WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric convective boundary

  1. Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Anirban

    Solar heating of the surface causes the near surface air to warm up and with sufficient buoyancy it ascends through the atmosphere as surface-layer plumes and thermals. The cold fluid from the upper part of the boundary layer descends as downdrafts. The downdrafts and thermals form streamwise roll vortices. All these turbulent coherent structures are important because they contribute most of the momentum and heat transport. While these structures have been studied in depth, their imprint on the surface through energy budget in a convective atmospheric boundary layer has received little attention. The main objective of the present study is to examine the turbulence-induced surface temperature fluctuations for different surface properties and stratification. Experiments were performed to measure atmospheric turbulence using sonic anemometers, fine wire thermocouples and LIDAR; and surface temperature using an infra-red camera over grass and artificial turf fields. The surface temperature fluctuations were found to be highly correlated to the turbulent coherent structures and follow the processes postulated in the surface renewal theory. The spatio-temporal scales and advection speed of the surface temperature fluctuation were found to match with those of turbulent coherent structures. A parametric direct numerical simulation (DNS) study was then performed by solving the solid-fluid heat transport mechanism numerically for varying solid thermal properties, solid thickness and strength of stratification. Even though there were large differences in the friction Reynolds and Richardson numbers between the experiments and numerical simulations, similar turbulent characteristics were observed. The ejection (sweep) events tend to be aligned with the streamwise direction to form roll vortices with unstable stratification. The solid-fluid interfacial temperature fluctuations increase with the decreases in solid thermal inertia; and with the increase in solid thickness to

  2. Impacts of Aerosol Shortwave Radiation Absorption on the Dynamics of an Idealized Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde Barbaro, E.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Krol, M.C.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the impact of aerosol heat absorption on convective atmospheric boundary-layer (CBL) dynamics. Numerical experiments using a large-eddy simulation model enabled us to study the changes in the structure of a dry and shearless CBL in depthequilibrium for different vertical profiles of

  3. Analytical solution for the convectively-mixed atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwersloot, H.G.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the prognostic equations of mixed-layer theory assuming a zeroth order jump at the entrainment zone, analytical solutions for the boundary-layer height evolution are derived with different degrees of accuracy. First, an exact implicit expression for the boundary-layer height for a situation

  4. Convection and Chemistry in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    OpenAIRE

    A. C. Petersen

    1999-01-01

    The earth’s troposphere is the lowest layer of the atmosphere and has a thickness of about 10 km. It is the layer that contains most of the mass (80%) of the atmosphere. All weather phenomena that we experience have their origin in the troposphere. It is the stage for some well-known environmental problems: climate change, ozone smog, and acidification. These problems are related to the trace amount of gases that are emitted into the troposphere from anthropogenic sources. Alth...

  5. A model study of mixing and entrainment in the horizontally evolving atmospheric convective boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorovich, E.; Kaiser, R. [Univ. Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Hydrologie und Wasserwirtschaft (Germany)

    1997-10-01

    We present results from a parallel wind-tunnel/large-eddy simulation (LES) model study of mixing and entrainment in the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) longitudinally developing over a heated surface. The advection-type entrainment of warmer air from upper turbulence-free layers into the growing CBL has been investigated. Most of numerical and laboratory model studies of the CBL carried out so far dealt with another type of entrainment, namely the non-steady one, regarding the CBL growth as a non-stationary process. In the atmosphere, both types of the CBL development can take place, often being superimposed. (au)

  6. The Impact of Vegetation on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Convective Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tsengdar John

    The impact of vegetation on atmospheric boundary layer and convective storms is examined through the construction and testing of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model. The Land Ecosystem-Atmosphere (LEAF) model is developed using an elevated canopy structure, an above -canopy aerodynamic resistance, two in-canopy aerodynamic resistances, and one stomatal conductance functions. The air temperature and humidity are assumed to be constant in the canopy whereas the wind and radiation follow a specified vertical profile. A simple dump-bucket method is used to parameterize the interception of precipitation and a multi-layer soil model is utilized to handle the vertical transfer of soil water. Evaporation from soil and wet leaves and transpiration from dry leaves are evaluated separately. The solid water uptake is based on soil water potential rather than on the length of roots. Separate energy budgets for vegetation and for the soil are used in order to remove unnecessary assumptions on energy partition between the vegetation and the substrate. Primary parameters are LAI, maximum stomatal conductance, and albedo. Secondary parameters include displacement height and environmental controls on stomatal resistance function. Due to the complexity of the LEAF model, statistical methods are used to improve LEAF model performance. The Multi-response Randomized Bock Permutation (MRBP) procedure is used to guide the choice of model parameter values. The Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) is applied to better understand the model behavior in response to the changes in model parameters. Finally, LEAF is used to study the growth of boundary layer and the local thermal circulations generated by surface inhomogeneities. Results show the atmospheric boundary layer is substantially cooler and more moist over unstressed vegetation than over bare dry soil. Thermally forced circulation can result from the juxtaposition of two vegetation types due to different biophysical

  7. Characterization of the 222Rn family turbulent transport in the convective atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Galmarini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of turbulent transport and radioactive decay on the distribution of 222Rn and its progeny in convective atmospheric boundary layers (CBL is investigated. Large eddy simulation is used to simulate their dispersion in steady state CBL and in unsteady conditions represented by the growth of a CBL within a pre-existing reservoir layer. The exact decomposition of the concentration and flux budget equations under steady state conditions allowed us to determine which processes are responsible for the vertical distribution of 222Rn and its progeny. Their mean concentrations are directly correlated with their half-life, e.g. 222Rn and 210Pb are the most abundant whereas 218Po show the lowest concentrations. 222Rn flux decreases linearly with height and its flux budget is similar to the one of inert emitted scalar, i.e., a balance between on the one hand the gradient and the buoyancy production terms, and on the other hand the pressure and dissipation at smaller scales which tends to destroy the fluxes. While 222Rn exhibits the typical bottom-up behavior, the maximum flux location of the daughters is moving upwards while their rank in the 222Rn progeny is increasing leading to a typical top-down behavior for 210Pb. We also found that the relevant radioactive decaying contributions of 222Rn short-lived daughters (218Po and 214Pb act as flux sources leading to deviations from the linear flux shape. In addition, while analyzing the vertical distribution of the radioactive decay contributions to the concentrations, e.g. the decaying zone, we found a variation in height of 222Rn daughters' radioactive transformations. Under unsteady conditions, the same behaviors reported under steady state conditions are found: deviation of the fluxes from the linear shape for 218Po, enhanced discrepancy in height of the radioactive transformation contributions for all the daughters. In addition, 222Rn and its progeny concentrations decrease due to the

  8. Boundary layer control of rotating convection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Eric M; Stellmach, Stephan; Noir, Jerome; Hansen, Ulrich; Aurnou, Jonathan M

    2009-01-15

    Turbulent rotating convection controls many observed features of stars and planets, such as magnetic fields, atmospheric jets and emitted heat flux patterns. It has long been argued that the influence of rotation on turbulent convection dynamics is governed by the ratio of the relevant global-scale forces: the Coriolis force and the buoyancy force. Here, however, we present results from laboratory and numerical experiments which exhibit transitions between rotationally dominated and non-rotating behaviour that are not determined by this global force balance. Instead, the transition is controlled by the relative thicknesses of the thermal (non-rotating) and Ekman (rotating) boundary layers. We formulate a predictive description of the transition between the two regimes on the basis of the competition between these two boundary layers. This transition scaling theory unifies the disparate results of an extensive array of previous experiments, and is broadly applicable to natural convection systems.

  9. A semi-analytical solution for the mean wind profile in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: the convective case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Buligon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel methodology to derive the average wind profile from the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The development employs the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT, which combines series expansions with Integral Transforms. The new approach provides a solution described in terms of the quantities that control the wind vector with height. Parameters, such as divergence and vorticity, whose magnitudes represent sinoptic patterns are contained in the semi-analytical solution. The results of this new method applied to the convective boundary layer are shown to agree with wind data measured in Wangara experiment.

  10. A semi-analytical solution for the mean wind profile in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: the convective case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Buligon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel methodology to derive the average wind profile from the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The development employs the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT, which joints series expansions with Integral Transforms. The new approach provides a solution described in terms of the quantities that control the wind vector with height. Parameters, such as divergence and vorticity, whose magnitudes represent sinoptic patterns are contained in the semi-analytical solution. The results of this new method applied to the convective boundary layer are shown to agree with wind data measured in Wangara experiment.

  11. A semi-analytical solution for the mean wind profile in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: the convective case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buligon, L.; Degrazia, G. A.; Acevedo, O. C.; Szinvelski, C. R. P.; Goulart, A. G. O.

    2010-03-01

    A novel methodology to derive the average wind profile from the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The development employs the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT), which combines series expansions with Integral Transforms. The new approach provides a solution described in terms of the quantities that control the wind vector with height. Parameters, such as divergence and vorticity, whose magnitudes represent sinoptic patterns are contained in the semi-analytical solution. The results of this new method applied to the convective boundary layer are shown to agree with wind data measured in Wangara experiment.

  12. A Lagrangian stochastic model to demonstrate multi-scale interactions between convection and land surface heterogeneity in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsakhoo, Zahra; Shao, Yaping

    2017-04-01

    Near-surface turbulent mixing has considerable effect on surface fluxes, cloud formation and convection in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Its quantifications is however a modeling and computational challenge since the small eddies are not fully resolved in Eulerian models directly. We have developed a Lagrangian stochastic model to demonstrate multi-scale interactions between convection and land surface heterogeneity in the atmospheric boundary layer based on the Ito Stochastic Differential Equation (SDE) for air parcels (particles). Due to the complexity of the mixing in the ABL, we find that linear Ito SDE cannot represent convections properly. Three strategies have been tested to solve the problem: 1) to make the deterministic term in the Ito equation non-linear; 2) to change the random term in the Ito equation fractional, and 3) to modify the Ito equation by including Levy flights. We focus on the third strategy and interpret mixing as interaction between at least two stochastic processes with different Lagrangian time scales. The model is in progress to include the collisions among the particles with different characteristic and to apply the 3D model for real cases. One application of the model is emphasized: some land surface patterns are generated and then coupled with the Large Eddy Simulation (LES).

  13. Scaling properties of velocity and temperature spectra above the surface friction layer in a convective atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. McNaughton

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We report velocity and temperature spectra measured at nine levels from 1.42 meters up to 25.7 m over a smooth playa in Western Utah. Data are from highly convective conditions when the magnitude of the Obukhov length (our proxy for the depth of the surface friction layer was less than 2 m. Our results are somewhat similar to the results reported from the Minnesota experiment of Kaimal et al. (1976, but show significant differences in detail. Our velocity spectra show no evidence of buoyant production of kinetic energy at at the scale of the thermal structures. We interpret our velocity spectra to be the result of outer eddies interacting with the ground, not "local free convection".

    We observe that velocity spectra represent the spectral distribution of the kinetic energy of the turbulence, so we use energy scales based on total turbulence energy in the convective boundary layer (CBL to collapse our spectra. For the horizontal velocity spectra this scale is (zi εo2/3, where zi is inversion height and εo is the dissipation rate in the bulk CBL. This scale functionally replaces the Deardorff convective velocity scale. Vertical motions are blocked by the ground, so the outer eddies most effective in creating vertical motions come from the inertial subrange of the outer turbulence. We deduce that the appropriate scale for the peak region of the vertical velocity spectra is (z εo2/3 where z is height above ground. Deviations from perfect spectral collapse under these scalings at large and small wavenumbers are explained in terms of the energy transport and the eddy structures of the flow.

    We find that the peaks of the temperature spectra collapse when wavenumbers are scaled using (z1/2 zi1/2. That is, the lengths of the thermal structures depend on both the lengths of the

  14. Integrating canopy and large-scale atmospheric effects in the convective boundary-layer dynamics and chemistry during the CHATS experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapkalijevski, M.; Ouwersloot, Huug; Moene, A.F.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.

    2017-01-01

    By characterizing the dynamics of a convective boundary layer above a relatively sparse and uniform orchard canopy, we investigated the impact of the roughness-sublayer (RSL) representation on the predicted diurnal variability of surface fluxes and state variables. Our approach combined numerical ex

  15. An Analytic Radiative-Convective Model for Planetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Tyler D; 10.1088/0004-637X/757/1/104

    2012-01-01

    We present an analytic 1-D radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries, (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunli...

  16. Bounds for convection between rough boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Goluskin, David

    2016-01-01

    We consider Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection in a layer of fluid between no-slip rough boundaries, where the top and bottom boundary heights are functions of the horizontal coordinates with bounded gradients. We use the background method to derive an upper bound on mean heat flux across the layer for all admissible boundary geometries. This flux, normalized by the temperature difference between the boundaries, can grow with the Rayleigh number ($Ra$) no faster than $Ra^{1/2}$ as $Ra \\rightarrow \\infty$. Coefficients of the bound are given explicitly in terms of the geometry, and evaluation of the coefficients is illustrated for sinusoidal boundaries.

  17. Boundary Layer Ventilation by Convection and Coastal Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacre, H.

    2008-12-01

    Several observational studies measuring aerosol in the atmosphere have found multiple aerosol layers located above the marine boundary layer. It is hypothesized that the existence of these layers is influenced by the diurnal variation in the structure of the upwind continental boundary layer. Furthermore, collision between a sea breeze and the prevailing wind can result in enhanced convection at the coast which can also lead to elevated layers of pollution. In this study we investigate the processes responsible for ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer near the coast using the UK Met Office Unified Model. Pollution sources are represented by the constant emission of a passive tracer everywhere over land. The ventilation processes observed include shallow convection, a sea breeze circulation and coastal outflow. Vertical distributions of tracer at the coast are validated qualitatively with AMPEP (Aircraft Measurement of chemical Processing Export fluxes of Pollutants over the UK) CO aircraft measurements and are shown to agree well.

  18. Nature, theory and modelling of geophysical convective planetary boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical convective planetary boundary layers (CPBLs) are still poorly reproduced in oceanographic, hydrological and meteorological models. Besides the mean flow and usual shear-generated turbulence, CPBLs involve two types of motion disregarded in conventional theories: 'anarchy turbulence' comprised of the buoyancy-driven plumes, merging to form larger plumes instead of breaking down, as postulated in conventional theory (Zilitinkevich, 1973), large-scale organised structures fed by the potential energy of unstable stratification through inverse energy transfer in convective turbulence (and performing non-local transports irrespective of mean gradients of transporting properties). C-PBLs are strongly mixed and go on growing as long as the boundary layer remains unstable. Penetration of the mixed layer into the weakly turbulent, stably stratified free flow causes turbulent transports through the CPBL outer boundary. The proposed theory, taking into account the above listed features of CPBL, is based on the following recent developments: prognostic CPBL-depth equation in combination with diagnostic algorithm for turbulence fluxes at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries (Zilitinkevich, 1991, 2012, 2013; Zilitinkevich et al., 2006, 2012), deterministic model of self-organised convective structures combined with statistical turbulence-closure model of turbulence in the CPBL core (Zilitinkevich, 2013). It is demonstrated that the overall vertical transports are performed mostly by turbulence in the surface layer and entrainment layer (at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries) and mostly by organised structures in the CPBL core (Hellsten and Zilitinkevich, 2013). Principal difference between structural and turbulent mixing plays an important role in a number of practical problems: transport and dispersion of admixtures, microphysics of fogs and clouds, etc. The surface-layer turbulence in atmospheric and marine CPBLs is strongly enhanced by the velocity shears in

  19. Global Deep Convection Models of Saturn's Atmospheric Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Cuff, Keith; Gastine, Thomas; Wicht, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    The Cassini mission, along with previous missions and ground-based observations, has revealed a rich variety of atmospheric phenomena and time variability on Saturn. Some examples of dynamical features are: zonal flows with multiple jet streams, turbulent tilted shear flows that seem to power the jets, the north polar hexagon, the south polar cyclone, large anticyclones in "storm alley", numerous convective storms (white spots) of various sizes, and the 2010/2011 great storm, which destroyed an array of vortices dubbed the "string of pearls". Here we use the anelastic dynamo code MagIC, in non-magnetic mode, to study rotating convection in a spherical shell. The thickness of the shell is set to approximate the depth of the low electrical conductivity deep atmosphere of Saturn, and the convective forcing is set to yield zonal flows of similar velocity (Rossby number) to those of Saturn. Internal heating and the outer entropy boundary conditions allow simple modelling of atmospheric layers with neutral stability or stable stratification. In these simulations we can identify several saturnian and jovian atmospheric features, with some variations. We find that large anticyclonic vortices tend to form in the first anticyclonic shear zones away from the equatorial jet. Cyclones form at the poles, and polar polygonal jet streams, comparable to Saturn's hexagon, may or may not form, depending on the model conditions. Strings of small scale vortical structures arise as convective plumes near boundaries of shear zones. They typically precede larger scale convective storms that spawn propagating shear flow disturbances and anticyclonic vortices, which tend to drift across anticyclonic shear zones, toward the equator (opposite the drift direction of Saturn's 2010/2011 storm). Our model results indicate that many identifiable dynamical atmospheric features seen on Jupiter and Saturn arise from deep convection, shaped by planetary rotation, underlying and interacting with stably

  20. Convection in Condensible-rich Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Condensible substances are nearly ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres. For the most familiar case-water vapor in Earth's present climate-the condensible gas is dilute, in the sense that its concentration is everywhere small relative to the noncondensible background gases. A wide variety of important planetary climate problems involve nondilute condensible substances. These include planets near or undergoing a water vapor runaway and planets near the outer edge of the conventional habitable zone, for which CO2 is the condensible. Standard representations of convection in climate models rely on several approximations appropriate only to the dilute limit, while nondilute convection differs in fundamental ways from dilute convection. In this paper, a simple parameterization of convection valid in the nondilute as well as dilute limits is derived and used to discuss the basic character of nondilute convection. The energy conservation properties of the scheme are discussed in detail and are verified in radiative-co...

  1. the Martian atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrosyan, A.; Galperin, B.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    2011-01-01

    The planetary boundary layer (PBL) represents the part of the atmosphere that is strongly influenced by the presence of the underlying surface and mediates the key interactions between the atmosphere and the surface. On Mars, this represents the lowest 10 km of the atmosphere during the daytime...

  2. Convection in Condensible-rich Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, F.; Pierrehumbert, R. T.

    2016-05-01

    Condensible substances are nearly ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres. For the most familiar case—water vapor in Earth’s present climate—the condensible gas is dilute, in the sense that its concentration is everywhere small relative to the noncondensible background gases. A wide variety of important planetary climate problems involve nondilute condensible substances. These include planets near or undergoing a water vapor runaway and planets near the outer edge of the conventional habitable zone, for which CO2 is the condensible. Standard representations of convection in climate models rely on several approximations appropriate only to the dilute limit, while nondilute convection differs in fundamental ways from dilute convection. In this paper, a simple parameterization of convection valid in the nondilute as well as dilute limits is derived and used to discuss the basic character of nondilute convection. The energy conservation properties of the scheme are discussed in detail and are verified in radiative-convective simulations. As a further illustration of the behavior of the scheme, results for a runaway greenhouse atmosphere for both steady instellation and seasonally varying instellation corresponding to a highly eccentric orbit are presented. The latter case illustrates that the high thermal inertia associated with latent heat in nondilute atmospheres can damp out the effects of even extreme seasonal forcing.

  3. On the determination of the neutral drag coefficient in the convective boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grachev, A.A.; Fairall, C.W.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    1998-01-01

    Based on the idea that free convection can be considered as a particular case of forced convection, where the gusts driven by the large-scale eddies are scaled with the Deardorff convective velocity scale, a new formulation for the neutral drag coefficient, C-Dn, in the convective boundary layer ...... for mean wind speed less than about 2 m s(-1). The new approach also clarifies several contradictory results from earlier works. Some aspects related to an alternate definition of the neutral drag coefficient and the wind speed and the stress averaging procedure are considered.......) the stratification Psi function used in the derivation of C-Dn should satisfy the theoretical free-convection limit. The new formulation is compared with the traditional relationship for C-Dn, and data collected over the sea (during the Tropical Ocean-Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment...

  4. Entrainment process of carbon dioxide in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Gioli, B.; Miglietta, F.; Jonker, H.J.J.; Klein Baltink, H.; Hutjes, R.W.A.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Aircraft and surface measurements of turbulent thermodynamic variables and carbon dioxide (CO2) were taken above a grassland in a convective atmospheric boundary layer. The observations were analyzed to assess the importance of the entrainment process for the distribution and evolution of carbon dio

  5. Influence of convective conditions on three dimensional mixed convective hydromagnetic boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauf, A., E-mail: raufamar@ciitsahiwal.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Siddiq, M.K. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Abbasi, F.M. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Meraj, M.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Ashraf, M. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Shehzad, S.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan)

    2016-10-15

    The present work deals with the steady laminar three-dimensional mixed convective magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. A uniform magnetic field is applied normal to the flow direction. Similarity variables are implemented to convert the non-linear partial differential equations into ordinary ones. Convective boundary conditions are utilized at surface of the sheet. A numerical technique of Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg (RFK45) is used to obtain the results of velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The physical dimensionless parameters are discussed through tables and graphs. - Highlights: • Mixed convective boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid is taken into account. • Impact of magnetic field is examined. • Convective heat and mass conditions are imposed. • Numerical solutions are presented and discussed.

  6. The Lowest Atmosphere: Atmospheric Boundary Layer Including Atmospheric Surface Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    of motion of the atmosphere— "second order closure"—to such applications as the SCIPUFF -PC code for tracer dispersion (see Sykes, 1994). Now, for...Turbulence, Methuen, London, 2nd Ed., 1955. Sykes, R.I., "The SCIPUFF -PC Code," ARAP Draft Report, 1994. Tennekes, H., "The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

  7. An investigation of planetary convection: The role of boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Eric M.

    Thermal and gravitational energy sources drive turbulent convection in Earth's vast liquid metal outer core. These fluid motions generate the electric currents that are believed to power Earth's magnetic field through a process known as dynamo action. Core flow is subject to the influence of Earth's rotation via the Coriolis force, which has an organizational effect on otherwise chaotic motions. Furthermore the magnetic field generated by convection acts back on the flow via Lorentz forces. Fluid motions in Earth's core, and the magnetic field generating regions of other planets and stars, are then governed by three main ingredients: convection, rotation, and magnetic fields. The goal of my Ph.D. research is to further our understanding of the systematic fluid dynamics occurring in dynamo systems. To accomplish this, I have developed a unique experimental device that allows me to produce fluid conditions approaching those expected in Earth's core and other planetary and stellar environments. The results presented here stem from a broad parameter survey of non-magnetic, rotating convection. In this study, I examine the interplay between rotation and convection by broadly varying the strength of each and measuring the efficiency of convective heat transfer. This parameter survey allows me to argue that the importance of rotation in convection dynamics is determined by boundary layer physics, where the Ekman (rotating) and thermal (non-rotating) boundary layers compete for control of convection dynamics. I develop a simple predictive scaling of this convective regime transition using theoretical boundary layer thickness scalings. This transition scaling permits a unified description of heat transfer in rotating convection, which reconciles contrasting results from previous studies. I also extend this experimental result to a broad array of numerical dynamo models, arguing that the boundary layer control of convective regimes is also evident in the dynamo models. A

  8. A two-dimensional embedded-boundary method for convection problems with moving boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassen, Y.J.; Koren, B.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a two-dimensional embedded-boundary algorithm for convection problems is presented. A moving body of arbitrary boundary shape is immersed in a Cartesian finite-volume grid, which is fixed in space. The boundary surface is reconstructed in such a way that only certain fluxes in the imme

  9. Organization of tropical deep convection in low vertical wind shears: The role of boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezahegn Semie, Addisu; Tompkins, Adrian Mark

    2015-04-01

    Previous Experiments with convection-permitting models have documented the various roles of water vapor, cold pools, and radiative feedbacks in the self-organization of tropical deep convection. Most of these simulations were conducted using idealized conditions with fixed and spatially homogeneous sea surface temperatures (SST), and over large enough domains the feedback mechanisms lead to strongly organized convection. In its equilibrium state the convection occurs in a single organised cluster or band, depending on the system mean wind state, surrounded by regions that are extremely dry and free of deep convection. . We hypothesize that radiative feedbacks involving the surface may provide a strong negative feedback to counter the organisation of convection. For example, the enhanced downwelling short-wave radiation in suppressed area should lead to enhanced SST (sometime termed SST hotspots). Which will ultimately lead to convection if the atmosphere moistens sufficiently to permit it. Similar feedback may occur over land. We therefore extend the numerical idealized experiment framework by including the effect of an interactive lower boundary sea and land conditions such as ocean and land with a range of soil moisture contents. To ascertain how this affects the self-organization of convection we construct a simple set of diagnostics to classify which mechanisms are operating, their relative importance and spacial scales.

  10. Evaluating weather research and forecasting (WRF) model predictions of turbulent flow parameters in a dry convective boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibbs, J.A.; Fedorovich, E.; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    2011-01-01

    Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model predictions using different boundary layer schemes and horizontal grid spacings were compared with observational and numerical large-eddy simulation data for conditions corresponding to a dry atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) over the southern

  11. Roles of convective heating and boundary-layer moisture asymmetry in slowing down the convectively coupled Kelvin waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Li, Tim

    2017-04-01

    Mechanisms for an in-phase relationship between convection and low-level zonal wind and the slow propagation of the convectively coupled Kelvin wave (CCKW) are investigated by analyzing satellite-based brightness temperature and reanalysis data and by constructing a simple theoretical model. Observational data analysis reveals an eastward shift of the low-level convergence and moisture relative to the CCKW convective center. The composite vertical structures show that the low-level convergence lies in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) (below 800 hPa), and is induced by the pressure trough above the top of PBL through an Ekman-pumping process. A traditional view of a slower eastward propagation speed compared to the dry Kelvin waves is attributed to the reduction of atmospheric static stability in mid-troposphere due to the convective heating effect. The authors' quantitative assessment of the heating effect shows that this effect alone cannot explain the observed CCKW phase speed. We hypothesize that additional slowing process arises from the effect of zonally asymmetric PBL moisture. A simple theoretical model is constructed to understand the relative role of the heating induced effective static stability effect and the PBL moisture effect. The result demonstrates the important role of the both effects. Thus, PBL-free atmosphere interaction is important in explaining the observed structure and propagation of CCKW.

  12. Convective boundary layers driven by nonstationary surface heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Driel, R.; Jonker, H.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study the response of dry convective boundary layers to nonstationary surface heat fluxes is systematically investigated. This is relevant not only during sunset and sunrise but also, for example, when clouds modulate incoming solar radiation. Because the time scale of the associated change

  13. The decay of wake vortices in the convective boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzaepfel, F.; Gerz, T.; Frech, M.; Doernbrack, A.

    2000-03-01

    The decay of three wake vortex pairs of B-747 aircraft in a convectively driven atmospheric boundary layer is investigated by means of large-eddy simulations (LES). This situation is considered as being hazardous as the updraft velocities of a thermal may compensate the induced descent speed of the vortex pair resulting in vortices stalled in the flight path. The LES results, however, illustrate that (i) the primary rectilinear vortices are rapidly deformed on the scale of the alternating updraft and downdraft regions; (ii) parts of the vortices stay on flight level but are quickly eroded by the enhanced turbulence of an updraft; (iii) longest living sections of the vortices are found in regions of relatively calm downdraft flow which augments their descent. Strip theory calculations are used to illustrate the temporal and spatial development of lift and rolling moments experienced by a following medium weight class B-737 aircraft. Characteristics of the respective distributions are analysed. Initially, the maximum rolling moments slightly exceed the available roll control of the B-737. After 60 seconds the probability of rolling moments exceeding 50% of the roll control, a value which is considered as a threshold for acceptable rolling moments, has decreased to 1% of its initial probability. (orig.)

  14. The atmospheric structure during episodes of open cellular convection observed in KonTur 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruspe, G.; Bakan, S. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (West Germany))

    1990-02-20

    The KonTur (Konvektion and Turbulenz) 1981 experiment was primarily dedicated to the study of organized boundary layer convection. While two research aircraft were used for detailed boundary layer measurements, an aerological network of four stations in the North Sea yielded information on the mean atmospheric structure in organized convective situations. During the second experiment phase in October 1981, cold air advection caused intense convective activity. Four periods of well-organized open convection cells could be determined from NOAA satellite images. The present paper contains the results from the aerological data set, which allowed the derivation of mean profiles of the dynamic and thermodynamic quantities. Finally, the evolution of the most pronounced cellular episode is presented in a case study. Cellular episodes appeared during rather cold and dry periods in which potential temperature, specific humidity, and equivalent potential temperature in the convection layer reached a relative minimum. However, none of the mean atmospheric profiles differ considerably from those found under convective conditions without cellular organization. During the cellular episodes, horizontal gradients show generally small values throughout the convection layer.

  15. The atmospheric structure during episodes of open cellular convection observed in KonTur 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruspe, G.; Bakan, S.

    1990-02-01

    The KonTur (Konvektion und Turbulenz) 1981 experiment was primarily dedicated to the study of organized boundary layer convection. While two research aircraft were used for detailed boundary layer measurements, an aerological network of four stations in the North Sea yielded information on the mean atmospheric structure in organized convective situations. During the second experiment phase in October 1981, cold air advection caused intense convective activity. Four periods of well-organized open convection cells could be determined from NOAA satellite images. The present paper contains the results from the aerological data set, which allowed the derivation of mean profiles of the dynamic and thermodynamic quantities with acceptable accuracy, but also of the horizontal gradients of thermodynamic quantities. Finally, the evolution of the most pronounced cellular episode is presented in a case study. Cellular episodes appeared during rather cold and dry periods in which potential temperature, specific humidity, and equivalent potential temperature in the convection layer reached a relative minimum. However, none of the mean atmospheric profiles differ considerably from those found under convective conditions without cellular organization. During the cellular episodes, horizontal gradients show generally small values throughout the convection layer.

  16. Toward a unified theory of atmospheric convective instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirer, H. N.

    1982-01-01

    A nonlinear three-dimensional truncated spectral model of shallow and moist Boussinesq convection indicates that parallel instability and thermal forcing are linked, in view of the fact that only one convective mode exists in which either or both mechanisms are operating to generate convection in the planetary boundary layer. It is also established that the wind field causes two-dimensional roll convection formation, an alignment of the convection with the wind in a preferred manner, and a propagation speed that is related to the wind component perpendicular to the roll axis. Latent heating is responsible for the decrease of the critical value of the environmental lapse rate in accordance with the slice method stability criterion. When only the upper part of the upward branch is moist and all of the downward branch is dry, latent heating also causes a finite-amplitude convective solution for Rayleigh number values lower than the critical value of linear analysis.

  17. Boundary layer structure in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Nan; Schumacher, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the boundary layers in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection is studied by means of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. We consider convection in a cylindrical cell at an aspect ratio one for Rayleigh numbers of Ra=3e+9 and 3e+10 at fixed Prandtl number Pr=0.7. Similar to the experimental results in the same setup and for the same Prandtl number, the structure of the laminar boundary layers of the velocity and temperature fields is found to deviate from the prediction of the Prandtl-Blasius-Pohlhausen theory. Deviations decrease when a dynamical rescaling of the data with an instantaneously defined boundary layer thickness is performed and the analysis plane is aligned with the instantaneous direction of the large-scale circulation in the closed cell. Our numerical results demonstrate that important assumptions which enter existing classical laminar boundary layer theories for forced and natural convection are violated, such as the strict two-dimensionality of the dynamics or the s...

  18. Clear-air radar observations of the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Turker

    2001-10-01

    This dissertation presents the design and operation of a high-resolution frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM- CW) radar system to study the structure and dynamics of clear-air turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This sensitive radar can image the vertical structure of the ABL with both high spatial and temporal resolutions, and provide both qualitative information about the morphology of clear-air structures and quantitative information on the intensity of fluctuations in refractive-index of air. The principles of operation and the hardware and data acquisition characteristics of the radar are described in the dissertation. In October 1999, the radar participated in the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study (CASES'99) Experiment to characterize the temporal structure and evolution of the boundary-layer features in both convective and stable conditions. The observed structures include clear-air convection, boundary layer evolution, gravity waves, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, stably stratified layers, and clear-air turbulence. Many of the S-band radar images also show high- reflectivity returns from Rayleigh scatterers such as insects. An adaptive median filtering technique based on local statistics has, therefore, been developed to discriminate between Bragg and Rayleigh scattering in clear-air radar observations. The filter is tested on radar observations of clear air convection with comparison to two commonly used image processing techniques. The dissertation also examines the statistical mean of the radar-measured C2n for clear-air convection, and compares it with the theoretical predictions. The study also shows that the inversion height, local thickness of the inversion layer, and the height of the elevated atmospheric layers can be estimated from the radar reflectivity measurements. In addition, comparisons to the radiosonde-based height estimates are made. To examine the temporal and spatial structure of C2n , the dissertation

  19. Stretched flow of Carreau nanofluid with convective boundary condition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Hayat; M Waqas; S A Shehzad; A Alsaedi

    2016-01-01

    The steady laminar boundary layer flow of Carreau nanofluid over a stretching sheet is investigated. Effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis are present. Heat transfer is characterized using convective boundary condition at the sheet. The governing partial differential equations are reduced into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations through suitable transformations. Results of velocity, temperature and concentration fields are computed via homotopic procedure. Numerical values of skin-friction coefficient, local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are computed and discussed. A comparative study with existing solutions in a limiting sense is made.

  20. Comparison of Large Eddy Simulations of a convective boundary layer with wind LIDAR measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Kelly, Mark C.; Gryning, Sven-Erik;

    2012-01-01

    Vertical profiles of the horizontal wind speed and of the standard deviation of vertical wind speed from Large Eddy Simulations of a convective atmospheric boundary layer are compared to wind LIDAR measurements up to 1400 m. Fair agreement regarding both types of profiles is observed only when...... the simulated flow is driven by a both time- and height-dependent geostrophic wind and a time-dependent surface heat flux. This underlines the importance of mesoscale effects when the flow above the atmospheric surface layer is simulated with a computational fluid dynamics model....

  1. MHD Natural Convection with Convective Surface Boundary Condition over a Flat Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M. Rashidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We apply the one parameter continuous group method to investigate similarity solutions of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD heat and mass transfer flow of a steady viscous incompressible fluid over a flat plate. By using the one parameter group method, similarity transformations and corresponding similarity representations are presented. A convective boundary condition is applied instead of the usual boundary conditions of constant surface temperature or constant heat flux. In addition it is assumed that viscosity, thermal conductivity, and concentration diffusivity vary linearly. Our study indicates that a similarity solution is possible if the convective heat transfer related to the hot fluid on the lower surface of the plate is directly proportional to (x--1/2 where x- is the distance from the leading edge of the solid surface. Numerical solutions of the ordinary differential equations are obtained by the Keller Box method for different values of the controlling parameters associated with the problem.

  2. A case study of boundary layer ventilation by convection and coastal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacre, H. F.; Gray, S. L.; Belcher, S. E.

    2007-09-01

    It is often assumed that ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer is weak in the absence of fronts, but is this always true? In this paper we investigate the processes responsible for ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer during a nonfrontal day that occurred on 9 May 2005 using the UK Met Office Unified Model. Pollution sources are represented by the constant emission of a passive tracer everywhere over land. The ventilation processes observed include shallow convection, turbulent mixing followed by large-scale ascent, a sea breeze circulation and coastal outflow. Vertical distributions of tracer are validated qualitatively with AMPEP (Aircraft Measurement of chemical Processing Export fluxes of Pollutants over the UK) CO aircraft measurements and are shown to agree impressively well. Budget calculations of tracers are performed in order to determine the relative importance of these ventilation processes. Coastal outflow and the sea breeze circulation were found to ventilate 26% of the boundary layer tracer by sunset of which 2% was above 2 km. A combination of coastal outflow, the sea breeze circulation, turbulent mixing and large-scale ascent ventilated 46% of the boundary layer tracer, of which 10% was above 2 km. Finally, coastal outflow, the sea breeze circulation, turbulent mixing, large-scale ascent and shallow convection together ventilated 52% of the tracer into the free troposphere, of which 26% was above 2 km. Hence this study shows that significant ventilation of the boundary layer can occur in the absence of fronts (and thus during high-pressure events). Turbulent mixing and convection processes can double the amount of pollution ventilated from the boundary layer.

  3. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar re

  4. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar re

  5. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar

  6. Moist convective storms in the atmosphere of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2003-05-01

    Moist convective storms might be a key aspect in the global energy budget of the atmospheres of the Giant Planets. In spite of its dull appearance, Saturn is known to develop the largest scale convective storms in the Solar System, the Great White Spots, the last of them arising in 1990 triggered a planetary scale disturbance that encircled the whole Equatorial region. However, Saturn seems to be very much less convective than Jupiter, being convective storms rare and small for the most part of the cases. Here we present simulations of moist convective storms in the atmosphere of Saturn at different latitudes, the Equator and 42 deg S, the regions where most of the convective activity of the planet has been observed. We use a 3D anelastic model of the atmosphere with parameterized microphysics (Hueso and Sánchez-Lavega, 2001) and we study the onset and evolution of moist convective storms. Ammonia storms are able to develop only if the static stability of the upper atmosphere is slightly decreased. Water storms are difficult to develop requiring very specific atmospheric conditions. However, when they develop they can be very energetic arriving at least to the 150 mbar level. The Coriolis forces play a mayor role in the characteristics of water based storms in the atmosphere of Saturn. The 3-D Coriolis forces at the Equator transfer upward momentum to westward motions acting to diminish the strength of the equatorial jet. The GWS of 1990 could have been a mayor force in reducing the intensity of the equatorial jet stream as revealed recently (Sánchez-Lavega et al. Nature, 2003). The Cassini spacecraft will arrive to Saturn in a year. Its observations of the atmosphere will allow to measure the amount of convective activity on the planet, its characteristics and it will clarify the role of moist convection in the atmospheric dynamics of the Giant Planets. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Spanish MCYT PNAYA 2000-0932. RH acknowledges a Post

  7. Atmospheric Boundary Layers: Modeling and Parameterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution we deal with the representation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) for modeling studies of weather, climate, and air quality. As such we review the major characteristics of the ABL, and summarize the basic parameterizations for the description of atmospheric turbulence and

  8. EFFECT OF CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY CONDITIONS AT BOTTOM WALL ON NATURAL CONVECTIONS IN A SQUARE CAVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASWATHA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Simulations were carried out for natural convection in a square cavity using finite volume based computational procedure with biased quadratic elements to investigate the influence of convective boundary conditions at bottom wall. Parametric study has been carried out for a wide range of Rayleigh number (Ra (103 ≤ Ra ≤ 108, Prandtl number (Pr (0.7 ≤ Pr ≤ 17 and heat transfer coefficient (h (0.1 ≤ h ≤ 104 W/m2 K. It is observed from the present study that the heat transfer is primarily due to conduction for Rayleigh number up to 104. Convection dominant heat transfer is observed at higher Ra values. The intensity of circulation increases with increase in Ra number. The average heat transfer rate at the bottom wall is found to be invariant for all values of heat transfer coefficient for Ra up to 104. The power law correlations between average Nusselt number and Rayleigh numbers are presented for convection dominated regimes.

  9. Natural convective boundary layer flow of a nano-fluid past a convectively heated vertical plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA 99258 (United States); Khan, W.A. [Department of Engineering Sciences, PN Engineering College, National University of Sciences and Technology, Karachi 75350 (Pakistan)

    2012-03-15

    Natural convective flow of a nano-fluid over a convectively heated vertical plate is investigated using a similarity analysis of the transport equations followed by their numerical computations. The transport model employed includes the effect of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The analysis shows that velocity, temperature and solid volume fraction of the nano-fluid profiles in the respective boundary layers depend, besides the Prandtl and Lewis numbers, on four additional dimensionless parameters, namely a Brownian motion parameter Nb, a thermophoresis parameter Nt, a buoyancy-ratio parameter Nr and convective parameter Nc. In addition to the study of these parameters on the boundary layer flow characteristics (velocity, temperature, solid volume fraction of the nano-fluid, skin friction, and heat transfer), correlations for the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers have been developed based on a regression analysis of the data. These linear regression models provide a highly accurate (with a maximum standard error of 0.004) representation of the numerical data and can be conveniently used in engineering practice. (authors)

  10. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Characteristics during BOBMEX-Pilot Experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G S Bhat; S Ameenulla; M Venkataramana; K Sengupta

    2000-06-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer characteristics observed during the BOBMEX-Pilot experiment are reported. Surface meteorological data were acquired continuously through an automatic weather monitoring system and manually every three hours. High resolution radiosondes were launched to obtain the vertical thermal structure of the atmosphere. The study area was convectively active, the SSTs were high, surface air was warm and moist, and the surface air moist static energy was among the highest observed over the tropical oceans. The mean sea air temperature difference was about 1.25°C and the sea skin temperature was cooler than bucket SST by 0.5°C. The atmospheric mixed layer was shallow, fluctuated in response to synoptic conditions from 100 m to 900 m with a mean around 500 m.

  11. Transitional boundary layers in low-Prandtl-number convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Jörg; Bandaru, Vinodh; Pandey, Ambrish; Scheel, Janet D.

    2016-12-01

    The boundary layer structure of the velocity and temperature fields in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard flows in closed cylindrical cells of unit aspect ratio is revisited from a transitional and turbulent viscous boundary layer perspective. When the Rayleigh number is large enough, the dynamics at the bottom and top plates can be separated into an impact region of downwelling plumes, an ejection region of upwelling plumes, and an interior region away from the side walls. The latter is dominated by the shear of the large-scale circulation (LSC) roll, which fills the whole cell and continuously varies its orientation. The working fluid is liquid mercury or gallium at a Prandtl number Pr=0.021 for Rayleigh numbers 3 ×105≤Ra≤4 ×108 . The generated turbulent momentum transfer corresponds to macroscopic flow Reynolds numbers with 1.8 ×103≤Re≤4.6 ×104 . In highly resolved spectral element direct numerical simulations, we present the mean profiles of velocity, Reynolds stress, and temperature in inner viscous units and compare our findings with convection experiments and channel flow data. The complex three-dimensional and time-dependent structure of the LSC in the cell is compensated by a plane-by-plane symmetry transformation which aligns the horizontal velocity components and all its derivatives with the instantaneous orientation of the LSC. As a consequence, the torsion of the LSC is removed, and a streamwise direction in the shear flow can be defined. It is shown that the viscous boundary layers for the largest Rayleigh numbers are highly transitional and obey properties that are directly comparable to transitional channel flows at friction Reynolds numbers Reτ≲102 . The transitional character of the viscous boundary layer is also underlined by the strong enhancement of the fluctuations of the wall stress components with increasing Rayleigh number. An extrapolation of our analysis data suggests that the friction Reynolds number Reτ in the velocity boundary

  12. Soil-plant-atmosphere conditions regulating convective cloud formation above southeastern US pine plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Novick, Kimberly; Oishi, Andrew Christopher; Noormets, Asko; Marani, Marco; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.) occupy more than 20% of the forested area in the southern United States, represent more than 50% of the standing pine volume in this region, and remove from the atmosphere about 500 g C m-2 per year through net ecosystem exchange. Hence, their significance as a major regional carbon sink can hardly be disputed. What is disputed is whether the proliferation of young plantations replacing old forest in the southern United States will alter key aspects of the hydrologic cycle, including convective rainfall, which is the focus of the present work. Ecosystem fluxes of sensible (Hs) and latent heat (LE) and large-scale, slowly evolving free atmospheric temperature and water vapor content are known to be first-order controls on the formation of convective clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer. These controlling processes are here described by a zero-order analytical model aimed at assessing how plantations of different ages may regulate the persistence and transition of the atmospheric system between cloudy and cloudless conditions. Using the analytical model together with field observations, the roles of ecosystem Hs and LE on convective cloud formation are explored relative to the entrainment of heat and moisture from the free atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that cloudy-cloudless regimes at the land surface are regulated by a nonlinear relation between the Bowen ratio Bo=Hs/LE and root-zone soil water content, suggesting that young/mature pines ecosystems have the ability to recirculate available water (through rainfall predisposition mechanisms). Such nonlinearity was not detected in a much older pine stand, suggesting a higher tolerance to drought but a limited control on boundary layer dynamics. These results enable the generation of hypotheses about the impacts on convective cloud formation driven by afforestation/deforestation and groundwater depletion projected to increase following increased human population in the

  13. A Thermal Plume Model for the Martian Convective Boundary Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Colaïtis, Arnaud; Hourdin, Frédéric; Rio, Catherine; Forget, François; Millour, Ehouarn

    2013-01-01

    The Martian Planetary Boundary Layer [PBL] is a crucial component of the Martian climate system. Global Climate Models [GCMs] and Mesoscale Models [MMs] lack the resolution to predict PBL mixing which is therefore parameterized. Here we propose to adapt the "thermal plume" model, recently developed for Earth climate modeling, to Martian GCMs, MMs, and single-column models. The aim of this physically-based parameterization is to represent the effect of organized turbulent structures (updrafts and downdrafts) on the daytime PBL transport, as it is resolved in Large-Eddy Simulations [LESs]. We find that the terrestrial thermal plume model needs to be modified to satisfyingly account for deep turbulent plumes found in the Martian convective PBL. Our Martian thermal plume model qualitatively and quantitatively reproduces the thermal structure of the daytime PBL on Mars: superadiabatic near-surface layer, mixing layer, and overshoot region at PBL top. This model is coupled to surface layer parameterizations taking ...

  14. THE UNSTABLE MODES OF NATURAL CONVECTION BOUNDARY LAYER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Jianjun; Zhuang Fenggan; Yan Dachun

    2000-01-01

    The instability of natural convection boundary layer around a vertical heated flat plate is analyzed theoretically in this paper. The results illustrate that the “loop” in the neutral curve is not a real loop but a twist of the curve is the frequencywave number-Grashof number space, and there is only one unstable mode at small Prandtl numbers. Specially, when the Prandtl number is large enough two unstable modes will be found in the “loop” region. Along the amplifying surface intersection the two unstable modes have the same Grashof number, wave number and frequency but different amplifying rates. Their instability characteristics are analyzed and the criterion for determining the existence of the multi-unstable modes is also discussed.

  15. Large-Eddy Simulations of Tropical Convective Systems, the Boundary Layer, and Upper Ocean Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Large - Eddy Simulations of Tropical Convective Systems... large eddy simulation (LES) of organized convective systems, which resolve boundary layer eddy scales to mesoscale Report Documentation Page Form...COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Large - Eddy Simulations of Tropical Convective Systems, the Boundary Layer, and Upper Ocean

  16. Numerical model of a non-steady atmospheric planetary boundary layer, based on similarity theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zilitinkevich, S.S.; Fedorovich, E.E.; Shabalova, M.V.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical model of a non-stationary atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a horizontally homogeneous flat surface is derived on the basis of similarity theory. The two most typical turbulence regimes are reproduced: one corresponding to a convectively growing PBL and another correspon...

  17. On inferring isoprene emission surface flux from atmospheric boundary layer concentration measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Dries, van den K.; Pino, D.

    2009-01-01

    We examine the dependence of the inferred isoprene surface emission flux from atmospheric concentration on the diurnal variability of the convective boundary layer (CBL). A series of systematic numerical experiments carried out using the mixed-layer technique enabled us to study the sensitivity of i

  18. 1-D Radiative-Convective Model for Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cecilia W. S.; Robinson, Tyler D.

    2016-10-01

    We present a one dimensional radiative-convective model to study the thermal structure of terrestrial exoplanetary atmospheres. The radiative transfer and equilibrium chemistry in our model is based on similar methodologies in models used for studying Extrasolar Giant Planets (Fortney et al. 2005b.) We validated our model in the optically thin and thick limits, and compared our pressure-temperature profiles against the analytical solutions of Robinson & Catling (2012). For extrasolar terrestrial planets with pure hydrogen atmospheres, we evaluated the effects of H2-H2 collision induced absorption and identified the purely roto-translational band in our modeled spectra. We also examined how enhanced atmospheric metallicities affect the temperature structure, chemistry, and spectra of terrestrial exoplanets. For a terrestrial extrasolar planet whose atmospheric compostion is 100 times solar orbiting a sun-like star at 2 AU, our model resulted in a reducing atmosphere with H2O, CH4, and NH3 as the dominant greenhouse gases.

  19. Geostrophic convective turbulence: The effect of boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Kunnen, Rudie P J; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    This Letter presents results of the first direct numerical simulations of rotating Rayleigh--B\\'enard convection in the so-called geostrophic regime, (hence very small Ekman numbers $\\mathcal{O}(10^{-7})$ and high Rayleigh numbers~$Ra=10^{10}$ and~$5\\cdot 10^{10}$), employing the \\emph{full} Navier--Stokes equations. In the geostrophic regime the criteria of very strong rotation and large supercriticality are met simultaneously, which is true for many geophysical and astrophysical flows. Until now, numerical approaches of this regime have been based on \\emph{reduced} versions of the Navier--Stokes equations (cf. Sprague \\emph{et al.} J. Fluid Mech., \\textbf{551}, 141 (2006)), omitting the effect of the viscous (Ekman) boundary layers. By using different velocity boundary conditions at the plates, we study the effect of these Ekman layers. We find that the formation of large-scale structures (Rubio \\emph{et al.} (Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{112} (2014)), which indicates the presence of an inverse energy cascade, ...

  20. A Study of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Structure During a Clear Day in the Arid Region of Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiang; WANG Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The local climate and atmospheric circulation pattern exert a clear influence on the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) formation and development in Northwest China. In this paper, we use field observational data to analyze the distribution and characteristics of the ABL in the extremely arid desert in Dunhuang, Northwest China. These data show that the daytime convective boundary layer and night time stable boundary layer in this area extend to higher altitudes than in other areas. In the night time, the stable boundary layer exceeds 900 m in altitude and can sometimes peak at 1750 m, above which the residual layer may reach up to about 4000 m. The daytime convective boundary layer develops rapidly after entering the residual layer, and exceeds 4000 m in thickness. The results show that the deep convective boundary layer in the daytime is a pre-requisite for maintaining the deep residual mixed layer in the night time. Meanwhile, the deep residual mixed layer in the night time provides favorable thermal conditions for the development of the convective boundary layer in the daytime. The prolonged periods of clear weather that often occurs in this area allow the cumulative effect of the atmospheric residual layer to develop fully, which creates thermal conditions beneficial for the growth of the daytime convective boundary layer. At the same time, the land surface process and atmospheric motion within the surface layer in this area also provide helpful support for forming the particular structure of the thermal ABL. High surface temperature is clearly the powerful external thermal forcing for the deep convective boundary layer. Strong sensible heat flux in the surface layer provides the required energy. Highly convective atmosphere and strong turbulence provide the necessary dynamic conditions, and the accumulative effect of the residual layer provides a favorable thermal environment.

  1. The existence of Hadley convective regimes of atmospheric motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, J. A.; Kloeden, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    The solutions of the equations describing deep global convection on a rotating planet are discussed. The existence of generalized steady axisymmetric solutions is established. It is then shown that these are classical solutions when the heat source is sufficiently smooth. The solutions are shown to be unique when the heating is sufficiently weak and asymptotically stable when the shear is sufficiently small. Finally, the application of these results to earth's atmosphere is discussed, with eddy viscosity replacing molecular viscosity.

  2. Spherical-shell boundaries for two-dimensional compressible convection in a star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, J.; Baraffe, I.; Goffrey, T.; Geroux, C.; Viallet, M.; Folini, D.; Constantino, T.; Popov, M.; Walder, R.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Studies of stellar convection typically use a spherical-shell geometry. The radial extent of the shell and the boundary conditions applied are based on the model of the star investigated. We study the impact of different two-dimensional spherical shells on compressible convection. Realistic profiles for density and temperature from an established one-dimensional stellar evolution code are used to produce a model of a large stellar convection zone representative of a young low-mass star, like our sun at 106 years of age. Aims: We analyze how the radial extent of the spherical shell changes the convective dynamics that result in the deep interior of the young sun model, far from the surface. In the near-surface layers, simple small-scale convection develops from the profiles of temperature and density. A central radiative zone below the convection zone provides a lower boundary on the convection zone. The inclusion of either of these physically distinct layers in the spherical shell can potentially affect the characteristics of deep convection. Methods: We perform hydrodynamic implicit large eddy simulations of compressible convection using the MUltidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC). Because MUSIC has been designed to use realistic stellar models produced from one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, MUSIC simulations are capable of seamlessly modeling a whole star. Simulations in two-dimensional spherical shells that have different radial extents are performed over tens or even hundreds of convective turnover times, permitting the collection of well-converged statistics. Results: To measure the impact of the spherical-shell geometry and our treatment of boundaries, we evaluate basic statistics of the convective turnover time, the convective velocity, and the overshooting layer. These quantities are selected for their relevance to one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, so that our results are focused toward studies exploiting the so

  3. Langevin equation model of dispersion in the convective boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasstrom, J S

    1998-08-01

    This dissertation presents the development and evaluation of a Lagrangian stochastic model of vertical dispersion of trace material in the convective boundary layer (CBL). This model is based on a Langevin equation of motion for a fluid particle, and assumes the fluid vertical velocity probability distribution is skewed and spatially homogeneous. This approach can account for the effect of large-scale, long-lived turbulent structures and skewed vertical velocity distributions found in the CBL. The form of the Langevin equation used has a linear (in velocity) deterministic acceleration and a skewed randomacceleration. For the case of homogeneous fluid velocity statistics, this ""linear-skewed" Langevin equation can be integrated explicitly, resulting in a relatively efficient numerical simulation method. It is shown that this approach is more efficient than an alternative using a "nonlinear-Gaussian" Langevin equation (with a nonlinear deterministic acceleration and a Gaussian random acceleration) assuming homogeneous turbulence, and much more efficient than alternative approaches using Langevin equation models assuming inhomogeneous turbulence. "Reflection" boundary conditions for selecting a new velocity for a particle that encounters a boundary at the top or bottom of the CBL were investigated. These include one method using the standard assumption that the magnitudes of the particle incident and reflected velocities are positively correlated, and two alternatives in which the magnitudes of these velocities are negatively correlated and uncorrelated. The constraint that spatial and velocity distributions of a well-mixed tracer must be the same as those of the fluid, was used to develop the Langevin equation models and the reflection boundary conditions. The two Langevin equation models and three reflection methods were successfully tested using cases for which exact, analytic statistical properties of particle velocity and position are known, including well

  4. Convection and waves on Small Earth and Deep Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddine Semane

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A scaled version of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF spectral hydrostatic forecast model (IFS has been developed with full physics using an Aqua planet configuration. This includes Kuang et al.'s Small Earth Diabatic Acceleration and REscaling (DARE/SE approach bringing the synoptic scale a factor γ closer to the convective scale by reducing the Earth radius by γ, and increasing the rotation rate and all diabatic processes by the same factor. Furthermore, the scaled version also provides an alternative system to DARE/SE, dubbed ‘Deep Atmosphere Diabatic Acceleration and REscaling’ (DARE/DA, which reduces gravity by a factor γ and thereby increases the horizontal scale of convection by γ, while only weakly affecting the large-scale flow. The two approaches have been evaluated using a T159 spectral truncation and γ = 8 with the deep convection scheme switched off. The evaluation is against the baseline unscaled model at T1279 spectral resolution without deep convection parametrisation, as well as the unscaled T159 model using the deep convection parametrisation. It is shown that the DARE/SE and DARE/DA systems provide fairly equivalent results, while the DARE/DA system seems to be the preferred choice as it damps divergent modes, providing a better climatology, and is technically easier to implement. However, neither of the systems could reproduce the motion range and modes of the high-resolution spectral model. Higher equivalent horizontal resolution in the 1–10 km range and the full non-hydrostatic system might be necessary to successfully simulate the convective and large-scale explicitly at reduced cost.

  5. Long-term Observations of the Convective Boundary Layer Using Insect Radar Returns at the SGP ARM Climate Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, A S; Kollias, P; Giangrande, S E; Klein, S A

    2009-08-20

    A long-term study of the turbulent structure of the convective boundary layer (CBL) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility is presented. Doppler velocity measurements from insects occupying the lowest 2 km of the boundary layer during summer months are used to map the vertical velocity component in the CBL. The observations cover four summer periods (2004-08) and are classified into cloudy and clear boundary layer conditions. Profiles of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and mass flux are estimated to study the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer during these conditions. A conditional sampling method is applied to the original Doppler velocity dataset to extract coherent vertical velocity structures and to examine plume dimension and contribution to the turbulent transport. Overall, the derived turbulent statistics are consistent with previous aircraft and lidar observations. The observations provide unique insight into the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer and the role of increased cloudiness in the turbulent budget of the subcloud layer. Coherent structures (plumes-thermals) are found to be responsible for more than 80% of the total turbulent transport resolved by the cloud radar system. The extended dataset is suitable for evaluating boundary layer parameterizations and testing large-eddy simulations (LESs) for a variety of surface and cloud conditions.

  6. The Influence of Convergence Movement on Turbulent Transportation in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡隐樵; 左洪超

    2003-01-01

    Classical turbulent K closure theory of the atmospheric boundary layer assumes that the verticalturbulent transport flux of any macroscopic quantity is equivalent to that quantity's vertical gradienttransport flux. But a cross coupling between the thermodynamic processes and the dynamic processesin the atmospheric system is demonstrated based on the Curier-Prigogine principle of cross coupling oflinear thermodynamics. The vertical turbulent transportation of energy and substance in the atmosphericboundary layer is related not only to their macroscopic gradient but also to the convergence and the di-vergence movement. The transportation of the convergence or divergence movement is important for theatmospheric boundary layer of the heterogeneous underlying surface and the convection boundary layer.Based on this, the turbulent transportatiou in the atmospheric boundary layer, the energy budget of theheterogeneous underlying surface and the convection boundary layer, and the boundary layer parameteri-zation of land surface processes over the heterogeneous underlying surface are studied. This research offersclues not only for establishing the atmospheric boundary layer theory about the heterogeneous underlyingsurface, but also for overcoming the difficulties encountered recently in the application of the atmosphericboundary layer theory.

  7. Turbulent kinetic energy generation in the convective boundary layer derived from thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slameršak, Aljoša; Renner, Maik; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Hartogensis, Oscar; Kolle, Olaf; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Turbulent heat fluxes facilitate the bulk of heat transfer between the surface and lower atmosphere, which results in the diurnal growth of convective boundary layer (CBL) and turbulent kinetic energy generation (TKE). Here we postulate the hypothesis that TKE generation in the CBL occurs as a result of heat transfer in a "Carnot-like" heat engine with temporal changes in the internal energy of the boundary layer. We used the Tennekes energy-balance model of CBL and extended it with the analysis of the entropy balance to derive the estimates of TKE generation in the CBL. These TKE generation estimates were compared to the turbulent dissipation from a simple dissipation model from Moeng and Sullivan, to test the validity of our heat engine hypothesis. In addition, to evaluate the performance of the dissipation model, this was independently validated by a comparison of its estimates with the turbulent dissipation calculations based on spectral analysis of eddy covariance wind measurements at a German field station. Our analysis demonstrates how a consistent application of thermodynamics can be used to obtain an independent physical constraint on the diurnal boundary layer evolution. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that the CBL operates at the thermodynamic limit, thus imposing a thermodynamic constraint on surface-atmosphere exchange.

  8. 3D Simulations of methane convective storms on Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2005-08-01

    The arrival of the Cassini/Huygens mission to Titan has opened an unprecedented opportunity to study the atmosphere of this satellite. Under the pressure-temperature conditions on Titan, methane, a large atmospheric component amounting perhaps to a 3-5% of the atmosphere, is close to its triple point, potentially playing a similar role as water on Earth. The Huygens probe has shown a terrain shaped by erosion of probably liquid origin, suggestive of past rain. On the other hand, Voyager IRIS spectroscopic observations of Titan imply a saturated atmosphere of methane (amounting perhaps to 150 covered by methane clouds, if we think on Earth meteorology. However, observations from Earth and Cassini have shown that clouds are localized, transient and fast evolving, in particular in the South Pole (currently in its summer season). This might imply a lack of widespread presence on Titan of nuclei where methane could initiate condensation and particle growth with subsequent precipitation. We investigate different scenarios of moist convective storms on Titan using a complete 3D atmospheric model that incorporates a full microphysics treatment required to study cloud formation processes under a saturated atmosphere with low concentration of condensation nuclei. We study local convective development under a variety of atmospheric conditions: sub-saturation, super-saturation, abundances of condensation nuclei fall, condensation nuclei lifted from the ground or gently falling from the stratosphere. We show that under the appropriate circumstances, precipitation rates comparable to typical tropical storms on Earth can be found. Acknowledgements: This work has been funded by Spanish MCYT PNAYA2003-03216, fondos FEDER and Grupos UPV 15946/2004. R. Hueso acknowledges a post-doc fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  9. Year-Long Vertical Velocity Statistics Derived from Doppler Lidar Data for the Continental Convective Boundary Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Larry K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Newsom, Rob K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Turner, David D. [Global Systems Division, NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado

    2017-09-01

    One year of Coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) data collected at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Oklahoma is analyzed to provide profiles of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis for cases of cloud-free convective boundary layers. The variance was scaled by the Deardorff convective velocity scale, which was successful when the boundary layer depth was stationary but failed in situations when the layer was changing rapidly. In this study the data are sorted according to time of day, season, wind direction, surface shear stress, degree of instability, and wind shear across the boundary-layer top. The normalized variance was found to have its peak value near a normalized height of 0.25. The magnitude of the variance changes with season, shear stress, and degree of instability, but was not impacted by wind shear across the boundary-layer top. The skewness was largest in the top half of the boundary layer (with the exception of wintertime conditions). The skewness was found to be a function of the season, shear stress, wind shear across the boundary-layer top, with larger amounts of shear leading to smaller values. Like skewness, the vertical profile of kurtosis followed a consistent pattern, with peak values near the boundary-layer top (also with the exception of wintertime data). The altitude of the peak values of kurtosis was found to be lower when there was a large amount of wind shear at the boundary-layer top.

