial distribution and density of seagrass in coastal waters and the analysis of multitemporal variations related to the human activity and climate change in littoral zones.

  11. Lidar mapping of atmospheric atomic mercury in the Wanshan area, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Ming; Shang, Lihai; Duan, Zheng; Li, Yiyun; Zhao, Guangyu; Zhu, Shiming; Qiu, Guangle; Meng, Bo; Sommar, Jonas; Feng, Xinbin; Svanberg, Sune

    2018-05-08

    A novel mobile laser radar system was used for mapping gaseous atomic mercury (Hg 0 ) atmospheric pollution in the Wanshan district, south of Tongren City, Guizhou Province, China. This area is heavily impacted by legacy mercury from now abandoned mining activities. Differential absorption lidar measurements were supplemented by localized point monitoring using a Lumex RA-915M Zeeman modulation mercury analyzer. Range-resolved concentration measurements in different directions were performed. Concentrations in the lower atmospheric layers often exceeded levels of 100 ng/m 3 for March conditions with temperature ranging from 5 °C to 20 °C. A flux measurement of Hg 0 over a vertical cross section of 0.12 km 2 resulted in about 29 g/h. Vertical lidar sounding at night revealed quickly falling Hg 0 concentrations with height. This is the first lidar mapping demonstration in a heavily mercury-polluted area in China, illustrating the lidar potential in complementing point monitors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Letter to the Editor: Complete maps of the aspect sensitivity of VHF atmospheric radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Worthington

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Using the MU radar at Shigaraki, Japan (34.85°N, 136.10°E, we measure the power distribution pattern of VHF radar echoes from the mid-troposphere. The large number of radar beam-pointing directions (320 allows the mapping of echo power from 0° to 40° from zenith, and also the dependence on azimuth, which has not been achieved before at VHF wavelengths. The results show how vertical shear of the horizontal wind is associated with a definite skewing of the VHF echo power distribution, for beam angles as far as 30° or more from zenith, so that aspect sensitivity cannot be assumed negligible at any beam-pointing angle that most existing VHF radars are able to use. Consequently, the use of VHF echo power to calculate intensity of atmospheric turbulence, which assumes only isotropic backscatter at large beam zenith angles, will sometimes not be valid.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; turbulence; instruments and techniques

  13. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Cetacean and Sound Mapping Effort: Continuing Forward with an Integrated Ocean Noise Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jolie; Ferguson, Megan; Gedamke, Jason; Hatch, Leila; Southall, Brandon; Van Parijs, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    To help manage chronic and cumulative impacts of human activities on marine mammals, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) convened two working groups, the Underwater Sound Field Mapping Working Group (SoundMap) and the Cetacean Density and Distribution Mapping Working Group (CetMap), with overarching effort of both groups referred to as CetSound, which (1) mapped the predicted contribution of human sound sources to ocean noise and (2) provided region/time/species-specific cetacean density and distribution maps. Mapping products were presented at a symposium where future priorities were identified, including institutionalization/integration of the CetSound effort within NOAA-wide goals and programs, creation of forums and mechanisms for external input and funding, and expanded outreach/education. NOAA is subsequently developing an ocean noise strategy to articulate noise conservation goals and further identify science and management actions needed to support them.

  14. Effect of oxygen level on the oxidative stability of two different retail pork products stored using modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanos, Dimitrios; Ann Tørngren, Mari; Christensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics and the oxidative stability of pork steaks and of pork mince were investigated during 2, 5 and 7 days of refrigerated storage using oxygen (O2) levels of 0%, 20%, 50% and 80% in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). Steaks stored during 7 days were not affected by an increase i......%) O2 MAP. The results show that fresh pork products are affected differently by the MAP O2 concentration and strongly indicate that optimisation of MAP based on the retail product type would be of considerable benefit to their oxidative stability....

  15. Rhenium corrosion in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.D.; Shkol'nikov, S.N.; Vetyukov, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The results investigating rhenium corrosion in chloride melts containing sodium, potassium and chromium ions by a gravimetry potentials in argon atmosphere in a sealing quarth cell are described. Rhenium corrosion is shown to be rather considerable in melts containing CrCl 2 . The value of corrosion rate depending on temperature is determined

  16. Corrosion of metallic materials. Dry corrosion, aqueous corrosion and corrosion by liquid metal, methods of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, Max

    2015-01-01

    This book is based on a course on materials given in an engineering school. The author first gives an overview of metallurgy issues: metallic materials (pure metals, metallic alloys), defects of crystal lattices (point defects, linear defects or dislocations), equilibrium diagrams, steels and cast, thermal processing of steels, stainless steels, aluminium and its alloys, copper and its alloys. The second part addresses the properties and characterization of surfaces and interfaces: singularity of a metal surface, surface energy of a metal, energy of grain boundaries, adsorption at a material surface, metal-electrolyte interface, surface oxide-electrolyte interface, techniques of surface analysis. The third chapter addresses the electrochemical aspects of corrosion: description of the corrosion phenomenon, free enthalpy of a compound and free enthalpy of a reaction, case of dry corrosion (thermodynamic aspect, Ellingham diagram, oxidation mechanisms, experimental study, macroscopic modelling), case of aqueous corrosion (electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics, experimental determination of corrosion rate). The fourth part addresses the different forms of aqueous corrosion: generalized corrosion (atmospheric corrosion, mechanisms and tests), localized corrosion (galvanic, pitting, cracking, intergranular, erosion and cavitation), particular cases of stress cracking (stress corrosion, fatigue-corrosion, embrittlement by hydrogen), and bi-corrosion (of non alloyed steels, of stainless steels, and of aluminium and copper alloys). The sixth chapter addresses the struggle and the protection against aqueous corrosion: methods of prevention, scope of use of main alloys, geometry-based protection of pieces, use of corrosion inhibitors, use of organic or metallic coatings, electrochemical protection. The last chapter proposes an overview of corrosion types in industrial practices: in the automotive industry, in the oil industry, in the aircraft industry, and in the

  17. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  18. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Mapping Vinyl Cyanide and Other Nitriles in Titan’s Atmosphere Using ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, J. C.-Y.; Cordiner, M. A.; Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Molter, E. M.; Palmer, M. Y.; Charnley, S. B.; Lindberg, J. E.; Mumma, M. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Teanby, N. A. [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen’s Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Kisiel, Z. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikøw 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Irwin, P. G. J., E-mail: martin.cordiner@nasa.gov [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2017-11-01

    Vinyl cyanide (C{sub 2}H{sub 3}CN) is theorized to form in Titan’s atmosphere via high-altitude photochemistry and is of interest regarding the astrobiology of cold planetary surfaces due to its predicted ability to form cell membrane-like structures (azotosomes) in liquid methane. In this work, we follow up on the initial spectroscopic detection of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}CN on Titan by Palmer et al. with the detection of three new C{sub 2}H{sub 3}CN rotational emission lines at submillimeter frequencies. These new, high-resolution detections have allowed for the first spatial distribution mapping of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}CN on Titan. We present simultaneous observations of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN, HC{sub 3}N, and CH{sub 3}CN emission, and obtain the first (tentative) detection of C{sub 3}H{sub 8} (propane) at radio wavelengths. We present disk-averaged vertical abundance profiles, two-dimensional spatial maps, and latitudinal flux profiles for the observed nitriles. Similarly to HC{sub 3}N and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN, which are theorized to be short-lived in Titan’s atmosphere, C{sub 2}H{sub 3}CN is most abundant over the southern (winter) pole, whereas the longer-lived CH{sub 3}CN is more concentrated in the north. This abundance pattern is consistent with the combined effects of high-altitude photochemical production, poleward advection, and the subsequent reversal of Titan’s atmospheric circulation system following the recent transition from northern to southern winter. We confirm that C{sub 2}H{sub 3}CN and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN are most abundant at altitudes above 200 km. Using a 300 km step model, the average abundance of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}CN is found to be 3.03 ± 0.29 ppb, with a C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN/C{sub 2}H{sub 3}CN abundance ratio of 2.43 ± 0.26. Our HC{sub 3}N and CH{sub 3}CN spectra can be accurately modeled using abundance gradients above the tropopause, with fractional scale-heights of 2.05 ± 0.16 and 1.63 ± 0.02, respectively.

  20. Mapping Vinyl Cyanide and Other Nitriles in Titan’s Atmosphere Using ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J. C.-Y.; Cordiner, M. A.; Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Molter, E. M.; Teanby, N. A.; Palmer, M. Y.; Charnley, S. B.; Lindberg, J. E.; Kisiel, Z.; Mumma, M. J.; Irwin, P. G. J.

    2017-11-01

    Vinyl cyanide (C2H3CN) is theorized to form in Titan’s atmosphere via high-altitude photochemistry and is of interest regarding the astrobiology of cold planetary surfaces due to its predicted ability to form cell membrane-like structures (azotosomes) in liquid methane. In this work, we follow up on the initial spectroscopic detection of C2H3CN on Titan by Palmer et al. with the detection of three new C2H3CN rotational emission lines at submillimeter frequencies. These new, high-resolution detections have allowed for the first spatial distribution mapping of C2H3CN on Titan. We present simultaneous observations of C2H5CN, HC3N, and CH3CN emission, and obtain the first (tentative) detection of C3H8 (propane) at radio wavelengths. We present disk-averaged vertical abundance profiles, two-dimensional spatial maps, and latitudinal flux profiles for the observed nitriles. Similarly to HC3N and C2H5CN, which are theorized to be short-lived in Titan’s atmosphere, C2H3CN is most abundant over the southern (winter) pole, whereas the longer-lived CH3CN is more concentrated in the north. This abundance pattern is consistent with the combined effects of high-altitude photochemical production, poleward advection, and the subsequent reversal of Titan’s atmospheric circulation system following the recent transition from northern to southern winter. We confirm that C2H3CN and C2H5CN are most abundant at altitudes above 200 km. Using a 300 km step model, the average abundance of C2H3CN is found to be 3.03 ± 0.29 ppb, with a C2H5CN/C2H3CN abundance ratio of 2.43 ± 0.26. Our HC3N and CH3CN spectra can be accurately modeled using abundance gradients above the tropopause, with fractional scale-heights of 2.05 ± 0.16 and 1.63 ± 0.02, respectively.

  1. Mapping the Galvanic Corrosion of Three Coupled Metal Alloys Using Coupled Multielectrode Array: Influence of Chloride Ion Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ju

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The galvanic corrosion behavior of three metal alloys commonly used in water desalination plants was investigated using coupled multielectrode arrays consisting of aluminum-brass (HAl77-2, titanium alloy (TA2, and 316L stainless steel (316L SS. The three electrode types were coupled galvanically and arranged in different geometric configurations. Their corrosion behavior was characterized as a function of the chloride concentration. The potential and current distributions of the three-electrode coupling systems display electrochemical inhomogeneity. Generally, the aluminum-brass wires are anodic versus the titanium alloy and stainless steel. The titanium alloy acts as a primary cathode, and the 316L SS acts as a secondary cathode. The corrosion rate of aluminum-brass depends on the concentration of chloride ion, with a maximum corrosion rate at a chloride concentration of 2.3 wt %. In terms of geometrical arrangements, when the anodic HAl77-2 wires are located on the edge and are connected to the 316L SS wires in the coupling system, the main anodic area enlarges, especially in the area adjacent to the 316L SS wires. When the HAl77-2 wires are located between (in the middle of the two other types of wires, the corrosion rates are higher than the corrosion rates observed from the other two geometrical arrangements.

  2. Mapping the Galvanic Corrosion of Three Coupled Metal Alloys Using Coupled Multielectrode Array: Influence of Chloride Ion Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hong; Duan, JinZhuo; Yang, Yuanfeng; Cao, Ning; Li, Yan

    2018-04-20

    The galvanic corrosion behavior of three metal alloys commonly used in water desalination plants was investigated using coupled multielectrode arrays consisting of aluminum-brass (HAl77-2), titanium alloy (TA2), and 316L stainless steel (316L SS). The three electrode types were coupled galvanically and arranged in different geometric configurations. Their corrosion behavior was characterized as a function of the chloride concentration. The potential and current distributions of the three-electrode coupling systems display electrochemical inhomogeneity. Generally, the aluminum-brass wires are anodic versus the titanium alloy and stainless steel. The titanium alloy acts as a primary cathode, and the 316L SS acts as a secondary cathode. The corrosion rate of aluminum-brass depends on the concentration of chloride ion, with a maximum corrosion rate at a chloride concentration of 2.3 wt %. In terms of geometrical arrangements, when the anodic HAl77-2 wires are located on the edge and are connected to the 316L SS wires in the coupling system, the main anodic area enlarges, especially in the area adjacent to the 316L SS wires. When the HAl77-2 wires are located between (in the middle of) the two other types of wires, the corrosion rates are higher than the corrosion rates observed from the other two geometrical arrangements.

  3. Attempt at mapping acidic atmospheric pollution in the north of France in relation to the toxic sensitivity of epiphytic lichens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehu, J M; Bon, M; Delzenne, C; Rose, F

    1973-01-29

    The authors present, for the first time in France, a map of acidic atmospheric pollution (for the departments of Nord, Pas-de-calais and Somme) based on the study of the epiphytic lichen flora and its distribution in ten zones of toxic sensitivity, using the Hawksworth and Rose scale.

  4. Verification of small-scale water vapor features in VAS imagery using high resolution MAMS imagery. [VISSR Atmospheric Sounder - Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Paul W.; Jedlovec, Gary; Wilson, Gregory

    1986-01-01

    The Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS), a modification of NASA's Airborne Thematic Mapper, is described, and radiances from the MAMS and the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) are compared which were collected simultaneously on May 18, 1985. Thermal emission from the earth atmosphere system in eight visible and three infrared spectral bands (12.3, 11.2 and 6.5 microns) are measured by the MAMS at up to 50 m horizontal resolution, and the infrared bands are similar to three of the VAS infrared bands. Similar radiometric performance was found for the two systems, though the MAMS showed somewhat less attenuation from water vapor than VAS because its spectral bands are shifted to shorter wavelengths away from the absorption band center.

  5. Initial stages of indoor atmospheric corrosion of electronics contact metals in humid tropical climate: tin and nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veleva, L.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Samples of electrolytic tin and nickel have been exposed for 1 to 12 m in indoor environment, inside a box (rain sheltered cabinet, placed in tropical humid marine-urban climate, as a part of Gulf of Mexico. The corrosion aggressiveness of box has been classified as a very high corrosive, based on the monitored chlorides and SO2 deposition rates, and the Temperature/Relative Humidity air daily complex. The annual mass increasing of nickel is approximately twice higher than its values of mass loss (C. The relation between nickel mass loss or increasing and time of wetness (t of metal surface is linear and does not obey the power equation C = A tn, which has be found for tin. The SEM images reveal a localized corrosion on nickel and tin surfaces. XRD detects the formation of SnCl2.H2O as a corrosion product. Within the time on the tin surface appear black spots, considered as organic material.

    Muestras de estaño y níquel electrolíticos han sido expuestas de 1 a 12 m en ambiente interno (indoor, en una caseta (gabinete protegido de lluvia, colocada en clima tropical húmedo marino-urbano del Golfo de México. La agresividad de la caseta ha sido clasificada como muy altamente corrosiva, basada al registro de la velocidad de deposición de cloruros y SO2, y en el complejo diario de temperatura/humedad relativa del aire. El incremento de masa anual de níquel es, aproximadamente, dos veces mayor que del valor de su pérdida de masa (C. La relación entre la pérdida de masa de Ni o su incremento, y el tiempo de humectación (t de la superficie metálica y lineal y no obedece la ley de potencia C = A tn , que ha sido encontrada para el estaño. Las imágenes del SEM revelan una corrosión localizada en las superficie de níquel y estaño. El análisis de rayos-X detecta la formación de SnCl2.H2O como producto de corrosión. Con el tiempo

  6. Corrosion in the presence of a complexing agent - application to the continuous determination of hydrofluoric acid in the atmosphere; Corrosion en presence de complexant. - Application a la determination en continu de l'acide fluorhydrique dans l'atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapron, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France)

    1966-10-01

    After a presentation of the thermodynamics and kinetics involved during corrosion in the presence of a complexing agent, the first part of this report deals with the electrochemical properties of an aluminium electrode in the presence of fluoride solutions. Various physical and chemical parameters have been studied together with their influence on the aforementioned properties. From this first part are deduced the medium and the various parameters which lead to the maximum efficiency for the detection of fluorides by amperometry. The second part is an application of the results of the above work, which has made it possible to develop a cell having an original design. Its performances are described. They show that the cell has a greater sensitivity and a shorter response time than existing equipment. (author) [French] Apres un rappel sur la thermodynamique et la cinetique de la corrosion en presence de complexant, la premiere partie du memoire est consacree a l'etude des proprietes electrochimiques de l'electrode d'aluminium, en presence de solutions de fluorure. Differents parametres physiques et chimiques ont ete etudies ainsi que leurs influences sur les dites proprietes. De cette premiere partie on en a deduit le milieu et les divers parametres a fixer de facon a obtenir un rendement optimum au vue de la detection des fluorures par amperometrie. La deuxieme partie, qui est l'application des renseignements tires du travail deja cite, a permis de mettre au point une cellule de conception nouvelle. Ses performances sont decrites. Elles indiquent une sensibilite plus grande, un temps de reponse plus court que les appareils existants. (auteur)

  7. Automatic identification of corrosion damage using image processing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bento, Mariana P.; Ramalho, Geraldo L.B.; Medeiros, Fatima N.S. de; Ribeiro, Elvis S. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Medeiros, Luiz C.L. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper proposes a Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) method for atmospheric corrosion detection on metallic surfaces using digital images. In this study, the uniform corrosion is characterized by texture attributes extracted from co-occurrence matrix and the Self Organizing Mapping (SOM) clustering algorithm. We present a technique for automatic inspection of oil and gas storage tanks and pipelines of petrochemical industries without disturbing their properties and performance. Experimental results are promising and encourage the possibility of using this methodology in designing trustful and robust early failure detection systems. (author)

  8. Corrosion and anticorrosion. Industrial practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beranger, G.; Mazille, H.

    2002-01-01

    This book comprises 14 chapters written with the collaboration of about 50 French experts of corrosion. It is complementary to another volume entitled 'corrosion of metals and alloys' and published by the same editor. This volume comprises two parts: part 1 presents the basic notions of corrosion phenomena, the properties of surfaces, the electrochemical properties of corrosion etc.. Part 2 describes the most frequent forms of corrosion encountered in industrial environments and corresponding to specific problems of protection: marine environment, atmospheric corrosion, galvanic corrosion, tribo-corrosion, stress corrosion etc.. The first 8 chapters (part 1) treat of the corrosion problems encountered in different industries and processes: oil and gas production, chemical industry, phosphoric acid industry, PWR-type power plants, corrosion of automobile vehicles, civil engineering and buildings, corrosion of biomaterials, non-destructive testing for the monitoring of corrosion. The other chapters (part 2) deal with anticorrosion and protective coatings and means: choice of materials, coatings and surface treatments, thick organic coatings and enamels, paints, corrosion inhibitors and cathodic protection. (J.S.)

  9. Corrosion in the presence of a complexing agent - application to the continuous determination of hydrofluoric acid in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapron, J.

    1966-10-01

    After a presentation of the thermodynamics and kinetics involved during corrosion in the presence of a complexing agent, the first part of this report deals with the electrochemical properties of an aluminium electrode in the presence of fluoride solutions. Various physical and chemical parameters have been studied together with their influence on the aforementioned properties. From this first part are deduced the medium and the various parameters which lead to the maximum efficiency for the detection of fluorides by amperometry. The second part is an application of the results of the above work, which has made it possible to develop a cell having an original design. Its performances are described. They show that the cell has a greater sensitivity and a shorter response time than existing equipment. (author) [fr

  10. Atmospheric dayglow diagnostics involving the O2(b-X) Atmospheric band emission: Global Oxygen and Temperature (GOAT) mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slanger, T. G.; Pejaković, D. A.; Kostko, O.; Matsiev, D.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2017-03-01

    The terrestrial dayglow displays prominent emission features from the 0-0 and 1-1 bands of the O2 Atmospheric band system in the 760-780 nm region. We present an analysis of observations in this wavelength region recorded by the Space Shuttle during the Arizona Airglow Experiment. A major conclusion is that the dominant product of O(1D) + O2 energy transfer is O2(b, v = 1), a result that corroborates our previous laboratory studies. Moreover, critical to the interpretation of dayglow is the possible interference by N2 and N2+ bands in the 760-780 nm region, where the single-most important component is the N2 1PG 3-1 band that overlaps with the O2(b-X) 0-0 band. When present, this background must be accounted for to reveal the O2(b-X) 0-0 and 1-1 bands for altitudes at which the O2 and N2/N2+ emissions coincide. Finally, we exploit the very different collisional behavior of the two lowest O2(b) vibrational levels to outline a remote sensing technique that provides information on Atmospheric composition and temperature from space-based observations of the 0-0 and 1-1 O2 atmospheric bands.

  11. Evaluation of UAS for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Monitoring as Part of the 2017 CLOUD-MAP Flight Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, J.; Chilson, P. B.; Houston, A. L.; Smith, S.

    2017-12-01

    CLOUD-MAP (Collaboration Leading Operational UAS Development for Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics) is a 4 year, 4 university collaboration sponsored by the National Science Foundation to develop capabilities that will allow meteorologists and atmospheric scientists to use unmanned aircraft as a common, useful everyday measurement tool. Currently, we know that systems can be used for meteorological measurements, but they are far from being practical or robust for everyday field diagnostics by the average meteorologist or scientist. In particular, UAS are well suited for the lower atmosphere, namely the lower boundary layer that has a large impact on the atmosphere and where much of the weather phenomena begin. The 2016 and 2017 campaigns resulted in over 500 unmanned aircraft flights of over a dozen separate platforms collecting meteorological data at 3 different sites including Oklahoma Mesonet stations and the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The SGP atmospheric observatory was the first field measurement site established by the ARM Climate Research Facility and is the world's largest and most extensive climate research facility. Data from the SGP was used to validate observations from the various UAS. UAS operations consisted of both fixed and rotary platforms up to 3,000 AGL with thermodynamic, wind, and chemistry (viz., CO2 and CH4) sensors. ABL conditions were observed over a variety of conditions, particularly during the morning transition to evaluate the boundary layer dilution due to vertical mixing and changes in the wind patterns from diurnal variability.

  12. 78 FR 70076 - Aging Management of Internal Surfaces, Fire Water Systems, Atmospheric Storage Tanks, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... Systems, Atmospheric Storage Tanks, and Corrosion Under Insulation AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Internal Surfaces, Fire Water Systems, Atmospheric Storage Tanks, and Corrosion Under Insulation.'' This LR... related to internal surface aging effects, fire water systems, atmospheric storage tanks, and corrosion...

  13. Corrosion evaluation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Uh Chul; Han, Jeong Ho; Nho, Kye Ho; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo.

    1997-09-01

    A multifrequency ACPD system was assembled which can measure very small crack. Stress corrosion cracking test system with SSRT operating high temperature was installed. Stress corrosion cracking test of newly developed alloy 600 and existing alloy 600 was carried out in steam atmosphere of 400 deg C. No crack was observed in both materials within a test period of 2,000 hrs. Corrosion fatigue test system operating at high temperature was installed in which fatigue crack was measured by CDPD. Lead enhanced the SCC of the Alloy 600 in high temperature water, had a tendency to modify a cracking morphology from intergranular to transgranular. Pit initiation preferentially occurred at Ti-rich carbide. Resistance to pit initiation decreased with increasing temperature up to 300 deg C. Test loop for erosion corrosion was designed and fabricated. Thin layer activation technique was very effective in measuring erosion corrosion. Erosion corrosion of a part of secondary side pipe was evaluated by the Check Family Codes of EPRI. Calculated values of pipe thickness by Check Family Codes coincided with the pipe thickness measured by UT with an error of ± 20%. Literature review on turbine failure showed that failure usually occurred in low pressure turbine rotor disc and causes of failure are stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. (author). 12 refs., 20 tabs., 77 figs

  14. Mapping atmospheric aerosols with a citizen science network of smartphone spectropolarimeters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snik, F.; Rietjens, J.H.H.; Apituley, A.; Volten, H.; Mijling, B.; Di Noia, A.; Heikamp, S.; Heinsbroek, R.C.; Hasekamp, O.P.; Smit. , J.M.; Vonk, J.; Stam, D.M.; van Harten, G.; de Boer, J.; Keller, C.U.; iSPEX citizen scientists; Stuut, J.B.W.; Wernand, M.R.; Philippart, C.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of atmospheric aerosols on health, climate, and air traffic, aerosol properties must be measured with fine spatial and temporal sampling. This can be achieved by actively involving citizens and the technology they own to form an atmospheric measurement network. We establish this

  15. Formation of nitrile species on Ag nanostructures supported on a-Al2O3: a new corrosion route for silver exposed to the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez, R. J.; Espinós, J. P.; Afonso, C. N.

    2017-04-01

    The aging of supported Ag nanostructures upon storage in ambient conditions (air and room temperature) for 20 months has been studied. The samples are produced on glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD); first a 15 nm thick buffer layer of amorphous aluminum oxide (a-Al2O3) is deposited, followed by PLD of Ag. The amount of deposited Ag ranges from that leading to a discontinuous layer up to an almost-percolated layer with a thickness of oxidized faster, the smaller the amount of Ag. The corrosion leads to the formation of nitrile species due to the reaction between NO x species from the atmosphere adsorbed at the surface of Ag, and hydrocarbons adsorbed in defects at the surface of the a-Al2O3 layer during the deposition of the Ag nanostructures by PLD that migrate to the surface of the metal with time. The nitrile formation thus results in the main oxidation mechanism and inhibits almost completely the formation of sulphate/sulphide. Finally, the optical changes upon aging offer an easy-to-use tool for following the aging process. They are dominated by an enhanced absorption in the UV side of the spectrum and a blue-shift of the surface plasmon resonance that are, respectively, related to the formation of a dielectric overlayer on the Ag nanostructure and changes in the dimensions/features of the nanostructures, both due to the oxidation process.

  16. Comparing atmospheric transport models for future regional inversions over Europe - Part 1: mapping the atmospheric CO2 signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geels, C.; Brandt, J.; Christensen, J.H.; Frohn, L.M.; Gloor, M.; Ciais, P.; Bousquet, P.; Peylin, P.; Dargaville, R.; Ramonet, M.; Vermeulen, A.T.; Aalto, T.; Haszpra, L.; Karstens, U.; Rodenbeck, C.; Carboni, G.; Santaguida, R.