  10. Footprint Characteristics of Scalar Concentration in the Convective Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Footprint characteristics for passive scalar concentration in the convective boundary layer (CBL)are investigated. A backward Lagrangian stochastic (LS) dispersion model and a large eddy simulation (LES) model are used in the investigation. Typical characteristics of the CBL and their responses to the surface heterogeneity are resolved from the LES. Then the turbulence fields are used to drive the backward LS dispersion. To remedy the spoiled description of the turbulence near the surface, MoninObukhov similarity is applied to the lowest LES level and the surface for the modeling of the backward LS dispersion. Simulation results show that the footprint within approximately 1 km upwind predominates in the total contribution. But influence from farther distances also exists and is even slightly greater than that from closer locations. Surface heterogeneity may change the footprint pattern to a certain degree.A comparison to three analytical models provides a validation of the footprint simulations, which shows the possible influence of along-wind turbulence and the large eddies in the CBL, as well as the surface heterogeneity.

  11. Comparison of Measured and Numerically Simulated Turbulence Statistics in a Convective Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Raj K.; Berg, Larry K.; Kosović, Branko; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.

    2016-11-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model can be used to simulate atmospheric processes ranging from quasi-global to tens of m in scale. Here we employ large-eddy simulation (LES) using the WRF model, with the LES-domain nested within a mesoscale WRF model domain with grid spacing decreasing from 12.15 km (mesoscale) to 0.03 km (LES). We simulate real-world conditions in the convective planetary boundary layer over an area of complex terrain. The WRF-LES model results are evaluated against observations collected during the US Department of Energy-supported Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study. Comparison of the first- and second-order moments, turbulence spectrum, and probability density function of wind speed shows good agreement between the simulations and observations. One key result is to demonstrate that a systematic methodology needs to be applied to select the grid spacing and refinement ratio used between domains, to avoid having a grid resolution that falls in the grey zone and to minimize artefacts in the WRF-LES model solutions. Furthermore, the WRF-LES model variables show large variability in space and time caused by the complex topography in the LES domain. Analyses of WRF-LES model results show that the flow structures, such as roll vortices and convective cells, vary depending on both the location and time of day as well as the distance from the inflow boundaries.

  12. Comparison of Measured and Numerically Simulated Turbulence Statistics in a Convective Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Raj K.; Berg, Larry K.; Kosović, Branko; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.

    2016-11-25

    High resolution numerical simulation can provide insight into important physical processes that occur within the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The present work employs large eddy simulation (LES) using the Weather Forecasting and Research (WRF) model, with the LES domain nested within mesoscale simulation, to simulate real conditions in the convective PBL over an area of complex terrain. A multiple nesting approach has been used to downsize the grid spacing from 12.15 km (mesoscale) to 0.03 km (LES). A careful selection of grid spacing in the WRF Meso domain has been conducted to minimize artifacts in the WRF-LES solutions. The WRF-LES results have been evaluated with in situ and remote sensing observations collected during the US Department of Energy-supported Columbia BasinWind Energy Study (CBWES). Comparison of the first- and second-order moments, turbulence spectrum, and probability density function (PDF) of wind speed shows good agreement between the simulations and data. Furthermore, the WRF-LES variables show a great deal of variability in space and time caused by the complex topography in the LES domain. The WRF-LES results show that the flow structures, such as roll vortices and convective cells, vary depending on both the location and time of day. In addition to basic studies related to boundary-layer meteorology, results from these simulations can be used in other applications, such as studying wind energy resources, atmospheric dispersion, fire weather etc.

  13. Comparison of Measured and Numerically Simulated Turbulence Statistics in a Convective Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Raj K.; Berg, Larry K.; Kosović, Branko; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.

    2017-04-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model can be used to simulate atmospheric processes ranging from quasi-global to tens of m in scale. Here we employ large-eddy simulation (LES) using the WRF model, with the LES-domain nested within a mesoscale WRF model domain with grid spacing decreasing from 12.15 km (mesoscale) to 0.03 km (LES). We simulate real-world conditions in the convective planetary boundary layer over an area of complex terrain. The WRF-LES model results are evaluated against observations collected during the US Department of Energy-supported Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study. Comparison of the first- and second-order moments, turbulence spectrum, and probability density function of wind speed shows good agreement between the simulations and observations. One key result is to demonstrate that a systematic methodology needs to be applied to select the grid spacing and refinement ratio used between domains, to avoid having a grid resolution that falls in the grey zone and to minimize artefacts in the WRF-LES model solutions. Furthermore, the WRF-LES model variables show large variability in space and time caused by the complex topography in the LES domain. Analyses of WRF-LES model results show that the flow structures, such as roll vortices and convective cells, vary depending on both the location and time of day as well as the distance from the inflow boundaries.

  14. Predicting insect migration density and speed in the daytime convective boundary layer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Bell

    Full Text Available Insect migration needs to be quantified if spatial and temporal patterns in populations are to be resolved. Yet so little ecology is understood above the flight boundary layer (i.e. >10 m where in north-west Europe an estimated 3 billion insects km(-1 month(-1 comprising pests, beneficial insects and other species that contribute to biodiversity use the atmosphere to migrate. Consequently, we elucidate meteorological mechanisms principally related to wind speed and temperature that drive variation in daytime aerial density and insect displacements speeds with increasing altitude (150-1200 m above ground level. We derived average aerial densities and displacement speeds of 1.7 million insects in the daytime convective atmospheric boundary layer using vertical-looking entomological radars. We first studied patterns of insect aerial densities and displacements speeds over a decade and linked these with average temperatures and wind velocities from a numerical weather prediction model. Generalized linear mixed models showed that average insect densities decline with increasing wind speed and increase with increasing temperatures and that the relationship between displacement speed and density was negative. We then sought to derive how general these patterns were over space using a paired site approach in which the relationship between sites was examined using simple linear regression. Both average speeds and densities were predicted remotely from a site over 100 km away, although insect densities were much noisier due to local 'spiking'. By late morning and afternoon when insects are migrating in a well-developed convective atmosphere at high altitude, they become much more difficult to predict remotely than during the early morning and at lower altitudes. Overall, our findings suggest that predicting migrating insects at altitude at distances of ≈ 100 km is promising, but additional radars are needed to parameterise spatial covariance.

  15. A finite-volume method for convection problems with embedded moving boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassen, Y.J.; Koren, B.

    2009-01-01

    An accurate method, using a novel immersed-boundary approach, is presented for numerically solving linear, scalar convection problems. Moving interior boundary conditions are embedded in the fixed-grid fluxes in the direct neighborhood of the moving boundaries. Tailor-made limiters are derived such

  16. Improved boundary layer height measurement using a fuzzy logic method: Diurnal and seasonal variabilities of the convective boundary layer over a tropical station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allabakash, S.; Yasodha, P.; Bianco, L.; Venkatramana Reddy, S.; Srinivasulu, P.; Lim, S.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the efficacy of a "tuned" fuzzy logic method at determining the height of the boundary layer using the measurements from a 1280 MHz lower atmospheric radar wind profiler located in Gadanki (13.5°N, 79°E, 375 mean sea level), India, and discusses the diurnal and seasonal variations of the measured convective boundary layer over this tropical station. The original fuzzy logic (FL) method estimates the height of the atmospheric boundary layer combining the information from the range-corrected signal-to-noise ratio, the Doppler spectral width of the vertical velocity, and the vertical velocity itself, measured by the radar, through a series of thresholds and rules, which did not prove to be optimal for our radar system and geographical location. For this reason the algorithm was tuned to perform better on our data set. Atmospheric boundary layer heights obtained by this tuned FL method, the original FL method, and by a "standard method" (that only uses the information from the range-corrected signal-to-noise ratio) are compared with those obtained from potential temperature profiles measured by collocated Global Positioning System Radio Sonde during years 2011 and 2013. The comparison shows that the tuned FL method is more accurate than the other methods. Maximum convective boundary layer heights are observed between 14:00 and 15:00 local time (LT = UTC + 5:30) for clear-sky days. These daily maxima are found to be lower during winter and postmonsoon seasons and higher during premonsoon and monsoon seasons, due to net surface radiation and convective processes over this region being more intense during premonsoon and monsoon seasons and less intense in winter and postmonsoon seasons.

  17. Ground Boundary Conditions for Thermal Convection Over Horizontal Surfaces at High Rayleigh Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanjalić, K.; Hrebtov, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present "wall functions" for treating the ground boundary conditions in the computation of thermal convection over horizontal surfaces at high Rayleigh numbers using coarse numerical grids. The functions are formulated for an algebraic-flux model closed by transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy, its dissipation rate and scalar variance, but could also be applied to other turbulence models. The three-equation algebraic-flux model, solved in a T-RANS mode ("Transient" Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes, based on triple decomposition), was shown earlier to reproduce well a number of generic buoyancy-driven flows over heated surfaces, albeit by integrating equations up to the wall. Here we show that by using a set of wall functions satisfactory results are found for the ensemble-averaged properties even on a very coarse computational grid. This is illustrated by the computations of the time evolution of a penetrative mixed layer and Rayleigh-Bénard (open-ended, 4:4:1 domain) convection, using 10 × 10 × 100 and 10 × 10 × 20 grids, compared also with finer grids (e.g. 60 × 60 × 100), as well as with one-dimensional treatment using 1 × 1 × 100 and 1 × 1 × 20 nodes. The approach is deemed functional for simulations of a convective boundary layer and mesoscale atmospheric flows, and pollutant transport over realistic complex hilly terrain with heat islands, urban and natural canopies, for diurnal cycles, or subjected to other time and space variations in ground conditions and stratification.

  18. Low-frequency sea waves generated by atmospheric convection cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, M. P. C.; Battjes, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    The atmospheric origin of low-frequency sea waves that cause seiches in the Port of Rotterdam is investigated using hydrological and meteorological observations. These observations, combined with weather charts, show that all significant seiche events coincide with the passage of a low-pressure area and a cold front. Following these front passages, increased wind speed fluctuations occur with periods on the order of 1 hour. The records show that enhanced low-frequency wave energy at sea and the seiche events in the harbor occur more or less simultaneously with these strong wind speed fluctuations. These oscillatory wind speed changes are due to convection cells that arise in an unstable lower atmosphere in the area behind a cold front, where cold air moves over the relatively warm sea surface. It is shown that the moving system of a cold front and trailing convection cells generates forced low-frequency waves at sea that can cause seiche events inside the harbor. The occurrence of such events may be predictable operationally on the basis of a criterion for the difference in temperature between the air in the upper atmosphere and the water at the sea surface.

  19. Centrifugally driven convection in the rotating cylindrical annulus with modulated boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Westerburg

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sinusoidally modulated conical end boundaries on convection in a rotating cylindrical annulus is investigated theoretically and experimentally. A quasiperiodic time dependence of convection in the form of thermal Rossby waves is found and semi-quantitative agreement between theory and measurements can be established. The results are relevant to convection in the Earth's outer core close to the tangent cylinder touching the inner core at its equator.

  20. Double diffusive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convective slip flow along a radiating moving vertical flat plate with convective boundary condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Mohammad M; Kavyani, Neda; Abelman, Shirley; Uddin, Mohammed J; Freidoonimehr, Navid

    2014-01-01

    In this study combined heat and mass transfer by mixed convective flow along a moving vertical flat plate with hydrodynamic slip and thermal convective boundary condition is investigated. Using similarity variables, the governing nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are then solved using a semi-numerical/analytical method called the differential transform method and results are compared with numerical results. Close agreement is found between the present method and the numerical method. Effects of the controlling parameters, including convective heat transfer, magnetic field, buoyancy ratio, hydrodynamic slip, mixed convective, Prandtl number and Schmidt number are investigated on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. In addition effects of different parameters on the skin friction factor, [Formula: see text], local Nusselt number, [Formula: see text], and local Sherwood number [Formula: see text] are shown and explained through tables.

  1. Double Diffusive Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Mixed Convective Slip Flow along a Radiating Moving Vertical Flat Plate with Convective Boundary Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Mohammad M.; Kavyani, Neda; Abelman, Shirley; Uddin, Mohammed J.; Freidoonimehr, Navid

    2014-01-01

    In this study combined heat and mass transfer by mixed convective flow along a moving vertical flat plate with hydrodynamic slip and thermal convective boundary condition is investigated. Using similarity variables, the governing nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are then solved using a semi-numerical/analytical method called the differential transform method and results are compared with numerical results. Close agreement is found between the present method and the numerical method. Effects of the controlling parameters, including convective heat transfer, magnetic field, buoyancy ratio, hydrodynamic slip, mixed convective, Prandtl number and Schmidt number are investigated on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. In addition effects of different parameters on the skin friction factor, , local Nusselt number, , and local Sherwood number are shown and explained through tables. PMID:25343360

  2. Transition to geostrophic convection: the role of the boundary conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Ostilla-Monico, Rodolfo; Poel, van der E.P.; Verzicco, R.; Lohse, D.

    2016-01-01

    Rotating Rayleigh–Bénard convection, the flow in a rotating fluid layer heated from below and cooled from above, is used to analyse the transition to the geostrophic regime of thermal convection. In the geostrophic regime, which is of direct relevance to most geo- and astrophysical flows, the system

  3. Experimental study of wind turbine wakes in a convective boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Markfort, C. D.; Porte-Agel, F.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the interaction of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flows with wind turbines is important for optimizing the design of wind farms (maximizing energy output and mitigating fatigue loads) and improving the parameterization of wind farms in weather and climate models. Field observations have suggested that atmospheric stability affects ABL flow and its interaction with wind turbines, which in turn affects wind farm performance. However, the fluid mechanics involved has not been fully understood, highlighting the need of acquiring high quality data in clearly defined conditions. Well-controlled wind tunnel experiments of the wake of wind turbines immersed in thermally stratified or convective boundary layers are very limited. In this study, we investigate the wake structure of a miniature three-blade wind turbine model placed in a convective boundary layer (CBL) in the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory wind tunnel. The objectives of this study are: 1) to understand how the CBL flow affects the wake behind a wind turbine in terms of tip vortices distribution, mean velocity deficit, turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stress and heat flux modification; 2) to provide reliable data sets for validating and developing new parameterizations of turbulent fluxes and turbine-induced forces in numerical models, such as large-eddy simulation (LES). The CBL was generated by cooling the free stream air flow to 13 οC and heating up the test section floor to 80 οC. The free stream speed was set at 2.5 m/s, resulting in the Obukhov stability of δ/L=-3.15 and the bulk Richardson number about -0.16. The wake of a wind turbine model, whose height is about 1/3 the boundary layer thickness, was systematically studied using Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) and a hot-wire/cold-wire anemometer. Results revealed the top tip vortices (in Fig.1), noticeably degraded velocity deficit and significantly enhanced turbulence. Turbulent momentum and heat fluxes were also

  4. Numerical solution of thermo-solutal mixed convective slip flow from a radiative plate with convective boundary condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M J UDDIN; O Anwar BG; M N UDDIN; A I Md ISMAIL

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model for mixed convective slip flow with heat and mass transfer in the presence of thermal radiation is presented. A convective boundary condition is included and slip is simulated via the hydrodynamic slip parameter. Heat generation and absorption effects are also incorporated. The Rosseland diffusion flux model is employed. The governing partial differential conservation equations are reduced to a system of coupled, ordinary differential equations via Lie group theory method. The resulting coupled equations are solved using shooting method. The influences of the emerging parameters on dimensionless velocity, tempera- ture and concentration distributions are investigated. Increasing radiative-conductive parameter accelerates the boundary layer flow and increases temperature whereas it depresses concentration. An elevation in convection-conduction parameter also accelerates the flow and temperatures whereas it reduces concentrations. Velocity near the wall is considerably boosted with increasing momentum slip parameter although both temperature and concentration boundary layer thicknesses are decreased. The presence of a heat source is found to increase momentum and thermal boundary layer thicknesses but reduces concentration boundary layer thickness. Excelle- nt correlation of the numerical solutions with previous non-slip studies is demonstrated. The current study has applications in bio- reactor diffusion flows and high-temperature chemical materials processing systems.

  5. Effects of small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Kouji; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Komori, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Effects of weak, small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection are experimentally investigated using a wind tunnel. Two experiments are carried out: the first is isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence, and the second is non-isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence. Both boundary layers develop under a small favorable pressure gradient. For the latter case, the bottom wall of the test section is heated...

  6. Moist turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Weidauer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with phase changes in an extended layer between two parallel impermeable planes is studied by means of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations for Rayleigh numbers between 10^4 and 1.5\\times 10^7 and for Prandtl number Pr=0.7. Two different sets of boundary conditions of temperature and total water content are compared: imposed constant amplitudes which translate into Dirichlet boundary conditions for the scalar field fluctuations about the quiescent diffusive equilibrium and constant imposed flux boundary conditions that result in Neumann boundary conditions. Moist turbulent convection is in the conditionally unstable regime throughout this study for which unsaturated air parcels are stably and saturated air parcels unstably stratified. A direct comparison of both sets of boundary conditions with the same parameters requires to start the turbulence simulations out of differently saturated equilibrium states. Similar to dry Rayleigh-Benard convection the differences...

  7. G-jitter induced magnetohydrodynamics flow of nanofluid with constant convective thermal and solutal boundary conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed J Uddin

    Full Text Available Taking into account the effect of constant convective thermal and mass boundary conditions, we present numerical solution of the 2-D laminar g-jitter mixed convective boundary layer flow of water-based nanofluids. The governing transport equations are converted into non-similar equations using suitable transformations, before being solved numerically by an implicit finite difference method with quasi-linearization technique. The skin friction decreases with time, buoyancy ratio, and thermophoresis parameters while it increases with frequency, mixed convection and Brownian motion parameters. Heat transfer rate decreases with time, Brownian motion, thermophoresis and diffusion-convection parameters while it increases with the Reynolds number, frequency, mixed convection, buoyancy ratio and conduction-convection parameters. Mass transfer rate decreases with time, frequency, thermophoresis, conduction-convection parameters while it increases with mixed convection, buoyancy ratio, diffusion-convection and Brownian motion parameters. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper on this topic and hence the results are new. We believe that the results will be useful in designing and operating thermal fluids systems for space materials processing. Special cases of the results have been compared with published results and an excellent agreement is found.

  8. G-jitter induced magnetohydrodynamics flow of nanofluid with constant convective thermal and solutal boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammed J; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, Ahmad Izani Md

    2015-01-01

    Taking into account the effect of constant convective thermal and mass boundary conditions, we present numerical solution of the 2-D laminar g-jitter mixed convective boundary layer flow of water-based nanofluids. The governing transport equations are converted into non-similar equations using suitable transformations, before being solved numerically by an implicit finite difference method with quasi-linearization technique. The skin friction decreases with time, buoyancy ratio, and thermophoresis parameters while it increases with frequency, mixed convection and Brownian motion parameters. Heat transfer rate decreases with time, Brownian motion, thermophoresis and diffusion-convection parameters while it increases with the Reynolds number, frequency, mixed convection, buoyancy ratio and conduction-convection parameters. Mass transfer rate decreases with time, frequency, thermophoresis, conduction-convection parameters while it increases with mixed convection, buoyancy ratio, diffusion-convection and Brownian motion parameters. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper on this topic and hence the results are new. We believe that the results will be useful in designing and operating thermal fluids systems for space materials processing. Special cases of the results have been compared with published results and an excellent agreement is found.

  9. The Diurnal Cycle of the Boundary Layer, Convection, Clouds, and Surface Radiation in a Coastal Monsoon Environment (Darwin Australia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Peter T.; Long, Charles N.; Protat, Alain

    2012-08-01

    The diurnal variation of convection and associated cloud and radiative properties remains a significant issue in global NWP and climate models. This study analyzes observed diurnal variability of convection in a coastal monsoonal environment examining the interaction of convective rain clouds, their associated cloud properties, and the impact on the surface radiation and corresponding boundary layer structure during periods where convection is suppressed or active on the large scale. The analysis uses data from the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) as well as routine measurements from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Both active monsoonal and large-scale suppressed (buildup and break) conditions are examined and demonstrate that the diurnal variation of rainfall is much larger during the break periods and the spatial distribution of rainfall is very different between the monsoon and break regimes. During the active monsoon the total net radiative input to the surface is decreased by more than 3 times the amount than during the break regime - this total radiative cloud forcing is found to be dominated by the shortwave (SW) cloud effects because of the much larger optical thicknesses and persistence of long-lasting anvils and cirrus cloud decks associated with the monsoon regime. These differences in monsoon versus break surface radiative energy contribute to low-level air temperature differences in the boundary layer over the land surfaces.

  10. Toward a Unified Representation of Atmospheric Convection in Variable-Resolution Climate Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walko, Robert [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    2016-11-07

    The purpose of this project was to improve the representation of convection in atmospheric weather and climate models that employ computational grids with spatially-variable resolution. Specifically, our work targeted models whose grids are fine enough over selected regions that convection is resolved explicitly, while over other regions the grid is coarser and convection is represented as a subgrid-scale process. The working criterion for a successful scheme for representing convection over this range of grid resolution was that identical convective environments must produce very similar convective responses (i.e., the same precipitation amount, rate, and timing, and the same modification of the atmospheric profile) regardless of grid scale. The need for such a convective scheme has increased in recent years as more global weather and climate models have adopted variable resolution meshes that are often extended into the range of resolving convection in selected locations.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Conjugate Thermogravitational Convection in a Closed System with a Radiant Energy Source in Conditions of Convective-Radiative Heat Exchange at the External Boundary

    OpenAIRE

    Nee Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of conjugate natural convection in a closed rectangular cavity with a radiant energy source in conditions of convective-radiative heat exchange at the external boundary was conducted. The radiant energy distribution was set by the Lambert’s law. Conduction and convection processes analysis showed that the air masses flow pattern is modified slightly over the time. The temperature increases in the gas cavity, despite the heat removal from the one of the external boundary....

  12. Turbulence in the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Harindra; Kit, Eliezer; Conry, Patrick; Hocut, Christopher; Liberzon, Dan

    2016-11-01

    During the field campaigns of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program, fine-scale measurements of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) were made using a novel sonic and hot-film anemometer dyad (a combo probe). A swath of scales, from large down to Kolmogorov scales, was covered. The hot-film was located on a gimbal within the sonic probe volume, and was automated to rotate in the horizontal plane to align with the mean flow measured by sonic. This procedure not only helped satisfy the requirement of hot-film alignment with the mean flow, but also allowed in-situ calibration of hot-films. This paper analyzes a period of nocturnal flow that was similar to an idealized stratified parallel shear flow. Some new phenomena were identified, which included the occurrence of strong bursts in the velocity records indicative of turbulence generation at finer scales that are not captured by conventional sonic anemometers. The spectra showed bottleneck effect, but its manifestation did not fit into the framework of previous bottleneck-effect theories and was unequivocally related to bursts of turbulence. The measurements were also used to evaluate the energetics of stratified shear flows typical of the environment. ONR # N00014-11-1-0709; NSF # AGS-1528451; ISF 408/15.

  13. Spectral quasi-linearisation method for nonlinear thermal convection flow of a micropolar fluid under convective boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    RamReddy, Ch.; Pradeepa, T.

    2016-09-01

    The significance of nonlinear temperaturedependent density relation and convective boundary condition on natural convection flow of an incompressible micropolar fluid with homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions is analyzed. In spite of the complicated nonlinear structure of the present setup and to allow all the essential features, the representation of similarity transformations for the system of non-dimensional fluid flow equations is attained through Lie group transformations and hence the governing similarity equations are worked out by a numerical approach known as spectral quasi-linearization method. It is noticed that in the presence of the nonlinear convection parameter enhance the velocity, species concentration, heat transfer rate, skin friction, but decreases the temperature and wall couple stress.

  14. Adapting a Fourier pseudospectral method to Dirichlet boundary conditions for Rayleigh--B\\'enard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, I C

    2015-01-01

    We present the adaptation to non--free boundary conditions of a pseudospectral method based on the (complex) Fourier transform. The method is applied to the numerical integration of the Oberbeck--Boussinesq equations in a Rayleigh--B\\'enard cell with no-slip boundary conditions for velocity and Dirichlet boundary conditions for temperature. We show the first results of a 2D numerical simulation of dry air convection at high Rayleigh number ($R\\sim10^9$). These results are the basis for the later study, by the same method, of wet convection in a solar still.

  15. Study of large eddy simulation of the effects of boundary layer convection on tracer uplift and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qian; Wang, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Using large eddy model (LEM) and observed data from Dunhuang meteorological station during the intensive period of land-atmosphere interaction field experiment over arid region of North-west China, a series of sensitivity experiments have been performed to investigate the effects of the surface heat flux and wind shear on the strength and the organization of boundary layer convection as well as the growth of the convective boundary layer (CBL). The results show that surface heat flux increases with constant wind shear will give rise to a thicker and warmer CBL, stronger convections and larger thermal eddies due to intense surface turbulence transporting more energy to the upper layer. On the other hand wind shear increases with constant surface heat flux lead to a thicker and warmer CBL because of the entrainment of warm air from the inversion layer to the mixed layer, while the boundary layer convection became weaker with broken thermal eddies. To investigate the quantitative linkage of surface heat flux, wind shear with the tracer uplift rate and transport height, a passive tracer with a constant value of 100 was added at all model levels below the 100 m in all simulations. The least square analysis reveals that the tracer uplift rate increases linearly with the surface heat flux when wind shear is less than 10.5×10-3 s-1 owing to the enhancement of the downward transport of higher momentum. However, the tracer uplift rate decreases with increasing wind shear when the surface heat flux is less than 462.5 W/m2 because of the weakened convection. The passive tracer in the model is also shown to be transported to the higher altitude with increasing surface heat flux and under constant wind shear. However, under a constant surface heat flux, the tracer transport height increases with increasing wind shear only when the shear is above a certain threshold and this threshold depend on the magnitude of surface heat fluxes.

  16. Efficient Turbulent Compressible Convection in the Deep Stellar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Chun-Lin; Chan, Kwing-Lam; Xiong, Da-Run

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports an application of gas-kinetic BGK scheme to the computation of turbulent compressible convection in the stellar interior. After incorporating the Sub-grid Scale (SGS) turbulence model into the BGK scheme, we tested the effects of numerical parameters on the quantitative relationships among the thermodynamic variables, their fluctuations and correlations in a very deep, initially gravity-stratified stellar atmosphere. Comparison indicates that the thermal properties and dynamic properties are dominated by different aspects of numerical models separately. An adjustable Deardorff constant in the SGS model $c_\\mu=0.25$ and an amplitude of artificial viscosity in the gas-kinetic BGK scheme $C_2=0$ are appropriate for current study. We also calculated the density-weighted auto- and cross-correlation functions in Xiong's (\\cite{xiong77}) turbulent stellar convection theories based on which the gradient type of models of the non-local transport and the anisotropy of the turbulence are preliminarily...

  17. Efficient turbulent compressible convection in the deep stellar atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Lin Tian; Li-Cai Deng; Kwing-Lam Chan; Da-Run Xiong

    2009-01-01

    We report on an application of gas-kinetic BGK scheme to the computation of turbulent compressible convection in the stellar interior. After incorporating the Sub-grid Scale (SGS) turbulence model into the BGK scheme, we tested the effects of numerical parameters on the quantitative relationships among the thermodynamic variables, their fluctuations and correlations in a very deep, initially gravity-stratified stellar atmosphere. Comparison indicates that the thermal properties and dynamic properties are dominated by different aspects of numerical models separately. An adjustable Deardorff constant in the SGS model cμ = 0.25 and an amplitude of artificial viscosity in the gas-kinetic BGK scheme C2 = 0 are appropriate for the current study. We also calculated the density-weighted auto-and cross-correlation functions in Xiong's turbulent stellar convection theory based on which the gradient type of models of the non-local transport and the anisotropy of the turbulence were preliminarily studied. No universal relations or con-stant parameters were found for these models.

  18. Effects of Explicit Convection on Global Land-atmosphere Coupling in the Superparameterized CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J.; Pritchard, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Many global climate models are prone to producing land-atmosphere coupling dynamics that are too strong and simplistic. Cumulus and convection parameterizations are natural culprits but the effect of bypassing them with explicitly resolved convection on global land-atmosphere coupling dynamics has not been explored systematically. We apply a suite of modern land-atmosphere coupling diagnostics to isolate the effect of cloud superparameterization (SP) in the Community Atmosphere Model v3.5, focusing on both the land segment (i.e., soil moisture and evapotranspiration relationship) and atmospheric segment (i.e., evapotranspiration and precipitation relationship) in the water pathway of the land-atmosphere feedback loop. Comparing SPCAM3.5 and conventional CAM3.5 in daily timescale, our results show that the Super-Parameterized model reduces the coupling strength in the Central Great Plain in American, and reverses the terrestrial segment coupling sign (from negative to positive) over India. Which are consistent with previous studies and are favorable improvements on the known issues reported in literatures. Analysis of the triggering feedback strength (TFS) and amount feedback strength (AFS) shows that SPCAM3.5 favorably reproduces the patterns of these indices over North America, with probability of afternoon precipitation enhanced by high evaporative fraction along the eastern United States and Mexico, while conventional CAM3.5 does not capture this signal. The links in the soil moisture-precipitation feedback loop are further explored through applying the mixing diagram approach to the diurnal cycles of the land surface and planetary boundary layer variables.

  19. Effects of explicit convection on global land-atmosphere coupling in the superparameterized CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Pritchard, Michael S.

    2016-09-01

    Conventional global climate models are prone to producing unrealistic land-atmosphere coupling signals. Cumulus and convection parameterizations are natural culprits but the effect of bypassing them with explicitly resolved convection on global land-atmosphere coupling dynamics has not been explored systematically. We apply a suite of modern land-atmosphere coupling diagnostics to isolate the effect of cloud Superparameterization in the Community Atmosphere Model (SPCAM) v3.5, focusing on both the terrestrial segment (i.e., soil moisture and surface turbulent fluxes interaction) and atmospheric segment (i.e., surface turbulent fluxes and precipitation interaction) in the water pathway of the land-atmosphere feedback loop. At daily timescales, SPCAM produces stronger uncoupled terrestrial signals (negative sign) over tropical rainforests in wet seasons, reduces the terrestrial coupling strength in the Central Great Plain in American, and reverses the coupling sign (from negative to positive) over India in the boreal summer season—all favorable improvements relative to reanalysis-forced land modeling. Analysis of the triggering feedback strength (TFS) and amplification feedback strength (AFS) shows that SPCAM favorably reproduces the observed geographic patterns of these indices over North America, with the probability of afternoon precipitation enhanced by high evaporative fraction along the eastern United States and Mexico, while conventional CAM does not capture this signal. We introduce a new diagnostic called the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Feedback Strength (PFS), which reveals that SPCAM exhibits a tight connection between the responses of the lifting condensation level, the PBL height, and the rainfall triggering to surface turbulent fluxes; a triggering disconnect is found in CAM.

  20. Inverse boundary design of square enclosures with natural convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payan, S.; Sarvari, S.M.H.; Ajam, H. [The University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Mechanical Engineering Dept. (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    An optimization technique is applied to design of heat transfer systems in which the natural convection is important. The inverse methodology is employed to estimate the unknown strengths of heaters on the heater surface of a square cavity with free convection from the knowledge of the desired temperature and heat flux distributions over a given design surface. The direct and the sensitivity problems are solved by finite volume method. The conjugate gradient method is used for minimization of an objective function, which is expressed by the sum of square residuals between estimated and desired heat fluxes over the design surface. The performance and accuracy of the present method for solving inverse convection heat transfer problems is evaluated by comparing the results with a benchmark problem and a numerical experiment. (authors)

  1. Wind-Turbine Wakes in a Convective Boundary Layer: A Wind-Tunnel Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey D.; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-02-01

    Thermal stability changes the properties of the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer, and in turn affects the behaviour of wind-turbine wakes. To better understand the effects of thermal stability on the wind-turbine wake structure, wind-tunnel experiments were carried out with a simulated convective boundary layer (CBL) and a neutral boundary layer. The CBL was generated by cooling the airflow to 12-15 °C and heating up the test section floor to 73-75 °C. The freestream wind speed was set at about 2.5 m s-1, resulting in a bulk Richardson number of -0.13. The wake of a horizontal-axis 3-blade wind-turbine model, whose height was within the lowest one third of the boundary layer, was studied using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (S-PIV) and triple-wire (x-wire/cold-wire) anemometry. Data acquired with the S-PIV were analyzed to characterize the highly three-dimensional turbulent flow in the near wake (0.2-3.2 rotor diameters) as well as to visualize the shedding of tip vortices. Profiles of the mean flow, turbulence intensity, and turbulent momentum and heat fluxes were measured with the triple-wire anemometer at downwind locations from 2-20 rotor diameters in the centre plane of the wake. In comparison with the wake of the same wind turbine in a neutral boundary layer, a smaller velocity deficit (about 15 % at the wake centre) is observed in the CBL, where an enhanced radial momentum transport leads to a more rapid momentum recovery, particularly in the lower part of the wake. The velocity deficit at the wake centre decays following a power law regardless of the thermal stability. While the peak turbulence intensity (and the maximum added turbulence) occurs at the top-tip height at a downwind distance of about three rotor diameters in both cases, the magnitude is about 20 % higher in the CBL than in the neutral boundary layer. Correspondingly, the turbulent heat flux is also enhanced by approximately 25 % in the lower part of the wake, compared to that

  2. Tropical Cyclone Signatures in Atmospheric Convective Available Potential Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studholme, Joshua; Gulev, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Tropical cyclones play an important role in the climate system providing transports of energy and water vapor, forcing the ocean, and also affecting mid-latitude circulation phenomena. Tropical cyclone tracks experience strong interannual variability and in addition, longer term trend-like changes in all ocean basins. Analysis of recent historical data reveal a poleward shift in the locations of tropical cyclone tracks in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres (Kossin et al. 2014, Nature, 509, 349-352). The physical consequences of these alterations are largely unconstrained. For example, the increasing encroachment of tropical cyclone activity into the extra-tropical environment presents a novel and still poorly understood paradigm for tropical-extratropical interactions. In this respect, the role that the atmospheric convective available potential energy (CAPE) plays in the dynamics of tropical cyclones is highly interesting. The two characteristic global-scale spatial patterns in CAPE are identified using EOF analysis. The first pattern shows an abundance of CAPE in the centre of the Pacific and corresponds to the El Nino Southern Oscillation. The second one is capturing positive CAPE anomalies in the oceanic tropics and negative anomalies over equatorial Africa. Associated with these buoyancy patterns, alterations in tropical cyclone activity occur in all basins forming both zonal and meridional patterns. Atmospheric buoyancy is the trigger for deep convection, and subsequently cyclone genesis. This is the mechanism of impact upon location at the start of cyclone tracks. It is found to have less impact upon where cyclones subsequently move, whether or not they undergo extratropical transition and when and where they experience lysis. It is shown that CAPE plays a critical role in the general circulation in the tropics which in turn is the larger steering context for embedded systems within the Walker and Hadley cells. So this lack of `latter life' impact

  3. A conceptual framework to quantify the influence of convective boundary layer development on carbon dioxide mixing ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Peters, W.; Schröter, J.; van Heerwaarden, C. C.; Krol, M. C.

    2012-03-01

    Interpretation of observed diurnal carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios near the surface requires knowledge of the local dynamics of the planetary boundary layer. In this paper, we study the relationship between the boundary layer dynamics and the CO2 budget in convective conditions through a newly derived set of analytical equations. From these equations, we are able to quantify how uncertainties in boundary layer dynamical variables or in the morning CO2 distribution in the mixed-layer or in the free atmosphere (FA) influence the bulk CO2 mixing ratio. We find that the largest uncertainty incurred on the mid-day CO2 mixing ratio comes from the prescribed early morning CO2 mixing ratios in the stable boundary layer, and in the free atmosphere. Errors in these values influence CO2 mixing ratios inversely proportional to the boundary layer depth (h), just like uncertainties in the assumed initial boundary layer depth and surface CO2 flux. The influence of uncertainties in the boundary layer depth itself is one order of magnitude smaller. If we "invert" the problem and calculate CO2 surface exchange from observed or simulated CO2 mixing ratios, the sensitivities to errors in boundary layer dynamics also invert: they become linearly proportional to the boundary layer depth. We demonstrate these relations for a typical well characterized situation at the Cabauw site in The Netherlands, and conclude that knowledge of the temperature and carbon dioxide profiles of the atmosphere in the early morning are of vital importance to correctly interpret observed CO2 mixing ratios during midday.

  4. Unsteady boundary layer flow of a nanofluid over a stretching/shrinking sheet with a convective boundary condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahira Mansur

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady boundary layer flow of a nanofluid past a stretching/shrinking sheet with a convective surface boundary condition is studied. The effects of the unsteadiness parameter, stretching/shrinking parameter, convective parameter, Brownian motion parameter and thermophoresis parameter on the local Nusselt number are investigated. Numerical solutions to the governing equations are obtained using a shooting method. The results for the local Nusselt number are presented for different values of the governing parameters. The local Nusselt number decreases as the stretching/shrinking parameter increases. The local Nusselt number is consistently higher for higher values of the convective parameter but lower for higher values of the unsteadiness parameter, Brownian motion parameter and thermophoresis parameter.

  5. The height of the atmospheric boundary layer during unstable conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryning, S.E.

    2005-11-01

    The height of the convective atmospheric boundary layer, also called the mixed-layer, is one of the fundamental parameters that characterise the structure of the atmosphere near the ground. It has many theoretical and practical applications such as the prediction of air pollution concentrations, surface temperature and the scaling of turbulence. However, as pointed out by Builtjes (2001) in a review paper on Major Twentieth Century Milestones in Air Pollution Modelling and Its Application, the weakest point in meteorology data is still the determination of the height of the mixed-layer, the so-called mixing height. A simple applied model for the height of the mixed-layer over homogeneous terrain is suggested in chapter 2. It is based on a parameterised budget for the turbulent kinetic energy. In the model basically three terms - the spin-up term and the production of mechanical and convective turbulent kinetic energy - control the growth of the mixed layer. The interplay between the three terms is related to the meteorological conditions and the height of the mixed layer. A stable layer, the so-called entrainment zone, which is confined between the mixed layer and the free air above, caps the mixed layer. A parameterisation of the depth of the entrainment zone is also suggested, and used to devise a combined model for the height of the mixed layer and the entrainment zone. Another important aspect of the mixed layer development exists in coastal areas where an internal boundary layer forms downwind from the coastline. A model for the growth of the internal boundary layer is developed in analogy with the model for mixed layer development over homogeneous terrain. The strength of this model is that it can operate on a very fine spatial resolution with minor computer resources. Chapter 3 deals with the validation of the models. It is based in parts on data from the literature, and on own measurements. For the validation of the formation of the internal boundary layer

  6. Compressible convection in the deep atmospheres of giant planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Chris A.; Kuzanyan, Kirill M.

    2009-11-01

    Fast rotating giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn possess alternate prograde and retrograde zonal winds which are stable over long periods of time. We consider a compressible model of convection in a spherical shell with rapid rotation, using the anelastic approximation, to explore the parameter range for which such zonal flows can be produced. We consider models with a large variation in density across the layer. Our models are based only on the molecular H/He region above the metallic hydrogen transition at about 2 Mbar, and we do not include the hydromagnetic effects which may be important if the electrical conductivity is significant. We find that the convective velocities are significantly higher in the low density regions of the shell, but the zonal flow is almost independent of the z-coordinate parallel to the rotation axis. We analyse how this behaviour is consistent with the Proudman-Taylor theorem. We find that deep prograde zonal flow near the equator is a very robust feature of our models. Prograde and retrograde jets alternating in latitude can occur inside the tangent cylinder in compressible as well as Boussinesq models, particularly at lower Prandtl numbers. However, the zonal jets inside the tangent cylinder are suppressed if a no-slip condition is imposed at the inner boundary. This suggests that deep high latitude jets may be suppressed if there is significant magnetic dissipation. Our compressible calculations include the viscous dissipation in the entropy equation, and we find this is comparable to, and in some cases exceeds, the total heat flux emerging from the surface. For numerical reasons, these simulations cannot reach the extremely low Ekman number found in giant planets, and they necessarily also have a much larger heat flux than planets. We therefore discuss how our results might scale down to give solutions with lower dissipation and lower heat flux.

  7. Thermal Performance of Laser Diode Array under Constant Convective Heat Transfer Boundary Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Cong; HUANG Lei; HE Fa-Hong; GONG Ma-Li

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional heat transfer model of laser diode array under constant convective heat transfer coefficient boundary condition is established and analytical temperature profiles within its heat sink are obtained by separation of variables. The influences on thermal resistance and maximum temperature variation among emitters from heat sink structure parameters and convective heat transfer coefficient are brought forward. The derived formula enables the thermal optimization of laser diode array.

  8. Fingering convection and cloudless models for cool brown dwarf atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Tremblin, P; Mourier, P; Baraffe, I; Chabrier, G; Drummond, B; Homeier, D; Venot, O

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to improve the current understanding of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs, especially cold ones with spectral type T and Y, whose modeling is a current challenge. Silicate and iron clouds are believed to disappear at the photosphere at the L/T transition, but cloudless models fail to reproduce correctly the spectra of T dwarfs, advocating for the addition of more physics, e.g. other types of clouds or internal energy transport mechanisms. We use a one-dimensional (1D) radiative/convective equilibrium code ATMO to investigate this issue. This code includes both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium chemistry and solves consistently the PT structure. Included opacity sources are H2-H2, H2-He, H2O, CO, CO2, CH4, NH3, K, Na, and TiO, VO if they are present in the atmosphere. We show that the spectra of Y dwarfs can be accurately reproduced with a cloudless model if vertical mixing and NH3 quenching are taken into account. T dwarf spectra still have some reddening in e.g. J - H compared to cloudless mode...

  9. Interaction of Convective Organization and Monsoon Precipitation, Atmosphere, Surface and Sea (INCOMPASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A. G.; Bhat, G. S.; Evans, J. G.; Madan, R.; Marsham, J. H.; Martin, G.; Mitra, A. K.; Mrudula, G.; Parker, D. J.; Pattnaik, S.; Rajagopal, E. N.; Taylor, C.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    INCOMPASS will build on a field and aircraft measurement campaign from the 2016 monsoon onset to better understand and predict monsoon rainfall. The monsoon supplies the majority of water in South Asia, however modelling and forecasting the monsoon from days to the season ahead is limited by large model errors that develop quickly. Likely problems lie in physical parametrizations such as convection, the boundary layer and land surface. At the same time, lack of detailed observations prevents more thorough understanding of monsoon circulation and its interaction with the land surface; a process governed by boundary layer and convective cloud dynamics. From May to July 2016, INCOMPASS used a modified BAe-146 jet aircraft operated by the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM), for the first project of this scale in India. The India and UK team flew around 100 hours of science sorties from bases in northern and southern India. Flights from Lucknow in the northern plains took measurements to the west and southeast to allow sampling of the complete contrast from dry desert air to the humid environment over the north Bay of Bengal. These routes were repeated in the pre-monsoon and monsoon phases, measuring contrasting surface and boundary layer structures. In addition, flights from the southern base in Bengaluru measured contrasts from the Arabian Sea, across the intense rains of the Western Ghats mountains, over the rain shadow in southeast India and over the southern Bay of Bengal. Flight planning was performed with the aid of forecasts from a new UK Met Office 4km limited area model. INCOMPASS also installed a network of surface flux towers, as well as operating a cloud-base ceilometer and performing intensive radiosonde launches from a supersite in Kanpur. This presentation will outline preliminary results from the field campaign including new observations of the surface, boundary layer structure and atmospheric profiles together with detailed

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic Stagnation Point Flow with a Convective Surface Boundary Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafar, Khamisah; Ishak, Anuar; Nazar, Roslinda

    2011-09-01

    This study analyzes the steady laminar two-dimensional stagnation point flow and heat transfer of an incompressible viscous fluid impinging normal to a horizontal plate, with the bottom surface of the plate heated by convection from a hot fluid. A uniform magnetic field is applied in a direction normal to the flat plate, with a free stream velocity varying linearly with the distance from the stagnation point. The governing partial differential equations are first transformed into ordinary differential equations, before being solved numerically. The analysis includes the effects of the magnetic parameter, the Prandtl number, and the convective parameter on the heat transfer rate at the surface. Results showed that the heat transfer rate at the surface increases with increasing values of these quantities.

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic stagnation point flow with a convective surface boundary condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafar, Khamisah [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia). Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment; Ishak, Anuar; Nazar, Roslinda [Universiti Kebangsaan, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia). School of Mathematical Sciences

    2011-08-15

    This study analyzes the steady laminar two-dimensional stagnation point flow and heat transfer of an incompressible viscous fluid impinging normal to a horizontal plate, with the bottom surface of the plate heated by convection from a hot fluid. A uniform magnetic field is applied in a direction normal to the flat plate, with a free stream velocity varying linearly with the distance from the stagnation point. The governing partial differential equations are first transformed into ordinary differential equations, before being solved numerically. The analysis includes the effects of the magnetic parameter, the Prandtl number, and the convective parameter on the heat transfer rate at the surface. Results showed that the heat transfer rate at the surface increases with increasing values of these quantities. (orig.)

  12. Analytical solution of conjugate turbulent forced convection boundary layer flow over plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joneydi Shariatzadeh Omid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A conjugate (coupled forced convection heat transfer from a heated conducting plate under turbulent boundary layer flow is considered. A heated plate of finite thickness is cooled under turbulent forced convection boundary layer flow. Because the conduction and convection boundary layer flow is coupled (conjugated in the problem, a semi-analytical solution based on Differential Transform Method (DTM is presented for solving the non-linear integro-differential equation occurring in the problem. The main conclusion is that in the conjugate heat transfer case the temperature distribution of the plate is flatter than the one in the non-conjugate case. This feature is more pronounced under turbulent flow when compared with the laminar flow.

  13. A conceptual framework to quantify the influence of convective boundary layer development on carbon dioxide mixing ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Interpretation of observed diurnal carbon dioxide (CO2 mixing ratios near the surface requires knowledge of the local dynamics of the planetary boundary layer. In this paper, we quantify the relationship between the boundary layer dynamics and the CO2 budget in convective conditions through a newly derived set of analytical equations. From these equations, we are able to quantify how uncertainties in boundary layer dynamical variables or in the morning CO2 distribution in the mixed-layer or in the free atmosphere influence the bulk CO2 mixing ratio.

    We find that the largest uncertainty incurred on the mid-day CO2 mixing ratio comes from the prescribed early morning CO2 mixing ratios in the stable boundary layer, and in the free atmosphere. Errors in these values influence CO2 mixing ratios inversely proportional to the boundary layer depth (h, just like uncertainties in the assumed initial boundary layer depth and surface CO2 flux. The influence of uncertainties in the boundary layer depth itself are one order of magnitude smaller. If we "invert" the problem and calculate CO2 surface exchange from observed or simulated CO2 mixing ratios, the sensitivities to errors in boundary layer dynamics also invert: they become linearly proportional to the boundary layer depth.

    We demonstrate these relations for a typical well characterized situation at the Cabauw tower in the Netherlands, and conclude that knowledge of the temperature and carbon dioxide vertical profiles in the early morning are of vital importance to correctly interpret observed CO2 mixing ratios during midday.

  14. Convective forcing of mercury and ozone in the Arctic boundary layer induced by leads in sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christopher W; Obrist, Daniel; Steffen, Alexandra; Staebler, Ralf M; Douglas, Thomas A; Richter, Andreas; Nghiem, Son V

    2014-02-06

    The ongoing regime shift of Arctic sea ice from perennial to seasonal ice is associated with more dynamic patterns of opening and closing sea-ice leads (large transient channels of open water in the ice), which may affect atmospheric and biogeochemical cycles in the Arctic. Mercury and ozone are rapidly removed from the atmospheric boundary layer during depletion events in the Arctic, caused by destruction of ozone along with oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) to oxidized mercury (Hg(II)) in the atmosphere and its subsequent deposition to snow and ice. Ozone depletion events can change the oxidative capacity of the air by affecting atmospheric hydroxyl radical chemistry, whereas atmospheric mercury depletion events can increase the deposition of mercury to the Arctic, some of which can enter ecosystems during snowmelt. Here we present near-surface measurements of atmospheric mercury and ozone from two Arctic field campaigns near Barrow, Alaska. We find that coastal depletion events are directly linked to sea-ice dynamics. A consolidated ice cover facilitates the depletion of Hg(0) and ozone, but these immediately recover to near-background concentrations in the upwind presence of open sea-ice leads. We attribute the rapid recoveries of Hg(0) and ozone to lead-initiated shallow convection in the stable Arctic boundary layer, which mixes Hg(0) and ozone from undepleted air masses aloft. This convective forcing provides additional Hg(0) to the surface layer at a time of active depletion chemistry, where it is subject to renewed oxidation. Future work will need to establish the degree to which large-scale changes in sea-ice dynamics across the Arctic alter ozone chemistry and mercury deposition in fragile Arctic ecosystems.

  15. Atmospheric boundary layers in storms: advanced theory and modelling applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Zilitinkevich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent planetary boundary layers (PBLs control the exchange processes between the atmosphere and the ocean/land. The key problems of PBL physics are to determine the PBL height, the momentum, energy and matter fluxes at the surface and the mean wind and scalar profiles throughout the layer in a range of regimes from stable and neutral to convective. Until present, the PBLs typical of stormy weather were always considered as neutrally stratified. Recent works have disclosed that such PBLs are in fact very strongly affected by the static stability of the free atmosphere and must be treated as factually stable (we call this type of the PBL "conventionally neutral" in contract to the "truly neutral" PBLs developed against the neutrally stratified free flow. It is common knowledge that basic features of PBLs exhibit a noticeable dependence on the free-flow static stability and baroclinicity. However, the concern of the traditional theory of neural and stable PBLs was almost without exception the barotropic nocturnal PBL, which develops at mid latitudes during a few hours in the night, on the background of a neutral or slightly stable residual layer. The latter separates this type of the PBL from the free atmosphere. It is not surprising that the nature of turbulence in such regimes is basically local and does not depend on the properties of the free atmosphere. Alternatively, long-lived neutral (in fact only conditionally neutral or stable PBLs, which have much more time to grow up, are placed immediately below the stably stratified free flow. Under these conditions, the turbulent transports of momentum and scalars even in the surface layer - far away from the PBL outer boundary - depend on the free-flow Brunt-Väisälä frequency, N. Furthermore, integral measures of the long-lived PBLs (their depths and the resistance law functions depend on N and also on the baroclinic shear, S. In the traditional PBL models both non-local parameters N and S

  16. Atmospheric boundary layers in storms: advanced theory and modelling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilitinkevich, S. S.; Esau, I. N.; Baklanov, A.

    2005-03-01

    Turbulent planetary boundary layers (PBLs) control the exchange processes between the atmosphere and the ocean/land. The key problems of PBL physics are to determine the PBL height, the momentum, energy and matter fluxes at the surface and the mean wind and scalar profiles throughout the layer in a range of regimes from stable and neutral to convective. Until present, the PBLs typical of stormy weather were always considered as neutrally stratified. Recent works have disclosed that such PBLs are in fact very strongly affected by the static stability of the free atmosphere and must be treated as factually stable (we call this type of the PBL "conventionally neutral" in contract to the "truly neutral" PBLs developed against the neutrally stratified free flow). It is common knowledge that basic features of PBLs exhibit a noticeable dependence on the free-flow static stability and baroclinicity. However, the concern of the traditional theory of neural and stable PBLs was almost without exception the barotropic nocturnal PBL, which develops at mid latitudes during a few hours in the night, on the background of a neutral or slightly stable residual layer. The latter separates this type of the PBL from the free atmosphere. It is not surprising that the nature of turbulence in such regimes is basically local and does not depend on the properties of the free atmosphere. Alternatively, long-lived neutral (in fact only conditionally neutral) or stable PBLs, which have much more time to grow up, are placed immediately below the stably stratified free flow. Under these conditions, the turbulent transports of momentum and scalars even in the surface layer - far away from the PBL outer boundary - depend on the free-flow Brunt-Väisälä frequency, N. Furthermore, integral measures of the long-lived PBLs (their depths and the resistance law functions) depend on N and also on the baroclinic shear, S. In the traditional PBL models both non-local parameters N and S were overlooked

  17. On the effect of laterally varying boundary heat flux on rapidly rotating spherical shell convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Swarandeep; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2017-08-01

    The onset of convection in a rotating spherical shell subject to laterally varying heat flux at the outer boundary is considered in this paper. The focus is on the geophysically relevant regime of rapid rotation (low Ekman number) where the natural length scale of convection is significantly smaller than the length scale imposed by the boundary heat flux pattern. Contrary to earlier studies at a higher Ekman number, we find a substantial reduction in the onset Rayleigh number Rac with increasing lateral variation. The decrease in Rac is shown to be closely correlated to the equatorial heat flux surplus in the steady, basic state solution. The consistency of such a correlation makes the estimation of Rac possible without solving the full stability problem. The steady baroclinic flow has a strong cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry in the kinetic helicity only for equatorially symmetric lateral variations, with possible implications for dynamo action. Equatorially antisymmetric variations, on the other hand, break the symmetry of the mean flow, in turn negating its helicity. Analysis of the perturbation solution reveals strongly localized clusters through which convection rolls drift in and out at a frequency higher than that for the reference case with homogeneous boundary heat flux. Large lateral variations produce a marked decrease in the azimuthal length scale of columns, which indicates that small-scale motions are essential to the transport of heat in rapidly rotating, localized convection. With an equatorially antisymmetric heat flux pattern, convection in individual clusters goes through an asynchronous wax-wane cycle whose frequency is much lower than the drift rate of the columns. These continual variations in convection intensity may in turn result in fluctuations in the magnetic field intensity, an effect that needs to be considered in dynamo models. Finally, there is a notable analogy between the role of a laterally varying boundary heat flux and the role of a

  18. Understanding dynamics of large-scale atmospheric vortices with moist-convective shallow water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, M.; Zeitlin, V.

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric jets and vortices which, together with inertia-gravity waves, constitute the principal dynamical entities of large-scale atmospheric motions, are well described in the framework of one- or multi-layer rotating shallow water models, which are obtained by vertically averaging of full “primitive” equations. There is a simple and physically consistent way to include moist convection in these models by adding a relaxational parameterization of precipitation and coupling precipitation with convective fluxes with the help of moist enthalpy conservation. We recall the construction of moist-convective rotating shallow water model (mcRSW) model and give an example of application to upper-layer atmospheric vortices.

  19. Characterizing the Effects of Convection on the Afternoon to Evening Boundary Layer Transition During Pecan 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    transition afternoon-to-evening transition, field campaign PECAN 2015 convective boundary layer decay, multi- platform surface fluxes COARE COAMPS 15...tower, (2.83, 5.66, 11.32 and 16 meters), wind, virtual temperature, and water vapor density were sampled at 20 Hz intended for turbulence...Knupp, 2014: Multi- platform Observations Characterizing the Afternoon-to-Evening Transition of the Planetary Boundary Layer in Northern Alabama, USA

  20. Unsteady MHD convection in a flat horizontal layer of liquid with free boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antimirov, M.Ya.; Liyepinya, V.R.

    1977-10-01

    A complete solution is produced to the unsteady problem of the convective movement of a conducting fluid in a flat horizontal layer with free boundaries (in its linear statement) when an external magnetic field is present. Analysis of the solution produced allows the stability of motion to be studied and, furthermore, permits unambiguous determination of steady motion at the boundary of stability by a passage to the limit as t ..-->.. infinity in the unsteady solution at the critical Rayleigh number. 3 references.

  1. On the Nature of the Transition Between Roll and Cellular Organization in the Convective Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salesky, Scott T.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2017-04-01

    Both observational and numerical studies of the convective boundary layer (CBL) have demonstrated that when surface heat fluxes are small and mean wind shear is strong, convective updrafts tend to organize into horizontal rolls aligned within 10-20° of the geostrophic wind direction. However, under large surface heat fluxes and weak to negligible shear, convection tends to organize into open cells, similar to turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. Using a suite of 14 large-eddy simulations (LES) spanning a range of -z_i/L between zero (neutral) and 1041 (highly convective), where z_i is the CBL depth and L is the Obukhov length, the transition between roll- and cellular-type convection is investigated systematically for the first time using LES. Mean vertical profiles including velocity variances and turbulent transport efficiencies, as well the "roll factor," which characterizes the rotational symmetry of the vertical velocity field, indicate the transition occurs gradually over a range of -z_i/L; however, the most significant changes in vertical profiles and CBL organization occur from near-neutral conditions up to about -z_i/L ≈ 15-20. Turbulent transport efficiencies and quadrant analysis are used to characterize the turbulent transport of momentum and heat with increasing -z_i/L. It is found that turbulence transports heat efficiently from weakly to highly convective conditions; however, turbulent momentum transport becomes increasingly inefficient as -z_i/L increases.

  2. Characteristic Length Scales of Reactive Species in a Convective Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, H.J.J.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Duynkerke, P.G.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper variance spectra of chemically active species in a dry convective boundary layer are studied by means of large-eddy simulations (LESs). The aim is to quantify the impact of chemistry on the spatial fluctuations in the concentration fields. The computational domain has a large aspect ra

  3. Mapping travelling convection vortex events with respect to energetic particle boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moretto, T.; Yahnin, A.

    1998-01-01

    Thirteen events of high-latitude ionospheric travelling convection vortices during very quiet conditions were identified in the Greenland magnetometer data during 1990 and 1991. The latitudes of the vortex centres for these events are compared to the energetic electron trapping boundaries...

  4. Effects of shear in the convective boundary layer: analysis of the turbulent kinetic energy budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of convective and mechanical turbulence at the entrainment zone are studied through the use of systematic Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) experiments. Five LES experiments with different shear characteristics in the quasi-steady barotropic boundary layer were conducted by increasing the value of

  5. Parameterization of entrainment in a sheared convective boundary layer using a first-order jump model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, S.W.; Park, S.U.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2006-01-01

    Basic entrainment equations applicable to the sheared convective boundary layer (CBL) are derived by assuming an inversion layer with a finite depth, i.e., the first-order jump model. Large-eddy simulation data are used to determine the constants involved in the parameterizations of the entrainment

  6. Lie symmetry analysis of a double-diffusive free convective slip flow with a convective boundary condition past a radiating vertical surface embedded in a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afify, A. A.; Uddin, Md. J.

    2016-09-01

    A numerical study of a steady two-dimensional double-diffusive free convection boundary layer flow over a vertical surface embedded in a porous medium with slip flow and convective boundary conditions, heat generation/absorption, and solar radiation effects is performed. A scaling group of transformations is used to obtain the governing boundary layer equations and the boundary conditions. The transformed equations are then solved by the fourth- and fifth-order Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg numerical method with Maple 13. The results for the velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles, as well as the skin friction coefficient, the Nusselt number, and the Sherwood number are presented and discussed.

  7. Grey zone simulations of the morning convective boundary layer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, G. A.; Beare, R. J.; Osborne, S.; Lock, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical simulations of two cases of morning boundary layer development are conducted to investigate the impact of grid resolution on mean profiles and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) partitioning from the large eddy simulation (LES) to the mesoscale limit. Idealized LES, using the 3-D Smagorinsky scheme, is shown to be capable of reproducing the boundary layer evolution when compared against measurements. However, increasing grid spacing results in the damping of resolved TKE and the production of superadiabatic temperature profiles in the boundary layer. Turbulence initiation is significantly delayed, exhibiting an abrupt onset at intermediate resolutions. Two approaches, the bounding of vertical diffusion coefficient and the blending of the 3-D Smagorinsky with a nonlocal 1D scheme, are used to model subgrid diffusion at grey zone resolutions. Simulations are compared against the coarse-grained fields from the validated LES results for each case. Both methods exhibit particular strengths and weaknesses, indicating the compromise that needs to be made currently in high-resolution numerical weather prediction. The blending scheme is able to reproduce the adiabatic profiles although turbulence is underestimated in favor of the parametrized heat flux, and the spin-up of TKE remains delayed. In contrast, the bounding approach gives an evolution of TKE that follows the coarse-grained LES very well, relying on the resolved motions for the nonlocal heat flux. However, bounding gives unrealistic static instability in the early morning temperature profiles (similar to the 3-D Smagorinsky scheme) because model dynamics are unable to resolve TKE when the boundary layer is too shallow compared to the grid spacing.