    2007-01-01

    The CO 2 source and sink distribution across Europe can be estimated in principle through inverse methods by combining CO 2 observations and atmospheric transport models. Uncertainties of such estimates are mainly due to insufficient spatio-temporal coverage of CO 2 observations and biases of the models. In order to assess the biases related to the use of different models the CO 2 concentration field over Europe has been simulated with five different Eulerian atmospheric transport models as part of the EU-funded AEROCARB project, which has the main goal to estimate the carbon balance of Europe. In contrast to previous comparisons, here both global coarse-resolution and regional higher-resolution models are included. Continuous CO 2 observations from continental, coastal and mountain sites as well as flasks sampled on aircraft are used to evaluate the models ability to capture the spatio-temporal variability and distribution of lower troposphere CO 2 across Europe. 14 CO 2 is used in addition to evaluate separately fossil fuel signal predictions. The simulated concentrations show a large range of variation, with up to similar to 10 ppm higher surface concentrations over Western and Central Europe in the regional models with highest (mesoscale) spatial resolution. The simulation-data comparison reveals that generally high-resolution models are more successful than coarse models in capturing the amplitude and phasing of the observed short-term variability. At high-altitude stations the magnitude of the differences between observations and models and in between models is less pronounced, but the timing of the diurnal cycle is not well captured by the models. The data comparisons show also that the timing of the observed variability on hourly to daily time scales at low-altitude stations is generally well captured by all models. However, the amplitude of the variability tends to be underestimated. While daytime values are quite well predicted, nighttime values are

  17. Comparing atmospheric transport models for future regional inversions over Europe - Part 1: mapping the atmospheric CO{sub 2} signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geels, C.; Brandt, J.; Christensen, J.H.; Frohn, L.M. [Univ Aarhus, Natl Environm Res Inst, DK-4000 Roskilde, (Denmark); Gloor, M. [Univ Leeds, Leeds, W Yorkshire, (United Kingdom); Ciais, P.; Bousquet, P.; Peylin, P.; Dargaville, R.; Ramonet, M. [CEA, CNRS, UMR 1572, Lab Sci Climat and Environm, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Vermeulen, A.T. [ECN, NL-1755 ZG Petten, (Netherlands); Aalto, T. [Finnish Meteorol Inst Air Qual Res, Helsinki 00810, (Finland); Haszpra, L. [Hungarian Meteorol Serv, H-1675 Budapest, (Hungary); Karstens, U.; Rodenbeck, C. [Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, D-07701 Jena, (Germany); Carboni, G. [CESI ApA, I-20134 Milan, (Italy); Santaguida, R. [Italian AF Meteorol Serv, I-41029 Sestola, MO, (Italy)

    2007-07-01

    The CO{sub 2} source and sink distribution across Europe can be estimated in principle through inverse methods by combining CO{sub 2} observations and atmospheric transport models. Uncertainties of such estimates are mainly due to insufficient spatio-temporal coverage of CO{sub 2} observations and biases of the models. In order to assess the biases related to the use of different models the CO{sub 2} concentration field over Europe has been simulated with five different Eulerian atmospheric transport models as part of the EU-funded AEROCARB project, which has the main goal to estimate the carbon balance of Europe. In contrast to previous comparisons, here both global coarse-resolution and regional higher-resolution models are included. Continuous CO{sub 2} observations from continental, coastal and mountain sites as well as flasks sampled on aircraft are used to evaluate the models ability to capture the spatio-temporal variability and distribution of lower troposphere CO{sub 2} across Europe. {sup 14}CO{sub 2} is used in addition to evaluate separately fossil fuel signal predictions. The simulated concentrations show a large range of variation, with up to similar to 10 ppm higher surface concentrations over Western and Central Europe in the regional models with highest (mesoscale) spatial resolution. The simulation-data comparison reveals that generally high-resolution models are more successful than coarse models in capturing the amplitude and phasing of the observed short-term variability. At high-altitude stations the magnitude of the differences between observations and models and in between models is less pronounced, but the timing of the diurnal cycle is not well captured by the models. The data comparisons show also that the timing of the observed variability on hourly to daily time scales at low-altitude stations is generally well captured by all models. However, the amplitude of the variability tends to be underestimated. While daytime values are quite

  18. Comparing atmospheric transport models for future regional inversions over Europe ─ Part 1: mapping the atmospheric CO2 signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramonet

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The CO2 source and sink distribution across Europe can be estimated in principle through inverse methods by combining CO2 observations and atmospheric transport models. Uncertainties of such estimates are mainly due to insufficient spatiotemporal coverage of CO2 observations and biases of the models. In order to assess the biases related to the use of different models the CO2 concentration field over Europe has been simulated with five different Eulerian atmospheric transport models as part of the EU-funded AEROCARB project, which has the main goal to estimate the carbon balance of Europe. In contrast to previous comparisons, here both global coarse-resolution and regional higher-resolution models are included. Continuous CO2 observations from continental, coastal and mountain sites as well as flasks sampled on aircrafts are used to evaluate the models' ability to capture the spatiotemporal variability and distribution of lower troposphere CO2 across Europe. 14CO2 is used in addition to evaluate separately fossil fuel signal predictions. The simulated concentrations show a large range of variation, with up to ~10 ppm higher surface concentrations over Western and Central Europe in the regional models with highest (mesoscale spatial resolution. The simulation – data comparison reveals that generally high-resolution models are more successful than coarse models in capturing the amplitude and phasing of the observed short-term variability. At high-altitude stations the magnitude of the differences between observations and models and in between models is less pronounced, but the timing of the diurnal cycle is not well captured by the models. The data comparisons show also that the timing of the observed variability on hourly to daily time scales at low-altitude stations is generally well captured by all models. However, the amplitude of the variability tends to be underestimated. While daytime values are quite well predicted, nighttime values are

  19. Effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) with low and superatmospheric oxygen on the quality and antioxidant enzyme system of golden needle mushrooms (Flammulina velutipes) during postharvest storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Cheng T.; Wang, Chang T.; Cao, Y.P.; Nout, M.J.R.; Sun, B.G.; Liu, L.

    2011-01-01

    To quantify the effect of oxygen concentrations on the quality and antioxidant enzyme system of stored golden needle mushroom, modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) with low and initial superatmospheric oxygen was applied during mushroom storage, and physiological changes associated with postharvest

  20. Standard practice for measurement of time-of-wetness on surfaces exposed to wetting conditions as in atmospheric corrosion testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1989-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a technique for monitoring time-of-wetness (TOW) on surfaces exposed to cyclic atmospheric conditions which produce depositions of moisture. 1.2 The practice is also applicable for detecting and monitoring condensation within a wall or roof assembly and in test apparatus. 1.3 Exposure site calibration or characterization can be significantly enhanced if TOW is measured for comparison with other sites, particularly if this data is used in conjunction with other site-specific instrumentation techniques. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  1. Biomonitoring of atmospheric pollution (with emphasis on trace elements) - BioMAP. Proceedings of an international workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-06-01

    Some organisms accumulate atmospheric contaminants over certain periods of time and concentrate them, thus allowing reliable analytical measurements if the organisms are suitably chosen. Measurements of contaminants accumulated by such organisms (biomonitors) provide information on the integrated exposure over an extended period of time. They may also be present in remote areas, and no expensive technical equipment is involved in collecting them. Therefore, biomonitoring can be an effective tool for pollutant mapping and trend monitoring by real time and retrospective analysis. The IAEA is making concerted efforts to promote the practical use of nuclear and related analytical techniques in studies of non-radioactive environmental pollutants that may impact human health, and one of the main emphases is on studying air contaminants. The idea of organizing a workshop on biomonitoring atmospheric pollution arose during an IAEA Technical Co-operation Project on Monitoring of Trace Element Air Pollution, carried out at the Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), Portugal, with substantial technical support by the Interfaculty Reactor Institute (IRI) of the Delft University of Technology (TUDelft), Netherlands. The International Workshop on Biomonitoring of Atmospheric Pollution (With Emphasis on Trace Elements) - BioMAP, was held in Lisbon, Portugal, from 21 to 24 September 1997. The meeting was organized in co-operation with the Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear

  2. Biomonitoring of atmospheric pollution (with emphasis on trace elements) - BioMAP. Proceedings of an international workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-06-01

    Some organisms accumulate atmospheric contaminants over certain periods of time and concentrate them, thus allowing reliable analytical measurements if the organisms are suitably chosen. Measurements of contaminants accumulated by such organisms (biomonitors) provide information on the integrated exposure over an extended period of time. They may also be present in remote areas, and no expensive technical equipment is involved in collecting them. Therefore, biomonitoring can be an effective tool for pollutant mapping and trend monitoring by real time and retrospective analysis. The IAEA is making concerted efforts to promote the practicaluse of nuclear and related analytical techniques in studies of non-radioactive environmental pollutants that may impact human health, and one of the main emphases is on studying air contaminants. The idea of organizing a workshop on biomonitoring atmospheric pollution arose during an IAEA Technical Co-operation Project on Monitoring of Trace Element Air Pollution, carried out at the Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), Portugal, with substantial technical support by the Interfaculty Reactor Institute (IRI) of the Delft University of Technology (TUDelft), Netherlands. The International Workshop on Biomonitoring of Atmospheric Pollution (With Emphasis on Trace Elements) - BioMAP, was held in Lisbon, Portugal, from 21 to 24 September 1997. The meeting was organized in co-operation with the Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear.

  3. Accelerated cyclic corrosion tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prošek T.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated corrosion testing is indispensable for material selection, quality control and both initial and residual life time prediction for bare and painted metallic, polymeric, adhesive and other materials in atmospheric exposure conditions. The best known Neutral Salt Spray (NSS test provides unrealistic conditions and poor correlation to exposures in atmosphere. Modern cyclic accelerated corrosion tests include intermittent salt spray, wet and dry phases and eventually other technical phases. They are able to predict the material performance in service more correctly as documented on several examples. The use of NSS should thus be restricted for quality control.

  4. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  5. Durability of bare and anodised aluminium in atmosphere of very different corrosivities I. Bare aluminium; Durabilidad del aluminio desnudo y anodizado en atmosferas de muy diferentes corrosividades. I. Aluminio desnudo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Escudero, E.; Lopez, V.; Simancas, J.; Morcillo, M.

    2004-07-01

    The behaviour of bare aluminium is studied in atmospheric exposure at 11 natural testing stations with salinity levels ranging between 2.1 and 684 mg Cl''- m''-2 d''-1. In atmospheres of low or moderate aggressivity aluminium behaves as a passive material, though the insignificant corrosion that is produced is sufficient to spoil its appearance. In contrast, at salinity levels of 50 mg Cl''- m''-2 ''-1 or above, aluminium is susceptible to pitting corrosion even in the first year of atmospheric exposure, or in the second year at salinities of {<=} 10 mg Cl''- m''-2 d''-1. For comparative purposes, results are included for aluminium protected with an anodic film of 28 {mu}m thickness exposed at the same testing stations. A 28 {mu}m anodic film, correctly sealed, prevents the risk of localised corrosion even in the most unfavourable situations. (Author) 23 refs.

  6. Evaluation of atmospheric corrections on hyperspectral data with special reference to mineral mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Rani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral images have wide applications in the fields of geology, mineral exploration, agriculture, forestry and environmental studies etc. due to their narrow band width with numerous channels. However, these images commonly suffer from atmospheric effects, thereby limiting their use. In such a situation, atmospheric correction becomes a necessary pre-requisite for any further processing and accurate interpretation of spectra of different surface materials/objects. In the present study, two very advance atmospheric approaches i.e. QUAC and FLAASH have been applied on the hyperspectral remote sensing imagery. The spectra of vegetation, man-made structure and different minerals from the Gadag area of Karnataka, were extracted from the raw image and also from the QUAC and FLAASH corrected images. These spectra were compared among themselves and also with the existing USGS and JHU spectral library. FLAASH is rigorous atmospheric algorithm and requires various parameters to perform but it has capability to compensate the effects of atmospheric absorption. These absorption curves in any spectra play an important role in identification of the compositions. Therefore, the presence of unwanted absorption features can lead to wrong interpretation and identification of mineral composition. FLAASH also has an advantage of spectral polishing which provides smooth spectral curves which helps in accurate identification of composition of minerals. Therefore, this study recommends that FLAASH is better than QUAC for atmospheric correction and correct interpretation and identification of composition of any object or minerals.

  7. Corrosion of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.J.; Adolphson, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of beryllium in aqueous and elevated-temperature oxidizing environments has been extensively studied for early-intended use of beryllium in nuclear reactors and in jet and rocket propulsion systems. Since that time, beryllium has been used as a structural material in les corrosive environments. Its primary applications include gyro systems, mirror and reentry vehicle structures, and aircraft brakes. Only a small amount of information has been published that is directly related to the evaluation of beryllium for service in the less severe or normal atmospheric environments associated with these applications. Despite the lack of published data on the corrosion of beryllium in atmospheric environments, much can be deduced about its corrosion behavior from studies of aqueous corrosion and the experiences of fabricators and users in applying, handling, processing, storing, and shipping beryllium components. The methods of corrosion protection implemented to resist water and high-temperature gaseous environments provide useful information on methods that can be applied to protect beryllium for service in future long-term structural applications

  8. Electrochemical properties of corrosion products formed on Zn-Mg, Zn-Al and Zn-Al-Mg coatings in model atmospheric conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stoulil, J.; Prošek, T.; Nazarov, A.; Oswald, Jiří; Kříž, P.; Thierry, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 8 (2015), s. 777-782 ISSN 0947-5117 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : corrosion products * electrochemical properties * zinc coating Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.450, year: 2015

  9. Corrosion engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book emphasizes the engineering approach to handling corrosion. It presents corrosion data by corrosives or environments rather than by materials. It discusses the corrosion engineering of noble metals, ''exotic'' metals, non-metallics, coatings, mechanical properties, and corrosion testing, as well as modern concepts. New sections have been added on fracture mechanics, laser alloying, nuclear waste isolation, solar energy, geothermal energy, and the Statue of Liberty. Special isocorrosion charts, developed by the author, are introduced as a quick way to look at candidates for a particular corrosive.

  10. Corrosion processes and coalification of ferrtic-martensitic steels in H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} atmospheres; Korrosionsprozesse und Aufkohlung von ferritisch-martensitischen Staehlen in H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} Atmosphaeren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huenert, Daniela

    2010-09-20

    The dissertation desribes the corrosion of steels with chromium concentrations of 1-12 percent in H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} atmospheres at variable pressure in the temperature range of 500-650 C and shows the corresponding degree of coalification. The investigations were carried out in a specially constructed corrosion unit which enables simulations of the power plant conditions temperature, pressure, gas composition, and gas flow rate. Above 575 C, the experimentally measured corrosion rates decrease, similar to those in hydrogen. Below 575 C, higher corrosion rates are observed in H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} atmospheres than in hydrogen, which is assumed to be the result of chromium fixation by the carbon formed in the corrosion process and of the existence of wuestite below this temperature. Below 600 C, temperature and pressure act independently of each other. Investigations between 600 and 625 C showed that pressure and temperature are not independent parameters with regard to oxide layer growth. The combined effect of these parameters results in higher corrosion rates and coalification depths. The dissertation describes this higher corrosion rate and coalification depth by an enhanced transport model. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde das Korrosionsverhalten an Stahlqualitaeten mit Chromgehalten zwischen 1 und 12 % in H{sub 2}O-CO-2-Atmosphaeren bei unterschiedlichem Druck im Temperaturbereich von 500 bis 650 C dargestellt und die parallel erfolgende Aufkohlung gezeigt. Fuer die Untersuchungen wurde eine Korrosionsanlage aufgebaut, welche die Simulation der Kraftwerksbedingungen Temperatur, Druck und Gaszusammensetzung und -geschwindigkeit erlaubt. Die experimentell bestimmten Korrosionsraten sind oberhalb von 575 C vergleichbar mit denen in Wasserdampf. Unterhalb von 575 C werden hoehere Korrosionsraten in H2O-CO2- Atmosphaeren beobachtet als in Wasserdampf, was als Folge der Fixierung des Chroms durch den waehrend des Korrosionsprozesses gebildeten

  11. The Boston Methane Project: Mapping Surface Emissions to Inform Atmospheric Estimation of Urban Methane Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, N.; Crosson, E.; Down, A.; Hutyra, L.; Jackson, R. B.; McKain, K.; Rella, C.; Raciti, S. M.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Lost and unaccounted natural gas can amount to over 6% of Massachusetts' total annual greenhouse gas inventory (expressed as equivalent CO2 tonnage). An unknown portion of this loss is due to natural gas leaks in pipeline distribution systems. The objective of the Boston Methane Project is to estimate the overall leak rate from natural gas systems in metropolitan Boston, and to compare this flux with fluxes from the other primary methane emissions sources. Companion talks at this meeting describe the atmospheric measurement and modeling framework, and chemical and isotopic tracers that can partition total atmospheric methane flux into natural gas and non-natural gas components. This talk focuses on estimation of surface emissions that inform the atmospheric modeling and partitioning. These surface emissions include over 3,300 pipeline natural gas leaks in Boston. For the state of Massachusetts as a whole, the amount of natural gas reported as lost and unaccounted for by utility companies was greater than estimated landfill emissions by an order of magnitude. Moreover, these landfill emissions were overwhelmingly located outside of metro Boston, while gas leaks are concentrated in exactly the opposite pattern, increasing from suburban Boston toward the urban core. Work is in progress to estimate spatial distribution of methane emissions from wetlands and sewer systems. We conclude with a description of how these spatial data sets will be combined and represented for application in atmospheric modeling.

  12. Mapping Light Atmosphere - Seen through the Danish interior Design magazine BO BEDRE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup; Thuesen, Niels; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide information on Danish lighting trends. The agenda is to present a method for documenting sensory qualities of light, which are often described as subjective preferences and not documentable. The impacts of light on the atmosphere are discussed against sociocul...

  13. Mapping weathering and corrosion damage on biological treatment plants; Kartlaeggning av vittrings- och korrosionsskador paa biologiska behandlingsanlaeggningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boubitsas, Dimitrios; Aakesson, Urban (Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Institute, CBI, Stockholm (Sweden)); Hellstroem, Hanna; Henriksson, Gunilla (Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    Problems regarding that leachate from food waste have been corroding vehicles and concrete slabs has been reported by Biogas- and composting plants. The results from this project show that concrete doesn't have enough resistance in these environments where food waste is treated. No matter which quality of concrete is put in use these problems will occur, though in different speeds. To ensure the function of the concrete construction, the concrete must be protected with a sealing coat. These sealing coats must be able to endure the aggressive nature from leachate coming from food waste and be resistant to mechanical abrasion from vehicles. In the report several seal coatings are shown that have been used for solving measures. Some of these have worked, while others didn't work as well. To be able to ensure the function within the different seal coatings they have to be tested in 'their proper' environment considering the chemical temperature and composition of the leachate. There are no standard methods to perform this, they have to be developed. There are plans for a new study where you bring out specific demands and standard methods for seal coats in food waste environments. Corrosion problems also occur on gathering vehicles for food waste and mechanic equipment at treatment plants, it is desired also to deal with these issues and a study is recommended regarding the influence from food waste on metal materials that are in contact with food waste

  14. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  15. Atmospheric Propagation Modeling Indicates Homing Pigeons use Loft-Specific Infrasonic 'Map' Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrum, J. T.; Baker, L. M.; Spritzer, J. M.; McKenna, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Pigeons (Columba livia) released at distant sites commonly depart in directions significantly off the actual homeward bearing. Such site-dependent deviations, or biases, for birds from a given loft are generally stable over time, but can also change from hour to hour, day to day, and year to year. At some release sites, birds consistently vanish in random directions and have longer flight times and lower return rates. Release sites characterized by frequent disorientation are not uncommon for pigeon lofts in both Europe and the USA. One such site is the Jersey Hill fire tower in upstate New York located ~120 km W of the Cornell loft in Ithaca. Cornell birds released at Jersey Hill between 1968 and 1987 almost always vanished randomly, although birds from other lofts had little difficulty orienting there. The results for one day, however, stand out: on August 13, 1969, Cornell birds released at Jersey Hill vanished consistently to the NE (r = 0.921; n=7) and returned home after normal flight times. Cornell pigeons released the next day again showed 'normal' behavior for the site and departed randomly. If, in fact, the birds are using acoustic cues to navigate, the long-term acoustic 'dead' zone we propose for Jersey Hill, due to prevailing atmospheric conditions, indicates that the cues are coming from a single, relatively restricted area, most likely surrounding the home loft. We have modeled the transmission of infrasonic waves, presumably coupled to the atmosphere from ocean-generated microseisms (0.14 Hz), between the Cornell loft and a number of release sites using HARPA (Hamiltonian Acoustic Ray-tracing Program for the Atmosphere) and rawinsonde data collected near Albany and Buffalo, NY. The HARPA modeling shows that acoustic signals from the Cornell loft reached Jersey Hill only on a few release days with unusual atmospheric conditions, including August 13, and were launched at angles less than ~2° above horizontal, most likely from steep-sided terrain in

  16. The Middle Atmosphere Program: Winter In Northern Europe (MAP/WINE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonzahn, U.

    1982-04-01

    The goals of map/wind (winter in Northern Europe) are to better understand: (1) the interaction of planetary waves of tropospheric origin; (2) the temporal and spatial development of sudden stratospheric warmings; (3) the temporal and spatial development of mesospheric cooling events in conjunction with stratospheric warmings; (4) the vertical and horizontal transport of minor constituents; (5) the effects on the chemistry of neutral and charged species of the large temperature changes occurring during stratospheric warmings and mesospheric cooling; (6) sources of turbulent energy; (7) the temporal and spatial development of turbulent layers; and (8) the contributions of dynamical processes to the heating and cooling of the mesospheric and turbopause region.

  17. Mapping the spatial distribution of global anthropogenic mercury atmospheric emission inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Simon J.; Steenhuisen, Frits; Pacyna, Jozef M.; Pacyna, Elisabeth G.

    This paper describes the procedures employed to spatially distribute global inventories of anthropogenic emissions of mercury to the atmosphere, prepared by Pacyna, E.G., Pacyna, J.M., Steenhuisen, F., Wilson, S. [2006. Global anthropogenic mercury emission inventory for 2000. Atmospheric Environment, this issue, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2006.03.041], and briefly discusses the results of this work. A new spatially distributed global emission inventory for the (nominal) year 2000, and a revised version of the 1995 inventory are presented. Emissions estimates for total mercury and major species groups are distributed within latitude/longitude-based grids with a resolution of 1×1 and 0.5×0.5°. A key component in the spatial distribution procedure is the use of population distribution as a surrogate parameter to distribute emissions from sources that cannot be accurately geographically located. In this connection, new gridded population datasets were prepared, based on the CEISIN GPW3 datasets (CIESIN, 2004. Gridded Population of the World (GPW), Version 3. Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), Columbia University and Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT). GPW3 data are available at http://beta.sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/gpw/index.jsp). The spatially distributed emissions inventories and population datasets prepared in the course of this work are available on the Internet at www.amap.no/Resources/HgEmissions/

  18. Atmospheric corrosion effects on copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franey, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Studies have been performed on the naturally formed patina on various copper samples. Samples have been obtained from structures at AT and T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (40,2,1 and <1 yr) and the Statue of Liberty (100 yr). The samples show a distinct layering effect, that is, the copper base material shows separate oxide and basic sulfate layers on all samples, indicating that patina is not a homogeneous mixture of oxides and basic sulfates

  19. Atmospheric Rawinsonde and Pigeon Release Data Implicate Infrasound as the Long- Range Map Cue in Avian Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrum, J. T.

    2007-12-01

    Pigeons ( Columba livia) and other birds released from distant familiar and unfamiliar sites generally head in the homeward (loft) direction, but often vanish from view or radio contact consistently off the exact homeward bearing. At some sites the deviation can be a significant and stable amount, while at other sites birds can appear to become completely lost and depart in random directions. These deviations or biases can change from hour to hour, day to day, and year to year, but have not, over the last ~50 years of intensive research, been related to any atmospheric factor. They are, however, still considered to reflect significant irregularities in the pigeons' "map" function. Celestial and geomagnetic "compasses" have been shown to orient avian flight, but how pigeons determine their location in order to select the correct homeward bearing remains controversial. At present the debate is primarily between workers advocating an olfactory "map" and those advocating variations in the direction and intensity of the geomagnetic field as map functions. Alternatively, infrasonic cues can travel 1000s of km in the atmosphere with little attenuation, and can be detected in the laboratory by pigeons at frequencies down to 0.05 Hz. Although infrasound has been considered as a navigational tool for homing and migratory birds, little supporting evidence of its use has been found. Infrasonic ray paths in the atmosphere are controlled primarily by temperature and secondarily by wind. Assuming birds use infrasonic cues, atmospheric conditions could cause the perplexing changes (both geographic and temporal) observed in the mean vanishing bearings (MVBs) of pigeons released from experimental sites. To test for correlations between MVBs and tropospheric conditions, release data collected by the late W.T. Keeton between 1968 and 1980 from around the Cornell University lofts in upstate NY are compared to rawinsonde data from stations near Buffalo and Albany. For example, birds

  20. Corrosion of nickel and stainless steels in concentrated lithium hydroxide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graydon, J.W.; Kirk, D.W.

    1990-06-01

    The corrosion behaviour of four alloys in 3 and 5 mol/L lithium hydroxide solutions under a hydrogen atmosphere at 95 degrees C was investigated. Corrosion of Nickel 200 and the stainless steels 316, 316L, and E-Brite 26-1 was assessed in two sets of immersion tests lasting 10 and 136 days. Corrosion rates were determined by weight loss, susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking was evaluated using U-bends, and the details of the corrosion process were studied on specimens with a mirror finish using light and electron microscopy, x-ray spectrometry and mapping, and x-ray diffraction. The long term corrosion rates were low for all alloys ( 2 , β-LiFeO 2 , and a very iron-rich β-LiFe 5 0 8 . The passivating layer on the nickel was Ni(OH) 2 . The underlying metal corroded evenly except for the 316 stainless steels. These showed a uniform intergranular corrosion with minor drop-out of smaller grains likely because of segregation of impurities to the grain boundaries. The walls of these intergranular crevices were covered with a passivating layer of chromium oxide. (8 figs., 5 tabs., 11 refs.)

  1. Use of Fourier transforms for asynoptic mapping: Applications to the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite microwave limb sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, Lee S.; Froidevaux, Lucien

    1993-01-01

    Fourier analysis has been applied to data obtained from limb viewing instruments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. A coordinate system rotation facilitates the efficient computation of Fourier transforms in the temporal and longitudinal domains. Fields such as ozone (O3), chlorine monoxide (ClO), temperature, and water vapor have been transformed by this process. The transforms have been inverted to provide maps of these quantities at selected times, providing a method of accurate time interpolation. Maps obtained by this process show evidence of both horizontal and vertical transport of important trace species such as O3 and ClO. An examination of the polar regions indicates that large-scale planetary variations are likely to play a significant role in transporting midstratospheric O3 into the polar regions. There is also evidence that downward transport occurs, providing a means of moving O3 into the polar vortex at lower altitudes. The transforms themselves show the structure and propagation characteristics of wave variations.

  2. Mapping land water and energy balance relations through conditional sampling of remote sensing estimates of atmospheric forcing and surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Leila; Entekhabi, Dara; Salvucci, Guido

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop and apply a mapping estimation capability for key unknown parameters that link the surface water and energy balance equations. The method is applied to the Gourma region in West Africa. The accuracy of the estimation method at point scale was previously examined using flux tower data. In this study, the capability is scaled to be applicable with remotely sensed data products and hence allow mapping. Parameters of the system are estimated through a process that links atmospheric forcing (precipitation and incident radiation), surface states, and unknown parameters. Based on conditional averaging of land surface temperature and moisture states, respectively, a single objective function is posed that measures moisture and temperature-dependent errors solely in terms of observed forcings and surface states. This objective function is minimized with respect to parameters to identify evapotranspiration and drainage models and estimate water and energy balance flux components. The uncertainty of the estimated parameters (and associated statistical confidence limits) is obtained through the inverse of Hessian of the objective function, which is an approximation of the covariance matrix. This calibration-free method is applied to the mesoscale region of Gourma in West Africa using multiplatform remote sensing data. The retrievals are verified against tower-flux field site data and physiographic characteristics of the region. The focus is to find the functional form of the evaporative fraction dependence on soil moisture, a key closure function for surface and subsurface heat and moisture dynamics, using remote sensing data.

  3. Characterization of Corrosion Products on Carbon Steel Exposed to Natural Weathering and to Accelerated Corrosion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Altobelli Antunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to compare the corrosion products formed on carbon steel plates submitted to atmospheric corrosion in urban and industrial atmospheres with those formed after accelerated corrosion tests. The corrosion products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The specimens were exposed to natural weathering in both atmospheres for nine months. The morphologies of the corrosion products were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The main product found was lepidocrocite. Goethite and magnetite were also found on the corroded specimens but in lower concentrations. The results showed that the accelerated test based on the ASTM B117 procedure presented poor correlation with the atmospheric corrosion tests whereas an alternated fog/dry cycle combined with UV radiation exposure provided better correlation.

  4. Use of regression‐based models to map sensitivity of aquatic resources to atmospheric deposition in Yosemite National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Nanus, Leora; Huggett, Brian

    2010-01-01

    An abundance of exposed bedrock, sparse soil and vegetation, and fast hydrologic flushing rates make aquatic ecosystems in Yosemite National Park susceptible to nutrient enrichment and episodic acidification due to atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S). In this study, multiple linear regression (MLR) models were created to estimate fall‐season nitrate and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in surface water in Yosemite wilderness. Input data included estimated winter N deposition, fall‐season surface‐water chemistry measurements at 52 sites, and basin characteristics derived from geographic information system layers of topography, geology, and vegetation. The MLR models accounted for 84% and 70% of the variance in surface‐water nitrate and ANC, respectively. Explanatory variables (and the sign of their coefficients) for nitrate included elevation (positive) and the abundance of neoglacial and talus deposits (positive), unvegetated terrain (positive), alluvium (negative), and riparian (negative) areas in the basins. Explanatory variables for ANC included basin area (positive) and the abundance of metamorphic rocks (positive), unvegetated terrain (negative), water (negative), and winter N deposition (negative) in the basins. The MLR equations were applied to 1407 stream reaches delineated in the National Hydrography Data Set for Yosemite, and maps of predicted surface‐water nitrate and ANC concentrations were created. Predicted surface‐water nitrate concentrations were highest in small, high‐elevation cirques, and concentrations declined downstream. Predicted ANC concentrations showed the opposite pattern, except in high‐elevation areas underlain by metamorphic rocks along the Sierran Crest, which had relatively high predicted ANC (>200 μeq L−1). Maps were created to show where basin characteristics predispose aquatic resources to nutrient enrichment and acidification effects from N and S deposition. The maps can be used to help guide

  5. Use of regression-based models to map sensitivity of aquatic resources to atmospheric deposition in Yosemite National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, D. W.; Nanus, L.; Huggett, B. W.