  8. Boundary layer Slip Flow and Heat Transfer of Nanofluid Induced by a Permeable Stretching Sheet with Convective Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Malvandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to consider both effects of slip and convective heat boundary conditions on steady two-dimensional boundary layer flow of a nanofluid over a stretching sheet in the presence of blowing/suction simultaneously. Flow meets the Navier's slip condition at the surface and Biot number is also used to consider the effects of convective heat transfer. The employed model for nanofluid includes two-component four-equation nonhomogeneous equilibrium model that incorporates the effects of nanoparticle migration owing to Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The basic partial boundary layer equations have been transformed into a two-point boundary value problem via similarity variables. Results for impermeable isothermal surface and also no-slip boundary condition were in best agreements with those existing in literatures. Effects of governing parameters such as Biot number (Bi, slip parameter (λ, thermophoresis (Nt, Prandtl number (Pr, Lewis number (Le, Brownian motion (Nb and blowing/suction (S on reduced Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are analyzed and discussed in details. The obtained results indicate that unlike heat transfer rate, concentration rate is very sensitive to all parameters among which Le, S and Pr are the most effective ones.

  9. MHD forced convective laminar boundary layer flow from a convectively heated moving vertical plate with radiation and transpiration effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Jashim; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, A I Md

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to x(m) whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to x((m-1)/2) where x is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory.

  10. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zhaoxia [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  11. Unstable phenomena of low speed compressible natural convection with open boundaries by multi-GPU implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Hsiang; Fu, Wu-Shung; Tsubokura, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    Unstable phenomena of low speed compressible natural convection are investigated numerically. Geometry contains parallel square plates or single heated plate with open boundaries is taken into consideration. Numerical methods of the Roe scheme, preconditioning and dual time stepping matching the DP-LUR method are used for low speed compressible flow. The absorbing boundary condition and modified LODI method is adopted to solve open boundary problems. High performance parallel computation is achieved by multi-GPU implementation with CUDA platform. The effects of natural convection by isothermal plates facing upwards in air is then carried out by the methods mentioned above Unstable behaviors appeared upon certain Rayleigh number with characteristic length respect to the width of plates or height between plates.

  12. Adapting a Fourier pseudospectral method to Dirichlet boundary conditions for Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. C. Ramos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the adaptation to non-free boundary conditions of a pseudospectral method based on the (complex Fourier transform. The method is applied to the numerical integration of the Oberbeck-Boussinesq equations in a Rayleigh-Bénard cell with no-slip boundary conditions for velocity and Dirichlet boundary conditions for temperature. We show the first results of a 2D numerical simulation of dry air convection at high Rayleigh number (. These results are the basis for the later study, by the same method, of wet convection in a solar still. Received: 20 Novembre 2014, Accepted: 15 September 2015; Edited by: C. A. Condat, G. J. Sibona; DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4279/PIP.070015 Cite as: I C Ramos, C B Briozzo, Papers in Physics 7, 070015 (2015

  13. Nanoparticle volume fraction with heat and mass transfer on MHD mixed convection flow in a nanofluid in the presence of thermo-diffusion under convective boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, R.; Jeyabalan, C.; Sivagnana Prabhu, K. K.

    2016-02-01

    This article examines the influence of thermophoresis, Brownian motion of the nanoparticles with variable stream conditions in the presence of magnetic field on mixed convection heat and mass transfer in the boundary layer region of a semi-infinite porous vertical plate in a nanofluid under the convective boundary conditions. The transformed boundary layer ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using Maple 18 software with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method. Numerical results are presented both in tabular and graphical forms illustrating the effects of these parameters with magnetic field on momentum, thermal, nanoparticle volume fraction and solutal concentration boundary layers. The numerical results obtained for the velocity, temperature, volume fraction, and concentration profiles reveal interesting phenomenon, some of these qualitative results are presented through plots. It is interesting to note that the magnetic field plays a dominant role on nanofluid flow under the convective boundary conditions.

  14. Surface and atmospheric controls on the onset of moist convection over land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gentine, P.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Andrea, D' F.; Ek, M.

    2013-01-01

    The onset of moist convection over land is investigated using a conceptual approach with a slab boundary layer model. We here determine the essential factors for the onset of boundary layer clouds over land, and study their relative importance. They are: 1) the ratio of the temperature to the moistu

  15. The dynamics and relationships of precipitation, temperature and convection boundaries in the dayside auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moen

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A continuous band of high ion temperature, which persisted for about 8h and zigzagged north-south across more than five degrees in latitude in the dayside (07:00-15:00MLT auroral ionosphere, was observed by the EISCAT VHF radar on 23 November 1999. Latitudinal gradients in the temperature of the F-region electron and ion gases (Te and Ti, respectively have been compared with concurrent observations of particle precipitation and field-perpendicular convection by DMSP satellites, in order to reveal a physical explanation for the persistent band of high Ti, and to test the potential role of Ti and Te gradients as possible markers for the open-closed field line boundary. The north/south movement of the equatorward Ti boundary was found to be consistent with the contraction/expansion of the polar cap due to an unbalanced dayside and nightside reconnection. Sporadic intensifications in Ti, recurring on ~10-min time scales, indicate that frictional heating was modulated by time-varying reconnection, and the band of high Ti was located on open flux. However, the equatorward Ti boundary was not found to be a close proxy of the open-closed boundary. The closest definable proxy of the open-closed boundary is the magnetosheath electron edge observed by DMSP. Although Te appears to be sensitive to magnetosheath electron fluxes, it is not found to be a suitable parameter for routine tracking of the open-closed boundary, as it involves case dependent analysis of the thermal balance. Finally, we have documented a region of newly-opened sunward convecting flux. This region is situated between the convection reversal boundary and the magnetosheath electron edge defining the open-closed boundary. This is consistent with a delay of several minutes between the arrival of the first (super-Alfvénic magnetosheath electrons and the response in the ionospheric

  16. Effects of Nonequilibrium at Edge of Boundary Layer on Convective Heat Transfer to a Blunt Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goekcen, Tahir; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    This investigation is a continuation of a previous study on nonequilibrium convective heat transfer to a blunt body. In the previous study, for relatively high Reynolds number flows, it was found that: nonequilibrium convective heat transfer to a blunt body is not strongly dependent on freestream parameters, provided that the thermochemical equilibrium is reached at the edge of boundary layer; and successful testing of convective heat transfer in an arc-jet environment is possible by duplicating the surface pressure and total enthalpy. The nonequilibrium convective heat transfer computations are validated against the results of Fay and Riddell/Goulard theory. Present work investigates low Reynolds number conditions which are typical in an actual arc-jet flow environment. One expects that there will be departures from the Fay and Riddell/Goulard result since certain assumptions of the classical theory are not satisfied. These departures are of interest because the Fay and Riddell/Goulard formulas are extensively used in arc-jet testing (e.g., to determine the enthalpy of the flow and the catalytic efficiency of heat shield materials). For practical sizes of test materials, density of the test flow (and Reynolds number) in an arc-jet is such that thermochemical equilibrium may not be reached at the edge of boundary layer. For blunt body flows of nitrogen and air, computations will be presented to show the effects of thermochemical nonequilibrium at the boundary layer edge on nonequilibrium heat transfer.

  17. Effects of Nonequilibrium at Edge of Boundary Layer on Convective Heat Transfer to a Blunt Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goekcen, Tahir; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    This investigation is a continuation of a previous study on nonequilibrium convective heat transfer to a blunt body. In the previous study, for relatively high Reynolds number flows, it was found that: nonequilibrium convective heat transfer to a blunt body is not strongly dependent on freestream parameters, provided that the thermochemical equilibrium is reached at the edge of boundary layer; and successful testing of convective heat transfer in an arc-jet environment is possible by duplicating the surface pressure and total enthalpy. The nonequilibrium convective heat transfer computations are validated against the results of Fay and Riddell/Goulard theory. Present work investigates low Reynolds number conditions which are typical in an actual arc-jet flow environment. One expects that there will be departures from the Fay and Riddell/Goulard result since certain assumptions of the classical theory are not satisfied. These departures are of interest because the Fay and Riddell/Goulard formulas are extensively used in arc-jet testing (e.g., to determine the enthalpy of the flow and the catalytic efficiency of heat shield materials). For practical sizes of test materials, density of the test flow (and Reynolds number) in an arc-jet is such that thermochemical equilibrium may not be reached at the edge of boundary layer. For blunt body flows of nitrogen and air, computations will be presented to show the effects of thermochemical nonequilibrium at the boundary layer edge on nonequilibrium heat transfer.

  18. LES model intercomparisons for the stable atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moene, A.F.; Baas, P.; Bosveld, F.C.; Basu, S.

    2011-01-01

    Model intercomparisons are one possible method to gain confidence in Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) as a viable tool to study turbulence in the atmospheric boundary-layer. This paper discusses the setup and some results of two intercomparison cases focussing on the stably stratified nocturnal boundary-

  19. Convective organization in the super-parameterized community atmosphere model with constant surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Organization in a moist convecting atmosphere is investigated using the super-parameterized community atmosphere model (SPCAM) in aquaplanet setting with constant surface temperature, with and without planetary rotation. Without radiative and surface feedbacks, convective organization is dominated by convectively coupled gravity waves without planetary rotation and convectively coupled equatorial waves when there is planetary rotation. This behavior is well captured when the cloud resolving model (CRM) in SPCAM is replaced by its linear response function, computed following Kuang (2010), for the state of radiative convective equilibrium (RCE). With radiative feedback, however, convection self-aggregates, and with planetary rotation, the tropical zonal wavenumber-frequency spectrum features a red noise background. These behaviors in the presence of the radiative feedback are not captured when the CRM is replaced by its linear response function around the RCE state with radiative feedback included in the construction. Implications to organization in a moist convecting atmosphere will be discussed. Kuang, Z., Linear response functions of a cumulus ensemble to temperature and moisture perturbations and implication to the dynamics of convectively coupled waves, J. Atmos. Sci., 67, 941-962, (2010)

  20. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a horizontal circular cylinder in a Jeffrey fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zokri, S. M.; Arifin, N. S.; Mohamed, M. K. A.; Salleh, M. Z.; Kasim, A. R. M.; Mohammad, N. F.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the mixed convection boundary layer flow and heat transfer of Jeffrey fluid past a horizontal circular cylinder with viscous dissipation effect and constant heat flux is discussed. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into dimensionless forms using the appropriate non-similar transformation. Numerical solutions are obtained by using the Keller-box method, which is proven well-tested, flexible, implicit and unconditionally stable. The numerical results for the velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are attained for various values of mixed convection parameter.

  1. Similarity Solutions of Marangoni Convection Boundary Layer Flow with Gravity and External Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳; 郑连存

    2014-01-01

    This study is focused on a steady dissipative layer, which is generated by Marangoni convection flow over the surface resulted from an imposed temperature gradient, coupled with buoyancy effects due to gravity and external pressure. A model is proposed with Marangoni condition in the boundary conditions at the interface. The similarity equations are determined and approximate analytical solutions are obtained by an efficient transformation, asymptotic expansion and Padé approximant technique. For the cases that buoyancy force is favorable or unfavor-able to Marangoni flow, the features of flow and temperature fields are investigated in terms of Marangoni mixed convection parameter and Prantl number.

  2. MHD free convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid past a flat vertical plate with Newtonian heating boundary condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed J Uddin

    Full Text Available Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement.

  3. MHD free convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid past a flat vertical plate with Newtonian heating boundary condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammed J; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, Ahmed I

    2012-01-01

    Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement.

  4. The hypohydrostatic rescaling and its impacts on modeling of atmospheric convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauluis, Olivier [New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York, NY (United States); Frierson, Dargan M.W. [University of Chicago, Department of Geophysical Sciences, Chicago, IL (United States); Garner, Stephen T.; Held, Isaac M. [Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory/NOAA, Princeton, NJ (United States); Vallis, Geoffrey K. [Princeton University, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2006-11-15

    The atmospheric circulation spans a wide range of spatial scales, including the planetary scale ({proportional_to}10,000 km), synoptic scale ({proportional_to}2,000 km), mesoscale ({proportional_to}200 km), and convective scales (< 20 km). The wide scale separation between convective motions, responsible for the vertical energy transport, and the planetary circulation, responsible for the meridional energy transport, has prevented explicit representation of convective motions in global atmospheric models. Kuang et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett. 32: L02809, 2005) have suggested a way to circumvent this limitation through a rescaling that they refer to as Diabatic Acceleration and REscaling (DARE). We focus here on a modified version of the procedure that we refer to as hypohydrostatic rescaling. These two strategies are equivalent for inviscid and adiabatic flow in the traditional meteorological setting in which the vertical component of the Coriolis acceleration is ignored, but they differ when atmospheric physics is taken into account. It is argued here that, while the hypohydrostatic rescaling preserves the dynamics of the planetary scale circulation, it increases the horizontal scale of convective motions. This drastically reduces the computational cost for explicit simulation of hypohydrostatic convection in a global atmospheric model. A key question is whether explicit simulations of hypohydrostatic convection could offer a valid alternative to convective parameterization in global models. To do so, radiative-convective equilibrium is simulated with a high-resolution non-hydrostatic model using different model resolutions and values of the rescaling parameter. When the behavior of hypohydrostatic convection is compared with coarse-resolution simulations of convection, the latter set of simulations reproduce more accurately the result from a reference high-resolution simulation. This is particularly true for the convective velocity and cloud ice distributions

  5. A Convective-like Energy-Stable Open Boundary Condition for Simulations of Incompressible Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Suchuan

    2015-01-01

    We present a new energy-stable open boundary condition, and an associated numerical algorithm, for simulating incompressible flows with outflow/open boundaries. This open boundary condition ensures the energy stability of the system, even when strong vortices or backflows occur at the outflow boundary. Under certain situations it can be reduced to a form that can be analogized to the usual convective boundary condition. One prominent feature of this boundary condition is that it provides a control over the velocity on the outflow/open boundary. This is not available with the other energy-stable open boundary conditions from previous works. Our numerical algorithm treats the proposed open boundary condition based on a rotational velocity-correction type strategy. It gives rise to a Robin-type condition for the discrete pressure and a Robin-type condition for the discrete velocity on the outflow/open boundary, respectively at the pressure and the velocity sub-steps. We present extensive numerical experiments on...

  6. Effects of small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Kouji; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Komori, Satoru

    2011-06-01

    Effects of weak, small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection are experimentally investigated using a wind tunnel. Two experiments are carried out: the first is isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence, and the second is non-isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence. Both boundary layers develop under a small favorable pressure gradient. For the latter case, the bottom wall of the test section is heated at a constant wall temperature to investigate the effects of thermal convection under the effects of freestream turbulence. For both cases, the turbulence intensity in the freestream is Tu = 1.3% ˜ 2.4%, and the integral length scale of freestream turbulence, L∞, is much smaller than the boundary layer thickness δ, i.e., L∞/δ ≪1. The Reynolds numbers Reθ based on the momentum thickness and freestream speed U∞ are Reθ = 560, 1100, 1310, and 2330 in isothermal boundary layers without grid turbulence. Instantaneous velocities, U and V, and instantaneous temperature T are simultaneously measured using a hot-wire anemometry and a constant-current resistance thermometer. The results show that the rms velocities and Reynolds shear stress normalized by the friction velocity are strongly suppressed by the freestream turbulence throughout the boundary layer in both isothermal and non-isothermal boundary layers. In the non-isothermal boundary layers, the normalized rms temperature and vertical turbulent heat flux are also strongly suppressed by the freestream turbulence. Turbulent momentum and heat transfer at the wall are enhanced by the freestream turbulence and the enhancement is notable in unstable stratification. The power spectra of u, v, and θ and their cospectra show that motions of almost all scales are suppressed by the freestream turbulence in both the isothermal and non-isothermal boundary layers.

  7. Modeling Turbulence Generation in the Atmospheric Surface and Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    index. In the boundary layer, atmospheric temperature fluctuations are primarily responsible for the variations in refractive index at ultraviolet...parameterization of the atmospheric emissivity, in the early 1980s a parallel study of the SEB was conducted by the US Army Waterways Experiment Station...period of rotation of the atmosphere can be defined as TI = 2π/fc. At most mid- latitude locations this period is approximately 17 h. This quantity is

  8. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a horizontal elliptic cylinder with constant heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Tariq; Ahmad, Hussain; Ghaffari, Abuzar

    2015-12-01

    Mixed convection boundary layer flow of a viscous fluid over a horizontal elliptic cylinder with a constant heat flux is investigated numerically. The governing partial differential equations are transformed to non-dimensional form and then are solved by an efficient implicit finite different scheme known as Keller-box method. The solutions are expressed in the form of skin friction and Nusselt number, which are plotted against the eccentric angle. The effect of pertinent parameters such as mixed convection parameter, aspect ratio (ratio of lengths of minor axis to major axis), and Prandtl number on skin friction and Nusselt number are illustrated through graphs for both blunt and slender orientations. The increase in the value of mixed convection parameter results in increase in skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number for blunt as well as slender orientations.

  9. The asymptotic equivalence of fixed heat flux and fixed temperature thermal boundary conditions for rapidly rotating convection

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, Michael A; Julien, Keith; Nieves, David; Driggs, Derek; Marti, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The influence of fixed temperature and fixed heat flux thermal boundary conditions on rapidly rotating convection in the plane layer geometry is investigated for the case of stress-free mechanical boundary conditions. It is shown that whereas the leading order system satisfies fixed temperature boundary conditions implicitly, a double boundary layer structure is necessary to satisfy the fixed heat flux thermal boundary conditions. The boundary layers consist of a classical Ekman layer adjacent to the solid boundaries that adjust viscous stresses to zero, and a layer in thermal wind balance just outside the Ekman layers adjusts the temperature such that the fixed heat flux thermal boundary conditions are satisfied. The influence of these boundary layers on the interior geostrophically balanced convection is shown to be asymptotically weak, however. Upon defining a simple rescaling of the thermal variables, the leading order reduced system of governing equations are therefore equivalent for both boundary condit...

  10. Boundary Layer Flow and Heat Transfer over a Permeable Stretching/Shrinking Sheet with a Convective Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairy Zaimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns with the boundary layer flow and heat transfer over a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet in a viscous fluid, with the bottom surface of the plate is heated by convection from a hot fluid. The partial differential equations governing the flow and heat transfer are converted into ordinary differential equations using a similarity transformation, before being solved numerically. The effects of the suction, convection and stretching/shrinking parameters on the skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are examined and graphically illustrated. Dual solutions are found to exist for a certain range of the suction and stretching/shrinking parameters. The numerical results also show that suction widens the range of the stretching/shrinking parameter for which the solution exists.

  11. Spectral Gap Energy Transfer in Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, S.; Walters, K.; Barros, A. P.; Nogueira, M.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental measurements of atmospheric turbulence energy spectra show E(k) ~ k-3 slopes at synoptic scales (~ 600 km - 2000 km) and k-5/3 slopes at the mesoscales (transfer, energy arrest at macroscales must be introduced. The most commonly used turbulence models developed to mimic the above energy transfer include the energy backscatter model for 2D turbulence in the horizontal plane via Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models, dissipative URANS models in the vertical plane, and Ekman friction for the energy arrest. One of the controversial issues surrounding the atmospheric turbulence spectra is the explanation of the generation of the 2D and 3D spectra and transition between them, for energy injection at the synoptic scales. Lilly (1989) proposed that the existence of 2D and 3D spectra can only be explained by the presence of an additional energy injection in the meso-scale region. A second issue is related to the observations of dual peak spectra with small variance in meso-scale, suggesting that the energy transfer occurs across a spectral gap (Van Der Hoven, 1957). Several studies have confirmed the spectral gap for the meso-scale circulations, and have suggested that they are enhanced by smaller scale vertical convection rather than by the synoptic scales. Further, the widely accepted energy arrest mechanism by boundary layer friction is closely related to the spectral gap transfer. This study proposes an energy transfer mechanism for atmospheric turbulence with synoptic scale injection, wherein the generation of 2D and 3D spectra is explained using spectral gap energy transfer. The existence of the spectral gap energy transfer is validated by performing LES for the interaction of large scale circulation with a wall, and studying the evolution of the energy spectra both near to and far from the wall. Simulations are also performed using the Advanced Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF-ARW) for moist zonal flow over Gaussian ridge, and the energy spectra close

  12. Numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions and pulse heating effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes the numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions. The effects of a step heat loading, a sudden pulse heat loading, and an internal heat source are considered in conjunction with convection boundary conditions. Two methods of solution are presened for predicting the transient behavior of the propagating thermal disturbances. In the first method, MacCormack's predictor-corrector method is employed for integrating the hyperbolic system of equations. Next, the transfinite element method, which employs specially tailored elements, is used for accurately representing the transient response of the propagating thermal wave fronts. The agreement between the results of various numerical test cases validate the representative behavior of the thermal wave fronts. Both methods represent hyperbolic heat conduction behavior by effectively modeling the sharp discontinuities of the propagating thermal disturbances.

  13. Numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions and pulse heating effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes the numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions. The effects of a step heat loading, a sudden pulse heat loading, and an internal heat source are considered in conjunction with convection boundary conditions. Two methods of solution are presened for predicting the transient behavior of the propagating thermal disturbances. In the first method, MacCormack's predictor-corrector method is employed for integrating the hyperbolic system of equations. Next, the transfinite element method, which employs specially tailored elements, is used for accurately representing the transient response of the propagating thermal wave fronts. The agreement between the results of various numerical test cases validate the representative behavior of the thermal wave fronts. Both methods represent hyperbolic heat conduction behavior by effectively modeling the sharp discontinuities of the propagating thermal disturbances.

  14. Hydromagnetic natural convection flow between vertical parallel plates with time-periodic boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adesanya, S.O., E-mail: adesanyas@run.edu.ng [Department of Mathematical Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Redeemer’s University (Nigeria); Oluwadare, E.O. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Redeemer’s University (Nigeria); Falade, J.A., E-mail: faladej@run.edu.ng [Department of Physical Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Redeemer’s University (Nigeria); Makinde, O.D., E-mail: makinded@gmail.com [Faculty of Military Science, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X2, Saldanha 7395 (South Africa)

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, the free convective flow of magnetohydrodynamic fluid through a channel with time periodic boundary condition is investigated by taking the effects of Joule dissipation into consideration. Based on simplifying assumptions, the coupled governing equations are reduced to a set of nonlinear boundary valued problem. Approximate solutions are obtained by using semi-analytical Adomian decomposition method. The effect of pertinent parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature distribution, Nusselt number and skin friction are presented graphically and discussed. The result of the computation shows that an increase in the magnetic field intensity has significant influence on the fluid flow. - Highlights: • The influence of magnetic field on the free convective fluid flow is considered. • The coupled equations are solved by using Adomian decomposition method. • The Adomian series solution agreed with previously obtained result. • Magnetic field decreases the velocity maximum but enhances temperature field.

  15. Homotopy simulation of axisymmetric laminar mixed convection nanofluid boundary layer flow over a vertical cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freidooni Mehr N.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the semi-analytical/numerical technique known as the homotopy analysis method (HAM is employed to derive solutions for the laminar axisymmetric mixed convection boundary-layer nanofluid flow past a vertical cylinder. The similarity solutions are employed to transform the parabolic partial differential conservation equations into system of nonlinear, coupled ordinary differential equations, subject to appropriate boundary conditions. A comparison has been done to verify the obtained results with the purely numerical results of Grosan and Pop (2011 with excellent correlation achieved. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction, curvature parameter and mixed convection or buoyancy parameter on the dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions, skin friction and wall temperature gradients are illustrated graphically. HAM is found to demonstrate excellent potential for simulating nanofluid dynamics problems. Applications of the study include materials processing and also thermal enhancement of energy systems.

  16. Moment-based boundary conditions for lattice Boltzmann simulations of natural convection in cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2016-06-29

    We study a multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann model for natural convection with moment-based boundary conditions. The unknown primary variables of the algorithm at a boundary are found by imposing conditions directly upon hydrodynamic moments, which are then translated into conditions for the discrete velocity distribution functions. The method is formulated so that it is consistent with the second order implementation of the discrete velocity Boltzmann equations for fluid flow and temperature. Natural convection in square cavities is studied for Rayleigh numbers ranging from 103 to 108. An excellent agreement with benchmark data is observed and the flow fields are shown to converge with second order accuracy. Copyright © 2016 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  17. Mixed convective heat transfer to Sisko fluid over a radially stretching sheet in the presence of convective boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Masood; Malik, Rabia, E-mail: rabiamalik.qau@gmail.com; Munir, Asif [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2015-08-15

    In this article, the mixed convective heat transfer to Sisko fluid over a radially stretching surface in the presence of convective boundary conditions is investigated. The viscous dissipation and thermal radiation effects are also taken into account. The suitable transformations are applied to convert the governing partial differential equations into a set of nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations. The analytical solution of the governing problem is obtained by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Additionally, these analytical results are compared with the numerical results obtained by the shooting technique. The obtained results for the velocity and temperature are analyzed graphically for several physical parameters for the assisting and opposing flows. It is found that the effect of buoyancy parameter is more prominent in case of the assisting flow as compared to the opposing flow. Further, in tabular form the numerical values are given for the local skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number. A remarkable agreement is noticed by comparing the present results with the results reported in the literature as a special case.

  18. A Laboratory Study of the Turbulent Velocity Characteristics in the Convective Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the measurement of the velocity field in the convective boundary layer (CBL) in a convection water tank with the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique, this paper studies the characteristics of the CBL turbulent velocity in a modified convection tank. The experiment results show that the velocity distribution in the mixed layer clearly possesses the characteristics of the CBL thermals, and the turbulent eddies can be seen obviously. The comparison of the vertical distribution of the turbulent velocity variables indicates that the modeling in the new tank is better than in the old one. The experiment data show that the thermal's motion in the entrainment zone sometimes fluctuates obviously due to the intermittence of turbulence. Analyses show that this fluctuation can influence the agreement of the measurement data with the parameterization scheme, in which the convective Richardson number is used to characterize the entrainment zone depth. The normalized square velocity w2i/w2* at the top of the mixed layer seems to be time-dependent, and has a decreasing trend during the experiments. This implies that the vertical turbulent velocity at the top of the mixed layer may not be proportional to the convective velocity (w*).

  19. A two-phase free boundary problem for a nonlinear diffusion-convection equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lillo, S; Lupo, G [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, Via Vanvitelli 1, 06123 Perugia (Italy)], E-mail: silvana.delillo@pg.infn.it

    2008-04-11

    A two-phase free boundary problem associated with a diffusion-convection equation is considered. The problem is reduced to a system of nonlinear integral equations, which admits a unique solution for small times. The system admits an explicit two-component solution corresponding to a two-component shock wave of the Burgers equation. The stability of such a solution is also discussed.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic flow of nanofluid over permeable stretching sheet with convective boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayat Tasawar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis has been carried out for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD boundary layer flow of nanofluid. The flow is caused by a permeable stretching sheet. Convective type boundary conditions are employed in modeling the heat and mass transfer process. Appropriate transformations reduce the nonlinear partial differential equations to ordinary differential equations. The convergent series solutions are constructed. Graphical results of different parameters are discussed. The behaviors of Brownian motion and thermophoretic diffusion of nanoparticles have been examined. The dimensionless expressions of local Nusselt and local Sherwood numbers have been evaluated and discussed.

  1. Boundary layers in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection in air

    CERN Document Server

    Puits, Ronald du; Resagk, Christian; Thess, André

    2012-01-01

    The boundary layer flow in a Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection cell of rectangular shape has been visualized in this fluid dynamics video. The experiment has been undertaken in air at a Rayleigh number $Ra=1.3\\times 10^{10}$ and a Prandtl number $Pr=0.7$. Various sequences captured at selected positions of the heating plate show that the boundary layer is a very transient flow region characterized by coherent structures that permanently evolve. It becomes fully turbulent in the areas where the large-scale circulation impinge or leave the bottom plate.

  2. Prandtl number scaling of unsteady natural convection boundary layers for Pr>1 fluids under isothermal heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenxian; Armfield, S W; Patterson, J C; Lei, Chengwang

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, the scalings incorporating the Prandtl number (Pr) dependence have been obtained by a scaling analysis for the unsteady natural convection boundary layer of an initially quiescent isothermal Newtonian fluid of Pr>1 produced by the sudden imposition of a higher temperature on a vertical plate. It is shown that the transient flow behavior of the resulting boundary layer can be described by a three-region structure and at the start-up stage the boundary layer development is one dimensional and independent of height due to the dominance of pure conduction; however, at steady state it becomes two dimensional and height dependent as the flow becomes dominated by convection. Numerical results demonstrate that the scalings representing the thermal boundary layer development accurately represent their Pr dependence over the whole stage of flow development. The scalings representing the viscous boundary layer development are generally in good agreement with the numerical results with the Pr variation over the whole stage of flow development, although there are small deviations from the numerical results with the Pr variation that are within acceptable limits for scaling.

  3. Heat and mass transfer for natural convection MHD flow over a permeable moving vertical plate with convective boundary condition in the presence of viscous dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shateyi, Stanford

    2017-07-01

    The spectral relaxation method is employed to examine natural convective heat and mass transfer, MHD flow over a permeable moving vertical plate with convective boundary condition in the presence of viscous dissipation, thermal radiation and chemical reaction. The governing partial differential equations were transformed into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using a similarity approach. The pertinent results are then displayed in tabular form and graphically.

  4. Application of a Theory and Simulation based Convective Boundary Mixing model for AGB Star Evolution and Nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Battino, U; Ritter, C; Herwig, F; Denisenkov, P; Hartogh, J W Den; Trappitsch, R; Hirschi, R; Freytag, B; Thielemann, F; Paxton, B

    2016-01-01

    The s-process nucleosynthesis in Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars depends on the modeling of convective boundaries. We present models and s-process simulations that adopt a treatment of convective boundaries based on the results of hydrodynamic simulations and on the theory of mixing due to gravity waves in the vicinity of convective boundaries. Hydrodynamics simulations suggest the presence of convective boundary mixing (CBM) at the bottom of the thermal pulse-driven convective zone. Similarly, convection-induced mixing processes are proposed for the mixing below the convective envelope during third dredge-up where the 13C pocket for the s process in AGB stars forms. In this work we apply a CBM model motivated by simulations and theory to models with initial mass M = 2 and M = 3M?, and with initial metal content Z = 0:01 and Z = 0:02. As reported previously, the He-intershell abundance of 12C and 16O are increased by CBM at the bottom of pulse-driven convection zone. This mixing is affecting the 22Ne(alph...

  5. Analysis of the electrolyte convection inside the concentration boundary layer during structured electrodeposition of copper in high magnetic gradient fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Jörg; Tschulik, Kristina; Büttner, Lars; Uhlemann, Margitta; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-03-19

    To experimentally reveal the correlation between electrodeposited structure and electrolyte convection induced inside the concentration boundary layer, a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field, generated by a magnetized Fe-wire, has been applied to an electrochemical system. The influence of Lorentz and magnetic field gradient force to the local transport phenomena of copper ions has been studied using a novel two-component laser Doppler velocity profile sensor. With this sensor, the electrolyte convection within 500 μm of a horizontally aligned cathode is presented. The electrode-normal two-component velocity profiles below the electrodeposited structure show that electrolyte convection is induced and directed toward the rim of the Fe-wire. The measured deposited structure directly correlates to the observed boundary layer flow. As the local concentration of Cu(2+) ions is enhanced due to the induced convection, maximum deposit thicknesses can be found at the rim of the Fe-wire. Furthermore, a complex boundary layer flow structure was determined, indicating that electrolyte convection of second order is induced. Moreover, the Lorentz force-driven convection rapidly vanishes, while the electrolyte convection induced by the magnetic field gradient force is preserved much longer. The progress for research is the first direct experimental proof of the electrolyte convection inside the concentration boundary layer that correlates to the deposited structure and reveals that the magnetic field gradient force is responsible for the observed structuring effect.

  6. Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, P [University of Oklahoma - School of Meteorology; Bonin, TA; Newman, JF [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Turner, DD [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Chilson, P [University of Oklahoma; Blumberg, WG [University of Oklahoma; Mishra, S; Wainwright, CE; Carney, M [University of Oklahoma - School of Meteorology; Jacobsen, EP [University of Oklahoma; Wharton, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2015-11-01

    The Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost collaboration among the University of Oklahoma, the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the ARM program. A unique aspect was the role of graduate students in LABLE. They served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments using different sampling strategies to best resolve boundary-layer phenomena.

  7. Application of a Theory and Simulation-based Convective Boundary Mixing Model for AGB Star Evolution and Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battino, U.; Pignatari, M.; Ritter, C.; Herwig, F.; Denisenkov, P.; Den Hartogh, J. W.; Trappitsch, R.; Hirschi, R.; Freytag, B.; Thielemann, F.; Paxton, B.

    2016-08-01

    The s-process nucleosynthesis in Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars depends on the modeling of convective boundaries. We present models and s-process simulations that adopt a treatment of convective boundaries based on the results of hydrodynamic simulations and on the theory of mixing due to gravity waves in the vicinity of convective boundaries. Hydrodynamics simulations suggest the presence of convective boundary mixing (CBM) at the bottom of the thermal pulse-driven convective zone. Similarly, convection-induced mixing processes are proposed for the mixing below the convective envelope during third dredge-up (TDU), where the {}13{{C}} pocket for the s process in AGB stars forms. In this work, we apply a CBM model motivated by simulations and theory to models with initial mass M = 2 and M=3 {M}⊙ , and with initial metal content Z = 0.01 and Z = 0.02. As reported previously, the He-intershell abundances of {}12{{C}} and {}16{{O}} are increased by CBM at the bottom of the pulse-driven convection zone. This mixing is affecting the {}22{Ne}(α, n){}25{Mg} activation and the s-process efficiency in the {}13{{C}}-pocket. In our model, CBM at the bottom of the convective envelope during the TDU represents gravity wave mixing. Furthermore, we take into account the fact that hydrodynamic simulations indicate a declining mixing efficiency that is already about a pressure scale height from the convective boundaries, compared to mixing-length theory. We obtain the formation of the {}13{{C}}-pocket with a mass of ≈ {10}-4 {M}⊙ . The final s-process abundances are characterized by 0.36\\lt [{{s}}/{Fe}]\\lt 0.78 and the heavy-to-light s-process ratio is -0.23\\lt [{hs}/{ls}]\\lt 0.45. Finally, we compare our results with stellar observations, presolar grain measurements and previous work.

  8. Anomalies in relative humidity profile in the boundary layer during convective rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rohit; Talukdar, Shamitaksha; Saha, Upal; Jana, Soumyajyoti; Maitra, Animesh

    2017-07-01

    Radiometric observations of relative humidity profile at Kolkata show a significant fall at around 1 to 2 km height during convective rain events. An extensive investigation shows that the fall of relative humidity is not seen during calm conditions but is strongly related to the characteristics of temperature lapse rate profiles. Moreover, the phenomenon may have strong association with boundary layer structure. The reason for such anomalies in the planetary boundary layer humidity profile might be due to the release of latent heat at the mentioned altitude. The abundance of pollutant aerosols in urban regions has also been found to contribute to this relative humidity anomaly. It has also been reported that this boundary layer relative humidity is accompanied by high latent heat release and condensation of vapour to liquid which is not much prominent in other rain types as observed in stratiform rain. Hence, convective rain produces some unique boundary layer characteristics which have also been partially supported with allied satellite and multi-station observations.

  9. Simulation of Wind turbines in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    Large eddy simulation of an arbitrary wind farm is studied in the neutral and thermally stratified atmospheric boundary Layer. Large eddy simulations of industrial flows usually requires full resolution of the flow near the wall and this is believed to be one of the main deficiencies of LES because...... layer. In the current study, another approach has been implemented to simulate the flow in a fully developed wind farm boundary layer. The approach is based on Immersed Boundary Method and involves implementation of an arbitrary prescribed initial boundary layer. An initial boundary layer is enforced...... height and the flow development is seen based on the temperature variations and wind turbine wake generations and interactions of wakes occurs as soon as the wakes of the upwind turbine reach the downwind turbines. References: [1] U. Piomelli, Wall-layer models for large-eddy simulations, Progress...

  10. On the parametrization of the planetary boundary layer of the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yordanov, D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Geophysical Inst., Sofia (Bulgaria); Syrakov, D.; Kolarova, M. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, National Inst. of Meteorology and Hydrology, Sofia (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The investigation of the dynamic processes in the planetary boundary layer presents a definite theoretical challenge and plays a growing role for the solution of a number of practical tasks. The improvement of large-scale atmospheric weather forecast depends, to a certain degree, on the proper inclusion of the planetary boundary layer dynamics in the numerical models. The modeling of the transport and the diffusion of air pollutants is connected with estimation of the different processes in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) and needs also a proper PBL parametrization. For the solution of these practical tasks the following PBL models;(i) a baroclinic PBL model with its barotropic version, and (ii) a convective PBL model were developed. Both models are one dimensional and are based on the similarity theory and the resistance lows extended for the whole PBL. Two different PBL parametrizations under stable and under convective conditions are proposed, on the basis of which the turbulent surface heat and momentum fluxes are estimated using generalized similarity theory. By the proposed parametrizations the internal parameters are calculated from the synoptic scale parameters as geostrophyc wind, potential temperature and humidity given at two levels (ground level and at 850 hPa) and from them - the PBL profiles. The models consists of two layers: a surface layer (SL) with a variable height and a second (Ekman layer) over it with a constant with height turbulent exchange coefficient. (au) 14 refs.

  11. Heat transfer in a porous saturated wavy channel with asymmetric convective boundary conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Q Hussain; S Asghar; T Hayat; A Alsaedi

    2015-01-01

    The viscous flow in a wavy channel with convective boundary conditions is investigated. The channel is filled with a porous viscous fluid. Two cases of equal and different external convection coefficients on the walls are taken into account. Effect of viscous dissipation is also considered. The governing equations are derived employing long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Exact closed form solutions are obtained for the simplified equations. Important physical features for peristaltic flow caused by the wavy wave are pumping, trapping and heat transfer rate at the channel walls. These are discussed one by one in depth and detail through graphical illustrations. Special attention has been given to the effects of convective boundary conditions. The results show that for Bi1≠Bi2, there exists a critical value of Brinkman number Brc at which the temperatures of both the walls become equal. And, for Bi1>Bi2 and Br>Brc, the temperature of the cold wall exceeds the temperature of hot wall.

  12. Effects of various thermal boundary conditions on natural convection in porous cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, H. T.; Sivasankaran, S.; Bhuvaneswari, M.; Siri, Z.

    2015-10-01

    The present work analyzes numerically the effects of various thermal boundary conditions and the geometry of the cavity on natural convection in cavities with fluid-saturated porous medium. Cavity of square, right-angled trapezium and right-angled triangle shapes are considered. The different temperature profiles are imposed on the left wall of the cavity and the right wall is maintained at a lower constant temperature. The top and bottom walls are adiabatic. The Darcy model is adopted for the porous medium. The finite difference method is used to solve the governing equations and boundary conditions over a range of Darcy-Rayleigh numbers. Streamlines, isotherms and Nusselt numbers are used for presenting the results. The heat transfer of the square cavity is more enhanced at high Darcy-Rayleigh number for all the thermal boundary conditions considered.

  13. Derivation and implementation of the boundary integral formula for the convective acoustic wave equation in time domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Woo; Lee, Duck Joo

    2014-12-01

    Kirchhoff's formula for the convective wave equation is derived using the generalized function theory. The generalized convective wave equation for a stationary surface is obtained, and the integral formulation, the convective Kirchhoff's formula, is derived. The formula has a similar form to the classical Kirchhoff's formula, but an additional term appears due to a moving medium effect. For convenience, the additional term is manipulated to a final form as the classical Kirchhoff's formula. The frequency domain boundary integral can be obtained from the current time domain boundary integral form. The derived formula is verified by comparison with the analytic solution of source in the uniform flow. The formula is also utilized as a boundary integral equation. Time domain boundary element method (BEM) analysis using the boundary integral equation is conducted, and the results show good agreement with the analytical solution. The formula derived here can be useful for sound radiation and scattering by arbitrary bodies in a moving medium in the time domain.

  14. Large eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer over wind farms using a prescribed boundary layer approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of flow in a wind farm is studied in neutral as well as thermally stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). An approach has been practiced to simulate the flow in a fully developed wind farm boundary layer. The approach is based on the Immersed Boundary Method (IBM......) and involves implementation of an arbitrary prescribed initial boundary layer (See [1]). A prescribed initial boundary layer profile is enforced through the computational domain using body forces to maintain a desired flow field. The body forces are then stored and applied on the domain through the simulation...... and the boundary layer shape will be modified due to the interaction of the turbine wakes and buoyancy contributions. The implemented method is capable of capturing the most important features of wakes of wind farms [1] while having the advantage of resolving the wall layer with a coarser grid than typically...

  15. CFD Modeling of Non-Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman

    to the atmospheric boundary-layer, are mostly ignored so far. In order to decrease the uncertainty of wind resource assessment, the present work focuses on atmospheric flows that include atmospheric stability and the Coriolis effect. Within the present work a RANS model framework is developed and implemented......For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on Computational Fluid Dynamics models that focus on modeling the airflow in a neutrally stratified surface-layer. Physical processes like the Coriolis force, buoyancy forces and heat transport, that are important...

  16. Chemically reacting dusty viscoelastic fluid flow in an irregular channel with convective boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sivaraj

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have studied the combined effects of free convective heat and mass transfer on an unsteady MHD dusty viscoelastic (Walters liquid model-B fluid flow between a vertical long wavy wall and a parallel flat wall saturated with porous medium subject to the convective boundary condition. The coupled partial differential equations are solved analytically using perturbation technique. The velocity, temperature and concentration fields have been studied for various combinations of physical parameters such as magnetic field, heat absorption, thermal radiation, radiation absorption, Biot number and chemical reaction parameters. The skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are also presented and displayed graphically. Further, it is observed that the velocity profiles of dusty fluid are higher than the dust particles.

  17. Development of the Convective Boundary Layer Capping with a Thick Neutral Layer in Badanjilin: Observations and Simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Bo; L(U) Shihua; AO Yinhuan

    2012-01-01

    In this study,the development of a convective boundary layer (CBL) in the Badanjilin region was investigated by comparing the observation data of two cases.A deep neutral layer capped a CBL that occurred on 30 August 2009.This case was divided into five sublayers from the surface to higher atmospheric elevations:surface layer,mixed layer,inversion layer,neutral layer,and sub-inversion layer.The development process of the CBL was divided into three stages:S1,S2,and S3.This case was quite different from the development of the three-layer CBL observed on 31 August 2009 because the mixed layer of the five-layer CBL (CBL5) eroded the neutral layer during S2.The specific initial structure of the CBL5 was correlated to the synoptic background of atmosphere during nighttime.The three-stage development process of the CBL5 was confirmed by six simulations using National Center for Atmospheric Research (USA) large-eddy simulation (NCAR-LES),and some of its characteristics are presented in detail.

  18. Unsteady Hydromagnetic Flow past a Moving Vertical Plate with Convective Surface Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Shanker Seth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of unsteady MHD natural convection flow through a fluid-saturated porous medium of a viscous, incompressible, electrically-conducting and optically-thin radiating fluid past an impulsively moving semi-infinite vertical plate with convective surface boundary condition is carried out. With the aim to replicate practical situations, the heat transfer and thermal expansion coefficients are chosen to be constant and a new set of non-dimensional quantities and parameters are introduced to represent the governing equations along with initial and boundary conditions in dimensionless form. Solution of the initial boundary-value problem (IBVP is obtained by an efficient implicit finite-difference scheme of the Crank-Nicolson type which is one of the most popular schemes to solve IBVPs. The numerical values of fluid velocity and fluid temperature are depicted graphically whereas those of the shear stress at the wall, wall temperature and the wall heat transfer are presented in tabular form for various values of the pertinent flow parameters. A comparison with previously published papers is made for validation of the numerical code and the results are found to be in good agreement.

  19. Convective heat transport in stratified atmospheres at low and high Mach number

    CERN Document Server

    Anders, Evan H

    2016-01-01

    Convection in astrophysical systems is stratified and often occurs at high Rayleigh number (Ra) and low Mach number (Ma). Here we study stratified convection in the context of plane-parallel, polytropically stratified atmospheres. We hold the density stratification ($n_{\\rho}$) and Prandtl number (Pr) constant while varying Ma and Ra to determine the behavior of the Nusselt number (Nu), which quantifies the efficiency of convective heat transport. As Ra increases and $\\text{Ma} \\rightarrow 1$, a scaling of Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{0.45}$ is observed. As Ra increases to a regime where Ma $\\geq 1$, this scaling gives way to a weaker Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{0.19}$. In the regime of Ma $\\ll 1$, a consistent Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{0.31}$ is retrieved, reminiscent of the Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{2/7}$ seen in Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Conjugate Thermogravitational Convection in a Closed System with a Radiant Energy Source in Conditions of Convective-Radiative Heat Exchange at the External Boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nee Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of conjugate natural convection in a closed rectangular cavity with a radiant energy source in conditions of convective-radiative heat exchange at the external boundary was conducted. The radiant energy distribution was set by the Lambert’s law. Conduction and convection processes analysis showed that the air masses flow pattern is modified slightly over the time. The temperature increases in the gas cavity, despite the heat removal from the one of the external boundary. According to the results of the integral heat transfer analysis were established that the average Nusselt number (Nuav increasing occurs up to τ = 200 (dimensionless time. Further Nuav has changed insignificantly due to the temperature field equalization near the interfaces “gas – wall”.

  1. Elastic-backscatter-lidar-based characterization of the convective boundary layer and investigation of related statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, S.; Behrendt, A.; Wulfmeyer, V. [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (DE). Inst. of Physics and Meteorology (IPM)

    2010-07-01

    We applied a ground-based vertically-pointing aerosol lidar to investigate the evolution of the instantaneous atmospheric boundary layer depth, its growth rate, associated entrainment processes, and turbulence characteristics. We used lidar measurements with range resolution of 3m and time resolution of up to 0.033 s obtained in the course of a sunny day (26 June 2004) over an urban valley (central Stuttgart, 48 47{sup '} N, 9 12{sup '} E, 240m above sea level). The lidar system uses a wavelength of 1064 nm and has a poweraperture product of 2.1 Wm{sup 2}. Three techniques are examined for determining the instantaneous convective boundary layer (CBL) depth from the high-resolution lidar measurements: the logarithm gradient method, the inflection point method, and the Haar wavelet transform method. The Haar wavelet-based approach is found to be the most robust technique for the automated detection of the CBL depth. Two different regimes of the CBL are discussed in detail: a quasi-stationary CBL in the afternoon and a CBL with rapid growth during morning transition in the presence of dust layers atop. Two different growth rates were found: 3-5 m/min for the growing CBL in the morning and 0.5-2 m/min during the quasisteady regime. The mean entrainment zone thickness for the quasi-steady CBL was found to be {proportional_to}75m while the CBL top during the entire day varied between 0.7 km and 2.3 km. A fast Fourier-transform-based spectral analysis of the instantaneous CBL depth time series gave a spectral exponent value of 1.50{+-}0.04, confirming non-stationary CBL behavior in the morning while for the other regime a value of 1.00{+-}0.06 was obtained indicating a quasi-stationary state of the CBL. Assuming that the spatio-temporal variation of the particle backscatter cross-section of the aerosols in the scattering volume is due to number density fluctuations (negligible hygro-scopic growth), the particle backscatter coefficient profiles can be used to

  2. A Numerical Solution of the Two-Dimensional Fusion Problem with Convective Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülkaç, Vildan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present an LOD method for solving the two-dimensional fusion problem with convective boundary conditions. In this study, we extend our earlier work [1] on the solution of the two-dimensional fusion problem by considering a class of time-split finite-difference methods, namely locally one-dimensional (LOD) schemes. In addition, following the idea of Douglas [2, 3], a Douglas-like splitting scheme is presented. A stability analysis by Fourier series method (von Neumann stability) of the scheme is also investigated. Computational results obtained by the present method are in excellent agreement with the results reported previously by other research.

  3. Two-Dimensional Thermal Boundary Layer Corrections for Convective Heat Flux Gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max; Haddad, George

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) study of two-dimensional thermal boundary layer correction factors for convective heat flux gauges mounted in flat plate subjected to a surface temperature discontinuity with variable properties taken into account. A two-equation k - omega turbulence model is considered. Results are obtained for a wide range of Mach numbers (1 to 5), gauge radius ratio, and wall temperature discontinuity. Comparisons are made for correction factors with constant properties and variable properties. It is shown that the variable-property effects on the heat flux correction factors become significant

  4. Radiative Squeezing Flow of Second Grade Fluid with Convective Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, T.; Jabeen, Sumaira; Shafiq, Anum; Alsaedi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Influence of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow between two parallel disks is considered. Heat transfer analysis is disclosed due to thermal radiation and convective boundary condition. Appropriate transformations are invoked to obtain the ordinary differential system. This system is solved using homotopic approach. Convergence of the obtained solution is discussed. Variations of embedded parameters into the governing problems are graphically discussed. Skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are numerically computed and analyzed. It is noticed that temperature profile is increasing function of radiation parameter. PMID:27096616

  5. Entropy generation of micropolar fluid flow in an inclined porous pipe with convective boundary conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D SRINIVASACHARYA; K HIMA BINDU

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the nature of irreversibilities in the form of entropy generation for a micropolar fluid flow through an inclined porous pipe with convective boundary conditions. The governing equations are non-dimensionlized and then linearized using a quasilinearization method. The resulting linearized equations are solved by Chebyshev spectral collocation method. The velocity, microrotation and temperature profiles are presented graphically for various values of governing parameters. Further, these profilesare used to evaluate the entropy generation and Bejan number

  6. Peristaltic flow in an asymmetric channel with convective boundary conditions and Joule heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abbasi Fahad Munir; Hayat Tasawar; Ahmad Bashir

    2014-01-01

    The peristaltic transport of viscous fluid in an asymmetric channel is concentrated. The channel walls exhibit convective boundary conditions. Both cases of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluids are considered. Mathematical analysis has been presented in a wave frame of reference. The resulting problems are non-dimensionalized. Long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations are employed. Joule heating effect on the thermal equation is retained. Analytic solutions for stream function and temperature are constructed. Numerical integration is carried out for pressure rise per wavelength. Effects of influential flow parameters have been pointed out through graphs.

  7. Convective boundary layer budgets of moisture and sensible heat over an unstressed prairie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of convective boundary layer budgets of sensible heat and moisture were examined for two days over the unstressed vegetation of the tallgrass Konza National Prairie. In addition to the budget evaluation the study had these goals: to estimate the area-average surface fluxes and compare them to independent, ground-based measurements, to estimate the near surface evaporative fraction, and to compare different evaluations of the ratio of surface to inversion fluxes, i.e., the entrainment parameter. The budget analyses indicate that vertical and horizontal advection were significant terms in the budget and cannot be ignored.

  8. Peristaltic flow of Johnson-Segalman fluid in asymmetric channel with convective boundary conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H YASMIN; T HAYAT; A ALSAEDI; HH ALSULAMI

    2014-01-01

    This work is concerned with the peristaltic transport of the Johnson-Segalman fluid in an asymmetric channel with convective boundary conditions. The mathematical modeling is based upon the conservation laws of mass, linear momentum, and energy. The resulting equations are solved after long wavelength and low Reynolds number are used. The results for the axial pressure gradient, velocity, and temperature profiles are obtained for small Weissenberg number. The expressions of the pressure gra-dient, velocity, and temperature are analyzed for various embedded parameters. Pumping and trapping phenomena are also explored.

  9. A test of sensitivity to convective transport in a global atmospheric CO2 simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, H.; Kawa, S. R.; M. Chin; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Rasch, P.; Wu, S.

    2011-01-01

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO2 distributions. Global CO2 in the year 2000 is simulated using the CTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA's Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO2 by adopting the same CO2 emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et...

  10. Stability of Interfacial Phase Growth in a Slab with Convective Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rahul

    2016-06-01

    The mass transport and energy equations for a semi-infinite porous slab are solved using similarity variables and closed form functions to describe freezing with remelt at the interface. Heat and mass balance analyses give a transcendental equation for the unknown interfacial freezing velocity for solving on the computer. The solutions for the temperature and mass concentration are decoupled and solved analytically. The solution for convective boundary conditions is compared with that for Dirichlet boundary conditions. The progressive development of the solution with material thickness and change of functional time dependence and effect on the stability of nucleation is outlined. A discussion with biological adaptation to extreme cold and possible evolution of molecules in heat transfer regimes is included in light of the above.

  11. Transition to turbulence in strongly heated vertical natural convection boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    De Larochelambert, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms governing the transition to turbulence in natural convection boundary layers along strongly heated vertical walls remain neither very clear nor well understood, because of the lack of experiments and the difficulties of physical modelling. Our measurements bring experimental data focusing on this transition in quiescent air along radiating and conducting plates in the whole range of 2000 to 8000 W/m\\^2 heating rate. The analysis of the time series obtained by sliding window cross-correlation thermoanemometry leads us to point out coherent turbulent structures on short heights throughout the thin boundary layer, which seem to be governed by heat transfer and time-microscales of turbulence through the inner sublayer. Physical interpretations are given to relate to the observed heat transfer correlation and these turbulence transition structures along with radiation and conduction.

  12. Transport of gaseous pollutants by convective boundary layer around a human body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licina, Dusan; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Sekhar, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the ability of the human convective boundary layer to transport pollution in a quiescent indoor environment. The impact of the source location in the vicinity of a human body is examined in relation to pollution distribution in the breathing zone and the thickness...... of the pollution boundary layer. The study, in addition, evaluates the effects of the room air temperature, table positioning, and seated body inclination. The human body is represented by a thermal manikin that has a body shape, size, and surface temperature that resemble those of a real person. The results show...... at the upper back or behind the chair. The results also indicate that a decrease in personal exposure to pollutants released from or around the human body increases the extent to which the pollution spreads to the surroundings. Reducing the room air temperature or backward body inclination intensifies...

  13. Approaching the Asymptotic Regime of Rapidly Rotating Convection: Boundary Layers vs Interior Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Stellmach, S; Julien, K; Vasil, G; Cheng, J S; Ribeiro, A; King, E M; Aurnou, J M

    2014-01-01

    Rapidly rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection is studied by combining results from direct numerical simulations (DNS), laboratory experiments and asymptotic modeling. The asymptotic theory is shown to provide a good description of the bulk dynamics at low, but finite Rossby number. However, large deviations from the asymptotically predicted heat transfer scaling are found, with laboratory experiments and DNS consistently yielding much larger Nusselt numbers than expected. These deviations are traced down to dynamically active Ekman boundary layers, which are shown to play an integral part in controlling heat transfer even for Ekman numbers as small as $10^{-7}$. By adding an analytical parameterization of the Ekman transport to simulations using stress-free boundary conditions, we demonstrate that the heat transfer jumps from values broadly compatible with the asymptotic theory to states of strongly increased heat transfer, in good quantitative agreement with no-slip DNS and compatible with the experimental d...

  14. Effect of boundary conditions and convection on thermally induced motion of beams subjected to internal heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MALIK Pravin; KADOLI Ravikiran; GANESAN N.

    2007-01-01

    Numerical exercises are presented on the thermally induced motion of internally heated beams under various heat transfer and structural boundary conditions. The dynamic displacement and dynamic thermal moment of the beam are analyzed taking into consideration that the temperature gradient is independent as well as dependent on the beam displacement. The effect of length to thickness ratio of the beam on the thermally induced vibration is also investigated. The type of boundary conditions has its influence on the magnitude of dynamic displacement and dynamic thermal moment. A sustained thermally induced motion is observed with progress of time when the temperature gradient being evaluated is dependent on the forced convection generated due to beam motion. A finite element method (FEM) is used to solve the structural equation of motion as well as the heat transfer equation.

  15. Modeling of the thermal boundary layer in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emran, Mohammad; Shishkina, Olga

    2016-11-01

    We report modeling of the thermal boundary layer in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC), which incorporates the effect of turbulent fluctuations. The study is based on the thermal boundary layer equation from Shishkina et al., and new Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of RBC in a cylindrical cell of the aspect ratio 1, for the Prandtl number variation of several orders of magnitude. Our modeled temperature profiles are found to agree with the DNS much better than those obtained with the classical Prandtl-Blasius or Falkner-Skan approaches. The work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the Grant Sh405/4 - Heisenberg fellowship and SFB963, Project A06.

  16. Crossing the Boundaries in Planetary Atmospheres - From Earth to Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Genio, Anthony Del

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has been an especially exciting time to study atmospheres, with a renaissance in fundamental studies of Earths general circulation and hydrological cycle, stimulated by questions about past climates and the urgency of projecting the future impacts of humankinds activities. Long-term spacecraft and Earth-based observation of solar system planets have now reinvigorated the study of comparative planetary climatology. The explosion in discoveries of planets outside our solar system has made atmospheric science integral to understanding the diversity of our solar system and the potential habitability of planets outside it. Thus, the AGU Chapman Conference Crossing the Boundaries in Planetary Atmospheres From Earth to Exoplanets, held in Annapolis, MD from June 24-27, 2013 gathered Earth, solar system, and exoplanet scientists to share experiences, insights, and challenges from their individual disciplines, and discuss areas in which thinking broadly might enhance our fundamental understanding of how atmospheres work.

  17. Wall Effect on the Convective-Absolute Boundary for the Compressible Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinet, Jean-Christophe; Dussauge, Jean-Paul; Casalis, Grégoire

    The linear stability of inviscid compressible shear layers is studied. When the layer develops at the vicinity of a wall, the two parallel flows can have a velocity of the same sign or of opposite signs. This situation is examined in order to obtain first hints on the stability of separated flows in the compressible regime. The shear layer is described by a hyperbolic tangent profile for the velocity component and the Crocco relation for the temperature profile. Gravity effects and the superficial tension are neglected. By examining the temporal growth rate at the saddle point in the wave-number space, the flow is characterized as being either absolutely unstable or convectively unstable. This study principally shows the effect of the wall on the convective-absolute transition in compressible shear flow. Results are presented, showing the amount of the backflow necessary to have this type of transition for a range of primary flow Mach numbers M1 up to 3.0. The boundary of the convective-absolute transition is defined as a function of the velocity ratio, the temperature ratio and the Mach number. Unstable solutions are calculated for both streamwise and oblique disturbances in the shear layer.

  18. Thermal convection in Earth's inner core with phase change at its boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Deguen, Renaud; Cardin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Inner core translation, with solidification on one hemisphere and melting on the other, provides a promising basis for understanding the hemispherical dichotomy of the inner core, as well as the anomalous stable layer observed at the base of the outer core - the F-layer - which might be sustained by continuous melting of inner core material. In this paper, we study in details the dynamics of inner core thermal convection when dynamically induced melting and freezing of the inner core boundary (ICB) are taken into account. If the inner core is unstably stratified, linear stability analysis and numerical simulations consistently show that the translation mode dominates only if the viscosity $\\eta$ is large enough, with a critical viscosity value, of order $3 10^{18}$ Pas, depending on the ability of outer core convection to supply or remove the latent heat of melting or solidification. If $\\eta$ is smaller, the dynamical effect of melting and freezing is small. Convection takes a more classical form, with a one...

  19. Currents and convection cause enhanced gas exchange in the ice–water boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brice Loose

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of sea ice acts as a physical barrier for air–sea exchange. On the other hand it creates additional turbulence due to current shear and convection during ice formation. We present results from a laboratory study that demonstrate how shear and convection in the ice–ocean boundary layer can lead to significant gas exchange. In the absence of wind, water currents beneath the ice of 0.23 m s−1 produced a gas transfer velocity (k of 2.8 m d−1, equivalent to k produced by a wind speed of 7 m s−1 over the open ocean. Convection caused by air–sea heat exchange also increased k of as much as 131 % compared to k produced by current shear alone. When wind and currents were combined, k increased, up to 7.6 m d−1, greater than k produced by wind or currents alone, but gas exchange forcing by wind produced mixed results in these experiments. As an aggregate, these experiments indicate that using a wind speed parametrisation to estimate k in the sea ice zone may underestimate k by ca. 50 % for wind speeds <8 m s−1.

  20. Mixed convection boundary-layer flow about an isothermal solid sphere in a nanofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tham, L [Faculty of Agro Industry and Natural Resources, Universiti Malaysia Kelantan, Kelantan (Malaysia); Nazar, R [School of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia); Pop, I, E-mail: rmn72my@yahoo.com [Faculty of Mathematics, University of Cluj, Cluj (Romania)

    2011-08-01

    The steady mixed convection boundary-layer flow of a nanofluid about a solid sphere with constant surface temperature has been studied for cases of both assisting and opposing flows. The resulting system of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved numerically using an implicit finite-difference scheme known as the Keller-box method. The solutions for the flow and heat-transfer characteristics are evaluated numerically for various values of the parameters, namely the nanoparticle volume fraction {psi} and the mixed convection parameter {lambda} at Prandtl numbers Pr=0.7 and 6.2. The three different types of nanoparticles considered are Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cu and TiO{sub 2}, using water-based fluid with Pr=6.2. It is found that for each particular nanoparticle, as the nanoparticle volume fraction {psi} increases, the skin friction coefficient and the heat-transfer rate at the surface also increase. This leads to an increase in the value of the mixed convection parameter {lambda}, which at first gives no separation.