    2010-12-01

    An abundance of exposed bedrock, sparse soil and vegetation, and fast hydrologic flushing rates make aquatic ecosystems in Yosemite National Park susceptible to nutrient enrichment and episodic acidification due to atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S). In this study, multiple-linear regression (MLR) models were created to estimate fall-season nitrate and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in surface water in Yosemite wilderness. Input data included estimated winter N deposition, fall-season surface-water chemistry measurements at 52 sites, and basin characteristics derived from geographic information system layers of topography, geology, and vegetation. The MLR models accounted for 84% and 70% of the variance in surface-water nitrate and ANC, respectively. Explanatory variables (and the sign of their coefficients) for nitrate included elevation (positive) and the abundance of neoglacial and talus deposits (positive), unvegetated terrain (positive), alluvium (negative), and riparian (negative) areas in the basins. Explanatory variables for ANC included basin area (positive) and the abundance of metamorphic rocks (positive), unvegetated terrain (negative), water (negative), and winter N deposition (negative) in the basins. The MLR equations were applied to 1407 stream reaches delineated in the National Hydrography Dataset for Yosemite, and maps of predicted surface-water nitrate and ANC concentrations were created. Predicted surface-water nitrate concentrations were highest in small, high-elevation cirques, and concentrations declined downstream. Predicted ANC concentrations showed the opposite pattern, except in high-elevation areas underlain by metamorphic rocks along the Sierran Crest, which had relatively high predicted ANC (>200 µeq L-1). Maps were created to show where basin characteristics predispose aquatic resources to nutrient enrichment and acidification effects from N and S deposition. The maps can be used to help guide development of

  6. Biomonitoring of atmospheric pollution (with emphasis on trace elements) - BioMap II. Proceedings of an international workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    Certain types of organisms integrate pollution over time, reducing the need for continuous chemical monitoring, thus avoiding the difficulty of interpreting 'snapshot' measurements and offering the potential of retrospective monitoring. Such organisms enrich the substance to be determined so that the analytical accessibility is improved and the measurement uncertainty reduced. By observing and measuring the changes in an appropriately selected organism, a conclusion as to the kind of pollution, its source, and its intensity can be drawn. The IAEA is making concerted efforts to promote the practical use of nuclear and related analytical techniques in studies of non-radioactive environmental pollutants that may impact on human health, and one of the main emphasis is on studying air contaminants. The IAEA has been systematically supporting biomonitoring atmospheric pollution for 10 years in the framework of its project on Environmental Pollution Monitoring and Research Using Nuclear and Related Analytical Techniques. The objective of this project is to identify the source and evaluate the fate of key non-radioactive environmental contaminants and provide the basis for improved health for human populations. The project has been implemented through a Coordinated Research Project on Validation and Application of Plants as Biomonitors of Trace Element Atmospheric Pollution Analysed by Nuclear and Related Techniques, several technical co-operation projects, and some dedicated analytical quality control activities. Within the scope of these efforts, the Second International Workshop on Biomonitoring of Atmospheric Pollution (with Emphasis on Trace Elements) - BioMAP, was organized as a follow-up to the 1997 BioMAP workshop held in Lisbon, Portugal. The proceedings of the first workshop were published in IAEA-TECDOC-1152. The second workshop was held in Praia da Vitoria, Azores Islands, Portugal, from 28 August to 3 September 2000. It was organized in co-operation with the

  7. Biomonitoring of atmospheric pollution (with emphasis on trace elements) - BioMap II. Proceedings of an international workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Certain types of organisms integrate pollution over time, reducing the need for continuous chemical monitoring, thus avoiding the difficulty of interpreting 'snapshot' measurements and offering the potential of retrospective monitoring. Such organisms enrich the substance to be determined so that the analytical accessibility is improved and the measurement uncertainty reduced. By observing and measuring the changes in an appropriately selected organism, a conclusion as to the kind of pollution, its source, and its intensity can be drawn. The IAEA is making concerted efforts to promote the practical use of nuclear and related analytical techniques in studies of non-radioactive environmental pollutants that may impact on human health, and one of the main emphasis is on studying air contaminants. The IAEA has been systematically supporting biomonitoring atmospheric pollution for 10 years in the framework of its project on Environmental Pollution Monitoring and Research Using Nuclear and Related Analytical Techniques. The objective of this project is to identify the source and evaluate the fate of key non-radioactive environmental contaminants and provide the basis for improved health for human populations. The project has been implemented through a Coordinated Research Project on Validation and Application of Plants as Biomonitors of Trace Element Atmospheric Pollution Analysed by Nuclear and Related Techniques, several technical co-operation projects, and some dedicated analytical quality control activities. Within the scope of these efforts, the Second International Workshop on Biomonitoring of Atmospheric Pollution (with Emphasis on Trace Elements) - BioMAP, was organized as a follow-up to the 1997 BioMAP workshop held in Lisbon, Portugal. The proceedings of the first workshop were published in IAEA-TECDOC-1152. The second workshop was held in Praia da Vitoria, Azores Islands, Portugal, from 28 August to 3 September 2000. It was organized in co-operation with the

  8. Effect of flue gas composition on deposit induced high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions mimicking biomass firing. Part II: Exposures in SO2 containing atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kiamehr, Saeed; Montgomery, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    SO2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-rayspectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques werecomplimentarily applied to characterize the resulting corrosion products. Apartially molten K2SO4-layer formed on KCl coated specimens, and corrosionresulted in localized......In biomass fired power plants, the fast corrosion of superheaters is facilitatedby the presence of corrosive flue gas species, for example, SO2, which arereleased during combustion. To understand the role of the gas species on thecorrosion process, comparative laboratory exposures of deposit (KCl......)-coatedand deposit-free austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG) samples to gas mixturescontaining SO2 was carried out, under conditions relevant to biomass-firing.Exposures were conducted isothermally at 560 8C for 72 h, in oxidizingsulphidizing,and oxidizing-sulphidizing-chlorinating gas mixtures containing60 ppmv...

  9. Airborne mapping of Seoul's atmosphere: Trace gas measurements from GeoTASO during KORUS-AQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowlan, C. R.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Castellanos, P.; Chance, K.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Janz, S. J.; Judd, L.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Liu, X.

    2017-12-01

    The Geostationary Trace gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GeoTASO) instrument is a pushbroom airborne remote sensing instrument capable of making measurements of air quality and ocean color using backscattered UV and visible light. GeoTASO is an airborne test-bed for the upcoming Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) and Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) geostationary satellite missions, which will measure air quality over North America and Asia, respectively. GeoTASO also acts as a satellite analogue during field campaigns. GeoTASO flew on the NASA Langley Research Center UC-12 aircraft during the Korea-United States Air Quality Study in May-June 2016, collecting spectra over South Korea during 30 flights over 19 flight days. These observations can be used to derive 2-D maps of tropospheric trace gases including ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, nitrous acid and glyoxal below the aircraft at spatial resolutions between 250 m x 250 m and 1 km x 1 km, depending on the gas. We present spatially resolved trace gas retrievals over Seoul and its surrounding industrial regions, and comparisons with correlative satellite and campaign data.

  10. Corrosion mapping in ducts using the automated ultrasonic technique C-Scan - correlation with results given by pig inspection; Mapeamento de corrosao em dutos atraves da tecnica ultrassonica C-Scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feres Filho, Pedro; Moura, Nestor Carlos de [Physical Acoustics South America (PASA), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    In-service inspection has received diverse contributions from technologies and documents with the objective of maximizing equipment availability and minimizing inadequate repairs. Amongst the available technologies, there are the automated ultrasound tests, in the B and C-scan versions. This paper describes an evaluation methodology based on the correlation between the test techniques of instrumented electromagnetic PIG and automated ultrasound, both applied with the purpose of detecting and mapping areas with corrosion in pipes for oil transport. The main objective of the application of the C-scan methodology, in this case, was the measuring and detailing of the corroded area, thus providing an adequate maintenance plan through the substitution or installation of a double gutter. The result demonstrates the correlation between the measurements taken by the PIG and the sizing of the regions done using the C-scan method, consisting of the length, width and thickness values in the points affected by the corrosion. (author)

  11. Corrosion '98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What's All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO 2 Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  12. The atmospheric corrosion, important technical and economic factor in the construction of nuclear power plants; La corrosion atmosferica, factor de importancia tecnico-economica en la construccion de centrales electronucleares (CEN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, R. [Agencia de Energia Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba); Diaz, J.; Gomez, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Quimicas (Cuba); Rodriguez, J. [MINBAS (Cuba). Direccion de Centrales Nucleares; Galeano, N. [ECM-10 (Cuba)

    1995-12-31

    In order to determine the atmospheric effects of the construction of the Juragua NPP some experiments were performed in the reactor site. Samples of carbon steel were placed in experimental stations and the consequent oxidation was measured. The results show that the region`s atmosphere aggressiveness may be classified from low to median. 11 refs.

  13. Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  14. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in North America. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the highly corrosive hydrochloric acid (HCl) generated by the solid rocket boosters (SRBs). Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion. The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. NASA has over fifty years of experience dealing with unexpected failures caused by corrosion and has developed expertise in corrosion control in the launch and other environments. The Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC evolved, from what started as an atmospheric exposure test site near NASAs launch pads, into a capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA, external partners, and customers.This paper provides a chronological overview of NASAs role in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion in highly corrosive environments. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  15. Mapping the Galvanic Corrosion of Three Metals Coupled with a Wire Beam Electrode: The Influence of Temperature and Relative Geometrical Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-Fei; Liu, Shu-Fa; Duan, Jin-Zhuo

    2018-01-01

    The local electrochemical properties of galvanic corrosion for three coupled metals in a desalination plant were investigated with three wire-beam electrodes as wire sensors: aluminum brass (HAl77-2), titanium (TA2), and 316L stainless steel (316L SS). These electrodes were used with artificial seawater at different temperatures. The potential and current–density distributions of the three-metal coupled system are inhomogeneous. The HAl77-2 wire anodes were corroded in the three-metal coupled system. The TA2 wires acted as cathodes and were protected; the 316L SS wires acted as secondary cathodes. The temperature and electrode arrangement have important effects on the galvanic corrosion of the three-metal coupled system. The corrosion current of the HAl77-2 increased with temperature indicating enhanced anode corrosion at higher temperature. In addition, the corrosion of HAl77-2 was more significant when the HAl77-2 wires were located in the middle of the coupled system than with the other two metal arrangement styles. PMID:29495617

  16. Mapping the Galvanic Corrosion of Three Metals Coupled with a Wire Beam Electrode: The Influence of Temperature and Relative Geometrical Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hong; Yang, Yuan-Feng; Liu, Yun-Fei; Liu, Shu-Fa; Duan, Jin-Zhuo; Li, Yan

    2018-02-28

    The local electrochemical properties of galvanic corrosion for three coupled metals in a desalination plant were investigated with three wire-beam electrodes as wire sensors: aluminum brass (HAl77-2), titanium (TA2), and 316L stainless steel (316L SS). These electrodes were used with artificial seawater at different temperatures. The potential and current-density distributions of the three-metal coupled system are inhomogeneous. The HAl77-2 wire anodes were corroded in the three-metal coupled system. The TA2 wires acted as cathodes and were protected; the 316L SS wires acted as secondary cathodes. The temperature and electrode arrangement have important effects on the galvanic corrosion of the three-metal coupled system. The corrosion current of the HAl77-2 increased with temperature indicating enhanced anode corrosion at higher temperature. In addition, the corrosion of HAl77-2 was more significant when the HAl77-2 wires were located in the middle of the coupled system than with the other two metal arrangement styles.

  17. Mapping the Galvanic Corrosion of Three Metals Coupled with a Wire Beam Electrode: The Influence of Temperature and Relative Geometrical Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ju

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The local electrochemical properties of galvanic corrosion for three coupled metals in a desalination plant were investigated with three wire-beam electrodes as wire sensors: aluminum brass (HAl77-2, titanium (TA2, and 316L stainless steel (316L SS. These electrodes were used with artificial seawater at different temperatures. The potential and current–density distributions of the three-metal coupled system are inhomogeneous. The HAl77-2 wire anodes were corroded in the three-metal coupled system. The TA2 wires acted as cathodes and were protected; the 316L SS wires acted as secondary cathodes. The temperature and electrode arrangement have important effects on the galvanic corrosion of the three-metal coupled system. The corrosion current of the HAl77-2 increased with temperature indicating enhanced anode corrosion at higher temperature. In addition, the corrosion of HAl77-2 was more significant when the HAl77-2 wires were located in the middle of the coupled system than with the other two metal arrangement styles.

  18. Determination of atmospheric parameters to estimate global radiation in areas of complex topography: Generation of global irradiation map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batlles, F.J.; Bosch, J.L. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Tovar-Pescador, J. [Dpto. Fisica, Universidad de Jaen, 23071 Jaen (Spain); Martinez-Durban, M. [Dpto. Ingenieria Lenguajes y Computacion, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Ortega, R. [Dpto. Edafologia y Quimica Agricola, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Miralles, I. [Dpto. Edafologia y Quimica Agricola, Universidad de Granada, 28071 Granada (Spain)

    2008-02-15

    Incoming shortwave solar radiation is an important parameter in environmental applications. A detailed spatial and temporal analysis of global solar radiation on the earth surface is needed in many applications, ranging from solar energy uses to the study of agricultural, forest and biological processes. At local scales, the topography is the most important factor in the distribution of solar radiation on the surface. The variability of the elevation, the surface orientation and the obstructions due to elevations are a source of great local differences in insolation and, consequently, in other variables as ground temperature. For this reason, several models based on GIS techniques have been recently developed, integrating topography to obtain the solar radiation on the surface. In this work, global radiation is analyzed with the Solar Analyst, a model implemented on ArcView, that computes the topographic parameters: altitude, latitude, slope and orientation (azimuth) and shadow effects. Solar Analyst uses as input parameters the diffuse fraction and the transmittance. These parameters are not usually available in radiometric networks in mountainous areas. In this work, a method to obtain both parameters from global radiation is proposed. Global radiation data obtained in two networks of radiometric stations is used: one located in Sierra Magina Natural Park (Spain) with 11 stations and another one located on the surroundings of Sierra Nevada Natural Park (Spain) with 14 stations. Daily solar irradiation is calculated from a digital terrain model (DTM), the daily diffuse fraction, K, and daily atmospheric transmittivity, {tau}. Results provided by the model have been compared with measured values. An overestimation for high elevations is observed, whereas low altitudes present underestimation. The best performance was also reported during summer months, and the worst results were obtained during winter. Finally, a yearly global solar irradiation map has been

  19. Corrosion in airframes

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    The introductory chapter provides a brief reference to the issue of corrosion and corrosion damage to aircraft structures. Depending on the nature and dimensions of this non uniformity, three different categories of corrosion are defined: uniform, selective and localized corrosion. The following chapters present the forms of corrosion that can occur in three defined categories of corrosion. Conditions that cause certain types of corrosion in various corrosive environments are discussed. Examp...

  20. Mapping the dominant regions of the phase space associated with c c ¯ production relevant for the prompt atmospheric neutrino flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Victor P.; Maciuła, Rafał; Pasechnik, Roman; Szczurek, Antoni

    2017-11-01

    We present a detailed mapping of the dominant kinematical domains contributing to the prompt atmospheric neutrino flux at high neutrino energies by studying their sensitivity to the cuts on several kinematical variables crucial for charm production in cosmic ray scattering in the atmosphere. This includes the maximal center-of-mass energy for proton-proton scattering, the longitudinal momentum fractions of partons in the projectile (cosmic ray) and target (nucleus of the atmosphere), the Feynman xF variable, and the transverse momentum of charm quark/antiquark. We find that the production of neutrinos with energies larger than Eν>107 GeV is particularly sensitive to the c.m. energies larger than the ones at the LHC and to the longitudinal momentum fractions in the projectile 10-8ranges beyond the reach of the current collider measurements.

  1. AEOLUS: A MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO CODE FOR MAPPING ULTRACOOL ATMOSPHERES. AN APPLICATION ON JUPITER AND BROWN DWARF HST LIGHT CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karalidi, Theodora; Apai, Dániel; Schneider, Glenn; Hanson, Jake R. [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Pasachoff, Jay M., E-mail: tkaralidi@email.arizona.edu [Hopkins Observatory, Williams College, 33 Lab Campus Drive, Williamstown, MA 01267 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    Deducing the cloud cover and its temporal evolution from the observed planetary spectra and phase curves can give us major insight into the atmospheric dynamics. In this paper, we present Aeolus, a Markov chain Monte Carlo code that maps the structure of brown dwarf and other ultracool atmospheres. We validated Aeolus on a set of unique Jupiter Hubble Space Telescope (HST) light curves. Aeolus accurately retrieves the properties of the major features of the Jovian atmosphere, such as the Great Red Spot and a major 5 μm hot spot. Aeolus is the first mapping code validated on actual observations of a giant planet over a full rotational period. For this study, we applied Aeolus to J- and H-band HST light curves of 2MASS J21392676+0220226 and 2MASS J0136565+093347. Aeolus retrieves three spots at the top of the atmosphere (per observational wavelength) of these two brown dwarfs, with a surface coverage of 21% ± 3% and 20.3% ± 1.5%, respectively. The Jupiter HST light curves will be publicly available via ADS/VIZIR.

  2. Integration of InfraMAP with Near-Real-Time Atmospheric Characterizations and Applications to Infrasound Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gibson, Robert

    2003-01-01

    .... Of particular interest herein is the recently developed capability to incorporate near-real-time atmospheric updates, such as the output from numerical weather prediction models, to supplement...

  3. Corrosion inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, A O

    1965-12-29

    An acid corrosion-inhibiting composition consists essentially of a sugar, and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of iodides and bromides. The weight ratio of the sugar to the alkali metal salt is between 2:1 and about 20,000:1. Also, a corrosion- inhibited phosphoric acid composition comprising at least about 20 wt% of phosphoric acid and between about 0.1 wt% and about 10 wt% of molasses, and between about 0.0005 wt% and about 1 wt% of potassium iodide. The weight ratio of molasses to iodide is greater than about 2:1. (11 claims)

  4. Hanford transuranic storage corrosion review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.; Divine, J.R.

    1980-12-01

    The rate of atmospheric corrosion of the transuranic (TRU) waste drums at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Project, near Richland, Washington, was evaluated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The rate of corrosion is principally contingent upon the effects of humidity, airborne pollutants, and temperature. Results of the study indicate that actual penetration of barrels due to atmospheric corrosion will probably not occur within the 20-year specified recovery period. Several other US burial sites were surveyed, and it appears that there is sufficient uncertainty in the available data to prevent a clearcut statement of the corrosion rate at a specific site. Laboratory and site tests are recommended before any definite conclusions can be made. The corrosion potential at the Hanford TRU waste site could be reduced by a combination of changes in drum materials (for example, using galvanized barrels instead of the currently used mild steel barrels), environmental exposure conditions (for example, covering the barrels in one of numerous possible ways), and storage conditions

  5. Corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ashry, El Sayed H.; El Nemr, Ahmed; Esawy, Sami A.; Ragab, Safaa

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition efficiencies of some triazole, oxadiazole and thiadiazole derivatives for steel in presence of acidic medium have been studied by using AM1, PM3, MINDO/3 and MNDO semi-empirical SCF molecular orbital methods. Geometric structures, total negative charge on the molecule (TNC), highest occupied molecular energy level (E HOMO ), lowest unoccupied molecular energy level (E LUMO ), core-core repulsion (CCR), dipole moment (μ) and linear solvation energy terms, molecular volume (V i ) and dipolar-polarization (π *), were correlated to corrosion inhibition efficiency. Four equations were proposed to calculate corrosion inhibition efficiency. The agreement with the experimental data was found to be satisfactory; the standard deviations between the calculated and experimental results ranged between ±0.03 and ±4.18. The inhibition efficiency was closely related to orbital energies (E HOMO and E LUMO ) and μ. The correlation between quantum parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency has been validated by single point calculations for the semi-empirical AM1 structures using B3LYP/6-31G** as a higher level of theory. The proposed equations were applied to predict the corrosion inhibition efficiency of some related structures to select molecules of possible activity from a presumable library of compounds

  6. Underground pipeline corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    Orazem, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines transporting liquid petroleum products and natural gas are critical components of civil infrastructure, making corrosion prevention an essential part of asset-protection strategy. Underground Pipeline Corrosion provides a basic understanding of the problems associated with corrosion detection and mitigation, and of the state of the art in corrosion prevention. The topics covered in part one include: basic principles for corrosion in underground pipelines, AC-induced corrosion of underground pipelines, significance of corrosion in onshore oil and gas pipelines, n

  7. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material that results from its interaction with the environment. The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the United States. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that were generated by the solid rocket boosters. Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion.The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. As a result of fifty years of experience with launch and ground operations in a natural marine environment that is highly corrosive, NASAs Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC is a major source of corrosion control expertise in the launch and other environments. Throughout its history, the Laboratory has evolved from what started as an atmospheric exposure facility near NASAs launch pads into a world-wide recognized capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA and external customers.This presentation will provide a historical overview of the role of NASAs Corrosion Technology in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  8. DYNAMO: a Mars upper atmosphere package for investigating solar wind interaction and escape processes, and mapping Martian fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chassefiere, E.; Nagy, A.; Mandea, M.

    2004-01-01

    DYNAMO is a small multi-instrument payload aimed at characterizing current atmospheric escape, which is still poorly constrained, and improving gravity and magnetic field representations, in order to better understand the magnetic, geologic and thermal history of Mars. The internal structure...... of periapsis 170 km), and in a lesser extent 2a, offers an unprecedented opportunity to investigate by in situ probing the chemical and dynamical properties of the deep ionosphere, thermosphere, and the interaction between the atmosphere and the solar wind, and therefore the present atmospheric escape rate...

  9. Aircraft Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    attribud au choix de traitements et de rev~tements spproprids. Au contrairo, dens d’sutros structures des corrosions iirportsntea se sont msnifestdes...au traitement . micaniqus qui provoque une compression de surface - h1l’spplication i1’une double protection comportant oxydation snodique et...chlore mais dans une proportion semblable b cells d’une eau de vil)e ; - lea solides, d’aprbs lea analyses chimique et criatallographique, paraissaiont

  10. A Mathematical Model of the Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP System for the Gas Transmission Rate of Fruit Produce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model to predict oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapour exchanges in non-perforated and micro-perforated modified atmosphere packaging films has successfully been proposed. The transmission rate of gases was measured for films with thickness of 0.03 and 0.05 mm, perforation diameters of 0.5 and 2.0 mm, and temperatures of 0, 10 and 20 °C. Under most conditions, the increase in temperature and perforation diameter increased the transmission rate of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapour, whereas the increase in film thickness decreased the transmission rate of the various gases. Validation of the proposed modified atmosphere packaging model was found to yield good prediction for gas concentrations and percentage losses in the mass of the produce after comparison with the experimental results of modified atmosphere packaging for tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum.

  11. Corrosion of Steel in Concrete, Part I – Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Møller, Per; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2006-01-01

    prematurely. Reinforcement corrosion is identified to be the foremost cause of deterioration. Steel in concrete is normally protected by a passive layer due the high alkalinity of the concrete pore solution; corrosion is initiated by neutralization through atmospheric carbon dioxide and by ingress...... of depassivation ions, especially chloride ions. The background and consequences of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures caused by steel corrosion are summarized. Selected corrosion mechanisms postulated in the literature are briefly discussed and related to observations. The key factors controlling...... initiation and propagation of corrosion of steel in concrete are outlined....

  12. Water side corrosion prevention in boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeid, A.

    1993-01-01

    Corrosion may be defined as a naturally occurring physical and chemical deterioration of a material due to reaction with the environment or surrounding atmosphere. In boilers the material is subjected on both sides to two different media which may cause severe corrosion. At the water side the content of O 2 considered one of the principal factors which determine the extent of corrosion in the boiler tubes. This paper deals with certain conditions that result in the increase of O 2 in the boiler water and hence increase the corrosion rate, to minimize the effect of these conditions a chemical treatment was carried out the results obtained indicated the success of the treatment procedure in corrosion prevention and boiler material protection. The treatment is traditional. But the study indicates how a simple mean could be applied to solve a serious problem. 4 tab

  13. Electrochemical evaluation of under-deposit corrosion and its inhibition using the wire beam electrode method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan Yongjun, E-mail: yj.tan@curtin.edu.a [Western Australian Corrosion Research Group, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth (Australia); Fwu, Young; Bhardwaj, Kriti [Western Australian Corrosion Research Group, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth (Australia)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: A new experiment method for evaluating under-deposit corrosion and its inhibitors. Under-deposit corrosion did not occur in a CO{sub 2} saturated pure brine solution. Inhibitor imidazoline addition and O{sub 2} contamination initiated under-deposit corrosion. Inhibitor imidazoline reduced general corrosion but enhanced localised corrosion. - Abstract: A new experimental method has been applied to evaluate under-deposit corrosion and its inhibition by means of an electrochemically integrated multi-electrode array, namely the wire beam electrode (WBE). Maps showing galvanic current and corrosion potential distributions were measured from a WBE surface that was partially covered by sand. Under-deposit corrosion did not occur during the exposure of the WBE to carbon dioxide saturated brine under ambient temperature. The introduction of corrosion inhibitor imidazoline and oxygen into the brine was found to significantly affect the patterns and rates of corrosion, leading to the initiation of under-deposit corrosion over the WBE.

  14. Development of 2-channel (532 nm and 355 nm) mobile LIDAR for mapping particulate matter in the atmosphere

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sivakumar, V

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors describe the developmentof 2-Channel (532 nm and 355 nm) mobile LIDAR system for studying atmospheric particulate matter. The system is currently tested in house at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research...

  15. corrosion problems and their relationship with the environment in the Colombian productive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arroyave P, Carlos E; Herrera B, Francisco J; Delgado L, Juan; Cuervo T, Joaquin

    1999-01-01

    As a part of a broad study on the corrosion problems in the Colombian industry, it was included an assessment of the effect of the main corrosive environments (atmosphere, soil, salad and drinking water, and chemicals), on materials stability. On the other hand, the impact of the corrosion processes on the environmental constituents (live species, atmosphere, soil, materials, and water) was also assessed. Main conclusions are: Atmosphere is the more extensively corrosive environment, and, all the environmental constituents are affected by corrosion without significant differences

  16. Corrosion technology. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book has been produced for dissemination of information on corrosion technology, corrosion hazards and its control. Chapter one of this book presents an overall view of the subject and chapter 2-5 deals with electrochemical basics, types of corrosion, pourbaix diagrams and form of corrosion. The author explains polarization/kinetics of corrosion, passivity, aqueous corrosion and corrosion testing and monitoring in 6-11 chapters. The author hopes it will provide incentive to all those interested in the corrosion technology. (A.B.)

  17. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO 2 corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  18. Task E container corrosion studies: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnell, L.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Topping, J.B.; Duncan, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting the Solid Waste Technology Support Program (SWTSP) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Task E is the Container Corrosion Study Portion of the SWTSP that will perform testing to provide defensible data on the corrosion of low-carbon steel, as used in drums to contain chemical and radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site. A second objective of Task E is to provide and test practical alternative materials that have higher corrosion resistance than low-carbon steel. The scope of work for fiscal year (FY) 1993 included initial testing of mild steel specimens buried in Hanford soils or exposed to atmospheric corrosion in metal storage sheds. During FY 1993, progress was made in three areas of Task E. First, exposure of test materials began at the Soil Corrosion Test Site where low-carbon steel specimens were placed in the soil in five test shafts at depths of 9 m (30 ft). Second, the corrosion measurement of low-carbon steel in the soil of two solid waste trenches continued. The total exposure time is ∼ 500 days. Third, an atmospheric corrosion test of low-carbon steel was put initiated in a metal shed (Building 2401-W) in the 200 West Area. This annual report describes the Task E efforts and provides a current status

  19. The detection and mapping of the spatial distribution of insect defense compounds by desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization Orbitrap mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Hanus, Robert; Vaikkinen, A.; Haapala, M.; Kauppila, T. J.; Kostiainen, R.; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 886, Jul 30 (2015), s. 91-97 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-25137P Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551204 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization * ambient mass spectrometry * insect chemical defense * exocrine glands * termite * stink bug Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.712, year: 2015

  20. Multistate atmospheric power production pollution study - MAP3S. Progress report for FY 1977 and FY 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacCracken, Michael C.; Ballantine, David S.

    1979-07-01

    Research progress on the transport, transformation, and fate of pollutants released by energy-related activities is summarized. Information is reported under the following section headings: power production emissions; non-power production emissions; measuring pollutants and their properties; regional pollutant distribution; transport; pollutant transformation; surface removal processes; wet removal processes; weather and climate modification; numerical modeling and analysis; special activities; and, MAP3S research directions. (JGB)

  1. THE CARMA PAIRED ANTENNA CALIBRATION SYSTEM: ATMOSPHERIC PHASE CORRECTION FOR MILLIMETER WAVE INTERFEROMETRY AND ITS APPLICATION TO MAPPING THE ULTRALUMINOUS GALAXY ARP 193

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauderer, B. Ashley; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Curley, Roger; Pound, Marc W.; Mundy, Lee G.; Teng, Stacy H.; Teuben, Peter J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Carpenter, John M. [California Institute of Technology, Department of Astronomy, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Peréz, Laura M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Lamb, James W.; Woody, David P.; Leitch, Erik M.; Muchovej, Stephen J.; Volgenau, Nikolaus H. [California Institute of Technology, Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Big Pine, CA 93513 (United States); Bock, Douglas C.-J. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia); Carlstrom, John E.; Culverhouse, Thomas L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Plambeck, Richard L. [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marrone, Daniel P. [Department of Astronomy, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

    2016-01-15

    Phase fluctuations introduced by the atmosphere are the main limiting factor in attaining diffraction limited performance in extended interferometric arrays at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. We report the results of C-PACS, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy Paired Antenna Calibration System. We present a systematic study of several hundred test observations taken during the 2009–2010 winter observing season where we utilize CARMA's eight 3.5 m antennas to monitor an atmospheric calibrator while simultaneously acquiring science observations with 6.1 and 10.4 m antennas on baselines ranging from a few hundred meters to ∼2 km. We find that C-PACS is systematically successful at improving coherence on long baselines under a variety of atmospheric conditions. We find that the angular separation between the atmospheric calibrator and target source is the most important consideration, with consistently successful phase correction at CARMA requiring a suitable calibrator located ≲6° away from the science target. We show that cloud cover does not affect the success of C-PACS. We demonstrate C-PACS in typical use by applying it to the observations of the nearby very luminous infrared galaxy Arp 193 in {sup 12}CO(2-1) at a linear resolution of ≈70 pc (0.″12 × 0.″18), 3 times better than previously published molecular maps of this galaxy. We resolve the molecular disk rotation kinematics and the molecular gas distribution and measure the gas surface densities and masses on 90 pc scales. We find that molecular gas constitutes ∼30% of the dynamical mass in the inner 700 pc of this object with a surface density ∼10{sup 4} M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −2}; we compare these properties to those of the starburst region of NGC 253.

  2. Measurement of reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures. Betonirakenteiden raudoituksen korroosion tutkiminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuronen, A

    1992-03-01

    Ageing and aggressive enviromental conditions of concrete structures will result in deterioration of concrete and corrosion of steel in concrete. Corrosion of steel will in time result in the end of the service life or expensive renovations, unless corrosion of steel is noticed and renovated in time. Corrosion of steel in concrete can be found out by the present corrosion measurement methods, so that renovation can be started in right time. The report presents mainly on the basis of the literature references the following corrosion measurement methods: polarisation resistance, AC-impedance, electrical resistance probe, electrochemical noice and half-cell potential mapping. The half-cell potential mapping will be presented more precisely than the other corrosion measurement methods, for the potential mapping is the most used method. Concrete and Soils Laboratory of Imatran Voima Oy uses in the measurement of reinforcement corrosion the English, eight channel potential measuring equipment.

  3. Measurement of reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures; Betonirakenteiden raudoituksen korroosion tutkiminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuronen, A

    1992-03-01

    Ageing and aggressive enviromental conditions of concrete structures will result in deterioration of concrete and corrosion of steel in concrete. Corrosion of steel will in time result in the end of the service life or expensive renovations, unless corrosion of steel is noticed and renovated in time. Corrosion of steel in concrete can be found out by the present corrosion measurement methods, so that renovation can be started in right time. The report presents mainly on the basis of the literature references the following corrosion measurement methods: polarisation resistance, AC-impedance, electrical resistance probe, electrochemical noice and half-cell potential mapping. The half-cell potential mapping will be presented more precisely than the other corrosion measurement methods, for the potential mapping is the most used method. Concrete and Soils Laboratory of Imatran Voima Oy uses in the measurement of reinforcement corrosion the English, eight channel potential measuring equipment.

  4. Factors and mechanisms affecting corrosion of steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehqanian, Ch.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic power plants possess reinforced concrete structures which are exposed to sea water or sea atmosphere. Sea water or its surrounding environment contain very corrosive species which cause corrosion of metal in concrete. It should be mentioned that corrosion of steel in concrete is a complex problem that is not completely understood. Some of the factors which influence the corrosion mechanism and can be related to the pore solution composition is discussed. Chloride ion caused problems are the main source of the corrosion damage seen on the reinforced concrete structures. Corrosion rate in concrete varies and depends on the way chloride ion diffuses into concrete. In addition, the associated cations can influence diffusion of chloride into concrete. The type of portland cement and also the concrete mix design all affect the corrosion behaviour of steel in concrete

  5. GCR dismantling: corrosion of vessel internals during decay storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, J.M.

    1991-06-01

    Gas-cooled reactor decommissioning confronts EDF with the problem of the corrosion resistance of vessel internals over a decay storage period fixed at 50 years. The layer of magnetite previously formed in the C0 2 should protect structural steelwork from atmospheric corrosion. In any case, estimated steel corrosion after 50 years may be put at below or equal to 0.1 mm and the corresponding swelling induced by corrosion products at 0.2 mm. There should be no risk of hydrogen embrittlement or stress corrosion cracking of threaded fasteners. Corrosion tests aimed at providing further insight into the effects of the magnetite layer and a program for the surveillance of post-decommissioning structural corrosion should nevertheless be envisaged

  6. Corrosion behaviour of metallic containers during long term interim storages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desgranges, C.; Feron, D.; Mazaudier, F.; Terlain, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two main corrosion phenomena are encountered in long term interim storage conditions: dry oxidation by the air when the temperature of high level nuclear wastes containers is high enough (roughly higher than 100 C) and corrosion phenomena as those encountered in outdoor atmospheric corrosion when the temperature of the container wall is low enough and so condensation is possible on the container walls. Results obtained with dry oxidation in air lead to predict small damages (less than 1μm on steels over 100 years at 100 C) and no drastic changes with pollutants. For atmospheric corrosion, first developments deal with a pragmatic method that gives assessments of the indoor atmospheric corrosivities. (author)

  7. Humid-air and aqueous corrosion models for corrosion-allowance barrier material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Atkins, J.E.; Andrews, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Humid-air and aqueous general and pitting corrosion models (including their uncertainties) for the carbon steel outer containment barrier were developed using the corrosion data from literature for a suite of cast irons and carbon steels which have similar corrosion behaviors to the outer barrier material. The corrosion data include the potential effects of various chemical species present in the testing environments. The atmospheric corrosion data also embed any effects of cyclic wetting and drying and salts that may form on the corroding specimen surface. The humid-air and aqueous general corrosion models are consistent in that the predicted humid-air general corrosion rates at relative humidities between 85 and 100% RH are close to the predicted aqueous general corrosion rates. Using the expected values of the model parameters, the model predicts that aqueous pitting corrosion is the most likely failure mode for the carbon steel outer barrier, and an earliest failure (or initial pit penetration) of the 100-mm thick barrier may occur as early as about 500 years if it is exposed continuously to an aqueous condition at between 60 and 70 degrees C

  8. Development of Copper Corrosion Products and Relation between Surface Appearance and Corrosion Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Tru, Nguyen Nhi; Yoshino, Tsujino; Yasuki, Maeda

    2008-01-01

    Copper was exposed unsheltered and sheltered in four humid tropical sites, representing urban, urban-industrial, urban-marine and rural environments. The corrosion rates and the sequence of corrosion product formation are presented and discussed in relation with climatic and atmospheric pollution parameters. Chemical compositions of corrosion products were found to depend on environments and duration of exposure. In all environments, cuprite was the predominating corrosion product that formed first and continuously increased during the exposure. Among the sulphur-containing corrosion products, posnjakite and brochantite were more frequently found and the first formed earlier. Nantokite was the most common chlorine-containing products for most cases, except the high-chloride environment, where atacamite was detected instead. The corrosion rate of copper was well indicated by the colour of patina. The red-purple colour corresponded to the high corrosion rate and the greenish grey colour corresponded to the low corrosion rate. Corrosion rate of sheltered copper in urban-marine environment increased with the exposure time

  9. Corrosion in the presence of a complexing agent - application to the continuous determination of hydrofluoric acid in the atmosphere; Corrosion en presence de complexant. - Application a la determination en continu de l'acide fluorhydrique dans l'atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapron, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France)

    1966-10-01

    After a presentation of the thermodynamics and kinetics involved during corrosion in the presence of a complexing agent, the first part of this report deals with the electrochemical properties of an aluminium electrode in the presence of fluoride solutions. Various physical and chemical parameters have been studied together with their influence on the aforementioned properties. From this first part are deduced the medium and the various parameters which lead to the maximum efficiency for the detection of fluorides by amperometry. The second part is an application of the results of the above work, which has made it possible to develop a cell having an original design. Its performances are described. They show that the cell has a greater sensitivity and a shorter response time than existing equipment. (author) [French] Apres un rappel sur la thermodynamique et la cinetique de la corrosion en presence de complexant, la premiere partie du memoire est consacree a l'etude des proprietes electrochimiques de l'electrode d'aluminium, en presence de solutions de fluorure. Differents parametres physiques et chimiques ont ete etudies ainsi que leurs influences sur les dites proprietes. De cette premiere partie on en a deduit le milieu et les divers parametres a fixer de facon a obtenir un rendement optimum au vue de la detection des fluorures par amperometrie. La deuxieme partie, qui est l'application des renseignements tires du travail deja cite, a permis de mettre au point une cellule de conception nouvelle. Ses performances sont decrites. Elles indiquent une sensibilite plus grande, un temps de reponse plus court que les appareils existants. (auteur)

  10. Corrosion behaviour of AZ91D and AM50 magnesium alloys with Nd and Gd additions in humid environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrabal, R., E-mail: raularrabal@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Matykina, E.; Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Paucar, K. [Gabinete de Corrosion, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica y Textil, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Cod. Postal 25, Lima (Peru); Mohedano, M.; Casajus, P. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloys with additions of Nd and Gd were exposed to high humidity atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The increase of Nd or Gd diminished the effect of micro-galvanic couples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion resistance of the AM50 alloy improved with the addition of Nd or Gd by 43%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nd and Gd had no significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the AZ91D alloy. - Abstract: AM50 and AZ91D alloys modified with rare earths (RE) were evaluated under atmospheric conditions. Nd and Gd additions resulted in formation of Al{sub 2}RE and Al-Mn-RE compounds and reduction of the fraction of {beta}-phase. According to surface potential maps, RE-containing intermetallics were more noble than the {beta}-phase, but less than Al-Mn inclusions. As a result, the action of micro-galvanic couples depended on the added amount of RE and the initial alloy microstructure. Nd or Gd additions improved the corrosion resistance of the AM50 alloy by up to 43%, but had no significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the AZ91D alloy.

  11. Corrosion behaviour of AZ91D and AM50 magnesium alloys with Nd and Gd additions in humid environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrabal, R.; Matykina, E.; Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Paucar, K.; Mohedano, M.; Casajús, P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mg alloys with additions of Nd and Gd were exposed to high humidity atmosphere. ► The increase of Nd or Gd diminished the effect of micro-galvanic couples. ► Corrosion resistance of the AM50 alloy improved with the addition of Nd or Gd by 43%. ► Nd and Gd had no significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the AZ91D alloy. - Abstract: AM50 and AZ91D alloys modified with rare earths (RE) were evaluated under atmospheric conditions. Nd and Gd additions resulted in formation of Al 2 RE and Al–Mn–RE compounds and reduction of the fraction of β-phase. According to surface potential maps, RE-containing intermetallics were more noble than the β-phase, but less than Al–Mn inclusions. As a result, the action of micro-galvanic couples depended on the added amount of RE and the initial alloy microstructure. Nd or Gd additions improved the corrosion resistance of the AM50 alloy by up to 43%, but had no significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the AZ91D alloy.

  12. Use of a Simple GIS-Based Model in Mapping the Atmospheric Concentration of γ-HCH in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Vizcaino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The state-of-the-art of atmospheric contaminant transport modeling provides accurate estimation of chemical concentrations. However, existing complex models, sophisticated in terms of process description and potentially highly accurate, may entail expensive setups and require very detailed input data. In contexts where detailed predictions are not needed (e.g., for regulatory risk assessment or life cycle impact assessment of chemicals, simple models allowing quick evaluation of contaminants may be preferable. The goal of this paper is to illustrate and critically discuss the use of a simple equation proposed by Pistocchi and Galmarini (2010, which can be implemented through basic GIS functions, to predict atmospheric concentrations of lindane (γ-HCH in Europe from both local and remote sources. Concentrations were computed for 1995 and 2005 assuming different modes of use of lindane and consequently different spatial patterns of emissions. Results were compared with those from the well-established MSCE-POP model (2005 developed within EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme, and with available monitoring data, showing acceptable correspondence in terms of the orders of magnitude and spatial distribution of concentrations, especially when the background effect of emissions from extracontinental sources, estimated using the same equation, is added to European emissions.

  13. The marine corrosion program developed by Nuclebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, P.A.P.; Quinan, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    A marine corrosion program is being developed by NUCLEBRAS and NUCLEN. This program consists in carrying out non-accelerated experiments in marine atmosphere, with immersion in sewater and laboratory accelerated tests. The purpose is to obtain a correlation between the corrosion rates observed in non-accelerated conditions and laboratory tests. Through these results it is inteded, only with laboratory tests, to estimate the bahavior of similar materials when tsted in similar marine atmosphereic conditions. Some aspects observed in the implementation of the program and some results so far obtained are discussed. (Author) [pt

  14. Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Treaty Organization, Brussels, 1971), p. 449. 14. D. 0. Sprowls, T. J. Summerson, G. M. Ugianski, S. G. Epstein, and H. L. Craig , Jr., in Stress...National Association of Corrosion Engineers Houston, TX, 1972). 22. H. L. Craig , Jr. (ed.), Stress Corrosion-New Approaches, ASTM-STP- 610 (American...62. M. Hishida and H. Nakada, Corrosion 33 (11) 403 (1977). b3. D. C. Deegan and B. E. Wilde, Corrosion 34 (6), 19 (1978). 64. S. Orman, Corrosion Sci

  15. Mortar fights acid corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-14

    The burning of coal or oil to produce heat required to operate a power boiler also generates a severe corrosion problem within the interior of the duct and stacks used to emit the flue gas into the atmosphere. How can concrete and steel be protected from the effects of acid attack, when the acids are carried in a gas form, or come into direct contact with the steel or concrete from spillage or immersion conditions. Industry in North America has found that the solution to this problem is to build an outside concrete column, in this case of Portland cement, and inside that column, build a totally independent brick liner bonded with Sauereisen mortar.

  16. Mapping of the atomic hydrogen density in combustion processes at atmospheric pressure by two-photon polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiger, A.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Steiger, M.; Gonzalo, A.B.; Rosa, M.I. de la

    2001-01-01

    With laser spectroscopic techniques used so far, quantitative measurements of atomic number densities in flames and other combustion processes at atmospheric pressure yield no satisfying results because high quenching rates remarkably reduce the signal size and the results suffer from large uncertainties. Whereas, two-photon polarization spectroscopy is not limited by quenching, as the polarization signal is a direct measure of the two-photon absorption. This sensitive laser technique with high spatial and temporal resolution has been applied to determine absolute number densities and the kinetic temperatures of atomic hydrogen in flames for the first time. The great potential of this method of measurement comes into its own only in conjunction with laser radiation of highest possible spectral quality, i.e. single-frequency ns-pulses with peak irradiance of up to 1 GW/cm 2 tunable around 243 nm for 1S-2S two-photon transition of atomic hydrogen

  17. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  18. Corrosion of 15th and early 16th century stained glass from the monastery of Batalha studied with external ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilarigues, M., E-mail: mgv@fct.unl.pt [Dep. de Conservacao e Restauro and Centro do Vidro e da Ceramica para as Artes, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Redol, P. [Dep. de Conservacao e Restauro and Centro do Vidro e da Ceramica para as Artes, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Monastery of Batalha, P-2440 (Portugal); Machado, A. [Dep. de Conservacao e Restauro and Centro do Vidro e da Ceramica para as Artes, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Rodrigues, P.A.; Alves, L.C.; Silva, R.C. da [Dep. Fisica, LFI, ITN, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2011-02-15

    This paper reports the study of corrosion in two stained glass panels from the south aisle of Sta. Maria da Vitoria monastery, at Batalha (Portugal), one depicting the Last Supper (dated from 1508), and the other one showing a saint (c. 1450). These panels exhibit extensive corrosion with darkening phenomena that are an impediment to their correct visualization, a source of major concern both to conservators and curators. By using external micro-beam Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Particle Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE) spectrometry, the elemental compositions of large fragments were obtained, enabling the selection of representative corroded areas, from which elemental distribution maps were produced by scanning. Calcium and potassium rich structures were found - at the surface and inside cavities in the glass - that were identified as oxalates and carbonates, by Raman microscopy and micro-FTIR. The dark spots present in the glass surfaces were found to be Zn and Pb rich. These findings indicate that the corrosion observed was due not only to reactions with atmospheric water and CO{sub 2} but also with the oxalic acid secreted by micro-organisms. Furthermore, it did not result from reactions with atmospheric SO{sub 2} or acid rain. The information obtained is relevant for a better understanding of the corrosion processes and products formed on the surface of these panels and therefore for the proper planning of much needed adequate conservation-restoration actions and appropriate display conditions. - Research Highlights: {yields} Corrosion and darkening of stained glasses is of concern to conservators and curators. {yields} A multi-technique approach is of relevance to study stained glass corrosion. {yields} External beam PIXE-PIGE provide valuable insight on stained glass corrosion.

  19. Perspectives of 2D and 3D mapping of atmospheric pollutants over urban areas by means of airborne DOAS spectrometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ravegnani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available tants, offering numerous advantages over conventional networks of in situ analysers. We propose some innovative solutions in the field of DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy remote systems, utilizing diffuse solar light as the radiation source. We examine the numerous potentialities of minor gas slant column calculations, applying the «off-axis» methodology for collecting the diffuse solar radiation. One of these particular approaches, using measurements along horizontal paths, has already been tested with the spectrometer installed on board the Geophysica aircraft during stratospheric flights up to altitudes of 20 km. The theoretical basis of these new measurement techniques using DOAS remote sensing systems are delineated to assess whether low altitude flights can provide 2D and 3D pollution tomography over metropolitan areas. The 2D or 3D trace gas total column mapping could be used to investigate: i transport and dispersion phenomena of air pollution, ii photochemical process rates, iii gas plume tomography, iv minor gas vertical profiles into the Planetary Boundary Layer and v minor gas flux divergence over a large area.

  20. XPS and Auger investigation of mechanisms affecting corrosion inhibition of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, R.M.; Surman, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric corrosion of metal surfaces need not be extremely obvious to cause extensive damage to many products. Very small corrosion pits and spots can cause defects in critical copper sources, often resulting in the catastrophic failure of complete electronic assemblies. Microscopic corrosion in steel can lead to the complete failure of subsequently added coatings or furnishings, the automotive industry has become aware. In addition, corrosion at its earliest stages can initiate other corrosion at a later date, resulting in inferior finishings or coatings. A major interest in atmospheric corrosion is in the mechanism by which the initial corrosion initiated and propagated. The initial phase involves the attack of the very other surface layers, hence it is difficult to observe with conventional techniques such as SEM/EDX. This paper presents some of the results obtained by both Auger electron spectroscopy and x- ray photoelectron spectroscopy, of steel and copper samples exposed to corrosive materials under controlled conditions

  1. Corrosion induced failure analysis of subsea pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yongsheng; Khan, Faisal; Thodi, Premkumar; Abbassi, Rouzbeh

    2017-01-01

    Pipeline corrosion is one of the main causes of subsea pipeline failure. It is necessary to monitor and analyze pipeline condition to effectively predict likely failure. This paper presents an approach to analyze the observed abnormal events to assess the condition of subsea pipelines. First, it focuses on establishing a systematic corrosion failure model by Bow-Tie (BT) analysis, and subsequently the BT model is mapped into a Bayesian Network (BN) model. The BN model facilitates the modelling of interdependency of identified corrosion causes, as well as the updating of failure probabilities depending on the arrival of new information. Furthermore, an Object-Oriented Bayesian Network (OOBN) has been developed to better structure the network and to provide an efficient updating algorithm. Based on this OOBN model, probability updating and probability adaptation are performed at regular intervals to estimate the failure probabilities due to corrosion and potential consequences. This results in an interval-based condition assessment of subsea pipeline subjected to corrosion. The estimated failure probabilities would help prioritize action to prevent and control failures. Practical application of the developed model is demonstrated using a case study. - Highlights: • A Bow-Tie (BT) based corrosion failure model linking causation with the potential losses. • A novel Object-Oriented Bayesian Network (OOBN) based corrosion failure risk model. • Probability of failure updating and adaptation with respect to time using OOBN model. • Application of the proposed model to develop and test strategies to minimize failure risk.

  2. Corrosion of vessel steel during its interaction with molten corium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Khabensky, V.B.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Lopukh, D.B.; Gusarov, V.V.; Martinov, A.P.; Martinov, V.V.; Fieg, G.; Tromm, W.; Bottomley, D.; Tuomisto, H.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental examination of the cooled vessel steel corrosion during the interaction with molten corium is presented. The experiments have been conducted on 'Rasplav-2' test facility and followed up with physico-chemical and metallographic analyses of melt samples and corium-specimen ingots. The results discussed in the first part of the paper have revealed specific corrosion mechanisms for air and inert atmosphere above the melt. Models have been proposed based on this information and approximate curves constructed for the estimation of the corrosion rate or corrosion depth of vessel steel in conditions simulated by the experiments

  3. Corrosion of vessel steel during its interaction with molten corium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechta, S.V. [Scientific Research Technological Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor of Leningrad Oblast 188540 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: bechta@sbor.spb.su; Khabensky, V.B. [Scientific Research Technological Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor of Leningrad Oblast 188540 (Russian Federation); Vitol, S.A. [Scientific Research Technological Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor of Leningrad Oblast 188540 (Russian Federation); Krushinov, E.V. [Scientific Research Technological Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor of Leningrad Oblast 188540 (Russian Federation); Granovsky, V.S. [Scientific Research Technological Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor of Leningrad Oblast 188540 (Russian Federation); Lopukh, D.B. [SPb Electrotechnical University (SpbGETU), Professor Popov str., b.5/3, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gusarov, V.V. [Institute of Silicate Chemistry of Russian Academy of Science (ISC of RAS), Odoevsky str., b. 24/2, 199155 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Martinov, A.P. [SPb Electrotechnical University (SpbGETU), Professor Popov str., b.5/3, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Martinov, V.V. [Scientific Research Technological Institute (NITI), Sosnovy Bor of Leningrad Oblast 188540 (Russian Federation); Fieg, G. [Forshungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), Institut fur Neutronenphysik and Reaktortechnik, Postfach 3640, D-78021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tromm, W. [Forshungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), Institut fur Neutronenphysik and Reaktortechnik, Postfach 3640, D-78021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bottomley, D. [Europaeische Kommission, General Direktion GFS, Institut fuer Transurane (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tuomisto, H. [Fortum Engineering Ltd. 00048 FORTUM, Rajatorpantie 8, Vantaa (Finland)

    2006-07-15

    An experimental examination of the cooled vessel steel corrosion during the interaction with molten corium is presented. The experiments have been conducted on 'Rasplav-2' test facility and followed up with physico-chemical and metallographic analyses of melt samples and corium-specimen ingots. The results discussed in the first part of the paper have revealed specific corrosion mechanisms for air and inert atmosphere above the melt. Models have been proposed based on this information and approximate curves constructed for the estimation of the corrosion rate or corrosion depth of vessel steel in conditions simulated by the experiments.

  4. The detection and mapping of the spatial distribution of insect defense compounds by desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Hanus, Robert; Vaikkinen, Anu; Haapala, Markus; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-07-30

    Many insects use chemicals synthesized in exocrine glands and stored in reservoirs to protect themselves. Two chemically defended insects were used as models for the development of a new rapid analytical method based on desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS). The distribution of defensive chemicals on the insect body surface was studied. Since these chemicals are predominantly nonpolar, DAPPI was a suitable analytical method. Repeatability of DAPPI-MS signals and effects related to non-planarity and roughness of samples were investigated using acrylic sheets uniformly covered with an analyte. After that, analytical figures of merit of the technique were determined. The spatial distribution of (E)-1-nitropentadec-1-ene, a toxic nitro compound synthesized by soldiers of the termite Prorhinotermes simplex, was investigated. Then, the spatial distribution of the unsaturated aldehydes (E)-hex-2-enal, (E)-4-oxohex-2-enal, (E)-oct-2-enal, (E,E)-deca-2,4-dienal and (E)-dec-2-enal was monitored in the stink bug Graphosoma lineatum. Chemicals present on the body surface were scanned along the median line of the insect from the head to the abdomen and vice versa, employing either the MS or MS(2) mode. In this fast and simple way, the opening of the frontal gland on the frons of termite soldiers and the position of the frontal gland reservoir, extending deep into the abdominal cavity, were localized. In the stink bug, the opening of the metathoracic scent glands (ostiole) on the ventral side of the thorax as well as the gland reservoir in the median position under the ventral surface of the anterior abdomen were detected and localized. The developed method has future prospects in routine laboratory use in life sciences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  6. Continuous assessment of land mapping accuracy at High Resolution from global networks of atmospheric and field observatories -concept and demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Pierre; Martin-lauzer, François-regis

    2017-04-01

    In the context of global climate change and adjustment/resilience policies' design and implementation, there is a need not only i. for environmental monitoring, e.g. through a range of Earth Observations (EO) land "products" but ii. for a precise assessment of uncertainties of the aforesaid information that feed environmental decision-making (to be introduced in the EO metadata) and also iii. for a perfect handing of the thresholds which help translate "environment tolerance limits" to match detected EO changes through ecosystem modelling. Uncertainties' insight means precision and accuracy's knowledge and subsequent ability of setting thresholds for change detection systems. Traditionally, the validation of satellite-derived products has taken the form of intensive field campaigns to sanction the introduction of data processors in Payload Data Ground Segments chains. It is marred by logistical challenges and cost issues, reason why it is complemented by specific surveys at ground-based monitoring sites which can provide near-continuous observations at a high temporal resolution (e.g. RadCalNet). Unfortunately, most of the ground-level monitoring sites, in the number of 100th or 1000th, which are part of wider observation networks (e.g. FLUXNET, NEON, IMAGINES) mainly monitor the state of the atmosphere and the radiation exchange at the surface, which are different to the products derived from EO data. In addition they are "point-based" compared to the EO cover to be obtained from Sentinel-2 or Sentinel-3. Yet, data from these networks, processed by spatial extrapolation models, are well-suited to the bottom-up approach and relevant to the validation of vegetation parameters' consistency (e.g. leaf area index, fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation). Consistency means minimal errors on spatial and temporal gradients of EO products. Test of the procedure for land-cover products' consistency assessment with field measurements delivered by worldwide

  7. Mapping gas-phase organic reactivity and concomitant secondary organic aerosol formation: chemometric dimension reduction techniques for the deconvolution of complex atmospheric data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyche, K. P.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Rickard, A. R.; McFiggans, G. B.; Jenkin, M. E.; Bloss, W. J.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-07-01

    Highly non-linear dynamical systems, such as those found in atmospheric chemistry, necessitate hierarchical approaches to both experiment and modelling in order to ultimately identify and achieve fundamental process-understanding in the full open system. Atmospheric simulation chambers comprise an intermediate in complexity, between a classical laboratory experiment and the full, ambient system. As such, they can generate large volumes of difficult-to-interpret data. Here we describe and implement a chemometric dimension reduction methodology for the deconvolution and interpretation of complex gas- and particle-phase composition spectra. The methodology comprises principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and positive least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). These methods are, for the first time, applied to simultaneous gas- and particle-phase composition data obtained from a comprehensive series of environmental simulation chamber experiments focused on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) photooxidation and associated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We primarily investigated the biogenic SOA precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, myrcene, linalool and β-caryophyllene. The chemometric analysis is used to classify the oxidation systems and resultant SOA according to the controlling chemistry and the products formed. Results show that "model" biogenic oxidative systems can be successfully separated and classified according to their oxidation products. Furthermore, a holistic view of results obtained across both the gas- and particle-phases shows the different SOA formation chemistry, initiating in the gas-phase, proceeding to govern the differences between the various BVOC SOA compositions. The results obtained are used to describe the particle composition in the context of the oxidised gas-phase matrix. An extension of the technique, which incorporates into the statistical models data from anthropogenic (i

  8. Catastrophes caused by corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    For many years, huge attention has been paid to the problem of corrosion damage and destruction of metallic materials. Experience shows that failures due to corrosion problems are very important, and statistics at the world level shows that the damage resulting from the effects of various forms of corrosion is substantial and that, for example, in industrialized countries it reaches 4-5% of national incomes. Significant funds are determined annually for the prevention and control of corrosion...

  9. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  10. 3D mapping of water in oolithic limestone at atmospheric and vacuum saturation using X-ray micro-CT differential imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, M.A., E-mail: marijn.boone@ugent.be [Department of Geology and Soil Science—UGCT, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S8, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Unit Sustainable Materials Management, VITO, Boerentang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); De Kock, T.; Bultreys, T. [Department of Geology and Soil Science—UGCT, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S8, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Schutter, G. [Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research, Department of Structural Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark-Zwijnaarde 904, 9052 Ghent (Belgium); Vontobel, P. [Spallation Neutron Source Division, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Van Hoorebeke, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy—UGCT, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cnudde, V. [Department of Geology and Soil Science—UGCT, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S8, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-11-15

    Determining the distribution of fluids in porous sedimentary rocks is of great importance in many geological fields. However, this is not straightforward, especially in the case of complex sedimentary rocks like limestone, where a multidisciplinary approach is often needed to capture its broad, multimodal pore size distribution and complex pore geometries. This paper focuses on the porosity and fluid distribution in two varieties of Massangis limestone, a widely used natural building stone from the southeast part of the Paris basin (France). The Massangis limestone shows locally varying post-depositional alterations, resulting in different types of pore networks and very different water distributions within the limestone. Traditional techniques for characterizing the porosity and pore size distribution are compared with state-of-the-art neutron radiography and X-ray computed microtomography to visualize the distribution of water inside the limestone at different imbibition conditions. X-ray computed microtomography images have the great advantage to non-destructively visualize and analyze the pore space inside of a rock, but are often limited to the larger macropores in the rock due to resolution limitations. In this paper, differential imaging is successfully applied to the X-ray computed microtomography images to obtain sub-resolution information about fluid occupancy and to map the fluid distribution in three dimensions inside the scanned limestone samples. The detailed study of the pore space with differential imaging allows understanding the difference in the water uptake behavior of the limestone, a primary factor that affects the weathering of the rock. - Highlights: • The water distribution in a limestone was visualized in 3D with micro-CT. • Differential imaging allowed to map both macro and microporous zones in the rock. • The 3D study of the pore space clarified the difference in water uptake behavior. • Trapped air is visualized in the moldic

  11. Erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghili, B.

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment

  12. Microbiological corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladislavlev, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Problems is considered of development of the microbiological corrosion of the NPP equipment. The main attention is paid to the selective character of microbiological corrosion in zones of welded joints of austenitic steels. It is noted that the presence of technological defects promotes growth of corrosional damages. Methods for microbiological corrosion protection are discussed

  13. Management of Reinforcement Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important cause for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, both with regard to costs and consequences. Thermodynamically consistent descriptions of corrosion mechanisms are expected to allow the development of innovative concepts for the management...... of reinforcement corrosion....