  1. Scaling Variances of Scalars in a Convective Boundary Layer Under Different Entrainment Regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moene, A.F.; Michels, B.I.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    For the presentation and analysis of atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) data, scales are used to non-dimensionalise the observed quantities and independent variables. Usually, the ABL height, surface sensible heat flux and surface scalar flux are used. This works well, so long as the absolute values o

  2. A Experimental Investigation of the Interaction Between Convecting Spanwise Vortices and a Turbulent Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRorie, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between convecting spanwise vortices and a flat plate turbulent boundary layer was studied experimentally. The results are relevant to the flow downstream of unsteady airfoils or spoilers. Vortices were generated with a rapidly pitched airfoil upstream of a test plate leading edge in a low-speed wind tunnel. By varying the height of the vortex generator the degree to which the vortices interacted with the test plate was controlled. Dynamic stall vortices of both positive and negative circulation were studied with Reynolds numbers (Gamma/upsilon ) of 9300 and 7400 respectively. The free-stream velocity was 5.9 m/s for all cases and the boundary layer momentum thickness Reynolds number was 480 at the primary measurement station. The measurement techniques were hot -wire anemometry (single and cross wire) and smoke-wire visualization. The results focus on two distinct aspects of the flow, first is the decay and diffusion rates of the vortices. Only in the case where a negative circulation vortex impinges directly on the leading edge does surface interaction significantly increase the vortex decay/diffusion rate. The second aspect is the response of the turbulent boundary layer to the convecting vortices. Wall shear stress measurements show that the passage of a positive circulation vortex results in an increase in wall shear after a delay-time, while the negative circulation vortices result in a decrease in wall shear. An application of log-law scaling to the ensemble-averaged mean flow was found to produce a velocity scale which resembles one based on measured wall shear stress but is offset by a phase lag. The ratio of turbulent shear stress to the two-dimensional turbulent kinetic energy was generally not constant, although it did show a constant value across the boundary layer at different phases of the interaction.

  3. Velocity fields and optical turbulence near the boundary in a strongly convective laboratory flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Goode, Wesley; Hellman, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Boundary layers around moving underwater vehicles or other platforms can be a limiting factor for optical communication. Turbulence in the boundary layer of a body moving through a stratified medium can lead to small variations in the index of refraction, which impede optical signals. As a first step towards investigating this boundary layer effect on underwater optics, we study the flow near the boundary in the Rayleigh-Bénard laboratory tank at the Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center. The tank is set up to generate temperature-driven, i.e., convective turbulence, and allows control of the turbulence intensity. This controlled turbulence environment is complemented by computational fluid dynamics simulations to visualize and quantify multi-scale flow patterns. The boundary layer dynamics in the laboratory tank are quantified using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system to examine the boundary layer velocities and turbulence parameters. The velocity fields and flow dynamics from the PIV are compared to the numerical model and show the model to accurately reproduce the velocity range and flow dynamics. The temperature variations and thus optical turbulence effects can then be inferred from the model temperature data. Optical turbulence is also visible in the raw data from the PIV system. The newly collected data are consistent with previously reported measurements from high-resolution Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter profilers (Nortek Vectrino), as well as fast thermistor probes and novel next-generation fiber-optics temperature sensors. This multi-level approach to studying optical turbulence near a boundary, combining in-situ measurements, optical techniques, and numerical simulations, can provide new insight and aid in mitigating turbulence impacts on underwater optical signal transmission.

  4. A test of sensitivity to convective transport in a global atmospheric CO2 simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, H.; Kawa, S. R.; Chin, M.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Rasch, P.; Wu, S.

    2006-11-01

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO2 distributions. Global CO2 in the year 2000 is simulated using the CTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA's Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO2 by adopting the same CO2 emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et al. (convective transport scheme denoted as Conv1). Conv1 approximates the convective transport by using the bulk convective mass fluxes to redistribute trace gases. The alternate approximation, Conv2, partitions fluxes into updraft and downdraft, as well as into entrainment and detrainment, and has potential to yield a more realistic simulation of vertical redistribution through deep convection. Replacing Conv1 by Conv2 results in an overestimate of CO2 over biospheric sink regions. The largest discrepancies result in a CO2 difference of about 7.8 ppm in the July NH boreal forest, which is about 30% of the CO2 seasonality for that area. These differences are compared to those produced by emission scenario variations constrained by the framework of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to account for possible land use change and residual terrestrial CO2 sink. It is shown that the overestimated CO2 driven by Conv2 can be offset by introducing these supplemental emissions.

  5. Ship plume dispersion rates in convective boundary layers for chemistry models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Chosson

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Detailed ship plume simulations in various convective boundary layer situations have been performed using a Lagrangian Dispersion Model driven by a Large Eddy Simulation Model. The simulations focus on early stage (1–2 h of plume dispersion regime and take into account the effects of plume rise on dispersion. Results are presented in an attempt to provide to chemical modellers community a realistic description of the impact of characteristic dispersion on exhaust ship plume chemistry. Plume dispersion simulations are used to derive analytical dilution rate functions. Even though results exhibit striking effects of plume rise parameter on dispersion patterns, it is shown that initial buoyancy fluxes at ship stack have minor effect on plume dilution rate. After initial high dispersion regimes a simple characteristic dilution time scale can be used to parameterize the subgrid plume dilution effects in large scale chemistry models. The results show that this parameter is directly related to the typical turn-over time scale of the convective boundary layer.

  6. Convective Heat Transfer at the Martian Boundary Layer, Measurement and Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás Soria-Salinas, Álvaro; Zorzano-Mier, María Paz; Martín-Torres, Javier

    2016-04-01

    We present a measuring concept to measure the convective heat transfer coefficient h near a spacecraft operating on the surface of Mars. This coefficient can be used to derive the speed of the wind and direction, and to detect its modulations. This measuring concept will be used in the instrument HABIT (HabitAbility: Brines, Irradiance and Temperature) for the Surface Platform of ExoMars 2018 (ESA-Roscosmos). The method is based on the use of 3 Resistance Temperature Thermodetectors (RTD) that measure the temperature at 3 locations along the axial direction of a rod of length L: at the base of the rod, Tb, an intermediate point x = L/n, TLn, and the tip,Ta. This sensing fin is called the Air Temperature Sensor (ATS). HABIT shall incorporate three ATS, oriented in perpendicular directions and thus exposed to wind in a different way. Solving these equations for each ATS, provides three fluid temperatures Tf as well as three m parameters that are used to derive three heat transfer coefficients h. This magnitude is dependent on the local forced convection and therefore is sensitive to the direction, speed and modulations of the wind. The m-parameter has already proven to be useful to investigate the convective activity at the planetary boundary layer on Mars and to determine the height of the planetary boundary layer. This method shall be presented here by: 1) Introducing the mathematical concepts for the retrieval of the m-parameter; 2) performing ANSYS simulations of the fluid dynamics and the thermal environment around the ATS-rods under wind conditions in Mars; and 3) comparing the method by using data measurements from the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) at the Curiosity rover of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory project currently operating on Mars. The results shall be compared with the wind sensor measurements of three years of REMS operation on Mars.

  7. Transport of particles in an atmospheric turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiongping Luo; Shiyi Chen

    2005-01-01

    A program incorporating the parallel code of large eddy simulation (LES) and particle transportation model is developed to simulate the motion of particles in an atmospheric turbulent boundary layer (ATBL). A model of particles of 100-micrometer order coupling with large scale ATBL is proposed. Two typical cases are studied, one focuses on the evolution of particle profile in the ATBL and the landing displacement of particles, whereas the other on the motion of particle stream.

  8. Breaking the boundary layer symmetry in turbulent convection using wall geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Toppaladoddi, Srikanth; Wettlaufer, John S

    2014-01-01

    We systematically probe the interaction of the boundary layer with the core flow during two-dimensional turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection using numerical simulations and scaling theory. The boundary layer/core flow interaction is manipulated by configuring the top plate with a sinusoidal geometry and breaking the symmetry between the top and bottom thermal boundary layers. At long wavelength the planar results are recovered. However, at intermediate wavelengths, and for Rayleigh numbers ($Ra$) such that the amplitude of the roughness elements is larger than the boundary layer thickness, there is enhanced cold plume production at the tips of the elements. It is found that, while the interior of the flow is well mixed as in the classical theory of Malkus, the mean temperature is lower than that in the planar case. For a Prandtl number of unity and $Ra = 10^6$ to $2.5 \\times 10^9$ we find a Nusselt number ($Nu$) scaling law of $Nu = 0.052 \\times Ra^{0.34}$, in good agreement with recent experiments. The c...

  9. "Ultimate state" of two-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection between free-slip fixed temperature boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Whitehead, Jared P

    2011-01-01

    Rigorous upper limits on the vertical heat transport in two dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection between stress-free isothermal boundaries are derived from the Boussinesq approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The Nusselt number Nu is bounded in terms of the Rayleigh number Ra according to $Nu \\leq 0.2295 Ra^{5/12}$ uniformly in the Prandtl number Pr. This Nusselt number scaling challenges some theoretical arguments regarding the asymptotic high Rayleigh number heat transport by turbulent convection.

  10. The diurnal evolution of 222Rn and its progeny in the atmospheric boundary layer during the Wangara experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Galmarini

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal atmospheric boundary layer evolution of the 222Rn decaying family is studied by using a state-of-the-art large-eddy simulation model. In particular, a diurnal cycle observed during the Wangara experiment is successfully simulated together with the effect of diurnal varying turbulent characteristics on radioactive compounds in a secular equilibrium. This study allows us to clearly analyze and identify the boundary layer processes driving the 222Rn and its progeny concentration behaviors. The activity disequilibrium observed in the nocturnal boundary layer is due to the proximity of the radon source and the trapping of fresh 222Rn close to the surface induced by the weak vertical transport. During the morning transition, the secular equilibrium is fast restored by the vigorous turbulent mixing. The evolution of 222Rn and its progeny concentration in the unsteady growing convective boundary layer depends on the strength of entrainment events.

  11. An Adaptive Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Modeling Atmospheric Convection (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    J. Päpke, K. Dethloff, amatos: Parallel adaptive mesh generator for atmospheric and oceanic simulation, Ocean Modelling 10, pp.171–183 (2005). [24] P. K. Kundu , Fluid Mechanics . Academic Press, 638 pp. (1990). 20 ...further explanation we refer to the text. two fluids . Johari found that, depending on the strength of the buoyancy reversal, the morphology of the cloud...development could be vastly different. Similar results were found in highly idealized numerical two- fluid experiments by Gra- bowski4 in 1995. These

  12. The effect of the Asian Monsoon to the atmospheric boundary layer over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maoshan; Su, Zhongbo; Chen, Xuelong; Zheng, Donghai; Sun, Fanglin; Ma, Yaoming; Hu, Zeyong

    2016-04-01

    Modulation of the diurnal variations in the convective activities associated with day-by-day changes of surface flux and soil moisture was observed in the beginning of the monsoon season on the central Tibetan plateau (Sugimoto et al., 2008) which indicates the importance of land-atmosphere interactions in determining convective activities over the Tibetan plateau. Detailed interaction processes need to be studied by experiments designed to evaluate a set of hypotheses on mechanisms and linkages of these interactions. A possible function of vegetation to increase precipitation in cases of Tibetan High type was suggested by Yamada and Uyeda (2006). Use of satellite derived plateau scale soil moisture (Wen et al., 2003) enables the verification of these hypotheses (e.g. Trier et al. 2004). To evaluate these feedbacks, the mesoscale WRF model will be used because several numerical experiments are being conducted to improve the soil physical parameterization in the Noah land surface scheme in WRF so that the extreme conditions on the Tibetan plateau could be adequately represented (Van der Velde et al., 2009) such that the impacts on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer can be assessed and improved. The Tibetan Observational Research Platform (TORP) operated by the Institute of Tibetan Plateau (Ma et al., 2008) will be fully utilized to study the characteristics of the plateau climate and different aspects of the WRF model will be evaluated using this extensive observation platform (e.g. Su et al., 2012). Recently, advanced studies on energy budget have been done by combining field and satellite measurements over the Tibetan Plateau (e.g. Ma et al., 2005). Such studies, however, were based on a single satellite observation and for a few days over an annual cycle, which are insufficient to reveal the relation between the land surface energy budget and the Asian monsoon over the Tibetan plateau. Time series analysis of satellite observations will provide the

  13. Fluctuation spectra and variances in convective turbulent boundary layers: A reevaluation of old models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaglom, A. M.

    1994-02-01

    Most of the existing theoretical models for statistical characteristics of turbulence in convective boundary layers are based on the similarity theory by Monin and Obukhov [Trudy Geofiz. Inst. Akad. Nauk SSSR 24(151), 163 (1954)], and its further refinements. A number of such models was recently reconsidered and partially compared with available data by Kader and Yaglom [J. Fluid Mech. 212, 637 (1990); Turbulence and Coherent Structures (Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1991), p. 387]. However, in these papers the data related to variances =σ2u and =σ2v of horizontal velocity components were not considered at all, and the data on horizontal velocity spectra Eu(k) and Ev(k) were used only for a restricted range of not too small wave numbers k. This is connected with findings by Kaimal et al. [Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 98, 563 (1972)] and Panofsky et al. [Boundary-Layer Meteorol. 11, 355 (1977)], who showed that the Monin-Obukhov theory cannot be applied to velocity variance σ2u and σ2v and to spectra Eu(k) and Ev(k) in energy ranges of wave numbers. It is shown in this paper that a simple generalization of the traditional similarity theory, which takes into account the influence of large-scale organized structures, leads to new models of horizontal velocity variances and spectra, which describe the observed deviations of these characteristics from the predictions based on the Monin-Obukhov theory, and agree satisfactorily with the available data. The application of the same approach to the temperature spectrum and variance explains why the observed deviations of temperature spectrum in convective boundary layers from the Monin-Obukhov similarity does not lead to marked violations of the same similarity as applied to temperature variance =σ2t.

  14. Methods for determining the height of the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Gayle [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nasstrom, John S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1999-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an operational emergency response program which provides real-time dose assessments of airborne pollutant releases. This report reviews methodologies for determining the height of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), which were investigated for use in the next generation of ARAC diagnostic and dispersion models. The ABL height, hABL, is an essential parameter in atmospheric dispersion modeling, controlling the extent of the vertical mixing of pollutants near the surface. Although eventually instrumentation (radiosonde, lidar, sodar, etc.) may provide accurate means for determining hABL, at present the availability of such data is too limited to provide a general capability for ARAC. The current operational ARAC diagnostic models use a fixed value of hABL for any given time. ARAC's new models support a horizontally-varying atmospheric boundary layer height, which is used to generate meteorological (mean wind, temperature, etc.) and turbulence fields. The purpose of the present work is to develop methods to derive the ABL height for all atmospheric stability regimes. One of our key requirements is to provide approaches which are applicable to routinely available data, which may be of limited temporal and spatial resolution. The final objective is to generate a consistent set of meteorological and turbulence or eddy diffusivity fields to drive the new ARAC dispersion model. A number of alternative definitions of the atmospheric boundary layer exist, leading to different approaches to deriving hABL. The definitions are based on either the turbulence characteristics of the atmosphere or the vertical structure of one or more meteorological variables. Most diagnostic analyses determine hABL from profiles of temperature or occasionally wind. A class of methods of considerable current interest are based on Richardson number criteria. Prognostic methods

  15. Study of a prototypical convective boundary layer observed during BLLAST: contributions by large-scale forcings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Pietersen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We study the disturbances of CBL dynamics due to large-scale atmospheric contributions for a representative day observed during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST campaign. We first reproduce the observed boundary-layer dynamics by combining the Dutch Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulation (DALES model with a mixed-layer theory based model. We find that by only taking surface and entrainment fluxes into account, the boundary-layer height is overestimated by 70%. If we constrain our numerical experiments with the BLLAST comprehensive data set, we are able to quantify the contributions of advection of heat and moisture, and subsidence. We find that subsidence has a clear diurnal pattern. Supported by the presence of a nearby mountain range, this pattern suggests that not only synoptic scales exert their influence on the boundary layer, but also mesoscale circulations. Finally, we study whether the vertical and temporal evolution of turbulent variables are influenced by these large-scale forcings. Our model results show good correspondence of the vertical structure of turbulent variables with observations. Our findings further indicate that when large-scale advection and subsidence are applied, the values for turbulent kinetic are lower than without these large-scale forcings. We conclude that the prototypical CBL can still be used as a valid representation of the boundary-layer dynamics near regions characterized by complex topography and small-scale surface heterogeneity, provided that surface- and large-scale forcings are well characterized.

  16. Thermal radiation effect on a mixed convection flow and heat transfer of the Williamson fluid past an exponentially shrinking permeable sheet with a convective boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaib, A.; Bhattacharyya, K.; Khalid, M.; Shafie, S.

    2017-05-01

    The thermal radiation effect on a steady mixed convective flow with heat transfer of a nonlinear (non-Newtonian) Williamson fluid past an exponentially shrinking porous sheet with a convective boundary condition is investigated numerically. In this study, both an assisting flow and an opposing flow are considered. The governing equations are converted into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using a suitable transformation. A numerical solution of the problem is obtained by using the Matlab software package for different values of the governing parameters. The results show that dual nonsimilar solutions exist for the opposing flow, whereas the solution for the assisting flow is unique. It is also observed that the dual nonsimilar solutions exist only if a certain amount of mass suction is applied through the porous sheet, which depends on the Williamson parameter, convective parameter, and radiation parameter.

  17. Atmospheric aerosol optical parameters, deep convective clouds and hail occurence - a correlation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talianu, Camelia; Andrei, Simona; Toanca, Florica; Stefan, Sabina

    2016-04-01

    Among the severe weather phenomena, whose frequency has increased during the past two decades, hail represents a major threat not only for agriculture but also for other economical fields. Generally, hail are produced in deep convective clouds, developed in an unstable environment. Recent studies have emphasized that besides the state of the atmosphere, the atmospheric composition is also very important. The presence of fine aerosols in atmosphere could have a high impact on nucleation processes, initiating the occurrence of cloud droplets, ice crystals and possibly the occurrence of graupel and/or hail. The presence of aerosols in the atmosphere, correlated with specific atmospheric conditions, could be predictors of the occurrence of hail events. The atmospheric investigation using multiwavelength Lidar systems can offer relevant information regarding the presence of aerosols, identified using their optical properties, and can distinguish between spherical and non-spherical shape, and liquid and solid phase of these aerosols. The aim of this study is to analyse the correlations between the presence and the properties of aerosols in atmosphere, and the production of hail events in a convective environment, using extensive and intensive optical parameters computed from lidar and ceilometer aerosols measurements. From these correlations, we try to evaluate if these aerosols can be taken into consideration as predictors for hail formation. The study has been carried out in Magurele - Romania (44.35N, 26.03E, 93m ASL) using two collocated remote sensing systems: a Raman Lidar (RALI) placed at the Romanian Atmospheric 3D Observatory and a ceilometer CL31 placed at the nearby Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest. To evaluate the atmospheric conditions, radio sounding and satellite images were used. The period analysed was May 1st - July 15th, 2015, as the May - July period is climatologically favorable for deep convection events. Two hail events have been

  18. Unsteady Casson nanofluid flow over a stretching sheet with thermal radiation, convective and slip boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibukun Sarah Oyelakin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report on combined Dufour and Soret effects on the heat and mass transfer in a Casson nanofluid flow over an unsteady stretching sheet with thermal radiation and heat generation. The effects of partial slip on the velocity at the boundary, convective thermal boundary condition, Brownian and thermophoresis diffusion coefficients on the concentration boundary condition are investigated. The model equations are solved using the spectral relaxation method. The results indicate that the fluid flow, temperature and concentration profiles are significantly influenced by the fluid unsteadiness, the Casson parameter, magnetic parameter and the velocity slip. The effect of increasing the Casson parameter is to suppress the velocity and temperature growth. An increase in the Dufour parameter reduces the flow temperature, while an increase in the value of the Soret parameter causes increase in the concentration of the fluid. Again, increasing the velocity slip parameter reduces the velocity profile whereas increasing the heat generation parameter increases the temperature profile. A validation of the work is presented by comparing the current results with existing literature.

  19. Aerosol Variations in Boundary Atmospheres: Review and Prospect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Shi, Guangyu

    Atmospheric aerosols play important roles in climate and atmospheric chemistry: They scatter sunlight, provide condensation nuclei for cloud droplets, and participate in heterogeneous chemical reactions. To enable better understanding of the vertical physical, chemical and optical feathers of the aerosols in East Asia, using some atmospheric and aerosol measurement instruments on board a kind of tethered-balloon system, a series of measurements were operated in some typical areas of East Asia, including Dunhuang, which is located in the source origin district of Asian dust and Beijing, which is the representative of large inland city during the years of 2002-2011. Mineral compositions carried by the airborne particles were analyzed as well as the microbial components, meanwhile the Lidar data were compared to the direct measurements in order to get the correlation between the optical properties of the particles and their physical and chemical variations in the boundary atmosphere. Moreover, the simultaneous observations over the districts of China, Japan and Korea, and even Pakistan supported by an international cooperative project are highly expected, in order to know the changes of the chemical, physical and even optical and radiation properties of the atmospheric aerosols during their long-range transport.

  20. Linking atmospheric composition data across data types and national boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Martin; Lyapina, Olga; Schröder, Sabine; Stein, Olaf; Mallmann, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The field of atmospheric composition research involves the management of data sources from various disciplines such as meteorology, chemistry, (radiation) physics, emission inventories, etc. The output from global and regional chemistry climate models, chemistry transport models, and air quality models presents considerable challenges due to the manifold variables of interest and the multitude of diagnostics needed in order to interpret the results. Furthermore, many observations of atmospheric composition exist from different platforms involving different geometries, time resolutions, size spectra, etc. Due to the fact that few observation networks are globally coordinated, various representations of data formats and metadata definitions exist. For example, there is no unique agreement on chemical species names and in many networks, national languages are used to document the data. We will present a summary of the issues involving global interoperability of atmospheric composition data including the aspects of data volume, data compexity and metadata standardisation, and we will demonstrate various activities carried out in Jülich and internationally to overcome these challenges. Specifically, we will describe the current implementation and plans for the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service boundary condition service (http://ows-server.iek.fz-juelich.de), the design of the JOIN web interface (https://join.fz-juelich.de), and the activities for building an ontology of atmospheric composition vocabulary (https://ontology.geodab.eu/).

  1. Wake Dynamics in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markfort, Corey D.

    The goal of this research is to advance our understanding of atmospheric boundary layer processes over heterogeneous landscapes and complex terrain. The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is a relatively thin (˜ 1 km) turbulent layer of air near the earth's surface, in which most human activities and engineered systems are concentrated. Its dynamics are crucially important for biosphere-atmosphere couplings and for global atmospheric dynamics, with significant implications on our ability to predict and mitigate adverse impacts of land use and climate change. In models of the ABL, land surface heterogeneity is typically represented, in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, as changes in aerodynamic roughness length and surface heat and moisture fluxes. However, many real landscapes are more complex, often leading to massive boundary layer separation and wake turbulence, for which standard models fail. Trees, building clusters, and steep topography produce extensive wake regions currently not accounted for in models of the ABL. Wind turbines and wind farms also generate wakes that combine in complex ways to modify the ABL. Wind farms are covering an increasingly significant area of the globe and the effects of large wind farms must be included in regional and global scale models. Research presented in this thesis demonstrates that wakes caused by landscape heterogeneity must be included in flux parameterizations for momentum, heat, and mass (water vapor and trace gases, e.g. CO2 and CH4) in ABL simulation and prediction models in order to accurately represent land-atmosphere interactions. Accurate representation of these processes is crucial for the predictions of weather, air quality, lake processes, and ecosystems response to climate change. Objectives of the research reported in this thesis are: 1) to investigate turbulent boundary layer adjustment, turbulent transport and scalar flux in wind farms of varying configurations and develop an improved

  2. On inferring isoprene emission surface flux from atmospheric boundary layer concentration measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vilà-Guerau de Arellano

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We examine the dependence of the inferred isoprene surface emission flux from atmospheric concentration on the diurnal variability of the convective boundary layer (CBL. A series of systematic numerical experiments carried out using the mixed-layer technique enabled us to study the sensitivity of isoprene fluxes to the entrainment process, the partition of surface fluxes, the horizontal advection of warm/cold air masses and subsidence. Our findings demonstrate the key role played by the evolution of boundary layer height in modulating the retrieved isoprene flux. More specifically, inaccurate values of the potential temperature lapse rate lead to changes in the dilution capacity of the CBL and as a result the isoprene flux may be overestimated or underestimated by as much as 20%. The inferred emission flux estimated in the early morning hours is highly dependent on the accurate estimation of the discontinuity of the thermodynamic values between the residual layer and the rapidly forming CBL. Uncertainties associated with the partition of the sensible and latent heat flux also yield large deviations in the calculation of the isoprene surface flux. Similar results are obtained if we neglect the influence of warm or cold advection in the development of the CBL. We show that all the above-mentioned processes are non-linear, for which reason the dynamic and chemical evolutions of the CBL must be solved simultaneously. Based on the discussion of our results, we suggest the measurements needed to correctly apply the mixed-layer technique in order to minimize the uncertainties associated with the diurnal variability of the convective boundary layer.

  3. On inferring isoprene emission surface flux from atmospheric boundary layer concentration measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vilà-Guerau de Arellano

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We examine the dependence of the inferred isoprene surface emission flux from atmospheric concentration on the diurnal variability of the convective boundary layer (CBL. A series of systematic numerical experiments carried out using the mixed-layer technique enabled us to study the sensitivity of isoprene fluxes to the entrainment process, the partition of surface fluxes, the horizontal advection of warm/cold air masses and subsidence. Our findings demonstrate the key role played by the evolution of boundary layer height in modulating the retrieved isoprene flux. More specifically, inaccurate values of the potential temperature lapse rate lead to changes in the dilution capacity of the CBL and as a result the isoprene flux may be overestimated or underestimated by as much as 20%. The inferred emission flux estimated in the early morning hours is highly dependent on the accurate estimation of the discontinuity of the thermodynamic values between the residual layer and the rapidly forming CBL. Uncertainties associated with the partition of the sensible and latent heat flux also yield large deviations in the calculation of the isoprene surface flux. Similar results are obtained if we neglect the influence of warm or cold advection in the development of the CBL. We show that all the above-mentioned processes are non-linear, for which reason the dynamic and chemical evolutions of the CBL must be solved simultaneously. Based on the discussion of our results, we suggest the measurements needed to correctly apply the mixed-layer technique in order to minimize the uncertainties associated with the diurnal variability of the convective boundary layer.

  4. Influence of a coronal envelope as a free boundary to global convective dynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnecke, J.; Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.; Brandenburg, A.

    2016-12-01

    Aims: We explore the effects of an outer stably stratified coronal envelope on rotating turbulent convection, differential rotation, and large-scale dynamo action in spherical wedge models of the Sun. Methods: We solve the compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations in a two-layer model with unstable stratification below the surface, representing the convection zone, and a stably stratified coronal envelope above. The interface represents a free surface. We compare our model to models that have no coronal envelope. Results: The presence of a coronal envelope is found to modify the Reynolds stress and the Λ effect resulting in a weaker and non-cylindrical differential rotation. This is related to the reduced latitudinal temperature variations that are caused by and dependent on the angular velocity. Some simulations develop a near-surface shear layer that we can relate to a sign change in the meridional Reynolds stress term in the thermal wind balance equation. Furthermore, the presence of a free surface changes the magnetic field evolution since the toroidal field is concentrated closer to the surface. In all simulations, however, the migration direction of the mean magnetic field can be explained by the Parker-Yoshimura rule, which is consistent with earlier findings. Conclusions: A realistic treatment of the upper boundary in spherical dynamo simulations is crucial for the dynamics of the flow and magnetic field evolution.

  5. Laboratory Simulations of Local Winds in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer via Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Moroni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the atmospheric boundary layer, under high pressure conditions and negligible geostrophic winds, problems associated with pollution are the most critical. In this situation local winds play a major role in the evaluation of the atmospheric dynamics at small scales and in dispersion processes. These winds originate as a result of nonuniform heating of the soil, either when it is homogeneous or in discontinuous terrain in the presence of sea and/or slopes. Depending on the source of the thermal gradient, local winds are classified into convective boundary layer, sea and land breezes, urban heat islands, and slope currents. Local winds have been analyzed by (i simple analytical models; (ii numerical models; (iii field measurements; (iv laboratory measurements through which it is impossible to completely create the necessary similarities, but the parameters that determine the phenomenon can be controlled and each single wind can be separately analyzed. The present paper presents a summary of laboratory simulations of local winds neglecting synoptic winds and the effects of Coriolis force. Image analysis techniques appear suitable to fully describe both the individual phenomenon and the superposition of more than one local wind. Results do agree with other laboratory studies and numerical experiments.

  6. Giant aeolian dune size determined by the average depth of the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudin, P.; Fourrière, A.; Andreotti, B.; Murray, A. B.

    2009-12-01

    Depending on the wind regime, sand dunes exhibit linear, crescent-shaped or star-like forms resulting from the interaction between dune morphology and sand transport. Small-scale dunes form by destabilization of the sand bed with a wavelength (a few tens of metres) determined by the sand transport saturation length. The mechanisms controlling the formation of giant dunes, and in particular accounting for their typical time and length scales, have remained unknown. Using a combination of field measurements and aerodynamic calculations, we show here that the growth of aeolian giant dunes, ascribed to the nonlinear interaction between small-scale superimposed dunes, is limited by the confinement of the flow within the atmospheric boundary layer. Aeolian giant dunes and river dunes form by similar processes, with the thermal inversion layer that caps the convective boundary layer in the atmosphere acting analogously to the water surface in rivers. In both cases, the bed topography excites surface waves on the interface that in turn modify the near-bed flow velocity. This mechanism is a stabilizing process that prevents the scale of the pattern from coarsening beyond the resonant condition. Our results can explain the mean spacing of aeolian giant dunes ranging from 300 m in coastal terrestrial deserts to 3.5 km. We propose that our findings could serve as a starting point for the modelling of long-term evolution of desert landscapes under specific wind regimes.

  7. Atmospheric circulation of tidally locked exoplanets II: dual-band radiative transfer and convective adjustment

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin; Phillipps, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Improving upon our purely dynamical work, we present three-dimensional simulations of the atmospheric circulation on Earth-like (exo)planets and hot Jupiters using the GFDL-Princeton Flexible Modeling System (FMS). As the first steps away from the purely dynamical benchmarks of Heng, Menou & Phillipps (2011), we add dual-band radiative transfer and dry convective adjustment schemes to our computational setup. Our treatment of radiative transfer assumes stellar irradiation to peak at a wavelength shorter than and distinct from that at which the exoplanet re-emits radiation ("shortwave" versus "longwave"), and also uses a two-stream approximation. Convection is mimicked by adjusting unstable lapse rates to the dry adiabat. The bottom of the atmosphere is bounded by an uniform slab with a finite thermal inertia. For our hot Jupiter models, we include an analytical formalism for calculating temperature-pressure profiles, in radiative equilibrium, which accounts for the effect of collision-induced absorption v...

  8. Measured Instantaneous Viscous Boundary Layer in Turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Quan

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of the instantaneous viscous boundary layer (BL) thickness $\\delta_v(t)$ in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection. It is found that $\\delta_v(t)$ obtained from the measured instantaneous two-dimensional velocity field exhibits intermittent fluctuations. For small values, $\\delta_v(t)$ obeys a lognormal distribution, whereas for large values the distribution of $\\delta_v(t)$ exhibits an exponential tail. The variation of $\\delta_v(t)$ with time is found to be driven by the fluctuations of the large-scale mean flow velocity, as expected, and the local horizontal velocities close to the plate can be used as an instant measure of this variation. It is further found that the mean velocity profile measured in the laboratory frame can now be brought into coincidence with the theoretical Blasius laminar BL profile, if it is resampled relative to the time-dependent frame of $\\delta_v(t)$.

  9. Unsteady Mixed Convection Boundary Layer from a Circular Cylinder in a Micropolar Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anati Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Most industrial fluids such as polymers, liquid crystals, and colloids contain suspensions of rigid particles that undergo rotation. However, the classical Navier-Stokes theory normally associated with Newtonian fluids is inadequate to describe such fluids as it does not take into account the effects of these microstructures. In this paper, the unsteady mixed convection boundary layer flow of a micropolar fluid past an isothermal horizontal circular cylinder is numerically studied, where the unsteadiness is due to an impulsive motion of the free stream. Both the assisting (heated cylinder and opposing cases (cooled cylinder are considered. Thus, both small and large time solutions as well as the occurrence of flow separation, followed by the flow reversal are studied. The flow along the entire surface of a cylinder is solved numerically using the Keller-box scheme. The obtained results are compared with the ones from the open literature, and it is shown that the agreement is very good.

  10. Influence of aligned MHD on convective boundary layer flow of viscoelastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Laila Amera; Kasim, Abdul Rahman Mohd; Al-Sharifi, H. A. M.; Salleh, Mohd Zuki; Mohammad, Nurul Farahain; Shafie, Sharidan; Ali, Anati

    2017-05-01

    Effects of aligned Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) on the mixed convection boundary layer flow of viscoelastic fluid past a circular cylinder with Newtonian heating is investigated. Appropriate transformation is applied to the governing partial differential equations to transform them into dimensionless forms which are then solved using finite difference method known as Keller box. For verification purpose, the preliminary numerical solutions of the model are compared with previous study with a particular condition that the magnetic and viscosity effect are both absent. With strong agreement between the previous and current results, the authors believe that the extended outcome produced from the present model is accurate. Findings from the study will be presented in tabular and graphical form.

  11. Mixed Convection Boundary Layer Flow Embedded in a Thermally Stratified Porous Medium Saturated by a Nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafizi Mat Yasin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the numerical investigation of the steady mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical surface embedded in a thermally stratified porous medium saturated by a nanofluid. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to the ordinary differential equations, using the similarity transformations. The similarity equations are solved numerically for three types of metallic or nonmetallic nanoparticles, namely, copper (Cu, alumina (Al2O3, and titania (TiO2, in a water-based fluid to investigate the effect of the solid volume fraction or nanoparticle volume fraction parameter φ of the nanofluid on the flow and heat transfer characteristics. The skin friction coefficient and the velocity and temperature profiles are presented and discussed.

  12. BUOYANCY INSTABILITY IN THE NATURAL CONVECTION BOUNDARY LAYER AROUND A VERTICAL HEATED FLAT PLATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜大椿; 张汉勋

    2002-01-01

    A systematic research on the buoyancy instability in the natural convection boundary layer was conducted, including the basic characteristics such as its spectral components, wave length and velocity, the location of its critical layer,and amplitude distributions of the triple independent eigenmodes with the linear instability theory, the growth rates of its temperature and velocity fluctuations and the corresponding neutral curves for the buoyancy eigenmode were also obtained.Results indicated that the neutral curve of the velocity fluctuation had a nose shape consistent with that obtained in the numerical calculation, but for the temperature fluctuation, a ring-like region could be measured at a lower Grashof number before the nose-shaped main portion of the neutral curve.

  13. Progress In Iron Transmission Measurements Relevant to the Solar Convection/Radiation Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jim; Nagayama, T.; Loisel, G.; Rochau, G. A; Blancard, C.; Colgan, J.; Cosse, Ph; Faussurier, G.; Fontes, Christopher J; Golovkin, I.; Hansen, S. B; Iglesias, C. A; Kilcrease, D. P; MacFarlane, Joseph J.; Mancini, Roberto; Nahar, S. N; Nash, T. J; Orban, Chris; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Pradhan, Anil Kumar; Sherrill, M.; Wilson, B. G

    2014-06-01

    Iron plasma opacity influences the internal structure of the sun. However, opacity models have never been experimentally tested at stellar interior conditions. Recent iron opacity experiments at the Sandia Z facility reached 195 eV temperatures, nearly the same as the solar convection/radiation zone boundary (CZB), at electron densities that are roughly ½ the solar CZB value. Progress to solidify these results and use them to examine the physical underpinnings of opacity models will be described. We will also discuss impact of the results on the Rosseland mean opacities important for stellar physics.++Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Effects of Joule Heating and Viscous Dissipation on MHD Marangoni Convection Boundary Layer Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohana Abdul Hamid

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is performed to study the effects of the Joule heating and viscous dissipation on the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD Marangoni convection boundary layer flow. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations via the similarity transformations. Numerical results of the similarity equations are obtained using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method. Effects of the magnetic field parameter, and the combined effects of the Joule heating and the viscous dissipation are investigated and the numerical results are tabulated in tables and figures. It is found that the magnetic field reduces the fluid velocity but increases the fluid temperature. On the other hand, the combined effects of the Joule heating and viscous dissipation have significantly influenced the surface temperature gradient.

  15. Stochastic eddy-diffusivity/mass-flux parameterization for moist convective boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suselj, K.; Teixeira, J.

    2012-12-01

    A new eddy-diffusivity/mass-flux (EDMF) based parameterization for moist convective boundary layers is introduced. In this EDMF framework, turbulent fluxes are a sum of a deterministic turbulent-kinetic-energy based eddy diffusivity component and a stochastic mass-flux component. The mass-flux component is represented by a fixed number of steady state plumes and plays a dominant role in the convection-dominated regimes. Two important, yet poorly understood components of the parameterization are: i) the within-plume variability of the model variables, and ii) the interaction between plume and the environment. To properly compute vertical profiles and the condensation within moist plumes, the above-mentioned processes have to be reasonably well represented. In the new parameterization, the within plume variability at the cloud base is represented by a diagnostically derived probability density function of the plume variables. The plume properties in the model are determined randomly by a Monte-Carlo type approach. The interaction between plumes and environment is represented as a lateral entrainment of the environmental air into the plumes. In our new EDMF approach the entrainment rate is modeled as a simple stochastic process following a Poison distribution. This stochastic parameterization of entrainment attempts at representing the possible intermittency of the entire entrainment process as well as the uncertainties related to entrainment. The EDMF parameterization is integrated into a single-column-model with a probability-density-function based description of cloudiness and simple long-wave radiation. We show that the model is able to capture essential features of moist boundary layers, ranging from the stratocumulus to shallow-cumulus regimes. Detailed comparisons of a few important cases with LES results are shown to confirm the value of the present approach.

  16. Simulation of Wind turbines in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    and higher moments. As an example, figure (1) shows a 2D snapshot of stream-wise velocity contours (in SI units) in an infinite row of wind turbines simulated in stably stratified flow. Simulations are performed usind the in-house CFD code Ellipsys3D, which is a multi-block general purpose, parallelized...... of the specific turbine, however the method reduces the computational costs significantly while giving accurate prediction of wakes and statistical quantities behind the turbine. The simulations start with a neutral prescribed boundary layer that follows a logarithmic profile with the velocity of 8 m/s at the hub......Large eddy simulation of an arbitrary wind farm is studied in the neutral and thermally stratified atmospheric boundary Layer. Large eddy simulations of industrial flows usually requires full resolution of the flow near the wall and this is believed to be one of the main deficiencies of LES because...

  17. Heat transfer in a couple stress fluid over a continuous moving surface with internal hat generation and convective boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayat, Tasawar [Quaid-i-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Mathematics; King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Physics; Iqbal, Zahid [Quaid-i-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Mathematics; Qasim, Muhammad [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Mathematics; Aldossary, Omar M. [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Physics

    2012-05-15

    This investigation reports the boundary layer flow and heat transfer characteristics in a couple stress fluid flow over a continuos moving surface with a parallel free stream. The effects of heat generation in the presence of convective boundary conditions are also investigated. Series solutions for the velocity and temperature distributions are obtained by the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Convergence of obtained series solutions are analyzed. The results are obtained and discussed through graphs for physical parameters of interest. (orig.)

  18. Effect of non-uniform basic temperature gradients on Marangoni convection with a boundary slab of finite conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumara I S,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The linear stability analysis of Marangoni convection in a fluid layer with a boundary slab of finite conductivity is considered. The effects of various non uniform temperature gradients are investigated. The lower boundary is a considered to be a thin slab of finite conductivity instead of a regular rigid surface. At the contact surface between the thin slab and the fluid layer the thermalboundary conditions are used and the upper surface is considered to be free and insulating to temperature perturbation and also surface tension effects are allowed. The resulting eigen value problem is solved exactly. The critical values of the Marangoni numbers for the onset of Marangoni convection are calculated for different temperature profile and the latter is found to be critically dependent on the depth ratio and conductivity ratio. The effects of the thermal conductivity and the thickness of the solid plate on the onset of convective instability with different temperature profile arestudied in detail.

  19. Thermal convection in a spherical shell with melting/freezing at either or both of its boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Deguen, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    In a number of geophysical or planetological settings (Earth's inner core, a silicate mantle crystallizing from a magma ocean, or an ice shell surrounding a deep water ocean) a convecting crystalline layer is in contact with a layer of its melt. Allowing for melting/freezing at one or both of the boundaries of the solid layer is likely to affect the pattern of convection in the layer. We study here the onset of thermal convection in a viscous spherical shell with dynamically induced melting/freezing at either or both of its boundaries. It is shown that the behavior of each interface depends on the value of a dimensional number P, which is the ratio of a melting/freezing timescale over a viscous relaxation timescale. A small value of P corresponds to permeable boundary conditions, while a large value of P corresponds to impermeable boundary conditions. The linear stability analysis predicts a significant effect of semi-permeable boundaries when the number P characterizing either of the boundary is small enough...

  20. The INCOMPASS project field and modelling campaign: Interaction of Convective Organization and Monsoon Precipitation, Atmosphere, Surface and Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew; Bhat, Ganapati; Evans, Jonathan; Madan, Ranju; Marsham, John; Martin, Gill; Mitra, Ashis; Mrudula, Gm; Parker, Douglas; Pattnaik, Sandeep; Rajagopal, En; Taylor, Christopher; Tripathi, Sachchida

    2017-04-01

    The INCOMPASS project uses data from a field and aircraft measurement campaign during the 2016 monsoon onset to better understand and predict monsoon rainfall. The monsoon supplies the majority of water in South Asia, however modelling and forecasting the monsoon from days to the season ahead is limited by large model errors that develop quickly. Likely problems lie in physical parametrizations such as convection, the boundary layer and land surface. At the same time, lack of detailed observations prevents more thorough understanding of monsoon circulation and its interaction with the land surface; a process governed by boundary layer and convective cloud dynamics. From May to July 2016, INCOMPASS used a modified BAe-146 jet aircraft operated by the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM), for the first project of this scale in India. The India and UK team flew around 100 hours of science sorties from bases in northern and southern India. Flights from Lucknow in the northern plains took measurements to the west and southeast to allow sampling of the complete contrast from dry desert air to the humid environment over the north Bay of Bengal. These routes were repeated in the pre-monsoon and monsoon phases, measuring contrasting surface and boundary layer structures. In addition, flights from the southern base in Bengaluru measured contrasts from the Arabian Sea, across the intense rains of the Western Ghats mountains, over the rain shadow in southeast India and over the southern Bay of Bengal. Flight planning was performed with the aid of forecasts from a new UK Met Office 4km limited area model. INCOMPASS also installed a network of surface flux towers, as well as operating a cloud-base ceilometer and performing intensive radiosonde launches from a supersite in Kanpur. Here we will outline preliminary results from the field campaign including new observations of the surface, boundary layer structure and atmospheric profiles from aircraft data. We

  1. Tangent linear superparameterization of convection in a 10 layer global atmosphere with calibrated climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick; Mapes, Brian; Hu, I.-Kuan; Song, Siwon; Kuang, Zhiming

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes a new intermediate global atmosphere model in which synoptic and planetary dynamics including the advection of water vapor are explicit in 10 layers, the time-mean flow is centered near a realistic state through the use of carefully calibrated time-independent 3-D forcings, and temporal anomalies of convective tendencies of heat and moisture in each column are represented as a linear matrix acting on the anomalous temperature and moisture profiles. Currently, this matrix is Kuang's [] linear response function (LRF) of a cyclic convection-permitting model (CCPM) in equilibrium with specified atmospheric cooling (i.e., without radiation or WISHE interactions, so it conserves column moist static energy exactly). The goal of this effort is to cleanly test the role of convection's free-tropospheric moisture sensitivity in tropical waves, without incurring large changes of mean climate that confuse the interpretation of experiments with entrainment parameters in the convection schemes of full-physics GCMs. When the sensitivity to free-tropospheric moisture is multiplied by a factor ranging from 0 to 2, the model's variability ranges from: (1) moderately strong convectively coupled Kelvin waves with speeds near 20 m s-1; to (0) similar but much weaker waves; to (2) similar but stronger and slightly faster waves as the water vapor field plays an increasingly important role. Longitudinal structure in the model's time-mean tropical flow is not fully realistic, and does change significantly with matrix-coupled variability, but further work on editing the anomaly physics matrix and calibrating the mean state could improve this class of models.

  2. A test of sensitivity to convective transport in a global atmospheric CO{sub 2} simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, H. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States). UMBC Goddard Earth Science and Technology Center; Kawa, S.R.; Chin, M.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Rasch, P. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Wu, S. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO{sub 2} distributions. Global CO{sub 2} in the year 2000 is simulated using the CTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA's Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO{sub 2} by adopting the same CO{sub 2} emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et al. (convective transport scheme denoted as Conv1). Conv1 approximates the convective transport by using the bulk convective mass fluxes to redistribute trace gases. The alternate approximation, Conv2, partitions fluxes into updraft and downdraft, as well as into entrainment and detrainment, and has potential to yield a more realistic simulation of vertical redistribution through deep convection.Replacing Conv1 by Conv2 results in an overestimate of CO{sub 2} over biospheric sink regions. The largest discrepancies result in a CO{sub 2} difference of about 7.8 ppm in the July NH boreal forest, which is about 30% of the CO{sub 2} seasonality for that area. These differences are compared to those produced by emission scenario variations constrained by the framework of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to account for possible land use change and residual terrestrial CO{sub 2} sink. It is shown that the overestimated CO{sub 2} driven by Conv2 can be offset by introducing these supplemental emissions.

  3. Influence and impact of the parametrization of the turbulent air-sea fluxes on atmospheric moisture and convection in the tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Olivier; Braconnot, Pascale; Gainusa-Bogdan, Alina; Hourdin, Frédéric; Marti, Olivier; Pelletier, Charles

    2016-04-01

    The turbulent fluxes across the ocean/atmosphere interface represent one of the principal driving forces of the global atmospheric and oceanic circulation and are also responsible for various phenomena like the water supply to the atmospheric column, which itself is extremely important for atmospheric convection. Although the representation of these fluxes has been the subject of major studies, it still remains a very challenging problem. Our aim is to better understand the role of these fluxes in climate change experiments and in the equator-pole redistribution of heat and water by the oceanic and atmospheric circulation. For this, we are developing a methodology starting from idealized 1D experiments and going all the way up to fully coupled ocean-atmosphere simulations of past and future climates. The poster will propose a synthesis of different simulations we have performed with a 1D version of the LMDz atmosphere model towards a first objective of understanding how different parameterizations of the turbulent fluxes affect the moisture content of the atmosphere and the feedback with the atmospheric boundary layer and convection schemes. Air-sea fluxes are not directly resolved by the models because they are subgrid-scale phenomena and are therefore represented by parametrizations. We investigate the differences between several 1D simulations of the TOGA-COARE campaign (1992-1993, Pacific warm pool region), for which 1D boundary conditions and observations are available to test the results of atmospheric models. Each simulation considers a different version of the LMDz model in terms of bulk formula (four) used to compute the turbulent fluxes. We also consider how the representation of gustiness in these parameterizations affects the results. The use of this LMDz test case (very constrained within an idealized framework) allows us to determine how the response of surface fluxes helps to reinforce or damp the atmospheric water vapor content or cloud feedbacks

  4. Physics-based Stabilization of Spectral Elements for the 3D Euler Equations of Moist Atmospheric Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    3D Euler Equations of Moist Atmospheric Convection 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...STABILIZATION OF SPECTRAL ELEMENTS FOR THE 3D EULER EQUATIONS OF MOIST ATMOSPHERIC CONVECTION SIMONE MARRAS, ANDREAS MÜLLER, FRANCIS X. GIRALDO Dept. Appl...spectral elements, we introduce a dissipative scheme based on the solution of the compressible Euler equations that are regularized through the addi

  5. Spectral simulation of thermocapillary convection with a deformable free surface using boundary-fitted coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ikramuddin

    A Chebyshev-spectral collocation scheme has been developed to simulate thermocapillary convection processes in a differentially heated cavity with and without buoyancy effects. The time-dependent Navier- Stokes equations in primitive variables were solved with a semi-implicit scheme using the influence matrix technique. The deformable free surface was incorporated by means of a boundary-fitted coordinate (BFC) system. The BFC grid was generated by solving a system of elliptic equations. An iterative scheme based on finite difference methods was found to be sufficient for calculating a smooth distribution of grid-points for relatively low degrees of deformation of the free surface. The metrics of transformation, however, were calculated spectrally in order to achieve a high order of accuracy in the a posteriori mapping of the physical grid to the computational grid. The overall scheme was found to be efficient, economical, and capable of resolving the complex hydrodynamic and thermal structures in thermocapillarity driven flows with deformable free surfaces. The scheme was also modified to study problems with very high Marangoni numbers and non-deformable free surfaces, and later extended to three dimensions with periodic boundary conditions in order to explore the transitions to fully three dimensional phenomena that are anticipated in industrially relevant flow configurations.

  6. Integrating canopy and large-scale effects in the convective boundary-layer dynamics during the CHATS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapkalijevski, Metodija M.; Ouwersloot, Huug G.; Moene, Arnold F.; Vilà-Guerau de Arrellano, Jordi

    2017-02-01

    By characterizing the dynamics of a convective boundary layer above a relatively sparse and uniform orchard canopy, we investigated the impact of the roughness-sublayer (RSL) representation on the predicted diurnal variability of surface fluxes and state variables. Our approach combined numerical experiments, using an atmospheric mixed-layer model including a land-surface-vegetation representation, and measurements from the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS) field experiment near Dixon, California. The RSL is parameterized using an additional factor in the standard Monin-Obukhov similarity theory flux-profile relationships that takes into account the canopy influence on the atmospheric flow. We selected a representative case characterized by southerly wind conditions to ensure well-developed RSL over the orchard canopy. We then investigated the sensitivity of the diurnal variability of the boundary-layer dynamics to the changes in the RSL key scales, the canopy adjustment length scale, Lc, and the β = u*/|U| ratio at the top of the canopy due to their stability and dependence on canopy structure. We found that the inclusion of the RSL parameterization resulted in improved prediction of the diurnal evolution of the near-surface mean quantities (e.g. up to 50 % for the wind velocity) and transfer (drag) coefficients. We found relatively insignificant effects on the modelled surface fluxes (e.g. up to 5 % for the friction velocity, while 3 % for the sensible and latent heat), which is due to the compensating effect between the mean gradients and the drag coefficients, both of which are largely affected by the RSL parameterization. When varying Lc (from 10 to 20 m) and β (from 0.25 to 0.4 m), based on observational evidence, the predicted friction velocity is found to vary by up to 25 % and the modelled surface-energy fluxes (sensible heat, SH, and latent heat of evaporation, LE) vary up to 2 and 9 %. Consequently, the boundary-layer height varies up to

  7. Determination of One Unknown Thermal Coefficient through a Mushy Zone Model with a Convective Overspecified Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea N. Ceretani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A semi-infinite material under a solidification process with the Solomon-Wilson-Alexiades mushy zone model with a heat flux condition at the fixed boundary is considered. The associated free boundary problem is overspecified through a convective boundary condition with the aim of the simultaneous determination of the temperature, the two free boundaries of the mushy zone and one thermal coefficient among the latent heat by unit mass, the thermal conductivity, the mass density, the specific heat, and the two coefficients that characterize the mushy zone, when the unknown thermal coefficient is supposed to be constant. Bulk temperature and coefficients which characterize the heat flux and the heat transfer at the boundary are assumed to be determined experimentally. Explicit formulae for the unknowns are given for the resulting six phase-change problems, besides necessary and sufficient conditions on data in order to obtain them. In addition, relationship between the phase-change process solved in this paper and an analogous process overspecified by a temperature boundary condition is presented, and this second problem is solved by considering a large heat transfer coefficient at the boundary in the problem with the convective boundary condition. Formulae for the unknown thermal coefficients corresponding to both problems are summarized in two tables.

  8. Influence of thermal boundary conditions on MHD natural convection in square enclosure using Cu–water nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Mansour

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerical investigation for heat transfer with natural convection and nanofluid flow subjected to changeable thermal boundary conditions and inclined magnetic field has been performed. Effect of problem’s parameters on each other has been monitored. It has been reached to that inclination angle can justify the quasi-symmetric boundary conditions to be symmetric. In addition to that as inclination angle increases, the magnetic force pointed to horizontal trend; so the convection regime dominates the cavity. In a related context, nanoparticles provide conduction regime, increase and maintenance the rate of heat transfer all over the cavity. However thermal emission at ends of heat source–sink has been found to be constant when boundary conditions change in the pure case.

  9. A methodology to determine boundary conditions from forced convection experiments using liquid crystal thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakkareddy, Pradeep S.; Balaji, C.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental study to estimate the heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient using liquid crystal thermography and Bayesian inference in a heat generating sphere, enclosed in a cubical Teflon block. The geometry considered for the experiments comprises a heater inserted in a hollow hemispherical aluminium ball, resulting in a volumetric heat generation source that is placed at the center of the Teflon block. Calibrated thermochromic liquid crystal sheets are used to capture the temperature distribution at the front face of the Teflon block. The forward model is the three dimensional conduction equation which is solved within the Teflon block to obtain steady state temperatures, using COMSOL. Match up experiments are carried out for various velocities by minimizing the residual between TLC and simulated temperatures for every assumed loss coefficient, to obtain a correlation of average Nusselt number against Reynolds number. This is used for prescribing the boundary condition for the solution to the forward model. A surrogate model obtained by artificial neural network built upon the data from COMSOL simulations is used to drive a Markov Chain Monte Carlo based Metropolis Hastings algorithm to generate the samples. Bayesian inference is adopted to solve the inverse problem for determination of heat flux and heat transfer coefficient from the measured temperature field. Point estimates of the posterior like the mean, maximum a posteriori and standard deviation of the retrieved heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient are reported. Additionally the effect of number of samples on the performance of the estimation process has been investigated.

  10. A methodology to determine boundary conditions from forced convection experiments using liquid crystal thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakkareddy, Pradeep S.; Balaji, C.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental study to estimate the heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient using liquid crystal thermography and Bayesian inference in a heat generating sphere, enclosed in a cubical Teflon block. The geometry considered for the experiments comprises a heater inserted in a hollow hemispherical aluminium ball, resulting in a volumetric heat generation source that is placed at the center of the Teflon block. Calibrated thermochromic liquid crystal sheets are used to capture the temperature distribution at the front face of the Teflon block. The forward model is the three dimensional conduction equation which is solved within the Teflon block to obtain steady state temperatures, using COMSOL. Match up experiments are carried out for various velocities by minimizing the residual between TLC and simulated temperatures for every assumed loss coefficient, to obtain a correlation of average Nusselt number against Reynolds number. This is used for prescribing the boundary condition for the solution to the forward model. A surrogate model obtained by artificial neural network built upon the data from COMSOL simulations is used to drive a Markov Chain Monte Carlo based Metropolis Hastings algorithm to generate the samples. Bayesian inference is adopted to solve the inverse problem for determination of heat flux and heat transfer coefficient from the measured temperature field. Point estimates of the posterior like the mean, maximum a posteriori and standard deviation of the retrieved heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient are reported. Additionally the effect of number of samples on the performance of the estimation process has been investigated.

  11. Relationship between Neumann solutions for two-phase Lamé-Clapeyron-Stefan problems with convective and temperature boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarzia Domingo Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtain for the two-phase Lamé-Clapeyron-Stefan problem for a semi-infinite material an equivalence between the temperature and convective boundary conditions at the fixed face in the case that an inequality for the convective transfer coefficient is satisfied. Moreover, an inequality for the coefficient which characterizes the solid-liquid interface of the classical Neumann solution is also obtained. This inequality must be satisfied for data of any phase-change material, and as a consequence the result given in Tarzia, Quart. Appl. Math., 39 (1981, 491-497 is also recovered when a heat flux condition was imposed at the fixed face.

  12. Relation between the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Impact Factors under Severe Surface Thermal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhuan Ao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reported a comprehensive analysis on the diurnal variation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL in summer of Badain Jaran Desert and discussed deeply the effect of surface thermal to ABL, including the Difference in Surface-Air Temperature (DSAT, net radiation, and sensible heat, based on limited GPS radiosonde and surface observation data during two intense observation periods of experiments. The results showed that (1 affected by topography of the Tibetan Plateau, the climate provided favorable external conditions for the development of Convective Boundary Layer (CBL, (2 deep CBL showed a diurnal variation of three- to five-layer structure in clear days and five-layer ABL structure often occurred about sunset or sunrise, (3 the diurnal variation of DSAT influenced thickness of ABL through changes of turbulent heat flux, (4 integral value of sensible heat which rapidly converted by surface net radiation had a significant influence on the growth of CBL throughout daytime. The cumulative effect of thick RML dominated the role after CBL got through SBL in the development stage, especially in late summer, and (5 the development of CBL was promoted and accelerated by the variation of wind field and distribution of warm advection in high and low altitude.

  13. Radiation and Viscous Dissipation Effects on Laminar Boundary Layer Flow Nanofluid over a Vertical Plate with a Convective Surface Boundary Condition with Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gangadhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of laminar radiation and viscous dissipation effects on laminar boundary layer flow over a vertical plate with a convective surface boundary condition is studied using different types of nanoparticles. The general governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of two nonlinear ordinary differential equations using unique similarity transformation. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are obtained using the Nachtsheim-Swigert Shooting iteration technique along with the fourth order Runga Kutta method. Two different types of nanoparticles copper water nanofluid and alumina water nanofluid are studied. The effects of radiation and viscous dissipation on the heat transfer characteristics are discussed in detail. It is observed that as Radiation parameter increases, temperature decreases for copper water and alumina water nanofluid and the heat transfer coefficient of nanofluids increases with the increase of convective heat transfer parameter for copper water and alumina water nanofluids.

  14. Convectively Forced Gravity Waves and their Sensitivity to Heating Profile and Atmospheric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Oliver; Parker, Douglas; Griffiths, Stephen; Vosper, Simon; Stirling, Alison

    2016-04-01

    It has been known for some time that convective heating is communicated to its environment by gravity waves. Despite this, the radiation of gravity waves in macro-scale models, which are typically forced at the grid-scale by meso-scale parameterization schemes, is not well understood. We present here theoretical work directed toward improving our fundamental understanding of convectively forced gravity wave effects at the meso-scale, in order to begin to address this problem. Starting with the hydrostatic, non-rotating, 2D, Boussinesq equations in a slab geometry, we find a radiating, analytical solution to prescribed sensible heat forcing for both the vertical velocity and potential temperature response. Both Steady and pulsed heating with adjustable horizontal structure is considered. From these solutions we construct a simple model capable of interrogating the spatial and temporal sensitivity to chosen heating functions of the remote forced response in particular. By varying the assumed buoyancy frequency, the influence of the model stratosphere on the upward radiation of gravity waves, and in turn, on the tropospheric response can be understood. Further, we find that the macro-scale response to convection is highly dependent on the radiation characteristics of gravity waves, which are in turn dependent upon the temporal and spatial structure of the source, and upper boundary condition of the domain.

  15. Influence of the characteristics of atmospheric boundary layer on the vertical distribution of air pollutant in China's Yangtze River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggang; Cao, Le

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution occurring in the atmospheric boundary layer is a kind of weather phenomenon which decreases the visibility of the atmosphere and results in poor air quality. Recently, the occurrence of the heavy air pollution events has become more frequent all over Asia, especially in Mid-Eastern China. In December 2015, the most severe air pollution in recorded history of China occurred in the regions of Yangtze River Delta and Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei. More than 10 days of severe air pollution (Air Quality Index, AQI>200) appeared in many large cities of China such as Beijing, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang and Baoding. Thus, the research and the management of the air pollution has attracted most attentions in China. In order to investigate the formation, development and dissipation of the air pollutions in China, a field campaign has been conducted between January 1, 2015 and January 28, 2015 in Yangtze River Delta of China, aiming at a intensive observation of the vertical structure of the air pollutants in the atmospheric boundary layer during the time period with heavy pollution. In this study, the observation data obtained in the field campaign mentioned above is analyzed. The characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer and the vertical distribution of air pollutants in the city Dongshan located in the center of Lake Taihu are shown and discussed in great detail. It is indicated that the stability of the boundary layer is the strongest during the nighttime and the early morning of Dongshan. Meanwhile, the major air pollutants, PM2.5 and PM10 in the boundary layer, reach their maximum values, 177.1μg m-3 and 285μg m-3 respectively. The convective boundary layer height in the observations ranges from approximately 700m to 1100m. It is found that the major air pollutants tend to be confined in a relatively shallow boundary layer, which represents that the boundary layer height is the dominant factor for controlling the vertical distribution of the air pollutants. In

  16. A study on the structure of the convective atmosphere over the Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX-99

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U C Mohanty; N V Sam; S Das; A N V Satyanarayana

    2003-06-01

    Convective activity is one of the major processes in the atmosphere influencing the local and large scale weather in the tropics. The latent heat released by the cumulus cloud is known to drive monsoon circulation, which on the other hand supplies the moisture that maintains the cumulus clouds. An investigation is carried out on the convective structure of the atmosphere during active and suppressed periods of convection using data sets obtained from the Bay of Bengal and Monsoon Experiment (BOBMEX). The cumulus convection though being a small-scale phenomenon, still influences its embedding environment by interaction through various scales. This study shows the variation in the kinematic and convective parameters during the transition from suppressed to active periods of convection. Convergence in the lower levels and strong upward vertical velocity, significant during active convection are associated with the formation of monsoon depressions. The apparent heat source due to latent heat release and the vertical transport of the eddy heat by cumulus convection, and the apparent moisture sink due to net condensation and vertical divergence of the eddy transport of moisture, are estimated through residuals of the thermodynamic equation and examined in relation to monsoon activity during BOBMEX.

  17. Forced convective heat transfer in boundary layer flow of Sisko fluid over a nonlinear stretching sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Asif; Shahzad, Azeem; Khan, Masood

    2014-01-01

    The major focus of this article is to analyze the forced convective heat transfer in a steady boundary layer flow of Sisko fluid over a nonlinear stretching sheet. Two cases are studied, namely (i) the sheet with variable temperature (PST case) and (ii) the sheet with variable heat flux (PHF case). The heat transfer aspects are investigated for both integer and non-integer values of the power-law index. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using appropriate similarity variables and solved numerically. The numerical results are obtained by the shooting method using adaptive Runge Kutta method with Broyden's method in the domain[Formula: see text]. The numerical results for the temperature field are found to be strongly dependent upon the power-law index, stretching parameter, wall temperature parameter, material parameter of the Sisko fluid and Prandtl number. In addition, the local Nusselt number versus wall temperature parameter is also graphed and tabulated for different values of pertaining parameters. Further, numerical results are validated by comparison with exact solutions as well as previously published results in the literature.

  18. Forced Convective Heat Transfer in Boundary Layer Flow of Sisko Fluid over a Nonlinear Stretching Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Asif; Shahzad, Azeem; Khan, Masood

    2014-01-01

    The major focus of this article is to analyze the forced convective heat transfer in a steady boundary layer flow of Sisko fluid over a nonlinear stretching sheet. Two cases are studied, namely (i) the sheet with variable temperature (PST case) and (ii) the sheet with variable heat flux (PHF case). The heat transfer aspects are investigated for both integer and non-integer values of the power-law index. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using appropriate similarity variables and solved numerically. The numerical results are obtained by the shooting method using adaptive Runge Kutta method with Broyden’s method in the domain. The numerical results for the temperature field are found to be strongly dependent upon the power-law index, stretching parameter, wall temperature parameter, material parameter of the Sisko fluid and Prandtl number. In addition, the local Nusselt number versus wall temperature parameter is also graphed and tabulated for different values of pertaining parameters. Further, numerical results are validated by comparison with exact solutions as well as previously published results in the literature. PMID:24949738

  19. Flow and heat transfer in Sisko fluid with convective boundary condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Rabia; Khan, Masood; Munir, Asif; Khan, Waqar Azeem

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we have studied the flow and heat transfer in Sisko fluid with convective boundary condition over a nonisothermal stretching sheet. The flow is influenced by non-linearly stretching sheet in the presence of a uniform transverse magnetic field. The partial differential equations governing the problem have been reduced by similarity transformations into the ordinary differential equations. The transformed coupled ordinary differential equations are then solved analytically by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM) and numerically by the shooting method. Effects of different parameters like power-law index n, magnetic parameter M, stretching parameter s, generalized Prandtl number Pr and generalized Biot number γ are presented graphically. It is found that temperature profile increases with the increasing value of M and γ whereas it decreases for Pr. Numerical values of the skin-friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are tabulated at various physical situations. In addition, a comparison between the HAM and exact solutions is also made as a special case and excellent agreement between results enhance a confidence in the HAM results.

  20. MHD Natural Convection in a Square Enclosure using Nanofluid with the Influence of Thermal Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical investigation for heat transfer with steady MHD natural convection cooling of a localized heat source at the bottom wall of an enclosure filled with nanofluids subjected to changeable thermal boundary conditions at the sidewalls has been studied in the a presence of inclined magnetic field. Finite difference method was employed to solve the dimensionless governing equations of the problem. The effects of governing parameters, namely, Hartmann number, solid volume fraction, the different values of the heat source length and the different locations of the heat source on the streamlines and isotherms contours as well as maximum temperature, Nusselt number and average Nusselt number along the heat source were considered. The present results are validated by favorable comparisons with previously published results. The results of the problem are presented in graphical and tabular forms and discussed. It is found that an increase in the Hartmann number results in a clear reduction in the rate of heat transfer; however, the increase in Rayleigh number enhances the nanofluid flow and heat transfer rate.

  1. Exploring the magnetic field complexity in M dwarfs at the boundary to full convection

    CERN Document Server

    Shulyak, D; Seemann, U; Kochukhov, O; Piskunov, N

    2014-01-01

    Based on detailed spectral synthesis we carry out quantitative measurements of the strength and complexity of surface magnetic fields in the four well-known M-dwarfs GJ 388, GJ 729, GJ 285, and GJ 406 populating the mass regime around the boundary between partially and fully convective stars. Very high resolution R=100000, high signal-to-noise (up to 400) near-infrared Stokes I spectra were obtained with CRIRES at ESO's Very Large Telescope covering regions of the FeH Wing-Ford transitions at 1mum. The field distributions in all four stars are characterized by three distinct groups of field components, the data are neither consistent with a smooth distribution of different field strengths, nor with one average field strength covering the full star. We find evidence of a subtle difference in the field distribution of GJ 285 compared to the other three targets. GJ 285 also has the highest average field of 3.5kG and the strongest maximum field component of 7-7.5kG. The maximum local field strengths in our sample...

  2. A Laboratory Modeling of the Velocity Field in the Convective Boundary Layer with the Particle Image Velocimetry Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李萍阳; 蒋维楣; 孙鉴泞; 袁仁民

    2003-01-01

    Based on the research of the convective boundary layer (CBL) temperature field in a convective tank, this paper studies the characteristics of the CBL velocity field in the convective tank. Aluminium powder (400 orders) is used as a tracer particle in the application of the particle image velocimetry (PIV)technique. The experiment demonstrates: the velocity distribution in the mixed layer clearly possesses the characteristics of CBL thermals; the velocity distribution in the top zone of the mixed layer shows entrainment layer characteristics; the vertical distribution of turbulent characteristic variables is reasonable,which is similar to field observations and other tank results; the error analysis demonstrates the validity of aluminium powder, which implies the reliability of the results.

  3. Effect of width, amplitude, and position of a core mantle boundary hot spot on core convection and dynamo action

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Wieland; Hori, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    Within the fluid iron cores of terrestrial planets, convection and the resulting generation of global magnetic fields are controlled by the overlying rocky mantle. The thermal structure of the lower mantle determines how much heat is allowed to escape the core. Hot lower mantle features, such as the thermal footprint of a giant impact or hot mantle plumes, will locally reduce the heat flux through the core mantle boundary (CMB), thereby weakening core convection and affecting the magnetic field generation process. In this study, we numerically investigate how parametrised hot spots at the CMB with arbitrary sizes, amplitudes, and positions affect core convection and hence the dynamo. The effect of the heat flux anomaly is quantified by changes in global flow symmetry properties, such as the emergence of equatorial antisymmetric, axisymmetric (EAA) zonal flows. For purely hydrodynamic models, the EAA symmetry scales almost linearly with the CMB amplitude and size, whereas self-consistent dynamo simulations typ...

  4. Influence of Variable Thermal Conductivity on MHD Boundary Layer Slip Flow of Ethylene-Glycol Based Cu Nanofluids over a Stretching Sheet with Convective Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bhaskar Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is carried out to investigate the influence of variable thermal conductivity and partial velocity slip on hydromagnetic two-dimensional boundary layer flow of a nanofluid with Cu nanoparticles over a stretching sheet with convective boundary condition. Using similarity transformation, the governing boundary layer equations along with the appropriate boundary conditions are transformed to a set of ordinary differential equations. Employing Runge-kutta fourth-order method along with shooting technique, the resultant system of equations is solved. The influence of various pertinent parameters such as nanofluid volume fraction parameter, the magnetic parameter, radiation parameter, thermal conductivity parameter, velocity slip parameter, Biot number, and suction or injection parameter on the velocity of the flow field and heat transfer characteristics is computed numerically and illustrated graphically. The present results are compared with the existing results for the case of regular fluid and found an excellent agreement.

  5. The Natural Convection Heat Transfer inside Vertical Pipe: Characteristic of Pipe Flow according to the Boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohk, Seung Min; Chung, Bum Jin [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The Passive Cooling System (PCS) driven by natural forces drew research attention since Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. This study investigated the natural convection heat transfer inside of vertical pipe with emphasis on the phenomena regarding the boundary layer interaction. Numerical calculations were carried out using FLUENT 6.3. Experiments were performed for the parts of the cases to explore the accuracy of calculation. Based on the analogy, heat transfer experiment is replaced by mass transfer experiment using sulfuric acid copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}. H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) electroplating system. The natural convection heat transfer inside a vertical pipe is studied experimentally and numerically. Experiments were carried out using sulfuric acid-copper sulfate (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-CuSO{sub 4}) based on the analogy concept between heat and mass transfer system. Numerical analysis was carried out using FLUENT 6.3. It is concluded that the boundary layer interaction along the flow passage influences the heat transfer, which is affected by the length, diameter, and Prandtl number. For the large diameter and high Prandtl number cases, where the thermal boundary layers do not interfered along the pipe, the heat transfer agreed with vertical flat plate for laminar and turbulent natural convection correlation within 8%. When the flow becomes steady state, the forced convective flow appears in the bottom of the vertical pipe and natural convection flow appears near the exit. It is different behavior from the flow on the parallel vertical flat plates. Nevertheless, the heat transfer was not different greatly compared with those of vertical plate.

  6. Improved treatments for general boundary conditions in the lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion and heat transfer processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Zhang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Junfeng

    2013-09-01

    In spite of the increasing applications of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) in simulating various flow and transport systems in recent years, complex boundary conditions for the convection-diffusion and heat transfer processes in LBM have not been well addressed. In this paper, we propose an improved bounce-back method by using the midpoint concentration value to modify the bounced-back density distribution for LBM simulations of the concentration field. An accurate finite-difference scheme in the normal boundary direction has also been introduced for gradient boundary conditions. Compared with existing boundary methods, our method has a simple algorithm and can easily deal with boundaries with general geometries, motions, and surface conditions (the Dirichlet, Neumann, and mixed conditions). Carefully designed simulations are performed to examine the capacity and accuracy of this proposed boundary method. Simulation results are compared with those from theory and a representative boundary method, and an improved performance is observed. We have also simulated the effect of reference velocity on global accuracy to examine the performance of our model in preserving the fundamental Galilean invariance. These boundary treatments for concentration boundary conditions can be readily applied to other processes such as heat transfer systems.

  7. Improved treatments for general boundary conditions in the lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion and heat transfer processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Zhang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Junfeng

    2013-09-01

    In spite of the increasing applications of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) in simulating various flow and transport systems in recent years, complex boundary conditions for the convection-diffusion and heat transfer processes in LBM have not been well addressed. In this paper, we propose an improved bounce-back method by using the midpoint concentration value to modify the bounced-back density distribution for LBM simulations of the concentration field. An accurate finite-difference scheme in the normal boundary direction has also been introduced for gradient boundary conditions. Compared with existing boundary methods, our method has a simple algorithm and can easily deal with boundaries with general geometries, motions, and surface conditions (the Dirichlet, Neumann, and mixed conditions). Carefully designed simulations are performed to examine the capacity and accuracy of this proposed boundary method. Simulation results are compared with those from theory and a representative boundary method, and an improved performance is observed. We have also simulated the effect of reference velocity on global accuracy to examine the performance of our model in preserving the fundamental Galilean invariance. These boundary treatments for concentration boundary conditions can be readily applied to other processes such as heat transfer systems.

  8. Spherical-shell boundaries for two-dimensional compressible convection in a star

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, J; Goffrey, T; Geroux, C; Viallet, M; Folini, D; Constantino, T; Popov, M; Walder, R

    2016-01-01

    Context: We study the impact of two-dimensional spherical shells on compressible convection. Realistic profiles for density and temperature from a one-dimensional stellar evolution code are used to produce a model of a large stellar convection zone representative of a young low-mass star. Methods: We perform hydrodynamic implicit large-eddy simulations of compressible convection using the MUltidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC). Because MUSIC has been designed to use realistic stellar models produced from one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, MUSIC simulations are capable of seamlessly modeling a whole star. Simulations in two-dimensional spherical shells that have different radial extents are performed over hundreds of convective turnover times, permitting the collection of well-converged statistics. Results: We evaluate basic statistics of the convective turnover time, the convective velocity, and the overshooting layer. These quantities are selected for their relevance to one-dimensional s...

  9. Double-diffusive natural convective boundary-layer flow of a nano-fluid past a vertical plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, A.V. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7910, Raleigh, NC 27695-7910 (United States); Nield, D.A. [Department of Engineering Science, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

    2011-05-15

    The double-diffusive natural convective boundary-layer flow of a nano-fluid past a vertical plate is studied analytically. The model used for the binary nano-fluid incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. In addition the thermal energy equations include regular diffusion and cross-diffusion terms. A similarity solution is presented. Numerical calculations were performed in order to obtain correlation formulas giving the reduced Nusselt number as a function of the various relevant parameters. (authors)

  10. MHD Flow of a Non-Newtonian Power Law Fluid over a Vertical Stretching Sheet with the Convective Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azeem SHAHZAD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we study the power law model of steady state, viscous, incompressible MHD flow over a vertically stretching sheet. Furthermore, heat transfer is also addressed by using the convective boundary conditions. The coupled partial differential equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations (ODEs using similarity transformations. The transformed highly non-linear ODEs are solved by using the Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM. The influence of different parameters on the velocity and temperature fields are analyzed and discussed.

  11. An LES study on the spatial variability impact of surface sensible heat flux (SHF) on the convective boundary layer (CBL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S. L.; Chun, J.; Kumar, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study the spatial variability impact of surface sensible heat flux (SHF) on the convective boundary layer (CBL), using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in large eddy simulation (LES) mode. In order to investigate the response of the CBL to multi-scale feature of the surface SHF field over a local area of several tens of kilometers or smaller, an analytic surface SHF map is crated as a function of the chosen feature. The spatial variation in the SHF map is prescribed with a two-dimensional analytical perturbation field, which is generated by using the inverse transform technique of the Fourier series whose coefficients are controlled, of which spectrum to have a particular slope in the chosen range of wavelength. Then, the CBL responses to various SHF heterogeneities are summarized as a function of the spectral slope, in terms of mean structure, turbulence statistics and cross-scale processes. The range of feasible SHF heterogeneities is obtained from the SHF maps produced by a land surface model (LSM) of the WRF system. The LSM-derived SHF maps are a function of geographical data on various resolutions. Based on the numerical experiment results with the surface heterogeneities in the range, we will discuss the uncertainty in the SHF heterogeneity and its impact on the atmosphere in a numerical model. Also we will present the range of spatial scale of the surface SHF heterogeneity that significantly influence on the whole CBL. Lastly, we will report the test result of the hypothesis that the spatial variability of SHF is more representative of surface thermal heterogeneity than is the latent heat flux over the local area of several tens of kilometers or smaller.

  12. The asteroseismic surface effect from a grid of 3D convection simulations - I. Frequency shifts from convective expansion of stellar atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trampedach, Regner; Aarslev, Magnus J.; Houdek, Günter

    2017-01-01

    We analyse the effect on adiabatic stellar oscillation frequencies of replacing the near-surface layers in 1D stellar structure models with averaged 3D stellar surface convection simulations. The main difference is an expansion of the atmosphere by 3D convection, expected to explain a major part...... of the asteroseismic surface effect; a systematic overestimation of p-mode frequencies due to inadequate surface physics. We employ pairs of 1D stellar envelope models and 3D simulations from a previous calibration of the mixing-length parameter, alpha. That calibration constitutes the hitherto most consistent...... matching of 1D models to 3D simulations, ensuring that their differences are not spurious, but entirely due to the 3D nature of convection. The resulting frequency shift is identified as the structural part of the surface effect. The important, typically non-adiabatic, modal components of the surface...

  13. The different influence of the residual layer on the development of the summer convective boundary layer in two deserts in northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhao; Bo, Han; Shihua, Lv; Lijuan, Wen; Xianhong, Meng; Zhaoguo, Li

    2016-12-01

    The development of the atmospheric boundary layer is closely connected with the exchange of momentum, heat, and mass near the Earth's surface, especially for a convective boundary layer (CBL). Besides being modulated by the buoyancy flux near the Earth's surface, some studies point out that a neutrally stratified residual layer is also crucial for the appearance of a deep CBL. To verify the importance of the residual layer, the CBLs over two deserts in northwest China (Badan Jaran and Taklimakan) were investigated. The summer CBL mean depth over the Taklimakan Desert is shallower than that over the Badan Jaran Desert, even when the sensible heat flux of the former is stronger. Meanwhile, the climatological mean residual layer in the Badan Jaran Desert is much deeper and neutrally stratified in summer. Moreover, we found a significant and negative correlation between the lapse rate of the residual layer and the CBL depth over the Badan Jaran Desert. The different lapse rates of the residual layer in the two regions are partly connected with the advection heating from large-scale atmospheric circulation. The advection heating tends to reduce the temperature difference in the 700 to 500-hPa layer over the Badan Jaran Desert, and it increases the stability in the same atmospheric layer over the Taklimakan Desert. The advection due to climatological mean atmospheric circulation is more effective at modulating the lapse rate of the residual layer than from varied circulation. Also, the interannual variation of planetary boundary layer (PBL) height over two deserts was found to covary with the wave train.

  14. Influence of atmospheric convection on the long and short-range transport of Xe133 emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta; Krysta, Monika; Gheddou, Abdelhakim; Nikkinen, Mika

    2014-05-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 79 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases supported by the atmospheric transport modelling (ATM). The ATM system is based on the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model, FLEXPART, designed for calculating the long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollution from point sources. In the operational configuration only the transport of the passive tracer is simulated. The question arises whether including other atmospheric processes, like convection, will improve results. To answer this question a series of forward simulations was conducted, assuming the maximum transport of 14 days. Each time 2 runs were performed: one with convection and one without convection. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. Due to the fact that CTBTO has recently received a noble gas emission inventory from the ANSTO facility we had a chance to do more accurate simulations. Studies have been performed to link Xe133 emissions with detections at the IMS stations supported by the ATM. The geographical localization to some extend justifies the assumption that the only source of Xe133 observed at the neighbouring stations, e.g. AUX04, AUX09 and NZX46, comes from the ANSTO facility. In simulations the analysed wind data provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used with the spatial resolution of 0.5 degree. The results of quantitative and qualitative comparison will be presented.

  15. Evaluation of the atmospheric transport in a GCM using radon measurements: sensitivity to cumulus convection parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zhang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The radioactive species radon (222Rn has long been used as a test tracer for the numerical simulation of large scale transport processes. In this study, radon transport experiments are carried out using an atmospheric GCM with a finite-difference dynamical core, the van Leer type FFSL advection algorithm, and two state-of-the-art cumulus convection parameterization schemes. Measurements of surface concentration and vertical distribution of radon collected from the literature are used as references in model evaluation.

    The simulated radon concentrations using both convection schemes turn out to be consistent with earlier studies with many other models. Comparison with measurements indicates that at the locations where significant seasonal variations are observed in reality, the model can reproduce both the monthly mean surface radon concentration and the annual cycle quite well. At those sites where the seasonal variation is not large, the model is able to give a correct magnitude of the annual mean. In East Asia, where radon simulations are rarely reported in the literature, detailed analysis shows that our results compare reasonably well with the observations.

    The most evident changes caused by the use of a different convection scheme are found in the vertical distribution of the tracer. The scheme associated with weaker upward transport gives higher radon concentration up to about 6 km above the surface, and lower values in higher altitudes. In the lower part of the atmosphere results from this scheme does not agree as well with the measurements as the other scheme. Differences from 6 km to the model top are even larger, although we are not yet able to tell which simulation is better due to the lack of observations at such high altitudes.

  16. Evaluation of the atmospheric transport in a GCM using radon measurements: sensitivity to cumulus convection parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zhang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The radioactive species radon (222Rn has long been used as a test tracer for the numerical simulation of large scale transport processes. In this study, radon transport experiments are carried out using an atmospheric GCM with a finite-difference dynamical core, the van Leer type FFSL advection algorithm and two state-of-the-art cumulus convection parameterization schemes. Measurements of surface concentration and vertical distribution of radon collected from literature are used as references in model evaluation.

    The simulated radon concentrations using both convection schemes turn out to be consistent with earlier studies with many other models. Comparison with measurements indicates that at the locations where significant seasonal variations are observed in reality, the model can reproduce both the monthly mean surface radon concentration and the annual cycle quite well. At those sites where the seasonal variation is not large, the model is able to give a correct magnitude of the annual mean. In East Asia, where radon simulations are rarely reported in literature, detailed analysis shows that our results compare reasonably well with the observations.

    The most evident changes caused by the use of a different convection scheme are found in the vertical distribution of the tracer. The scheme associated with a weaker upward transport gives higher radon concentration up to about 6 km above the surface, and lower values in higher altitudes. In the lower part of the atmosphere results from this scheme does not agree as well with the measurements as the other scheme. Differences from 6 km to the model top are even larger, although we are not yet able to tell which simulation is better due to the lack of observations at such high altitudes.

  17. Quadratic Convective Flow of a Micropolar Fluid along an Inclined Plate in a Non-Darcy Porous Medium with Convective Boundary Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    RamReddy, Ch.; Naveen, P.; Srinivasacharya, D.

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the effect of nonlinear variation of density with temperature and concentration on the mixed convective flow of a micropolar fluid over an inclined flat plate in a non-Darcy porous medium in the presence of the convective boundary condition. In order to analyze all the essential features, the governing non-dimensional partial differential equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations using a local non-similarity procedure and then the resulting boundary value problem is solved using a successive linearisation method (SLM). By insisting the comparison between vertical, horizontal and inclined plates, the physical quantities of the flow and its characteristics are exhibited graphically and quantitatively with various parameters. An increase in the micropolar parameter and non-Darcy parameter tend to increase the skin friction and the reverse change is observed in wall couple stress, mass and heat transfer rates. The influence of the nonlinear concentration parameter is more prominent on all the physical characteristics of the present model, compared with that of nonlinear temperature parameter.

  18. EVALUATION OF AN IMPROVED CONVECTION TRIGGERING MECHANISM IN THE NCAR COMMUNITY ATMOSPHERE MODEL CAM2 UNDER CAPT FRAMEWORK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, S; Boyle, J S; Cederwall, R T; Potter, G L; Zhang, M

    2003-10-15

    The problem that convection over land is overactive during warm-season daytime in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model CAM2 and its previous version (CCM3) has been found both in its single-column model (SCM) simulations (Xie and Zhang 2000; Ghan et al. 2000; Xie et al. 2002) and in its full general circulation model (GCM) short-range weather forecasts (Phillips et al. 2003) and climate simulations (Dai and Trenberth 2003). These studies showed that this problem is closely related to the convection triggering mechanism used in its deep convection scheme (Zhang and McFarlane 1995), which assumes that convection is triggered whenever there is positive convective available potential energy (CAPE). The positive CAPE triggering mechanism initiates model convection too often during the day because of the strong diurnal variations in the surface isolation and the induced CAPE diurnal change over land in the warm season. To reduce the problem, Xie and Zhang (2000) introduced a dynamic constraint, i.e., a dynamic CAPE generation rate (DCAPE) determined by the large-scale advective tendencies of temperature and moisture, to control the onset of deep convection. They showed that positive DCAPE is closely associated with convection in observations and the dynamic constraint could largely reduce the effect of the strong diurnal variations in the surface fluxes on the initiation of convection. Using the SCM version of CCM3, which has the same deep convection scheme as CAM2, Xie and Zhang (2000) showed that considerable improvements can be obtained in the model simulation of precipitation and other thermodynamic fields when the dynamic constraint was applied to the model triggering function. However, the performance of the improved convection triggering mechanism in the full GCM has not been tested. In this study, we will test the improved convection trigger mechanism in CAM2 under the U.S. Department of Energy's Climate Change

  19. CFD simulation of neutral ABL flows; Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaodong Zhang

    2009-04-15

    This work is to evaluate the CFD prediction of Atmospheric Boundary Layer flow field over different terrains employing Fluent 6.3 software. How accurate the simulation could achieve depend on following aspects: viscous model, wall functions, agreement of CFD model with inlet wind velocity profile and top boundary condition. Fluent employ wall function roughness modifications based on data from experiments with sand grain roughened pipes and channels, describe wall adjacent zone with Roughness Height (Ks) instead of Roughness Length (z{sub 0}). In a CFD simulation of ABL flow, the mean wind velocity profile is generally described with either a logarithmic equation by the presence of aerodynamic roughness length z{sub 0} or an exponential equation by the presence of exponent. As indicated by some former researchers, the disagreement between wall function model and ABL velocity profile description will result in some undesirable gradient along flow direction. There are some methods to improve the simulation model in literatures, some of them are discussed in this report, but none of those remedial methods are perfect to eliminate the streamwise gradients in mean wind speed and turbulence, as EllipSys3D could do. In this paper, a new near wall treatment function is designed, which, in some degree, can correct the horizontal gradients problem. Based on the corrected model constants and near wall treatment function, a simulation of Askervein Hill is carried out. The wind condition is neutrally stratified ABL and the measurements are best documented until now. Comparison with measured data shows that the CFD model can well predict the velocity field and relative turbulence kinetic energy field. Furthermore, a series of artificial complex terrains are designed, and some of the main simulation results are reported. (au)

  20. Momentum, heat, and neutral mass transport in convective atmospheric pressure plasma-liquid systems and implications for aqueous targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alexander; Anderson, Carly; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 μ m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results from this study include the presence of a 10 K temperature drop in the gas boundary layer adjacent to the interface that arises from convective cooling. Though the temperature magnitudes may vary among atmospheric discharge types (different amounts of plasma-gas heating), this relative difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures is expected to be present for any system in which convection is significant. Accounting for the resulting difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures has a significant impact on reaction kinetics; factor of two changes in terminal aqueous species concentrations like H2O2, NO2- , and NO3- are observed in this study if the effect of evaporative cooling is not included.

  1. An equilibrium model for the coupled ocean-atmosphere boundary layer in the tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Betts, Alan K.

    A coupled model is used to study the equilibrium state of the ocean-atmosphere boundary layer in the tropics. The atmospheric model is a one-dimensional thermodynamic model for a partially mixed, partly cloudy convective boundary layer (CBL), including the effects of cloud-top subsidence, surface momentum and heat (latent and sensible) fluxes, and realistic radiative transfer for both shortwaves and longwaves (Betts and Ridgway, 1988; 1989). The oceanic model is a thermodynamic model for a well-mixed layer, with a closure constraint based on a one-dimensional turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation following Kraus and Turner (1967). Results of several sets of experiments are reported in this paper. In the first two sets of experiments, with sea surface temperature (SST) specified, we solve the equilibrium state of the coupled system as a function of SST for a given surface wind (case 1) and as a function of surface wind for a given SST (case 2). In both cases the depth of the CBL and the ocean mixed layer (OML) increases and the upwelling below the OML decreases, corresponding to either increasing SST or increasing surface wind. The deepening of the equilibrium CBL is primarily linked to the increase of CBL moisture with increasing SST and surface wind. The increase of OML depth and decrease of upwelling are due to a decrease of net downward heat flux with increasing SST and the generation of TKE by increasing wind. In another two sets of experiments, we solve for the coupled ocean-atmosphere model iteratively as a function of surface wind for a fixed upwelling (case 3) and a fixed OML depth (case 4). SST falls with increasing wind in both cases, but the fall is steeper in case 4, because the OML depth is fixed, whereas in case 3 the depth is allowed to deepen and the cooling is spread over a larger mass of water. The decrease of evaporation with increasing wind in case 4 leads to a very dry and shallow CBL. Results of further experiments with surface wind and SST

  2. Radiation, Heat Generation and Viscous Dissipation Effects on MHD Boundary Layer Flow for the Blasius and Sakiadis Flows with a Convective Surface Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. GANGADHAR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is devoted to investigate the radiation, heat generation viscous dissipation and magnetohydrodynamic effects on the laminar boundary layer about a flat-plate in a uniform stream of fluid (Blasius flow, and about a moving plate in a quiescent ambient fluid (Sakiadis flow both under a convective surface boundary condition. Using a similarity variable, the governing nonlinear partial differential equations have been transformed into a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically by using shooting technique alongside with the forth order of Runge-Kutta method and the variations of dimensionless surface temperature and fluid-solid interface characteristics for different values of Magnetic field parameter M, Grashof number Gr, Prandtl number Pr, radiation parameter NR, Heat generation parameter Q, Convective parameter  and the Eckert number Ec, which characterizes our convection processes are graphed and tabulated. Quite different and interesting behaviors were encountered for Blasius flow compared with a Sakiadis flow. A comparison with previously published results on special cases of the problem shows excellent agreement.

  3. The role of convection, overshoot, and gravity waves for the transport of dust in M dwarf and brown dwarf atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Freytag, Bernd; Ludwig, Hans-Guenter; Homeier, Derek; Steffen, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Observationally, spectra of brown dwarfs indicate the presence of dust in their atmospheres while theoretically it is not clear what prevents the dust from settling and disappearing from the regions of spectrum formation. Consequently, standard models have to rely on ad hoc assumptions about the mechanism that keeps dust grains aloft in the atmosphere. We apply hydrodynamical simulations to develop an improved physical understanding of the mixing properties of macroscopic flows in M dwarf and brown dwarf atmospheres, in particular of the influence of the underlying convection zone. We performed 2D radiation hydrodynamics simulations including a description of dust grain formation and transport with the CO5BOLD code. The simulations cover the very top of the convection zone and the photosphere including the dust layers for effective temperatures between 900K and 2800K, all with logg=5 assuming solar chemical composition. Convective overshoot occurs in the form of exponentially declining velocities with small s...

  4. An {sup 3}He-DRIVEN INSTABILITY NEAR THE FULLY CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Saders, Jennifer L.; Pinsonneault, Marc H., E-mail: vansaders@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: pinsono@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    We report on the discovery of an instability in low-mass stars just above the threshold ({approx}0.35 M{sub Sun }) where they are expected to be fully convective on the main sequence (MS). Non-equilibrium {sup 3}He burning creates a convective core, which is separated from a deep convective envelope by a small radiative zone. The steady increase in central {sup 3}He causes the core to grow until it touches the surface convection zone, which triggers fully convective episodes in what we call the 'convective kissing instability'. These episodes lower the central abundance and cause the star to return to a state in which it has a separate convective core and envelope. These periodic events eventually cease when the {sup 3}He abundance throughout the star is sufficiently high that the star is fully convective, and remains so for the rest of its MS lifetime. The episodes correspond to few percent changes in radius and luminosity, over Myr to Gyr timescales. We discuss the physics of the instability, as well as prospects for detecting its signatures in open clusters and wide binaries. Secondary stars in cataclysmic variables (CVs) will pass through this mass range, and this instability could be related to the observed paucity of such systems for periods between two and three hours. We demonstrate that the instability can be generated for CV secondaries with mass-loss rates of interest for such systems and discuss potential implications.

  5. Retrieval of convective boundary layer wind field statistics from radar profiler measurements in conjunction with large eddy simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Scipión

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The daytime convective boundary layer (CBL is characterized by strong turbulence that is primarily forced by buoyancy transport from the heated underlying surface. The present study focuses on an example of flow structure of the CBL as observed in the U.S. Great Plains on June 8, 2007. The considered CBL flow has been reproduced using a numerical large eddy simulation (LES, sampled with an LES-based virtual boundary layer radar (BLR, and probed with an actual operational radar profiler. The LES-generated CBL flow data are then ingested by the virtual BLR and treated as a proxy for prevailing atmospheric conditions. The mean flow and turbulence parameters retrieved via each technique (actual radar profiler, virtual BLR, and LES have been cross-analyzed and reasonable agreement was found between the CBL wind parameters obtained from the LES and those measured by the actual radar. Averaged vertical velocity variance estimates from the virtual and actual BLRs were compared with estimates calculated from the LES for different periods of time. There is good agreement in the estimates from all three sources. Also, values of the vertical velocity skewness retrieved by all three techniques have been inter-compared as a function of height for different stages of the CBL evolution, showing fair agreement with each other. All three retrievals contain positively skewed vertical velocity structure throughout the main portion of the CBL. Radar estimates of the turbulence kinetic energy (eddy dissipation rate (ε have been obtained based on the Doppler spectral width of the returned signal for the vertical radar beam. The radar estimates were averaged over time in the same fashion as the LES output data. The agreement between estimates was generally good, especially within the mixing layer. Discrepancies observed above the inversion layer may be explained by a weak turbulence signal in particular flow configurations. The virtual BLR produces voltage

  6. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  7. Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-05-20

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than ±10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  8. a New Stochastic Model of Turbulent Dispersion in the Convective Planetary Boundary Layer and the Results of the ATTERBURY-87 Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljegren, James Christian

    The development and validation of a new stochastic model for predicting the dispersion of a passive tracer in the convective boundary layer are presented. The methods and procedures employed and the results obtained from the Atterbury-87 field study of the dispersion of fog-oil smoke and hexachloroethane (HC) smoke are also described. The stochastic model represents a substantial improvement over previous modelling approaches in that it provides a more realistic treatment of the atmospheric turbulence, especially for the large-scale convective motions occurring in the daytime planetary boundary layer which are largely responsible for driving the dispersion process. Using the Langevin equation to model the Lagrangian velocities, the dispersion of a large number of passive tracer particles is computationally simulated. The shape of the resulting probability density function closely matches observations. The behavior of the autocorrelation of the modelled Lagrangian velocities also matches the non-exponential form computed from balloon-borne measurements by using the local integral time scale of the turbulence. The model was verified against data gathered from laboratory simulations of the boundary layer carried out in water tanks and wind tunnels as well as from actual field measurements. The predictions of the stochastic model were in agreement with the trends and magnitudes observed in the data, including the lift-off of the plume centerline from the ground due to the influence of the rising thermal updrafts. Comparisons of crosswind-integrated concentration and plume spread computed from the test data with the results of previous field studies of atmospheric dispersion indicated strong agreement. These comparisons revealed that the centerline of the smoke plume rose as the plume moved downwind due to the effects of thermal convection. Comparison of concentration data with the predictions of the stochastic model also showed good agreement and confirmed that the

  9. Representation of tropical deep convection in atmospheric models – Part 2: Tracer transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hoyle

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The tropical transport processes of 14 different models or model versions were compared, within the framework of the SCOUT-O3 (Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere project. The tested models range from the regional to the global scale, and include numerical weather prediction (NWP, chemical transport, and chemistry-climate models. Idealised tracers were used in order to prevent the model's chemistry schemes from influencing the results substantially, so that the effects of modelled transport could be isolated. We find large differences in the vertical transport of very short-lived tracers (with a lifetime of 6 h within the tropical troposphere. Peak convective outflow altitudes range from around 300 hPa to almost 100 hPa among the different models, and the upper tropospheric tracer mixing ratios differ by up to an order of magnitude. The timing of convective events is found to be different between the models, even among those which source their forcing data from the same NWP model (ECMWF. The differences are less pronounced for longer lived tracers, however they could have implications for modelling the halogen burden of the lowermost stratosphere through transport of species such as bromoform, or short-lived hydrocarbons into the lowermost stratosphere. The modelled tracer profiles are strongly influenced by the convective transport parameterisations, and different boundary layer mixing parameterisations also have a large impact on the modelled tracer profiles. Preferential locations for rapid transport from the surface into the upper troposphere are similar in all models, and are mostly concentrated over the western Pacific, the Maritime Continent and the Indian Ocean. In contrast, models do not indicate that upward transport is highest over western Africa.

  10. Application of an Immersed Boundary Treatment in Simulation of Natural Convection Problems with Complex Geometry via the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Khazaeli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a version of thermal immersed boundary-Lattice Boltzmann method (TIB-LBM is used to simulate thermal flow problems within complex geometries. The present approach is a combination of the immersed boundary method (IBM and the thermal lattice Boltzmann method (TLBM under the double population approach. The method combines two different grid systems, an Eulerian grid for the flow domain and a Lagrangian grid for the boundary points immersed in the flow. In the present method, an unknown velocity correction is considered on the boundary points to impose the no-slip boundary condition. As a similar approach, an unknown internal energy correction on the boundary points is applied to satisfy the constant temperature boundary condition. The advantages of this approach are its second-order accuracy and straightforward calculation of the Nusselt number. The natural convection in an annulus with various outer cylinder shapes for different Rayleigh numbers have been simulated to demonstrate the capability and the accuracy of present approach. In terms of accuracy, the predicted results show an excellent agreement with those predicted by other experimental and numerical approaches.

  11. The Impacts of Microphysics and Planetary Boundary Layer Physics on Model Simulations of U.S. Deep South Summer Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaul, Eugene W., Jr.; Case, Jonathan L.; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Medlin, Jeffrey; Wood, Lance

    2014-01-01

    Convection-allowing numerical weather simula- tions have often been shown to produce convective storms that have significant sensitivity to choices of model physical parameterizations. Among the most important of these sensitivities are those related to cloud microphysics, but planetary boundary layer parameterizations also have a significant impact on the evolution of the convection. Aspects of the simulated convection that display sensitivity to these physics schemes include updraft size and intensity, simulated radar reflectivity, timing and placement of storm initi- ation and decay, total storm rainfall, and other storm features derived from storm structure and hydrometeor fields, such as predicted lightning flash rates. In addition to the basic parameters listed above, the simulated storms may also exhibit sensitivity to im- posed initial conditions, such as the fields of soil temper- ature and moisture, vegetation cover and health, and sea and lake water surface temperatures. Some of these sensitivities may rival those of the basic physics sensi- tivities mentioned earlier. These sensitivities have the potential to disrupt the accuracy of short-term forecast simulations of convective storms, and thereby pose sig- nificant difficulties for weather forecasters. To make a systematic study of the quantitative impacts of each of these sensitivities, a matrix of simulations has been performed using all combinations of eight separate microphysics schemes, three boundary layer schemes, and two sets of initial conditions. The first version of initial conditions consists of the default data from large-scale operational model fields, while the second features specialized higher- resolution soil conditions, vegetation conditions and water surface temperatures derived from datasets created at NASA's Short-term Prediction and Operational Research Tran- sition (SPoRT) Center at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) in Huntsville, AL. Simulations as

  12. Atmospheric and Oceanic Response to Southern Ocean Deep Convection Oscillations on Decadal to Centennial Time Scales in Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T.; Reintges, A.; Park, W.; Latif, M.

    2014-12-01

    Many current coupled global climate models simulate open ocean deep convection in the Southern Ocean as a recurring event with time scales ranging from a few years to centennial (de Lavergne et al., 2014, Nat. Clim. Ch.). The only observation of such event, however, was the occurrence of the Weddell Polynya in the mid-1970s, an open water area of 350 000 km2 within the Antarctic sea ice in three consecutive winters. Both the wide range of modeled frequency of occurrence and the absence of deep convection in the Weddell Sea highlights the lack of understanding concerning the phenomenon. Nevertheless, simulations indicate that atmospheric and oceanic responses to the cessation of deep convection in the Southern Ocean include a strengthening of the low-level atmospheric circulation over the Southern Ocean (increasing SAM index) and a reduction in the export of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), potentially masking the regional effects of global warming (Latif et al., 2013, J. Clim.; Martin et al., 2014, Deep Sea Res. II). It is thus of great importance to enhance our understanding of Southern Ocean deep convection and clarify the associated time scales. In two multi-millennial simulations with the Kiel Climate Model (KCM, ECHAM5 T31 atmosphere & NEMO-LIM2 ~2˚ ocean) we showed that the deep convection is driven by strong oceanic warming at mid-depth periodically overriding the stabilizing effects of precipitation and ice melt (Martin et al., 2013, Clim. Dyn.). Sea ice thickness also affects location and duration of the deep convection. A new control simulation, in which, amongst others, the atmosphere grid resolution is changed to T42 (~2.8˚), yields a faster deep convection flip-flop with a period of 80-100 years and a weaker but still significant global climate response similar to CMIP5 simulations. While model physics seem to affect the time scale and intensity of the phenomenon, the driving mechanism is a rather robust feature. Finally, we compare the atmospheric and

  13. Reduced-order FSI simulation of NREL 5 MW wind turbine in atmospheric boundary layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta-Mena, Javier; Campbell, Robert; Lavely, Adam; Jha, Pankaj

    2015-11-01

    A partitioned fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver based on an actuator-line method solver and a finite-element modal-dynamic structural solver is used to evaluate the effect of blade deformation in the presence of a day-time, moderately convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The solver components were validated separately and the integrated solver was partially validated against FAST. An overview of the solver is provided in addition to results of the validation study. A finite element model of the NREL 5 MW rotor was developed for use in the present simulations. The effect of blade pitching moment and the inherent bend/twist coupling of the rotor blades are assessed for both uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases. The results suggest that blade twisting in response to pitching moment and the bend/twist coupling can have a significant impact on rotor out-of-plane bending moment and power generated for both the uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases.

  14. ANALYTICAL AND NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF MHD BOUNDARY-LAYER FLOW OF AN INCOMPRESSIBLE UPPER-CONVECTED MAXWELLFLUID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. RAHIMI EOSBOEE,

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study magnetohydrodynamics (MHD boundary layer flow of an upper-convected Maxwell fluid has been investigated. Similarity transformation has been used to reduce the governing differential equations into an ordinary non-linear differential equation. homotopy perturbation Method (HPM has applied to solve this developed nonlinear equation. In this article firstly, the basic idea of the HPM for solving nonlinear differential equations is briefly ntroduced and then it is employed to derive solution of nonlinear governing equation of MHD boundary layer flow with highly nonlinear term. The obtained results from HPM have been compared with numerical Boundary Value problem Method (BVP to verify the accuracy of the proposed method. The effects of the Hartman number (M and Deborah number (β for various conditions have been shown through graphs.

  15. Effects of Thermal Radiation and Chemical Reaction on MHD Free Convection Flow past a Flat Plate with Heat Source and Convective Surface Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Hemalatha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the radiation and chemical reaction effects on MHD steady two-dimensional laminar viscous incompressible radiating boundary layer flow over a flat plate in the presence of internal heat generation and convective boundary condition. It is assumed that lower surface of the plate is in contact with a hot fluid while a stream of cold fluid flows steadily over the upper surface with a heat source that decays exponentially. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe radiative heat transfer as we consider optically thick fluids. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations, which are then solved numerically by employing fourth order Runge-Kutta method along with shooting technique. The effects of various material parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration as well as the skin friction coefficient, the Nusselt number, the Sherwood number and the plate surface temperature are illustrated and interpreted in physical terms. A comparison of present results with previously published results shows an excellent agreement.

  16. Exploring the magnetic field complexity in M dwarfs at the boundary to full convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulyak, D.; Reiners, A.; Seemann, U.; Kochukhov, O.; Piskunov, N.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Magnetic fields play a pivotal role in the formation and evolution of low-mass stars, but the dynamo mechanisms generating these fields are poorly understood. Measuring cool star magnetism is a complicated task because of the complexity of cool star spectra and the subtle signatures of magnetic fields. Aims: Based on detailed spectral synthesis, we carry out quantitative measurements of the strength and complexity of surface magnetic fields in the four well-known M dwarfs GJ 388, GJ 729, GJ 285, and GJ 406 that populate the mass regime around the boundary between partially and fully convective stars. Very high-resolution (R = 100 000), high signal-to-noise (up to 400), near-infrared Stokes I spectra were obtained with CRIRES at ESO's Very Large Telescope covering regions of the FeH Wing-Ford transitions at 1μm and Na i lines at 2.2μm. Methods: A modified version of the Molecular Zeeman Library (MZL) was used to compute Landé g-factors for FeH lines. We determined the distribution of magnetic fields by magnetic spectral synthesis performed with the Synmast code. We tested two different magnetic geometries to probe the influence of field orientation effects. Results: Our analysis confirms that FeH lines are excellent indicators of surface magnetic fields in low-mass stars of type M, particularly in comparison to profiles of Na i lines that are heavily affected by water lines and that suffer problems with continuum normalization. The field distributions in all four stars are characterized by three distinct groups of field components, and the data are consistent neither with a smooth distribution of different field strengths nor with one average field strength covering the full star. We find evidence of a subtle difference in the field distribution of GJ 285 compared to the other three targets. GJ 285 also has the highest average field of 3.5 kG and the strongest maximum field component of 7-7.5 kG. The maximum local field strengths in our sample seem to be

  17. Estimating precipitation on early Mars using a radiative-convective model of the atmosphere and comparison with inferred runoff from geomorphology

    CERN Document Server

    von Paris, P; Grenfell, J L; Hauber, E; Breuer, D; Jaumann, R; Rauer, H; Tirsch, D

    2014-01-01

    We compare estimates of atmospheric precipitation during the Martian Noachian-Hesperian boundary 3.8 Gyr ago as calculated in a radiative-convective column model of the atmosphere with runoff values estimated from a geomorphological analysis of dendritic valley network discharge rates. In the atmospheric model, we assume CO2-H2O-N2 atmospheres with surface pressures varying from 20 mb to 3 bar with input solar luminosity reduced to 75% the modern value. Results from the valley network analysis are of the order of a few mm d-1 liquid water precipitation (1.5-10.6 mm d-1, with a median of 3.1 mm d-1). Atmospheric model results are much lower, from about 0.001-1 mm d-1 of snowfall (depending on CO2 partial pressure). Hence, the atmospheric model predicts a significantly lower amount of precipitated water than estimated from the geomorphological analysis. Furthermore, global mean surface temperatures are below freezing, i.e. runoff is most likely not directly linked to precipitation. Therefore, our results strong...

  18. Outer scale and Monin-Obukhov flux relationships of atmospheric turbulence under dry convective conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruin, Henk; Hartogensis, Oscar

    2015-04-01

    In this study we will investigate the assumption that in the atmospheric surface layer the outer scale (L0) is proportional to the height above the surface, under dry convective conditions. For this purpose we analyzed raw sonic anemometers data collected at 3.5 m and at 9 m in a field campaign at the Santa Cruz Flats (32040.3190'N, 111032.641'W, 526 m of elevation) near Eloy, Arizona. For simplicity, we define the L0 as that separation distance at which the spatial correlation coefficient of air temperature at two points in the surface layer is 0.5. Then, according to the 2/3-Kolmogorov scaling law in the inertial sub-range, L0 is determined by the variance and the structure parameter of T . It is found that L0 does not scale with height. Possible reasons for this negative result will be discussed, by considering the methodology to determine structure parameters, Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, effects of intermittency and Monin-Obukhov flux relationships for variance and structure parameter for T . The question is asked whether the concept of surface constant flux layer still holds under strong convective condition.

  19. Implicit temperature-correction-based immersed-boundary thermal lattice Boltzmann method for the simulation of natural convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seta, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    In the present paper, we apply the implicit-correction method to the immersed-boundary thermal lattice Boltzmann method (IB-TLBM) for the natural convection between two concentric horizontal cylinders and in a square enclosure containing a circular cylinder. The Chapman-Enskog multiscale expansion proves the existence of an extra term in the temperature equation from the source term of the kinetic equation. In order to eliminate the extra term, we redefine the temperature and the source term in the lattice Boltzmann equation. When the relaxation time is less than unity, the new definition of the temperature and source term enhances the accuracy of the thermal lattice Boltzmann method. The implicit-correction method is required in order to calculate the thermal interaction between a fluid and a rigid solid using the redefined temperature. Simulation of the heat conduction between two concentric cylinders indicates that the error at each boundary point of the proposed IB-TLBM is reduced by the increment of the number of Lagrangian points constituting the boundaries. We derive the theoretical relation between a temperature slip at the boundary and the relaxation time and demonstrate that the IB-TLBM requires a small relaxation time in order to avoid temperature distortion around the immersed boundary. The streamline, isotherms, and average Nusselt number calculated by the proposed method agree well with those of previous numerical studies involving natural convection. The proposed IB-TLBM improves the accuracy of the boundary conditions for the temperature and velocity using an adequate discrete area for each of the Lagrangian nodes and reduces the penetration of the streamline on the surface of the body.

  20. Similarity and analytical solutions of free convective flow of dilatant nanofluid in a Darcian porous medium with multiple convective boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Uddin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with an analytical solution of free convective flow of dilatant nanofluid past a vertical cone/plate. A two-phase mixture model is used for nanofluid in which the Brownian motion and thermophoretic diffusivities are the important slip mechanisms between solid and liquid phases. The governing transport equations along with physically realistic thermal and mass convective boundary conditions are reduced to similarity equations using relevant similarity transformations before being solved by homotopy analysis method. The effects of the governing parameters (Brownian motion, thermophoresis, convection–conduction, convection–diffusion, Lewis number, buoyancy ratio, and power-law on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction, friction and heat transfer rates are plotted and discussed. It is found that friction factor decreases with the increase in Le and Nr for both vertical plate and cone. The local Nusselt number decreases with the increase in the thermophoresis and Brownian motion parameters for both the plate and cone. The local Sherwood number increases with the Brownian motion parameter and decreases for thermophoresis parameter. The results have been compared with the published ones and an excellent agreement has been noticed.

  1. Mixed convection boundary layer flow past vertical flat plate in nanofluid:case of prescribed wall heat flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. TRˆIMBIT¸AS¸; T.GROSAN; I.POP

    2015-01-01

    An analysis is carried out to investigate the steady mixed convection bound-ary layer flow of a water based nanofluid past a vertical semi-infinite flat plate. Using an appropriate similarity transformation, the governing partial differential equations are transformed into the coupled, nonlinear ordinary (similar) differential equations, which are then solved numerically for the Prandtl number Pr = 6.2. The skin friction coeffi-cient, the local Nusselt number, and the velocity and temperature profiles are presented graphically and discussed. Effects of the solid volume fractionφand the mixed convection parameterλon the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics are thoroughly examined. Different from an assisting flow, it is found that the solutions for an opposing flow are non-unique. In order to establish which solution branch is stable and physically realizable in practice, a stability analysis is performed.

  2. Mixed convective boundary layer flow over a vertical wedge embedded in a porous medium saturated with a nanofluid: Natural Convection Dominated Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamkha Ali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A boundary layer analysis is presented for the mixed convection past a vertical wedge in a porous medium saturated with a nano fluid. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of non-similar equations and solved numerically by an efficient, implicit, iterative, finite-difference method. A parametric study illustrating the influence of various physical parameters is performed. Numerical results for the velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles volume fraction profiles, as well as the friction factor, surface heat and mass transfer rates have been presented for parametric variations of the buoyancy ratio parameter Nr, Brownian motion parameter Nb, thermophoresis parameter Nt, and Lewis number Le. The dependency of the friction factor, surface heat transfer rate (Nusselt number, and mass transfer rate (Sherwood number on these parameters has been discussed.

  3. Interactions of the land-surface with the atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ek, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    We study daytime land-atmosphere interaction using a one-dimensional (column) coupled land-surface - atmospheric boundary-Iayer (ABL) model and data sets gathered at Cabauw (1978, central Netherlands) and during the Hydrological and Atmospheric Pilot Experiment - Modélisation du Bilan Hydrique (HAPE

  4. The diurnal evolution of ²²²Rn and its progeny in the atmospheric boundary layer during the Wangara experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Galmarini

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal atmospheric boundary layer evolution of the 222Rn decaying family is studied using a state-of-the-art large-eddy simulation model. In particular, a diurnal cycle observed during the Wangara experiment is successfully simulated together with the effect of diurnal varying turbulent characteristics on radioactive compounds initially in a secular equilibrium. This study allows us to clearly analyze and identify the boundary layer processes driving the behaviour of 222Rn and its progeny concentrations. An activity disequilibrium is observed in the nocturnal boundary layer due to the proximity of the radon source and the trapping of fresh 222Rn close to the surface induced by the weak vertical transport. During the morning transition, the secular equilibrium is fast restored by the vigorous turbulent mixing. The evolution of 222Rn and its progeny concentrations in the unsteady growing convective boundary layer depends on the strength of entrainment events.

  5. Two-Dimensional Analytical Solution of the Laminar Forced Convection in a Circular Duct with Periodic Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Astaraki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study analytical solution for forced convection heat transfer in a circular duct with a special boundary condition has been presented, because the external wall temperature is a periodic function of axial direction. Local energy balance equation is written with reference to the fully developed regime. Also governing equations are two-dimensionally solved, and the effect of duct wall thickness has been considered. The temperature distribution of fluid and solid phases is assumed as a periodic function of axial direction and finally temperature distribution in the flow field, solid wall, and local Nusselt number, is obtained analytically.

  6. Radiation effects on MHD stagnation point flow of nano fluid towards a stretching surface with convective boundary condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noreen Sher Akbar; S. Nadeem; Rizwan Ul Haq; Z.H. Khan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to study the numerical solutions of the steady MHD two dimensional stagnation point flow of an incompressible nano fluid towards a stretching cylinder. The effects of radiation and convective boundary condition are also taken into account. The model used for the nanofluid incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The result-ing nonlinear momentum, energy and nano particle equations are simplified using similarity trans-formations. Numerical solutions have been obtained for the velocity, temperature and nanoparticle fraction profiles. The influence of physical parameters on the velocity, temperature, nanoparticle fraction, rates of heat transfer and nanoparticle fraction are shown graphically.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Soil and Atmospheric Conditions on the Momentum, Mass, and Thermal Boundary Layers Above the Land Atmosphere Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautz, A.; Smits, K. M.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Schulte, P.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impacts of soil conditions (i.e. soil type, saturation) and atmospheric forcings (i.e. velocity, temperature, relative humidity) on the momentum, mass, and temperature boundary layers. The atmospheric conditions tested represent those typically found in semi-arid and arid climates and the soil conditions simulate the three stages of evaporation. The data generated will help identify the importance of different soil conditions and atmospheric forcings with respect to land-atmospheric interactions which will have direct implications on future numerical studies investigating the effects of turbulent air flow on evaporation. The experimental datasets generated for this study were performed using a unique climate controlled closed-circuit wind tunnel/porous media facility located at the Center for Experimental Study of Subsurface Environmental Processes (CESEP) at the Colorado School of Mines. The test apparatus consisting of a 7.3 m long porous media tank and wind tunnel, were outfitted with a sensor network to carefully measure wind velocity, air and soil temperature, relative humidity, soil moisture, and soil air pressure. Boundary layer measurements were made between the heights of 2 and 500 mm above the soil tank under constant conditions (i.e. wind velocity, temperature, relative humidity). The soil conditions (e.g. soil type, soil moisture) were varied between datasets to analyze their impact on the boundary layers. Experimental results show that the momentum boundary layer is very sensitive to the applied atmospheric conditions and soil conditions to a much less extent. Increases in velocity above porous media leads to momentum boundary layer thinning and closely reflect classical flat plate theory. The mass and thermal boundary layers are directly dependent on both atmospheric and soil conditions. Air pressure within the soil is independent of atmospheric temperature and relative humidity - wind velocity and soil

  8. Simultaneous profiling of the Arctic Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, S.; Jonassen, M.; Reuder, J.

    2009-09-01

    The structure of the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer (AABL) and the heat and moisture fluxes between relatively warm water and cold air above non-sea-ice-covered water (such as fjords, leads and polynyas) are of great importance for the sensitive Arctic climate system (e.g. Andreas and Cash, 1999). So far, such processes are not sufficiently resolved in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models (e.g. Tjernström et al., 2005). Especially for regions with complex topography as the Svalbard mountains and fjords the state and diurnal evolution of the AABL is not well known yet. Knowledge can be gained by novel and flexible measurement techniques such as the use of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). An UAV can perform vertical profiles as well as horizontal surveys of the mean meteorological parameters: temperature, relative humidity, pressure and wind. A corresponding UAV, called Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (SUMO), has been developed at the Geophysical Institute at the University of Bergen in cooperation with Müller Engineering (www.pfump.org) and the Paparazzi Project (http://paparazzi.enac.fr). SUMO has been used under Arctic conditions at Longyear airport, Spitsbergen in March/April 2009. Besides vertical profiles up to 1500 m and horizontal surveys at flight levels of 100 and 200 m, SUMO could measure vertical profiles for the first time simultaneously in a horizontal distance of 1 km; one over the ice and snow-covered land surface and the other one above the open water of Isfjorden. This has been the first step of future multiple UAV operations in so called "swarms” or "flocks”. With this, corresponding measurements of the diurnal evolution of the AABL can be achieved with minimum technical efforts and costs. In addition, the Advanced Research Weather Forecasting model (AR-WRF version 3.1) has been run in high resolution (grid size: 1 km). First results of a sensitivity study where ABL schemes have been tested and compared with

  9. Effect of the Diurnal Variation of the Convective Boundary Layer Height over Metro Manila on Pollutant Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genelita Tubal

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Air pollutants are dispersed throughout a very thin layer of the atmosphere called the boundary layer (BL, and concentrations would be influenced by the thickness of the BL. A monostatic, biaxial, vertically-pointing Mie Scattering 532 nm Nd: YAG lidar was used to observe the development of the daytime BL over Metro Manila in May 1999. The data profiles were background-subtracted, energy-normalized, and range-corrected; 20,000 profiles (30-32 minute period files were arranged in arrays in time sequential order. A MatLab program with color enhancement capability was developed to display the range-time indicator (RTI image to visualize the BL.The convective BL height developed with a general pattern; it increased gradually in the early morning, rapidly from mid-morning until noontime, then slowly reaching its maximum height in the early afternoon. (The Maximum height reached by the BL from 1-4 May 1999 was 1635 m. BL height is maintained or lowered very slowly from mid-afternoon until sunset.The BL grew higher when the surface temperature and solar radiation received was greater. Fair-weather active clouds inhibited the growth of the BL. When the relative humidity was higher, the base of the fair-weather cloud field was lower; therefore, the mean BL height was also lower. Prolonged sea breeze modified the convective BL by creating a much lower BL that when there was no sea breeze.Around 75% of the total suspended particulates (TSP in Metro Manila comes from traffic emissions. Traffic volume over most part of Metro Manila including the main thoroughfares near the lidar site, peaks at around 09:00 Local Standard Time (LST and between17:00 – 18:00 LST, although traffic volume is lower than at 09:00 LST. The traffic volume reduces to 80% from its morning peak at around noontime. The morning peak of the pollution concentration occurred earlier that that of the traffic. This could be due to the fact that the BL before 09:00 LST was much lower than

  10. Vertically bounded double diffusive convection in the fingering regime: comparing no-slip vs free-slip boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yantao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Vertically bounded fingering double diffusive convection (DDC) is numerically investigated, focusing on the influences of different velocity boundary conditions, i.e. the no-slip condition which is inevitable in the lab-scale experimental research, and the free-slip condition which is an approximation for the interfaces in many natural environments, such as the oceans. For both boundary conditions the flow is dominated by fingers and the global responses follow the same scaling laws, with enhanced prefactors for the free-slip cases. Therefore, the laboratory experiments with the no-slip boundaries serve as a good model for the finger layers in the ocean. Moreover, in the free-slip case although the tangential shear stress is eliminated at the boundaries, the local dissipation rate in the near-wall region may exceed the value found in the no-slip cases, which is caused by the stronger vertical motions of fingers and sheet structures near the free-slip boundaries. This counter intuitive result might be relevant...

  11. MHD Stagnation-Point Flow of a Carreau Fluid and Heat Transfer in the Presence of Convective Boundary Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Khan

    Full Text Available In the present investigation we analyze the impact of magnetic field on the stagnation-point flow of a generalized Newtonian Carreau fluid. The convective surface boundary conditions are considered to investigate the thermal boundary layer. The leading partial differential equations of the current problem are altered to a set of ordinary differential equations by picking local similarity transformations. The developed non-linear ordinary differential equations are then numerically integrated via Runge-Kutta Fehlberg method after changing into initial value problems. This investigation explores that the momentum and thermal boundary layers are significantly influenced by various pertinent parameters like the Hartmann number M, velocity shear ratio parameter α, Weissenberg number We, power law index n, Biot number γ and Prandtl number Pr. The analysis further reveals that the fluid velocity as well as the skin friction is raised by the velocity shear ratio parameter. Moreover, strong values of the Hartmann number correspond to thinning of the momentum boundary layer thickness while quite the opposite is true for the thermal boundary layer thickness. Additionally, it is seen that the numerical computations are in splendid consent with previously reported studies.

  12. MHD Stagnation-Point Flow of a Carreau Fluid and Heat Transfer in the Presence of Convective Boundary Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Masood; Hashim; Alshomrani, Ali Saleh

    2016-01-01

    In the present investigation we analyze the impact of magnetic field on the stagnation-point flow of a generalized Newtonian Carreau fluid. The convective surface boundary conditions are considered to investigate the thermal boundary layer. The leading partial differential equations of the current problem are altered to a set of ordinary differential equations by picking local similarity transformations. The developed non-linear ordinary differential equations are then numerically integrated via Runge-Kutta Fehlberg method after changing into initial value problems. This investigation explores that the momentum and thermal boundary layers are significantly influenced by various pertinent parameters like the Hartmann number M, velocity shear ratio parameter α, Weissenberg number We, power law index n, Biot number γ and Prandtl number Pr. The analysis further reveals that the fluid velocity as well as the skin friction is raised by the velocity shear ratio parameter. Moreover, strong values of the Hartmann number correspond to thinning of the momentum boundary layer thickness while quite the opposite is true for the thermal boundary layer thickness. Additionally, it is seen that the numerical computations are in splendid consent with previously reported studies.