  14. NGS Survey Control Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Survey Control Map provides a map of the US which allows you to find and display geodetic survey control points stored in the database of the National...

  15. Recovery Action Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Recovery Action Mapping Tool is a web map that allows users to visually interact with and query actions that were developed to recover species listed under the...

  16. Northern Hemisphere Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Part I consists of plotted and analyzed daily maps of sea-level and 500-mb maps for 0300, 0400, 1200, 1230, 1300, and 1500...

  17. Fighting corrosion in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, K S; Rangaswamy, N S

    1979-03-01

    A survey covers the cost of corrosion in India; methods of preventing corrosion in industrial plants; some case histories, including the prevention of corrosion in pipes through which fuels are pumped to storage and the stress-corrosion cracking of evaporators in fertilizer plants; estimates of the increase in demand in 1979-89 for anticorrosion products and processes developed by the Central Electrochemical Research Institute (CECRI) at Karaikudi, India; industries that may face corrosion problems requiring assistance from CECRI, including the light and heavy engineering structural, and transport industries and the chemical industry; and some areas identified for major efforts, including the establishment of a Corrosion Advisory Board with regional centers and the expansion of the Tropical Corrosion Testing Station at Mandapam Camp, Tamil Nadu.

  18. Copper corrosion experiments under anoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollila, Kaija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-06-15

    This report gives results from the corrosion experiments with copper under anoxic conditions. The objective was to study whether hydrogen-evolving corrosion reaction could occur. Copper foil samples were exposed in deaerated deionized water in Erlenmeyer flasks in the glove box with inert atmosphere. Four corrosion experiments (Cu1, Cu2, Cu3 and Cu4) were started, as well as a reference test standing in air. Cu1 and Cu2 had gas tight seals, whereas Cu3 and Cu4 had palladium foils as hydrogen permeable enclosure. The test vessels were stored during the experiments in a closed stainless steel vessel to protect them from the trace oxygen of the gas atmosphere and light. After the reaction time of three and a half years, there were no visible changes in the copper surfaces in any of the tests in the glove box, in contrast the Cu surfaces looked shiny and unaltered. The Cu3 test was terminated after the reaction time of 746 days. The analysis of the Pd-membrane showed the presence of H2 in the test system. If the measured amount of 7.2{center_dot}10{sup 5} mol H{sub 2} was the result of formation of Cu{sub 2}O this would correspond to a 200 nm thick corrosion layer. This was not in agreement with the measured layer thickness with SIMS, which was 6{+-}1 nm. A clear weight loss observed for the Cu3 test vessel throughout the test period suggests the evaporation of water through the epoxy sealing to the closed steel vessel. If this occurred, the anaerobic corrosion of steel surface in humid oxygen-free atmosphere could be a source of hydrogen. A similar weight loss was not observed for the parallel test (Cu4). The reference test standing in air showed visible development of corrosion products.

  19. Prediction of reinforcement corrosion using corrosion induced cracks width in corroded reinforced concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Inamullah; François, Raoul; Castel, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the evolution of reinforcement corrosion in comparison to corrosion crack width in a highly corroded reinforced concrete beam. Cracking and corrosion maps of the beam were drawn and steel reinforcement was recovered from the beam to observe the corrosion pattern and to measure the loss of mass of steel reinforcement. Maximum steel cross-section loss of the main reinforcement and average steel cross-section loss between stirrups were plotted against the crack width. The experimental results were compared with existing models proposed by Rodriguez et al., Vidal et al. and Zhang et al. Time prediction models for a given opening threshold are also compared to experimental results. Steel cross-section loss for stirrups was also measured and was plotted against the crack width. It was observed that steel cross-section loss in the stirrups had no relationship with the crack width of longitudinal corrosion cracks. -- Highlights: •Relationship between crack and corrosion of reinforcement was investigated. •Corrosion results of natural process and then corresponds to in-situ conditions. •Comparison with time predicting model is provided. •Prediction of load-bearing capacity from crack pattern was studied

  20. Corrosion principles and surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter examines the important strategies provided by the newer ideas of corrosion science and engineering that surface modification techniques must utilize to help prevent corrosion, especially the most damaging kind of aqueous corrosion, localized corrosion. Provides a brief introduction to the principles underlying the phenomenon of corrosion in order to use them to discuss surface modification strategies to combat corrosion. Discusses the electrochemistry of corrosion; the thermodynamics of corrosion; the kinetics of corrosion; thermodynamic strategies; and kinetic strategies (formation of more protective passive films; resistance to breakdown; ductility; repassivation)

  1. Investigations on the corrosion of constructional steels in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The corrosion behavior of three constructional steels used in Senegal, S235, S275 and S355, was studied in simulated atmospheric conditions in an exposure chamber above distilled water and above 3% NaCl solution representing marine atmosphere by comparing the ratio of rusted to unrusted area. Electrochemical test ...

  2. Corrosion of copper containers prior to saturation of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Kolar, M.

    1997-12-01

    The buffer material surrounding the containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault will partially desiccate as a result of the elevated temperature at the container surface. This will lead to a period of corrosion in a moist air atmosphere. Corrosion will either take the form of slow oxidation if the container surface remains dry or aqueous electrochemical corrosion if the surface is wetted by a thin liquid film. The relevant literature is reviewed, from which it is concluded that corrosion should be uniform in nature, except if the surface is wetted, in which case localized corrosion is a possibility. A quantitative analysis of the extent and rate of uniform corrosion during the unsaturated period is presented. Two bounding cases are considered: first, the case of slow oxidation in moist air following either logarithmic or parabolic oxide-growth kinetics and, second, the case of electrochemically based corrosion occurring in a thin liquid film uninhibited by the growth of corrosion products. (author)

  3. Corrosion aspects of steel radioactive waste containers in cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Nick Smart from Serco, UK, gave an overview of the effects of cementitious materials on the corrosion of steel during storage and disposal of various low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. Steel containers are often used as an overpack for the containment of radioactive wastes and are routinely stored in an open atmosphere. Since this is an aerobic and typically humid environment, the steel containers can start to corrode whilst in storage. Steel containers often come into contact with cementitious materials (e.g. grout encapsulants, backfill). An extensive account of different steel container designs and of steel corrosion mechanisms was provided. Steel corrosion rates under conditions buffered by cementitious materials have been evaluated experimentally. The main conclusion was that the cementitious environment generally facilitates the passivation of steel materials. Several general and localised corrosion mechanisms need to be considered when evaluating the performance of steel containers in cementitious environments, and environmental thresholds can be defined and used with this aim. In addition, the consequences of the generation of gaseous hydrogen by the corrosion of carbon steel under anoxic conditions must be taken into account. Discussion of the paper included: Is crevice corrosion really significant in cementitious systems? Crevice corrosion is unlikely in the cementitious backfill considered because it will tend to neutralise any acidic conditions in the crevice. What is the role of microbially-induced corrosion (MIC) in cementitious systems? Microbes are likely to be present in a disposal facility but their effect on corrosion is uncertain

  4. Application of wire beam electrode technique to investigate initiation and propagation of rebar corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Wei; Dong, Ze Hua; Kong, De Jie; Guo, Xing Peng

    2013-01-01

    Multi-electrode technique named as wire beam electrode (WBE) was used to study pitting corrosion of rebar under concrete cover. When WBE embedded mortar sample was immersed in NaCl solution, uneven distributions of galvanic current and open circuit potential (OCP) on the WBE were observed due to the initiation of pitting corrosion. The following oxygen depletion in mortar facilitated the negative shift of the OCP and the smoothing of the current and potential distributions. Wetting–drying cycle experiments showed that corrosion products instead of oxygen in wet mortar specimen sustained the propagation of pitting corrosion due to Fe (III) taking part in cathodic depolarization during oxygen-deficient wet period, which was confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. In addition, new pitting corrosion occurred mainly near the corrosion products, leading to preferentially horizontal propagation of rust layer on the WBE. A localized corrosion factor was further presented to quantify the localised corrosion based on galvanic current maps

  5. Application of wire beam electrode technique to investigate initiation and propagation of rebar corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Wei; Dong, Ze Hua, E-mail: zehua.dong@gmail.com; Kong, De Jie; Guo, Xing Peng

    2013-06-15

    Multi-electrode technique named as wire beam electrode (WBE) was used to study pitting corrosion of rebar under concrete cover. When WBE embedded mortar sample was immersed in NaCl solution, uneven distributions of galvanic current and open circuit potential (OCP) on the WBE were observed due to the initiation of pitting corrosion. The following oxygen depletion in mortar facilitated the negative shift of the OCP and the smoothing of the current and potential distributions. Wetting–drying cycle experiments showed that corrosion products instead of oxygen in wet mortar specimen sustained the propagation of pitting corrosion due to Fe (III) taking part in cathodic depolarization during oxygen-deficient wet period, which was confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. In addition, new pitting corrosion occurred mainly near the corrosion products, leading to preferentially horizontal propagation of rust layer on the WBE. A localized corrosion factor was further presented to quantify the localised corrosion based on galvanic current maps.

  6. Monitoring Microbially Influenced Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    and diffusional effects and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and ferrous sulphide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 by electrochemical techniques. Weight loss coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic monitoring techniques......Abstract Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The applicability and reliability of a number of corrosion monitoring techniques for monitoring MIC has been evaluated in experiments....... EIS might be used for detection of MIC as the appearance of very large capacitances can be attributed to the combined ferrous sulphide and biofilm formation. Capacitance correlates directly with sulphide concentration in sterile sulphide media. Keywords: Corrosion monitoring, carbon steel, MIC, SRB...

  7. SRB seawater corrosion project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozack, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2219 aluminum when exposed to seawater was characterized. Controlled corrosion experiments at three different temperatures (30, 60 and 100 C) and two different environments (seawater and 3.5 percent salt solution) were designed to elucidate the initial stages in the corrosion process. It was found that 2219 aluminum is an active catalytic surface for growth of Al2O3, NaCl, and MgO. Formation of Al2O3 is favored at lower temperatures, while MgO is favored at higher temperatures. Visible corrosion products are formed within 30 minutes after seawater exposure. Corrosion characteristics in 3.5 percent salt solution are different than corrosion in seawater. Techniques utilized were: (1) scanning electron microscopy, (2) energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and (3) Auger electron spectroscopy.

  8. Corrosion of niobium and niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yau, T.L.; Webster, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Niobium and niobium alloys are used in several corrosion-resistant applications, principally rocket and jet engines, nuclear reactors, sodium vapor highway lighting, and chemical-processing equipment. Niobium has many of the same properties of tantalum, its sister metal, but has one half the density of tantalum (see the article ''Corrosion of Tantalum'' in this Volume). A common property of niobium and tantalum is the interaction with the reactive elements hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon at temperatures above 300 0 C (570 0 F). These reactions will cause severe embrittlement. Consequently, at elevated temperatures, the metal must be protectively coated or used in vacuum or inert atmospheres. Niobium resists a wide variety of corrosive environments, including concentrated mineral acids, organic acids, liquid metals (particularly sodium and lithium), metal vapors, and molten salts

  9. Understanding corrosion via corrosion product characterization: II. Role of alloying elements in improving the corrosion resistance of Zn-Al-Mg coatings on steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volovitch, P.; Vu, T.N.; Allely, C.; Abdel Aal, A.; Ogle, K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Origins of better corrosion resistance of ZnAlMg coatings than galvanized steel. → Comparative study of corrosion products formed on ZnAlMg, ZnMg and Zn coatings. → Modeling of dissolution and precipitation stages of corrosion. → At early stages Mg stabilizes protective zinc basic salts during dry-wet cycling. → At later stages Al dissolves at high pH forming protective layered double hydroxides. - Abstract: Corrosion products are identified on Zn, ZnMg and ZnAlMg coatings in cyclic corrosion tests with NaCl or Na 2 SO 4 containing atmospheres. For Mg-containing alloys the improved corrosion resistance is achieved by stabilization of protective simonkolleite and zinc hydroxysulfate. At later stages, the formation of layered double hydroxides (LDH) is observed for ZnAlMg. According to thermodynamic modeling, Mg 2+ ions bind the excess of carbonate or sulfate anions preventing the formation of soluble or less-protective products. A preferential dissolution of Zn and Mg at initial stages of corrosion is confirmed by in situ dissolution measurement. The physicochemical properties of different corrosion products are compared.

  10. Corrosion control. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this text is to train engineers and technologists not just to understand corrosion but to control it. Materials selection, coatings, chemical inhibitors, cathodic and anodic protection, and equipment design are covered in separate chapters. High-temperature oxidation is discussed in the final two chapters ne on oxidation theory and one on controlling oxidation by alloying and with coatings. This book treats corrosion and high-temperature oxidation separately. Corrosion is divided into three groups: (1) chemical dissolution including uniform attack, (2) electrochemical corrosion from either metallurgical or environmental cells, and (3) stress-assisted corrosion. Corrosion is logically grouped according to mechanisms rather than arbitrarily separated into different types of corrosion as if they were unrelated. For those university students and industry personnel who approach corrosion theory very hesitantly, this text will present the electrochemical reactions responsible for corrosion summed up in only five simple half-cell reactions. When these are combined on a polarization diagram, which is also explained in detail, the electrochemical processes become obvious. For those who want a text stripped bare of electrochemical theory, several noted sections can be omitted without loss of continuity. However, the author has presented the material in such a manner that these sections are not beyond the abilities of any high school graduate who is interested in technology

  11. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  12. Corrosion behavior of construction materials for ionic liquid hydrogen compressor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arjomand Kermani, Nasrin; Petrushina, Irina; Nikiforov, Aleksey Valerievich

    2016-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of various commercially available stainless steels and nickel-based alloys as possible construction materials for components which are in direct contact with one of five different ionic liquids was evaluated. The ionic liquids, namely: 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium triflate, 1...... liquid hydrogen compressor. An electrochemical cell was specially designed, and steady-state cyclic voltammetry was used to measure the corrosion resistance of the alloys in the ionic liquids at 23 °C, under atmospheric pressure. The results showed a very high corrosion resistance and high stability...... for all the alloys tested. The two stainless steels, AISI 316L and AISI 347 showed higher corrosion resistance compared to AISI 321 in all the ionic liquids tested. It was observed that small addition of molybdenum, tantalum, and niobium to the alloys increased the corrosion stability in the ionic liquids...

  13. Assessment of corrosion failure in copper tube of refrigerator unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Harun; Hafizal Yazid; Zaiton Selamat; Mohd Shariff Sattar; Muhamamd Jalil

    2007-01-01

    The copper tubes of the refrigerator unit have been coated with red and white color paints. According to the date of purchase and complaint recorded, the tube leaked after operation about one year. It was observed that the tubes became black and green in color at U-bend of the tube. No corrosion occurred on the internal surface of the tube. The leaking started at outer surface of the tube. The leaking started at outer surface and propagated to the internal surface of the tubes. The leaking damage was caused by corrosive species either from atmospheric corrosion or the paint contained chloride and sulfur elements. The corrosive species of sulfur and chlorine were a main factor in pitting corrosion. (author)

  14. Corrosion in the oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brondel, D [Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France); Edwards, R [Schlumberger Well Services, Columbus, OH (United States); Hayman, A [Etudes et Productions Schlumberger, Clamart (France); Hill, D [Schlumberger Dowell, Tulsa, OK (United States); Mehta, S [Schlumberger Dowell, St. Austell (United Kingdom); Semerad, T [Mobil Oil Indonesia, Inc., Sumatra (Indonesia)

    1994-04-01

    Corrosion costs the oil industry billions of dollars a year, a fact that makes the role of the corrosion engineer an increasingly important one. Attention is paid to how corrosion affects every aspect of exploration and production, from offshore rigs to casing. Also the role of corrosion agents such as drilling and production fluids is reviewed. Methods of control and techniques to monitor corrosion are discussed, along with an explanation of the chemical causes of corrosion. 21 figs., 32 refs.

  15. Corrosive environment tester for filter media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, G.S.; Weber, C.W.; Keinberger, C.A.; Rivers, R.D.

    1977-02-01

    Two continuous dynamic systems have been designed and fabricated for testing filter media in humid, corrosive environments--one for fluorine or fluoride exposures, and the other for nitrogen dioxide exposures. The tester using fluorine or fluoride atmospheres was constructed of nickel and the one using nitrogen dioxide was fabricated of stainless steel. Other corrosive gases could be used with the appropriate choice of system. For example, chlorine or hydrogen chloride could be used in the system fabricated of nickel, and sulfur dioxides or ammonia could be used in the stainless steel testing apparatus. Each tester is comprised of four equivalent dynamic systems designed for diluting a corrosive reagent with dry air, then with humidified air to provide a humid-corrosive environment for filter media testing. Auxiliary equipment includes a water injection system, corrosive reagent supply systems, and an automatic pressure differential (ΔP) monitoring and recording system. The testers are relatively maintenance-free and have operated continuously for periods as long as 96 h without requiring any attention, during total exposures of materials exceeding 600 h

  16. Effects of environmental variables on the crack initiation stages of corrosion fatigue of high strength aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    Fatigue initiation in six aluminum alloys used in the aircraft industry was investigated. Cyclic loading superimposed on a constant stress was alternated with atmospheric corrosion. Tests made at different stress levels revealed that a residual stress as low as 39% of the yield strength caused stress corrosion cracking in some of the alloys. An atmospheric corrosion rate meter developed to measure the corrosivity of the atmosphere is described. An easily duplicated hole in the square test specimen with a self-induced residual stress was developed.

  17. Molten salt: Corrosion problems and electrometallurgy in nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarini, G.

    1981-01-01

    A bibliographic survey is given of corrosion problems and electrometallurgical problems of molten salt in nuclear reactor applications. Due to the high potential to be achieved, their high ionic conductivity and the rapidity of reactions in a molten salt atmosphere, molten salts are interesting solvents for various electrometallurgical processes. Another important field of application is in the separation or electrolytical refining of various metals (Be, U, Pu, Th, Hf, Zr). However, these very characteristics of molten salts may also cause serious corrosion problems. Results obtained for the molten-salt reactor and the different causes of corrosion are reviewed an possible countermeasures analyzed. (orig.)

  18. Corrosion of vessel steel during its interaction with molten corium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Khabensky, V.B.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Lopukh, D.B.; Gusarov, V.V.; Martinov, A.P.; Martinov, V.V.; Fieg, G.; Tromm, W.; Bottomley, D.; Tuomisto, H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with corrosion of a cooled vessel steel structure interacting with molten corium in air and neutral (nitrogen) atmospheres during an in-vessel retention scenario. The data on corrosion kinetics at different temperatures on the heated steel surface, heat flux densities and oxygen potential in the system are presented. The post-test physico-chemical and metallographic analyses of melt samples and the corium-specimen ingot have clarified certain mechanisms of steel corrosion taking place during the in-vessel melt interaction

  19. EFFECT OF RATIO OF SURFACE AREA ON THE CORROSION RATE

    OpenAIRE

    Dody Prayitno; M. Irsyad

    2018-01-01

    Aluminum and steel are used to be a construction for a building outdoor panel. Aluminum and steel are connected by bolt and nut. An atmosphere due to a corrosion of the aluminum. The corrosion possibly to cause the hole diameter of bolt and nut to become larger. Thus the bolt and nut can not enough strong to hold the panel. The panel may collapse. The aim of the research is first to answer a question where does the corrosion starts. The second is to know the effect of ratio surface area of st...

  20. Task E container corrosion studies: Annual report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnell, L.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Topping, J.B.; Duncan, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting the Solid Waste Technology Support Program (SWTSP) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Task E is the Container Corrosion Study Portion of the SWTSP that will perform testing to provide defensible data on the corrosion of low-carbon steel, as used in drums to contain chemical and radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site. A second objective of Task E is to provide and test practical alternative materials that have higher corrosion resistance than low-carbon steel. The scope of work for fiscal year (FY) 1993 included initial testing of mild steel specimens buried in Hanford soils or exposed to atmospheric corrosion in metal storage sheds. During FY 1993, progress was made in three areas of Task E. First, exposure of test materials began at the Soil Corrosion Test Site where low-carbon steel specimens were placed in the soil in five test shafts at depths of 9 m (30 ft). Second, the corrosion measurement of low-carbon steel in the soil of two solid waste trenches continued. The total exposure time is ∼ 500 days. Third, an atmospheric corrosion test of low-carbon steel was initiated in a metal shed (Building 2401-W) in the 200 West Area. This annual report describes the Task E efforts and provides a current status

  1. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serdar, Marijana [Department of Materials, Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Meral, Cagla [Middle East Technical University, Department of Civil Engineering, Ankara (Turkey); Kunz, Martin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bjegovic, Dubravka [Department of Materials, Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Wenk, Hans-Rudolf [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Monteiro, Paulo J.M., E-mail: monteiro@ce.berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide–hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel. - Highlights: • Synchrotron micro-diffraction used to map the distribution of crystalline phases. • Goethite and akaganeite are the main corrosion products during chloride induced corrosion in mortar. • Layers of goethite and akaganeite are negatively correlated. • EDS showed Cr present in corrosion products identified by SEM.

  2. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Kunz, Martin; Bjegovic, Dubravka; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide–hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel. - Highlights: • Synchrotron micro-diffraction used to map the distribution of crystalline phases. • Goethite and akaganeite are the main corrosion products during chloride induced corrosion in mortar. • Layers of goethite and akaganeite are negatively correlated. • EDS showed Cr present in corrosion products identified by SEM

  3. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-01-01

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study

  4. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  5. Archaeological analogs and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, D.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the high level and long life radioactive wastes disposal deep underground, the ANDRA built a research program on the material corrosion. In particular they aim to design containers for a very long time storage. Laboratory experiments are in progress and can be completed by the analysis of metallic archaeological objects and their corrosion after hundred years. (A.L.B.)

  6. Exploratory shaft liner corrosion estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1985-10-01

    An estimate of expected corrosion degradation during the 100-year design life of the Exploratory Shaft (ES) is presented. The basis for the estimate is a brief literature survey of corrosion data, in addition to data taken by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The scope of the study is expected corrosion environment of the ES, the corrosion modes of general corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, dissimilar metal corrosion, and environmentally assisted cracking. The expected internal and external environment of the shaft liner is described in detail and estimated effects of each corrosion mode are given. The maximum amount of general corrosion degradation was estimated to be 70 mils at the exterior and 48 mils at the interior, at the shaft bottom. Corrosion at welds or mechanical joints could be significant, dependent on design. After a final determination of corrosion allowance has been established by the project it will be added to the design criteria. 10 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Electrochemical study of corrosion inhibition of stainless steel in phosphoric medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnini, K.; Chtaini, A. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Bio Corrosion, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Beni-Mellal (Morocco); Khouili, M.; Elbouadili, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie Organique et Analytique, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Beni-Mellal (Morocco)

    2004-07-01

    The corrosion of metals represents a terrible waste of both natural resources and money, the failure of some stainless steel resulting from pitting corrosion is some times considered a technological problem, consequently, much effort has been expended in attempting to understand and overcome the corrosion therefore, many stainless steel/ environment combinations have been studied. The use of heterocyclic compounds as inhibitors is one of the most practical methods for protection against corrosion in acidic media. In continuation of our work on development of macrocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors we report in our study the corrosion inhibiting behaviour of organic compound Methoxy-2-Allyl-4 Phenol (MAP) containing coordinating and conjugation groups, at three forms (natural, polymerized and chemically treated) on the corrosion of stainless steel in phosphoric acid. This study focused on the comparison for corrosion inhibition proprieties of these different applications using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and SEM. The specimen was evaluated to determine change in his corrosion potential and resistance polarization; These MAP products have exhibited corrosion inhibition by maintaining a high resistance polarization (low corrosion rate) in each application. These results reveal that this compound is efficient inhibitor in all forms; the most inhibition efficiency is obtained with polymerized form. To further evaluate the test data, the steel surfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, SEM observations of surface treated concrete confirmed presence of inhibitor on the steel surfaces. (authors)

  8. Corrosion fatigue of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaehn, H.; Wagner, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue phenomena can be classified into two main groups according to the electrochemical state of the metal surface in the presence of electrolytes: the active and the passive state with an important sub-group of corrosion fatigue in the unstable passive state. The allowable stress for structures exposed to the conjoint action of corrosion and fatigue is influenced by many factors: kind of media, number of cycles, frequency, mean stress, size, notches, loading mode, alloy composition and mechanical strength. A critical literature review shows contradictory results if a classification by the electrochemical surface state is not applied. Case histories and counter measures illustrate the practical importance of corrosion fatigue in many branches of industry as well as the urgent need for a better knowledge about the mutual influence of the phenomena to get rules by which the engineer can appraise the risk of corrosion fatigue. (orig.) [de

  9. Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1998-12-01

    Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

  10. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Balkwill, P.H.; O'Brien, T.M.; Taylor, K.J.; Marsh, G.P.

    1990-11-01

    The report describes the work of a two year programme investigating the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel embedded in a range of candidate repository cements and concretes at laboratory temperatures. The factors investigated in the study were the rate of the anaerobic corrosion reaction, the effect of hydrogen overpressure on the reaction rate and the form of the corrosion product. Both electrochemical and sample weight loss corrosion rate measurements were used. The cements and concretes used were prepared both with and without small additions of chloride (2% by weight of mix water). The results indicate that the corrosion rate is low, < 1 μm/year, the effect of hydrogen overpressure is not significant over the range of pressures investigated, 1-100 atmospheres, and that the corrosion product is dependent on the cement used to cast the samples. Magnetite was identified in the case of blast furnace slag replacement cements but for pulverised fuel ash and ordinary Portland cements no corrosion product was evident either from X-ray diffraction or laser Raman measurements. Further work is presently underway to investigate the effects of elevated temperatures and chloride levels on the anaerobic corrosion reaction and the rate of hydrogen gas production. (author)

  11. Meso(topoclimatic maps and mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Plánka

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric characteristics can be studied from many points of view, most often we talk about time and spatial standpoint. Application of time standpoint leads either to different kinds of the synoptic and prognostic maps production, which presents actual state of atmosphere in short time section in the past or in the near future or to the climatic maps production which presents longterm weather regime. Spatial standpoint then differs map works according to natural phenomenon proportions, whereas the scale of their graphic presentation can be different. It depends on production purpose of each work.In the paper there are analysed methods of mapping and climatic maps production, which display longterm regime of chosen atmospheric features. These athmosphere features are formed in interaction with land surface and also have direct influence on people and their activities throughout the country. At the same time they’re influenced by anthropogenic intervention to the landscape.

  12. New approach to the elucidation of corrosion mechanism of ceramics by the ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, J.; Hayashi, K.; Tachi, Y.; Kano, S.

    1998-08-01

    Ceramics possessing high temperature strength are promising materials for the structural application in severe environment. The development of ceramics has been carried out in order to use them in FBR environment such as liquid sodium. In particular, corrosion behavior of ceramics has been investigated to improve the corrosion resistance in liquid sodium. However, the corrosion mechanism of ceramics was not comprehended in detail even now. Because corrosion products which were deposited on the surface of test pieces during corrosion test and played an important role in corrosion behavior, were not detected distinctly after thr corrosion test. In this study, an ion implantation technique was applied to understand the corrosion mechanism of ceramics in stead of the conventional corrosion test. Sodium ions were implanted in ceramics (100 keV, 1.9 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 ) and then heat treatment was performed at either 923 K or 823 K for 36 ks in argon atmosphere. After that, products on the surface were analyzed using SEM and TEM observation and X-ray diffraction. Consequently, the corrosion products were not identified exactly, but their presence was confirmed on the surface. It was caused by the minute amount of corrosion products. In future, it is necessary to carry systematically out the implantation and heat treatment under various conditions. Therefore, it seems that the beneficial information will be obtained to understand the corrosion mechanism of ceramics. (author)

  13. A study of the utilization of ERTS-1 data from the Wabash River Basin. [crop identification, water resources, urban land use, soil mapping, and atmospheric modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgrebe, D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The most significant results were obtained in the water resources research, urban land use mapping, and soil association mapping projects. ERTS-1 data was used to classify water bodies to determine acreages and high agreement was obtained with USGS figures. Quantitative evaluation was achieved of urban land use classifications from ERTS-1 data and an overall test accuracy of 90.3% was observed. ERTS-1 data classifications of soil test sites were compared with soil association maps scaled to match the computer produced map and good agreement was observed. In some cases the ERTS-1 results proved to be more accurate than the soil association map.

  14. Corrosion on Mars: An Investigation of Corrosion Mechanisms Under Relevant Simulated Martian Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Johansen, Michael R.; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2017-01-01

    This one-year project was selected by NASA's Science Innovation Fund in FY17 to address Corrosion on Mars which is a problem that has not been addressed before. Corrosion resistance is one of the most important properties in selecting materials for landed spacecraft and structures that will support surface operations for the human exploration of Mars. Currently, the selection of materials is done by assuming that the corrosion behavior of a material on Mars will be the same as that on Earth. This is understandable given that there is no data regarding the corrosion resistance of materials in the Mars environment. However, given that corrosion is defined as the degradation of a metal that results from its chemical interaction with the environment, it cannot be assumed that corrosion is going to be the same in both environments since they are significantly different. The goal of this research is to develop a systematic approach to understand corrosion of spacecraft materials on Mars by conducting a literature search of available data, relevant to corrosion in the Mars environment, and by performing preliminary laboratory experiments under relevant simulated Martian conditions. This project was motivated by the newly found evidence for the presence of transient liquid brines on Mars that coincided with the suggestion, by a team of researchers, that some of the structural degradation observed on Curiosity's wheels may be caused by corrosive interactions with the brines, while the most significant damage was attributed to rock scratching. An extensive literature search on data relevant to Mars corrosion confirmed the need for further investigation of the interaction between materials used for spacecraft and structures designed to support long-term surface operations on Mars. Simple preliminary experiments, designed to look at the interaction between an aerospace aluminum alloy (AA7075-T73) and the gases present in the Mars atmosphere, at 20degC and a pressure of 700 Pa

  15. Grain boundary defects initiation at the outer surface of dissimilar welds: corrosion mechanism studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bouvier, O.; Yrieix, B.

    1995-11-01

    Dissimilar welds located on the primary coolant system of the French PWR I plants exhibit grain boundary defects in the true austenitic zones of the first buttering layer. If grain boundaries reach the interface, they can extend to the martensitic band. Those defects are filled with compact oxides. In addition, the ferritic base metal presents some pits along the interface. Nowadays, three mechanisms are proposed to explain the initiation of those defects: stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion and high temperature intergranular oxidation. This paper is dealing with the study of the mechanisms involved in the corrosion phenomenon. Intergranular corrosion tests performed on different materials show that only the first buttering layer, even with some δ ferrite, is sensitized. The results of stress corrosion cracking tests in water solutions show that intergranular cracking is possible on a bulk material representative of the first buttering layer. It is unlikely on actual dissimilar welds where the ferritic base metal protects the first austenitic layer by galvanic coupling. Therefore, the stress corrosion cracking assumption cannot explain the initiation of the defects in aqueous environment. The results of the investigations and of the corrosion studies led to the conclusion that the atmosphere could be the only possible aggressive environment. This conclusion is based on natural atmospheric exposure and accelerated corrosion tests carried out with SO 2 additions in controlled atmosphere. They both induce a severe intergranular corrosion on true sensitized austenitic materials. This corrosion studies cannot conclude definitively on the causes of the defect initiation on field, but they show that the atmospheric corrosion could produce intergranular attacks in the pure austenitic zones of the first buttering layer of the dissimilar welds and that this corrosion is stress assisted. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Automated Methods Of Corrosion Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell.......The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell....

  17. Corrosion in power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventakeshwarlu, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    A brief account of the problem areas encountered as a result of corrosion in the electrical power industry including nuclear power industry is given and some of the measures contemplated and/or implemented to control corrosion are outlined. The corrosion problems in the steam generators and cladding tubes of the nuclear power plant have an added dimension of radioactivation which leads to contamination and radiation field. Importance of monitoring water quality and controlling water chemistry by addition of chemicals is emphasised. (M.G.B.)

  18. Corrosion of reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-01-15

    Much operational experience and many experimental results have accumulated in recent years regarding corrosion of reactor materials, particularly since the 1958 Geneva Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, where these problems were also discussed. It was, felt that a survey and critical appraisal of the results obtained during this period had become necessary and, in response to this need, IAEA organized a Conference on the Corrosion of Reactor Materials at Salzburg, Austria (4-9 June 1962). It covered many of the theoretical, experimental and engineering problems relating to the corrosion phenomena which occur in nuclear reactors as well as in the adjacent circuits

  19. The effect of crystallographic orientation on the active corrosion of pure magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ming; Qiu Dong; Zhao Mingchun; Song, Guangling; Atrens, Andrej

    2008-01-01

    An improved method was used to investigate the influence of crystallographic orientation on the corrosion of pure magnesium in 0.1 N HCl. The corrosion depth and orientation of surface features were mapped against crystallographic orientation (obtained by electron backscatter diffraction) for many off-principal magnesium crystals. The grains near (0 0 0 1) orientation are the most corrosion resistant. Most grains exhibited a striated structure of long and narrow hillocks with a unique direction

  20. Modelling reinforcement corrosion in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A physio-chemical model for the simulation of reinforcement corrosion in concrete struc-tures was developed. The model allows for simulation of initiation and subsequent propaga-tion of reinforcement corrosion. Corrosion is assumed to be initiated once a defined critical chloride threshold......, a numerical example is pre-sented, that illustrates the formation of corrosion cells as well as propagation of corrosion in a reinforced concrete structure....

  1. Corrosion of PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnsey, R.

    1979-01-01

    Some designs of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators have experienced a variety of corrosion problems which include stress corrosion cracking, tube thinning, pitting, fatigue, erosion-corrosion and support plate corrosion resulting in 'denting'. Large international research programmes have been mounted to investigate the phenomena. The operational experience is reviewed and mechanisms which have been proposed to explain the corrosion damage are presented. The implications for design development and for boiler and feedwater control are discussed. (author)

  2. Structure Analysis Of Corrosion Resistant Thermal Sprayed Coatings On Low Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pistofidis, N.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergiou, A.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.

    2007-04-01

    Metallic coatings have been proved to reduce the rate of corrosion of steel in various atmospheres. In this work the structure of Al, Cu-Al and Zn thermal sprayed coatings is examined. The as formed coatings are extremely rough, and they are composed of several phases which increase corrosion resistance as it was determined Salt Spray Chamber tests.

  3. Corrosion of valve metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draley, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized

  4. Corrosion in Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Gudla, Helene Virginie Conseil; Verdingovas, Vadimas

    2017-01-01

    Electronic control units, power modules, and consumer electronics are used today in a wide variety of varying climatic conditions. Varying external climatic conditions of temperature and humidity can cause an uncontrolled local climate inside the device enclosure. Uncontrolled humidity together...... and high density packing combined with the use of several materials, which can undergo electrochemical corrosion in the presence of water film formed due to humidity exposure and bias conditions on the PCBA surface. This article provides a short review of the corrosion reliability issues of electronics due...... to the use of electronics under varying humidity conditions. Important PCBA aspects, which are fundamental to the corrosion cell formation under humid conditions, are discussed. Effect of hygroscopic residues from the process and service and their role in assisting water film build up and corrosion...

  5. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    species grow as multicel- lular filaments called hyphae forming a mycelium, some fungal species also grow as single cells. Sexual and asexual...reinforced fluorinated 18 MICROBIOLOGICALLY INFLUENCED CORROSION polyimide composites due to hyphae penetration into resin interiors. The

  6. Carbon Dioxide Corrosion:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2008-01-01

    CO2 corrosion is a general problem in the industry and it is expensive. The focus of this study is an oil gas production related problem. CO2 corrosion is observed in offshore natural gas transportation pipelines. A general overview of the problem is presented in chapter 1. The chemical system...... with the basic thermodynamics of electrolytes in chapter 2, the extension and general description of electrolyte mass transport in chapter 3, and the electrochemical kinetics of corrosion in chapter 4. A literature overview of CO2 corrosion is shown in chapter 5 and possible extensions of the models...... and validated against heat capacity data. The model is also fitted to experimental data produced and shown in chapter 8 for SLE in the Na2CO3-NaHCO3-MEG-H2O system. The application of the above model is shown in chapter 9. Here the thermodynamic correction factors are calculated. These show how the diffusion...

  7. BWR steel containment corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  8. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  9. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...

  10. NEPR Geographic Zone Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geographic zone map was created by interpreting satellite and aerial imagery, seafloor topography (bathymetry model), and the new NEPR Benthic Habitat Map...

  11. NEPR Benthic Habitat Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This benthic habitat map was created from a semi-automated habitat mapping process, using a combination of bathymetry, satellite imagery, aerial imagery and...

  12. North America Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Maps contains a surface analysis comprised of plotted weather station observations, isobars indicating low and high-pressure...

  13. Corrosion resistance of metals and alloys in molten alkalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarubitskij, O.G.; Dmitruk, B.F.; Minets, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Literature data on the corrosion of non-ferrous and noble metals, iron and steels in the molten alkalis and mixtures of their base are presented. It is shown that zirconium, niobium and tantalum are characterized by high corrosion stability in the molten NaOH. Additions of NaOH and KOH to the alkali chloride melts result in a 1000 time decrease of zirconium corrosion rate at 850 deg. The data testify to the characteristic passivating properties of OH - ions; Mo and W do not possess an ability to selfpassivation in hydroxide melts. Corrosion resistance of carbon and chromium-nickel steels in hydroxide melts depends considerably on the temperature, electrolyte composition and atmosphere over them. At the temperatures up to 600 deg C chromium-nickel steel is corrosion resistant in the molten alkali only in the inert atmosphere. Corrosion rate of chromium-nickel alloy is the lower the less chromium and the more nickel it contains. For the small installations the 4Kh18N25S2 and Kh23N28M3D3T steels can be recommended

  14. Corrosion assessment of dry fuel storage containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    The structural stability as a function of expected corrosion degradation of 75 dry fuel storage containers located in the 200 Area Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds was evaluated. These containers include 22 concrete burial containers, 13 55-gal (208-l) drums, and 40 Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) transport/storage casks. All containers are buried beneath at least 48 in. of soil and a heavy plastic tarp with the exception of 35 of the EBR-II casks which are exposed to atmosphere. A literature review revealed that little general corrosion is expected and pitting corrosion of the carbon steel used as the exterior shell for all containers (with the exception of the concrete containers) will occur at a maximum rate of 3.5 mil/yr. Penetration from pitting of the exterior shell of the 208-l drums and EBR-II casks is calculated to occur after 18 and 71 years of burial, respectively. The internal construction beneath the shell would be expected to preclude containment breach, however, for the drums and casks. The estimates for structural failure of the external shells, large-scale shell deterioration due to corrosion, are considerably longer, 39 and 150 years respectively for the drums and casks. The concrete burial containers are expected to withstand a service life of 50 years.

  15. Monitoring corrosion rates and localised corrosion in low conductivity water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of low corrosion rates and localised corrosion in a media with low conductivity is a challenge. In municipal district heating, quality control may be improved by implementing on-line corrosion monitoring if a suitable technique can be identified to measure both uniform and localised...... corrosion. Electrochemical techniques (LPR, EIS, crevice corrosion current) as well as direct measurement techniques (high-sensitive electrical resistance, weight loss) have been applied in operating plants. Changes in the corrosion processes are best monitored in non-aggressive, low conductivity media...

  16. Effect of boron control of environment on corrosion and resistance to low-cycle corrosion fatigue in structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babej, Yu.I.; Zhitkov, V.V.; Zvezdin, Yu.I.; Liskevich, I.Yu.; Nazarov, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Tests of the specimens on total, contact and crevice corrosion, corrosion cracking and low-cycle fatigue are conducted for determination of corrosion and corrosion-fatigue characteristics in the 15Kh3NMFA, 10N3MFA, 10Kh16N4B, 05Kh13N6M2 structural steels, used in energetics. The environment is subjected to boron control and contacting with atmosphere for simulation of stop and operation modes of the facility. The experiments are carried out in the distilled water with 12g/l H 3 BO 3 and 10 mg/l Cl' at 25, 60, 100 deg C under contacting with atmosphere. It is established, that the pearlitic steels 15Kh3NMFA, 10N3MFA, as well as transition and martensitic 05Kh13N6M2 and 10Kh16N4B steels are highly stable to total, crevice and contact corrosion at the high parameters of aqueous boron-containing medium. Steel resistance to low-cycle fracture decreases slightly under the conditions similar to the operation ones, in the water with 12 g/l H 3 BO 3 . Durability of the pearlitic steels at the simulation of stop conditions decreases more noticeably, crack formation as a rule, initiating from corrosion spots

  17. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Balkwill, P.H.; O'Brien, T.M.; Taylor, K.J.; Marsh, G.P.

    1990-11-01

    The report describes the work of a two year programme investigating the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel embedded in a range of candidate repository cements and concretes at laboratory ambient temperatures. The factors investigated in the study were the rate of the anaerobic corrosion reaction, the effect of hydrogen overpressure on the reaction rate and the form of the corrosion product. Both electrochemical and sample weight loss corrosion rate measurements were used. The cements and concretes used were prepared both with and without small additions of chloride (2% by weight of mix water). The results indicate that the corrosion rate is low, <1 μm/year, the effect of hydrogen overpressure is not significant over the range of pressures investigated, 1-100 atmospheres, and that the corrosion product is dependent on the cement used to cast the samples. Magnetite was identified in the case of blast furnace slag replacement cements but for pulverised fuel ash and ordinary Portland cements no corrosion product was evident either from X-ray diffraction or laser Raman measurements. (Author)

  18. Corrosion resistance of zinc-magnesium coated steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosking, N.C.; Stroem, M.A.; Shipway, P.H.; Rudd, C.D.

    2007-01-01

    A significant body of work exists in the literature concerning the corrosion behaviour of zinc-magnesium coated steel (ZMG), describing its enhanced corrosion resistance when compared to conventional zinc-coated steel. This paper begins with a review of the literature and identifies key themes in the reported mechanisms for the attractive properties of this material. This is followed by an experimental programme where ZMG was subjected to an automotive laboratory corrosion test using acidified NaCl solution. A 3-fold increase in time to red rust compared to conventional zinc coatings was measured. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the corrosion products formed. The corrosion products detected on ZMG included simonkolleite (Zn 5 Cl 2 (OH) 8 . H 2 O), possibly modified by magnesium uptake, magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH) 2 ) and a hydroxy carbonate species. It is proposed that the oxygen reduction activity at the (zinc) cathodes is reduced by precipitation of alkali-resistant Mg(OH) 2 , which is gradually converted to more soluble hydroxy carbonates by uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide. This lowers the surface pH sufficiently to allow thermodynamically for general precipitation of insoluble simonkolleite over the corroding surface thereby retarding the overall corrosion reactions, leaving only small traces of magnesium corrosion products behind. Such a mechanism is consistent with the experimental findings reported in the literature

  19. Corrosion behavior of zinc-nickel alloy electrodeposited coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabri Miranda, F.J. [USIMINAS, Ipatinga, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Margarit, I.C.P.; Mattos, O.R.; Barcia, O.E. [UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Wiart, R. [Univ. Pierre et M. Curie, Paris (France)

    1999-08-01

    Various types of zinc-electrocoated steel sheets are used to improve the durability of car bodies. Among these coatings, the Zn-Ni alloy has higher corrosion resistance than pure Zn, as well as better welding and painting properties. The corrosion mechanism of the Zn-Ni alloy has been investigated mainly on the basis of accelerated tests and electrochemical measurements. There are few data about long-term corrosion tests. In the present study, the behavior of unpainted Zn-Ni alloy coated steel was studied during 3 years of exposure in industrial and marine environments. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and surface analysis (scanning electron microscopy [SEM] and Auger electron spectroscopy [AES]) were the experimental techniques used. Long-term atmospheric corrosion mechanism of Zn-Ni coatings was discussed and compared with that proposed based on short-term tests.

  20. Seawater corrosion tests for low-level radioactive waste drum containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Sho; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1985-11-01

    This report is a part of corrosion tests of drums under various environmental conditions (seawater, river water, coastal sand, inland soil and indoor and outdoor atmosphere) done at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute sponsored by the Science and Technology Agency. The corrosion tests were started in November, 1977 and complated at March, 1984. This report describes the results of the seawater corrosion tests which are part of the final report, ''Corrosion Safety Demonstration Test'' (Japanese), and it is expected to contribute the safety assessment of sea dumping of low-level radioactive waste packages. (author)

  1. Daily Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Several different government offices have published the Daily weather maps over its history. The publication has also gone by different names over time. The U.S....

  2. NOS Bathymetric Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection of bathymetric contour maps which represent the seafloor topography includes over 400 individual titles and covers US offshore areas including Hawaii...

  3. Evaporated metal films as indicators of atmospheric pollution. II. Resistance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodge, Jr, J P; Frank, E R

    1962-01-01

    There appears to be a direct relationship between gross atmospheric features associated with the accumulation of substances in air that are corrosive to metals and the rate of resistance change of thin metallic films. This behavior is the most striking in aluminum. The suggested apparatus provides an inexpensive and rapid method determining total atmospheric corrosiveness. 1 reference, 10 figures.

  4. Evaluation of corrosive behavior of SAE 5155 by corrosion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Jae Pil; Park, Keyung Dong

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the influence of shot peening and corrosive condition for corrosion property was investigated on immersed in 3.5% NaCl, 10% HNO 3 + 3% HF, 6% FeCl 3 . The immersion test was performed on two kinds of specimen. The immersion periods was performed 30days. Corrosion potential, weight loss were investigated from experimental results. From test results, the effect of shot peening on the corrosion was evaluated

  5. Microbiologically induced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Biological attack is a problem that can affect all metallic materials in a variety of environments and systems. In the power industry, corrosion studies have focused on condensers and service water systems where slime, barnacles, clams, and other macro-organisms are easily detected. Efforts have been made to eliminate the effect of these organisms through the use of chlorination, backflushing, organic coating, or thermal shock. The objective is to maintain component performance by eliminating biofouling and reducing metallic corrosion. Recently, corrosion of power plant components by micro-organisms (bacteria) has been identified even in very clean systems. A system's first exposure to microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) occurs during its first exposure to an aqueous environment, such as during hydrotest or wet layup. Corrosion of buried pipelines by sulfate-reducing bacteria has been studied by the petrochemical industry for years. This paper discusses various methods of diagnosing, monitoring, and controlling MIC in a variety of systems, as well as indicates areas where further study is needed

  6. Study on metal material corrosion behavior of packaging of cement solidified form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhouguo; Lin Meiqiong; Fan Xianhua

    1997-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of A3 carbon steel is studied by the specimens that are exposed to atmosphere, embedded in cement solidified form or immersed in corrosion liquid. The corrosion rate is determined by mass change of the specimens. In order to compare the corrosion resistant performance of various coatings, the specimens painted with various material such as epoxide resin, propionic acid resin, propane ether resin and Ti-white paint are tested. The results of the tests show that corrosion rate of A3 carbon steel is less than 10 -3 mm·a -1 in the atmosphere and the cement solidified from, less than 0.1 mm·a -1 in the corrosion liquids, and pH value in the corrosion liquids also affect the corrosion rate of A3 carbon steel. The corrosion resistant performance of Ti-white paint is better than that of other paints. So, A3 carbon steel as packaging material can meet the requirements during storage

  7. Corrosion failure analysis as related to prevention of corrosion failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suss, H.

    1977-10-01

    The factors and conditions which have contributed to many of the corrosion related service failures are discussed based on a review of actual case histories. The anti-corrosion devices which developed as a result of these failure analyses are reviewed, and the method which must be adopted and used to take advantage of the available corrosion prevention techniques is discussed

  8. Development phase of corrosion program in aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Providences adopted to implantation of corrosion program in aquatic ecosystems, developed by CDTN, NUCLEN and FURNAS are presented. The area, the atmospheric exposition station of Angra dos Reis, the marine floating, the material to test specimen and its preparation are described. (C.M.) [pt

  9. Modeling of Metal Structure Corrosion Damage: A State of the Art Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Portioli

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The durability of metal structures is strongly influenced by damage due to atmospheric corrosion, whose control is a key aspect for design and maintenance of both new constructions and historical buildings. Nevertheless, only general provisions are given in European codes to prevent the effects of corrosion during the lifetime of metal structures. In particular, design guidelines such as Eurocode 3 do not provide models for the evaluation of corrosion depth that are able to predict the rate of thickness loss as a function of different influencing parameters. In this paper, the modeling approaches of atmospheric corrosion damage of metal structures, which are available in both ISO standards and the literature, are presented. A comparison among selected degradation models is shown in order to evaluate the possibility of developing a general approach to the evaluation of thickness loss due to corrosion.

  10. Corrosion testing facilities in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, R.; Subramanian, Venu

    1981-01-01

    Major types of corrosion tests, establishment of specifications on corrosion testing and scope of their application in practice are briefly described. Important organizations in the world which publish specifications/standards are listed. Indian organizations which undertake corrosion testing and test facilities available at them are also listed. Finally in an appendix, a comprehensive list of specifications relevant to corrosion testing is given. It is arranged under the headings: environmental testing, humidity tests, salt spray/fog tests, immersion tests, specification corrosion phenomena, (tests) with respect to special corrosion media, (tests) with respect to specific corrosion prevention methods, and specific corrosion tests using electrical and electrochemical methods (principles). Each entry in the list furnishes information about: nature of the test, standard number, and its specific application. (M.G.B.)

  11. Novel corrosion experiments using the wire beam electrode: (III) Measuring electrochemical corrosion parameters from both the metallic and electrolytic phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Yong-Jun; Liu, Tie; Aung, Naing Naing

    2006-01-01

    The wire beam electrode (WBE) and the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) have been applied in a novel combination to measure, for the first time, electrochemical parameters simultaneously from both the metallic and electrolytic phases of a corroding metal surface. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the application of this combined WBE-SRET method in obtaining unique information on localised corrosion mechanism, by investigating typical corrosion processes occurring over a mild steel WBE surface exposed to the classic Evans solution. The WBE method was used to map current and potential distributions in the metallic phase, and the SRET was used to map current or potential distribution in the electrolytic phase. It has been found that the combined WBE-SRET method is able to gain useful information on macro-cell electrochemical corrosion processes that involve macro-scale separation of anodes and cathodes. In such macro-cell corrosion systems, maps measured using WBE and SRET were found to correlate with each other and both methods were able to detect the locations of anodic sites. However the movement of the scanning probe during SRET measurements was found to affect the SRET detection of cathodic sites. In micro-cell corrosion systems where the separation of anodic and cathodic sites were less distinct, SRET measurement was found to be insensitive in detecting anodic and cathodic sites, while the WBE method was still able to produce results that correlated well with observed corrosion behaviour. Results obtained from this work suggest that the WBE-SRET method is applicable for understanding the initiation, propagation and electrochemical behaviour of localised corrosion anodes and cathodes, and also their dependence on externally controllable variables, such as solution pH changes and the existence of surface coatings

  12. Jovian atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, M.; Travis, L.D.

    1986-10-01

    A conference on the atmosphere of Jupiter produced papers in the areas of thermal and ortho-para hydrogen structure, clouds and chemistry, atmospheric structure, global dynamics, synoptic features and processes, atmospheric dynamics, and future spaceflight opportunities. A session on the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune was included, and the atmosphere of Saturn was discussed in several papers

  13. Corrosion behaviour of Nd-Fe-B magnets containing Co and Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlowska, G.; Bala, H.; Szymura, S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of partial substitution of iron by Co and Cr on corrosion behaviour of Nd 16 Fe 76 B 8 permanent magnets has been investigated. Small additions of Cr (1 to 4%at) are enough to ensure maximal corrosion inhibition. Greater amount of Cr into Nd-Fe-B alloy (>8%at), against expectations, practically do not affect the corrosion behaviour and additionally, considerably worsen its magnetic properties. Corrosion tests have shown a distinct effect of cobalt addition on the inhibition of both acid corrosion and the abnormal dissolution process of the Nd-Fe-Co-B magnets. Cobalt additions inhibit the atmosphere corrosion of Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets, especially a salt-spray environment. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  14. Corrosion Challenges for the Oil and Gas Industry in the State of Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Roy

    In Qatar oil and gas has been produced from onshore fields in more than 70 years, while the first offshore field delivered its first crude oil in 1965. Due to the atmospheric conditions in Qatar with periodically high humidity, high chloride content, dust/sand combined with the temperature variations, external corrosion is a big treat to the installations and connecting infrastructure. Internal corrosion in tubing, piping and process systems is also a challenge due to high H2S content in the hydrocarbon mixture and exposure to corrosive aquifer water. To avoid corrosion different type of mitigations like application of coating, chemical treatment and material selection are important elements. This presentation will review the experiences with corrosion challenges for oil & gas installations in Qatar including some examples of corrosion failures that have been seen.

  15. Acid corrosion inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, N G

    1964-04-28

    An acid corrosion inhibitor is prepared by a 2-stage vacuum evaporation of effluents obtained from the ammonia columns of the coking oven plant. The effluent, leaving a scrubber in which the phenols are removed at a temperature of 98$C, passes through a quartz filter and flows into a heated chamber in which it is used for preheating a solution circulating through a vacuum unit, maintaining the temperature of the solution at 55$ to 60$C. The effluent enters a large tank in which it is boiled at 55$ to 60$C under 635 to 640 mm Hg pressure. Double evaporation of this solution yields a very effective acid corrosion inhibitor. Its corrosion-preventing effect is 97.9% compared with 90.1% for thiourea and 88.5% for urotropin under identical conditions.

  16. Plastics for corrosion inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Goldade, Victor A; Makarevich, Anna V; Kestelman, Vladimir N

    2005-01-01

    The development of polymer composites containing inhibitors of metal corrosion is an important endeavour in modern materials science and technology. Corrosion inhibitors can be located in a polymer matrix in the solid, liquid or gaseous phase. This book details the thermodynamic principles for selecting these components, their compatibility and their effectiveness. The various mechanisms of metal protection – barrier, inhibiting and electromechanical – are considered, as are the conflicting requirements placed on the structure of the combined material. Two main classes of inhibited materials (structural and films/coatings) are described in detail. Examples are given of structural plastics used in friction units subjected to mechano-chemical wear and of polymer films/coatings for protecting metal objects against corrosion.

  17. Corrosion Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Russ Braunling

    2004-10-31

    The Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS) program developed and demonstrated a continuously on-line system that provides real-time corrosion information. The program focused on detecting pitting corrosion in its early stages. A new invention called the Intelligent Ultrasonic Probe (IUP) was patented on the program. The IUP uses ultrasonic guided waves to detect small defects and a Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) algorithm to provide an image of the pits. Testing of the CMS demonstrated the capability to detect pits with dimensionality in the sub-millimeter range. The CMS was tested in both the laboratory and in a pulp and paper industrial plant. The system is capable of monitoring the plant from a remote location using the internet.

  18. Stochastic theory of fatigue corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyun

    1999-10-01

    A stochastic theory of corrosion has been constructed. The stochastic equations are described giving the transportation corrosion rate and fluctuation corrosion coefficient. In addition the pit diameter distribution function, the average pit diameter and the most probable pit diameter including other related empirical formula have been derived. In order to clarify the effect of stress range on the initiation and growth behaviour of pitting corrosion, round smooth specimen were tested under cyclic loading in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  19. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi [Wading River, NY

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  20. Corrosion of metal materials embedded in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffo, G.S.; Farina, S.B.; Schulz, F.M.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon steel is the material most frequently used to strengthen reinforced concrete structures; however, stainless steel and galvanized steel reinforcements are also used in construction concretes; and they are not often used in Latin America. Meanwhile, there are other metals that are embedded in the concrete forming part of the openings (aluminum) or in tubing systems (copper and lead). The use of concrete as a cementing material is also useful for immobilizing wastes, such as for example those generated by the nuclear industry. There is a great deal of research and development on the corrosion of steel reinforcements, but the same is not true for the behavior of other metals embedded in concrete and that also undergo corrosive processes. This work aims to study the corrosion of different metals: copper, lead, aluminum, zinc, stainless steel and carbon steel; embedded in concrete with and without the presence of aggressive species for the metal materials. Test pieces were made of mortar containing rods of different materials for testing, and with chlorides added in concentrations of 0; 0.3 % and 1% (mass of chloride per mass of cement). The test pieces were exposed to different conditions; laboratory environment with a relative humidity (RH) of 45%, a controlled atmosphere with 98% RH and submerged in a solution of 3.5% NaCl. The susceptibility to corrosion of the different metals was evaluated using techniques to monitor the corrosion potential, the resistivity of the mortar and the polarization resistance (PR). The rods were weighed before being placed inside the test pieces to later determine the loss of weight generated by the corrosion process. Polarization curves for the metals were also traced in a simulated pore solution (SPS) and in SPS with added chloride. The results obtained to date show that, of all the metals analyzed, aluminum is the most susceptible to corrosion, and that the test specimens with 0% and 1% of chloride exposed to the laboratory

  1. Erosion-corrosion interactions and their affect on marine and offshore components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Robert JK [Surface Engineering and Tribology Group, School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    The operation of modern fluid handling systems demands for low costs, reliability, longevity and no loss of fluid containment. All these can be achieved by minimising the material damage caused by the combined attack of solid particle or cavitation impingement and corrosion. This paper will cover the rationale behind the selection of erosion resistance surfaces for fluid handling equipment and highlight the complexities encountered when these surfaces are exposed to environments which contain sand particles or cavitation in a corrosive medium. The erosion and erosion-corrosion performance of a variety of coatings and bulk surfaces will be discussed using volume loss rate versus sand impact energy maps. Recent research into the erosion-corrosion of polymer coatings, PEO and HVOF aluminium and nickel aluminium bronze coatings will be reviewed. Electrochemical techniques designed to monitor the erosion-corrosion mechanisms and coating integrity will be presented and used to quantify the synergistic terms present when both erosion and corrosion act concurrently. (author)

  2. Achievments of corrosion science and corrosion protection technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, M.; Stehjl, R.