  13. Improving Convection and Cloud Parameterization Using ARM Observations and NCAR Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang J. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-11-07

    The fundamental scientific objectives of our research are to use ARM observations and the NCAR CAM5 to understand the large-scale control on convection, and to develop improved convection and cloud parameterizations for use in GCMs.

  14. Observing Convective Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-06-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  15. The transient behavior of scaling in the atmosphere: stratiform/convective transition and applications to sub-grid scale statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, M.; Barros, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Multifractal behavior holds to a remarkable approximation over wide ranges of spatial scales in orographic rainfall and cloud fields. The scaling exponents characterizing this behavior are shown to be fundamentally transient with nonlinear dependencies on the particular atmospheric state and terrain forcing. In particular, a robust transition is found in the scaling parameters between non-convective (stable) and convective (unstable) regimes, with clear physical correspondence to the transition from stratiform to organized convective orographic precipitation. These results can explain two often reported scaling regimes for atmospheric wind, temperature and water observations. On the one hand, spectral slopes around 2-2.3 arise under non-convective or very weak convective conditions when the spatial patterns are dominated by large-scale gradients and landform. On the other hand, under convective conditions the scaling exponents generally fluctuate around 5/3, in agreement with the Kolmogorov turbulent regime accounting for the intermittency correction. High-resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are able to reproduce the ubiquitous scaling behavior of observed atmospheric fields down to their effective resolution length-scale, below which the variability is misrepresented by the model. The effective resolution is shown to be a transient property dependent on the particular simulated conditions and NWP formulation, implying that a blunt decrease in grid spacing without adjusting numerical techniques may not lead to the improvements desired.Finally, the application of transient spatial scaling behavior for stochastic downscaling and sub-grid scale parameterization of cloud and rainfall fields is investigated. The proposed fractal methods are able to rapidly generate large ensembles of high-resolution statistically robust fields from the coarse resolution information alone, which can provide significant improvements for stochastic hydrological prediction

  16. Effects of Explicit Convection on Land-Atmosphere Coupling in GLACE-Type Experiments Using the SuperParameterized CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, H.; Pritchard, M. S.; Parishani, H.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding and realistically simulating the coupling between land and atmosphere in global climate models (GCMs) is an ongoing research frontier. We explore the hypothesis that past attempts to investigate these physics using GCM mechanism denial experiments may have suffered systematic limitations stemming from an overly strong sensitivity of deep convection parameterizations to surface conditions. Taking the philosophy of the Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE), we therefore compare the effects of breaking the soil-atmosphere feedback mechanism in the Super-Parameterized Community Atmosphere Model version 3.5 (SPCAM3.5) - which uses O(10k) embedded cloud resolving models to explicitly resolve moist convection - against the conventionally parameterized CAM3.5. This helps isolate the influence of explicit convection on land-atmosphere coupling. We find that soil moisture - precipitation coupling strength is reduced over northern Africa, northern South America and Arabian Peninsula due to superparameterization. Several geographically distinct coupling "hotspots" emerge in SPCAM3.5 located upstream of major topographic features in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes.

  17. Significant Atmospheric Boundary Layer Change Observed above an Agulhas Current Warm Cored Eddy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Messager

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The air-sea impact of a warm cored eddy ejected from the Agulhas Retroflection region south of Africa was assessed through both ocean and atmospheric profiling measurements during the austral summer. The presence of the eddy causes dramatic atmospheric boundary layer deepening, exceeding what was measured previously over such a feature in the region. This deepening seems mainly due to the turbulent heat flux anomaly above the warm eddy inducing extensive deep and persistent changes in the atmospheric boundary layer thermodynamics. The loss of heat by turbulent processes suggests that this kind of oceanic feature is an important and persistent source of heat for the atmosphere.

  18. National Convective Weather Diagnostic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current convective hazards identified by the National Convective Weather Detection algorithm. The National Convective Weather Diagnostic (NCWD) is an automatically...

  19. Analytical Solution of Forced-Convective Boundary-Layer Flow over a Flat Plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirgolbabaei, H.; Barari, Amin; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2010-01-01

    In this letter, the problem of forced convection heat transfer over a horizontal flat plate is investigated by employing the Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM). The series solution of the nonlinear differential equations governing on the problem is developed. Comparison between results obtained...

  20. Analytical Solution of Forced-Convective Boundary-Layer Flow over a Flat Plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirgolbabaei, H.; Barari, Amin; Ibsen, Lars Bo;

    2010-01-01

    In this letter, the problem of forced convection heat transfer over a horizontal flat plate is investigated by employing the Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM). The series solution of the nonlinear differential equations governing on the problem is developed. Comparison between results obtained...

  1. Atmospheric Boundary Layer, Integrating Air Chemistry and Land Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.; Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Stratum, van B.J.H.; Dries, van den C.L.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to the interactions between the atmosphere and the land for advanced undergraduate and graduate students and a reference text for researchers in atmospheric physics and chemistry, hydrology, and plant physiology. The combination of the book, which provides the

  2. Single-phase liquid flow forced convection under a nearly uniform heat flux boundary condition in microchannels

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Man

    2012-02-22

    A microchannel heat sink, integrated with pressure and temperature microsensors, is utilized to study single-phase liquid flow forced convection under a uniform heat flux boundary condition. Utilizing a waferbond-and-etch- back technology, the heat source, temperature and pressure sensors are encapsulated in a thin composite membrane capping the microchannels, thus allowing experimentally good control of the thermal boundary conditions. A three-dimensional physical model has been constructed to facilitate numerical simulations of the heat flux distribution. The results indicate that upstream the cold working fluid absorbs heat, while, within the current operating conditions, downstream the warmer working fluid releases heat. The Nusselt number is computed numerically and compared with experimental and analytical results. The wall Nusselt number in a microchannel can be estimated using classical analytical solutions only over a limited range of the Reynolds number, Re: both the top and bottom Nusselt numbers approach 4 for Re < 1, while the top and bottom Nusselt numbers approach 0 and 5.3, respectively, for Re > 100. The experimentally estimated Nusselt number for forced convection is highly sensitive to the location of the temperature measurements used in calculating the Nusselt number. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  3. Photochemical ozone production in tropical squall line convection during NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment/Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Scala, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The role of convection was examined in trace gas transport and ozone production in a tropical dry season squall line sampled on August 3, 1985, during NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment/Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A (NASA GTE/ABLE 2A) in Amazonia, Brazil. Two types of analyses were performed. Transient effects within the cloud are examined with a combination of two-dimensional cloud and one-dimensional photochemical modeling. Tracer analyses using the cloud model wind fields yield a series of cross sections of NO(x), CO, and O3 distribution during the lifetime of the cloud; these fields are used in the photochemical model to compute the net rate of O3 production. At noon, when the cloud was mature, the instantaneous ozone production potential in the cloud is between 50 and 60 percent less than in no-cloud conditions due to reduced photolysis and cloud scavenging of radicals. Analysis of cloud inflows and outflows is used to differentiate between air that is undisturbed and air that has been modified by the storm. These profiles are used in the photochemical model to examine the aftereffects of convective redistribution in the 24-hour period following the storm. Total tropospheric column O3 production changed little due to convection because so little NO(x) was available in the lower troposphere. However, the integrated O3 production potential in the 5- to 13-km layer changed from net destruction to net production as a result of the convection. The conditions of the August 3, 1985, event may be typical of the early part of the dry season in Amazonia, when only minimal amounts of pollution from biomass burning have been transported into the region.

  4. The instability of a horizontal magnetic field in an atmosphere stable against convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1979-01-01

    The theoretical problem posed by the buoyant escape of a magnetic field from the interior of a stably stratified body bears directly on the question of the present existence of primordial magnetic fields in stars. This paper treats the onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the upper boundary of a uniform horizontal magnetic field in a stably stratified atmosphere. The calculations are carried out in the Boussinesq approximation and show the rapid growth of the initial infinitesimal perturbation of the boundary. This result is in contrast to the extremely slow buoyant rise of a separate flux tube in the same atmosphere. Thus for instance, at a depth of 1/3 of a solar radius beneath the surface of the sun, a field of 100 G develops ripples over a scale of 1000 km in a characteristic time of 50 years, whereas the characteristic rise time of the same field in separate flux tubes with the same dimensions is 10 billion years. Thus, the development of irregularities proceeds quickly, soon slowing, however, to a very slow pace when the amplitude of the irregularities becomes significant. Altogether, the calculations show the complexity of the question of the existence of remnant primordial magnetic fields in stellar interiors.

  5. Development of a measurement platformon a light airplane and analysis of airborne measurementsin the atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Zardi

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we provide an overview of a long term research project aimed at setting up a suitable platform for measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer on a light airplane along with some preliminary results obtained from fi eld campaigns at selected sites. Measurements of air pressure, temperature and relative humidity have been performed in various Alpine valleys up to a height of about 2500 m a.m.s.l. By means of GPS resources and specifi c post-processing procedures careful positioning of measurement points within the explored domain has been achieved. The analysis of collected data allowed detailed investigation of atmospheric vertical structures and dynamics typical of valley environment, such as morning transition from ground based inversion to fully developed well mixed convective boundary layer. Based on data collected along fl ights, 3D fi elds of the explored variables have been detected and identifi ed through application of geostatistical techniques (Kriging. The adopted procedures allowed evaluation of the intrinsic statistical structure of the spatial distribution of measured quantities and the estimate of the values of the same variable at unexplored locations by suitable weighted average of data recorded at close locations. Results thus obtained are presented and discussed.

  6. The asteroseismic surface effect from a grid of 3D convection simulations. I. Frequency shifts from convective expansion of stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Trampedach, Regner; Houdek, Günter; Collet, Remo; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Stein, Robert F; Asplund, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the effect on adiabatic stellar oscillation frequencies of replacing the near-surface layers in 1D stellar structure models with averaged 3D stellar surface convection simulations. The main difference is an expansion of the atmosphere by 3D convection, expected to explain a major part of the asteroseismic surface effect; a systematic overestimation of p-mode frequencies due to inadequate surface physics. We employ pairs of 1D stellar envelope models and 3D simulations from a previous calibration of the mixing-length parameter, alpha. That calibration constitutes the hitherto most consistent matching of 1D models to 3D simulations, ensuring that their differences are not spurious, but entirely due to the 3D nature of convection. The resulting frequency shift is identified as the structural part of the surface effect. The important, typically non-adiabatic, modal components of the surface effect are not included in the present analysis, but relegated to future papers. Evaluating the structural surfac...

  7. Convective and global stability analysis of a Mach 5.8 boundary layer grazing a compliant surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettenrieder, Fabian; Bodony, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Boundary layer transition on high-speed vehicles is expected to be affected by unsteady surface compliance. The stability properties of a Mach 5.8 zero-pressure-gradient laminar boundary layer grazing a nominally-flat thermo-mechanically compliant panel is considered. The linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations describe small amplitude disturbances in the fluid while the panel deformations are described by the Kirchhoff-Love plate equation and its thermal state by the transient heat equation. Compatibility conditions that couple disturbances in the fluid to those in the solid yield simple algebraic and robin boundary conditions for the velocity and thermal states, respectively. A local convective stability analysis shows that the panel can modify both the first and second Mack modes when, for metallic-like panels, the panel thickness exceeds the lengthscale δ99 Rex- 0 . 5 . A global stability analysis, which permits finite panel lengths with clamped-clamped boundary conditions, shows a rich eigenvalue spectrum with several branches. Unstable modes are found with streamwise-growing panel deformations leading to Mach wave-type radiation. Stable global modes are also found and have distinctly different panel modes but similar radiation patterns. Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  8. Interaction of Atmospheric Turbulence with Blade Boundary Layer Dynamics on a 5MW Wind Turbine using Blade-Boundary-Layer-Resolved CFD with hybrid URANS-LES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayakumar, Ganesh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Brasseur, James [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Lavely, Adam; Jayaraman, Balaji; Craven, Brent

    2016-01-04

    We describe the response of the NREL 5 MW wind turbine blade boundary layer to the passage of atmospheric turbulence using blade-boundary-layer-resolved computational fluid dynamics with hybrid URANS-LES modeling.

  9. Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98) : a report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuxart, J.; Yague, C.; Morales, G.; Terradelles, E.; Orbe, J.; Calvo, J.; Vilu-Guerau, de J.; Soler, M.R.; Infante, C.; Buenestado, P.; Espinalt, A.; Jorgensem, H.E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98), which took place over the northern Spanish plateau comprising relatively flat grassland, in September 1998. The main objectives of the campaign were to study the properties of the mid-latitude stable boundary

  10. Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98) : a report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuxart, J.; Yague, C.; Morales, G.; Terradelles, E.; Orbe, J.; Calvo, J.; Vilu-Guerau, de J.; Soler, M.R.; Infante, C.; Buenestado, P.; Espinalt, A.; Jorgensem, H.E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98), which took place over the northern Spanish plateau comprising relatively flat grassland, in September 1998. The main objectives of the campaign were to study the properties of the mid-latitude stable boundary

  11. On the Nature, Theory, and Modeling of Atmospheric Planetary Boundary Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baklanov, Alexander A.; Grisogono, Branko; Bornstein, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The gap between our modern understanding of planetary boundary layer physics and its decades-old representations in current operational atmospheric models is widening, which has stimulated this review of the current state of the art and an analysis of the immediate needs in boundary layer theory...

  12. Influence of a coronal envelope as a free boundary to global convective dynamo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn; Käpylä, Maarit J; Brandenburg, Axel

    2015-01-01

    We explore the effects of an outer stably stratified coronal envelope on rotating turbulent convection, differential rotation, and large-scale dynamo action in spherical wedge models of the Sun. We solve the compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations in a two-layer model with unstable stratification below the surface, representing the convection zone, and a stably stratified outer layer, the coronal envelope. The interface emulates essentially a free surface. We compare with models that have no coronal envelope. The presence of a coronal envelope is found to modify the Reynolds stress and the $\\Lambda$-effect resulting in a weaker and non-cylindrical differential rotation. This is related to the reduced latitudinal temperature variations, which are caused by and dependent on the Coriolis force. Some simulations develop a rudimentary near-surface shear layer, which we can relate to a sign change of the meridional Reynolds stress term in the thermal wind balance equation. Furthermore, the presence of a free sur...

  13. Multiple and spin off initiation of atmospheric convectively coupled Kelvin waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Dariusz B.; Flatau, Maria K.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Schmidt, Jerome M.

    2017-02-01

    A novel atmospheric convectively coupled Kelvin wave trajectories database, derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission precipitation data, is used to investigate initiation of sequential Kelvin wave events. Based on the analysis of beginnings of trajectories from years 1998-2012 it is shown that sequential event initiations can be divided into two distinct categories: multiple initiations and spin off initiations, both of which involve interactions with ocean surface and upper ocean temperature variability. The results of composite analysis of the 83 multiple Kelvin wave initiations show that the local thermodynamic forcing related to the diurnal sea surface temperature variability is responsible for sequential Kelvin wave development. The composite analysis of 91 spin off Kelvin wave initiations shows that the dynamic forcing is a dominant effect and the local thermodynamic forcing is secondary. Detail case studies of both multiple and spin off initiations confirm statistical analysis. A multiple initiation occurs in the presence of the high upper ocean diurnal cycle and a spin off initiation results from both dynamic and local thermodynamic processes. The dynamic forcing is related to increased wind speed and latent heat flux likely associated with an off equatorial circulation. In addition a theoretical study of the sequential Kelvin waves is performed using a shallow water model. Finally, conceptual models of these two types of initiations are proposed.

  14. Multiple solutions in MHD flow and heat transfer of Sisko fluid containing nanoparticles migration with a convective boundary condition: Critical points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanai, Ruchika; Rana, Puneet; Kumar, Lokendra

    2016-05-01

    The motivation behind the present analysis is to focus on magneto-hydrodynamic flow and heat transfer characteristics of non-Newtonian fluid (Sisko fluid) past a permeable nonlinear shrinking sheet utilizing nanoparticles involving convective boundary condition. The non-homogenous nanofluid transport model considering the effect of Brownian motion, thermophoresis, suction/injection and no nanoparticle flux at the sheet with convective boundary condition has been solved numerically by the RKF45 method with shooting technique. Critical points for various pertinent parameters are evaluated in this study. The dual solutions (both first and second solutions) are captured in certain range of material constant (ncthermophoresis parameter.

  15. The turning of the wind in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2014-01-01

    at the Høvsøre site in Denmark, which is a flat farmland area with a nearly homogeneous easterly upstream sector. Therefore, within that sector, the turning of the wind is caused by a combination of atmospheric stability, Coriolis, roughness, horizontal pressure gradient and baroclinity effects. Atmospheric...... stability was measured using sonic anemometers placed at different heights on the mast. Horizontal pressure gradients and baroclinity are derived from outputs of a numerical weather prediction model and are used to estimate the geostrophic wind. It is found, for these specific and relatively short periods...

  16. Investigating the diurnal and spatial variability of flows in the atmospheric boundary layer: A large eddy simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijayant

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) studies of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) have historically modeled the daytime (convective), nighttime (stable) and dawn/dusk windy (neutral) regimes separately under the assumption of a quasi-steady ABL. The real-world ABL however, continuously transitions between the different stability regimes and development of an LES capable of simulating the entire diurnal evolution of the ABL is needed. We have developed an LES tool (The JHU-LES code) with the new-generation Lagrangian dynamic models capable of dynamic adjustment of the subgrid-scale stresses thereby, making it apt for LES over entire diurnal cycles of the ABL. Preliminary LES studies demonstrate that the JHU-LES code reproduces well-known features of the quasi-steady convective and stable boundary layers, such as the well-known spectral scalings for production and inertial subranges. LES of the entire 24-hour diurnal evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer is then performed and compared successfully to field observations (HATS dataset). Important features of the diurnal ABL such as entrainment-based growth of the CBL, development of the stable boundary layer and evolution of the nocturnal low-level jet are well reproduced. The advantages of using a local Obukhov length-scale to normalize the results are highlighted. To investigate the role of surface boundary conditions and geostrophic wind forcing, LES investigations of multi-day evolution of the ABL flow are then performed with several combinations of surface boundary conditions (imposed temperature and heat flux) and geostrophic forcing (constant, time-varying, time and height varying). The variable geostrophic forcing significantly improves the agreement of LES results with surface flux observations but shows poor agreement with daytime surface fluxes and, daytime and nighttime mean profiles. The LES setup using an imposed surface temperature almost always yields better results than cases where the heat flux is

  17. A Chebyshev Collocation Method for Moving Boundaries, Heat Transfer, and Convection During Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Alexander, J. I. D.; Ouazzani, J.

    1994-01-01

    Free and moving boundary problems require the simultaneous solution of unknown field variables and the boundaries of the domains on which these variables are defined. There are many technologically important processes that lead to moving boundary problems associated with fluid surfaces and solid-fluid boundaries. These include crystal growth, metal alloy and glass solidification, melting and name propagation. The directional solidification of semi-conductor crystals by the Bridgman-Stockbarger method is a typical example of such a complex process. A numerical model of this growth method must solve the appropriate heat, mass and momentum transfer equations and determine the location of the melt-solid interface. In this work, a Chebyshev pseudospectra collocation method is adapted to the problem of directional solidification. Implementation involves a solution algorithm that combines domain decomposition, finite-difference preconditioned conjugate minimum residual method and a Picard type iterative scheme.

  18. Extreme Vertical Gusts in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    with tornadogenesis [Mueller and Carbone (1987), Wilson (1986) and McCaul and Bluestein (1986)], although tornadoes are part of the hazard of...Burns, C. Nappo, R. Banta, R. Newsom and J. Cuxart (2002). CASES-99: A comprehensive investigation of the stable nocturnal boundary layer. Bulletin of...Meteorology 64(1-2): 55-74. Wilson , J. W. (1986). Tornadogenesis by nonprecipitation induced wind shear lines. Monthly Weather Review 114(2): 270-284

  19. Impact of ns-DBD plasma actuation on the boundary layer transition using convective heat transfer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmer, Dirk; Peschke, Philip; Terzis, Alexandros; Ott, Peter; Weigand, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    This paper demonstrates that the impact of nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (ns-DBD) actuators on the structure of the boundary layer can be investigated using quantitative convective heat transfer measurements. For the experiments, the flow over a flat plate with a C4 leading edge thickness distribution was examined at low speed incompressible flow (6.6-11.5 m s-1). An ns-DBD plasma actuator was mounted 5 mm downstream of the leading edge and several experiments were conducted giving particular emphasis on the effect of actuation frequency and the freestream velocity. Local heat transfer distributions were measured using the transient liquid crystal technique with and without plasma activated. As a result, any effect of plasma on the structure of the boundary layer is interpreted by local heat transfer coefficient distributions which are compared with laminar and turbulent boundary layer correlations. The heat transfer results, which are also confirmed by hot-wire measurements, show the considerable effect of the actuation frequency on the location of the transition point elucidating that liquid crystal thermography is a promising method for investigating plasma-flow interactions very close to the wall. Additionally, the hot-wire measurements indicate possible velocity oscillations in the near wall flow due to plasma activation.

  20. Laminar mixed convection boundary layer flow induced by a permeable surface stretched with prescribed skin friction boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mixed laminar boundary layer flow and heat transfer on a permeable stretched surface moving with prescribed skin friction are studied. Three major cases, which correspond to complete similarity solutions, are considered. The cases are combinations of power law indices n and m representing temperature and skin friction distributions, respectively. The first case (n = 0, m = 0.5 corresponds to isothermal stretched surface with skin friction at the surface scales as x 1/4. The second case (n = 1, m = 1 is a linear temperature and skin friction distribution along the vertical stretched surface. The third case (n = −1, m = 0 represents inverse temperature variation along the surface with prescribed skin friction of the order of x −1/2. Similarity solutions are obtained for the surface stretched in a stagnant air with Prandtl number = 0.72. The effect of suction/injection velocity (fw and the buoyancy parameter (λ is studied in detail. The results show that the heat transfer coefficient along the surface is enhanced for assisting flow (λ > 0 at any value of fw for the first and second cases, while it is reduced for the third case. However, the opposite is true for the opposing flow (λ < 0. Furthermore, suction enhances the heat transfer coefficient, whereas injection degrades it at any fixed λ for the first and second prescribed skin friction boundary conditions, and the opposite is true for the third case.

  1. Characterizing dust aerosols in the atmospheric boundary layer over the deserts in Northwest China: monitoring network and field observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Q.; Matimin, A.; Yang, X.

    2016-12-01

    TheTaklimakan, Gurbantunggut and BadainJaran Deserts with the total area of 43.8×104 km2 in Northwest China are the major dust emission sources in Central Asia. Understanding Central Asian dust emissions and the interaction with the atmospheric boundary layer has an important implication for regional and global climate and environment changes. In order to explore these scientific issues, a monitoring network of 63 sites was established over the vast deserts (Taklimakan Desert, Gurbantunggut Desert and Badain Jaran Desert) in Northwest China for the comprehensive measurements of dust aerosol emission, transport and deposition as well as the atmospheric boundary layer including the meteorological parameters of boundary layer, surface radiation, surface heat fluxes, soil parameters, dust aerosol properties, water vapor profiles, and dust emission. Based on the monitoring network, the field experiments have been conducted to characterize dust aerosols and the atmospheric boundary layer over the deserts. The experiment observation indicated that depth of the convective boundary layer can reach 5000m on summer afternoons. In desert regions, the diurnal mean net radiation was effected significantly by dust weather, and sensible heat was much greater than latent heat accounting about 40-50% in the heat balance of desert. The surface soil and dust size distributions of Northwest China Deserts were obtained through widely collecting samples, results showed that the dominant dust particle size was PM100within 80m height, on average accounting for 60-80% of the samples, with 0.9-2.5% for PM0-2.5, 3.5-7.0% for PM0-10 and 5.0-14.0% for PM0-20. The time dust emission of Taklimakan Desert, Gurbantunggut Desert and Badain Jaran Desert accounted for 0.48%, 7.3%×10-5and 1.9% of the total time within a year, and the threshold friction velocity for dust emission were 0.22-1.06m/s, 0.29-1.5m/s and 0.21-0.59m/s, respectively.

  2. Improving Convection Parameterization Using ARM Observations and NCAR Community Atmosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang J [Scripps Institution of Oceanography

    2013-07-29

    Highlight of Accomplishments: We made significant contribution to the ASR program in this funding cycle by better representing convective processes in GCMs based on knowledge gained from analysis of ARM/ASR observations. In addition, our work led to a much improved understanding of the interaction among aerosol, convection, clouds and climate in GCMs.

  3. Turbulent dispersion in cloud-topped boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijlbergh, R.A.; Jonker, H.J.J.; Heus, T.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2009-01-01

    Compared to dry boundary layers, dispersion in cloud-topped boundary layers has received less attention. In this LES based numerical study we investigate the dispersion of a passive tracer in the form of Lagrangian particles for four kinds of atmospheric boundary layers: 1) a dry convective boundary

  4. Homotopy analysis method for mixed convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid over a vertical circular cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinarvand Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the study of the steady axisymmetric mixed convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid over a vertical circular cylinder with prescribed external flow and surface temperature. By means of similarity transformation, the governing partial differential equations are reduced into highly non-linear ordinary differential equations. The resulting non-linear system has been solved analytically using an efficient technique namely homotopy analysis method (HAM. Expressions for velocity and temperature fields are developed in series form. In this study, three different types of nanoparticles are considered, namely alumina (, titania (, and copper ( with water as the base fluid. For copper-water nanofluid, graphical results are presented to describe the influence of the nanoparticle volume fraction on the velocity and temperature fields for the forced and mixed convection flows. Moreover, the features of the flow and heat transfer characteristics are analyzed and discussed for foregoing nanofluids. It is found that the skin friction coefficient and the heat transfer rate at the surface are highest for copper-water nanofluid compared to the alumina-water and titania-water nanofluids.

  5. Mechanisms Responsible for the Observed Thermodynamic Structure in a Convective Boundary Layer Over the Hudson Valley of New York State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Jeffrey M.; Fitzjarrald, David R.

    2017-02-01

    We examine cases of a regional elevated mixed layer (EML) observed during the Hudson Valley Ambient Meteorology Study (HVAMS) conducted in New York State, USA in 2003. Previously observed EMLs referred to topographic domains on scales of 105 -106 km2 . Here, we present observational evidence of the mechanisms responsible for the development and maintenance of regional EMLs overlying a valley-based convective boundary layer (CBL) on much smaller spatial scales (deployed during the HVAMS, we show that cross-valley horizontal advection, along-valley channelling, and fog-induced cold-air pooling are responsible for the formation and maintenance of the EML and valley-CBL coupling over New York State's Hudson Valley. The upper layer stability of the overlying EML constrains growth of the valley CBL, and this has important implications for air dispersion, aviation interests, and fog forecasting.

  6. Estimates of area-averaged turbulent energy fluxes in a convectively driven boundary layer using aircraft measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherf, A.; Roth, R.

    1996-12-01

    During the field campaign of EFEDA II several aircraft measurements were performed in order to evaluate area mean values of turbulent energy fluxes over a relatively flat terrain in a desertification threatened area in Spain. Since earlier field experiments indicated differences between airborne measurements and surface observations, we tried to close the gap by carefully analysing the turbulence measurements. In order to evaluate the influence of the temporal variation of the convective boundary layer, the rise of the inversion, derived from simultaneously performed radiosonde ascents, was taken into account. By estimating the linear approximated fields of the meteorological parameters, it was possible to calculate the mean values of these quantities as well as the temporal and spatial derivatives, which are necessary for the evaluation of the advective terms of the energy budget. In this way is possible to examine the terms of the conservation equations in a supplementary way.

  7. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a moving vertical flat plate in an external fluid flow with viscous dissipation effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norfifah Bachok

    Full Text Available The steady boundary layer flow of a viscous and incompressible fluid over a moving vertical flat plate in an external moving fluid with viscous dissipation is theoretically investigated. Using appropriate similarity variables, the governing system of partial differential equations is transformed into a system of ordinary (similarity differential equations, which is then solved numerically using a Maple software. Results for the skin friction or shear stress coefficient, local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. It is found that the set of the similarity equations has unique solutions, dual solutions or no solutions, depending on the values of the mixed convection parameter, the velocity ratio parameter and the Eckert number. The Eckert number significantly affects the surface shear stress as well as the heat transfer rate at the surface.

  8. New observational and experimental evidence for a plume-fed asthenosphere boundary layer in mantle convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J. P.; Hasenclever, J.; Shi, C.

    2013-03-01

    The textbook view is that the asthenosphere is the place beneath the tectonic plates where competing temperature and pressure effects on mantle rheology result in the lowest viscosity region of Earth's mantle. We think the sub-oceanic asthenosphere exists for a different reason, that instead it is where rising plumes of hot mantle stall and spread out beneath the strong tectonic plates. Below this plume-fed asthenosphere is a thermal and density inversion with cooler underlying average-temperature mantle. Here we show several recent seismic studies that are consistent with a plume-fed asthenosphere. These include the seismic inferences that asthenosphere appears to resist being dragged down at subduction zones, that a sub-oceanic thermal inversion ∼250-350 km deep is needed to explain the seismic velocity gradient there for an isochemical mantle, that a fast 'halo' of shear-wave travel-times surrounds the Hawaiian plume conduit, and that an apparent seismic reflector is found ∼300 km beneath Pacific seafloor near Hawaii. We also present 2D axisymmetric and 3D numerical experiments that demonstrate these effects in internally consistent models with a plume-fed asthenosphere. If confirmed, the existence of a plume-fed asthenosphere will change our understanding of the dynamics of mantle convection and melting, and the links between surface plate motions and mantle convection.

  9. The tropical marine boundary layer under a deep convection system: a large-eddy simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D A Randall

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The tropical marine PBL under the influence of a deep convection system is investigated using a largedomain LES that resolves a wide range of scales, from mesoscale cloud clusters down to energy-containing turbulence. The simulated PBL is dominated by both turbulence and cloud-induced cold-pools. The variance of vertical velocity in the PBL resides mostly in the turbulence scales while that of water vapor mixing ratio resides mostly at the cold-pool scales; however, both turbulence and cold-pool scales contribute about equally to their covariance. The broad scale range of the LES flow field is decomposed into the filtered (i.e., cloud system and the subfilter (i.e., small convection and turbulence components using a Gaussian filter with various filter widths. Such decomposed flow fields are used to retrieve information of spatial distribution of the subfilter-scale fluxes and their relationship to the filtered field. This information is then used to evaluate the performance of an eddy-viscosity model commonly used in cloud-resolving models. The subfilter-scale fluxes computed from the eddy-viscosity model correlate reasonably with those retrieved from the LES in the lower cloud layer but not in the PBL; the correlation coefficients between the modeled and the retrieved fluxes are about 0.5 in the lower cloud layer but smaller than 0.2 in the PBL.

  10. Heat and Moisture Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-05

    rapid distortion theory by considering the ’image’ of the eddies in the boundary (Goldstein & Durbin , 1980). The same techniques could be applied to...Fitzjarald, D.J. (1983) Katabatic wind in opposing flow NCAR3123-83/1 Goldstein, M.E. & Durbin , P.A. (1980) J. Fluid Mech. 98, 473. Geiger, R. (1965) The...Foldvick (1962), S -S (2.6a) or algebraically : S - SO (h m/Z) where N0 and U are the values at the height hm of the mid- dle layer, and hi is the vertical

  11. Transport Processes in the Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Energy Program for offshore based “ Wind Farms”. It forms the basis for a continued European Community sponsored program on the atmospheric transport and...this day is signified by the dissipation of a marine stratocumulus sheet, followed by a gradual collapse of the PBL offshore . Simultaneously, a low...increased wind speed; • The jet becomes detached from the local coast south of Cape Mendocino, which generates a region between the coast and the jet with

  12. Effect of a Convective Boundary Condition on Boundary Layer Slip Flow and Heat Transfer Over a Stretching Sheet in View of the Exact Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljoufi, Mona D.; Ebaid, Abdelhalim

    2016-12-01

    The exact solutions of a nonlinear differential equations system, describing the boundary layer flow over a stretching sheet with a convective boundary condition and a slip effect have been obtained in this paper. This problem has been numerically solved by using the shooting method in literature. The aim of the current paper is to check the accuracy of these published numerical results. This goal has been achieved via first obtaining the exact solutions of the governing nonlinear differential equations and then, by comparing them with the approximate numerical results reported in literature. The effects of the physical parameters on the flow field and the temperature distribution have been re-investigated through the new exact solutions. The main advantage of the current paper is the simple computational approach that has been introduced to analyze exactly the present physical problem. This simple analytical approach can be further applied to investigate similar problems. Although no remarkable differences have been detected between the current figures and those obtained in literature, the authors believe that if some numerical calculations were available for the fluid velocity and the temperature in literature then the convergence criteria and the accuracy of the shooting method used in Ref. [15] can be validated in view of the current exact expressions.

  13. Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, K A [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-05-12

    Mesoscale models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are increasingly used for high resolution simulations, particularly in complex terrain, but errors associated with terrain-following coordinates degrade the accuracy of the solution. Use of an alternative Cartesian gridding technique, known as an immersed boundary method (IBM), alleviates coordinate transformation errors and eliminates restrictions on terrain slope which currently limit mesoscale models to slowly varying terrain. In this dissertation, an immersed boundary method is developed for use in numerical weather prediction. Use of the method facilitates explicit resolution of complex terrain, even urban terrain, in the WRF mesoscale model. First, the errors that arise in the WRF model when complex terrain is present are presented. This is accomplished using a scalar advection test case, and comparing the numerical solution to the analytical solution. Results are presented for different orders of advection schemes, grid resolutions and aspect ratios, as well as various degrees of terrain slope. For comparison, results from the same simulation are presented using the IBM. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional immersed boundary methods are then described, along with details that are specific to the implementation of IBM in the WRF code. Our IBM is capable of imposing both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. Additionally, a method for coupling atmospheric physics parameterizations at the immersed boundary is presented, making IB methods much more functional in the context of numerical weather prediction models. The two-dimensional IB method is verified through comparisons of solutions for gentle terrain slopes when using IBM and terrain-following grids. The canonical case of flow over a Witch of Agnesi hill provides validation of the basic no-slip and zero gradient boundary conditions. Specified diurnal heating in a valley, producing anabatic winds, is used to validate the

  14. Implementation of a boundary layer heat flux parameterization into the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. McGrath-Spangler

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of atmospheric carbon dioxide to a given amount of surface flux is inversely proportional to the depth of the boundary layer. Overshooting thermals that entrain free tropospheric air down into the boundary layer modify the characteristics and depth of the lower layer through the insertion of energy and mass. This alters the surface energy budget by changing the Bowen ratio and thereby altering the vegetative response and the surface boundary conditions. Although overshooting thermals are important in the physical world, their effects are unresolved in most regional models. A parameterization to include the effects of boundary layer entrainment was introduced into a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model (SiB-RAMS. The parameterization is based on a downward heat flux at the top of the boundary layer that is proportional to the heat flux at the surface. Results with the parameterization show that the boundary layer simulated is deeper, warmer, and drier than when the parameterization is turned off. These results alter the vegetative stress factors thereby changing the carbon flux from the surface. The combination of this and the deeper boundary layer change the concentration of carbon dioxide in the boundary layer.

  15. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lauros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical profile of particle number distribution does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by biosphere.

    Simulation of aerosol concentration inside the atmospheric boundary layer during nucleation days shows highly dynamical picture, where particle formation is coupled with chemistry and turbulent transport. We have demonstrated suitability of our turbulent mixing scheme in reproducing most important characteristics of particle dynamics inside the atmospheric boundary layer. Deposition and particle flux simulations show that deposition affects noticeably only the smallest particles at the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  16. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing for the determination of the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Keller

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A new method for measuring air temperature profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer at high spatial and temporal resolution is presented. The measurements are based on Raman scattering distributed temperature sensing (DTS with a fiber optic cable attached to a tethered balloon. These data were used to estimate the height of the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The experiment was successfully deployed during a two-day campaign in September 2009, providing evidence that DTS is well suited for this atmospheric application. Observed stable temperature profiles exhibit an exponential shape confirming similarity concepts of the temperature inversion close to the surface. The atmospheric mixing height (MH was estimated to vary between 5 m and 50 m as a result of the nocturnal boundary layer evolution. This value is in good agreement to the MH derived from concurrent Radon-222 (222Rn measurements and in previous studies.

  17. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing for the determination of the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Keller

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A new method for measuring air temperature profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer at high spatial and temporal resolution is presented. The measurements are based on Raman scattering distributed temperature sensing (DTS with a fiber optic cable attached to a tethered balloon. These data were used to estimate the height of the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The experiment was successfully deployed during a two-day campaign in September 2009, providing evidence that DTS is well suited for this atmospheric application. Observed stable temperature profiles exhibit an exponential shape confirming similarity concepts of the temperature inversion close to the surface. The atmospheric mixing height (MH was estimated to vary between 5 m and 50 m as a result of the nocturnal boundary layer evolution. This value is in good agreement with the MH derived from concurrent Radon-222 (222Rn measurements and in previous studies.

  18. The groundwater-land-surface-atmosphere connection: soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, R M; Chow, F K; Kollet, S J

    2007-02-02

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can represent spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-hour period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  19. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models - III. The relation to mixing length convection theory

    CERN Document Server

    Magic, Zazralt; Asplund, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the relation between 1D atmosphere models that rely on the mixing length theory and models based on full 3D radiative hydrodynamic (RHD) calculations to describe convection in the envelopes of late-type stars. The adiabatic entropy value of the deep convection zone, s_bot, and the entropy jump, {\\Delta}s, determined from the 3D RHD models, are matched with the mixing length parameter, {\\alpha}_MLT, from 1D hydrostatic atmosphere models with identical microphysics (opacities and equation-of-state). We also derive the mass mixing length, {\\alpha}_m, and the vertical correlation length of the vertical velocity, C[v_z,v_z], directly from the 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar subsurface convection. The calibrated mixing length parameter for the Sun is {\\alpha}_MLT (s_bot) = 1.98. For different stellar parameters, {\\alpha}_MLT varies systematically in the range of 1.7 - 2.4. In particular, {\\alpha}_MLT decreases towards higher effective temperature, lower surface gravity and higher metallicity...

  20. A Physically Based Horizontal Subgrid-scale Turbulent Mixing Parameterization for the Convective Boundary Layer in Mesoscale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bowen; Xue, Ming; Zhu, Kefeng

    2017-04-01

    Compared to the representation of vertical turbulent mixing through various PBL schemes, the treatment of horizontal turbulence mixing in the boundary layer within mesoscale models, with O(10) km horizontal grid spacing, has received much less attention. In mesoscale models, subgrid-scale horizontal fluxes most often adopt the gradient-diffusion assumption. The horizontal mixing coefficients are usually set to a constant, or through the 2D Smagorinsky formulation, or in some cases based on the 1.5-order turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) closure. In this work, horizontal turbulent mixing parameterizations using physically based characteristic velocity and length scales are proposed for the convective boundary layer based on analysis of a well-resolved, wide-domain large-eddy simulation (LES). The proposed schemes involve different levels of sophistication. The first two schemes can be used together with first-order PBL schemes, while the third uses TKE to define its characteristic velocity scale and can be used together with TKE-based higher-order PBL schemes. The current horizontal mixing formulations are also assessed a priori through the filtered LES results to illustrate their limitations. The proposed parameterizations are tested a posteriori in idealized simulations of turbulent dispersion of a passive scalar. Comparisons show improved horizontal dispersion by the proposed schemes, and further demonstrate the weakness of the current schemes.

  1. A simple parameterization for the turbulent kinetic energy transport terms in the convective boundary layer derived from large eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhales, Franciano Scremin; Rizza, Umberto; Degrazia, Gervásio Annes; Acevedo, Otávio Costa

    2013-02-01

    In this work a parametrization for the transport terms of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget equation, valid for a convective boundary layer (CBL) is presented. This is a hard task to accomplish from experimental data, especially because of the difficulty associated to the measurements of pressure turbulent fluctuations, which are necessary to determine the pressure correlation TKE transport term. Thus, employing a large eddy simulation (LES) a full diurnal planetary boundary layer (PBL) cycle was simulated. In this simulation a forcing obtained from experimental data is used, so that the numerical experiment represents a more realistic case than a stationary PBL. For this study all terms of the TKE budget equation were determined for a CBL. From these data, polynomials that describe the TKE transport terms’ vertical profiles were adjusted. The polynomials found are a good description of the LES data, and from them it is shown that a simple formulation that directly relates the transport terms to the TKE magnitude has advantages on other parameterizations commonly used in CBL numerical models. Furthermore, the present study shows that the TKE turbulent transport term dominates over the TKE transport by pressure perturbations and that for most of the CBL these two terms have opposite signs.

  2. Uncertainties in atmospheric chemistry modelling due to convection parameterisations and subsequent scavenging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tost

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Moist convection in global modelling contributes significantly to the transport of energy, momentum, water and trace gases and aerosols within the troposphere. Since convective clouds are on a scale too small to be resolved in a global model their effects have to be parameterised. However, the whole process of moist convection and especially its parameterisations are associated with uncertainties. In contrast to previous studies on the impact of convection on trace gases, which had commonly neglected the convective transport for some or all compounds, we investigate this issue by examining simulations with five different convection schemes. This permits an uncertainty analysis due to the process formulation, without the inconsistencies inherent in entirely neglecting deep convection or convective tracer transport for one or more tracers.

    Both the simulated mass fluxes and tracer distributions are analysed. Investigating the distributions of compounds with different characteristics, e.g., lifetime, chemical reactivity, solubility and source distributions, some differences can be attributed directly to the transport of these compounds, whereas others are more related to indirect effects, such as the transport of precursors, chemical reactivity in certain regions, and sink processes.

    The model simulation data are compared with the average regional profiles of several measurement campaigns, and in detail with two campaigns in fall and winter 2005 in Suriname and Australia, respectively.

    The shorter-lived a compound is, the larger the differences and consequently the uncertainty due to the convection parameterisation are, as long as it is not completely controlled by local production that is independent of convection and its impacts (e.g. water vapour changes. Whereas for long-lived compounds like CO or O3 the mean differences between the simulations are less than 25%, differences for short-lived compounds reach

  3. Scaling structure of the velocity statistics in atmospheric boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Kurien, S; Procaccia, I; Sreenivasan, K R; Kurien, Susan; L'vov, Victor S.; Procaccia, Itamar

    2000-01-01

    The statistical objects characterizing turbulence in real turbulent flows differ from those of the ideal homogeneous isotropic model.They containcontributions from various 2d and 3d aspects, and from the superposition ofinhomogeneous and anisotropic contributions. We employ the recently introduceddecomposition of statistical tensor objects into irreducible representations of theSO(3) symmetry group (characterized by $j$ and $m$ indices), to disentangle someof these contributions, separating the universal and the asymptotic from the specific aspects of the flow. The different $j$ contributions transform differently under rotations and so form a complete basis in which to represent the tensor objects under study. The experimental data arerecorded with hot-wire probes placed at various heights in the atmospheric surfacelayer. Time series data from single probes and from pairs of probes are analyzed to compute the amplitudes and exponents of different contributions to the second order statistical objects characte...

  4. The Onset of Convection in an Unsteady Thermal Boundary Layer in a Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biliana Bidin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the linear stability of an unsteady thermal boundary layer in a semi-infinite porous medium is considered. This boundary layer is induced by varying the temperature of the horizontal boundary sinusoidally in time about the ambient temperature of the porous medium; this mimics diurnal heating and cooling from above in subsurface groundwater. Thus if instability occurs, this will happen in those regions where cold fluid lies above hot fluid, and this is not necessarily a region that includes the bounding surface. A linear stability analysis is performed using small-amplitude disturbances of the form of monochromatic cells with wavenumber, k. This yields a parabolic system describing the time-evolution of small-amplitude disturbances which are solved using the Keller box method. The critical Darcy-Rayleigh number as a function of the wavenumber is found by iterating on the Darcy-Rayleigh number so that no mean growth occurs over one forcing period. It is found that the most dangerous disturbance has a period which is twice that of the underlying basic state. Cells that rotate clockwise at first tend to rise upwards from the surface and weaken, but they induce an anticlockwise cell near the surface at the end of one forcing period, which is otherwise identical to the clockwise cell found at the start of that forcing period.

  5. A Study of stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer over highveld South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luhunga, P; Djolov, G [University of Pretoria (South Africa); Esau, I, E-mail: george.djolov@up.ac.z

    2010-08-15

    The study is part of the South African - Norwegian Programme for Research and Co-operation Phase II 'Analysis and Possibility for Control of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Processes to Facilitate Adaptation to Environmental Changes'. The research strategy of the project is based on 4 legged approach. 1) Application and further development of contemporary atmospheric boundary layer theory. 2) Use of modeling based on large eddy simulation techniques. 3) Experimental investigation of turbulent fluxes. 4) Training and developing academics capable of dealing with the present and new challenges. The paper presents some preliminary results on the micrometeorological variability of the basic meteorological parameters and turbulent fluxes.

  6. A simple atmospheric boundary layer model applied to large eddy simulations of wind turbine wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2014-01-01

    boundary type technique where volume forces are used to introduce wind shear and atmospheric turbulence. The application of the model for wake studies is demonstrated by combining it with the actuator line method, and predictions are compared with field measurements. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.......A simple model for including the influence of the atmospheric boundary layer in connection with large eddy simulations of wind turbine wakes is presented and validated by comparing computed results with measurements as well as with direct numerical simulations. The model is based on an immersed...

  7. Preface: GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary-layer Study (GABLS) on Stable Boundary Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) is a program initiated by the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) to observe, understand and model the hydrological cycle and the related energy fluxes in the atmosphere, at the land surface and in the upper oceans. Consequently the atmospheri

  8. An Estimation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Energy Dissipation Rate Based on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Similarity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jongil; Arya, S. Pal; Shaohua, Shen; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Proctor, Fred H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Algorithms are developed to extract atmospheric boundary layer profiles for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and energy dissipation rate (EDR), with data from a meteorological tower as input. The profiles are based on similarity theory and scalings for the atmospheric boundary layer. The calculated profiles of EDR and TKE are required to match the observed values at 5 and 40 m. The algorithms are coded for operational use and yield plausible profiles over the diurnal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  9. Phase locking between atmospheric convectively coupled equatorial Kelvin waves and the diurnal cycle of precipitation over the Maritime Continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Dariusz B.; Flatau, Maria K.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Matthews, Adrian J.

    2016-08-01

    Convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) are a major component of the tropical atmospheric circulation, propagating eastward around the equatorial belt. Here we show that there are scale interactions between CCKWs and the diurnal cycle over the Maritime Continent. In particular, CCKW packets that pass a base point in the eastern Indian Ocean at 90°E between 0600 and 0900 UTC subsequently arrive over Sumatra in phase with the diurnal cycle of convection. As the distance between Sumatra and Borneo is equal to the distance traveled by a CCKW in 1 day, these waves are then also in phase with the diurnal cycle over Borneo. Consequently, this subset of CCKWs has a precipitation signal up to a factor of 3 larger than CCKWs that arrive at other times of the day and a 40% greater chance of successfully traversing the Maritime Continent.

  10. Condensation-inhibited convection in hydrogen-rich atmospheres: Stability against double-diffusive processes and thermal profiles for Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune

    CERN Document Server

    Leconte, Jérémy; Hersant, Franck; Guillot, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    In an atmosphere, a cloud condensation region is characterized by a strong vertical gradient in the abundance of the related condensing species. On Earth, the ensuing gradient of mean molecular weight has relatively few dynamical consequences because N$_2$ is heavier than water vapor, so that only the release of latent heat significantly impacts convection. On the contrary, in an hydrogen dominated atmosphere (e.g. giant planets), all condensing species are significantly heavier than the background gas. This can stabilize the atmosphere against convection near a cloud deck if the enrichment in the given species exceeds a critical threshold. This raises two questions. What is transporting energy in such a stabilized layer, and how affected can the thermal profile of giant planets be? To answer these questions, we first carry out a linear analysis of the convective and double-diffusive instabilities in a condensable medium showing that an efficient condensation can suppress double-diffusive convection. This sug...

  11. Representation of tropical deep convection in atmospheric models – Part 1: Meteorology and comparison with satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Russo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fast convective transport in the tropics can efficiently redistribute water vapour and pollutants up to the upper troposphere. In this study we compare tropical convection characteristics for the year 2005 in a range of atmospheric models, including numerical weather prediction (NWP models, chemistry transport models (CTMs, and chemistry-climate models (CCMs. The model runs have been performed within the framework of the SCOUT-O3 (Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere project. The characteristics of tropical convection, such as seasonal cycle, land/sea contrast and vertical extent, are analysed using satellite observations as a benchmark for model simulations. The observational datasets used in this work comprise precipitation rates, outgoing longwave radiation, cloud-top pressure, and water vapour from a number of independent sources, including ERA-Interim analyses. Most models are generally able to reproduce the seasonal cycle and strength of precipitation for continental regions but show larger discrepancies with observations for the Maritime Continent region. The frequency distribution of high clouds from models and observations is calculated using highly temporally-resolved (up to 3-hourly cloud top data. The percentage of clouds above 15 km varies significantly between the models. Vertical profiles of water vapour in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere (UTLS show large differences between the models which can only be partly attributed to temperature differences. If a convective plume reaches above the level of zero net radiative heating, which is estimated to be ~15 km in the tropics, the air detrained from it can be transported upwards by radiative heating into the lower stratosphere. In this context, we discuss the role of tropical convection as a precursor for the transport of short-lived species into the lower stratosphere.

  12. Very-Large-Scale Motions in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Educed by Snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Stimit; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2014-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) under a wide range of stabilities are conducted to educe very-large-scale motions and then to study their dynamics and how they are influenced by buoyancy. Preliminary flow visualizations suggest that smaller-scale motions that resemble hairpins are embedded in much larger scale streamwise meandering rolls. Using simulations that represent more than 150 h of physical time, many snapshots in the -, - and -planes are then collected to perform snapshot proper orthogonal decomposition and further investigate the large structures. These analyses confirm that large streamwise rolls that share several features with the very-large-scale motions observed in laboratory studies arise as the dominant modes under most stabilities, but the effect of the surface kinematic buoyancy flux on the energy content of these dominant modes is very significant. The first two modes in the -plane in the neutral case contain up to 3 % of the total turbulent kinetic energy; they also have a vertical tilt angle in the -plane of about 0 to 30 due to the turning effect associated with the Coriolis force. Unstable cases also feature streamwise rolls, but in the convective ABL they are strengthened by rising plumes in between them, with two to four rolls spanning the whole domain in the first few modes; the Coriolis effect is much weaker in the unstable ABL. These rolls are no longer the dominant modes under stable conditions where the first mode is observed to contain sheet-like motions with high turbulent kinetic energy. Using these proper orthogonal decomposition modes, we are also able to extract the vertical velocity fields corresponding to individual modes and then to correlate them with the horizontal velocity or temperature fields to obtain the momentum and heat flux carried by individual modes. Structurally, the fluxes are explained by the topology of their corresponding modes. However, the fraction of the fluxes produced by

  13. Assessment of thermal structure of boundary layer atmosphere of Western Siberia

    OpenAIRE

    Akhmetshina, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of frequency of temperature inversions makes it possible to investigate the probability of coincidence of unfavorable conditions of atmospheric stratification and the results of the intensive business activity. This paper is devoted to the study of thermal structure of the atmosphere boundary layer of Western Siberian territory in the period from 1990 to 2010 by using reanalysis of NCEP/NCAR data. The data of reanalysis is the only available information for similar research. Ba...

  14. Natural convection air flow in vertical upright-angled triangular cavities under realistic thermal boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieres Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical and numerical computation of laminar natural convection in a collection of vertical upright-angled triangular cavities filled with air. The vertical wall is heated with a uniform heat flux; the inclined wall is cooled with a uniform temperature; while the upper horizontal wall is assumed thermally insulated. The defining aperture angle φ is located at the lower vertex between the vertical and inclined walls. The finite element method is implemented to perform the computational analysis of the conservation equations for three aperture angles φ (= 15º, 30º and 45º and height-based modified Rayleigh numbers ranging from a low Ra = 0 (pure conduction to a high 109. Numerical results are reported for the velocity and temperature fields as well as the Nusselt numbers at the heated vertical wall. The numerical computations are also focused on the determination of the value of the maximum or critical temperature along the hot vertical wall and its dependence with the modified Rayleigh number and the aperture angle.

  15. The scaling transition between Nu number and boundary thickness in RB convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hong-Yue; Chen, Xi; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-11-01

    A quantitative theory is developed for the vertical mean temperature profile (MTP) and mean velocity profile (MVP) in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection(RBC), which explains the experimental and numerical observations of logarithmic law in MTP and the coefficient A varying along the Ra. Based on a new mean-field approach via symmetry analysis to wall-bounded turbulent flows it yields accurate scaling of the sub-layer buffer layer and log-layer over a wide range of Rayleigh number and gives an explanation of their physical mechanism. In particular, based on the scaling of multi-layer thickness for mean temperature and velocity, we first prove that the coefficient A follows a -0.121 scaling, which agrees well with the experimental data, and the scaling transition of Nu from 1/3 to 0.38 is due to the thickness variation of the multi-layer. The new explanation of mean temperature logarithmic law is that the effect of inverse pressure gradient (LSC) driving the plume to side wall, which yields the similarity between vertical temperature transport and vertical momentum.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic mixed convection flow in vertical concentric annuli with time periodic boundary condition: Steady periodic regime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BASANT K JHA; BABATUNDE AINA

    2016-08-01

    This work reports an analytical solution for fully developed mixed convection flow of viscous,incompressible, electrically conducting fluid in vertical concentric annuli under the influence of a transverse magnetic field, where the outer surface of inner cylinder is heated sinusoidally and the inner surface of outercylinder is kept at a constant temperature. The analysis is carried out for fully developed parallel flow and steady-periodic regime. The governing dimensionless momentum and energy equations are separated into steadyand periodic parts and solved analytically. Closed form solutions are expressed in terms of modified Bessel function of first and second kind. The influence of each governing parameters such as magnetic field parameter,Prandtl number and the dimensionless frequency of heating on flow formation and thermal behaviour are discussed with the aid of graphs. During the course of investigation, it is found that the oscillation amplitude of the friction factor is maximized at a resonance frequency near the surface of the concentric annuli where there is periodic heating. Furthermore, increasing transverse magnetic field decreases the oscillation amplitude of the friction factor.

  17. Impact of radial magnetic field on peristalsis in curved channel with convective boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayat, Tasawar [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Tanveer, Anum, E-mail: qau14@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Alsaadi, Fuad [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Mousa, Ghassan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-04-01

    This paper addresses the peristaltic flow in curved channel with combined heat/mass transfer and convective effects. The channel walls are flexible. An imposed magnetic field is applied in radial direction to increase the wave amplitude (used in ECG for synchronization purposes). The pseudoplastic fluid comprising shear-thinning/shear thickening effects has been used in mathematical modeling. Small Reynolds number assumption is employed to neglect inertial effects. Half channel-width to wavelength ratio is small enough for the pressure to be considered uniform over the cross-section. The graphical results obtained are compared with planar channel. Results show the non-symmetric behavior of sundry parameters in contrary to the planar case. Additionally more clear results are seen when the curved channel is approached. - Highlights: • The behavior of curvature parameter k on velocity is not symmetric. • Temperature is decreasing function of Biot number Bi. • Hartman number has similar qualitative effects on both velocity and temperature. • Behavior of concentration is opposite to that of temperature in a qualitative sense. • Bolus size via curvature parameter has opposite effect near the upper and lower channel walls.

  18. Atmospheric boundary layer investigations in the Laptev Sea area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Pascal; Heinemann, Günther; Drüe, Clemens; Makshtas, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    In the winter season 2014/2015 a field campaign at the Tiksi observatory (71°38'N, 128°52'E) was carried out by the University of Trier with support of the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) and the GEOMAR Kiel in framework of the interdisciplinary Transdrift project. One goal of the campaign is to help to improve the understanding of processes within the Arctic stable boundary layer (SBL). Within the SBL, there are several important phenomena and processes like low-level jets, surface and lifted inversions, the development of the mixing height or the determination of the energy balance, which can be best investigated with a mix of high-resolution ground-based remote sensing systems and flux tower measurements. We mainly used a SODAR/RASS, a scintillometer, a ceilometer as well as the local flux tower to investigate the SBL for the Arctic winter. Baroclinity is found to be the main driven mechanism for low-level jets with jet core heights above 200 m due to the strong temperature gradient between the Laptev Sea and the Siberian continent. Strong temperature changes at short time scale (few hours) were often closely related to a change of wind direction and therefore advection. LLJs with heights below 200 m are likely influenced by local topography. In addition, regional climate model simulations using the COSMO-CLM (COnsortium for Small-scale MOdelling - Climate Limited area Mode) driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis data have been performed. The COSMO-CLM simulations show a good agreement with ERA-Interim reanalysis data and in-situ measurements (tower, soundings).

  19. Influence of orographically induced transport process on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer and on the distribution of trace gases; Einfluss orographisch induzierter Transportprozesse auf die Struktur der atmosphaerischen Grenzschicht und die Verteilung von Spurengasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossmann, M.

    1998-04-01

    The influence of terrain on the structure of the atmospheric boundary-layer and the distribution of trace gases during periods of high atmospheric pressure was studied by means of meteorological and air-chemical data collected in September 1992 during the TRACT experiment in the transition area between the upper Rhine valley and the northern Black Forest. The emphasis was on the investigation of the development of the convective boundary layer, the formation of thermally induced circulation systems, and the orographic exchange between the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere. Thanks to the extensive measurements, phenomena not yet described in literature could be verified by case studies, and processes that had only been established qualitatively could be quantified. (orig.)

  20. Structure of the auroral precipitation region in the dawn sector: relationship to convection reversal boundaries and field-aligned currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Feldstein

    electrons and isotropic ion precipitation (AO is mapped to the dawn periphery of the Central Plasma Sheet (CPS; the soft small scale structured precipitation (SSSL is mapped to the outer magnetosphere close to the magnetopause, i.e. the Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL. In the near-noon sector, earthward fluxes of soft electrons, which cause the Diffuse Red Aurora (DRA, are observed. The ion energies decrease with increasing latitude. The plasma spectra of the DRA regime are analogous to the spectra of the Plasma Mantle (PM. In the dawn sector, the large-scale field-aligned currents flow into the ionosphere at the SSSL latitudes (Region 1 and flow out at the AO or DAZ latitudes (Region 2. In the dawn and dusk sectors, the large-scale Region 1 and Region 2 FAC generation occurs in different plasma domains of the distant magnetosphere. The dawn and dusk FAC connection to the traditional Region 1 and Region 2 has only formal character, as FAC generating in various magnetospheric plasma domains integrate in the same region (Region 1 or Region 2. In the SSSL, there is anti-sunward convection; in the DAZ and the AO, there is the sunward convection. At PM latitudes, the convection is controlled by the azimuthal IMF component (By . It is suggested to extend the notation of the plasma pattern boundaries, as proposed by Newell et al. (1996, for the nightside sector of the auroral oval to the dawn sector.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; plasma convection

  1. Prediction and rational correlation of thermophoretically reduced particle mass transfer to hot surfaces across laminar or turbulent forced-convection gas boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1986-01-01

    A formulation previously developed to predict and correlate the thermophoretically-augmented submicron particle mass transfer rate to cold surfaces is found to account for the thermophoretically reduced particle mass transfer rate to overheated surfaces such that thermophoresis brings about a 10-decade reduction below the convective mass transfer rate expected by pure Brownian diffusion and convection alone. Thermophoretic blowing is shown to produce effects on particle concentration boundary-layer (BL) structure and wall mass transfer rates similar to those produced by real blowing through a porous wall. The applicability of the correlations to developing BL-situations is demonstrated by a numerical example relevant to wet-steam technology.

  2. Effect of a cold, dry air incursion on atmospheric boundary layer processes over a high-altitude lake in the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoguo; Lyu, Shihua; Wen, Lijuan; Zhao, Lin; Ao, Yinhuan; Wang, Shaoying

    2017-03-01

    High-altitude lakes are frequently exposed to extreme meteorological conditions, but the surface and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) processes have received little attention under specific weather conditions. This study used the multi-source field data, re-analysis and remote sensing data to investigate the varying patterns and driving forces of the convective boundary layer (CBL) height over Ngoring Lake in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) before and after the cold air incursion. Daily cumulative surface heat flux and buoyancy flux over the land were markedly larger than those over the lake on a clear summer day, but an opposite pattern was observed accompanied by the cold air incursion. CBLs determined by the potential temperature thinned (depth < 100 m) over the lake in the daytime and thickened (400-600 m) at night on a clear day. Along with the arrival of the cold air, CBL rapidly thickened to 2280 m over the lake, exceeded than the maximum value at adjacent Madoi station. Cold air dramatically cooled the middle-upper atmosphere but the temperature of the lower atmosphere cooled down slowly, partly due to a sharp increase of sensible heat flux over the lake, both of which linked up to weaken the potential temperature gradient. Moreover, increasing wind speed and vertical wind shear further facilitated the buoyancy flux to exert higher heat convection efficiency. All of these factors acted together to cause the rapid growth of CBL over the lake. This investigation provided a more in-depth knowledge of boundary layer dynamics in the lake-rich region of the TP.