    1985-01-01

    Problems of corrosion-mechanical strength of metals, effect of corrosive media on creep characteristics are presented. New concepts of the mechanism of corrosion cracking and its relation to hydrogen embrittlement are described. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement effect on the process of corrosion cracking of different steels and alloys are considered. The dependence of such types of failure on various structural factors is shown. Data on corrosion cracking of high-strength aluminium and titanium alloys, mechanism of the processes and protective methods are given

  3. Effect of mechanical treatment on intergranular corrosion of 6064 alloy bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sláma, P.; Nacházel, J.

    2017-02-01

    Aluminium Al-Mg-Si-type alloys (6xxx-series) exhibit good mechanical properties, formability, weldability and good corrosion resistance in various environments. They often find use in automotive industry and other applications. Some alloys, however, particularly those with higher copper levels, show increased susceptibility to intergranular corrosion. Intergranular corrosion (IGC) is typically related to the formation of microgalvanic cells between cathodic, more noble phases and depleted (precipitate-free) zones along grain boundaries. It is encountered mainly in AlMgSi alloys containing Cu, where it is thought to be related to the formation Q-phase precipitates (Al4Mg8Si7Cu2) along grain boundaries. The present paper describes the effects of mechanical working (extrusion, drawing and straightening) and artificial aging on intergranular corrosion in rods of the 6064 alloy. The resistance to intergranular corrosion was mapped using corrosion tests according to EN ISO 11846, method B. Corrosion tests showed dependence of corrosion type on mechanical processing of the material. Intergranular, pitting and transgranular corrosion was observed. Artificial ageing influenced mainly the depth of the corrosion.

  4. Surface Corrosion Resistance in Turning of Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the issues associated with implant surface modification. We propose a method to form the oxide film on implant surfaces by dry turning to generate heat and injecting oxygen-rich gas at the turning-tool flank. The morphology, roughness, composition, and thickness of the oxide films in an oxygen-rich atmosphere were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, optical profiling, and Auger electron spectroscopy. Electrochemical methods were used to study the corrosion resistance of the modified surfaces. The corrosion resistance trends, analyzed relative to the oxide film thickness, indicate that the oxide film thickness is the major factor affecting the corrosion resistance of titanium alloys in a simulated body fluid (SBF. Turning in an oxygen-rich atmosphere can form a thick oxide film on the implant surface. The thickness of surface oxide films processed at an oxygen concentration of 80% was improved to 4.6 times that of films processed at an oxygen concentration of 21%; the free corrosion potential shifted positively by 0.357 V, which significantly improved the corrosion resistance of titanium alloys in the SBF. Therefore, the proposed method may (partially replace the subsequent surface oxidation. This method is significant for biomedical development because it shortens the process flow, improves the efficiency, and lowers the cost.

  5. Corrosion resistant cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive, from about 4 to about 16 percent by weight metal binder phase, and with the remaining portion being from about 84 to about 96 percent by weight metal carbide wherein the metal carbide consists essentially of from about 4 to about 30 percent by weight of a transition metal carbide or mixtures thereof selected from Group IVB and of the Periodic Table of Elements and from about 70 to about 96 percent tungsten carbide. The metal binder phase consists essentially of nickel and from about 10 to about 25 percent by weight chromium, the effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive being selected from the group consisting essentially of copper, silver, tine and combinations thereof

  6. Corrosion resistant steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.; Borisov, V.P.; Latyshev, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion resistant steel for production of sheets and tubes containing C, Mn, Cr, Si, Fe is suggested. It is alloyed with vanadium and cerium for improving tensile properties and ductility. The steel can be melted by a conventional method in electric-arc or induction furnaces. The mentioned steel is intended to be used as a substitute for nickel-bearing austenitic steels

  7. Corrosion in seawater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, S.

    1988-01-01

    Highly alloyed stainless steels have been exposed to natural chlorinated and chlorine-free seawater at 35 deg. C. Simulated tube-tubesheet joints, weld joints and galvanic couples with titanium, 90/10 CuNi and NiAl bronze were tested and evaluated for corrosion. The corrosion rates of various anode materials - zinc, aluminium and soft iron - were also determined. Finally the risk of hydrogen embrittlement of tubes of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection was studied. An attempt was also made to explain the cracking mechanism of the ferritic steels by means of transmission electron microscopy. One important conclusion of the project is that chlorinated seawater is considerably more corrosive to stainless steels than chlorine-free water, whereas chlorination reduces the rate of galvanic corrosion of copper materials coupled to stainless steels. Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection of carbon steel or cast iron in the same structure can be avoided by strict potentiostatic control of the applied potential. (author)

  8. Corrosion resistant composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanin, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Foundations for corrosion-resistant composite materials design are considered with account of components compatibility. Fibrous and lamellar composites with metal matrix, dispersion-hardened steels and alloys, refractory metal carbides-, borides-, nitrides-, silicides-based composites are described. Cermet compositions and fields of their application, such as protective coatings for operation in agressive media at high temperatures, are presented

  9. Smart Coatings for Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wendy; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  10. Corrosion potential analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Karl F.

    1998-03-01

    Many cities in the northeastern U.S. transport electrical power from place to place via underground cables, which utilize voltages from 68 kv to 348 kv. These cables are placed in seamless steel pipe to protect the conductors. These buried pipe-type-cables (PTCs) are carefully designed and constantly pressurized with transformer oil to prevent any possible contamination. A protective coating placed on the outside diameter of the pipe during manufacture protects the steel pipe from the soil environment. Notwithstanding the protection mechanisms available, the pipes remain vulnerable to electrochemical corrosion processes. If undetected, corrosion can cause the pipes to leak transformer oil into the environment. These leaks can assume serious proportions due to the constant pressure on the inside of the pipe. A need exists for a detection system that can dynamically monitor the corrosive potential on the length of the pipe and dynamically adjust cathodic protection to counter local and global changes in the cathodic environment surrounding the pipes. The northeastern United States contains approximately 1000 miles of this pipe. This milage is critical to the transportation and distribution of power. So critical, that each of the pipe runs has a redundant double running parallel to it. Invocon, Inc. proposed and tested a technically unique and cost effective solution to detect critical corrosion potential and to communicate that information to a central data collection and analysis location. Invocon's solution utilizes the steel of the casing pipe as a communication medium. Each data gathering station on the pipe can act as a relay for information gathered elsewhere on the pipe. These stations must have 'smart' network configuration algorithms that constantly test various communication paths and determine the best and most power efficient route through which information should flow. Each network station also performs data acquisition and analysis tasks that ultimately

  11. Corrosion behavior of a self-sealing pore micro-arc oxidation film on AM60 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Kaihui; Song, Yingwei; Shan, Dayong; Han, En-Hou

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pore sealing constituents fall off and titanium oxides remain during corrosion. • Dark regions of film are corroded by migration of corrosion media through pores. • Light regions of film are corroded by transverse expansion of cracks. • Both outer and inner layers of the film provide effective protection to substrate. - Abstract: The deterioration process of a self-sealing pore micro-arc oxidation (MAO) film was investigated. The surface and cross-section corrosion morphologies were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical composition was detected by EDS elemental mapping and XRD. The corrosion process was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The surface of the film in dark and light regions exhibits different corrosion behavior. In the dark regions, the corrosion process mainly concentrates on the migration of corrosion media through the pores inward. In the light regions, the transverse expansion of cracks plays a key role, accompanying the exfoliation of film constituents.

  12. Risk based inspection for atmospheric storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, Agus; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Ismail, Rifky; Kim, Seon Jin

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is an attack that occurs on a metallic material as a result of environment's reaction.Thus, it causes atmospheric storage tank's leakage, material loss, environmental pollution, equipment failure and affects the age of process equipment then finally financial damage. Corrosion risk measurement becomesa vital part of Asset Management at the plant for operating any aging asset.This paper provides six case studies dealing with high speed diesel atmospheric storage tank parts at a power plant. A summary of the basic principles and procedures of corrosion risk analysis and RBI applicable to the Process Industries were discussed prior to the study. Semi quantitative method based onAPI 58I Base-Resource Document was employed. The risk associated with corrosion on the equipment in terms of its likelihood and its consequences were discussed. The corrosion risk analysis outcome used to formulate Risk Based Inspection (RBI) method that should be a part of the atmospheric storage tank operation at the plant. RBI gives more concern to inspection resources which are mostly on `High Risk' and `Medium Risk' criteria and less on `Low Risk' shell. Risk categories of the evaluated equipment were illustrated through case study analysis outcome.

  13. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80 degrees C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either open-quotes satisfactoryclose quotes (2-20 mpy) or open-quotes excellentclose quotes (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment

  14. Atmospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruetter, Juerg

    1997-01-01

    It is about the levels of contamination in center America, the population's perception on the problem, effects of the atmospheric contamination, effects in the environment, causes of the atmospheric contamination, possibilities to reduce the atmospheric contamination and list of Roeco Swisscontac in atmospheric contamination

  15. Mapping out Map Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferjan Ormeling

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Discussing the requirements for map data quality, map users and their library/archives environment, the paper focuses on the metadata the user would need for a correct and efficient interpretation of the map data. For such a correct interpretation, knowledge of the rules and guidelines according to which the topographers/cartographers work (such as the kind of data categories to be collected, and the degree to which these rules and guidelines were indeed followed are essential. This is not only valid for the old maps stored in our libraries and archives, but perhaps even more so for the new digital files as the format in which we now have to access our geospatial data. As this would be too much to ask from map librarians/curators, some sort of web 2.0 environment is sought where comments about data quality, completeness and up-to-dateness from knowledgeable map users regarding the specific maps or map series studied can be collected and tagged to scanned versions of these maps on the web. In order not to be subject to the same disadvantages as Wikipedia, where the ‘communis opinio’ rather than scholarship, seems to be decisive, some checking by map curators of this tagged map use information would still be needed. Cooperation between map curators and the International Cartographic Association ( ICA map and spatial data use commission to this end is suggested.

  16. Development of chloride-induced corrosion in pre-cracked RC beams under sustained loading: Effect of load-induced cracks, concrete cover, and exposure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Linwen [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC, Toulouse (France); Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada); François, Raoul, E-mail: raoul.francois@insa-toulouse.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC, Toulouse (France); Dang, Vu Hiep [Hanoi Architectural University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Hanoi (Viet Nam); L' Hostis, Valérie [CEA Saclay, CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Bétons et des Argiles, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gagné, Richard [Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    This paper deals with corrosion initiation and propagation in pre-cracked reinforced concrete beams under sustained loading during exposure to a chloride environment. Specimen beams that were cast in 2010 were compared to specimens cast in 1984. The only differences between the two sets of beams were the casting direction in relation to tensile reinforcement and the exposure conditions in the salt-fog chamber. The cracking maps, corrosion maps, chloride profiles, and cross-sectional loss of one group of two beams cast in 2010 were studied and their calculated corrosion rates were compared to that of beams cast in 1984 in order to investigate the factors influencing the natural corrosion process. Experimental results show that, after rapid initiation of corrosion at the crack tip, the corrosion process practically halted and the time elapsing before corrosion resumed depended on the exposure conditions and cover depth.

  17. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M.

    2008-06-01

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants

  18. Stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth monitoring in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senadheera, T.; Shipilov, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (including stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue) is one of the major causes for materials failure in a wide variety of industries. It is extremely important to understand the mechanism(s) of environmentally assisted crack propagation in structural materials so as to choose correctly from among the various possibilities-alloying elements, heat treatment of steels, parameters of cathodic protection, and inhibitors-to prevent in-service failures due to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. An important step towards understanding the mechanism of environmentally assisted crack propagation is designing a testing machine for crack growth monitoring and that simultaneously provides measurement of electrochemical parameters. In the present paper, a direct current (DC) potential drop method for monitoring crack propagation in metals and a testing machine that uses this method and allows for measuring electrochemical parameters during stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth are described. (author)

  19. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M

    2008-06-15

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants.

  20. Scanning reference electrode techniques in localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Vyas, B.

    1979-04-01

    The principles, advantages, and implementations of scanning reference electrode techniques are reviewed. Data related to pitting, intergranular corrosion, welds and stress corrosion cracking are presented. The technique locates the position of localized corrosion and can be used to monitor the development of corrosion and changes in the corrosion rate under a wide range of conditions

  1. CHECWORKS integrated software for corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schefski, C.; Pietralik; Hazelton, T.

    1997-01-01

    CHECWORKS, a comprehensive software package for managing Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC, also called erosion-corrosion and flow-assisted corrosion) concerns, is expanding to include other systems and other aspects of corrosion control in CANDU reactors. This paper will outline CHECWORKS applications at various CANDU stations and further plans for CHECWORKS to become a code for comprehensive corrosion control management. (author)

  2. Behaviour of unprotected and anodized aluminium in atmospheres with very different pollution degrees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bautista, A.; Morcillo, M.; Gonzalez, J.A.; Simancas, J.; Otero, E.

    1998-01-01

    In the present research, the responses of unprotected and anodized aluminium specimens are compared after they have been exposed to 12 different atmospheres. The significance of the anodizing and the sealing on the atmospheric corrosion behaviour is analysed. The results show that the anodizing and sealing of aluminium exclude the risk of pitting corrosion in marine atmospheres and that the oxide thickness is not determining, at least during the first year of exposure. (Author) 8 refs

  3. The Behavior of Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds in an Aggressive Coastal Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The shift to use environmentally friendly technologies throughout future space-related launch programs prompted a study aimed at replacing current petroleum and solvent-based Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) with environmentally friendly alternatives. The work in this paper focused on the identification and evaluation of environmentally friendly CPCs for use in protecting flight hardware and ground support equipment from atmospheric corrosion. The CPCs, while a temporary protective coating, must survive in the aggressive coastal marine environment that exists throughout the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The different protection behaviors of fifteen different soft film CPCs, both common petroleum-based and newer environmentally friendly types, were evaluated on various steel and aluminum substrates. The CPC and substrate systems were subjected to atmospheric testing at the Kennedy Space Center's Beachside Atmospheric Corrosion Test Site, as well as cyclic accelerated corrosion testing. Each CPC also underwent physical characterization and launch-related compatibility testing . The initial results for the fifteen CPC systems are reported : Key words: corrosion preventive compound, CPC, spaceport, environmentally friendly, atmospheric exposure, marine, carbon steel, aluminum alloy, galvanic corrosion, wire on bolt.

  4. Anti-Corrosion Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    SuperSpan RM 8000 is an anti-corrosion coating which effectively counteracts acid degradation, abrasive wear, and cracking in power industry facilities. It was developed by RM Industrial Products Company, Inc. with NERAC assistance. It had previously been necessary to shut down plants to repair or replace corroded duct-work in coal burning utilities. NASA-developed technology was especially useful in areas relating to thermoconductivity of carbon steel and the bonding characteristics of polymers. The product has sold well.

  5. Corrosion in power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    The proceedings contain the full texts of 25 papers of which 10 fall under the INIS Subject Scope. They concern the problems of corrosion in WWER type nuclear power plants. The topics include structural materials and equipment of the primary and the secondary circuits of nuclear power plants, components used in disposal of spent nuclear fuel, sodium valves for fast reactors and basic study of the properties of materials used in nuclear power. (Z.M.). 12 figs., 6 tabs., 46 refs

  6. Air corrosion in storing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazaudier, F.; Feron, D.; Baklouti, M.; Midoux, N.

    2001-01-01

    The air corrosiveness of a radioactive waste package has been estimated in a store inside which the environmental conditions are supposed to be rather close to the outside ones. It is expressed according to the ISO 9223 standard, from the humidification value and the amounts of sulfur dioxide and chlorine ions. A computer code has been perfected too; the thermal behaviour of the package can then been determined. (O.M.)

  7. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  8. Mapping pan-Arctic CH4 emissions using an adjoint method by integrating process-based wetland and lake biogeochemical models and atmospheric CH4 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Z.; Zhuang, Q.; Henze, D. K.; Frankenberg, C.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Sweeney, C.; Turner, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding CH4 emissions from wetlands and lakes are critical for the estimation of Arctic carbon balance under fast warming climatic conditions. To date, our knowledge about these two CH4 sources is almost solely built on the upscaling of discontinuous measurements in limited areas to the whole region. Many studies indicated that, the controls of CH4 emissions from wetlands and lakes including soil moisture, lake morphology and substrate content and quality are notoriously heterogeneous, thus the accuracy of those simple estimates could be questionable. Here we apply a high spatial resolution atmospheric inverse model (nested-grid GEOS-Chem Adjoint) over the Arctic by integrating SCIAMACHY and NOAA/ESRL CH4 measurements to constrain the CH4 emissions estimated with process-based wetland and lake biogeochemical models. Our modeling experiments using different wetland CH4 emission schemes and satellite and surface measurements show that the total amount of CH4 emitted from the Arctic wetlands is well constrained, but the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions is sensitive to priors. For CH4 emissions from lakes, our high-resolution inversion shows that the models overestimate CH4 emissions in Alaskan costal lowlands and East Siberian lowlands. Our study also indicates that the precision and coverage of measurements need to be improved to achieve more accurate high-resolution estimates.

  9. Corrosion of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, J.; Caillat, R.

    1958-01-01

    Data are reported on the volatilization rate of beryllium oxide in moist air depending on temperature and water vapour concentration. They are concerned with powder samples or sintered shapes of various densities. For sintered samples, the volatilization rate is very low under the following conditions: - temperature: 1300 deg. C, - water vapour concentration in moist air: 25 g/m 3 , - flow rate: 12 I/hour corresponding to a speed of 40 m/hour on the surface of the sample. For calcinated powders (1300 deg. C), grain growth has been observed under a stream of moist air at 1100 deg. C. For instance, grain size changes from 0,5 to at least 2 microns after 500 hours of exposure at this temperature. Furthermore, results data are reported on corrosion of sintered beryllium oxide in pressurized water. At 250 deg. C, under a pressure of 40 kg/cm 2 water is very slightly corrosive; however, internal strains are revealed. Finally, some features on the corrosion in liquid sodium are exposed. (author) [fr

  10. Zircaloy-4 corrosion in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyfitch, S.; Smalley, W.R.; Roberts, E.

    1985-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion has been studied extensively in the nuclear industry for a number of years. Following the early crud-related corrosion failures in the Saxton test reactor, Westinghouse undertook numerous programs to minimize crud deposition on fuel rods in power reactors through primary coolant chemistry control. Modern plants today are operating with improved coolant chemistry guidelines, and crud deposition levels are very low in proportion to earlier experience. Zircaloy-4 corrosion under a variety of coolant chemistry, heat flux and exposure conditions has been studied extensively. Experience to date, even in relatively high coolant temperature plants, has indicated that -for both fuel cladding and structural components- Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion performance has been excellent. Recognizing future industry trends, however, which will result in Zircaloy-4 being subjected to ever increasing corrosion duties, Westinghouse will continue accumulating Zircaloy-4 corrosion experience in large power plants. 13 refs.

  11. Nuclear corrosion science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Understanding corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods necessary for accurately measuring their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry for the safe, economic and competitive running of its plants. This book reviews the fundamentals of nuclear corrosion. Corrosion of nuclear materials, i.e. the interaction between these materials and their environments, is a major issue for plant safety as well as for operation and economic competitiveness. Understanding these corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods to accurately measure their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry. Combining assessment techniques and analytical models into this understanding allows operators to predict the service life of corrosion-affected nuclear plant materials, and to apply the most appropriate maintenance and mitigation options to ensure safe long term operation. This book critically reviews the fundamental corrosion mechani...

  12. Pipe Lines – External Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Babor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Two areas of corrosion occur in pipe lines: corrosion from the medium carried inside the pipes; corrosion attack upon the outside of the pipes (underground corrosion. Electrolytic processes are also involved in underground corrosion. Here the moisture content of the soil acts as an electrolyte, and the ions required to conduct the current are supplied by water-soluble salts (chlorides, sulfates, etc. present in the soil. The nature and amount of these soluble materials can vary within a wide range, which is seen from the varying electrical conductivity and pH (varies between 3 and 10. Therefore the characteristics of a soil will be an important factor in under-ground corrosion.

  13. Standard Guide for Conducting Corrosion Tests in Field Applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures for conducting corrosion tests in plant equipment or systems under operating conditions to evaluate the corrosion resistance of engineering materials. It does not cover electrochemical methods for determining corrosion rates. 1.1.1 While intended primarily for immersion tests, general guidelines provided can be applicable for exposure of test specimens in plant atmospheres, provided that placement and orientation of the test specimens is non-restrictive to air circulation. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. See also 10.4.2.

  14. Corrosion of beryllium exposed to celotex and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.; Butt, D.P.; Lillard, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Celotex is a commercial rigid cellulose fiberboard product primarily used in the building construction industry. Currently celotex is being used as a packing material in AL-R8 containers. Ion chromatography of celotex packing material at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has indicated that this material contains aggressive anions, including chloride, which may accelerate corrosion. It is well known that beryllium is susceptible to pitting corrosion when exposed to chloride containing environments. Levy noted pitting in beryllium at the open circuit potential when exposed to 0.1 M NaCl solution. This investigation attempts to evaluate the potential risk of accelerated beryllium corrosion from celotex and water which may occur naturally when celotex dust comes into contact with moisture from the atmosphere

  15. Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Test procedures for accelerated stress-corrosion testing of high-strength aluminum alloys faster and provide more quantitative information than traditional pass/fail tests. Method uses data from tests on specimen sets exposed to corrosive environment at several levels of applied static tensile stress for selected exposure times then subsequently tensile tested to failure. Method potentially applicable to other degrading phenomena (such as fatigue, corrosion fatigue, fretting, wear, and creep) that promote development and growth of cracklike flaws within material.

  16. Corrosion of fuel assembly materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, M.; Frejaville, G.; Beslu, P.

    1985-08-01

    Corrosion of zircaloy-4 is reviewed in relation with previsions of improvement in PWRs performance: higher fuel burnup; increase coolant temperature, implying nucleate boiling on the hot clad surfaces; increase duration of the cycle due to load-follow operation. Actual knowledge on corrosion rates, based partly on laboratory tests, is insufficient to insure that external clad corrosion will not constitute a limitation to these improvements. Therefore, additional testing within representative conditions is felt necessary [fr

  17. Corrosion Monitors for Embedded Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pfeifer, Kent B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Casias, Adrian L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorensen, Neil R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Missert, Nancy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We have developed and characterized novel in-situ corrosion sensors to monitor and quantify the corrosive potential and history of localized environments. Embedded corrosion sensors can provide information to aid health assessments of internal electrical components including connectors, microelectronics, wires, and other susceptible parts. When combined with other data (e.g. temperature and humidity), theory, and computational simulation, the reliability of monitored systems can be predicted with higher fidelity.

  18. Corrosion Performance of New Generation Aluminum-Lithium Alloys for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, James P.; Bovard, Francine S.; Chrzan, James D.; Vandenburgh, Peter

    Over the past several years, a new generation of aluminum-lithium alloys has been developed. These alloys are characterized by excellent strength, low density, and high modulus of elasticity and are therefore of interest for lightweight structural materials applications particularly for construction of current and future aircraft. These new alloys have also demonstrated significant improvements in corrosion resistance when compared with the legacy and incumbent alloys. This paper documents the superior corrosion resistance of the current commercial tempers of these materials and also discusses the corrosion performance as a function of the degree of artificial aging. Results from laboratory corrosion tests are compared with results from exposures in a seacoast atmosphere to assess the predictive capability of the laboratory tests. The correlations that have been developed between the laboratory tests and the seacoast exposures provide confidence that a set of available methods can provide an accurate assessment of the corrosion performance of this new generation of alloys.

  19. Corrosion resistance of modified layer on uranium formed by plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Zhong; Liu Kezhao; Bai Bin; Yan Dongxu

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen ion was implanted into uranium surface using plasma immersion ion implantation, and the corrosion resistance of modified layer was studied by corrosion experiment. SEM was used to observe variety of samples surface. In atmosphere, the sample surface had not changed during five months. In heat-humid environment, there was dot-corrosion appearing after two months, but it did not influence the integrity of the modified layer. AES was used to study the diffusion of oxygen and nitrogen during hot-humid corrosion, in three months, both of two elements diffused to the substrate, but the diffusion was weak. The structure of modified layer was not changed. Experimental results show that the modified layer formed by plasma immersion ion implantation has good corrosion resistance.

  20. Corrosion resistance of modified layer on uranium formed by plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long Zhong, E-mail: long2001@163.co [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan, 621900 (China); Liu Kezhao; Bai Bin; Yan Dongxu [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan, 621900 (China)

    2010-02-18

    Nitrogen ion was implanted into uranium surface using plasma immersion ion implantation, and the corrosion resistance of modified layer was studied by corrosion experiment. SEM was used to observe variety of samples surface. In atmosphere, the sample surface had not changed during five months. In heat-humid environment, there was dot-corrosion appearing after two months, but it did not influence the integrity of the modified layer. AES was used to study the diffusion of oxygen and nitrogen during hot-humid corrosion, in three months, both of two elements diffused to the substrate, but the diffusion was weak. The structure of modified layer was not changed. Experimental results show that the modified layer formed by plasma immersion ion implantation has good corrosion resistance.

  1. Morphology of the ash corrosion products on the P92 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernas, A.; Imosa, M.

    2004-01-01

    The P92 steel, owing to its high mechanical strength at an elevated temperature, is one of the new steel types intended for the components of modern boilers in the power engineering industry. Currently, attempts are being undertaken to use the P92 steel for the components of boiler units in municipal waste incineration plants. Therefore, it is important that an analysis be made of the P92 steel resistance to the high-temperature chlorine - sulfur corrosion impact, the latter being the main factor which limits durability of boilers in waste incineration plants. The present article presents the investigation of P92 steel corrosion resistance under the conditions of high-temperature chlorine- sulfur corrosion in an atmosphere of flue gas with ashes. The analyses were conducted by means of laboratory tests in an atmosphere containing sulfur and chlorine compounds. The morphology of corrosion products was determined by scanning microscopy and X-ray analysis methods. (author)

  2. Evaluation of steel corrosion by numerical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahigashi, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    Recently, various non-destructive and numerical methods have been used and many cases of steel corrosion are examined. For example, methods of evaluating corrosion through various numerical methods and evaluating macrocell corrosion and micro-cell corrosion using measurements have been proposed. However, there are few reports on estimating of corrosion loss with distinguishing the macro-cell and micro-cell corrosion and with resembling an actuality phenomenon. In this study, for distinguishin...

  3. Low carbon steel corrosion damage prediction in rural and urban environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz, V.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an Artificial Neural Network (ANN model for the damage function of carbon steel, expressed in μm of corrosion penetration as a function of environmental variables. Working in the context of the Iberoamerican Atmospheric Corrosion Map Project, the experimental data comes as result of the corrosion of low alloy steel subtracts in three test sites in Uruguay, South America. In addition, we included experimental values obtained from short time kinetics studies, corresponding to special series from one of the sites. The ANN numerical model shows attractive results regarding goodness of fit and residual distributions. It achieves a RMSE value of 0.5 μm while a classical regression model lies in the range of 4.1 μm. Furthermore, a properly adjusted ANN model can be useful in the prediction of corrosion damage under different climatological and pollution conditions, while linear models cannot.

    Este artículo presenta la metodología de las redes neuronales artificiales (RNA como solución para el modelado de los valores experimentales obtenidos en los procesos de corrosión atmosférica. Se desarrolla el modelo de RNA para la función de daño, expresada en μm de penetración para el acero de bajo carbono en función de las variables medioambientales, en el contexto del Proyecto MICAT (Mapa Iberoamericano de Corrosión Atmosférica y programas de experimentación propios. Los datos experimentales son resultado de los estudios de calibración sobre sustratos ferrosos en tres sitios del territorio uruguayo, Sudamérica. Se incluyen, además, los valores experimentales obtenidos en los estudios de cinéticas iniciales, correspondientes a series especiales de cortos tiempos de exposición en una de las estaciones de ensayo. El modelo numérico de RNA muestra resultados con un valor de RMSE de 0,5 μm, en tanto el modelo de regresión clásico arroja un valor de 4,1 μm.

  4. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Was, G. S.; Ampornrat, P.; Gupta, G.; Teysseyre, S.; West, E. A.; Allen, T. R.; Sridharan, K.; Tan, L.; Chen, Y.; Ren, X.; Pister, C.

    2007-09-01

    Supercritical water (SCW) has attracted increasing attention since SCW boiler power plants were implemented to increase the efficiency of fossil-based power plants. The SCW reactor (SCWR) design has been selected as one of the Generation IV reactor concepts because of its higher thermal efficiency and plant simplification as compared to current light water reactors (LWRs). Reactor operating conditions call for a core coolant temperature between 280 °C and 620 °C at a pressure of 25 MPa and maximum expected neutron damage levels to any replaceable or permanent core component of 15 dpa (thermal reactor design) and 100 dpa (fast reactor design). Irradiation-induced changes in microstructure (swelling, radiation-induced segregation (RIS), hardening, phase stability) and mechanical properties (strength, thermal and irradiation-induced creep, fatigue) are also major concerns. Throughout the core, corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and the effect of irradiation on these degradation modes are critical issues. This paper reviews the current understanding of the response of candidate materials for SCWR systems, focusing on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking response, and highlights the design trade-offs associated with certain alloy systems. Ferritic-martensitic steels generally have the best resistance to stress corrosion cracking, but suffer from the worst oxidation. Austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys have better oxidation resistance but are more susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. The promise of grain boundary engineering and surface modification in addressing corrosion and stress corrosion cracking performance is discussed.