  3. Effects of Boundary Layer Height on the Model of Ground-Level PM2.5 Concentrations from AOD: Comparison of Stable and Convective Boundary Layer Heights from Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengliang Zang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol optical depth (AOD from satellites or ground-based sun photometer spectral observations has been widely used to estimate ground-level PM2.5 concentrations by regression methods. The boundary layer height (BLH is a popular factor in the regression model of AOD and PM2.5, but its effect is often uncertain. This may result from the structures between the stable and convective BLHs and from the calculation methods of the BLH. In this study, the boundary layer is divided into two types of stable and convective boundary layer, and the BLH is calculated using different methods from radiosonde data and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP reanalysis data for the station in Beijing, China during 2014–2015. The BLH values from these methods show significant differences for both the stable and convective boundary layer. Then, these BLHs were introduced into the regression model of AOD-PM2.5 to seek the respective optimal BLH for the two types of boundary layer. It was found that the optimal BLH for the stable boundary layer is determined using the method of surface-based inversion, and the optimal BLH for the convective layer is determined using the method of elevated inversion. Finally, the optimal BLH and other meteorological parameters were combined to predict the PM2.5 concentrations using the stepwise regression method. The results indicate that for the stable boundary layer, the optimal stepwise regression model includes the factors of surface relative humidity, BLH, and surface temperature. These three factors can significantly enhance the prediction accuracy of ground-level PM2.5 concentrations, with an increase of determination coefficient from 0.50 to 0.68. For the convective boundary layer, however, the optimal stepwise regression model includes the factors of BLH and surface wind speed. These two factors improve the determination coefficient, with a relatively low increase from 0.65 to 0.70. It is found that the

  4. Internal boundary-layer height formulae — A comparison with atmospheric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, John L.

    1989-04-01

    The height of the internal boundary layer (IBL) downwind of a step change in surface roughness is computed using formulae of Elliott (1958), Jackson (1976) and Panofsky and Dutton (1984). The results are compared with neutral-stratification atmospheric data extracted from the set of wind-tunnel and atmospheric data summarized by Jackson (1976) as well as neutral-stratification data presented by Peterson et al. (1979) and new data measured at Cherrywood, Ontario. It is found that the Panofsky-Dutton formulation gives the least root-mean-square (RMS) absolute errors for atmospheric applications.

  5. Stable atmospheric boundary-layer experiment in Spain (SABLES 98): A report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuxart, J.; Yague, C.; Morales, G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98), which took place over the northern Spanish plateau comprising relatively flat grassland, in September 1998. The main objectives of the campaign were to study the properties of the mid-latitude stable bound...

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics model of stratified atmospheric boundary-layer flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman; Bechmann, Andreas; Sogachev, Andrey;

    2015-01-01

    For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on computational fluid dynamics models of the neutrally stratified surface-layer. So far, physical processes that are important to the whole atmospheric boundary-layer, such as the Coriolis effect, buoyancy forces and heat...

  7. A consistent turbulence formulation for the dynamic wake meandering model in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; Veldkamp, Dick; Wedel-Heinen, Jens Jakob

    This thesis describes the further development and validation of the dynamic meandering wake model for simulating the flow field and power production of wind farms operating in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The overall objective of the conducted research is to improve the modelling capabil...... intensity. This power drop is comparable to measurements from the North Hoyle and OWEZ wind farms....

  8. Thermal boundary layer profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection in a cylindrical sample

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, Richard J A M; Grossmann, Siegfried; Verzicco, Roberto; Xia, Ke-Qing; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    We numerically investigate the structures of the near-plate temperature profiles close to the bottom and top plates of turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard flow in a cylindrical sample at Rayleigh numbers $Ra=10^8$ to $Ra=2\\times10^{12}$ and Prandtl numbers Pr=6.4 and Pr=0.7 thus extending previous results for quasi-2-dimensional systems to 3D systems for the first time. The results show that the instantaneous temperature profiles scaled by the dynamical frame method [Q. Zhou and K.-Q. Xia, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 104301 (2010)] agree well with the classical Prandtl-Blasius laminar boundary layer (BL) profiles, especially for low Ra and high Pr. The agreement is slightly less, but still good, for lower Pr, where the thermal BL is more exposed to the bulk fluctuations due to the thinner kinetic BL, and higher Ra, where more plumes are passing the measurement location.

  9. Similarity Solution of Marangoni Convection Boundary Layer Flow over a Flat Surface in a Nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihan Md. Arifin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of steady Marangoni boundary layer flow and heat transfer over a flat plate in a nanofluid is studied using different types of nanoparticles. The general governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of two nonlinear ordinary differential equations using unique similarity transformation. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are obtained using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg (RKF method. Three different types of nanoparticles are considered, namely, Cu, Al2O3, and TiO2, by using water as a base fluid with Prandtl number Pr=6.2. The effects of the nanoparticle volume fraction ϕ and the constant exponent m on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are obtained and discussed.

  10. Impact of storm-induced cooling of sea surface temperature on large turbulent eddies and vertical turbulent transport in the atmospheric boundary layer of Hurricane Isaac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Wang, Yuting; Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan; Gao, Cen

    2016-01-01

    Roll vortices in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are important to oil operation and oil spill transport. This study investigates the impact of storm-induced sea surface temperature (SST) cooling on the roll vortices generated by the convective and dynamic instability in the ABL of Hurricane Isaac (2012) and the roll induced transport using hindcasting large eddy simulations (LESs) configured from the multiply nested Weather Research & Forecasting model. Two experiments are performed: one forced by the Unified Wave INterface - Coupled Model and the other with the SST replaced by the NCEP FNL analysis that does not include the storm-induced SST cooling. The simulations show that the roll vortices are the prevalent eddy circulations in the ABL of Isaac. The storm-induced SST cooling causes the ABL stability falls in a range that satisfies the empirical criterion of roll generation by dynamic instability, whereas the ABL stability without considering the storm-induced SST cooling meets the criterion of roll generation by convective instability. The ABL roll is skewed and the increase of convective instability enhances the skewness. Large convective instability leads to large vertical transport of heat and moisture; whereas the dominant dynamic instability results in large turbulent kinetic energy but relatively weak heat and moisture transport. This study suggests that failure to consider roll vortices or incorrect initiation of dynamic and convective instability of rolls in simulations may substantially affect the transport of momentum, energy, and pollutants in the ABL and the dispersion/advection of oil spill fume at the ocean surface.

  11. The influence of convective current generator on the global current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Morozov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical generalization of classical model of the global circuit with taking into account the convective current generator, working in the planetary boundary layer was considered. Convective current generator may be interpreted as generator, in which the electromotive force is generated by processes, of the turbulent transport of electrical charge. It is shown that the average potential of ionosphere is defined not only by the thunderstorm current generators, working at the present moment, but by the convective current generator also. The influence of the convective processes in the boundary layer on the electrical parameters of the atmosphere is not only local, but has global character as well. The numerical estimations, made for the case of the convective-unstable boundary layer demonstrate that the increase of the average potential of ionosphere may be of the order of 10% to 40%.

  12. Investigating TIME-GCM Atmospheric Tides for Different Lower Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, K.; Hagan, M. E.; Lu, G.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Doornbos, E.

    2013-12-01

    It has been recently established that atmospheric tides generated in the lower atmosphere significantly influence the geospace environment. In order to extend our knowledge of the various coupling mechanisms between the different atmospheric layers, we rely on model simulations. Currently there exist two versions of the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM), i.e. GSWM02 and GSWM09, which are used as a lower boundary (ca. 30 km) condition for the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) and account for the upward propagating atmospheric tides that are generated in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. In this paper we explore the various TIME-GCM upper atmospheric tidal responses for different lower boundary conditions and compare the model diagnostics with tidal results from satellite missions such as TIMED, CHAMP, and GOCE. We also quantify the differences between results associated with GSWM02 and GSWM09 forcing and results of TIMEGCM simulations using Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA) data as a lower boundary condition.

  13. Efficiency of eddy mixing in a stable stratified atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatskiy, A. F.; Kurbatskaya, L. I.

    2011-12-01

    Based on a mesoscale RANS model of turbulence, the behavior of turbulent eddy mixing parameters is found to agree with the latest data of laboratory and atmospheric measurements. Some problems of the description of turbulent eddy mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer are studied. When the flow transforms to an extremely stable state, in particular, it is found the flux Richardson number Ri f can change nonmonotonically: it increases with increasing gradient Richardson number Rig until the state of saturation is reached at Ri g ≃ 1 and then decreases. The behavior of the coefficients of eddy diffusion of momentum and heat agrees with the concept of momentum (but not heat) transfer by internal waves propagating in an extremely stable atmospheric boundary layer.

  14. A Simple Model for the Vertical Transport of Reactive Species in the Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif; Lenschow, Donald H.; Gurarie, David

    2010-01-01

    with standard parameterizations. This leads to formulations for profiles of the turbulent diffusivity and the ratio of temperature-scalar covariance to the flux of the passive scalar. The model is then extended to solving, in terms of profiles of mean concentrations and fluxes, the NO x –O3 triad problem...

  15. Deep convective injection of boundary layer air into the lowermost stratosphere at midlatitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fischer

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available On 22 August 2001 a measurement flight was performed with the German research aircraft FALCON from Sardinia to Crete as part of the Mediterranean Oxidant Study (MINOS. Cruising at 8.2 km, the aircraft was forced to climb to 11.2 km over the southern tip of Italy to stay clear of the anvil of a large cumulonimbus tower. During ascent into the lowermost stratosphere in-situ measurements onboard the FALCON indicated several sharp increases in the concentrations of tropospheric trace gases, e.g. CO, acetone, methanol, benzene and acetonitrile, above the anvil. During one particular event deep in the stratosphere, at O3 concentrations exceeding 200 ppv, CO increased from about 60 to 90 ppv, while the concentration of acetone and methanol increased by more than a factor of 2 (0.7 to 1.8 ppv for acetone; 0.4 to 1.4 ppv for methanol. Enhancements for the short lived species benzene are even higher, increasing from 20 pptv in the stratosphere to approx. 130 pptv. The concentrations during the event were higher than background concentrations in the upper troposphere, indicating that polluted boundary layer air was directly mixed deep into the lowermost stratosphere.

  16. Effect of velocity boundary conditions on the heat transfer and flow topology in two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Poel, Erwin P; Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-07-01

    The effect of various velocity boundary condition is studied in two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection. Combinations of no-slip, stress-free, and periodic boundary conditions are used on both the sidewalls and the horizontal plates. For the studied Rayleigh numbers Ra between 10(8) and 10(11) the heat transport is lower for Γ=0.33 than for Γ=1 in case of no-slip sidewalls. This is, surprisingly, the opposite for stress-free sidewalls, where the heat transport increases for a lower aspect ratio. In wider cells the aspect-ratio dependence is observed to disappear for Ra ≥ 10(10). Two distinct flow types with very different dynamics can be seen, mostly dependent on the plate velocity boundary condition, namely roll-like flow and zonal flow, which have a substantial effect on the dynamics and heat transport in the system. The predominantly horizontal zonal flow suppresses heat flux and is observed for stress-free and asymmetric plates. Low aspect-ratio periodic sidewall simulations with a no-slip boundary condition on the plates also exhibit zonal flow. In all the other cases, the flow is roll like. In two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection, the velocity boundary conditions thus have large implications on both roll-like and zonal flow that have to be taken into consideration before the boundary conditions are imposed.

  17. A Diagnostic Diagram to Understand the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer at High Wind Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Long time series of offshore meteorological measurements in the lower marine atmospheric boundary layer show dynamical regimes and variability that are forced partly by interaction with the underlying sea surface and partly by the passage of cloud systems overhead. At low wind speeds, the dynamics and stability structure of the surface layer depend mainly on the air-sea temperature difference and the measured wind speed at a standard height. The physical processes are mostly understood and the quantified through Monin-Obukhov (MO) similarity theory. At high wind speeds different dynamical regimes become dominant. Breaking waves contribute to the atmospheric loading of sea spray and water vapor and modify the character of air-sea interaction. Downdrafts and boundary layer rolls associated with clouds at the top of the boundary layer impact vertical heat and momentum fluxes. Data from offshore meteorological monitoring sites will typically show different behavior and the regime shifts depending on the local winds and synoptic conditions. However, the regular methods to interpret time series through spectral analysis give only a partial view of dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer. Also, the spectral methods have limited use for boundary layer and mesoscale modellers whose geophysical diagnostics are mostly anchored in directly measurable quantities: wind speed, temperature, precipitation, pressure, and radiation. Of these, wind speed and the air-sea temperature difference are the most important factors that characterize the dynamics of the lower atmospheric boundary layer and they provide a dynamical and thermodynamic constraint to frame observed processes, especially at high wind speeds. This was recognized in the early interpretation of the Froya database of gale force coastal winds from mid-Norway (Andersen, O.J. and J. Lovseth, Gale force maritime wind. The Froya data base. Part 1: Sites and instrumentation. Review of the data base, Journal of Wind

  18. Observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height over Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates: Investigating boundary layer climatology in arid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzooqi, Mohamed Al; Basha, Ghouse; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.; Armstrong, Peter; Molini, Annalisa

    2014-05-01

    Strong sensible heat fluxes and deep turbulent mixing - together with marked dustiness and a low substrate water content - represent a characteristic signature in the boundary layer over hot deserts, resulting in "thicker" mixing layers and peculiar optical properties. Beside these main features however, desert ABLs present extremely complex local structures that have been scarcely addressed in the literature, and whose understanding is essential in modeling processes such as the transport of dust and pollutants, and turbulent fluxes of momentum, heat and water vapor in hyper-arid regions. In this study, we analyze a continuous record of observations of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) height from a single lens LiDAR ceilometer operated at Masdar Institute Field Station (24.4oN, 54.6o E, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates), starting March 2013. We compare different methods for the estimation of the ABL height from Ceilometer data such as, classic variance-, gradient-, log gradient- and second derivation-methods as well as recently developed techniques such as the Bayesian Method and Wavelet covariance transform. Our goal is to select the most suited technique for describing the climatology of the ABL in desert environments. Comparison of our results with radiosonde observations collected at the nearby airport of Abu Dhabi indicate that the WCT and the Bayesian method are the most suitable tools to accurately identify the ABL height in all weather conditions. These two methods are used for the definition of diurnal and seasonal climatologies of the boundary layer conditional to different atmospheric stability classes.

  19. Sea ice edge position impact on the atmospheric boundary layer temperature structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavina, Elena; Repina, Irina

    2016-04-01

    Processes happening in the Arctic region nowadays strongly influence global climate system; the polar amplification effect can be considered one of the main indicators of ongoing changes. Dramatic increase in amount of ice-free areas in the Arctic Ocean, which took place in 2000s, is one of the most significant examples of climate system dynamic in polar region. High amplitude of changes in Arctic climate, both observed and predicted, and existing inaccuracies of climate and weather forecasting models, enforce the development of a more accurate one. It is essential to understand the physics of the interaction between atmosphere and ocean in the Northern Polar area (particularly in boundary layer of the atmosphere) to improve the models. Ice conditions have a great influence on the atmospheric boundary layer in the Arctic. Sea ice inhibits the heat exchange between atmosphere and ocean water during the polar winter, while the heat exchange above the ice-free areas increases rapidly. Due to those significant temperature fluctuations, turbulence of heat fluxes grows greatly. The most intensive interaction takes place at marginal ice zones, especially in case of the cold outbreak - intrusion of cooled air mass from the ice to free water area. Still, thermal structure and dynamic of the atmosphere boundary layer are not researched and described thoroughly enough. Single radio sounding observations from the planes being done, bur they do not provide high-resolution data which is necessary for study. This research is based on continuous atmosphere boundary layer temperature and sea ice observation collected in the Arctic Ocean during the two NABOS expeditions in August and September in 2013 and 2015, as well as on ice conditions satellite data (NASA TEAM 2 and VASIA 2 data processing). Atmosphere temperature data has been obtained with Meteorological Temperature Profiler MTP-5 (ATTEX, Russia). It is a passive radiometer, which provides continuous data of atmospheric

  20. Convection-Diffusion Model for Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jets: Obtaining Off-Axis Data from On-Axis Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Dünnbier, Mario; Winter, Jörn; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan

    2012-10-01

    An analytical convection-diffusion model for atmospheric pressure plasma jets is presented. The model can be applied both for ambient air species diffusion and for heat transfer into a jets effluent. Using on-axis data from experiments as input, the model can be used to extrapolate the measured quantities to the complete domain for laminar flows and near-axis region for turbulent flows. The method is applied to experimental data obtained from molecular beam mass spectrometry as well as from a VUV absorption spectrometry method using the plasma jet itself as a VUV emitter. The measurements are conducted on a turbulent atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet with a protective gas nozzle, allowing for the creation of a shielding gas curtain around the plasma jets effluent. The results obtained from the hybrid analytical-experimental method are compared to computational fluid dynamics simulations.

  1. Physical modeling of the atmospheric boundary layer in the UNH Flow Physics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Power, Gregory; Gilooly, Stephanie; Wosnik, Martin; Klewicki, Joe; Turner, John

    2016-11-01

    The Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH has test section dimensions W =6.0m, H =2.7m, L =72m. It can achieve high Reynolds number boundary layers, enabling turbulent boundary layer, wind energy and wind engineering research with exceptional spatial and temporal instrument resolution. We examined the FPF's ability to experimentally simulate different types of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) using upstream roughness arrays. The American Society for Civil Engineers defines standards for simulating ABLs for different terrain types, from open sea to dense city areas (ASCE 49-12). The standards require the boundary layer to match a power law shape, roughness height, and power spectral density criteria. Each boundary layer type has a corresponding power law exponent and roughness height. The exponent and roughness height both increase with increasing roughness. A suburban boundary layer was chosen for simulation and a roughness element fetch was created. Several fetch lengths were experimented with and the resulting boundary layers were measured and compared to standards in ASCE 49-12: Wind Tunnel Testing for Buildings and Other Structures. Pitot tube and hot wire anemometers were used to measure average and fluctuating flow characteristics. Velocity profiles, turbulence intensity and velocity spectra were found to compare favorably.

  2. Impacts from ice-nucleating bacteria on deep convection: implications for the biosphere-atmosphere interaction in climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. J. Phillips

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A cloud modeling framework is described to simulate ice nucleation by biogenic aerosol particles, as represented by airborne ice-nucleation active (INA bacteria. It includes the empirical parameterization of heterogeneous ice nucleation. The formation of cloud liquid by soluble material coated on such insoluble aerosols is represented and determines their partial removal from deep convective clouds by accretion onto precipitation.

    Preliminary simulations are performed for a case of deep convection over Oklahoma. If present at high enough concentrations, as might occur in proximity to land sources, INA bacteria are found to influence significantly: – (1 the average numbers and sizes of crystals in the clouds; (2 the horizontal cloud coverage in the free troposphere; and (3 precipitation and incident solar insolation at the surface, which influence rates of bacterial growth. At lower concentrations, the corresponding responses of cloud fields appear much lower or are ambiguous.

    In nature, the growth rates of INA bacteria on leaves prior to emission into the atmosphere are known to be highly dependent on temperature, precipitation and plant species. Consequently, the open question emerges of whether emissions of such ice-nucleating biogenic particles can then be modified by their own effects on clouds and atmospheric conditions, forming a weak feedback in climate or microclimate systems.

  3. Modelling the partitioning of ammonium nitrate in the convective boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. J. Aan de Brugh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available An explanatory model study is presented on semi-volatile secondary inorganic aerosols on three clear days in May 2008 during the IMPACT campaign at the Cabauw tower in the Netherlands. A single column model in combination with the equilibrium aerosol model ISORROPIA is used. This model uses surface observations from IMPACT and calculates the gas-aerosol partitioning of ammonium nitrate. The calculated gas-aerosol equilibrium overestimates the gas phase fraction during daytime, and overestimates the aerosol phase fraction during night-time. This discrepancy can partly be solved when the approach of the gas-aerosol equilibrium is forced to proceed with a delay timescale of up to two hours. Although it is shown that the delay itself has a small effect, the most important effect is caused by the mixing of air from higher altitudes at which the equilibrium is shifted to the aerosol phase. Thus, vertical mixing is shown to have a significant influence on the calculated partitioning at the surface. In some occasions, the correspondence to the observed partitioning improves dramatically.

    Even though gas-aerosol partitioning of ammonium nitrate is not instantaneous, observations show that a different equilibrium in the upper boundary layer causes aerosol ammonium nitrate concentrations to increase with altitude. Our model calculates similar vertical gradients depending on the assumed speed of gas-aerosol equilibrium. The calculated optical properties of the aerosol show a similar behaviour. The aerosol optical properties depend on the aerosol size distribution both directly, because light scattering depends on particle size, and indirectly, because the equilibration timescale depends on the aerosol sizes. Future studies should therefore focus on a fully size-resolved treatment of the gas-aerosol partitioning.

    Finally, coarser-resolution models may treat the gas-aerosol equilibrium of ammonium nitrate by calculating the equilibrium with

  4. Measurements and Modelling of the Wind Speed Profile in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Hasager, Charlotte B.

    2008-12-01

    We present measurements from 2006 of the marine wind speed profile at a site located 18 km from the west coast of Denmark in the North Sea. Measurements from mast-mounted cup anemometers up to a height of 45 m are extended to 161 m using LiDAR observations. Atmospheric turbulent flux measurements performed in 2004 with a sonic anemometer are compared to a bulk Richardson number formulation of the atmospheric stability. This is used to classify the LiDAR/cup wind speed profiles into atmospheric stability classes. The observations are compared to a simplified model for the wind speed profile that accounts for the effect of the boundary-layer height. For unstable and neutral atmospheric conditions the boundary-layer height could be neglected, whereas for stable conditions it is comparable to the measuring heights and therefore essential to include. It is interesting to note that, although it is derived from a different physical approach, the simplified wind speed profile conforms to the traditional expressions of the surface layer when the effect of the boundary-layer height is neglected.

  5. Automatic remote sensing detection of the convective boundary layer structure over flat and complex terrain using the novel PathfinderTURB algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltera, Yann; Martucci, Giovanni; Hervo, Maxime; Haefele, Alexander; Emmenegger, Lukas; Brunner, Dominik; Henne, stephan

    2016-04-01

    We have developed, applied and validated a novel algorithm called PathfinderTURB for the automatic and real-time detection of the vertical structure of the planetary boundary layer. The algorithm has been applied to a year of data measured by the automatic LIDAR CHM15K at two sites in Switzerland: the rural site of Payerne (MeteoSwiss station, 491 m, asl), and the alpine site of Kleine Scheidegg (KSE, 2061 m, asl). PathfinderTURB is a gradient-based layer detection algorithm, which in addition makes use of the atmospheric variability to detect the turbulent transition zone that separates two low-turbulence regions, one characterized by homogeneous mixing (convective layer) and one above characterized by free tropospheric conditions. The PathfinderTURB retrieval of the vertical structure of the Local (5-10 km, horizontal scale) Convective Boundary Layer (LCBL) has been validated at Payerne using two established reference methods. The first reference consists of four independent human-expert manual detections of the LCBL height over the year 2014. The second reference consists of the values of LCBL height calculated using the bulk Richardson number method based on co-located radio sounding data for the same year 2014. Based on the excellent agreement with the two reference methods at Payerne, we decided to apply PathfinderTURB to the complex-terrain conditions at KSE during 2014. The LCBL height retrievals are obtained by tilting the CHM15K at an angle of 19 degrees with respect to the horizontal and aiming directly at the Sphinx Observatory (3580 m, asl) on the Jungfraujoch. This setup of the CHM15K and the processing of the data done by the PathfinderTURB allows to disentangle the long-transport from the local origin of gases and particles measured by the in-situ instrumentation at the Sphinx Observatory. The KSE measurements showed that the relation amongst the LCBL height, the aerosol layers above the LCBL top and the gas + particle concentration is all but

  6. Clouds in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. V. The impact of CO2 ice clouds on the outer boundary of the habitable zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmann, D.

    2017-04-01

    Clouds have a strong impact on the climate of planetary atmospheres. The potential scattering greenhouse effect of CO2 ice clouds in the atmospheres of terrestrial extrasolar planets is of particular interest because it might influence the position and thus the extension of the outer boundary of the classic habitable zone around main sequence stars. Here, the impact of CO2 ice clouds on the surface temperatures of terrestrial planets with CO2 dominated atmospheres, orbiting different types of stars is studied. Additionally, their corresponding effect on the position of the outer habitable zone boundary is evaluated. For this study, a radiative-convective atmospheric model is used the calculate the surface temperatures influenced by CO2 ice particles. The clouds are included using a parametrised cloud model. The atmospheric model includes a general discrete ordinate radiative transfer that can describe the anisotropic scattering by the cloud particles accurately. A net scattering greenhouse effect caused by CO2 clouds is only obtained in a rather limited parameter range which also strongly depends on the stellar effective temperature. For cool M-stars, CO2 clouds only provide about 6 K of additional greenhouse heating in the best case scenario. On the other hand, the surface temperature for a planet around an F-type star can be increased by 30 K if carbon dioxide clouds are present. Accordingly, the extension of the habitable zone due to clouds is quite small for late-type stars. Higher stellar effective temperatures, on the other hand, can lead to outer HZ boundaries about 0.5 au farther out than the corresponding clear-sky values.

  7. National Convective Weather Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NCWF is an automatically generated depiction of: (1) current convection and (2) extrapolated signficant current convection. It is a supplement to, but does NOT...

  8. Improvements in Climate Simulation with Modifications to the Tiedtke Convective Parameterization in the Grid-Point Atmospheric Model of IAP LASG (GAMIL)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The grid-point atmospheric model of IAP LASG (GAMIL) was developed in and has been evaluated since early 2004. Although the model shows its ability in simulating the global climate, it suffers from some problems in simulating precipitation in the tropics. These biases seem to result mainly from the treatment of the subgrid scale convection, which is parameterized with Tiedtke's massflux scheme (or the Zhang-McFarlane scheme, as an option) in the model. In order to reduce the systematic biases, several modifications were made to the Tiedtke scheme used in GAMIL, including (1) an increase in lateral convective entrainment/detrainment rate for shallow convection, (2) inclusion of a relative humidity threshold for the triggering of deep convection, and (3) a reduced efficiency for the conversion of cloud water to rainwater in the convection scheme.Two experiments, one with the original Tiedtke scheme used in GAMIL and the other with the modified scheme, were conducted to evaluate the performance of the modified scheme in this study. The results show that both the climatological mean state, such as precipitation, temperature and specific humidity, and interannual variability in the model simulation are improved with the use of this modified scheme. Results from several additional experiments show that the improvements in the model performance in different regions mainly result from either the introduction of the relative humidity threshold for triggering of the deep convection or the suppressed shallow convection due to enhanced lateral convective entrainment/detrainment rates.

  9. Observational relationship between meso-sized convection and 5-min oscillation in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, S.; Kitai, R.

    In order to understand 3-dimensional structures of upper solar convection zone, we performed two different kinds of observation simultaneously with the Domeless Solar Telescope of Hida Observatory. One is the 2D imaging observation of solar quiet photosphere in wavelengths around lambda4308 AA. Another is the slit 1D spectroscopy of the neutral iron line lambda6302.5 AA; at the central region of the field-of-view of the imaging observation. Thus the horizontal velocity field is obtained from the former observation, while the radial velocity field is obtained from the latter one at the same region. In both velocity fields, we found the meso-sized structures and confirmed convective nature of the flow. And we observed that amplitudes of 5-min oscillations were increased soon after large downward motions of convection, similar to the other observations' results (T.R. Rimmele, P.R. Goode, E. Harold, and R.T. Stebbins 1995; O. Espagnet, R. Muller, Th. Roudier, P. Mein, N. Mein, and J.M. Malherbe 1996). Moreover, we report the possible relationship between horizontal velocity gradient distributions and oscillation excitations.

  10. Radiation Effect on Mixed Convection Boundary Layer Flow of a Viscoelastic Fluid over a Horizontal Circular Cylinder with Constant Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present article, radiation effect on mixed convection boundary layer flow of a viscoelastic fluid over a horizontal circular cylinder with constant heat flux has been numerically analyzed. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed to dimensionless nonlinear partial differential equations. The equations are solved numerically by using Keller-box method. The computed results are in excellent agreement with the previous studies. Skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are emphasized specifically. These quantities are displayed against the curvature parameter. The effects of pertinent parameters involved in the problem namely effective Prandtl number and mixed convection parameter on skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are shown through graphs and table. Boundary layer separation points are also calculated with and without radiation and a comparison is shown. The presence of radiation helps to decrease or increase the skin friction coefficient for the negative or positive values of the mixed convection parameter accordingly. The decrease in value of effective Prandtl number helps to increase the value of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number for viscoelastic fluids.

  11. The marine atmospheric boundary layer under strong wind conditions: Organized turbulence structure and flux estimates by airborne measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilouet, Pierre-Etienne; Durand, Pierre; Canut, Guylaine

    2017-02-01

    During winter, cold air outbreaks take place in the northwestern Mediterranean sea. They are characterized by local strong winds (Mistral and Tramontane) which transport cold and dry continental air across a warmer sea. In such conditions, high values of surface sensible and latent heat flux are observed, which favor deep oceanic convection. The HyMeX/ASICS-MED field campaign was devoted to the study of these processes. Airborne measurements, gathered in the Gulf of Lion during the winter of 2013, allowed for the exploration of the mean and turbulent structure of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). A spectral analysis based on an analytical model was conducted on 181 straight and level runs. Profiles of characteristic length scales and sharpness parameter of the vertical wind spectrum revealed larger eddies along the mean wind direction associated with an organization of the turbulence field into longitudinal rolls. These were highlighted by boundary layer cloud bands on high-resolution satellite images. A one-dimensional description of the vertical exchanges is then a tricky issue. Since the knowledge of the flux profile throughout the entire MABL is essential for the estimation of air-sea exchanges, a correction of eddy covariance turbulent fluxes was developed taking into account the systematic and random errors due to sampling and data processing. This allowed the improvement of surface fluxes estimates, computed from the extrapolation of the stacked levels. A comparison between those surface fluxes and bulk fluxes computed at a moored buoy revealed considerable differences, mainly regarding the latent heat flux under strong wind conditions.

  12. What causes the large extensions of red-supergiant atmospheres? Comparisons of interferometric observations with 1-D hydrostatic, 3-D convection, and 1-D pulsating model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Arroyo-Torres, B; Chiavassa, A; Scholz, M; Freytag, B; Marcaide, J M; Hauschildt, P H; Wood, P R; Abellan, F J

    2015-01-01

    We present the atmospheric structure and the fundamental parameters of three red supergiants, increasing the sample of RSGs observed by near-infrared spectro-interferometry. Additionally, we test possible mechanisms that may explain the large observed atmospheric extensions of RSGs. We carried out spectro-interferometric observations of 3 RSGs in the near-infrared K-band with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution. To comprehend the extended atmospheres, we compared our observational results to predictions by available hydrostatic PHOENIX, available 3-D convection, and new 1-D self-excited pulsation models of RSGs. Our near-infrared flux spectra are well reproduced by the PHOENIX model atmospheres. The continuum visibility values are consistent with a limb-darkened disk as predicted by the PHOENIX models, allowing us to determine the angular diameter and the fundamental parameters of our sources. Nonetheless, in the case of V602 Car and HD 95686, the PHOENIX model visibilities do not predict ...

  13. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models. III. The relation to mixing length convection theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magic, Z.; Weiss, A.; Asplund, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the relation between 1D atmosphere models that rely on the mixing length theory and models based on full 3D radiative hydrodynamic (RHD) calculations to describe convection in the envelopes of late-type stars. Methods: The adiabatic entropy value of the deep convection zone, sbot, and the entropy jump, Δs, determined from the 3D RHD models, were matched with the mixing length parameter, αMLT, from 1D hydrostatic atmosphere models with identical microphysics (opacities and equation-of-state). We also derived the mass mixing length parameter, αm, and the vertical correlation length of the vertical velocity, C[vz,vz], directly from the 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar subsurface convection. Results: The calibrated mixing length parameter for the Sun is α๏MLT (Sbot) = 1.98. . For different stellar parameters, αMLT varies systematically in the range of 1.7 - 2.4. In particular, αMLT decreases towards higher effective temperature, lower surface gravity and higher metallicity. We find equivalent results for α๏MLT (ΔS). In addition, we find a tight correlation between the mixing length parameter and the inverse entropy jump. We derive an analytical expression from the hydrodynamic mean-field equations that motivates the relation to the mass mixing length parameter, αm, and find that it qualitatively shows a similar variation with stellar parameter (between 1.6 and 2.4) with the solar value of α๏m = 1.83.. The vertical correlation length scaled with the pressure scale height yields 1.71 for the Sun, but only displays a small systematic variation with stellar parameters, the correlation length slightly increases with Teff. Conclusions: We derive mixing length parameters for various stellar parameters that can be used to replace a constant value. Within any convective envelope, αm and related quantities vary strongly. Our results will help to replace a constant αMLT. Appendices are available in electronic form at http

  14. Large-eddy simulation of the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer and influence of the radiative forcing during the Wangara experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Ozzo, Cédric; Carissimo, Bertrand; Milliez, Maya; Musson-Genon, Luc; Dupont, Eric

    2013-04-01

    The ability to simulate the whole diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer in order to study the complex turbulent structures remains a difficult topic. Consequently large-eddy simulations (LES) are performed with the open source CFD code Code_Saturne [Archambeau et al., 2004]. First the code is validated on an atmospheric convective case [Schmidt and Schumann, 1989] where different subgrid-scale (SGS) models are compared: two non-dynamical SGS models [Smagorinsky, 1963] [Nicoud and Ducros, 1999] and two dynamical SGS models [Germano et al., 1991 ; Lilly, 1992] [Wong and Lilly, 1994]. Then LES are performed to simulate the whole diurnal cycle of the Wangara experiment (Day 33-34). The results are compared to measurements , RANS "k-ɛ" model and other LES performed by [Basu et al., 2008] using a locally averaged scale-dependent dynamic (LASDD) SGS model. Thereafter the influence of the radiative forcing on the atmosphere is studied testing several SGS models. The results are especially discussed on nocturnal low level jet and potential temperature gradient in the stable boundary layer. References: [Archambeau et al., 2004] Archambeau F., Mehitoua N., Sakiz M. (2004). Code_Saturne: a finite volume code for the computation of turbulent incompressible flows. International Journal on Finite Volumes 1(1). [Basu et al., 2008] Basu S., Vinuesa J. F., and Swift A. (2008). Dynamic LES modeling of a diurnal cycle. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 47 :1156-1174. [Germano et al., 1991] Germano M., Piomelli U., Moin P., and Cabot W. H. (1991). A dynamic subgrid-scale eddy-viscosity model. Physics of Fluids, A3 :1760-1765. [Lilly, 1992] Lilly D. K. (1992). A proposed modification of the Germano subgrid-scale closure method. Physics of Fluids, A 4 :633-635. [Schmidt and Schumann, 1989] Schmidt H. and Schumann U. (1989). Coherent structure of the convective boundary layer derived from lage-eddy simulation. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 200 :511-562. [Smagorinsky

  15. A shallow convection parameterization for the non-hydrostatic MM5 mesoscale model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaman, N.L.; Kain, J.S.; Deng, A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A shallow convection parameterization suitable for the Pennsylvannia State University (PSU)/National Center for Atmospheric Research nonhydrostatic mesoscale model (MM5) is being developed at PSU. The parameterization is based on parcel perturbation theory developed in conjunction with a 1-D Mellor Yamada 1.5-order planetary boundary layer scheme and the Kain-Fritsch deep convection model.

  16. WAVELET TRANSFORM METHOD FOR DERIVING ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER HEIGHT FROM LIDAR SIGNALS

    OpenAIRE

    RAJITHA PALETI; Y. Bhavani Kumar; T. Krishna Chaitanya

    2013-01-01

    Wavelet method of determining the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) height from lidar signals is presented in this paper. The wavelet covariance transform (WCT) method employed determines the significant gradient in the measured lidar signals. Using this method, the accuracy of ABL height detection enhances with increased dilation length. The developed wavelet algorithm is coded in MATLAB software and has a provision to alter the dilation length in real-time for a given translation estimate.

  17. Entrainment of stratospheric air and Asian pollution by the convective boundary layer in the southwestern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, A. O.; Alvarez, R. J.; Brioude, J.; Fine, R.; Gustin, M. S.; Lin, M. Y.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Pierce, R. B.; Sandberg, S. P.; Senff, C. J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Williams, E. J.

    2017-01-01

    A series of deep stratospheric intrusions in late May 2013 increased the daily maximum 8 h surface ozone (O3) concentrations to more than 70 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at rural and urban surface monitors in California and Nevada. This influx of ozone-rich lower stratospheric air and entrained Asian pollution persisted for more than 5 days and contributed to exceedances of the 2008 8 h national ambient air quality standard of 75 ppbv on 21 and 25 May in Clark County, NV. Exceedances would also have occurred on 22 and 23 May had the new standard of 70 ppbv been in effect. In this paper, we examine this episode using lidar measurements from a high-elevation site on Angel Peak, NV, and surface measurements from NOAA, the Clark County, Nevada Department of Air Quality, the Environmental Protection Agency Air Quality System, and the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative. These measurements, together with analyses from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/North American Regional Reanalysis; NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory AM3 model; NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service Real-time Air Quality Modeling System; and FLEXPART models, show that the exceedances followed entrainment of 20 to 40 ppbv of lower stratospheric ozone mingled with another 0 to 10 ppbv of ozone transported from Asia by the unusually deep convective boundary layers above the Mojave desert. Our analysis suggests that this vigorous mixing can affect both high and low elevations and help explain the springtime ozone maximum in the southwestern U.S.

  18. Decadal change in the troposphere and atmospheric boundary layer over the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, W.D. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    During the austral winter of 1993, the Environmental Technology Laboratory carried out a detailed field study of the atmospheric boundary layer at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station to determine the effect of transitory synoptic disturbances on the surface-energy budget. This study used newly developed 915-megahertz radar wind-profiling technology for the first time in the Antarctic in combination with conventional boundary layer instrumentation that included a short tower, sonic anemometer, microbarograph array, and doppler sodar. Recent discussions, however, of interdecadal variability in the circumpolar circulation around Antarctica and of decadal changes in summer cloudiness at the South Pole, motivated our study of the long-term variability in boundary layer characteristics, cloudiness, and tropospheric flow behavior to provide a climatological context for our single year`s observations. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Large eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flows and application to pollen dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamecki, Marcelo

    This work presents a framework for simulating pollen dispersal by wind based on Large Eddy Simulation. Important phenomena such as pollen emission by plants and ground deposition are modeled through the boundary condition. An expression for the vertical equilibrium concentration profile of pollen particles, including the effect of the canopy on the eddy diffusivity as well as corrections for atmospheric stability, is proposed for this purpose. This expression is validated against measurements of vertical concentration profiles of corn pollen above a corn field. The numerical discretization of the evolution equations follows a new approach in which different discretization schemes are used for the velocity and concentration fields. A new interpolation scheme is proposed to couple the two discretizations. The numerical model is validated against previously published experiments of point-source releases of glass beads and pollen grains in the atmospheric boundary layer. The numerical model is used together with experimental data of pollen emission and downwind deposition from a natural field obtained near Washington DC in the summer of 2006. The combined analysis of experimental and numerical data elucidates the emission, transport, and deposition processes in considerable detail. In particular, the relative fractions of pollen deposited inside the source field and airborne at the edge of the field can be quantified. Investigations based on experimental data and direct numerical simulation of the effects of the local structure of the flow on subgrid scale models for simulations of the atmospheric boundary layer are also presented.

  20. Exploring the Effects of Atmospheric Forcings on Evaporation: Experimental Integration of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Shallow Subsurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Kathleen; Eagen, Victoria; Trautz, Andrew

    2015-06-08

    Evaporation is directly influenced by the interactions between the atmosphere, land surface and soil subsurface. This work aims to experimentally study evaporation under various surface boundary conditions to improve our current understanding and characterization of this multiphase phenomenon as well as to validate numerical heat and mass transfer theories that couple Navier-Stokes flow in the atmosphere and Darcian flow in the porous media. Experimental data were collected using a unique soil tank apparatus interfaced with a small climate controlled wind tunnel. The experimental apparatus was instrumented with a suite of state of the art sensor technologies for the continuous and autonomous collection of soil moisture, soil thermal properties, soil and air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. This experimental apparatus can be used to generate data under well controlled boundary conditions, allowing for better control and gathering of accurate data at scales of interest not feasible in the field. Induced airflow at several distinct wind speeds over the soil surface resulted in unique behavior of heat and mass transfer during the different evaporative stages.

  1. Contrasts of Atmospheric Circulation and Associated Tropical Convection between Huaihe River Valley and Yangtze River Valley Mei-yu Flooding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Jieli; LIU Yimin

    2012-01-01

    The significant differences of atmospheric circulation between flooding in the Huaihe and Yangtze River valleys during early mei-yu (i.e.,the East Asian rainy season in June) and the related tropical convection were investigated.During the both flooding cases,although the geopotential height anomalies always exhibit equivalent barotropic structures in middle to high latitudes at middle and upper troposphere,the phase of the Rossby wave train is different over Eurasian continent.During flooding in the Huaihe River valley,only one single blocking anticyclone is located over Baikal Lake.In contrast,during flooding in the Yangtze River valley,there are two blocking anticyclones.One is over the Ural Mountains and the other is over Northeast Asia.In the lower troposphere a positive geopotential height anomaly is located at the western ridge of subtropical anticyclone over Western Pacific (SAWP) in both flooding cases,but the location of the height anomaly is much farther north and west during the Huaihe River mei-yu flooding.Furthermore,abnormal rainfall in the Huaihe River valley and the regions north of it in China is closely linked with the latent heating anomaly over the Arabian Sea and Indian peninsula.However,the rainfall in the Yangtze River valley and the regions to its south in China is strongly related to the convection over the western tropical Pacific.Numerical experiments demonstrated that the enhanced latent heating over the Arabian Sea and Indian peninsula causes water vapor convergence in the region south of Tibetan Plateau and in the Huaihe River valley extending to Japan Sea with enhanced precipitation; and vapor divergence over the Yangtze River valley and the regions to its south with deficient precipitation.While the weakened convection in the tropical West Pacific results in moisture converging over the Yangtze River and the region to its south,along with abundant rainfall.

  2. An Improved Atmospheric Vector Radiative Transfer Model Incorporating Rough Ocean Boundaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xue-Hua; CHEN Hong-Bin; HAN Zhi-Gang; LIN Long-Fu

    2010-01-01

    The radiative transfer model (RT3), a vector radiative transfer (VRT) scheme in a plane-parallel at-mosphere, was bounded by a rough ocean surface in this study. The boundary problem was solved using a Fourier series decomposition of the radiation field as a function of the azimuth. For the case of a rough ocean surface, the decomposition was obtained by developing both the Fresnel reflection matrix and the probability distribution of the water facet orientation as Fourier series. The effect of shadowing by ocean surface waves was also considered in the boundary condition. The VRT model can compute the intensity and degree of polarization of the light at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), the ocean surface, and any level of the atmosphere in the ocean-atmosphere system. The results obtained by our model are in good agreement with those computed by Ahmad's model. The simulated results showed that the shadow effects of wave facets on the intensity and the degree of polarization are negligible except at the ocean surface near the grazing angle, possi-bly because we did not consider the effect of white caps.

  3. Intercomparison of Martian Lower Atmosphere Simulated Using Different Planetary Boundary Layer Parameterization Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Murali; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Dwyer Cianciolo, Alicia; Smith, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    We use the mesoscale modeling capability of Mars Weather Research and Forecasting (MarsWRF) model to study the sensitivity of the simulated Martian lower atmosphere to differences in the parameterization of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Characterization of the Martian atmosphere and realistic representation of processes such as mixing of tracers like dust depend on how well the model reproduces the evolution of the PBL structure. MarsWRF is based on the NCAR WRF model and it retains some of the PBL schemes available in the earth version. Published studies have examined the performance of different PBL schemes in NCAR WRF with the help of observations. Currently such assessments are not feasible for Martian atmospheric models due to lack of observations. It is of interest though to study the sensitivity of the model to PBL parameterization. Typically, for standard Martian atmospheric simulations, we have used the Medium Range Forecast (MRF) PBL scheme, which considers a correction term to the vertical gradients to incorporate nonlocal effects. For this study, we have also used two other parameterizations, a non-local closure scheme called Yonsei University (YSU) PBL scheme and a turbulent kinetic energy closure scheme called Mellor- Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) PBL scheme. We will present intercomparisons of the near surface temperature profiles, boundary layer heights, and wind obtained from the different simulations. We plan to use available temperature observations from Mini TES instrument onboard the rovers Spirit and Opportunity in evaluating the model results.

  4. Tracking atmospheric boundary layer dynamics with water vapor D-excess observations

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotope water vapor observations present a history of hydrological processes that have impacted on an air mass. Consequently, there is scope to improve our knowledge of how different processes impact on humidity budgets by determining the isotopic end members of these processes and combining them with in-situ water vapor measurements. These in-situ datasets are still rare and cover a limited geographical expanse, so expanding the available data can improve our ability to define isotopic end members and knowledge about atmospheric humidity dynamics. Using data collected from an intensive field campaign across a semi-arid grassland site in eastern Australia, we combine multiple methods including in-situ stable isotope observations to study humidity dynamics associated with the growth and decay of the atmospheric boundary layer and the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The deuterium-excess (D-excess) in water vapor is traditionally thought to reflect the sea surface temperature and relative humidity at the point of evaporation over the oceans. However, a number of recent studies suggest that land-atmosphere interactions are also important in setting the D-excess of water vapor. These studies have shown a highly robust diurnal cycle for the D-excess over a range of sites that could be exploited to better understand variations in atmospheric humidity associated with boundary layer dynamics. In this study we use surface radon concentrations as a tracer of surface layer dynamics and combine these with the D-excess observations. The radon concentrations showed an overall trend that was inversely proportional to the D-excess, with early morning entrainment of air from the residual layer of the previous day both diluting the radon concentration and increasing the D-excess, followed by accumulation of radon at the surface and a decrease in the D-excess as the stable nocturnal layer developed in the late afternoon and early evening. The stable nocturnal boundary layer

  5. Model Simulations of the Arctic Atmospheric Boundary Layer from the SHEBA Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjernstroem, Michael; Zagar, Mark; Svensson, Gunilla [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    2004-06-01

    We present Arctic atmospheric boundary-layer modeling with a regional model COAMPSTM, for the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment. Model results are compared to soundings, near-surface measurements and forecasts from the ECMWF model. The near-surface temperature is often too high in winter, except in shorter periods when the boundary layer was cloud-capped and well-mixed due to cloud-top cooling. Temperatures are slightly too high also during the summer melt season. Effects are too high boundary-layer moisture and formation of too dense stratocumulus, generating a too deep well-mixed boundary layer with a cold bias at the simulated boundary-layer top. Errors in temperature and therefore moisture are responsible for large errors in heat flux, in particular in solar radiation, by forming these clouds. We conclude that the main problems lie in the surface energy balance and the treatment of the heat conduction through the ice and snow and in how low-level clouds are treated.

  6. Effects of artificial sea film slick upon the atmospheric boundary layer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repina, Irina; Artamonov, Arseniy; Malinovsky, Vladimir; Chechin, Dmitriy

    2010-05-01

    Organic surface-active compounds accumulate at the ocean-atmosphere boundary, influencing several air-sea interaction processes. In coastal areas with high biological activity this accumulation frequently becomes visible as mirrorlike patches ("slicks") on the sea surface. The artificial surface films of oleyl alcohol and vegetable oil were produced in the Black Sea coastal zone (one site was located near Gelendjik and another was near Crimea coast) to investigate its influence on energy and gas exchange between atmosphere and sea surface under different meteorological conditions. The atmospheric turbulence measurements during the passage of an artificial sea slick are compared with similar measurements without a sea slick. The effects of the slick are modifications of roughness length z0, and a possible increase in mean wind speed. In the mean, during the passage of the slick, the roughness length decreased while the mean wind speed appeared to increase. For the spectral comparison we compared the wind field over the sea during the time the film slick was in the vicinity of the measurement site with the wind field observed after the slick had passed. The cross-spectral density was computed between horizontal velocity and vertical velocity (Reynolds stress) and between atmospheric temperature and vertical velocity (heat flux). The introduction of the sea film slick, with its damping and suppression of capillary waves, appears to completely destroy the atmospheric turbulence generation. When a slick is present, the U-W phase angle and Reynolds stress spectrum for the atmosphere appear to be completely unaffected by undulating sea surface directly below the sensors. Spectral and wavelet analysis of the atmospheric surface layer characteristics showed a significant correlation between the processes on the sea surface and the atmospheric boundary layer. An intensification of change processes in the vicinity of the windward slick boundary are detected. It may be

  7. Observation of deep convection initiation from shallow convection environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothon, Marie; Couvreux, Fleur; Guichard, Françoise; Campistron, Bernard; Chong, Michel; Rio, Catherine; Williams, Earle

    2010-05-01

    In the afternoon of 10 July 2006, deep convective cells initiated right in the field of view of the Massachusetts Institute Technology (MIT) C-band Doppler radar. This radar, with its 3D exploration at 10 min temporal resolution and 250 m radial resolution, allows us to track the deep convective cells and also provides clear air observations of the boundary layer structure prior to deep convection initiation. Several other observational platforms were operating then which allow us to thoroughly analyse this case: Vertically pointing aerosol lidar, W-band radar and ceilometer from the ARM Mobile Facility, along with radiosoundings and surface measurements enable us to describe the environment, from before their initiation to after the propagation of of one propagating cell that generated a circular gust front very nicely caught by the MIT radar. The systems considered here differ from the mesoscale convective systems which are often associated with African Easterly Waves, increasing CAPE and decreasing CIN. The former have smaller size, and initiate more locally, but there are numerous and still play a large role in the atmospheric circulation and scalar transport. Though, they remain a challenge to model. (See the presentation by Guichard et al. in the same session, for a model set up based on the same case, with joint single-column model and Large Eddy Simulation, which aims at better understanding and improving the parametrisation of deep convection initiation.) Based on the analysis of the observations mentioned above, we consider here the possible sources of deep convection initiation that day, which showed a typical boundary-layer growth in semi-arid environment, with isolated deep convective events.

  8. Mixed Convection Boundary-layer Flow of a Nanofluid Near Stagnation-point on a Vertical Plate with Effects of Buoyancy Assisting and Opposing Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Tamim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the steady laminar mixed convection boundary layer flow of a nanofluid near the stagnation-point on a vertical plate with prescribed surface temperature is investigated. Here, both assisting and opposing flows are considered and studied. Using appropriate transformations, the system of partial differential equations is transformed into an ordinary differential system of two equations, which is solved numerically by shooting method, coupled with Runge-Kutta scheme. Three different types of nanoparticles, namely copper Cu, alumina Al2O3 and titania TiO2 with water as the base fluid are considered. Numerical results are obtained for the skin-friction coefficient and Nusselt number as well as for the velocity and temperature profiles for some values of the governing parameters, namely, the nanoparticle volume fraction parameter &Phiand mixed convection parameter &lambda It is found that the highest rate of heat transfer occurs in the mixed convection with assisting flow while the lowest one occurs in the mixed convection with opposing flow. Moreover, the skin friction coefficient and the heat transfer rate at the surface are highest for copper–water nanofluid compared to the alumina–water and titania–water nanofluids.

  9. Effects of the chemical reaction and heat generation or absorption on a mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical stretching sheet with nonuniform slot mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samyuktha, N.; Ravindran, R.; Ganapathirao, M.

    2017-01-01

    An analysis is performed to study the effects of the chemical reaction and heat generation or absorption on a steady mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical stretching sheet with nonuniform slot mass transfer. The governing boundary layer equations with boundary conditions are transformed into the dimensionless form by a group of nonsimilar transformations. Nonsimilar solutions are obtained numerically by solving the coupled nonlinear partial differential equations using the quasi-linearization technique combined with an implicit finite difference scheme. The numerical computations are carried out for different values of dimensionless parameters to display the distributions of the velocity, temperature, concentration, local skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number, and local Sherwood number. The results obtained indicate that the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers increase with nonuniform slot suction, but nonuniform slot injection produces the opposite effect. The local Nusselt number decreases with heat generation and increases with heat absorption.

  10. Study of Transitions in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Explicit Algebraic Turbulence Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazeroms, W. M. J.; Svensson, G.; Bazile, E.; Brethouwer, G.; Wallin, S.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We test a recently developed engineering turbulence model, a so-called explicit algebraic Reynolds-stress (EARS) model, in the context of the atmospheric boundary layer. First of all, we consider a stable boundary layer used as the well-known first test case from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study (GABLS1). The model is shown to agree well with data from large-eddy simulations (LES), and this agreement is significantly better than for a standard operational scheme with a prognostic equation for turbulent kinetic energy. Furthermore, we apply the model to a case with a (idealized) diurnal cycle and make a qualitative comparison with a simpler first-order model. Some interesting features of the model are highlighted, pertaining to its stronger foundation on physical principles. In particular, the use of more prognostic equations in the model is shown to give a more realistic dynamical behaviour. This qualitative study is the first step towards a more detailed comparison, for which additional LES data are needed.

  11. Effect of Large Finite-Size Wind Farms and Their Wakes on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ka Ling; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Through the use of large-eddy simulation, the effect of large finite-size wind farms and their wakes on conventionally-neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics and power extraction is investigated. Specifically, this study focuses on a wind farm that comprises 25 rows of wind turbines, spanning a distance of 10 km. It is shown that large wind farms have a significant effect on internal boundary layer growth both inside and downwind of the wind farms. If the wind farm is large enough, the internal boundary layer interacts with the thermally-stratified free atmosphere above, leading to a modification of the ABL height and power extraction. In addition, it is shown that large wind farms create extensive wakes, which could have an effect on potential downwind wind farms. Specifically, for the case considered here, a power deficit as large as 8% is found at a distance of 10 km downwind from the wind farm. Furthermore, this study compares the wind farm wake dynamics for cases in which the conventionally neutral ABLs are driven by a unidirectional pressure gradient and Coriolis forces.

  12. LOTOS: A Proposed Lower Tropospheric Observing System from the Land Surface through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, S. A.; Lee, W. C.; Carbone, R. E.; Oncley, S.; Brown, W. O. J.; Spuler, S.; Horst, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sensor capabilities, but also in electronics, optics, RF communication, and off-the-grid power are enabling new measurement paradigms. NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) is considering new sensors, new deployment modes, and integrated observing strategies to address challenges in understanding within the atmospheric boundary layer and the underlying coupling to the land surface. Our vision is of a network of deployable observing sites, each with a suite of complementary instruments that measure surface-atmosphere exchange, and the state and evolution of the boundary layer. EOL has made good progress on distributed surface energy balance and flux stations, and on boundary layer remote sensing of wind and water vapor, all suitable for deployments of combined instruments and as network of such sites. We will present the status of the CentNet surface network development, the 449-MHz modular wind profiler, and a water vapor and temperature profiling differential absorption lidar (DIAL) under development. We will further present a concept for a test bed to better understand the value of these and other possible instruments in forming an instrument suite flexible for multiple research purposes.

  13. A consistent turbulence formulation for the dynamic wake meandering model in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, R.-E.

    2013-07-15

    This thesis describes the further development and validation of the dynamic meandering wake model for simulating the flow field and power production of wind farms operating in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The overall objective of the conducted research is to improve the modelling capability of the dynamics wake meandering model to a level where it is sufficiently mature to be applied in industrial applications and for an augmentation of the IEC-standard for wind turbine wake modelling. Based on a comparison of capabilities of the dynamic wake meandering model to the requirement of the wind industry, four areas were identified as high prioritizations for further research: 1. the turbulence distribution in a single wake. 2. multiple wake deficits and build-up of turbulence over a row of turbines. 3. the effect of the atmospheric boundary layer on wake turbulence and wake deficit evolution. 4. atmospheric stability effects on wake deficit evolution and meandering. The conducted research is to a large extent based on detailed wake investigations and reference data generated through computational fluid dynamics simulations, where the wind turbine rotor has been represented by an actuator line model. As a consequence, part of the research also targets the performance of the actuator line model when generating wind turbine wakes in the atmospheric boundary layer. Highlights of the conducted research: 1. A description is given for using the dynamic wake meandering model as a standalone flow-solver for the velocity and turbulence distribution, and power production in a wind farm. The performance of the standalone implementation is validated against field data, higher-order computational fluid dynamics models, as well as the most common engineering wake models in the wind industry. 2. The EllipSys3D actuator line model, including the synthetic methods used to model atmospheric boundary layer shear and turbulence, is verified for modelling the evolution of wind

  14. Unsteady laminar mixed convection boundary layer flow near a vertical wedge due to oscillations in the free-stream and surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy N.C.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady laminar boundary layer characteristics of mixed convection flow past a vertical wedge have been investigated numerically. The free-stream velocity and surface temperature are assumed to be oscillating in the magnitude but not in the direction of the oncoming flow velocity. The governing equations have been solved by two distinct methods, namely, the straightforward finite difference method for the entire frequency range, and the extended series solution for low frequency range and the asymptotic series expansion method for high frequency range. The results demonstrate the effects of the Richardson number, Ri, introduced to quantify the influence of mixed convection and the Prandtl number, Pr, on the amplitudes and phase angles of the skin friction and heat transfer. In addition, the effects of these parameters are examined in terms of the transient skin friction and heat transfer.

  15. Similarity Solution for Combined Free-Forced Convection Past a Vertical Porous Plate in a Porous Medium with a Convective Surface Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg P.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the mathematical implications of the two dimensional viscous steady laminar combined free-forced convective flow of an incompressible fluid over a semi infinite fixed vertical porous plate embedded in a porous medium. It is assumed that the left surface of the plate is heated by convection from a hot fluid which is at a temperature higher than the temperature of the fluid on the right surface of the vertical plate. To achieve numerical consistency for the problem under consideration, the governing non linear partial differential equations are first transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations using a similarity variable and then solved numerically under conditions admitting similarity solutions. The effects of the physical parameters of both the incompressible fluid and the vertical plate on the dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are studied and analysed and the results are depicted both graphically and in a tabular form. Finally, algebraic expressions and the numerical values are obtained for the local skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number.

  16. Radiation and atmospheric circulation controls on carbonyl sulfide concentrations in the marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkelhammer, M.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Cosgrove, A.; Peters, A. J.; Johnson, R.; Hayden, M.; Montzka, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    A potential closure of the global carbonyl sulfide (COS or OCS) budget has recently been attained through a combination of remote sensing, modeling, and extended surface measurements. However, significant uncertainties in the spatial and temporal dynamics of the marine flux still persist. In order to isolate the terrestrial photosynthetic component of the global atmospheric OCS budget, tighter constraints on the marine flux are needed. We present 6 months of nearly continuous in situ OCS concentrations from the North Atlantic during the fall and winter of 2014-2015 using a combination of research vessel and fixed tower measurements. The data are characterized by synoptic-scale ˜100 pmol mol-1 variations in marine boundary layer air during transitions from subtropical to midlatitude source regions. The synoptic OCS variability is shown here to be a linear function of the radiation history along an air parcel's trajectory with no apparent sensitivity to the chlorophyll concentration of the surface waters that the air mass interacted with. This latter observation contradicts expectations and suggests a simple radiation limitation for the combined direct and indirect marine OCS emissions. Because the concentration of OCS in the marine boundary layer is so strongly influenced by an air parcel's history, marine and atmospheric concentrations would rarely be near equilibrium and thus even if marine production rates are held constant at a given location, the ocean-atmosphere flux would be sensitive to changes in atmospheric circulation alone. We hypothesize that changes in atmospheric circulation including latitudinal shifts in the storm tracks could affect the marine flux through this effect.

  17. Preliminary analysis of the Nocturnal Atmospheric Boundary Layer during the experimental campaign CIBA 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagüe, C.; Maqueda, G.; Ramos, D.; Sastre, M.; Viana, S.; Serrano, E.; Morales, G.; Ayarzagüena, B.; Viñas, C.; Sánchez, E.

    2009-04-01

    An Atmospheric Boundary Layer campaign was developed in Spain along June 2008 at the CIBA (Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere) site which is placed on a fairly homogeneous terrain in the centre of an extensive plateau (41°49' N, 4°56' W). Different instrumentation at several levels was available on a new 10m meteorological mast, including temperature and humidity sensors, wind vanes and cup anemometers, as well as one sonic anemometer. Besides, two quartz-based microbarometers were installed at 50 and 100m on the main permanent 100m tower placed at CIBA. Three additional microbarometers were deployed on the surface on a triangular array of approximately 200 m side, and a tethered balloon was used in order to record vertical profiles of temperature, wind and humidity up to 1000m. Finally, a GRIMM particle monitor (MODEL 365), which can be used to continuously measure each six seconds simultaneously the PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 values, was deployed at 1.5m. This work will show some preliminary results from the campaign CIBA 2008, analysing the main physical processes present in the atmospheric Nocturnal Boundary Layer (NBL), the different stability periods observed and the corresponding turbulent parameters, as well as the coherent structures detected. The pressure perturbations measured from the surface and tower levels make possible to study the main wave parameters from wavelet transform, and compared the structures detected by the microbarometers with those detected in the wind and particles records.

  18. Differences in the efficacy of climate forcings explained by variations in atmospheric boundary layer depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2016-05-25

    The Earth has warmed in the last century and a large component of that warming has been attributed to increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. There are also numerous processes that introduce strong, regionalized variations to the overall warming trend. However, the ability of a forcing to change the surface air temperature depends on its spatial and temporal distribution. Here we show that the efficacy of a forcing is determined by the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere, which in cold and dry climates is defined by the depth of the planetary boundary layer. This can vary by an order of magnitude on different temporal and spatial scales, and so we get a strongly amplified temperature response in shallow boundary layers. This must be accounted for to assess the efficacy of a climate forcing, and also implies that multiple climate forcings cannot be linearly combined to determine the temperature response.

  19. Stable Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98): A Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuxart, J.; Yague, C.; Morales, G.; Terradellas, E.; Orbe, J.; Calvo, J.; Fernandez, A.; Soler, M.R.; Infante, C.; Buenestado, P.; Espinalt, A.; Joergensen, H.E.; Rees, J.M.; Vila, J.; Redondo, J.M.; Cantalapiedra, I.R.; Conangla, L.

    This paper describes the Stable AtmosphericBoundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98),which took place over the northern Spanish plateaucomprising relatively flat grassland,in September 1998. The main objectives of the campaign were to study the properties of themid-latitude stable boundary layer (SBL).Instrumentation deployed on two meteorologicalmasts (of heights 10 m and 100 m)included five sonic anemometers, 15 thermocouples,five cup anemometers and three propeller anemometers,humidity sensors and radiometers.A Sensitron mini-sodar and a tetheredballoon were also operated continuously. Atriangular array of cup anemometers wasinstalled to allow the detection ofwave events. Two nocturnal periods analysedon 14-15 and 20-21 September are used toillustrate the wide-ranging characteristics of the SBL.

  20. Perturbations to the Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of the Diurnally-Varying Atmospheric Boundary Layer Due to an Extensive Wind Farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V.; Parlange, M. B.; Calaf, M.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of extensive terrestrial wind farms on the spatio-temporal structure of the diurnally-evolving atmospheric boundary layer is explored. High-resolution large-eddy simulations of a realistic diurnal cycle with an embedded wind farm are performed. Simulations are forced by a constant geostrophic velocity with time-varying surface boundary conditions derived from a selected period of the CASES-99 field campaign. Through analysis of the bulk statistics of the flow as a function of height and time, it is shown that extensive wind farms shift the inertial oscillations and the associated nocturnal low-level jet vertically upwards by approximately 200 m; cause a three times stronger stratification between the surface and the rotor-disk region, and as a consequence, delay the formation and growth of the convective boundary layer (CBL) by approximately 2 h. These perturbations are shown to have a direct impact on the potential power output of an extensive wind farm with the displacement of the low-level jet causing lower power output during the night as compared to the day. The low-power regime at night is shown to persist for almost 2 h beyond the morning transition due to the reduced growth of the CBL. It is shown that the wind farm induces a deeper entrainment region with greater entrainment fluxes. Finally, it is found that the diurnally-averaged effective roughness length for wind farms is much lower than the reference value computed theoretically for neutral conditions.

  1. Perturbations to the Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of the Diurnally-Varying Atmospheric Boundary Layer Due to an Extensive Wind Farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V.; Parlange, M. B.; Calaf, M.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of extensive terrestrial wind farms on the spatio-temporal structure of the diurnally-evolving atmospheric boundary layer is explored. High-resolution large-eddy simulations of a realistic diurnal cycle with an embedded wind farm are performed. Simulations are forced by a constant geostrophic velocity with time-varying surface boundary conditions derived from a selected period of the CASES-99 field campaign. Through analysis of the bulk statistics of the flow as a function of height and time, it is shown that extensive wind farms shift the inertial oscillations and the associated nocturnal low-level jet vertically upwards by approximately 200 m; cause a three times stronger stratification between the surface and the rotor-disk region, and as a consequence, delay the formation and growth of the convective boundary layer (CBL) by approximately 2 h. These perturbations are shown to have a direct impact on the potential power output of an extensive wind farm with the displacement of the low-level jet causing lower power output during the night as compared to the day. The low-power regime at night is shown to persist for almost 2 h beyond the morning transition due to the reduced growth of the CBL. It is shown that the wind farm induces a deeper entrainment region with greater entrainment fluxes. Finally, it is found that the diurnally-averaged effective roughness length for wind farms is much lower than the reference value computed theoretically for neutral conditions.

  2. Formulation of a Prototype Coupled Atmospheric and Oceanic Boundary Layer Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    layers. The approach will be to compare observed evolutions in the oceanic and atmospheric boundary layers with predictions from bulk modelo wherein...16.4 -. 004S 6.3 1100 276 iSi 8.2 £3.0 £5.2 16.4 -.0045 6.3 1130 278 M53 6.6 13.1 iS.2 14.1 -.0057 6.3 1200 279 iS3 5.0 £3.0 iS.2 14.1 -.00S7 5.7 1230

  3. Numerical solution on mixed convection boundary layer flow past a horizontal circular cylinder in a Jeffrey fluid with constant heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zokri, S. M.; Arifin, N. S.; Mohamed, M. K. A.; Salleh, M. Z.; Kasim, A. R. M.; Mohammad, N. F.

    2017-08-01

    This paper discusses the viscous dissipation effect with constant heat flux on the mixed convection boundary layer flow past a horizontal circular cylinder in a Jeffrey fluid. The transformed partial differential equations are solved numerically by using the well-tested, flexible, implicit and unconditionally stable Keller-box method. Numerical results for the velocity and temperature profiles are attained in the form of graph for different values of parameters such as Prandtl number, ratio of relaxation to retardation times and Deborah number. It is found that the velocity profile is noticeably decreased with an increase in Deborah number while the temperature profile is slightly increased.

  4. Lie Group Analysis on Brownian Motion and Thermophoresis Effect on Free Convective Boundary-Layer Flow on a Vertical Cylinder Embedded in a Nanofluid-Saturated Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ferdows

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural convective boundary-layer flow of a nanofluid on a heated vertical cylinder embedded in a nanofluid-saturated porous medium is studied. The model used for the nanofluid incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Lie groups analysis is used to get the similarity transformations, which transform the governing partial differential equations to a system of ordinary differential equations. Two groups of similarity transformations are obtained. Numerical solutions of the resulting ordinary differential systems are obtained and discussed for various values of the governing parameters.

  5. Lithium spectral line formation in stellar atmospheres. The impact of convection and NLTE effects

    CERN Document Server

    Klevas, J; Steffen, M; Caffau, E; Ludwig, H -G

    2015-01-01

    Different simplified approaches are used to account for the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects with 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. In certain cases, chemical abundances are derived in 1D NLTE and corrected for the 3D effects by adding 3D-1D LTE abundance corrections (3D+NLTE approach). Alternatively, average model atmospheres are sometimes used to substitute for the full 3D hydrodynamical models. We tested whether the results obtained using these simplified schemes (i.e., 3D+NLTE, NLTE) may reproduce those derived using the full 3D NLTE computations. The tests were made using 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of the main sequence (MS), main sequence turn-off (TO), subgiant (SGB), and red giant branch (RGB) stars, all at [M/H]=0.0 and -2.0. Our goal was to investigate the role of 3D and NLTE effects on the formation of the 670.8 nm lithium line by assessing strengths of synthetic 670.8 nm line profiles, computed using 3D/1D NLTE/LTE approaches. Our results show that Li 670.8 n...

  6. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric boundary layer with application to wind farm dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggy, Scott B.

    With the recent push for renewable energy sources, wind energy has emerged as a candidate to replace some of the power produced by traditional fossil fuels. Recent studies, however, have indicated that wind farms may have a direct effect on local meteorology by transporting water vapor away from the Earth's surface. Such turbulent transport could result in an increased drying of soil, and, in turn, negatively affect the productivity of land in the wind farm's immediate vicinity. This numerical study will analyze four scenarios with the goal of understanding turbulence transport in the wake of a turbine: the neutrally-stratified boundary layer with system rotation, the unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer, and wind turbine simulations of these previous two cases. For this work, the Ekman layer is used as an approximation of the atmospheric boundary layer and the governing equations are solved using a fully-parallelized direct numerical simulation (DNS). The in-depth studies of the neutrally and unstably-stratified boundary layers without introducing wind farm effects will act to provide a concrete background for the final study concerning turbulent transport due to turbine wakes. Although neutral stratification rarely occurs in the atmospheric boundary layer, it is useful to study the turbulent Ekman layer under such conditions as it provides a limiting case when unstable or stable stratification are weak. In this work, a thorough analysis was completed including turbulent statistics, velocity and pressure autocorrelations, and a calculation of the full turbulent energy budget. The unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer was studied under two levels of heating: moderate and vigorous. Under moderate stratification, both buoyancy and shearing contribute significantly to the turbulent dynamics. As the level of stratification increases, the role of shearing is shown to diminish and is confined to the near-wall region only. A recent, multi

  7. [Analysis on concentration variety characteristics of atmospheric ozone under the boundary layer in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Xue-Mei; Wang, Geng-Chen; Chen, Hong-Bin; Wang, Pu-Cai; Xuan, Yue-Jian

    2007-11-01

    Based on the atmospheric ozone sounding data, the average monthly and seasonal variety principles of atmospheric ozone concentration during six years are analyzed under the boundary layer in Beijing. The results show that the monthly variation of atmospheric ozone are obvious that the minimum values appear in January from less than 10 x 10(-9) on ground to less than 50 x 10(-9) on upper layer (2 km), but the maximum values appear in June from 85 x 10(-9) on ground to more than 90 x 10(-9) on upper layer. The seasonal variation is also clear that the least atmospheric ozone concentration is in winter and the most is in summer, but variety from ground to upper layer is largest in winter and least in summer. According to the type of outline, the outline of ozone concentration is composite of three types which are winter type, summer type and spring-autumn type. The monthly ozone concentration in different heights is quite different. After analyzing the relationship between ozone concentration and meteorological factors, such as temperature and humidity, we find ozone concentration on ground is linear with temperature and the correlation coefficient is more than 85 percent.

  8. Survey of literature on convective heat transfer coefficients and recovery factors for high atmosphere thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, S.

    1973-01-01

    Heat transfer phenomena of rarefied gas flows is discussed based on a literature survey of analytical and experimental rarefied gas dynamics. Subsonic flows are emphasized for the purposes of meteorological thermometry in the high atmosphere. The heat transfer coefficients for three basic geometries are given in the regimes of free molecular flow, transition flow, slip flow, and continuum flow. Different types of heat phenomena, and the analysis of theoretical and experimental data are presented. The uncertainties calculated from the interpolation rule compared with the available experimental data are discussed. The recovery factor for each geometry in subsonic rarefied flows is also given.

  9. Nonlinear radiation heat transfer effects in the natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate: a numerical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Meraj; Mushtaq, Ammar; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    The problem of natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate is discussed in the presence of nonlinear radiative heat flux. The effects of magnetic field, Joule heating and viscous dissipation are also taken into consideration. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations and then solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The results reveal an existence of point of inflection for the temperature distribution for sufficiently large wall to ambient temperature ratio. Temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as Brownian motion and thermophoretic effects intensify. Moreover temperature increases and heat transfer from the plate decreases with an increase in the radiation parameter.

  10. Nonlinear radiation heat transfer effects in the natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate: a numerical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meraj Mustafa

    Full Text Available The problem of natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate is discussed in the presence of nonlinear radiative heat flux. The effects of magnetic field, Joule heating and viscous dissipation are also taken into consideration. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations and then solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The results reveal an existence of point of inflection for the temperature distribution for sufficiently large wall to ambient temperature ratio. Temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as Brownian motion and thermophoretic effects intensify. Moreover temperature increases and heat transfer from the plate decreases with an increase in the radiation parameter.

  11. The effect of velocity slip and multiple convective boundary conditions in a Darcian porous media with microorganism past a vertical stretching/shrinking sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latiff, Nur Amalina Abdul; Yahya, Elisa; Ismail, Ahmad Izani Md.; Amirsom, Ardiana; Basir, Faisal

    2017-08-01

    An analysis is carried out to study the steady mixed convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid in a Darcian porous media with microorganisms past a vertical stretching/shrinking sheet. Heat generation/absorption and chemical reaction effects are incorporated in the model. The partial differential equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformations generated by scaling group transformations. The transformed equations with boundary conditions are solved numerically. The effects of controlling parameters such as velocity slip, Darcy number, heat generation/absorption and chemical reaction on the skin friction factor, heat transfer, mass transfer and microorganism transfer are shown and discuss through graphs. Comparison of numerical solutions in the present study with the previous existing results in literature are made and comparison results are in very good agreement.

  12. Stagnation-point flow of a nanofluid past a stretching/shrinking sheet with heat generation/absorption and convective boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganthran, Kohilavani; Nazar, Roslinda

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the stagnation-point flow of a nanofluid towards a stretching/shrinking sheet with heat generation/absorption and convective boundary conditions has been analysed numerically. The governing boundary layer equations in the form of nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using the similarity transformations, so that they can be solved numerically by the bvp4c function (programme) in Matlab software. The effects of the associated parameters on the numerical results are illustrated in tables and figures. It is found that dual solutions exist in both cases of stretching and shrinking sheet situations. A stability analysis has been conducted to determine the stability of the dual solutions. Results from the stability analysis proved that the first solution is stable and physically realizable whereas the second solution is unstable.

  13. THE SIMULATION OF FINE SCALE NOCTURNAL BOUNDARY LAYER MOTIONS WITH A MESO-SCALE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werth, D.; Kurzeja, R.; Parker, M.

    2009-04-02

    A field project over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement-Clouds and Radiation Testbed (ARM-CART) site during a period of several nights in September, 2007 was conducted to explore the evolution of the low-level jet (LLJ). Data was collected from a tower and a sodar and analyzed for turbulent behavior. To study the full range of nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) behavior, the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was used to simulate the ARM-CART NBL field experiment and validated against the data collected from the site. This model was run at high resolution, and is ideal for calculating the interactions among the various motions within the boundary layer and their influence on the surface. The model reproduces adequately the synoptic situation and the formation and dissolution cycles of the low-level jet, although it suffers from insufficient cloud production and excessive nocturnal cooling. The authors suggest that observed heat flux data may further improve the realism of the simulations both in the cloud formation and in the jet characteristics. In a higher resolution simulation, the NBL experiences motion on a range of timescales as revealed by a wavelet analysis, and these are affected by the presence of the LLJ. The model can therefore be used to provide information on activity throughout the depth of the NBL.

  14. Solar wind Alfvén waves: a source of pulsed ionospheric convection and atmospheric gravity waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prikryl

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A case study of medium-scale travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs that are correlated with solar wind Alfvén waves is presented. The HF radar ground-scatter signatures of TIDs caused by atmospheric gravity waves with periods of 20-40min are traced to a source at high latitudes, namely pulsed ionospheric flows (PIFs due to bursts in the convection electric field and/or the associated ionospheric current fluctuations inferred from ground magnetic field perturbations. The significance of PIFs and TIDs in the context of solar-terrestrial interaction is that Alfvénic fluctuations of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF observed in the solar wind plasma streaming from a coronal hole correlate with PIFs and TIDs. The link between the solar wind Alfvén waves and TIDs is corroborated by the ground magnetic field signatures of ionospheric current fluctuations that are associated with the IMF-By oscillations and TIDs. The observed PIFs and the associated negative-to-positive deflections of the ground magnetic field X component are interpreted as ionospheric signatures of magnetic reconnection pulsed by solar wind Alfvén waves at the dayside magnetopause. Although the clarity of the radar line-of-sight velocity data may have been affected by anomalous HF propagation due to intervening TIDs, the application of a pure state filtering technique to analyze the radar data time series reveals a one-to-one correspondence between PIFs, TIDs and solar wind Alfvén waves. The spectra of solar wind and ground magnetic field perturbations are similar to those of PIFs and TIDs. The ground-scatter signatures indicate TID wavelengths, phase velocities and travel times that are consistent with ray tracing, which shows a subset of possible gravity wave group paths that reach the F region from a source in the E region after the wave energy first travel downward to the upper mesosphere where the waves are reflected upward. The observed one

  15. Comparison between the atmospheric boundary layer in Paris and its rural suburbs during the ECLAP experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, E.; Menut, L.; Carissimo, B.; Pelon, J.; Flamant, P.

    The ECLAP experiment has been performed during the winter of 1995 in order to study the influence of the urban area of Paris on the vertical structure and diurnal evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer, in situations favourable to intense urban heat island and pollution increase. One urban site and one rural site have been instrumented with sodars, lidars and surface measurements. Additional radiosondes, 100 m masts and Eiffel Tower data were also collected. This paper gives a general overview of this experiment, and presents results of the analysis of four selected days, characterized by various wind directions and temperature inversion strengths. This analysis, which consists in a comparison between data obtained in the two sites, has been focused on three parameters of importance to the ABL dynamics: the standard deviation of vertical velocity, the surface sensible heat flux, and the boundary layer height. The vertical component of turbulence is shown to be enhanced by the urban area, the amplitude of this effect strongly depending on the meteorological situation. The sensible heat flux in Paris is generally found larger than in the rural suburbs. The most frequent differences range from 25-65 W m -2, corresponding to relative differences of 20-60%. The difference of unstable boundary layer height between both sites are most of the time less than 100 m. However, sodar and temperature data show that the urban influence is enhanced during night-time and transitions between stable and unstable regimes.

  16. Estimating the atmospheric boundary layer height over sloped, forested terrain from surface spectral analysis during BEARPEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Choi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL height (zi over complex, forested terrain is estimated based on the power spectra and the integral length scale of horizontal winds obtained from a three-axis sonic anemometer during the BEARPEX (Biosphere Effects on Aerosol and Photochemistry Experiment. The zi values estimated with this technique showed very good agreement with observations obtained from balloon tether sonde (2007 and rawinsonde (2009 measurements under unstable conditions (z/L < 0 at the coniferous forest in the California Sierra Nevada. The behavior of the nocturnal boundary layer height (h and power spectra of lateral winds and temperature under stable conditions (z/L > 0 is also presented. The nocturnal boundary layer height is found to be fairly well predicted by a recent interpolation formula proposed by Zilitinkevich et al. (2007, although it was observed to only vary from 60–80 m during the experiment. Finally, significant directional wind shear was observed during both day and night with winds backing from the prevailing west-southwesterlies in the ABL (anabatic cross-valley circulation to consistent southerlies in a layer ~1 km thick just above the ABL before veering to the prevailing westerlies further aloft. We show that this is consistent with the forcing of a thermal wind driven by the regional temperature gradient directed due east in the lower troposphere.

  17. Evolution of the atmospheric boundary-layer structure of an arid Andes Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodayar, S.; Kalthoff, N.; Fiebig-Wittmaack, M.; Kohler, M.

    2008-04-01

    The boundary-layer structure of the Elqui Valley is investigated, which is situated in the arid north of Chile and extends from the Pacific Ocean in the west to the Andes in the east. The climate is dominated by the south-eastern Pacific subtropical anticyclone and the cold Humboldt Current. This combination leads to considerable temperature and moisture gradients between the coast and the valley and results in the evolution of sea and valley wind systems. The contribution of these mesoscale wind systems to the heat and moisture budget of the valley atmosphere is estimated, based on radiosoundings performed near the coast and in the valley. Near the coast, a well-mixed cloud-topped boundary layer exists. Both, the temperature and the specific humidity do not change considerably during the day. In the stratus layer the potential temperature increases, while the specific humidity decreases slightly with height. The top of the thin stratus layer, about 300 m in depth, is marked by an inversion. Moderate sea breeze winds of 3-4 m s-1 prevail in the sub-cloud and cloud layer during daytime, but no land breeze develops during the night. The nocturnal valley atmosphere is characterized by a strong and 900 m deep stably stratified boundary layer. During the day, no pronounced well-mixed layer with a capping inversion develops in the valley. Above a super-adiabatic surface layer of about 150 m depth, a stably stratified layer prevails throughout the day. However, heating can be observed within a layer above the surface 800 m deep. Heat and moisture budget estimations show that sensible heat flux convergence exceeds cold air advection in the morning, while both processes compensate each other around noon, such that the temperature evolution stagnates. In the afternoon, cold air advection predominates and leads to net cooling of the boundary layer. Furthermore, the advection of moist air results in the accumulation of moisture during the noon and afternoon period, while

  18. Structure and Optical Properties of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer over Dusty Hot Deserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalermthai, B.; Al Marzooqi, M.; Basha, G.; Ouarda, T.; Armstrong, P.; Molini, A.

    2014-12-01

    Strong sensible heat fluxes and deep turbulent mixing - together with marked dustiness and a low substrate water content - represent a characteristic signature of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over hot deserts, resulting in "thicker" mixing layers and peculiar optical properties. Beside these main common features however, desert boundary layers present extremely complex local structures that have been scarcely addressed in the literature, and whose understanding is essential in modeling processes such as transport and deposition of dust and pollutants, local wind fields, turbulent fluxes and their impacts on the sustainable development, human health and solar energy harvesting in these regions. In this study, we explore the potential of the joint usage of Lidar Ceilometer backscattering profiles and sun-photometer optical depth retrievals to quantitatively determine the vertical aerosol profile over dusty hot desert regions. Toward this goal, we analyze a continuous record of observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height from a single lens LiDAR ceilometer operated at Masdar Institute Field Station (24.4425N 54.6163E, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates), starting March 2013, and the concurrent measurements of aerosol optical depth derived independently from the Masdar Institute AERONET sun-photometer. The main features of the desert ABL are obtained from the ceilometer range corrected backscattering profiles through bi-dimensional clustering technique we developed as a modification of the recently proposed single-profile clustering method, and therefore "directly" and "indirectly" calibrated to obtain a full diurnal cycle climatology of the aerosol optical depth and aerosol profiles. The challenges and the advantages of applying a similar methodology to the monitoring of aerosols and dust over hyper-arid regions are also discussed, together with the issues related to the sensitivity of commercial ceilometers to changes in the solar background.

  19. Large Eddy Simulation and Field Experiments of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C.; Parlange, M. B.; van Hout, R.

    2006-12-01

    Dispersion of airborne pollen by the wind has been a subject of interest for botanists and allergists for a long time. More recently, the development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and subsequent contamination of natural plant populations has brought even more interest to this field. A critical question is how far from the source field pollen grains will be advected. Clearly the answer depends on the aerodynamic properties of the pollen, geometrical properties of the field, topography, local vegetation, wind conditions, atmospheric stability, etc. As a consequence, field experiments are well suited to provide some information on pollen transport mechanisms but are limited to specific field and weather conditions. Numerical simulations do not have this drawback and can be a useful tool to study pollen dispersal in a variety of configurations. It is well known that the dispersion of particles in turbulent fields is strongly affected by the large scale coherent structures. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is a technique that allows us to study the typical distances reached by pollen grains and, at the same time, resolve the larger coherent structures present in the atmospheric boundary layer. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using LES. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of extreme importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. In both cases we make use of the theoretical profile for suspended particles derived by Kind (1992). Field experiments were performed to study the applicability of the theoretical profile to pollen grains and the results are encouraging. Airborne concentrations as well as ground deposition from the simulations are compared to experimental data to validate the

  20. A Parameter-Uniform Finite Difference Method for a Coupled System of Convection-Diffusion Two-Point Boundary Value Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eugene O'Riordan; Jeanne Stynes; Martin Stynes

    2008-01-01

    A system of m (≥ 2) linear convection-diffusion two-point boundary value problems is examined, where the diffusion term in each equation is multiplied by a small parameter e and the equations are coupled through their convective and reactive terms via matrices B and A respectively. This system is in general singularly perturbed. Unlike the case of a single equation, it does not satisfy a conventional maximum princi-ple. Certain hypotheses are placed on the coupling matrices B and A that ensure exis-tence and uniqueness of a solution to the system and also permit boundary layers in the components of this solution at only one endpoint of the domain; these hypotheses can be regarded as a strong form of diagonal dominance of B. This solution is decomposed into a sum of regular and layer components. Bounds are established on these compo-nents and their derivatives to show explicitly their dependence on the small parameterε. Finally, numerical methods consisting of upwinding on piecewise-uniform Shishkin meshes are proved to yield numerical solutions that are essentially first-order conver-gent, uniformly in ε, to the true solution in the discrete maximum norm. Numerical results on Shishkin meshes are presented to support these theoretical bounds.

  1. On the factors governing water vapor turbulence mixing in the convective boundary layer over land: Concept and data analysis technique using ground-based lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Sandip, E-mail: sup252@PSU.EDU

    2016-06-01

    The convective boundary layer (CBL) turbulence is the key process for exchanging heat, momentum, moisture and trace gases between the earth's surface and the lower part of the troposphere. The turbulence parameterization of the CBL is a challenging but important component in numerical models. In particular, correct estimation of CBL turbulence features, parameterization, and the determination of the contribution of eddy diffusivity are important for simulating convection initiation, and the dispersion of health hazardous air pollutants and Greenhouse gases. In general, measurements of higher-order moments of water vapor mixing ratio (q) variability yield unique estimates of turbulence in the CBL. Using the high-resolution lidar-derived profiles of q variance, third-order moment, and skewness and analyzing concurrent profiles of vertical velocity, potential temperature, horizontal wind and time series of near-surface measurements of surface flux and meteorological parameters, a conceptual framework based on bottom up approach is proposed here for the first time for a robust characterization of the turbulent structure of CBL over land so that our understanding on the processes governing CBL q turbulence could be improved. Finally, principal component analyses will be applied on the lidar-derived long-term data sets of q turbulence statistics to identify the meteorological factors and the dominant physical mechanisms governing the CBL turbulence features. - Highlights: • Lidar based study for CBL turbulence features • Water vapor and aerosol turbulence profiles • Processes governing boundary layer turbulence profiles using lidars.

  2. Lie group analysis of flow and heat transfer of non-Newtonian nanofluid over a stretching surface with convective boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afify, Ahmed A.; El-Aziz, Mohamed Abd

    2017-02-01

    The steady two-dimensional flow and heat transfer of a non-Newtonian power-law nanofluid over a stretching surface under convective boundary conditions and temperature-dependent fluid viscosity has been numerically investigated. The power-law rheology is adopted to describe non-Newtonian characteristics of the flow. Four different types of nanoparticles, namely copper (Cu), silver (Ag), alumina (Al 2 O 3) and titanium oxide (TiO 2) are considered by using sodium alginate (SA) as the base non-Newtonian fluid. Lie symmetry group transformations are used to convert the boundary layer equations into non-linear ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are solved numerically by using a shooting method with fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme. The results show that the effect of viscosity on the heat transfer rate is remarkable only for relatively strong convective heating. Moreover, the skin friction coefficient and the rate of heat transfer increase with an increase in Biot number.

  3. Convective boundary layer flow and heat transfer in a nanofluid in the presence of second order slip, constant heat flux and zero nanoparticles flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, M.M., E-mail: mansurdu@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, PO Box 36, PC 123 Al-Khod, Muscat (Oman); Al-Rashdi, Maryam H. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, PO Box 36, PC 123 Al-Khod, Muscat (Oman); Pop, I. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca 400084 (Romania)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Convective boundary layer flow and heat transfer in a nanofluid is investigated. • Second order slip increases the rate of shear stress and decreases the rate of heat transfer in a nanofluid. • In nanofluid flow zero normal flux of the nanoparticles at the surface is realistic to apply. • Multiple solutions are identified for certain values of the parameter space. • The upper branch solution is found to be stable, hence physically realizable. - Abstract: In this work, the effects of the second order slip, constant heat flux, and zero normal flux of the nanoparticles due to thermophoresis on the convective boundary layer flow and heat transfer characteristics in a nanofluid using Buongiorno's model over a permeable shrinking sheet is studied theoretically. The nonlinear coupled similarity equations are solved using the function bvp4c using Matlab. Similarity solutions of the flow, heat transfer and nanoparticles volume fraction are presented graphically for several values of the model parameters. The results show that the application of second order slip at the interface is found to be increased the rate of shear stress and decreased the rate of heat transfer in a nanofluid, so need to be taken into account in nanofluid modeling. The results further indicate that multiple solutions exist for certain values of the parameter space. The stability analysis provides guarantee that the lower branch solution is unstable, while the upper branch solution is stable and physically realizable.

  4. Lie group analysis of flow and heat transfer of non-Newtonian nanofluid over a stretching surface with convective boundary condition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AHMED A AFIFY; MOHAMED ABD EL-AZIZ

    2017-02-01

    The steady two-dimensional flow and heat transfer of a non-Newtonian power-law nanofluid over a stretching surface under convective boundary conditions and temperature-dependent fluid viscosity has been numerically investigated. The power-law rheology is adopted to describe non-Newtonian characteristics of the flow. Four different types of nanoparticles, namely copper (Cu), silver (Ag), alumina (Al$_2$O$_3$) and titanium oxide (TiO$_2$) are considered by using sodium alginate (SA) as the base non-Newtonian fluid. Lie symmetry group transformations are used to convert the boundary layer equations into non-linear ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are solved numerically by using a shooting method with fourth-order Runge–Kutta integration scheme. The results show that the effect of viscosity on the heat transfer rate is remarkable only for relatively strong convective heating. Moreover, the skin friction coefficient and the rate of heat transfer increasewith an increase in Biot number.

  5. Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Clouds wind speed profile measurements with the new compact long range wind Lidar WindCube(TM) WLS70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boquet, M.; Cariou, J. P.; Sauvage, L.; Lolli, S.; Parmentier, R.; Loaec, S.

    2009-04-01

    To fully understand atmospheric dynamics, climate studies, energy transfer, and weather prediction the wind field is one of the most important atmospheric state variables. Small scales variability and low atmospheric layers are not described with sufficient resolution up to now. To answer these needs, the WLS70 long-range wind Lidar is a new generation of wind Lidars developed by LEOSPHERE, derived from the commercial WindCube™ Lidar widely used by the wind power industry and well-known for its great accuracy and data availability. The WLS70 retrieves the horizontal and vertical wind speed profiles as well as the wind direction at various heights simultaneously inside the boundary layer and cloud layers. The amplitude and spectral content of the backscattering signal are also available. From raw data, the embedded signal processing software performs the computation of the aerosol Doppler shift and backscattering coefficient. Higher values of normalized relative backscattering (NRB) are proportional to higher aerosol concentration. At 1540 nm, molecular scattering being negligible, it is then possible to directly retrieve the Boundary Layer height evolution observing the height at which the WindCube NRB drops drastically. In this work are presented the results of the measurements obtained during the LUAMI campaign that took place in Lindenberg, at the DWD (Deutscher WetterDienst) meteorological observatory, from November 2008 to January 2009. The WLS70 Lidar instrument was placed close together with an EZ Lidar™ ALS450, a rugged and compact eye safe aerosol Lidar that provides a real time measurement of backscattering and extinction coefficients, aerosol optical depth (AOD), automatic detection of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height and clouds base and top from 100m up to more than 20km. First results put in evidence wind shear and veer phenomena as well as strong convective effects during the raise of the mixing layer or before rain periods. Wind speed

  6. Condensation-inhibited convection in hydrogen-rich atmospheres . Stability against double-diffusive processes and thermal profiles for Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, Jérémy; Selsis, Franck; Hersant, Franck; Guillot, Tristan

    2017-02-01

    In an atmosphere, a cloud condensation region is characterized by a strong vertical gradient in the abundance of the related condensing species. On Earth, the ensuing gradient of mean molecular weight has relatively few dynamical consequences because N2 is heavier than water vapor, so that only the release of latent heat significantly impacts convection. On the contrary, in a hydrogen dominated atmosphere (e.g., giant planets), all condensing species are significantly heavier than the background gas. This can stabilize the atmosphere against convection near a cloud deck if the enrichment in the given species exceeds a critical threshold. This raises two questions. What is transporting energy in such a stabilized layer, and how affected can the thermal profile of giant planets be? To answer these questions, we first carry out a linear analysis of the convective and double-diffusive instabilities in a condensable medium showing that an efficient condensation can suppress double-diffusive convection. This suggests that a stable radiative layer can form near a cloud condensation level, leading to an increase in the temperature of the deep adiabat. Then, we investigate the impact of the condensation of the most abundant species (water) with a steady-state atmosphere model. Compared to standard models, the temperature increase can reach several hundred degrees at the quenching depth of key chemical tracers. Overall, this effect could have many implications for our understanding of the dynamical and chemical state of the atmosphere of giant planets, for their future observations (with Juno for example), and for their internal evolution.

  7. Melting and freezing in a finite slab due to a linearly decreasing free-stream temperature of a convective boundary condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roday Anand P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional melting and freezing problem in a finite slab with time-dependent convective boundary condition is solved using the heat-balance integral method. The temperature, T4 1(t, is applied at the left face and decreases linearly with time while the other face of the slab is imposed with a constant convective boundary condition where T4 2 is held at a fixed temperature. In this study, the initial condition of the solid is subcooled (initial temperature is below the melting point. The temperature, T4 1(t at time t = 0 is so chosen such that convective heating takes place and eventually the slab begins to melt (i. e., T4 1(0 > Tf > T4 2. The transient heat conduction problem, until the phase-change starts, is also solved using the heat-balance integral method. Once phase-change process starts, the solid-liquid interface is found to proceed to the right. As time continues, and T4,1(t decreases with time, the phase-change front slows, stops, and may even reverse direction. Hence this problem features sequential melting and freezing of the slab with partial penetration of the solid-liquid front before reversal of the phase-change process. The effect of varying the Biot number at the right face of the slab is investigated to determine its impact on the growth/recession of the solid-liquid interface. Temperature profiles in solid and liquid regions for the different cases are reported in detail. One of the results for Biot number, Bi2=1.5 are also compared with those obtained by having a constant value of T4 1(t.

  8. Estimating the atmospheric boundary layer height over sloped, forested terrain from surface spectral analysis during BEARPEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Choi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL height (zi over complex, forested terrain is estimated based on the power spectra and the integral length scale of cross-stream winds obtained from a three-axis sonic anemometer during the two summers of the BEARPEX (Biosphere Effects on Aerosol and Photochemistry Experiment. The zi values estimated with this technique show very good agreement with observations obtained from balloon tether sondes (2007 and rawinsondes (2009 under unstable conditions (z/L < 0 at the coniferous forest in the California Sierra Nevada. On the other hand, the low frequency behavior of the streamwise upslope winds did not exhibit significant variations and was therefore not useful in predicting boundary layer height. The behavior of the nocturnal boundary layer height (h with respect to the power spectra of the v-wind component and temperature under stable conditions (z/L > 0 is also presented. The nocturnal boundary layer height is found to be fairly well predicted by a recent interpolation formula proposed by Zilitinkevich et al. (2007, although it was observed to only vary from 60–80 m during the 2009 experiment in which it was measured. Finally, significant directional wind shear was observed during both day and night soundings. The winds were found to be consistently backing from the prevailing west-southwesterlies within the ABL (the anabatic cross-valley circulation to southerlies in a layer ~1–2 km thick just above the ABL before veering to the prevailing westerlies further aloft. This shear pattern is shown to be consistent with the forcing of a thermal wind driven by the regional temperature gradient directed east-southeast in the lower troposphere.

  9. An analytical model for radioactive pollutant release simulation in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weymar, Guilherme J.; Vilhena, Marco T.; Bodmann, Bardo E.J., E-mail: guicefetrs@gmail.com, E-mail: mtmbvilhena@gmail.com, E-mail: bejbodmann@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Buske, Daniela; Quadros, Regis, E-mail: danielabuske@gmail.com, E-mail: quadros99@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), Capao do Leao, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Matematica

    2013-07-01

    Simulations of emission of radioactive substances in the atmosphere from the Brazilian nuclear power plant Angra 1 are a necessary tool for control and elaboration of emergency plans as a preventive action for possible accidents. In the present work we present an analytical solution for radioactive pollutant dispersion in the atmosphere, solving the time-dependent three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation. The experiment here used as a reference in the simulations consisted of the controlled releases of radioactive tritiated water vapor from the meteorological tower close to the power plant at Itaorna Beach. The wind profile was determined using experimental meteorological data and the micrometeorological parameters were calculated from empirical equations obtained in the literature. We report on a novel analytical formulation for the concentration of products of a radioactive chain released in the atmospheric boundary layer and solve the set of coupled equations for each chain radionuclide by the GILTT solution, assuming the decay of all progenitors radionuclide for each equation as source term. Further we report on numerical simulations, as an explicit but fictitious example and consider three radionuclides in the radioactive chain of Uranium 235. (author)

  10. How coastal surges may be generated by mesoscale atmospheric disturbances that in turn are related to propagating convective systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlic, M.; Belusic, D.; Janekovic, I.; Pasaric, M.

    2010-09-01

    On the morning of 21 June 1978, exceptional sea-level oscillations with a trough-to-crest height of 6 m and a period of 10-20 min were observed in Vela Luka Bay. Slightly less pronounced variability was observed in a wider Middle and South Adriatic east coastal area and, with some delay, along the west coast. In the presentation, one of the original hypotheses put forward to interpret the event, relating it to a mesoscale air-pressure disturbance, is reconsidered by using all the available data as well as state-of-the-art meteorological and oceanographic models. A fresh look at the meteorological data confirms that the atmospheric disturbance propagated at about 22 m/s in a northeastward direction. Additionally, the data suggest that it had the shape of the boxcar function characterized by an air-pressure offset of 3 mbar and duration of 10 min. The meteorological model employed (WRF-ARW) proves unable to reproduce the mesoscale disturbance coinciding with the surge, but it shows that the background atmospheric conditions were favorable for the development of convective systems and therefore also for the formation of mesoscale disturbances. The oceanographic model ADCIRC-2DDI, forced by the described air-pressure disturbance, successfully reproduces sea-level variability in Vela Luka Bay reaching a few meters and thus surpassing the inverted barometer response by two orders of magnitude. The enhancement appears to be due to a four-phase process. The model also suggests that the scattering due to the variable bathymetry and the reflection from the east Adriatic coast resulted in waves that returned towards the west coast and generated considerable sea-level activity there. Similar surges that were observed in the Adriatic more recently (Stari Grad and Mali Ston, 2003; Ist, 2007; Mali Losinj, 2008; Stari Grad, 2010) are also mentioned and the dynamics revealed is used as the basis for a brief discussion of terminology appropriate for such processes.

  11. Phase Locking between Atmospheric Convectively Coupled Equatorial Kelvin Waves and the Diurnal Cycle of Precipitation over the Maritime Continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatau, M. K.; Baranowski, D. B.; Flatau, P. J.; Matthews, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Although the importance of the Maritime Continent to the global atmospheric circulation has been long recognized, many researchers have argued that scale separation prevents local processes, such as the local diurnal cycle of precipitation, from directly influencing global scale phenomena such as the variability of atmospheric circulation associated with the equatorial waves. In our study we show that in fact multiscale interactions, which link processes in local and global scales, may play a crucial role for propagation of the CCKWs, which along with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) are the main eastward propagating component of intraseasonal variability. In our study, we show that not only do CCKWs bring excess amounts of precipitation to the Maritime Continent, but events which are phase locked with the local diurnal cycle of convection have a precipitation signal up to three times larger than average. That means that CCKWs are a primary candidate for extreme precipitation events over the densely populated areas of Indonesia and Malaysia. The complex terrain created by mixture of oceans and lands within the Maritime Continent is unique: the distance between the two main land masses at the equator (islands of Sumatra and Borneo) is approximately the same as the distance travelled by a CCKW in one day. Therefore a CCKW event that is synchronized with a local diurnal cycle over Sumatra is likely to be synchronized over Borneo as well. We find that CCKWs, which are in phase with the local diurnal cycle of precipitation over Sumatra, Borneo and surrounding seas, have a 40% larger chance to successfully cross the Maritime Continent than other CCKWs. That unique feature is a likely a clear example of a multiscale interaction within the region.

  12. Preparing for Exascale: Towards convection-permitting, global atmospheric simulations with the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzeller, Dominikus; Duda, Michael G.; Kunstmann, Harald

    2017-04-01

    With strong financial and political support from national and international initiatives, exascale computing is projected for the end of this decade. Energy requirements and physical limitations imply the use of accelerators and the scaling out to orders of magnitudes larger numbers of cores then today to achieve this milestone. In order to fully exploit the capabilities of these Exascale computing systems, existing applications need to undergo significant development. The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) is a novel set of Earth system simulation components and consists of an atmospheric core, an ocean core, a land-ice core and a sea-ice core. Its distinct features are the use of unstructured Voronoi meshes and C-grid discretisation to address shortcomings of global models on regular grids and the use of limited area models nested in a forcing data set, with respect to parallel scalability, numerical accuracy and physical consistency. Here, we present work towards the application of the atmospheric core (MPAS-A) on current and future high performance computing systems for problems at extreme scale. In particular, we address the issue of massively parallel I/O by extending the model to support the highly scalable SIONlib library. Using global uniform meshes with a convection-permitting resolution of 2-3km, we demonstrate the ability of MPAS-A to scale out to half a million cores while maintaining a high parallel efficiency. We also demonstrate the potential benefit of a hybrid parallelisation of the code (MPI/OpenMP) on the latest generation of Intel's Many Integrated Core Architecture, the Intel Xeon Phi Knights Landing.

  13. Scaling Anisotropy and Convective Instability of the Atmospheric Surface-Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitton, G. F.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D. J.; Lovejoy, S.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we use the scaling exponents, often called Hurst exponents, of the horizontal velocity and the temperature to classify the stability of the atmospheric surface-layer, including in the wake of a turbine. For this study we use two datasets for comparison. In the Growian experiment two 150m masts were constructed on coastal terrain with propeller anemometers positioned at the heights 10, 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150m measuring wind speed and direction. The measurements were taken at 2.5Hz over twenty-minutes with 300 measuring runs done in total. In addition, temperature was measured also at 2.5Hz over twenty minutes but only at the heights 10, 50, 100 and 150m. The second dataset consisted of three sonic anemometers positioned at 22, 23 and 43m on a single mast situated in a wind turbine test site in a mountainous part of Corsica France. The sonic anemometers measured three dimensional velocities and temperature at 10Hz over a period of six-months. The samples are separated into daily sub-samples, 180 in total. We find that the stability of the atmospheric surface-layer strongly depends on whether or not the temperature scales passively as the velocity. When the two scaling exponents remain of the same order, the scaling of both the velocity and temperature is consistent with surface-layer literature. However, when the scaling exponent of the temperature becomes larger than the scaling exponent of the velocity, the corresponding time-scales exhibit a strong, scaling anisotropy. To avoid shadow effects from masts, we are compelled to deal with samples whose `mean' velocity is near-perpendicular to the masts. The anisotropy of these samples turns out to be beyond a trivial component-wise anisotropy corresponding to pre-factors depending on the direction, i.e., the scaling exponents themselves (in particular the Hurst exponent) depend on the direction. We use a rotated frame of reference to better analyse this behaviour and put forward analytical expression of

  14. Profiles of second- to third-order moments of turbulent temperature fluctuations in the convective boundary layer: first measurements with Rotational Raman Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Behrendt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The rotational Raman lidar of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH measures atmospheric temperature profiles during daytime with high resolution (10 s, 109 m. The data contain low noise errors even in daytime due to the use of strong UV laser light (355 nm, 10 W, 50 Hz and a very efficient interference-filter-based polychromator. In this paper, we present the first profiling of the second- to forth-order moments of turbulent temperature fluctuations as well as of skewness and kurtosis in the convective boundary layer (CBL including the interfacial layer (IL. The results demonstrate that the UHOH RRL resolves the vertical structure of these moments. The data set which is used for this case study was collected in western Germany (50°53'50.56′′ N, 6°27'50.39′′ E, 110 m a.s.l. within one hour around local noon on 24 April 2013 during the Intensive Observations Period (IOP 6 of the HD(CP2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE, which is embedded in the German project HD(CP2 (High-Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction. First, we investigated profiles of the noise variance and compared it with estimates of the statistical temperature measurement uncertainty Δ T based on Poisson statistics. The agreement confirms that photon count numbers obtained from extrapolated analog signal intensities provide a lower estimate of the statistical errors. The total statistical uncertainty of a 20 min temperature measurement is lower than 0.1 K up to 1050 m a.g.l. at noontime; even for single 10 s temperature profiles, it is smaller than 1 K up to 1000 m a.g.l.. Then we confirmed by autocovariance and spectral analyses of the atmospheric temperature fluctuations that a temporal resolution of 10 s was sufficient to resolve the turbulence down to the inertial subrange. This is also indicated by the profile of the integral scale of the temperature fluctuations, which was in the range of 40 to 120 s in the CBL. Analyzing then

  15. Role of the residual layer and large-scale subsidence on the development and evolution of the convective boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blay-Carreras, E.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Boer, van de A.; Coster, de O.; Darbieu, C.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Lohou, F.; Lothon, M.; Pietersen, H.P.

    2014-01-01

    Observations, mixed-layer theory and the Dutch Large-Eddy Simulation model (DALES) are used to analyze the dynamics of the boundary layer during an intensive operational period (1 July 2011) of the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence campaign. Continuous measurements made by remote s

  16. Using Observations of Deep Convective Systems to Constrain Atmospheric Column Absorption of Solar Radiation in the Optically Thick Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiquan; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Xi, Baike; Hu, Yongxiang; Mace, Gerald G.; Benson, Sally; Rose, Fred; Kato, Seiji; Charlock, Thomas; Minnis, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric column absorption of solar radiation A(sub col) is a fundamental part of the Earth's energy cycle but is an extremely difficult quantity to measure directly. To investigate A(sub col), we have collocated satellite-surface observations for the optically thick Deep Convective Systems (DCS) at the Department of Energy Atmosphere Radiation Measurement (ARM) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) sites during the period of March 2000 December 2004. The surface data were averaged over a 2-h interval centered at the time of the satellite overpass, and the satellite data were averaged within a 1 deg X 1 deg area centered on the ARM sites. In the DCS, cloud particle size is important for top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedo and A(sub col) although the surface absorption is independent of cloud particle size. In this study, we find that the A(sub col) in the tropics is approximately 0.011 more than that in the middle latitudes. This difference, however, disappears, i.e., the A(sub col) values at both regions converge to the same value (approximately 0.27 of the total incoming solar radiation) in the optically thick limit (tau greater than 80). Comparing the observations with the NASA Langley modified Fu_Liou 2-stream radiative transfer model for optically thick cases, the difference between observed and model-calculated surface absorption, on average, is less than 0.01, but the model-calculated TOA albedo and A(sub col) differ by 0.01 to 0.04, depending primarily on the cloud particle size observation used. The model versus observation discrepancies found are smaller than many previous studies and are just within the estimated error bounds. We did not find evidence for a large cloud absorption anomaly for the optically thick limit of extensive ice cloud layers. A more modest cloud absorption difference of 0.01 to 0.04 cannot yet be ruled out. The remaining uncertainty could be reduced with additional cases, and by reducing the current

  17. Towards convection-resolving, global atmospheric simulations with the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS: an extreme scaling experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Heinzeller

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS is a novel set of earth-system simulation components and consists of an atmospheric model, an ocean model and a land-ice model. Its distinct features are the use of unstructured Voronoi meshes and C-grid discretisation to address shortcomings of global models on regular grids and of limited area models nested in a forcing data set, with respect to parallel scalability, numerical accuracy and physical consistency. This makes MPAS a promising tool for conducting climate-related impact studies of, for example, land use changes in a consistent approach. Here, we present an in-depth evaluation of MPAS with regards to technical aspects of performing model runs and scalability for three medium-size meshes on four different High Performance Computing sites with different architectures and compilers. We uncover model limitations and identify new aspects for the model optimisation that are introduced by the use of unstructured Voronoi meshes. We further demonstrate the model performance of MPAS in terms of its capability to reproduce the dynamics of the West African Monsoon and its associated precipitation. Comparing 11 month runs for two meshes with observations and a Weather Research & Forecasting tool (WRF reference model, we show that MPAS can reproduce the atmospheric dynamics on global and local scales, but that further optimisation is required to address a precipitation excess for this region. Finally, we conduct extreme scaling tests on a global 3 km mesh with more than 65 million horizontal grid cells on up to half a million cores. We discuss necessary modifications of the model code to improve its parallel performance in general and specific to the HPC environment. We confirm good scaling (70 % parallel efficiency or better of the MPAS model and provide numbers on the computational requirements for experiments with the 3 km mesh. In doing so, we show that global, convection-resolving atmospheric

  18. Laboratory modelling of the transfer processes between the ocean and atmosphere in the boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Daniil; Kandaurov, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Vdovin, Maxim

    2016-11-01

    The processes of momentum and heat transfer between ocean and atmosphere in the boundary layer were investigated within laboratory modeling for a wide range of wind speed and surface wave including hurricane conditions. Experiments were carried out on the Wind-Wave Flume of the Large Thermostratified Tank of IAP RAS. A special net located under the surface at different depths allows to vary parameters of surface waves independently on wind parameters. Theory of self-similarity of air flow parameters in the flume was used to calculate values aerodynamic and heat transfer coefficients from the measured velocity and temperature profiles by Pito and hotfilm gauges respectively. Simultaneous measurements of surface elevation with system wire allow to obtain spectra and integral parameters of waves. It was demonstrated that in contrast to the drag coefficient, heat transfer coefficient is virtually independent of wind speed and wave parameters to the moment of the beginning of spray generation and then increases rapidly.

  19. Spectral link for the mean velocity profile in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongrong; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent flow in the atmospheric boundary layer is sheared and stratified. For this flow, we consider the mean velocity profile (MVP), the vertical profile of the time-averaged horizontal wind velocity. We employ the theoretical framework of the spectral link, originally proposed for MVP in sheared flows (Gioia et al., 2010) and later extended to stratified flows (Katul et al., 2011). Accounting for the whole structure of the turbulent energy spectrum-the energetic range, the inertial range, and the dissipative range-we examine the scaling of the MVP in the "wall coordinates" and in the Monin-Obukhov similarity coordinates, for both stable and unstable stratification. Our results are in excellent accord with field measurements and numerical simulations. Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology.

  20. Generation of atmospheric boundary layer in the IIUM low speed wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Za'aba, Khalid Aldin Bin; Asrar, Waqar; Dheeb, Mohamad Al

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an attempt made to simulate the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in the Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) at IIUM. This was performed through modifications of the inlet and surface conditions of the test section. Devices such as spires, fences and surface roughness were used. The ASCE 7-10 standard was used as a reference to validate the results between the wind tunnel data and the full-scale ABL flow characteristics. The velocity profile and turbulence intensity were measured using a one-dimensional hotwire (CTA) probe. The data obtained show good agreement with ASCE 7-10 velocity profiles for exposures B and C while using a scale of 1:488 to match the wind tunnel data. The turbulence intensity profiles do not show a good agreement.

  1. Modified shape of the Eiffel Tower determined for an atmospheric boundary-layer wind profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, P. D.

    2009-06-01

    The design and construction of the Eiffel Tower was based, in part, on a uniform horizontal wind model giving 300 kg m-2 kinematic pressure acting on the surface of the tower. Eiffel received a patent for his method of construction that eliminates the need for diagonal trellis bars used to resist the moment of an oncoming wind. At the end of the 19th century boundary-layer theory, laminar or turbulent, was nonexistent. Now, however, models for atmospheric flow over rough landscapes are available, the simplest being a power-law distribution of velocity with height. In this paper we deduce the shape of the tower had Eiffel incorporated this information into the design and construction of his world famous tower. Moreover, we prove Eiffel's observation that the tower profile conforms to the moment distribution wrought by the wind.

  2. New expressions for the surface roughness length and displacement height in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Jian-Zhong; Li Hui-Jun; Zhang Kai

    2007-01-01

    An alternative model for the prediction of surface roughness length is developed. In the model a new factor is introduced to compensate for the effects of wake diffusion and interactions between the wake and roughness obstacles.The experiments are carried out by the use of the hot wire anemometry in the simulated atmospheric boundary layer in a wind tunnel. Based on the experimental data, a new expression for the zero-plane displacement height is proposed for the square arrays of roughness elements, which highlights the influence of free-stream speed on the roughness length. It appears that the displacement height increases with the wind speed while the surface roughness length decreases with Reynolds number increasing. It is shown that the calculation results based on the new expressions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Large Eddy Simulation of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamecki, Marcelo; Meneveau, Charles; Parlange, Marc B.

    2007-11-01

    The development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and contamination of natural plant populations enhanced the importance of understanding wind dispersion of airborne pollen. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using large eddy simulation. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of great importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. The velocity field is discretized using a pseudospectral approach. However the application of the same discretization scheme to the pollen equation generates unphysical solutions (i.e. negative concentrations). The finite-volume bounded scheme SMART is used for the pollen equation. A conservative interpolation scheme to determine the velocity field on the finite volume surfaces was developed. The implementation is validated against field experiments of point source and area field releases of pollen.

  4. LOLAS: an optical turbulence profiler in the atmospheric boundary layer with extreme altitude-resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Avila, R; Wilson, R W; Chun, M; Butterley, T; Carrasco, E

    2008-01-01

    We report the development and first results of an instrument called Low Layer Scidar (LOLAS) which is aimed at the measurement of optical-turbulence profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer with high altitude-resolution. The method is based on the Generalized Scidar (GS) concept, but unlike the GS instruments which need a 1- m or larger telescope, LOLAS is implemented on a dedicated 40-cm telescope, making it an independent instrument. The system is designed for widely separated double-star targets, which enables the high altitude-resolution. Using a 20000-separation double- star, we have obtained turbulence profiles with unprecedented 12-m resolution. The system incorporates necessary novel algorithms for autoguiding, autofocus and image stabilisation. The results presented here were obtained at Mauna Kea Observatory. They show LOLAS capabilities but cannot be considered as representative of the site. A forthcoming paper will be devoted to the site characterisation. The instrument was built as part of the ...

  5. Laboratory modelling of the transfer processes between the ocean and atmosphere in the boundary layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeev Daniil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of momentum and heat transfer between ocean and atmosphere in the boundary layer were investigated within laboratory modeling for a wide range of wind speed and surface wave including hurricane conditions. Experiments were carried out on the Wind-Wave Flume of the Large Thermostratified Tank of IAP RAS. A special net located under the surface at different depths allows to vary parameters of surface waves independently on wind parameters. Theory of self-similarity of air flow parameters in the flume was used to calculate values aerodynamic and heat transfer coefficients from the measured velocity and temperature profiles by Pito and hotfilm gauges respectively. Simultaneous measurements of surface elevation with system wire allow to obtain spectra and integral parameters of waves. It was demonstrated that in contrast to the drag coefficient, heat transfer coefficient is virtually independent of wind speed and wave parameters to the moment of the beginning of spray generation and then increases rapidly.

  6. On the existence of convectively produced gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Melfi, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    The Boundary Layer Lidar System (BLLS), together with the gustprobe system onboard the NASA Electra has acquired a unique data set which, for the first time, clearly depicts a gravity wave above a convectively driven planetary boundary layer (PBL). In addition, we believe that the data show the development of a trapped gravity wave over a period of about an hour. If this is the case, it would certainly be the first time that such a process has been seen in the atmosphere. We also conclude that the gravity wave, while being initiated by the convection in the PBL, ultimately acts to organize and control scales in the PBL.

  7. On the Structure and Adjustment of Inversion-Capped Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flows: Large-Eddy Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Kelly, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    A range of large-eddy simulations, with differing free atmosphere stratification and zero or slightly positive surface heat flux, is investigated to improve understanding of the neutral and near-neutral, inversion-capped, horizontally homogeneous, barotropic atmospheric boundary layer with emphasis...... on the upper region. We find that an adjustment time of at least 16 h is needed for the simulated flow to reach a quasi-steady state. The boundary layer continues to grow, but at a slow rate that changes little after 8 h of simulation time. A common feature of the neutral simulations is the development...... of a super-geostrophic jet near the top of the boundary layer. The analytical wind-shear models included do not account for such a jet, and the best agreement with simulated wind shear is seen in cases with weak stratification above the boundary layer. Increasing the surface heat flux decreases the magnitude...

  8. Conditionally Averaged Large-Scale Motions in the Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Insights for Aeolian Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Chinthaka; Anderson, William

    2016-06-01

    Aeolian erosion of flat, arid landscapes is induced (and sustained) by the aerodynamic surface stress imposed by flow in the atmospheric surface layer. Conceptual models typically indicate that sediment mass flux, Q (via saltation or drift), scales with imposed aerodynamic stress raised to some exponent, n, where n > 1 . This scaling demonstrates the importance of turbulent fluctuations in driving aeolian processes. In order to illustrate the importance of surface-stress intermittency in aeolian processes, and to elucidate the role of turbulence, conditional averaging predicated on aerodynamic surface stress has been used within large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over an arid, flat landscape. The conditional-sampling thresholds are defined based on probability distribution functions of surface stress. The simulations have been performed for a computational domain with ≈ 25 H streamwise extent, where H is the prescribed depth of the neutrally-stratified boundary layer. Thus, the full hierarchy of spatial scales are captured, from surface-layer turbulence to large- and very-large-scale outer-layer coherent motions. Spectrograms are used to support this argument, and also to illustrate how turbulent energy is distributed across wavelengths with elevation. Conditional averaging provides an ensemble-mean visualization of flow structures responsible for erosion `events'. Results indicate that surface-stress peaks are associated with the passage of inclined, high-momentum regions flanked by adjacent low-momentum regions. Fluid in the interfacial shear layers between these adjacent quasi-uniform momentum regions exhibits high streamwise and vertical vorticity.

  9. The vertical structure of the atmospheric boundary layer over the central Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Lingen; MA Yongfeng; LU Changgui; LIN Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The tropopause height and the atmospheric boundary layer (PBL) height as well as the variation of inversion layer above the floating ice surface are presented using GPS (global position system ) radiosonde sounding data and relevant data obtained by China’s fourth arctic scientific expedition team over the central Arctic Ocean (86◦-88◦N, 144◦-170◦W ) during the summer of 2010. The tropopause height is from 9.8 to 10.5 km, with a temperature range between-52.2 and-54.1◦C in the central Arctic Ocean. Two zones of maximum wind (over 12 m/s) are found in the wind profile, namely, low-and upper-level jets, located in the middle troposphere and the tropopause, respectively. The wind direction has a marked variation point in the two jets from the southeast to the southwest. The average PBL height determined by two methods is 341 and 453 m respectively. These two methods can both be used when the inversion layer is very low, but the results vary significantly when the inversion layer is very high. A significant logarithmic relationship exists between the PBL height and the inversion intensity, with a correlation coefficient of 0.66, indicating that the more intense the temperature inversion is, the lower the boundary layer will be. The observation results obviously differ from those of the third arctic expedition zone (80◦-85◦N). The PBL height and the inversion layer thickness are much lower than those at 87◦-88◦N, but the inversion temperature is more intense, meaning a strong ice-atmosphere interaction in the sea near the North Pole. The PBL structure is related to the weather system and the sea ice concentration, which affects the observation station.

  10. Conditionally Averaged Large-Scale Motions in the Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Insights for Aeolian Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Chinthaka; Anderson, William

    2017-01-01

    Aeolian erosion of flat, arid landscapes is induced (and sustained) by the aerodynamic surface stress imposed by flow in the atmospheric surface layer. Conceptual models typically indicate that sediment mass flux, Q (via saltation or drift), scales with imposed aerodynamic stress raised to some exponent, n, where n > 1. This scaling demonstrates the importance of turbulent fluctuations in driving aeolian processes. In order to illustrate the importance of surface-stress intermittency in aeolian processes, and to elucidate the role of turbulence, conditional averaging predicated on aerodynamic surface stress has been used within large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over an arid, flat landscape. The conditional-sampling thresholds are defined based on probability distribution functions of surface stress. The simulations have been performed for a computational domain with ≈ 25 H streamwise extent, where H is the prescribed depth of the neutrally-stratified boundary layer. Thus, the full hierarchy of spatial scales are captured, from surface-layer turbulence to large- and very-large-scale outer-layer coherent motions. Spectrograms are used to support this argument, and also to illustrate how turbulent energy is distributed across wavelengths with elevation. Conditional averaging provides an ensemble-mean visualization of flow structures responsible for erosion `events'. Results indicate that surface-stress peaks are associated with the passage of inclined, high-momentum regions flanked by adjacent low-momentum regions. Fluid in the interfacial shear layers between these adjacent quasi-uniform momentum regions exhibits high streamwise and vertical vorticity.

  11. Analytical Reduced Models for the Non-stationary Diabatic Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, Mostafa; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2017-09-01

    Geophysical boundary-layer flows feature complex dynamics that often evolve with time; however, most current knowledge centres on the steady-state problem. In these atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers, the pressure gradient, buoyancy, Coriolis, and frictional forces interact to determine the statistical moments of the flow. The resulting equations for the non-stationary mean variables, even when succinctly closed, remain challenging to handle mathematically. Here, we derive a simpler physical model that reduces these governing unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes partial differential equations into a single first-order ordinary differential equation with non-constant coefficients. The reduced model is straightforward to solve under arbitrary forcing, even when