  5. Archaeological analogs and corrosion; Analogues archeologiques et corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, D

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of the high level and long life radioactive wastes disposal deep underground, the ANDRA built a research program on the material corrosion. In particular they aim to design containers for a very long time storage. Laboratory experiments are in progress and can be completed by the analysis of metallic archaeological objects and their corrosion after hundred years. (A.L.B.)

  6. Phytochemicals as Green Corrosion Inhibitors in Various Corrosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is an intensive effort underway to develop new plant origin corrosion inhibitors for metal subjected to various environmental conditions. These efforts have been motivated by the desire to replace toxic inhibitors used for mitigation of corrosion of various metals and alloys in aqueous solutions. Plants represent a class ...

  7. Shadow Corrosion Mechanism of Zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullberg, Mats; Lysell, Gunnar; Nystrand, Ann-Charlotte

    2004-02-01

    Local corrosion enhancement appears on zirconium-base alloys in-core in boiling water reactors when the zirconium alloy is in close proximity to another metal. The visual appearance often resembles a shadow of the other component. The phenomenon is therefore referred to as 'shadow corrosion'. Shadow corrosion has been known for more than 25 years. Mechanisms based on either galvanic corrosion or local radiolysis effects have been proposed as explanations. Both types of mechanism have seemed to explain some facets of the phenomenon. Normally, shadow corrosion is of no practical significance. However, an enhanced and potentially serious form of shadow corrosion was discovered in 1996. This discovery stimulated new experiments that fully supported neither of the longstanding theories. Thus, there is till now no generally accepted understanding of the shadow corrosion phenomenon. The aim of the present investigation was to analyse the available data and to identify, if possible, a plausible mechanism of shadow corrosion. It was found that the experimental evidence is, with a few exceptions, remarkably consistent with a galvanic mechanism. The main exception is that shadow corrosion may occur also when the two metals are nominally electrically insulated. One way to account for the main exception could be to invoke the effect of photoconductivity. Photoconductivity results when a semiconductor or an insulator is irradiated with photons of UV or higher energy. The photons elevate electrons from the valence band to the conduction band, thereby raising the electron conductivity of the solid. In particular, photoconductivity lowers the electrical resistance of the normally insulating oxide on zirconium base alloys. Photoconductivity therefore also has the potential to explain why shadow corrosion is only seen in, or in proximity to, a nuclear reactor core. The suggested mechanism of shadow corrosion can be tested in a reasonably simple experiment in a research reactor

  8. EX1505 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  9. EX1006 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  10. EX1403 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  11. EX1703 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  12. EX1106 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  13. EX0905 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  14. EX1301 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  15. EX1704 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  16. EX1204 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  17. EX1105 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  18. EX1302 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  19. EX1206 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  20. EX1201 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  1. EX1104 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  2. EX1604 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  3. EX1101 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  4. EX1102 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  5. EX1303 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  6. EX1608 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  7. EX1705 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  8. EX1701 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  9. EX1603 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  10. EX0903 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  11. EX0904 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  12. EX1702 Seafloor Mapping Products Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of multibeam survey mapping products generated by the Okeanos Explorer seafloor mapping team on data collected on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during...

  13. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  14. Progress in the Research of Fatigue of Weathering Steel after Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianyu, Liang; Jian, Yao; Youwu, Xu

    2017-12-01

    Weathering steel has a good corrosion resistance in the atmosphere, and the application of weathering steel in civil structure also reduces the cost of painting and maintenance. It is also possible for the bare weathering steel to bear the fatigue load with a rust layer. This paper summarizes the fatigue researches after corrosion of weathering steel, including the shape of specimens, failure modes of fatigue and the conclusions obtained through experimental investigations. It is also introduced the fatigue model of weathering steel after corrosion, which can be useful for the engineering application or further researches.

  15. Corrosion of copper-based materials in irradiated moist air systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1991-06-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of oxygen-free copper (CDA-102), 70/30 copper-nickel (CDA-715), and 7% aluminum bronze (CDA-613) in an irradiated moist air environment was investigated. Experiments were performed in both dry and 40% RH (at sign 90 degree C) air at temperatures of 90 and 150 degree C. Initial corrosion rates were determined based on a combination of weight gain and weight loss measurements. Corrosion products observed were identified. These experiments support efforts by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to evaluate possible metallic barrier materials for nuclear waste containers. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  16. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-05

    high in water content, are less corrosive owing to their elevated viscosity and resulting low conductivity (᝺-7 S/cm) [30]. Asphaltenes and resins...wet surface to a water-wet surface. Sludge deposits are combinations of hydrocarbons, sand, clay , corTosion prod- ucts, and biomass that can reach 50...fine clay sun·ounded by a film of water. Under low flow conditions, these particles precipitate and form a sludge deposit. 27.4 TESTING 27 .4.1 A

  17. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  18. Corrosion management in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion is a major degradation mechanism of metals and alloys which significantly affects the global economy with an average loss of 3.5% of GDP of several countries in many important industrial sectors including chemical, petrochemical, power, oil, refinery, fertilizer etc. The demand for higher efficiency and achieving name plate capacity, in addition to ever increasing temperatures, pressures and complexities in equipment geometry of industrial processes, necessitate utmost care in adopting appropriate corrosion management strategies in selecting, designing, fabricating and utilising various materials and coatings for engineering applications in industries. Corrosion control and prevention is an important focus area as the savings achieved from practicing corrosion control and prevention would bring significant benefits to the industry. Towards this, advanced corrosion management strategies starting from design, manufacturing, operation, maintenance, in-service inspection and online monitoring are essential. At the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) strategic corrosion management efforts have been pursued in order to provide solutions to practical problems emerging in the plants, in addition to innovative efforts to provide insight into mechanism and understanding of corrosion of various engineering materials and coatings. In this presentation the author highlights how the nuclear industry benefited from the practical approach to successful corrosion management, particularly with respect to fast breeder reactor programme involving both reactor and associated reprocessing plants. (author)

  19. New technologies - new corrosion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitz, E.

    1994-01-01

    Adequate resistance of materials to corrosion is equally important for classical and for new technologies. This article considers the economic consequences of corrosion damage and, in addition to the long-known GNP orientation, presents a new approach to the estimation of the costs of corrosion and corrosion protection via maintenance and especially corrosion-related maintenance. The significance of ''high-tech'', ''medium-tech'' and ''low-tech'' material and corrosion problems is assessed. Selected examples taken from new technologies in the areas of power engineering, environmental engineering, chemical engineering, and biotechnology demonstrate the great significance of the problems. It is concluded that corrosion research and corrosion prevention technology will never come to an end but will constantly face new problems. Two technologies are of particular interest since they focus attention on new methods of investigation: microelectronics and final disposal of radioactive wastes. The article closes by considering the importance of the transfer of experience and technology. Since the manufacturs and operators of machines and plant do not generally have access to the very latest knowledge, they should be kept informed through advisory services, experimental studies, databases, and further education. (orig.) [de

  20. Corrosion inhibitors. Manufacture and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranney, M.W.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed information is presented relating to corrosion inhibitors. Areas covered include: cooling water, boilers and water supply plants; oil well and refinery operations; fuel and lubricant additives for automotive use; hydraulic fluids and machine tool lubes; grease compositions; metal surface treatments and coatings; and general processes for corrosion inhibitors

  1. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  2. Long-term corrosion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.

    1998-01-01

    The scope of this activity is to assess the long-term corrosion properties of metallic materials under consideration for fabricating waste package containers. Three classes of metals are to be assessed: corrosion resistant, intermediate corrosion resistant, and corrosion allowance. Corrosion properties to be evaluated are general, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress-corrosion cracking, and galvanic corrosion. The performance of these materials will be investigated under conditions that are considered relevant to the potential emplacement site. Testing in four aqueous solutions, and vapor phases above them, and at two temperatures are planned for this activity. (The environmental conditions, test metals, and matrix are described in detail in Section 3.0.) The purpose and objective of this activity is to obtain the kinetic and mechanistic information on degradation of metallic alloys currently being considered for waste package containers. This information will be used to provide assistance to (1) waste package design (metal barrier selection) (E-20-90 to E-20-92), (2) waste package performance assessment activities (SIP-PA-2), (3) model development (E-20-75 to E-20-89). and (4) repository license application

  3. Influence of mictrostructure features on the corrosion behaviourof AZ91 alloy in chloride media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Bukovinová

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the microstructure of as-cast AZ91 magnesium alloy, which applied to solution annealing treatment and ageing treatment respectively, was evaluated in terms of its corrosion behaviour in 0.1 M NaCl solution at room temperature. The corrosion process was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and the surface was characterized by scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM. The extent of corrosion damage was dependent on the microstructure. Surface potential maps indicated that, the surface potential of α-matrix is more positive than surface potential of β phase.

  4. Martensitic transformation in an intergranular corrosion area of austenitic stainless steel during thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Yen, Hung-Wei; Trimby, Patrick; Moody, Steven; Miller, Sarah; Chensee, Martin; Ringer, Simon; Cairney, Julie

    2014-01-01

    An oxidation-assisted martensitic phase transformation was observed in an austenitic stainless steel after thermal cycling up to 970 °C in air in a solar thermal steam reformer. The intergranular corrosion areas were investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structural-and-chemical maps revealed that within intergranular corrosion areas this martensitic transformation primarily occurs in oxidation-induced chromium-depleted zones, rather than due to only sensitization. This displacive transformation may also play a significant role in the rate at which intergranular corrosion takes place

  5. Fatigue and Corrosion in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Milella, Pietro Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This textbook, suitable for students, researchers and engineers, gathers the experience of more than 20 years of teaching fracture mechanics, fatigue and corrosion to professional engineers and running experimental tests and verifications to solve practical problems in engineering applications. As such, it is a comprehensive blend of fundamental knowledge and technical tools to address the issues of fatigue and corrosion. The book initiates with a systematic description of fatigue from a phenomenological point of view, since the early signs of submicroscopic damage in few surface grains and continues describing, step by step, how these precursors develop to become mechanically small cracks and, eventually, macrocracks whose growth is governed by fracture mechanics. But fracture mechanics is also introduced to analyze stress corrosion and corrosion assisted fatigue in a rather advanced fashion. The author dedicates a particular attention to corrosion starting with an electrochemical treatment that mechanical e...

  6. Preceedings of the International Congress (12th), Corrosion Control for Low-Cost Reliability, Held in Houston, Texas on September 19 -24, 1993. Volume 2. Process Industries Plant Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-24

    abraded to no. 1000 emeryc paper, degreased with acetone and then electrolytically etched in 10C, Oxalic acid , with a current density of I Ampere per square...16 during Atmospheric Exposure by Means of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy 400 Hydrothermal Properties of...329 040 The Effects of Acid Deposition on the Atmospheric Corrosion 461 Study of Corrosion Resistance of Electroless Ni-P Platings

  7. Coastal Mapping Program Project TX1406: FREEPORT, TX.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of the Coastal Mapping Program (CMP) is to provide surveying and mapping information of our nation's coastline. This shoreline mapping effort also...

  8. Coastal Mapping Program Project OR1401; SOUTH SLOUGH NERR, OR.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of the Coastal Mapping Program (CMP) is to provide surveying and mapping information of our nation's coastline. This shoreline mapping effort also...

  9. Coastal Mapping Program Project MN1501: SILVER BAY, MN.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of the Coastal Mapping Program (CMP) is to provide surveying and mapping information of our nation's coastline. This shoreline mapping effort also...

  10. Seagrass from Unified Florida Reef Tract Map (NODC Accession 0123059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a subset of the Unified Map representing Seagrass areas. Version 1.1 - December 2013. The Unified Florida Reef Tract Map (Unified Reef Map) provides...

  11. Coastal Mapping Program Project MI1501: ST CLAIR, MI.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of the Coastal Mapping Program (CMP) is to provide surveying and mapping information of our nation's coastline. This shoreline mapping effort also...

  12. Zn/55Al coating microstructure and corrosion mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, A. Ramus; Panossian, Z.; Camargo, P.L.; Moreira, M. Ferreira; Silva, I.C. da; Ribeiro de Carvalho, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work Zn/55Al coatings from different suppliers were studied. The results revealed the presence of at least two different phases in the interdendritic and in the dendritic areas that compose the coating. Analyses done in the cross section of test panels exposed for five years in six different atmospheres showed that the corrosion process begins in the aluminium-rich phase present in the interdendritic area

  13. Corrosion Protection of Launch Infrastructure and Hardware Through the Space Shuttle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion, the environmentally induced degradation of materials, has been a challenging and costly problem that has affected NASA's launch operations since the inception of the Space Program. Corrosion studies began at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term protective coatings for the atmospheric protection of carbon steel. NASA's KSC Beachside Corrosion Test Site, which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive natural conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acidic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous efforts at KSC identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosiye environment at the launch pads. Knowledge on materials degradation, obtained by facing the highly corrosive conditions of the Space Shuttle launch environment, as well as limitations imposed by the environmental impact of corrosion control, have led researchers at NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory to establish a new technology development capability in the area of corrosion prevention, detection, and mitigation at KSC that is included as one of the "highest priority" technologies identified by NASA's integrated technology roadmap. A historical perspective highlighting the challenges encountered in protecting launch infrastructure and hardware from corrosion during the life of the Space Shuttle program and the new technological advances that have resulted from facing the unique and highly corrosive conditions of the Space Shuttle launch environment will be presented.

  14. Corrosion and hydrogen permeation of A216 Grade WCA steel in hydrothermal magnesium-containing brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberman, J.H.; Frydrych, D.J.; Westerman, R.E.

    1988-03-01

    Corrosion rates determined at 1 month in 150/degree/C brine increased with magnesium concentration. The structure of the corrosion product, as determined by x-ray diffraction, depended upon the magnesium concentration. In brines with less than 10,000 ppM magnesium, the primary corrosion product had a spinel structure characteristic of magnetite or magnesioferrite. In brines containing magnesium concentrations greater than 20,000 ppM, the primary corrosion product had the amakinite structure characteristic of a complex iron-magnesium hydroxide. The high corrosion rates observed in brines containing high magnesium concentrations suggest that the corrosion products having the amakinite structure is less protective than corrosion products having the spinel structure. Corrosion rates in high-magnesium (inclusion) brine determined over a 6-month test duration were essentially constant. Hydrogen permeation rates observed in exposing mild steel to high-Mg/sup 2/plus// brine at 150/degree/C could be potentially damaging to a mild steel waste package container. The rate of hydrogen permeation was proportional to the brine flow rate in the autoclave. Thiourea additions to the brine increased the hydrogen permeation rate; sulfate and bromide ion additions did not. The maximum gaseous hydrogen pressure attainable is not known (based on 3Fe /plus/ 4H 2 O /plus/ Fe(sub 3)O /plus/ 4H 2 , would be /approximately/900 atmospheres), and the dependence of permeation rate on temperature is not known. 8 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steels with the presence of molten carbonates below 923 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Ken-ichiro; Toda, Katsuya; Mitsushima, Shigenori; Kamiya, Nobuyuki

    2002-01-01

    The high-temperature corrosion of stainless steels (SUS316L and SUS310S) in the presence of lithium-potassium eutectic carbonate and lithium-sodium eutectic carbonate has been studied by thermogravimetry and the metal consumption method under a carbon dioxide-oxygen atmosphere in the temperature range of 773-1123 K. Although the corrosion of SUS310S obeyed the parabolic rate law for all reaction conditions, the corrosion of SUS316L significantly depended on the reaction conditions. At or above 923 K, the corrosion of SUS316L obeyed the parabolic rate law, even with a carbonate coating. The corrosion rates were accelerated during the initial period of corrosion tests below 923 K, especially around 823 K with a lithium-sodium carbonates coating. The initial accelerated corrosion was a local corrosion, which produced through holes in the metal specimens, and occurred more clearly at higher carbon dioxide partial pressures with the lithium-sodium carbonate coating than with the lithium-potassium carbonate coating. (author)

  16. Hot corrosion behavior of magnesia-stabilized ceramic material in a lithium molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Soo-Haeng, E-mail: nshcho1@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae-Young [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Hyeon, E-mail: jonglee@cnu.ac.kr [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Rapidly Solidified Materials Research Center, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Jin-Mok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The isothermal and cyclic corrosion behaviors of magnesia-stabilized zirconia in a LiCl-Li{sub 2}O molten salt were investigated at 650 °C in an argon atmosphere. The weights of as-received and corroded specimens were measured and the microstructures, morphologies, and chemical compositions were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. For processes where Li is formed at the cathode during electrolysis, the corrosion rate was about five times higher than those of isothermal and thermal cycling processes. During isothermal tests, the corrosion product Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} was formed after 216 h. During thermal cycling, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} was not detected until after the completion of 14 cycles. There was no evidence of cracks, pores, or spallation on the corroded surfaces, except when Li was formed. We demonstrate that magnesia-stabilized zirconia is beneficial for increasing the hot corrosion resistance of structural materials subjected to high temperature molten salts containing Li{sub 2}O. - Highlights: •Corrosion mechanism of MSZin LiCl-Li{sub 2}O molten salt is proposed. •Formation of Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}is main corrosion mechanism. •There were no cracks, pores and spallation after corrosion test. •MSZ shows high corrosion resistance to LiCl-Li{sub 2}O molten salt.

  17. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  18. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 625 in PbSO4-Pb3O4-PbCl2-ZnO-10 Wt Pct CdO Molten Salt Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi Zahrani, E.; Alfantazi, A. M.

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion behavior and degradation mechanisms of alloy 625 under a 47.288 PbSO4-12.776 Pb3O4-6.844PbCl2-23.108ZnO-10CdO (wt pct) molten salt mixture under air atmosphere were studied at 873 K, 973 K, and 1073 K (600 °C, 700 °C, and 800 °C). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, and potentiodynamic polarization techniques were used to evaluate the degradation mechanisms and characterize the corrosion behavior of the alloy. Morphology, chemical composition, and phase structure of the corrosion products and surface layers of the corroded specimens were studied by scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) and X-ray map analyses. Results confirmed that during the exposure of alloy 625 to the molten salt, chromium was mainly dissolved through an active oxidation process as CrO3, Cr2O3, and CrNbO4, while nickel dissolved only as NiO in the system. Formation of a porous and nonprotective oxide layer with low resistance is responsible for the weak protective properties of the barrier layer at high temperatures of 973 K and 1073 K (700 °C and 800 °C). There were two kinds of attack for INCONEL 625, including general surface corrosion and pitting. Pitting corrosion occurred due to the breakdown of the initial oxide layer by molten salt dissolution of the oxide or oxide cracking.

  19. Boundary element inverse analysis for rebar corrosion detection: Study on the 2004 tsunami-affected structure in Aceh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fonna

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of rebar/reinforcing-steel corrosion for the 2004 tsunami-affected reinforced concrete (RC buildings in Aceh was conducted using half-cell potential mapping technique. However, the results only show qualitative meaning as corrosion risk rather than the corrosion itself, such as the size and location of corrosion. In this study, boundary element inverse analysis was proposed to be performed to detect rebar corrosion of the 2004 tsunami-affected structure in Aceh, using several electrical potential measurement data on the concrete surface. One RC structure in Peukan Bada, an area heavily damaged by the tsunami, was selected for the study. In 2004 the structure was submerged more than 5 m by the tsunami. Boundary element inverse analysis was developed by combining the boundary element method (BEM and particle swarm optimization (PSO. The corrosion was detected by evaluating measured and calculated electrical potential data. The measured and calculated electrical potential on the concrete surface was obtained by using a half-cell potential meter and by performing BEM, respectively. The solution candidates were evaluated by employing PSO. Simulation results show that boundary element inverse analysis successfully detected the size and location of corrosion for the case study. Compared with the actual corrosion, the error of simulation result was less than 5%. Hence, it shows that boundary element inverse analysis is very promising for further development to detect rebar corrosion. Keywords: Inverse analysis, Boundary element method, PSO, Corrosion, Reinforced concrete

  20. Possible origin of superior corrosion resistance for electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, I.; Yang, H.W.; Dinh, L.; Lund, I.; Earthman, J.C.; Mohamed, F.A.

    2008-01-01

    We present here for the first time observations that grain boundaries in electrodeposited (ED) nanocrystalline (nc) Ni are predominantly of Σ3 character. The results presented are based on orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) performed to produce electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps. This large volume fraction of coherent low sigma coincidence site lattice (CSL) boundaries appears to be consistent with the superior corrosion resistance of ED nc-Ni in comparison with its coarse-grained counterpart

  1. Progress in the understanding of the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Fraser; Lilja, Christina; Vähänen, Marjut

    2013-07-01

    highly compacted bentonite buffer which (i) inhibits the transport of reactants to, and of corrosion products away from, the canister surface, (ii) limits the amount of atmospheric O2 initially trapped in the repository, and (iii) suppresses microbial activity close to the canister surface [5,6,9]. The environment will evolve with time as the initially trapped atmospheric O2 is consumed and as the canister cools. This evolution can be described as a transition from an early period of warm, oxidising conditions to an indefinite period of cool, anoxic conditions. In turn, this environmental evolution will impact the corrosion behaviour of the canister. Localised corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) will only be possible for a limited period of time initially when there is sufficient oxidant available to support these forms of corrosion. This aerobic phase is only expected to last a few tens or hundreds of years [10,11]. For the vast majority of the service life of the canister, the redox conditions will be determined by the absence of O2 and the presence of sulphide. Although obvious, it is important to remember that the corrosion behaviour is determined by the environmental conditions at the canister surface. Because of the presence of the compacted bentonite, the environment at the canister surface will be quite different from that in the ground water in the rock. In particular, the interfacial concentration of HS- will be small as the rate of corrosion in the presence of sulphide is transport limited [1,2,12]. The low interfacial [HS-] has important implications for various sulphur-related corrosion mechanisms. The relatively high salinity of the ground water (and, hence, of the bentonite pore water) promotes the general dissolution of copper and inhibits localised corrosion and SCC [5,6].

  2. Pluto's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, J.L.; Dunham, E.W.; Bosh, A.S.; Slivan, S.M.; Young, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    Airborne CCD photometer observations of Pluto's June 9, 1988 stellar occultation have yielded an occultation lightcurve, probing two regions on the sunrise limb 2000 km apart, which reveals an upper atmosphere overlying an extinction layer with an abrupt upper boundary. The extinction layer may surround the entire planet. Attention is given to a model atmosphere whose occultation lightcurve closely duplicates observations; fits of the model to the immersion and emersion lightcurves exhibit no significant derived atmosphere-structure differences. Assuming a pure methane atmosphere, surface pressures of the order of 3 microbars are consistent with the occultation data. 43 references

  3. Atmospheric electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, J Alan

    1957-01-01

    Atmospheric Electricity brings together numerous studies on various aspects of atmospheric electricity. This book is composed of 13 chapters that cover the main problems in the field, including the maintenance of the negative charge on the earth and the origin of the charges in thunderstorms. After a brief overview of the historical developments of atmospheric electricity, this book goes on dealing with the general principles, results, methods, and the MKS system of the field. The succeeding chapters are devoted to some aspects of electricity in the atmosphere, such as the occurrence and d

  4. STEER Coastal Use Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Use Mapping Project is designed to collect critical information on human activities in and near the St. Thomas East End Reserves (STEER). The project...

  5. NOAA Coastal Mapping Shoreline Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Coastal Mapping Shoreline Products from the Remote Sensing Division are primarily for application to the nautical charts produced by NOAA's Office of Coast...

  6. Review of corrosion causes and corrosion control in a technical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charng, T.; Lansing, F.

    1982-06-01

    Causes of corrosion of metals and their alloys are reviewed. The corrosion mechanism is explained by electrochemical reaction theory. The causes and methods of controlling of both physiochemical corrosion and biological corrosion are presented. Factors which influence the rate of corrosion are also discussed

  7. Corrosion detection of nanowires by magnetic sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jü rgen; Amara, Selma; Ivanov, Iurii; Blanco, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Disclosed are various embodiments related to a corrosion detection device for detecting corrosive environments. A corrosion detection device comprises a magnetic sensor and at least one magnetic nanowire disposed on the magnetic sensor. The magnetic sensor is configured to detect corrosion of the one or more magnetic nanowires based at least in part on a magnetic field of the one or more magnetic nanowires.

  8. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Suess

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, material evaluation, data review and conclusion procurement. In analyzing corrosion failures, one must recognize the wide range of common corrosion mechanisms. The features of any corrosion failure give strong clues as to the most likely cause of the corrosion. This article details a proven approach to properly determining the root cause of a failure, and includes pictographic illustrations of the most common corrosion mechanisms, including general corrosion, pitting, galvanic corrosion, dealloying, crevice corrosion, microbiologically-influenced corrosion (MIC, corrosion fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC, intergranular corrosion, fretting, erosion corrosion and hydrogen damage.

  9. Corrosion detection of nanowires by magnetic sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jürgen

    2017-10-05

    Disclosed are various embodiments related to a corrosion detection device for detecting corrosive environments. A corrosion detection device comprises a magnetic sensor and at least one magnetic nanowire disposed on the magnetic sensor. The magnetic sensor is configured to detect corrosion of the one or more magnetic nanowires based at least in part on a magnetic field of the one or more magnetic nanowires.

  10. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  11. Improvement of PWR reliability by corrosion prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Since first PWR in Japan started commercial operation in 1970, we have encountered the various modes of corrosion on primary and secondary side components. We have paid much efforts for resolving these corrosion problems, that is, investigating the causes of corrosion and establishing the countermeasures for these corrosion. We summarize these efforts in this article. (author)

  12. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CORROSIVE label. 172.442 Section 172.442... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label must... CORROSIVE label must be white in the top half and black in the lower half. [Amdt. 172-123, 56 FR 66259, Dec...

  13. High temperature corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  14. Dealloying, Microstructure and the Corrosion/Protection of Cast Magnesium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieradzki, Karl [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); Aiello, Ashlee [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); McCue, Ian [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2017-12-15

    The purpose of this project was to develop a greater understanding of micro-galvanic corrosion effects in cast magnesium alloys using both experimental and computational methods. Experimental accomplishments have been made in the following areas of interest: characterization, aqueous free-corrosion, atmospheric corrosion, ionic liquid dissolution, rate kinetics of oxide dissolution, and coating investigation. Commercial alloys (AZ91D, AM60, and AZ31B), binary-phase alloys (αMg-2at.%Al, αMg-5at.%Al, and Mg-8at.%Al), and component phases (Mg, Al, β-Mg, β-1%Zn, MnAl3) were obtained and characterized using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Full immersion in aqueous chloride was used to characterize the corrosion behavior of alloys. Rotating disc electrodes (RDEs) were used to observe accelerated long-term corrosion behavior. Al surface redistribution for freely corroded samples was analyzed using SEM, EDS, and lithium underpotential deposition (Li UPD). Atmospheric corrosion was observed using contact angle evolution, overnight pH monitoring, and surface pH evolution studies. Ionic liquid corrosion characterization was performed using linear sweep voltammetry and potentiostatic dissolution in 150° choline chloride-urea (cc-urea). Two surface coatings were investigated: (1) Li-carbonate and (2) cc-urea. Li-carbonate coatings were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), SEM, and aqueous free corrosion potential monitoring. Hydrophobic cc-urea coatings were characterized using contact angle measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Oxide dissolution rate kinetics were studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Computational accomplishments have been made through the development of Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations which model time- and composition-dependent effects on the microstructure due to spatial redistribution of alloying

  15. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, R

    2012-01-01

    This book covers the use of nanomaterials to prevent corrosion. The first section deals with the fundamentals of corrosion prevention using nanomaterials. Part two includes a series of case studies and applications of nanomaterials for corrosion control.$bCorrosion is an expensive and potentially dangerous problem in many industries. The potential application of different nanostructured materials in corrosion protection, prevention and control is a subject of increasing interest. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials explores the potential use of nanotechnology in corrosion control. The book is divided into two parts. Part one looks at the fundamentals of corrosion behaviour and the manufacture of nanocrystalline materials. Chapters discuss the impact of nanotechnology in reducing corrosion cost, and investigate the influence of various factors including thermodynamics, kinetics and grain size on the corrosion behaviour of nanocrystalline materials. There are also chapters on electrodeposition ...

  16. Articulating Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily...

  17. Atmospheric electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volland, H.

    1984-01-01

    The book Atmospheric Electrodynamics, by Hans Voland is reviewed. The book describes a wide variety of electrical phenomena occurring in the upper and lower atmosphere and develops the mathematical models which simulate these processes. The reviewer finds that the book is of interest to researchers with a background in electromagnetic theory but is of only limited use as a reference work

  18. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  19. Corrosion-resistant coating development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, D.M.; Martin, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    SiC-based heat exchangers have been identified as the prime candidate material for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants. Unfortunately, hot corrosion of the SiC-based materials created by alkali metal salts present in the combustion gases dictates the need for corrosion-resistant coatings. The well-documented corrosion resistance of CS-50 combined with its low (and tailorable) coefficient of thermal expansion and low modulus makes CS-50 an ideal candidate for this application. Coatings produced by gelcasting and traditional particulate processing have been evaluated.

  20. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1999-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.